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Washburn University

TheReview Serving Washburn Universit y since 1873

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volume 138, Issue 3 • wednesday, September 7, 2011

1700 S.W. College • topeka, kan. 66621

Fair gives students a slice of all things WU Rob Burkett

able to them, organization presidents and department representatives were on hand to give students any additional College is sometimes summed information they could impart. up as a chance to live new experi“We’ve had a few students stop by ences. Those in asking questions,” attendance at the said Beth Nech, “ Washburn Study junior anthropolAbroad, Activities ogy major. “It and Majors Fair seems like there had a chance to are quite a few explore their oppeople here really tions. interested in getThe fair ting involved at kicked off with Washburn.” a dizzying arSome sturay of choices in dents had already the study abroad decided on their category. With major but still booths near the came down to get Outtakes Corner some more infor- Jordan McCallister Store inside the Freshman ” mation on possible Memorial Union, minors, as well as students were able acquire skills that to get up close and could make them personal with different cultural experi- more desirable in the workplace after ences offered through the university. graduation. Choices ranged from relatively close “I came down to learn more about in Mexico, to half way across the what kind of skills or classes different world, like China. departments might offer,” said AlexIn the Washburn Room and out- ander Weber, sophomore computer side in the lobby area adjoining it, information sciences major. “Classes student organizations and university like what they offer in the sociology departments were on hand to give stu- department might give you skills that dents a chance to learn about different help you to better understand people, aspects of student life. which is important in the business “I came down because I thought world. I’m also looking at clubs too it would be a good opportunity to see but I’m still looking to see if there is what the school has to offer,” said Jor- anything that interests me.” dan McCallister, undecided freshman. Regardless of what attracted stu“I wanted to learn about what kind of dents to attend, many went away with majors they offer because I’m inter- a better sense of what Washburn’s difested in a few different things.” ferent departments and organizations McCallister was among the mem- had to offer them. bers of the new program, First Year “I learned a lot and I feel like it Experience, that were in attendance as will help me get more plugged in with part of their classes’ mission to expose what is happening at school,” said Wenew students to many of the pillars of ber. being a college student. Rob Burkett is a senior mass media major. While attendees wandered around Reach him at robert.burkett@washburn. taking in all the different choices avail- edu.

WASHBURN REVIEW

I wanted to learn about what kind of majors they offer because I’m interested in a few different things.

Photos by Kelly Andrews, Washburn Review

Major Fair: Washburn students mingle with faculty as well as students representing a cornucopia of choices and interests at the university. Among attendees were some notable guests like Bigfoot who spent time getting to know those in attendance while supporting the mission of the fair in getting students involved in extracurricular activities.

Sports

Arts & Entertainment

WU tackles Sioux LEGO before Mulvane goes Mariauna Hernandez

Kelly Hurla

The Washburn Ichabods traveled to South Dakota this past Thursday night and received their first victory of the season against the University of South Dakota Sioux Falls Cougars, 33-17. The releases of two key players caused speculation and criticism as to whether or not the team would be able to recover, but Washburn head coach Craig Schurig knew otherwise. “The biggest thing is we feel like we have good players here with us,” said Schurig. “So I think our guys played the way they expected to play. Obviously the first game you’re going to have some mistakes, but overall, particularly the first half, they played pretty well.” One player in particular had the best performance of his career, Washburn senior quarterback, Dane Simoneau. Simoneau was 27 for 40 throwing for 452 yards, accompanied by five touchdowns, three of which came

Picture this: colorful, tiny, and intricate interlocking building bricks. Now think of thousands of these bricks and what can be built with them. Then go to the Mulvane Art Museum and see what Nathan Sawaya can do with them. “The Art of Brick” exhibit at the Mulvane is only available until Sept. 18, when the museum as a whole will temporarily close. Improvements, investments and looking forward to the future are all in mind for the Mulvane Art Museum. Heating and cooling replacement, along with the addition of vestibules, are needed to help control the temperature and humidification levels. “You have to have certain temperature ranges and certain humidification ranges, and right now our equipment is not able to give us those conditions that we require,” said Cindi Morrison, director of the Mulvane Museum of Art. The proper temperatures to main-

WASHBURN REVIEW

WASHBURN REVIEW

Photo by Josh Rouse, Washburn Review

Pullin’ it down: Dejuan Beard, sophomore wide receiver catches a pass in Washburn’s 33-17 win over the University of South Dakota Sioux Falls. within the first quarter, and only one interception. “I feel like I did alright,” Simoneau said. “It was an overall good team effort. I think I got tackled once

Continued on page 6

Photo courtesy of Gene Cassell, Washburn SID

Is it hot in here?: The Mulvane Art Museum will close its doors for needed renovations to the heating and air conditioning system. The Mulvane has been a tourist destination this summer, recently receiving its 50,000th visitor to the “Art of the Brick” exhibit. tain the best care of the artwork and pieces in the museum would ideally be 70 degrees and between 50 and 55 percent humidity. 
 “It’s hard on the works on paper,” said Morrison. “They are sucking up water and expelling it more than they

should be. We are fortunate nothing has been damaged but we really don’t want that to have the opportunity to occur.” 
Providing the best care for pieces in the museum’s possession is a top priority. All together, there are around

Continued on page 7


News

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Wednesday, September 7, 2011

alendar Marshall’s art finds new home online

Friday, September 9

University Honors program meeting Myriad room 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. WU After Hours Bradbury Thompson Center 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Sorority recruitment all over campus 5 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Huff-n-Puff Balloon Rally Lake Shawnee west side 6 p.m. Gourmet Cabaret Psychic Fun and Feast The Break Room 6 p.m. “Two Sisters and a Piano” by Nilo Cruz Andrew J. and Georgia Neese Gray Theatre Sat., September 10

Downtown Topeka Farmer’s Market Judicial Center Parking Lot 12th & Harrison 7:30 a.m. - Noon “Two Sisters One Piano” Student play Andrew J. and Georgia Neese Gray Theatre 7:30 p.m. Sorority Recruitment and Bid Day all over campus 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, September 11

“Two Sisters One Piano” Student play Andrew J. and Georgia Neese Gray Theatre 7:30 p.m.

Monday, September 12

Organization advisor reception Kansas room 12:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Tuesday, September 13

Career and Graduate School Fair Lee Arena 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Washburn Lady Blues volleyball v. Missouri Southern Lee Arena 7 p.m. Wed., September 14

Social Security Information Sessions Washburn Tech Conference Center 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Josh Rouse

WASHBURN REVIEW

Cartoons aren’t art. He’s heard it many times, but he’s never let the preconceived notions of others determine how he defines himself and his work. In his mind, Chris Marshall is an artist. “When I was a kid and had chicken pox, I used to lay on the floor with socks on my hands and draw Sesame Street and XMen cartoons,” said Marshall, who graduated from Washburn in 2009 with a B.A. in mass media. “My parents always told me they were great drawings, even though they were probably terrible. So I think that’s probably what motivated me to keep drawing, even beyond the age when most people decide to grow up and stop making cartoons.” But Marshall didn’t stop. He made more, hundreds more. Today, Marshall is the owner of TheMarshallArtist. com, a website displaying many of his cartoons and graphic illustrations—most of which are sports-related and contain his unique and often blunt sense of humor. The site, which launched Aug. 17, 2011, is just one of many websites launched recently that are owned and operated by Washburn graduates. With an already loyal fan base of Washburn students and alums, he now looks to expand his following worldwide. But behind every great website is an even better story. His First Fans “As soon as Chris could hold a crayon, he started drawing,” said Alice Marshall, proud mother. “We drew with him and read when he would do his breathing treatments for asthma. Drawing on his own started when he was about 18 months old. We just let him draw away and put the drawings up on the refrigerator, stove, and anything that a magnet would stick to.” Chris Marshall’s drawing ability developed as a toddler, continuing to grow as he went through schooling. When he started preschool, his teachers would talk to his parents about his talent. As he moved into elementary school, the praise continued for his work. Many teachers noticed the doodles he’d draw in his notes and books. “Growing up, a lot of my teachers appreciated the cartoons I’d draw in the margins of papers and books,” said Chris Marshall. “They kind of encouraged me as long as I got good grades and pretended I was paying attention. My mom is also an elementary school teacher, and she’s saved all the cartoons I’ve had published in a scrapbook. She watches more sports than most people I know, so I think she gets the humor in it.” Others began to take notice of his talents, as well. One year, Crayola put out an ad asking for designs for T-shirts. His family submitted some of Chris’ draw-

Archive Review cartoon by Chris Marshall

Marshall Arts: Washburn graduate Chris Marshall has continued to make cartoons even after his career as the Washburn Review cartoonist. His artwork can now be viewed at his new website, TheMarshallArtist.com. ings, and they soon received T-shirts with his drawings on them. In 2000, the Kansas City Wizards MLS team had a drawing contest. Chris entered one of his drawings into the contest, which then won him and his family a trip to Washington, D.C., to see the MLS Championship. They got to tour the White House, the Capitol Building and, to top it all off, the Wizards won the championship. “His cartoons are pretty amazing,” said Eric Smith, fraternity brother and co-worker at the Topeka Capital-Journal. “I enjoy the sports ones especially. Those and the ones about inside jokes in daily life. The things he can do with Microsoft Paint and whatever he uses on the Mac are inexplicably awesome. His cartoons are going to make him famous someday.” Early Criticism However, not everyone was a fan of his art. “One of his primary grade teachers actually told him he was holding his pencil wrong when he wrote or drew, but we just kind of ignored that,” said Alice Marshall. “We wanted to support the teachers, so we just kind of overlooked the pencil holding thing.” As he continued through the educational system, the criticism of his art became more and more prevalent. “I had a lot of high school and college art teachers tell me cartoons aren’t real art,” said Chris Marshall. “It doesn’t really bother me. If the stick

houses outside the Mulvane Art Museum are considered art, then I don’t really want to make art anyway. My goal was never to make pictures that would be in a museum or something. I just enjoy drawing pictures that hopefully make people laugh. It’s like the dad in Step Brothers said, ‘Never lose your dinosaur.’ Drawing is something I’ve always liked to do and I want to keep doing it as long as I can.” The College Years “When I first met Marshall, I thought he was a little shy and reserved,” said Smith. “It didn’t take long for him to open up and be the jokester that I know today.” A f t e r graduating from Washburn Rural High School, Chris Marshall enrolled at Washburn University and became a member of the Delta Chi fraternity. It was at Washburn where his cartoons began to gain notoriety. He applied at The Review in May 2006 a s a writer, but despite his award-winning writing, it was his cartoons that drew the attention of The Review’s readership. Each week, “Marshall Arts” was published in the sports section, and soon his cartoons drew praise even from collegiate judges. “When I was on The Review, we were named the best college newspaper for fouryear colleges in Kansas,” said Marshall, who earned third

Thurs., September 15

Washburn Lady Blues soccer v. University of Central Missouri Yager Stadium 6 p.m.

Don’t see your event in the calendar? Call the Review newsroom at 6702506 to have your event included in an upcoming edition. It’s FREE. For upcoming Washburn athletic events, go to www.wusports.com.

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place and honorable mention awards for sports writing from the Kansas Association of Collegiate Press. “That same year, I think I won first, second and honorable mention for best cartoons. That was pretty exciting for the paper and for me.” Outside of The Review and his fraternity obligations, Marshall also worked for the Campus Activities Board and often made posters for the Washburn Student Government Association. While in college, he also interned and eventually got a part-time job as a sports clerk for the Topeka Capital-Journal. His drawings eventually made their way to the TCJ, as well, though after a few controversial cartoons he was asked not to draw any more. “My favorite cartoon is probably one I drew for the Capital-Journal during the 2008 Olympics,” he said. “It was a picture of Michael Phelps swimming, and it said his motivation to win races was his father, Fred. Then I drew Fred Phelps running alongside the pool with a sign that said ‘God Hates Silver.’ I got a lot of angry letters for it, saying things like ‘Michael Phelps is never coming to Topeka now,’ as if he would ever come here in the first place. But I thought it was a good way to relate the biggest athlete in the world at the time to things that were happening locally.” Back to the Present Currently, Chris Marshall is a full-time employee of the Topeka Capital-Journal. He has been allowed to draw an occasional cartoon, though editorial supervision is required. His website is about ready to celebrate its first month of existence, and he already had more than 40 Facebook followers on his fan page, www.facebook. com/themarshallartist. “I love his cartoons,” said

Alice Marshall. “He comes up with some ideas that amaze me. I also like his writing that connects to the cartoons. It’s great to see the fun he has with sports, cartoons, and writing.” Along the way, he has made memories and friends while illustrating his unique perspective on life through art and writing. “Marshall has inspired me to laugh... a lot,” said Smith. “He is one of the funniest people I know. Also, I guess you could say he has inspired me to love sports more. We both enjoy going to pretty much any sporting event, and without Marshall, I would not have attended KU bowl games, Sporting KC games or the College World Series.” Now, he looks to prove those who questioned his art wrong, and to take his talents to South Beach... and the rest of the world, via the internet. “After leaving Washburn, I didn’t really have a place to put the cartoons where people could see them,” said Chris Marshall. “The website is just a way for me to keep drawing sports cartoons and give people an easy way to see them. Hopefully someone will eventually give me a chance to draw them again, where they can be published and more people can see them, but for now it’s been fun just throwing them all online whenever I draw something. “I’ve tried to draw a new one every couple of days since I started the website last month. I thought it would be more difficult to come up with stuff regularly, but there’s always guys like Kobe [Bryant] and [Ron] Artest out there to do stupid stuff and make it easier for me.” Josh Rouse is a senior mass media major. Reach him at joshua.rouse@ washburn.edu.


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News • Wednesday, September 7, 2011

Bod squad gets “T’ed” up Members of Bod Squad got together during the first week of classes to dispense their new T-shirts that the organization is known for. With previous years editions of their iconic shirts sporting such graphics as a donkey that helped to complete the phrase, “get your [insert other name for donkey] up,” Bod Squad readies itself for another year of school spirit. As the first home football game approaches Bod Squad members ready themselves to support the Ichabods and Lady Blues as they compete for MIAA supremacy.

WSGA Freshman Elections Jordan Loomis

WASHBURN REVIEW

It’s that time of year again, when the door-to-door visitations start and campaign ads begin to show up in every mailbox, Washburn Student Government Association’s 2011 freshman elections are underway. WSGA Chief-ofStaff Eric Benedict, a junior majoring in political science and economics, stated that in the freshmen elections, 30 petitions are usually turned in to be on the ballad but this year it’s 10 petitions. That means that 10 students are bidding for five freshmen spots in WSGA. Some of the current candidates running for freshman senate are Zachary Phillips, Micah Offerman, Anthony Ho, Bryce Ruble, Katherine Bunting, Anthony Everett and Randi McAfee. To become a representative in student government, a candidate needed to pick up a petition from the student government office in the basement of the Memorial union. The candidate would then have to obtain 50 freshman

signatures on the petition to be computer science and Spanish. officially in the ballad. “I wanted to get involved The freshmen elections on campus in something that officially began today at 8 a.m. would make the students here and continue until Thursday have a more rewarding and at 5 p.m. During the election, excellent experience,” said freshmen students will be Philips. able to vote for D a n i e l the candidate McElroy, of their choice double major in the union. in criminal T h e justice and candidates began political science, campaigning also wants to for positions make an impact starting this on freshman past Friday. student’s Campaigning by experience. flyer, word of mouth, “I wanted to Facebook and Twitter become involved are allowed. Candidates Graphic by Maggie Pilcher with the student cannot give away government to try T-shirts or other gifts beyond and improve any aspects of the a campaign button. No more university as a freshman,” said than 20 posters per building are McElroy. allowed and no campaigning One of this year’s female in teams. The most common freshmen candidates is Ashley methods are posters, handbills, Habiger, freshman in nursing. and Facebook. The candidates’ “I really wanted to get personal information will into the student government also be available for the because of my time on the freshmen students to look at on student council in high school,” mywashburn.edu. said Habiger. “I just really want One of this year’s male my time here to be a big part of freshmen candidates is Zachary this school in being able to help Phillips, double major in the student body in any way

that benefits them best.” Katherine Bunting’s, freshman in Spanish, goal to join WSGA is something she has been planning for a while due to her interests prior to attending Washburn. “I decided as a freshman in high school that WSGA would be one of my first extracurricular activities,” said Bunting. “I have a real passion for government and politics. I feel that politics is a realm where I’m confident, where there’s more room to grow as a student and stand for something. I believe that getting a chair in the WSGA would help me meet some of my fellow classmates and help me build a better sense of community.”

Jordan Loomis is a freshman Mass Media major. Reach her at jordan. loomis@washburnb.edu

Photos by Robert Burkett, Washburn Review


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Wednesday, September 7, 2011

Anniversary of 9/11 drives home lessons

Rob Burkett

WASHBURN REVIEW

In four days the 10th anniversary of September 11, 2001, will come and go. Many will spend next Sunday taking in the start of the NFL season. While there is nothing wrong with spending a weekend living the life of a normal September afternoon, I hope that everyone will take time Sunday to show their respect for those who perished. To that end, The Review asked in our “Bod on the Street� what memories stuck with people 10 years later. I think it only fair then that I also partake in the sharing and give my thoughts on what many think of as the worst day in American history and the impact it’s had. I recall that morning waking up to my aunt Carolyn shaking me awake. She told me that a plane had crashed into a building in New York City. I came upstairs half awake wondering what had happened. As I sat down on the couch, I listened as Matt Lauer, cohost of NBC’s “Today Show� described what I was looking at on the screen. About the time that Lauer started talking about the structural integrity of the building, I looked up and saw the second plane hitting the World Trade Center. I immediately thought of all the people on board those planes and the tragic loss of life that was occurring right before my eyes. As the morning wore on reports began to break about another plane hitting the Pentagon in Washington D.C.. That particular event hit

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home for me personally. My father at that time was living in the northern Virginia area and worked in the District of Columbia. The truly frightening part was that on his daily commute, he would pick up a connecting bus at the stop in front of the Pentagon. That morning, he was in the company of his dentist having gone in to get a routine cleaning. Its probably the closest to having a nervous wreck that I’ve ever experienced, not knowing where my father was or if he was okay. As the day continued to progress I went to work and listen to President Bush talk about what had occurred. Now, as I reflect back on that day, A few things come to mind. The effects that 9/11 had on our day-to-day lives. I am old enough to remember when you could go to a Kansas City Royals game and no one would blink an eye at someone carrying a diaper bag or purse into a game. I remember when going to the airport required you to put your bag through the X-ray machine but you didn’t have to show an ID or take off your shoes, belt and empty your pockets just to get into the terminal. What I most remember in the immediate aftermath of 9/11 was the general feeling of community. At the time I worked in a service industry job and had become used to people treating me with a very “I’m better than you� attitude. After that day, for the next several weeks people seemed more prone to say thanks and not take each other for granted. That is the real message I will always take away from that day. Ten years have passed and I hope that people will remember that being decent to each other is a lesson that can’t be forgotten. From all of that human tragedy, we should always remember that life and loved ones could be gone in the blink of an eye. Robert Burkett is a senior mass media major. Reach him at robert. burkett@washburn.edu.

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As the 10 year anniversary of the attacks of September 11 approach, The Review wanted to know 10 years later what student thoughts were.....

Ten years later what kind Beth Husted Junior, Psychology

Dana Elliot Junior, Nursing “We had just gotten back from recess and all of our teachers were crying�

“They didn’t explain much. They had a bunch of classes watching the news�

Zac Croucher Junior, Business

Braxton Hunt Freshman, Theatre

“A couple of my classmates were [crying] too, because their parents were in the military�

“We weren’t really doing anything and then all of our teachers were panicked and trying to rush us all inside�

of memories stuck with Jennifer Rosebaugh Freshman, Undeclared

Cheyenne Weaver Freshman, Undeclared

“On 9/11 I was in third grade and we watched what was happening on TV�

“We had the moment of silence and everything but nobody knew what was going on�

you from September 11?

�

For more stories, photos and videos visit Pre-order your wasburnreview.org

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Cameron Hughes is a junior art major. Reach him at cameron.hughes@washburn.edu.

Contact Us

Phone: (785) 670-2506 Fax: (785) 670-1131 www.washburnreview.org Print Editor-in-Chief Rob Burkett Online Editor-in-Chief Brian Dulle Advertising Manager Elisa Gayle News Editor Megan Hash Sports Editor Sam Sayler A&E Editor Patricia Peterson Photo Editor Mike Goehring Graphic Design Editor Maggie Pilcher Copy Editors Josh Rouse • Richard Kelly Production Assistants Ryan Hodges • Cameron Hughes • Chris Young Writers Rob Burkett • Angela Connell • Kelly Andrews • Nicholas Birdsong • Jordan Chilcote • Mariauna Hernandez • Matthew Kelly • Derek Koehler • Jordan Loomis • Ben Mack • Scott Moser • Brad Pechanec• Alex Schoenberger • Photographers Kelly Andrews • Ryan Burge • Rob Burkett • Tesa DeForest •Jessica DeJager • Mike Goehring • Jordan Loomis • Anthony Richardson • Josh Rouse • Stephanie Wilhelm • Senior Videographer Bryce Grammer Videographers Denise Hemingway • Bradley Hernandez • Derek Koehler • Adam Stephenson• Rodolfo Parisi • Russell Pearman Advertising Staff Melissa Bylsma • Autumn Kitchner • Anne Paulson Promotions Staff Myles Howell • Anthony Fast Business Manager Scott Moser Adviser Regina Cassell The Washburn Review is published every Wednesday throughout the academic year, excluding holidays and some other dates. Copies are free for students, faculty and staff, and can be found at numerous locations around the campus of Washburn University. Subscriptions to the Washburn Review are available at the following rates: 13 issues for $20 or 26 issues for $35. For more information, please visit our Web site at www.washburnreview.org or call (785) 670-2506. The Washburn Review is a member newspaper of the Associated Press (AP), the Kansas Associated Press (KPA) and the Kansas Associated Collegiate Press (KACP). The Review was the 2009 winner of the All-State award, given to the best four-year public university newspaper in the state of Kansas. The Washburn Review accepts letters to the editor pertaining to articles appearing in the Washburn Review or on issues of importance to the Washburn or Topeka community. We do not accept mass letters to the editor. Please limit letters to less than 400 words. Letters must be submitted via Word document if possible, and there must be a phone number where the person can be reached for verification. Please e-mail letters to wureview@gmail.com. The Review reserves the right to edit all submissions to the paper for length, libel, language and clarity. Because of volume on the opinion page, we are unable to print all letters and are unable to return submissions.

Š The Washburn Review Copyright 2011

Correction:

-Oct. 29: Two hours before

Homecoming Football Game

Our Staff

2009-10 Kaw Yearbook

Kaw Yearbook 2011

Alex Schoenberger’s name appeared last week misspelled in the byline.


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Wednesday, September 7, 2011

Sports

‘Runners run up score Richard Kelly

WASHBURN REVIEW

Photo by Mike Goehring, Washburn Review

Schultz set for success Ben Mack

WASHBURN REVIEW

Lady Blues senior guard Stevi Schultz is looking to start this year’s basketball season off with a bang. The Neodesha, Kan., native is coming off a stellar 2010-11 season, where she averaged 15 points and eight rebounds per game. The 5’9 guard was a first team all-conference and second team all-region. She was also voted MVP of the Lady Blues squad this past season. Despite being named the MVP, Schultz doesn’t consider herself the “star” of the team. “I truly don’t see myself as ‘the star,’” said Schultz. “We all take certain roles on the team so we can win games and I am just taking the role that needs to be done. During games my teammates and I just play the game together. We worry about getting the win, not who the star is. There were many games last year that I was definitely not the star.” This season, Schultz will take on a larger leadership role which she said comes natural to her. “I do enjoy having a leadership role,” said Schultz.

“Leading is pretty natural for me. Having a leadership role doesn’t change my style of play. If I had to say it changes anything, it would be it changes my attitude. No matter what attitude I truly have, I must show a positive, determined attitude so others will follow the same attitude. Hopefully that will put us in a better position to win” Last year, the Lady Blues finished 22-7. The Blues have a majority of their roster returning and the first thing Schultz expects is to have a fun year, because everyone gets along and likes to play together. She also expects the team to push themselves on to bigger and better things. The Blues have everything they need to accomplish those goals with size, experience and a talented coaching staff that was revamped in the offseason. Last year, the Blues ended their season in the NCAA Tournament with a heartbreaking 65-64 loss to Central Oklahoma. It was the Lady Blues 10th straight appearance in the tournament. Ben Mack is a junior mass media major. Reach him at benjamin. mack@washburn.edu.

The Topeka RoadRunners’ coaching staff was looking for strong performances from its newcomers and its veterans over its first weekend of exhibition games. Scoring 11 goals on Sunday can likely be considered a strong performance. A night removed from a 4-0 victory over the University of Central Oklahoma Bronchos, Topeka picked up where they left off, defeating Central Oklahoma 11-0 at Landon Arena. But unlike Saturday’s contest where Topeka only suited up three returners, Topeka had 10 veterans in the lineup on Sunday. Seven of them registered points in the contest. The RoadRunners outshot the Bronchos 52-8. “We gelled really well tonight,” said returning forward Kyle Sharkey, who had two goals in the contest. “A lot of guys worked really hard and it’s still a tryout for us.” In the first period, the Bronchos appeared to have escaped without substantial damage on the scoreboard. But during the final four minutes, Topeka scored three goals to increase their lead from 1-0 to 4-0 going into the first intermission. Ryan White, Sharkey, Ryan Doucet and Brian Christie all had first period goals. From there, the scoring continued, as Topeka scored four more goals in the second period. Defenseman Mic Bruce found the back of the net at 3:33. Forward Dan Dupell then followed with a goal at 5:16 and the onslaught continued 22 seconds later on a goal by defenseman Kevin Patterson. Forward Andrew O’Leary also

Career And Graduate Fair

Photo by Richard Kelly, Washburn Review

Keep away: Central Oklahoma defenseman Tyler Benson pursues Topeka Roadrunners forward Ben Babe during Sunday’s exhibition match. Babe ended the game with 2 assists en route to a one sided 11-0 win. scored late in the period. Scott Langer, Topeka head coach, was happy to see his players gel so quickly. “A lot of these guys haven’t worked together in lines, but it shows you that they’re picking up some of the principles that we are teaching,” said Langer. “We scored some goals and did some really good things coming from our zone out. I think it was a real good step in the right direction.” Sharkey, Jake Lynes and Linus Johannson finished off

the scoring in the third period. Johannson, who also had three assists on the night, is battling with Shigenobu Kakudate and Julian Van Lijden for the two spots for non-United States players on the roster. Johannson is from Sweden, Kakudate is f r o m Japan and Van Lijden is from The Netherlands. All three players had at least one point over the weekend. Of the 29 players who played over the weekend, only 25 of them will make the regu-

lar season roster. Langer and his staff have not made the final decisions on who will make the roster. He hopes this Wednesday and Thursday’s exhibition games at Amarillo will help with making those decisions. “We certainly can make a few more decisions,” said Langer. “Amarillo’s going to be a good test for us with all the veterans they have back. I think we can inch a little closer to some decisions, but there’s still guys battling for spots on this team.” Richard Kelly is a senior mass media and social work major. Reach him at richard.kelly@washburn.edu.

September 8, 2010 | 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. | Lee Arena

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A6

Sports • Wednesday, September 7, 2011

Scott Moser

WASHBURN REVIEW

If you do not have an opportunity to grab one of the big four quarterbacks (Rodgers, Brees, Vick or Brady) do not worry. There are several quarterbacks that will be there in the middle to late rounds that can be of great value this year. Philip Rivers (Yahoo! ADP 21.1): Philip Rivers is actually being selected in the middle of the second round in standard Yahoo 12-team leagues. He has been consistent over the last few years and it is hard to imagine any sort of drop-off this year. Rivers has several things going for him this year. The Chargers missed the playoffs last year and he is out to prove that the Chargers belong in the same company with the likes of Pittsburgh, New England and the New York Jets. The Chargers also play in the AFC West so that means Rivers will play two games against the Broncos, Raiders and Chiefs. This is the Chargers division to lose. Matthew Stafford (Yahoo! ADP 93.2): Although Matthew Stafford has never made it through a complete season he still has the tools to be a great quarterback. He also will be throwing the ball to Calvin Johnson, one of the best wide receivers in the game today. Stafford is currently going in the middle of the seventh round in Yahoo 12-team drafts. Stafford is the perfect risk-reward quarterback. If he can stay healthy for an entire season, he will give you great value. If you are one that does not like to take risks, consider the next quarterback on my list, Josh Freeman. Josh Freeman (Yahoo! ADP 93.7): Freeman is in his third season as the starting quarterback for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Although Tampa Bay is the youngest team in the league, they are full of talent. I expect Freeman to surpass last year’s numbers and lead this team to the playoffs. He is currently being drafted in Yahoo leagues somewhere in the middle of the seventh round of 12-team leagues. He can provide great value at the position if you elect to go running back and wide receiver heavy at the beginning of your draft. www.washburnreview.com

More online @

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w e i v e Staff Pick ‘Em R e Th

Week Two

the staff

Fantasy QB’s to acquire

the games

Slayer

Washburn vs Lincoln University

Lincoln

Emporia State vs Pittsburg State

PSU

@ Kansas vs Northern Illinois

KU

Dickie D. Hashbrown Billy Noble Fried Bryce

Roose Juice

Roboto

Magellan

Washburn

Washburn

Washburn

Washburn

Washburn

Washburn

Washburn

PSU

PSU

PSU

PSU

PSU

PSU

PSU

KU

KU

KU

KU

NIU

NIU

KU

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama vs Penn State

Penn St

Alabama

Penn St

South Carolina vs Georgia

Georgia

South Carolina

South Carolina

South Carolina

Georgia

Georgia

Georgia

South Carolina

Kansas City Chiefs vs Buffalo Bills

Bills

Chiefs

Chiefs

Chiefs

Bills

Bills

Chiefs

Chiefs

Tampa Bay Buccaneers vs Detroit Lions

Lions

Bucs

Lions

Bucs

Lions

Lions

Bucs

Bucs

New Orleans Saints vs Green Bay Packers

Packers

Saints

Packers

Saints

Packers

Packers

Packers

Saints

Notre Dame vs Michigan

Michigan

Notre Dame

Notre Dame

Michigan

Notre Dame

Notre Dame

Notre Dame Cowboys

Alabama St

EMU

Alabama St

Alabama St.

EMU

EMU

Alabama St. vs Eastern Michigan

EMU

Michigan EMU

Last Week Record

6-4

9-1

6-4

8-2

3-7

7-3

6-4

6-4

OVERALL RECORDS

6-4

9-1

6-4

8-2

3-7

7-3

6-4

6-4

The Review Staff Pick ‘Em is a weekly feature where we pick the winners of college and pro football games around the country. Check back weekly to see our standings!

What happened to fair play in college football? Rob Burkett

WASHBURN REVIEW

With the beginning of football season comes some rather interesting story lines. While some local news regarding Washburn’s team has been of interest, the national landscape of college football has been in flux over the past few months. The recent announcement of Texas A&M moving conferences is just the latest in a long string of moves that has occurred over the last year. The PAC 10 is now the PAC 12. The Big 10 has 12 members and the Big 12 has nine members. With the continuing changes in the lineups of conferences the business of college football has begun to take a profound effect on how college football is viewed. Gone are the days of the amateur athlete who lived off the stipend given in the form of scholarships. This is seen in the incident at Ohio State University that broke in June. Multiple athletes were suspended five games for selling various items like conference championship rings and other items gifted by the university in honor of their athletic accomplishments. While technically the prop-

erty belonged to the athletes, the items sold and the profit from them were constituted as an “extra benefit” by the NCAA and prohibited under the collegiate classification of an amateur athlete. This incident ultimately led to the resignation of Jim Tressel, the head coach at OSU through his not reporting the incidents to authorities. That incident pales in comparison however to recent revelations that have come out of Coral Gables, Fla., home of the University of Miami Hurricanes. While undue alumni or booster influence has always been an issue in college sports, the exploits of Nevin Shapiro, a renegade booster, takes illegal benefits to a whole new level. Shapiro is already in prison for orchestrating a $930 million ponzi scheme. In over 100 hours of jailhouse interviews with investigators Shapiro described his interactions with the Miami football team. Over the course of the last eight years, Shapiro spent literally millions of dollars on benefits to athletes included but were not limited to cash, prostitutes, entertainment in his multimillion-dollar homes and yacht, paid trips to high-end restaurants and night-

clubs, jewelry, bounties for onfield play (including bounties for injuring opposing players), travel and, on one occasion, an abortion. Not since the 1980s and the pay for play scandal of Southern Methodist University has something of this scale been witnessed. In SMU’s case the “death penalty” was invoked as the school was banned from having a football program, ultimately leading to the destruction of their competitiveness as a team. Miami now faces a possibly similar fate which could destroy a program that was at one time one of the top football programs in the country. One hopes that all of these events that have taken place in just this year will have consequences for those involved that will deter future schools from hiding violations and caving to the pressures that others outside these programs are exerting on them.

Rob Burkett is a senior mass media major. Reach him at robert.burkett@ washburn.edu.

Cougars can’t hang with Bods, lose 33-17 Continued from Page 1 team effort. I think I got tackled once or twice the whole game which is always nice. I give credit to the offensive line they did a nice job handling the pressure.” Early in the first quarter during WU’s first drive sophomore tight end Tore Hurst put Washburn on the board after a 10-yard reception. Senior running back Justin Cooper followed up with the second TD of the quarter with a 47-yard reception. Toward the final minutes of the first quarter sophomore wide receiver Matt Kobbeman would be the third Ichabod to complete a touchdown pass extending WU’s lead to 21-0. Opening the second quarter Sioux Falls’ sophomore quarterback, Carrington Hanna rallied the Cougars to Washburn’s 30-yard line, only to be intercepted by the first of two picks by WU senior linebacker Marty Pfannenstiel. After two first down drives the play resulted in Simoneau’s first interception of the season by the Cougar’s junior linebacker Eric Anderson. WU’s defense prevailed, forcing Sioux Falls to punt after a sack by senior defensive

end Cameron Jackson. After a scoreless quarter, WU’s Simoneau completed a 10-yard pass with 2:44 left in the half to sophomore WR DeJuan Beard for their fourth score of the game. Inside the two-minute warning, USF responded with a touchdown wrapping up the first half, 27-7. With a series of incomplete passes and rushes for negative yardage the beginning of the third quarter brought no good news or points to WU. USF would be the first to take a crack at the scoreboard with a touchdown reception by junior WR Jeremiah Oates. WU’s final TD would come in the last 18 seconds of the quarter with a reception by sophomore wide receiver Ronnell Garner. The last score of the game would be a field goal by Sioux Falls making the final score 33-17. Although the Ichabods dominated many aspects of the game, they also racked up a few turnovers as well as numerous penalties. Washburn’s next foe is Lincoln University at 7 p.m. Thursday at Yager Stadium. Mariauna Hernandez is a sopomore mass media major. Reach her at mariauna.hernandez@washburn.edu.

Students ready for intramurals Ivy Marcus

WASHBURN REVIEW

Deadline for entries: Sept. 30th

www.kawyearbook.com

For students who are always looking for something to do on campus, intramural sports are one thing to take into consideration, especially if they want to stay active. Intramurals are a great way for students to compete athletically without the higher competitive level of college sports. Team sports such as soccer and flag football are played, and individual sports, for instance tennis and badminton, are also available. The range of activities extends far beyond competitive sports, however, and students have the option to sign up for checkers, chess, “Wii Bowling,” table tennis, and even “Guitar Hero.” According to John Cummings, Student Recreation and Wellness Center Assistant Director, they are also a great way to socialize and get out to meet new people for both new and returning students. “Competing with someone on the same court or the same chessboard is a lot different than going up and trying to start a conversation in the dining hall where you don’t know anybody, which can be awkward,” said Cummings. Many of the intramural events take place during the afternoon. Team sports start at 3, 4 and 5 p.m. There are also evening events that begin after late classes have ended, at 8, 9 and 10 p.m. There are various sign-up deadlines for

intramurals, posted in the SRWC lobby, on posters in the Memorial Union and washburn.edu/getfit, as well as its Twitter and Facebook. Students can also sign onto teams for sports via imleagues.com. For Dave Clark, a senior political science major, and his fellow Sigma Phi Epsilon members, intramurals are about more than just the competition. While he participates in some team sports, Clark has also gotten involved with intramurals in other ways. “I’m in a fraternity, and the position that I hold requires me to set up our intramural teams,” said Clark. “So I get all of our teams set up and everybody signed onto the teams, and I play basketball and volleyball too.” Clark played basketball and volleyball in high school, and while he stopped playing in his last few years of school, he says it felt good to get back to playing again at a level that was less competitive and a little more fun. In addition it was one of the reasons he chose his position in his fraternity, because he both enjoyed intramurals and helping other students get involved with them. So, whether getting involved through student organizations or with a small group of friends...or competing all out at soccer or jamming at “Guitar Hero,” it’s never a bad idea to look into intramurals. Ivy Marcus is a freshman English major. Reach her at ivy.marcus@washburn.edu.


A7

Wednesday, September 7, 2011

A&E

Apes gone wild LEGO before Mulvane goes

David Weins WASHBURN REVIEW

Continued from page 1 4,000 pieces of artwork in the current collection and on loan from other artists and institutions in the museum. Approximately 50 percent of the artwork includes works on paper. 
Even though the museum will be closed there is no doubt it will remain busy. During the repairs Morrison predicts Mulvane will be noisy, dusty and hot. The art lab will remain open so fall classes can continue as scheduled. The gift shop will be relocated, the decision of where to is still pending. “We hadn’t really planned on this, but it is good timing for us,” said Morrison.. “The other option was to close all next summer, and the summer is one of our busiest times during the year.” In just two months this summer, it was thought that “The Art of Brick” brought in more visitors than the museum Photo courtesy of apeswillrise.com

man characters is their diminishing importance throughout the film. Although this was “Rise of the Planet of the quite possibly an intentional Apes” had confused me since shift, given that the movie was the first trailer was released; depicting the rise of apes and here was a movie that was set to the decline of humans, its narcome out a decade after the last rative merit is outweighed by (failed) attempt to revive the the drag it creates for the movie franchise and 38 years after the as a whole. Demoting the main last movie in the original series, character to a supporting role and a movie that seemed to be a and focusing on another characmajor departure from the origi- ter after spending 20 or 30 minnal film, the sequels it spawned, utes establishing motivations the TV series those sequels and relationships that wind up spawned, and the 2001 remake. serving very little purpose for So why make a film attempt- the remainder of the movie was ing to distance itself downright stupid. MOVIE from a franchise Will Rodman, who when that franchise initially appeared to REVIEW was already comabe the central chartose and forgotten? Perhaps it acter, felt like an unnecessary is best just not to probe into the and unwanted presence in the thought-processes that overlook climax and ending scenes who such things. was put in simply because exInterestingly, the major cluding him from them would weak points of this movie are have been slightly more awkin the life-action characters. ward. While admittedly realistic and “Rise of the Planet of the well-enough portrayed, there Apes” remains a pretty good seems to have been little care film despite this sizable hiccup or thought put into their de- in its plot. While I would not go velopment. The ailing family so far as to recommend you go member, the profit-driven boss, see it, if you are planning a trip the sadistic Animal Control to the movies sometime soon it employee and the angry neigh- is one of your best choices. bor all seem like dotted-line cutouts from a picture-book of useful generics. Will Rodman’s (James Franco) love interest Caroline Aranha (Freida Pinto) is almost completely superfluous to the story, were she not the only female character with more than one scene. David Wiens is a junior English More problematic than the major. Reach him at david.wiens@ underdevelopment of the hu- washburn.edu

had seen in the last two years. Building off of this excitement, the museum has many other exciting exhibits scheduled up to January 2013. Following

the short closing, Mulvane will open with the “Parallel Views” exhibit with work by Miguel Angel Giovanetti and Fernando Pezzino on February 4, 2012.

Photo by Josh Rouse

Kelly Hurla is a sophomore mass media major. Reach her at kelly. hurla@washburn.edu

TPAC continues to shine

Photo courtesy of TPAC

Entertainment Fixture: Topeka Performing Arts Center helps plan events throughout the year that bring high profile performers like comedian Lewis Black to the community. Black, a well known stand up comedian, will perform September 23 at TPAC.

Tanner Ballangee WASHBURN REVIEW The Topeka Performing Arts Center (TPAC) has been serving its city by “… providing for the advancement, promotion, presentation, and development of the arts to meet the diverse cultural and educational needs of our community,” as stated in their mission statement. This concept has prevailed at this location since as early as the late 1800s when the building was known as “The Municipal Auditorium.” Located at 214 S.E. Eighth Ave. in the core of downtown Topeka, Kan., TPAC now plays host to about 160 events a year, attracting roughly 61,000 people in 2010 alone. From what first stood as the site of the first building in Topeka with electric lights and indoor bathrooms, TPAC has gone through numerous changes and renovations to stand as the successful arts venue it is today. The original land where TPAC now resides first housed Col. George W. Veale and his family before it was demolished and rebuilt as a two-story civic building. The new building contained city offices, a fire station, and “The Municipal Auditorium,” which hosted shows that attracted lovers of music and the arts from all over. Starting with dance-band leader Paul Whiteman and his orchestra as its first performer, the Municipal Auditorium brought forth many wellknown names to the city of Topeka, such as Nat King Cole and even Elvis Presley.

Not only did the auditorium serve the community in regards to arts and entertainment, but it also helped the city’s citizens in its most dire times of need. Be it the great flood of 1951, where 1,500 people were fed and sheltered in the auditorium, or the disastrous tornado that tore through Topeka in 1961, like a real friend to its citizens, TPAC was there to provide a safe retreat. Despite seeing success with traveling performers, Broadway shows, trade shows, circuses, and even high school graduations, the auditorium ran into a threat in the 1980s with the opening of the Kansas Expocentre. To eliminate the need for competition, an ambitious and determined group of citizens and city officials came together and proposed a pivotal transformation for the auditorium, giving it a permanent stage and other adjustments to allow it to support those performing arts events that the Expocentre could not. The campaign was able to raise enough money to make the dream a reality and in 1987 the renovation of the auditorium began. The renovation of the building did great things for TPAC and it’s community: creating jobs for citizens of Topeka, enhancing the architectural dimensions of the building while still retaining it’s original style and character, altering its walls and seating for better hearing and viewing purposes, and giving it its new title: The Topeka Performing Arts Center. On March 23, 1991 the

Topeka Performing Arts Center was open to the public. The following 20 years brought many upscale events and big names to Topeka, such as blues guitar master B.B. King, country-singing superstar LeAnn Rimes, and comedicgenius Jerry Seinfeld. Ashley Schmidt, a senior business major at Washburn University, was able to attend a TPAC event that took place on April 24, 2010. The event featured Nate Phelps, an estranged son of radical media star and pastor of Westboro Baptist Church Fred Phelps, speaking about his controversial family. “It was really interesting and informative,” said Schmidt. “I found the speech that he gave to be really enlightening, because nobody really knew the truth about the inner workings of the family.” Nate Phelps’ performance brought many people to TPAC, causing the building to be slightly crowded. “I could still hear well, though,” said Schmidt. “It was still a good experience . . . I think that TPAC is a good staple in Topeka and I wish there were more venues like it.” Barbara Wiggins, Executive Director of TPAC, is the decision maker when it comes to events TPAC will host. Wiggins works with national promoters who bring the ideas for possible events to her, and she determines which of those will best suit Topeka and its surrounding area citizens. The TPAC staff will support Let’s Help’s fundraising efforts by co-hosting an upcoming

outdoor event featuring the music group from the 1970s, KC and the Sunshine Band. Wiggins, who says she is a fan of the ‘70s funk band, also explains that although she and her employees may be at every event TPAC hosts, they do not get to sit and watch them. “We don’t work in this industry to enjoy the events,” said Wiggins. Wiggins points out that not only does TPAC serve as a national touring house for Broadway shows, comedians, dance performances, and other such events, a safe-haven for Topeka’s citizens in times of despair, and a historic landmark, but also stands as an economic stronghold that keeps downtown Topeka flush with new faces. “Downtown businesses thrive because of events,” said Wiggins. The events that TPAC hosts not only bring in members of the Topeka community but also patrons from cities all over Kansas, throughout the Midwest, and at times from across the nation. These people stop at gas stations, eat dinner at restaurants, shop at the mall, and are putting money into the community and are boosting Topeka’s economy. Without TPAC, Topeka would lose all that incoming money and would suffer in that respect, said Wiggins.

Tanner Ballangee is a junior English major. Reach him at tanner.ballangee@washburn.edu.


Arts & Entertainment • Wednesday, September 7, 2011

A8

Dressing to impress: interview wear Fall TV offers variety Jordan Chilcote Washburn REVIEW

It was once said clothes make the man, but has anyone ever really stopped wondered how true these words are? In a job interview clothes are just that. Clothes in a job interview, can really make or break the chance at a job. “Clothes are very important. They create the first impression for the person conducting the interview,” said Ian Mikkelsen, a Washburn student. It is all in the way you present yourself. College may help you present yourself through qualifications; however it will not always help an individual in the wardrobe department. So here are some helpful tips on the do’s and don’ts for interview dress. According to “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to the Perfect Job Interview”, there are two important questions when dressing for an interview: “1. Do you have clothing appropriate to the position, industry, company, and department in which you are seeking a job?” and “2. Is this clothing in excellent condition: clean, neat, in impeccable repair, and not obviously ‘dated’?” With these two questions in mind start looking towards the wardrobe. When getting ready for an interview keep in mind the job the interview is for. An interviewee would not want to show up to an interview with Wall Street in jeans and a polo and expect to be a stock broker. When getting ready for the interview “Job Interviews for Dummies” points out four ways you can learn how to find out the company you are applying for’s dress code: •“Visit the company’s Web

Photos courtesy of stevecarell.net and gellarfan.org

Brad Pechanec

will join the cast as ultra-confident yet very creepy Robert California. To find out if Spader’s character will make or This year’s fall lineup of new break the show tune into “The Office” and returning TV shows boasts of season eight September 22 on NBC at drama, action adventure, science 9 p.m. fiction, crime, new cast members and There are some early previews of meltdowns. new shows that are making waves with Most of this drama has circulated critics and audiences a like. According around the ninth season of “Two and a to IMDb.com, “Terra Nova” and Half Men.” Earlier this year, Charlie “Ringer” are at the top of the list for Sheen was fired by the producers most anticipated shows for the fall of the show for his ‘hostile and self- season. “Terra Nova” is about destructive’ nature. CBS was then put a family selected to travel back to the task of finding a replacement in time to the prehistoric era in order to for Sheen’s character, Charlie Harper. save the human race. (Think “Jurassic Several months later, Ashton Kutcher Park” with a little mix of “The Time was announced as the Machine”). It all begins TELEVISION Sept. 26, at 8 p.m. on Fox. newest edition to the cast. PREVIEW So far the cast and Ringer marks Sarah crew have enjoyed working with Michelle Gellar’s return to TV eight Kutcher, but the fan’s reactions might years after Buffy The Vampire Slayer be another story. Already, several ended. Witnessing a mob hit, Bridget rumors have surfaced as to how Sheen’s Kelly (Gellar) is placed into the witness character will go out. However, the protection program only to fear for her real question is will the show sink or life from her government watcher. swim without Charlie Sheen? Find Kelly flees and reunites with her twin out Sept. 19 on CBS. sister, Siobhan (also played by Gellar). A new cast member also played Siobhan mysteriously disappears and an important part in another show as Bridget ascends into her twin sister’s NBC’s “The Office” enters its eighth life. However, Siobhan has some season. Steve Carell, who played interesting secrets in her life. Ringer Dunder Mifflin’s regional manager premieres Sept. 13 at 9 p.m. on The Michael Scott left the show after his CW. contract expired after the previous season. During season seven’s finale, fans were given a taste as to who the new manager would be after several celebrities playing candidates were Brad Pechanec is a junior mass media interviewed. Fans rejoiced in July when major. Reach him at brad.pechanec@ it was confirmed that James Spader washburn.edu WASHBURN REVIEW

Graphic by Maggie Pilcher

site and search for videos of employees. Check for beards, mustaches and long, loose hair. Notice whether the men are wearing sport jackets or suits, or simply shirts with or without a tie. •Call the human resources office and ask about the company’s dress code. •Use your personal network-or an online social network-to find an employee whom you can quiz. •Loiter near the workplace and observe employees coming and going. Just don’t wear a raincoat, show up in a white van, or watch through binoculars.” There are many more ways to be aware of the dress codes of different companies. However, if there is not a written dress code, one must go with their gut. “I’ll wear suit with dress shoes and a tie,” said Nic Campbell, a Washburn student. “You want something that looks professional and doesn’t stand out.” While this is a good base to start

with later in “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to the Perfect Job Interview”, the authors point out to “be aware that dark colors suggest authority, and that dark blue conveys the greatest degree of authority.” Now, this is great to know when picking out suits and spot jackets, nevertheless when it comes to the ladies, “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to the Perfect Job Interview” points out, “A close-toe pump with a 1-inch heel is the safe choice for an interview…. choose shoes that complement your suit and accessories.” Take this information into advisement but always try to pick what is best for the job. Even Dr. Suess once said, “You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose. You’re on your own. And you know what you know. And YOU are the one who’ll decide where to go...” Jordan Chilcote is a senior mass media major. Reach her at jordan. chilcote@washburn.edu.

Mike's Music Mike Goehring

WASHBURN REVIEW

Members of the band Evolove played Aug. 25 in Kansas City at the Aftershock Bar and Grill promoting their new album “Breaking Heartstrings”. The band is from Los Angeles, Calif., and will be on tour through Sept. 26. Photos by Mike Goehring, Washburn Review

2011 SW Wanamaker Rd. Topeka, KS 66604

Mon – Thur. / 2pm-4pm

Kelly Andrews is a sophomore mass media/sociology major. Reach her at kelly. andrews@washburn.edu Opportunities for Smiling Faces & Great Attitudes!

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2011-12 Issue 3