Issuu on Google+

The CNV Chronology

1


2

The CNV Chronology


Table of contents Chairman’s message

4

Regional Director’s message

5

Purpose of the CNV

6

Gerakan Pramuka (Indonesia)

8

Pakistan Boy Scouts Association

10

Scouts of China

12

Persekutuan Pengakap Negara Brunei Darussalam

14

National Scout Organization of Thailand

16

The Scout Association of Macau

18

Boy Scouts of the Philippines

20

The Scout Association of Papua New Guinea

22

The Scout Association of Maldives

24

Scout Association of Japan

26

Scout Association of Mongolia

28

Sri Lanka Scout Association

30

Korea Scouts Association

32

Bharat Scouts & Guides

34

Fiji Scouts Association

36

The Hong Kong Scout Association

38

Bangladesh Scouts

40

Scouts Australia

42

Scouting New Zealand

44

Cambodia Scouts

46

Nepal Scouts

48

Bhutan Scouts Association

50

Polynesia Scouts Council

52

The Singapore Scout Association

54

Persekutuan Pengakap Malaysia

56

Kiribati Scout Association

58

APR Scout Committee-NSO Visit (CNV) Undertaken

60

Need-based analysis of NSOs emerging from the CNV Recommendations

62

CNV Evaluation Tool

64

The CNV Chronology

3


Message of the Regional Chairman

Jejomar C Binay Chairman, APR Scout Committee

Having completed the full cycle of the Committee NSO Visit within a period of four years in all 26 National Scout Organizations is gratifying. Now it’s time to revisit this entire program and take a second look from a fresh perspective. What did we accomplish from this initiative? Did we achieve the purpose of the CNV, which is to assist NSOs in delivering and continually improving the quality of Scouting? As a Committee, the CNV has been the focus of our collective work, not by ourselves, but with the cooperation of the 26 NSOs that took part including the young people who dialogued with us. Indeed it was an educational and inspiring exercise to learn how diverse NSOs are, operating in very different circumstances and yet deeply engaged in a single purpose – the Mission of Scouting. There are numerous lessons to learn and improve, and clearly, each NSO has its own

4

The CNV Chronology

issues and challenges to face. I thank the leaders who came to the Regional Scout Committee meetings, one year after the CNV, to report on the progress of their work based on the agreed recommendations. I also thank, individually, the Regional Scout Committee members who devoted their expertise and time with the NSOs. I believe that the CNV has been a very good initiative and technical exercise both for the NSO and Regional Committee to support each other and promote goodwill. After the first cycle, the Regional Scout Committee has decided to follow-up the CNV recommendations through consultancy so that more specific issues in NSOs are directly addressed with the help of experts, and we could keep track of delivering quality Scouting to our members.


Message of the Regional Director

Abdullah Rasheed Regional Director World Scout Bureau/Asia-Pacific Region

The Committee NSO Visit or CNV has been the focal responsibility of the Regional Scout Committee since March 2008, which was carried on to the current triennium 2009 to 2012. It has the underlying of deepening goodwill between the Regional Scout Committee and NSOs. As the representative from the APR office in all CNV missions, it is exhilarating to have worked with the Regional Scout Committee and NSOs on this extensive program. Covering all NSOs in major areas of operation was quite daunting but the full cooperation of NSOs and their warm hospitality made the work a lot easier. The CNV focused on the eight indicators: Constitution, Mission and Vision, Management, Youth Programme, Adult Resources, Relationships and Communications, Resources Development, and Research and Development. It was a fact that many NSOs need to reexamine their constitution and by-laws and governing rules to ensure that fundamental principles are consistent with WOSM. Since the

adoption of the Mission of Scouting by the World Scout Conference (1999), it has been visibly reflected in the mission statement of most NSOs. More clarity could be achieved when the responsibilities of leaders are defined through their terms of reference and job descriptions. A periodic research is needed as a tool for updating or revising the youth programme. The Adults in Scouting policy, and its practical functioning on the ground, was another point of emphasis. The area of communications is generally well established in many NSOs, while resources development presents a more varied picture where NSOs are in different levels of development. May I reiterate that the CNV has made it imperative that the practice of democracy is important in the management of NSOs. With the widespread socio-economic challenges nowadays, the demand on leadership is higher in terms of managing our organization with greater responsiveness and flexibility.

The CNV Chronology

5


Purpose of the CNV Background. The concept of “Qualities of an Effective NSO” was developed after the discussions at the APR Committee level and during the 5th APR Leaders Summit in May 2006 in relation to standards of NSOs. It was identified that countries who are working towards becoming members of WOSM are required to comply with a certain set of criteria which must be met before they can be recommended as WOSM members. Once a member however, where there are no continuing measures to ensure NSOs maintain minimum standards to effectively achieve the mission of Scouting, the APR Regional Scout Committee agreed that the CNV will commence in 2008 following its adoption at the 22nd APR Scout Conference in Japan in October 2007. The conference resolution 14/07 (a) states: “Recalling the function of the APR Committee to promote cooperation and mutual assistance amongst the scout organizations in the Region (Article IX), the Conference endorses the paper “Committee NSO Visit” (CNV) and urges the full cooperation of NSOs in its implementation.” Purpose. The CNV is designed to assist NSOs in delivering and continually improving the quality of Scouting. An evaluation tool is provided to the NSO as an outline of what is being emphasized as indicators of effective NSOs. These indicators need to be considered in light of the “Background paper on Governance of WOSM-Governing Unity” (WC 4/2005 – Item 4) and are to be used as a guide that will assist NSOs in achieving the standards of an effective NSO.

The CNV concept used the evaluation tool as the main springboard in stimulating discussions on specific issues. The tool focused on eight elements. First, the Constitution and governing rules of the NSO were reviewed and this includes legal recognition by the country of existence and protection of intellectual properties. A number of organizational issues were dealt with at the national level, with follow-up on the implementation of policies adopted at the world level. The Mission and Vision was seen as important as they define the aims and objectives of the NSO to its members and the broader community. Vis-à-vis the mission, there were discussions on how the NSO vision indeed reflected the overall paradigm of the development of youth in local communities. It is imperative that NSOs have a clear distinction between the rights, responsibilities and duties of NSO management and local groups and it is very important that unity exists between these two groups. Elements of the educational methods were highlighted, starting with providing relevant, interesting and challenging youth programs and the need for periodic research and analysis on human behavior and the needs of young people. The role of adult leaders was seen as

Sharing of experiences. A number of occasions were offered to share the CNV concept with colleagues outside the Asia-Pacific Region, such as the presentation for key leaders of Inter-american Region during the 2011 World Scout Conference in Brazil, Dr Mukhyuddin, and sharing the progress of CNV with World Scout Bureau at several meetings of Executive Directors.

6

Essential Elements of CNV

The CNV Chronology

imperative at all levels from the local group to the top leaders who influence the running of the Scout Movement. Therefore, the policies that affect the management of adults in Scouting were given emphasis and that these incorporate support mechanisms at all levels.


The CNV stressed that NSO must have a National Adult Resource Policy (NARP) that goes beyond the provision of competency-based training and include the continual professional growth of adult volunteers, and this includes the adoption and implementation of the World Adult Resources Policy and the Adults in Scouting framework.

Special thanks to those behind the CNV concept A number of volunteers and Scout leaders have contributed largely to the development of the CNV concept paper. Special thanks to the Management Sub-Committee 2007-2009, especially Ms Emma Barker who put together the concept paper and evaluation tool, picking

Communication is key to the success of

up from the APR document “Qualities of an

Scout organizations, therefore, the CNV

Effective NSO�, and the regional office staff who,

reiterated the need to review the systems and

over a period of time, brainstormed with Scout

communications tools they use to run and

leaders and managers on what it takes to be an

promote the organization both internally and

effective and successful Scout organization.

externally. Based on the capacity of NSOs, it was made clear that to reach audiences, there was a need for a communication strategy with emphasis that traditional methods of communications and relationships have changed in light of globalization. The CNV tool defines Resources Development as ensuring that the NSO utilities all business skills to allow it to make the most of its resources. As much as possible, NSOs should be asset rich and have limited liabilities. This could be achieved by maximizing the use of existing resources within the NSO to influence finance generation and ensure that the right people are managing this facet of the NSO. It is important for NSOs to ensure that they are up to date with the changing trends of the communities that they are based in. In order to be effective and efficient the NSO must continually understand the needs of their audiences through review, research and development.

The CNV Chronology

7


st

stop

Gerakan Pramuka (Indonesia)

Gerakan Pramuka is the largest Scouting nation in the world with over 21 million members. The association builds much of its success on engaging young people in community service and development. Scouting in local communities is a prime mover of development interventions such as health and sanitation campaigns, environmental cleanup, vocational training, and more visibly in rescue and relief operations during natural disasters.

Gerakan Pramuka Indonesia was the first Scout association to welcome the CNV. In March 2008, members of the Regional Scout Committee (RSC) visited Gerakan Pramuka in Jakarta to launch the CNV concept. The three-day meeting highlighted key indicators including constitutional matters and financial management. Adult Resources and Youth Programme were discussed in depth. A special meeting was arranged with Rovers and young people to get their ideas about the Scout Movement.

8

The CNV Chronology

While almost all areas of practice by GP were strong, significant efforts and improvements were made in the area of relationships and communications, raising the profile of GP in the communities particularly at national and provincial levels. Major commitments for future action were made in resources development. Mission and Vision statements were clarified, while the Youth Programme, with its strong elements


of community development, and adult resources are well established. Gerakan Pramuka affirmed that the CNV is useful that could set a benchmark for future discussions. The final session produced an 8-point target for the growth of Indonesian Scouting in the areas of constitution, mission and vision, management, youth program, adult resources, relationship and communications, resources development, research and development. RSC member John Ravenhall and Prakorb Mukura led the CNV together with Regional Director Abdullah Rasheed. Officials of Gerakan Pramuka headed by Dr Azrul Azwar expressed their appreciation to the visiting team and the honour to be chosen as the first stop of the mission.

Facts & figures Year Founded: 1912 WOSM Member: 1953 Membership 2011: 21,274,202 International Events Hosted: • • • • • •

1st APR Community Service Camp, 1973 6th APR/GP Jamboree, 1981 13th APR Scout Conference, 1982 17th APR Scout Conference, 1992 1st World COMDECA, 1993 APR Adult Resources Management Workshop, 2002 • 1st APR International Resources Workshop, 2003 • 4th APR Scout Leaders Summit, 2003 • APR Workshop on Developing Partnerships through PR, 2006 • 1st APR Air-Internet Jamboree • 2nd Southeast Asian Scout Jamboree, 2008 • 47th APR Basic Management Course, 2008 • APR Disaster Management Workshop, 2009 • APR Workshop on Environment Education and Biodiversity, 2011 • Course for Leader Trainers, 2011

The CNV Chronology

9


2 stop nd

Pakistan Boy Scouts Association

In the midst of internal challenges, the volume of Scout training and activities continue around Pakistan. During difficult times, Scouts render services to people and communities that are in dire need or in distress, such as the earthquake victims in Balochistan and internally displaced persons in the northern provinces.

Chairman Binay leads mission to Pakistan The second of the CNV series was in Islamabad from 15 th to 17 th May 2008, led by Regional Chairman Jejomar Binay along with committee member Prakorb Mukura. Other members of the team were Regional Director Abdullah Rasheed and Prassanna of the regional office. Chief Commissioner of Pakistan Boy Scouts Association (PBSA), Lt Gen Javed Ashraf, welcomed the visiting team, and with

10

The CNV Chronology

his leadership, the three-day discussions recommended far-reaching and substantive measures to put Scouting back on track. The visiting team cited the efforts of PBSA in resources development, the enhancement of Rovering and membership growth. Ideas emerging from the informal forum with young people in Islamabad reinforced the need to sustain attractive activities for young people, better headquarters premises,


and greater visibility. What really amazed the visiting team – and the most educating of all – was the opinion expressed by non-Scouts and post-graduate students about the Scout Movement. A TV show featured young adults talking about Scouting and what they expect Scouts and Guides should do in Pakistan and around the world. The Pakistan Scout Cadet College, a subsidiary of PBSA, was cited for its key role in quality education that boosts the image of Scouting. The college is a source of inspiration for young people who are given the preference to choose Scouting besides their academic education.

Facts & figures Year Founded: 1947 WOSM Member: 1948 Membership 2010: 631,856 International Events Hosted: • AP Public Relations Seminar, 1994 • 3rd Advanced Management Course, 2005 • 5th SAF Scout Friendship Camp, 2007 • APR Programme Development Workshop, 2007

Senior Deputy Chief Commissioner of PBSA Syed Pervez Ali Shah Jillani, a member of the Regional Scout Committee, took part in the meeting together with International commissioner Ghazanfar Mashkoor, National Secretary Col. Hashmat, and the Principal of Batarasi Scout Cadet College, Lt Gen Sajid Syed.

The CNV Chronology

11


3 stop rd

Scouts of China

Scouts of China continues its drive to expand partnerships and diversify ventures with business institutions, indigenous communities, religious groups, local communities and even with families of Scouts. In the last triennium, Scouts of China intensified its adult training scheme, and a well established Rover program is seeking new horizons through exchange programs and the Scouts of the World award.

Scouts of China expands Scouting through joint ventures In early June of 2009, Scouts of China welcomed members of the Regional Scout Committee and Asia Pacific Regional executives for a two-day meeting at the national headquarters in Taipei. Taiwan was the third stop of the CNV.

12

The CNV Chronology

Chief Commissioner Dr Chao Shou-Po led the local team and Mr Chen Huan Ran, Deputy Secretary General of Scouts of China, coordinated the CNV that turned out to be another avenue for collaboration and understanding. Discussions focused on eight key areas, preceded by inputs from coordinators in the areas of constitution, mission and vision, management, communications and


relationships, resources management, adult resources, research and development. The committee noted the association’s multi sources of income and proposed the formation of a finance group who will look into possibilities of expansion. Visiting team members were Asia Pacific Regional Scout Committee Vice-Chairman Tan Cheng Kiong and Prakorb Mukura with Regional Director Abdullah Rasheed and Thian Hiong Boon. The CNV cited the abundance of potential adult resources who could help increase membership to a ratio of 1:4 or one Scout leader for every 4 Scouts. Both groups agreed on the need to study the reasons for the decline of membership among young people.

Facts & figures Year Founded: 1912 WOSM Member: 1937 Membership 2011: 48,223 International Events Hosted: • 3rd AP Rover Moot, 1982 • 6th APR Scout Conference, 1989 • 1st APR Workshop on Scout Supply cum Trade Fair, 1994 • 1st APR Adult Resources Management Workshop, 1997 • 20th APR Jamboree, 1998 • 12th World Scout Moot, 2004 • Inter-religious Symposium, 2006 • APR AULTC for Rover, 2006 • Chinese Speaking CLT, 2006 • NTC Gathering & Adult Resources Management, 2008 • 28th APR Jamboree, 2011 • 7th APR Air/Internet Jamboree, 2011

After the meeting, the visiting group spent time with Senior Scouts to talk about challenges in the advancement scheme. Rovers shared their service projects and international activities with the visiting group.

The CNV Chronology

13


4 stop th

Persekutuan Pengakap Negara Brunei Darussalam

With strong government and media support, Scouts receive attention for their engaging activities whether they are camping, or taking training, or doing activities with their families.

Young People want wider networking A fast track two-day meeting between the Regional Scout Committee and Persekutuan Pengakap Negara Brunei Darussalam (PPNBD) was held on 19-20 August at the Scout complex in Brunei Darussalam. Chairman Jejomar C Binay co-presided the meeting with PPNBD President Pehin Dato Hj Ali and Chief Scout Pehin Dato Hj Hussin, with RSC member Prakorb Mukura, Regional Direc-

14

The CNV Chronology

tor Abdullah Rasheed and Ms Luz Taray. The hosts offered very warm hospitality to the visiting team. Key leaders in Brunei Darussalam participated in the discussions of key performance areas with a thorough discussion on constitutional issues and organizational structure. Even with Yayasan Pengakap (Scout Foundation) providing annual subsidy to the organization, it was also agreed to plan other sources of income and other fundraising activities. Local leaders


are well aware of the association’s constraints and did not hesitate to raise them. It was noted that PR and media relations works very well in the country. While members, both young and adults, consider themselves as Scouts, a proposal was made to register all active members using a proper registration system. Substantial conclusions and observations were captured in the final recommendations paper agreed upon at the final session.

Facts & figures Year Founded: 1933 WOSM Member: 1981 Membership 2011: 1,443 International Events Hosted: • • • • • •

PR Workshop on Financial Management, 1997 APR Workshop on Training System Development, 2003 AIS International Seminar, 2004 APR Course for Leader Trainers, 2004 4th APR Scout Youth Forum, 2004 21st AP Regional Conference, 2004

At the dialogue with young people, some of them said that they take pride in being Scouts. They treasure their learning experiences and want to see more environmental programs. They are looking for a wider Rover network that could take them closer to the wider community of world Scouting.

The CNV Chronology

15


5 stop th

National Scout Organization of Thailand

The National Scout Organization of Thailand stands by its long-time, generous, and historic reputation of being an international hub for Scouting. In the last three years, NSOT hosted various international events for young people, adult training, workshops, and major Scout gatherings.

Thailand: A Gracious Host to Scouting events Thailand was the fifth stop of the CNV. Members of the National Scout Organization of Thailand (NSOT) welcomed the regional team on 27-29 September 2008, comprised of Chairman Jejomar Jejomar Binay, Vice Chairman M.A. Khalid, and Mr Oh Sang Gyoon. The meeting was held in Pattaya. NSOT Secretary General Boonrat Wongyai, Mr Sutham Phanthusak, RSC member Prakorb

16

The CNV Chronology

Mukura, and key Scout leaders of NSOT took part in the three-day discussions. It was an opportunity to understand better the working set up of NSOT and the major activities undertaken. It was noted that the revised Scout Act which came into effect on 5 March 2008 has given NSOT a broader mandate and more independence to manage their own resources, especially campsites, training centers and several other properties.


The new youth programme was discussed at length integrating educational objectives for each section and the need to reinforce the King Scout Award. Some of the recommendations are to establish a computer-based registration system and to extend Scouting to out-ofschool youth. NSOT owns training centers and camps with a plan to upgrade services and facilities for public use. During the dialogue with young people, they expressed their aspirations, look forward to more opportunities for involvement in international events and exchange programmes. Regional Director Abdullah Rasheed and Syd Castillo of APR office assisted the CNV, while Mr Sommart Sungkapun was the coordinator.

Facts & figures Year Founded: 1911 WOSM Member: 1922 Membership 2010: 1,181,851 International Events Hosted: • 1st Scout Camp & Hostel Management Workshop, 1996 • 38th APR Basic Management Course, 1994 • 33rd World Scout Conference, 1993 • 15th APR Scout Conference, 1986 • 9th AP/11th Thai Jamboree, 1985 • 3rd APR Scout Conference, 1983 • 20th World Scout Jamboree, 2003 • 25 APR Scout Jamboree, 2005 • 46 BMC, 2006 • APR Seminar on Scouts of the World, 2007 • International Seminar on IP, 2009 • APR Seminar on Youth Involvement, 2010 • APR Strategic Planning Forum, 2011 • International Workshop on Youth for Change, 2012

The CNV Chronology

17


6 stop th

The Scout Association of Macau

The Scout Association of Macau has been an Associate Member of the Asia-Pacific Region since 1983. Its headquarters is a historical fortress with 150 years of history. In 1998, the association was recognized with the Outstanding Youth Organization Award and on the same year, the Governor of Macau awarded a medal of Philanthropic Merit to the association in recognition of its contribution to the community.

Facing up to emerging challenges The Scout Association of Macau (SAM), while hosting the Regional Scout Committee (RSC) meeting at Fortaleza de Taipa, agreed to take up the CNV to take advantage of the presence of Regional Committee members.

18

The CNV Chronology

Several challenges surfaced during the CNV, especially in the last five years with the rapidly changing industrial landscape of Macau as an international city. Many of its young adult members are engaged in the vibrant economy, and less time is devoted to Scouting. This is leading to lack of Scout leaders that consequently affect the recruitment of new young members.


Chairman Jejomar Binay headed the CNV team, together with Vice Chairmen Prakorb Mukura and Dr Mukhyuddin, and other regional members. Chief Commissioner Leong Sui Pui and his team were well prepared for the occasion. Scouting in Macau continues to enjoy government support. In 1999, the former Macau government offered SAM the historical Taipa Fort for the purpose of developing Scouting. Until now, the association continues to stress the principles of discipline, team spirit, leadership and civic education among its Scout members.

Facts & figures Year Founded: 1911 WOSM Member: APR Associate member: 1993 Membership 2011: 2,360 International Events Hosted: • Course for Assistant Leader Trainer, 2005 • Brand Communication Seminar, 2006 • APR Workshop on Membership Growth Review, 2012

The CNV Chronology

19


7 stop th

Boy Scouts of the Philippines

Boy Scouts of the Philippines is the most respected youth organization in the country, with its influence reaching far flung provinces and islands. BSP is chartering more councils in provinces, cities and municipalities, now with 116 local councils around the country and over 1.5 million members.

Scouting extends influence around the country On 15-17 January 2009, it was Boy Scouts of the Philippines’ (BSP) turn to present updates of their constitution, mission and vision, management, youth programme, adult resources, relationships and communications, resources development, research and development. Overall, the visiting team commended the BSP for their readiness and well-prepared presentations.

20

The CNV Chronology

The CNV made recommendations including BSP’s determination to continue its coeducational character by accepting girls in the movement. The organic law of BSP needs to be amended to conform to this endeavor. Part of the plan is the review of sectional programs and the age range of each section to ensure that the five personal development areas are fully integrated into the youth program.


Recommendation was made for the appointment of National Adult Resources Commissioner and the commissioner’s manual revision to conform with the National Adult Resources Policy. With a membership of 1.5 million, there was a reiteration to market Scouting outside the school system and to other segments of society. Regional Vice-Chairman Mohammed Ali Khalid led the CNV team, together with Dr Mohd Mukhyuddin, Regional Awards Chairman Zainal Abidin, Regional Director Abdullah Rasheed and Syd Castillo of APR office. Regional Chairman Jejomar C Binay, the National President of BSP, said that “ the success of Scouting in the country is due to the eagerness of young people to be in the Scout Movement and the Scout leaders are always ready to serve”.

Facts & figures Year Founded: 1936 WOSM Member: 1946 Membership 2011: 1,570,206 International Events Hosted: 1st APR Scout Conference, 1958 10th World Scout Jamboree, 1959 8th APR Scout Conference, 1972 1st AP/BSP Jamboree, 1973 12th AP/BSP Jamboree, 1991 1st ASEAN Jamboree, 1993 3rd APR Workshop on Scout Camp and Hostel, 1998 41st APR BMC for Professional Scout Executives, 1998 42nd APR BMC for Professional Scout Executives, 1999 APR Advanced Management Course for Professional Scout Executives, 2000 4th APR Scout Supply Workshop cum Trade Fair, 2002 5th APR Summit, 2006 APR Workshop on CEDC, 2006 APR Communication Workshop, 2008 26th APR Scout Jamboree, 2009 APR Seminar on Community-Based Scouting, 2010 2nd AULTC fir Vietnam Scout Leaders, 2011 APR Workshop for Correspondents, 2012

The CNV Chronology

21


8 stop th

The Scout Association of Papua New Guinea

Good relationship with government and international agencies is a pillar of strength for Scouting in Papua New Guinea. With strong support, the association has the capacity for resources development and management, and a great potential to expand membership in mainstream and indigenous communities.

Crossing the South Pacific Papua New Guinea was the first stop in the South Pacific for the CNV mission held on 27th - 29th March 2009. Using the eight key performance indicators, the team looked into the progress of the Papua New Guinea in the areas of constitution, mission and vision, management, youth programme, adult resources, relationship and communication, resources development and research development.

22

The CNV Chronology

This exercise created an opportunity for PNG leaders to evaluate their practices at different levels, look at areas that are going well, and suggest ways to modify or improve. After several years of membership decrease, there has been a slight ascent in numbers in the last couple of years. The team noted the association’s income generating assets and their good relations with the government, local and international agencies – all have the potential for productive partnerships and projects.


The CNV team comprised of Regional Scout Committee member John Ravenhall, Regional Governance Review Task Force chairman Alex Wong, Regional Director Abdullah Rasheed and Director Prassanna Shrivastava. Their PNG counterparts were Chief Commissioner Maj. Sere Kala, International Commissioner Winston Jacob, Deputy Chief Commissioners Michael Pearson, Bonner F. Tito and other key Scout leaders. The CNV team made courtesy calls on the British High Commission, the Australian High Commission and the Minister of Community Development to seek their support for Scouting – and they received positive feedback from high-ranking representatives.

Facts & figures Year Founded: 1926 WOSM Member: 1975 Membership 2010: 6,284 International Events Hosted: APR Multipurpose Workshop, 1994 SPENSOC Meeting, 1994 A Strategic Priorities Workshop, 2000

Finally the team went to the Gaire Village for a face to face interaction with young people who gave interesting feedback on how they perceive the values of Scouting, their aspiration for international opportunities, and the basic need for equipment to effectively carry out their activities.

The CNV Chronology

23


9 stop th

The Scout Association of Maldives

Small in land size and number, Maldives has one of the highest membership densities in the region at 1:75. Through active participation, Maldivian Scouts continue to make a consistent and strong presence at the international arena of Scouting.

Scouting is vibrant in the islands and beyond The regional team comprised of Regional Scout Committee Vice-Chairman Mohammed Ali Khalid, members Fazlur Rahman, Prakorb Mukura and Dr Mohammed Mukhyuddin, flew to Maldives from 10 to 12 May 2009 and completed another successful Committee NSO Visit. Assisting the team were Regional Director Abdullah Rasheed and Director Thian Hiong Boon.

24

The CNV Chronology

The team had a dialogue with leaders of the Scout Association of Maldives on key performance areas. Presently the association has over 10,000 members and has one of the highest Scout densities in the region. The regional team appreciated the diverse range of Scouting activities in the islands and the active participation of young Maldivians in overseas events. No stones were left unturned during the meeting, from governance issues to strategic planning, from revision of advancement


scheme to community-based Scouting, from review of training scheme and awards to the enhancement of resource base such as membership, Scout supplies and grants. After intense discussions, a set of actions were agreed upon, highlighting constitution, POR, youth programme and training schemes. During the lively dialogue with young people, main issues raised were revitalizing the Rover section, introduction of the World Environment Badge, Scouts of the World Programme and making youth programme more active. The young people articulated their experiences and gratefulness on how Scouting is becoming an essential part of their young lives.

Facts & figures Year Founded: 1956 WOSM Member: 1990 Membership 2011: 5,302 International Events Hosted:

ARP Programme and Community Development Workshop, 1998 2nd SAF Friendship Camp, 2003 1st SAARC Chief Commissioners Meeting, 2003 Intl Seminar on Youth Programme Dev’t. Rover, 2006 APR Workshop on PR & Marketing, 2009

Chief Commissioner Ahmed Ali Maniku expressed his gratitude to the regional team for their keen interest in the development of Scouting in Maldives.

The CNV Chronology

25


10 stop th

Scout Association of Japan

The Scout Association of Japan is no doubt a community leader for young people in Japan, and a great initiator and builder of international friendship and exchanges with other nations. Being community based, SAJ has proven how Scouting thrives and remains relevant to youth outside the school system.

Solid foundation, well-kept traditions and international goodwill are the conclusions derived from the CNV at the Scout Association of Japan.

their Japanese counterparts coordinated by Ms Mari Nakano, Chairman of SAJ International Committee, to assess eight key performance indicators. Regional Director Abdullah Rasheed and Director for Communications Ms Luz Taray supported both teams.

At the visit that took place from 1st to 3rd June in Tokyo, the regional team comprised of Regional Scout Committee (RSC) members Dr Yung Chaur-Shin, Fazlur Rahman, Prakorb Mukura and Kirsty Brown, as RSC consultant, joined

Together, they looked at the areas of constitution, mission and vision, management, youth program, adult resources, relationships and communications, resources development and research development.

Community leader for young people

26

The CNV Chronology


They carefully assessed how SAJ performed in these areas in delivering Scouting to young people. At the end of the meeting, they reached a mutual agreement to look into areas that need expansion or strengthening. Overall, the CNV commended SAJ for its cohesive style in serving Scouting locally and internationally. The CNV team highly commended the Rovers for their impressive presentations on various exchange projects with other Scout associations and for sharing their personal experiences in local and international activities. It should be noted that these activities are being initiated, planned and implemented by the Rovers. Team member Kirsty Brown said, “they are to be commended for the enormous amount of work they have put into the association and ensure they are a community leader for young people.�

Facts & figures Year Founded: 1913 WOSM Member: 1922 Membership 2011: 143,432 International Events Hosted:

23rd World Scout Conference, 1971 13th World Scout Jamboree, 1971 Asia-Pacific Top Leaders Summit, 1997 APR Multipurpose Workshop, 2000 23rd APR Scout Jamboree, 2002 Workshop on the Role of ICT in Youth Programme, 2004 5th APR Scout Youth Forum, 2007 APR CLT, 2007 22nd APR Scout Conference, 2007 APR Workshop on Effective National Adult Resources Committee and National Training System, 2011

The CNV Chronology

27


11 stop th

Scout Association of Mongolia

From its humble beginning since becoming a member in 1994, the Scout Association of Mongolia debuts at 18 years old with over 8,000 members. At a relatively young age, SAM has acquired and developed its own headquarters building, a vast campsite with facilities, community training centers, and the support of generous partners.

Excelling in joint ventures After Japan, the CNV went to Mongolia from 17th to 19th June 2009 at the capital, Ulaanbaatar. The regional team reviewed the progress of SAM in the areas of constitution, mission and vision, management, youth program, adult resources, relationships and communications, resources and research development, using the eight key performance

28

The CNV Chronology

indicators. At the second day of the visit, the team spent time with young people for a dynamic sharing and dialogue. After a thorough assessment on SAM's performance, CNV concluded that it has done well as a Scout organization since joining WOSM in 1994. The conscientious effort of its young leaders was reflected in the presentations and discussions.


At the end of the meeting, a recommendation paper was signed showing SAM's commitment to implement quality Scouting in Mongolia and for the regional office to continue supporting SAM until it attains the proficiency it desires. Most of the recommendations involved the creation or improvement of systems and procedures whether these are administrative functions, membership registration, job descriptions of volunteers, or in the implementation of Adults in Scouting. The team realized to a greater extent the value of the exercise and the level of participation. The team comprised of Regional Scout Committee member John Ravenhall, Scouting Profile Chairman Shree Ram Lamichhane, Regional Director Abdullah Rasheed and Director Syd Castillo. On the Mongolian side were Chief Commissioner Erdenejamiyan Erdenebileg, International Commissioner Adyiabold Namkhai,

Facts & figures Year Founded: 1991 WOSM Member: 1994 Membership 2011: 8,869 International Events Hosted:

11th Asia-Pacific/1st Mongolian National Rover Moot (1999) First International Jamboree, 2012

Executive Director Bayarjargal Damdindagva, National Training Commissioner Delgermaa Tsedsuren and National Rover Commissioner Ankhbayar Purevsuren.

The CNV Chronology

29


12 stop th

Sri Lanka Scout Association

As an organization that thrived well for 100 years, Sri Lanka Scout Association invited and hosted the Asia-Pacific Regional Jamboree to celebrate its success with the international Scouting community. At the same time, Sri Lankan Scouts take the greater challenge to initiate peace and heal the nation and its young generation from the long-term effects of ethnic conflict.

Opportunity to boost image of Scouting On the occasion of the Committee NSO Visit (CNV) to Colombo, the Scout Association of Sri Lanka (SLSA) assembled a huge rally to draw public attention to young people’s call for a more peaceful and healthier environment. Thousands of Scouts and their parents lined up both sides of Colombo’s main street in a 15-minute walk towards Sasakawa Hall for the opening of the CNV. While walking, Scouts held messages for environment and peace interventions, and underscored the Scout Promise and Law.

30

The CNV Chronology

Asia-Pacific Regional Scout Committee members and key leaders of SLSA met for the CNV from 17th to 19th January 2010 at the Galle Face Hotel in Colombo.  Sri Lanka Scout Commissioners were well prepared for the visit and have a good grasp of issues that are crucial to the effectiveness of SLSA. As a conclusion, both the visiting team and SLSA leaders signed a commitment to work for the growth of the association with greater efficiency.


Part of the visit was a dialogue with young people where they discussed a variety of issues. Some of them expressed their aspiration for more international Scouting opportunities within Sri Lanka. Furthermore, they would like to see that Scouting is introduced deeper into the rural communities around the country. Through a press conference, the CNV team faced the media, many of whom were accomplished Scouts, to explain the purpose of the visit and to engage the support of media for a greater visibility of Scouting.

Facts & figures

Year Founded: 1912 WOSM Member: 1953 Membership 2011: 43,147 International Events Hosted

1st APR Information Technology Workshop, 1998 APR Sub-Regional Resources Development Workshop, 2006 4th SAF Scout Friendship Camp, 2006 TTL Workshop, 2010 APR Workshop on Innovative Leadership and Effective Communication, 2011 29th APR Scout Jamboree, 2012

Chief Commissioner Chandrasena Batuwangala headed the Sri Lankan team for both the CNV and press conference. The visiting team comprised of Regional Scout Committee (RSC) Vice-Chairmen Prakorb Mukura and Dr Mohd Mukhyuddin, RSC member Dr Chao ShouPo, APR consultant Mohammed Ali Khalid, Regional Director Abdullah Rasheed and Director Thian Hiong-Boon.

The CNV Chronology

31


13 stop th

Korea Scouts Association

Korea’s boldness to take the most difficult challenge of hosting regional and world events solidifies its capability and status as one of the most influential youth organizations nationally and internationally.

CNV: an opportunity to synergize The Committee NSO Visit (CNV) to Korea was the 15th round of visits to National Scout Organizations. “Each visit to the NSOs brings a new learning and a fresh perspective”, said Regional Director Abdullah Rasheed. “Preparing for the CNV has been a rare opportunity to synchronize our reports. Weeks before the event, we made a tremendous effort to look at every department. As a result we now have a better view of every angle of our work together as an integral part of the organization”, said Hong Seung-Soo, then Secretary General of KSA.

32

The CNV Chronology

Dr Young Joong Kang, then President of KSA welcomed the visiting team and encouraged a high level of sharing and transparency for CNV Korea which was held from 11th to 13th March 2009. The CNV team, headed by Prakorb Mukura, was clearly impressed with the preparations and delivery of reports. They commended the good management of the organization, particularly its healthy financial situation as they shared practical applications of strategic planning, youth program development, adult support, partnerships and communications, research and development. For KSA, the CNV reinforced their efforts to translate official


documents and policies from Korean to English. One interesting highlight of the visit was the traditional tribute to a female Scout who earned the Tiger Scout Award. A large group of the Scouting community attended the recognition ceremony including parents, Scout leaders, and from the troop where she belongs. The usual dialogue with the young people was very beneficial to both sides as the young people expressed their opinions related to Scouting. To conclude the visit, team members signed the conclusions and recommendations of the meeting. Signatories from the KSA were Simon Hang Bock Rhee, Vice President; Bock Hyun Jung, Chief Commissioner; Dr Eugene Gui Kim, International Commissioner; Danny Hong Seung Soo, Secretary General. From the Regional Committee were Prakorb Mukura, Vice-Chairman; Dr Mohammed Mukhyuddin, Vice-Chairman; Nicholas Tang, member; Sang Ho Shim, member; and Abdullah Rasheed, Regional Director, with Luz Taray as desk officer.

Facts & figures Year Founded: 1922 WOSM Member: 1953 Membership 2011: 209,369 International Events Hosted:

17th World Jamboree, 1991 Regional Scout Conference, 1965 17th AP Jamboree, 1996 21st AP Jamboree, 2000 International Patrol Jamboree, 2002 APR PR, ICT and Marketing Workshop, 2003 24th APR Scout Jamboree, 2004 13th International Rover Moot, 2005 International Patrol Jamboree, 2005 APR Events Management Workshop, 2006 10th World Scout Youth Forum, 2008 38th World Scout Conference, 2008 27th APR Jamboree, 2010 APR Workshop on Partnership and Fundraising, 2011 4th Inter-religious Symposium, 2012 8th APR Air Internet Jamboree, 2012

The CNV Chronology

33


14 stop th

Bharat Scouts & Guides

The Bharat Scouts & Guides, like its country India, is huge and widely spread. It remains a keeper of Scouting traditions even as it embraces the demands of the 21st century. The organization keeps an eye on keeping good practices alive and a proactive agent for environmental awareness and education.

Good Scouting practices cited Representatives of the World Organization of the Scout Movement (WOSM) and World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS) in the Asia-Pacific Region largely appreciated the progress of the Bharat Scouts and Guides (BSG) at the Committee NSO Visit (CNV) held in New Delhi from 5th to 7th May 2010. Using the eight-point guideline of the CNV Package, members of the visiting team identified a number of good practices of the

34

The CNV Chronology

BS&G that could be worth-sharing with other organizations. One area that shows potential is how BS&G is marketing its programme to young people of all Scouting sections. At the same time, BS&G was receptive to recommendations particularly in adopting new programmes for young people such as the Scouts of the World Award and the World Scout Environment Badge. A long running adventure programme of the scout association at the National Adventure Institute was cited. The programme runs every year at the nature laden training centre


in Pachmarhi, Madhya Pradesh. It caters to the adventurous nature of young people and inspires them to appreciate the gifts of a wellpreserved and protected natural environment. In a dialogue with Rover and Ranger Scouts in New Delhi and nearby areas, the CNV team were pleased to hear suggestions from youth members on how Scouting and Guiding could be improved, and notably their hope to know more about Scouting outside India. The visiting team comprised of first ViceChairman Mr Prakorb Mukura, members Mr Fazlur Rahman and Shree Ram Lamichhane, accompanied by Regional Director Abdullah Rasheed and APR Director Mr Thian HiongBoon. Counterparts from WAGGGS Asia-Pacific Committee member Ms Normala Baharudin and Regional Director Ms Ming Fe Wu were present. Bharat Scouts & Guides National Commissioner L. M. Jain headed the team of senior volunteers and professionals who actively participated in the CNV deliberation.

Facts & figures

Year Founded: 1909 WOSM Member: 1938 Membership 2011: 3,294,245 International Events Hosted:

17th World Scout Conference, 1959 APR Fund Raising Seminar, 1974 10th APR Jamboree, 1987 APR Basic Management Course, 1987 2nd APR Adult Resources Management Seminar, 1998 APR Basic Management Course, 1994 1st APR Advanced Management Course, 1995 43rd APR Basic Management Course, 2000 20th APR Scout Conference, 2001 APR Course for Leader Trainers, 2001 APR Scout Youth Forum, 2001 45th APR BMC for Professional Scout Executives, 2003 Seminar on Learning Organization, 2005 International Seminar on Partnership, 2005 TTL Evaluation Workshop, 2007 7th SAF Scout Friendship Camp, 2009 4th APR AMC, 2010 7th APR Scout Leaders Summit, 2010 APR Workshop on Community-Based Scouting, 2011

The CNV Chronology

35


15 stop th

Fiji Scouts Association

A significant increase in membership and the refurbishment of a historical training center are vital signs that Fiji Scouts Association is back on its feet to prepare for celebrating its 100th year in 2014. Considered as a breakthrough, the association hosted the first Woodbadge Course for Unit Leaders coming from different nations and island territories in the South Pacific.

Going with Change Pacific islands, situated at the far extreme of the region, was the focal place where the Committee NSO Visit (CNV) spent two days in June. Former Regional Scout Committee member John Ravenhall (Australia) led the meeting between the visiting team from the APR office and the Fijian Scout leaders.

Mr John Naisau, Acting Chief Commissioner, took over the leadership and with this change, new and energetic leaders took up various commissioners' positions. Some expressed their underlying hope that the CNV could give them a boost and the momentum for a fresh start. Former Chief Commissioner Chandra Shekhar who is also the Acting Deputy Chief Scout joined the meeting.

A few months before the CNV, Fiji Scouts Association underwent substantial changes.

Scouting in Fiji is largely school-based, receiving support from the Ministry of Education.

36

The CNV Chronology


The ministry gives importance to Scouting as the most useful co-curricular activity within the school system. At the time of the visit, Fiji had a Scout population of 4,192 and there is much scope for membership expansion around the islands. With enormous effort, Scout membership has soared to almost 5,500 in recent years. Fiji Scouts has made steady progress in recent years to spread Scouting across the islands and is preparing to celebrate its centenary in a remarkable way.

Facts & figures Year Founded: 1914 WOSM Member: 1971 Membership 2011: 7,401 International Events Hosted:

9th AP CD Seminar, 1979 APR Sub-regional Multipurpose Workshop, 1983 APR Sub-regional Programme and Training Workshop, 1991 APR Multipurpose Workshop, 1999 2nd CSPSA meeting and a Course for ALT, 1999 South Pacific Council Meeting, 2004 Woodbadge for CSPSA, 2012

The CNV Chronology

37


16 stop th

The Hong Kong Scout Association

The Scout Association of Hong Kong excels in developing resources and its expertise in various areas could play a wider role in international Scouting. The association has set a benchmark as the most preferred non-formal educational programme for the youth of Hong Kong.

CNV commends achievements of Hong Kong Scouts At the two-day Committee NSO Visit (CNV) held at the Hong Kong Scout Centre on 2324 July, the Scout Association of Hong Kong (SAHK) has proven itself as a well-managed Scout association and one of the leading youth organizations in Hong Kong. The CNV cited the unprecedented achievements of SAHK and its expertise in various areas, especially its sound financial base and resources management.

38

The CNV Chronology

The CNV is an opportunity to take an overview of all operational areas of the association. SAHK has remarkably advanced into a well-rounded organization even as it faces the greater challenge of making Scouting as the most preferred Other Learning Experience (OLE) for young people in Hong Kong under the recently declared government educational reform. At the same time, SAHK leaders acknowledge their capacity and potential to recruit more young members and adult Scout leaders.


The Hong Kong Polytechnic University has accredited SAHK’s Wood Badge Training Scheme as their Diploma in Leadership Training. The next goal is to make the Wood Badge Training interface with the Qualifications Framework of the Hong Kong SAR Government. Part of the CNV was a dialogue with Venture and Rover Scouts who were participating in a Youth Forum at that time. When asked about the decreasing Scout membership, some of them said that the emergence of other youth groups, as well as the social media, are giving young people more choices for networking.

Facts & figures

Year Founded: 1911 WOSM Member: 1977 Membership 2011: 96,296 International Events Hosted:

2nd APR Workshop on Scout Supply Service Management Cum Trade Fair, 1996 19th APR Scout Conference, 1998 APR Course for Leader Trainers, 1998 2nd APR Youth Forum, 1998 Hong Kong Scout Millennium Jamboree, 1999 - 2000 APR Unit Leaders Roundtable, 2002 1st APR Seminar Learning Organization, 2004 Course for Assistant Leader Trainers, 2010

At the CNV, key leaders of SAHK comprised of Chief Commissioner Anthony Chan, International Commissioner Alex Wong, Deputy Chief Commissioners and other Commissioners made comprehensive reports and led the discussions. The visiting team from the Regional Scout Committee were First Vice-Chairman Prakorb Mukura, Dr Chao Shou-Po, Regional Director Abdullah Rasheed, and Ms Luz Taray.

The CNV Chronology

39


17 stop th

Bangladesh Scouts

Bangladesh Scouts has much to offer young people and has exercised conscientious effort to review its youth program and educational objectives. As the host of the 24th APR Scout Conference, it aims to boost the image of Scouting and demonstrate its capacity and maturity as a leading youth organization in the country.

Bangladesh sets high level of participation Continuing the series of Committee NSO Visits in the Asia-Pacific Region, leaders of Bangladesh Scouts and the Regional Scout Committee kicked off the three-day meeting in Dhaka on 24th September 2010. Bangladesh Scouts was the 17th NSO and the largest CNV gathering so far. First Vice-Chairman Prakorb Mukura of the Regional Scout Committee led the visiting team and Chief National Commissioner Abul Kalam

40

The CNV Chronology

Azad headed the Bangladesh Scouts. Key position holders gave well documented presentations on the key areas such as mission and vision, updates on youth programme, organizational development, resources development, and special projects. “Bangladesh Scouts has established a strong research team to improve its services to young people, and Bangladesh Scouts affirms its emphasis on community development, their visibility in relief work during disasters,


and focus on health camps nationwide. The government continues to support two huge projects for the expansion of Cub and Scout sections to cover a larger area of the youth population�, said Regional Director Abdullah Rasheed. The meeting was held at the national headquarters starting with a simple opening ceremony with the President of Bangladesh Scouts, Mr Mohammed Momtazul Islam. Constituting the visiting team were 2nd ViceChairman Dr Mukhyddin bin Sarwani, Dr Chao-Shou Po and Shree Ram Lamichanne, Consultant Mohammad Ali Khalid, Regional Director Abdullah Rasheed and Director Prassanna Shrivastava. Bangladeshi counterparts were National Commissioners, Deputy National Commissioners and Scout Executives.

Facts & figures Year Founded: 1972 WOSM Member: 1974 Membership 2011: 1,163,473 International Events Hosted:

APR Fund Raising Seminar, 1975 5th APR Jamboree, 1981 Management Course for Professionals (operation as Module), 1985 & 1986 14th APR Jamboree, 1994 2nd APR COMDECA, 1995 9th APR Rover Moot, 1997 International Workshop on Expansion of Cub Scouting, 2000 Advanced Management Course for Professional Scout Executives, 2001 2nd APR Unit Leader Roundtable, 2004 APR Trainers Gathering, 2006 APR Training System Development Workshop, 2006 6th SAF Scout Friendship Camp, 2008 TTL Evaluation & Planning Workshop, 2010 48th APR BMC, 2010 Sub-Regional Workshop on Risk Management, 2012 APR Course for Leader Trainers, 2011 7th APR Scout Youth Forum, 2012 24th APR Scout Conference, 2012

The CNV Chronology

41


18 stop th

Scouts Australia

Scouts Australia’s vision is to be “the pre-eminent youth organization in Australia”, and it has already extended itself to cover emerging and crucial concerns of today’s society such as health, keeping children way from harm and exploitation, and working towards ensuring an ecologically balanced development in environment. Projects were initiated contributing towards peace and the importance of gainful employment. Work in these areas aim to meet most of the challenges of today’s young people in Australia.

CNV in Australia reveals immense work accomplished Eighteenth of the list of NSO visits was Scouts Australia. Among the remarkable achievements of Scouts Australia were the regular and vigorous review and research undertaken in youth programme in all the five sections, the tremendous work by the current National Adult Resources Committee (NARC) in supporting the adult leaders, the effective marketing strategies that recorded significant changes in membership, elaborate training arrangements offered at the Scouts of Australia Institute of Training (SAIT), to name a few. Scouts Australia is very supportive to other NSOs in the region especially those that lack youth programme materials and experience in implementing the Adults in Scouting policy. With the association’s healthy financial situation based on its own resources coming from Branch Councils (43%), own trust fund (29%) and commercial operations (18%), Scouts Australia works heavily with other

42

The CNV Chronology

partners in multiple projects across the country ranging from e-learning projects to saving water and energy. Its work in putting up 11,000 water tanks in all Scout halls and saving 100 million liters of water a year paved the way for Scouts Australia becoming the 2010 national winner for saving water. Scouts Australia also excels in providing various opportunities to young people to be part of decision making processes through the effective functioning of two youth bodies: the National Youth Council which covers all sections of the youth programme and the National Rover Council which oversees the Rover Section. Representatives from these two bodies participate fully at the National Executive Committee and National Scout Council and provide regular and timely responses to the needs and aspirations of the young people. These were evident when the team met the selected young people from the Scout, Venture and Rover Sections who expressed their commitment and confidence that Scouting provides the wholesome development for young people through adventure, self


reliance and do not regret giving up some other sports and hobbies in place of Scouting. They expressed that Scouting gives them opportunities, which they have never found in any other organization in getting more friends, joining adventure, going abroad, among others. Among the extensive research undertaken during the last decade was the review of the management structure in 2008 that had a great impact in bringing about the necessary changes for improving various aspects in management. The Venture Scout Review of 2008 has paved the way in improving the Venture Section, which has outreached all other sections in gaining a better growth of 5.8% over the last year while the next closest cub section had a growth of only 2%. The current “Rover Review Towards 2020“ is expected to reveal the needed change in the Rover section. Once the review is completed, the plan is to make Rovering as one of the most robust sections in the Scout Movement. Among the research projects are the Brand positioning research, research on young peoples interests, lifestyle, values and attitudes as generation Y have had the Scouting programme more relevant and attractive to young people. Total membership has grown for the fourth successive year in 2009 for a total of 73,523. Last but not least is the current strategic planning process of Scouts Australia, with seven targets set for 2014 and 10 milestones to reach by June 2011. This on-line system is called “StrategyConnect”, giving information updates on the level of implementation, progress and reporting by those responsible at any given time. First Vice Chairman Prakorb Mukura led the team together with Fazlur Rahman and Regional Director Abdullah Rasheed. Scouts Australia was led by National Chief Commissioner Reg Williams together with the core national team of Scouts Australia including Chairman of

Facts & figures Year Founded: 1908 WOSM Member: 1953 Membership 2011: 73,097 International Events Hosted:

1st AP Rover Moot, 1977 4th AP Jamboree, 1979 12th APR Scout Conference, 1980 2nd AP Rover Moot, 1980 4th AP Rover Moot, 1984 16th World Jamboree, 1987 31st World Scout Conference, 1988 6th AP Rover Moot, 1989 7th & 8th World Rover Moot, 1990 & 1991 13th AP Jamboree, 1992 7th AP Rover Moot, 1992 15th A-P Jamboree, 1994 1st A-P Venture, 1994 3rd A-P Venture, 1996 8th AP Rover Moot, 1995 19th APR Scout Jamboree, 1998 3rd APR Top Leader Summit, 2000 22nd APR/19th Australian Jamboree, 2001 12th Asia-Pacific/15th Australian Rover Moot, 2002 Workshop on Scouting and Special Needs, 2006 Youth Programme & Training Commissioner’s Forum, 2011 APR Workshop on Scouting for Young People with Special Needs, 2012

the Executive Committee David Jones, Programme Commissioner John Clarke, Training Commissioner Paul Parkinson, International Commissioner Neville Tomkins and National Executive Richard Miller, and Prassanna Shrivastava of APR office.

The CNV Chronology

43


19 stop th

Scouting New Zealand

Over recent years, Scouts New Zealand made a remarkable headway in bringing desired changes. A number of factors contributed to this change. They applied dynamic and innovative approaches to offer attractive activities to young people. They eased the training style and mode to meet the lifestyle of adult leaders, plus they introduced creative branding and image building initiatives.

Scouting, an invigorating force As the last CNV mission in 2010, the Regional Scout Committee met with key leaders of Scouts New Zealand in Wellington from 1-3 December to understand in-depth the developments of Scouting there, and the progress is foreseeable with a team of experienced volunteers and dedicated professionals making this possible. One apparent change is the 5.3% membership growth starting 2010, a big leap coming from a 9-year decline. Current membership is 19,927 and commitment is high to reach an ambitious target of 25,000 by 2015. Attractiveness of youth programme is a challenge to every unit leader. To ensure this, Scouts New Zealand designed tailor-made

44

The CNV Chronology

support packages available to all leaders online. This pre-packaged material is well articulated, using a carefully selected theme for each term to ensure that those who are less experienced can refer to it anytime. Modular approach to training is divided into four stages, making woodbadge the highest Scout training for the leader. With no emphasis on the current training scheme for assistant leader trainers (ALT) or leader trainers (LT), it has enabled Scouts New Zealand to increase its adult leader training by 300% in three years to meet the increasing demand for new leaders. The tagline Adventure Plus is the key for marketing with an number of publications produced such as the An Introduction to Scouts New Zealand, annual review report, special


news, a comprehensive website of resources and information, strategic priorities booklet, annual report, National Programme Package for leaders -- all adding to the revival of scouting since the introduction of New Scouting in New Zealand five years ago. Scouting continues to be community-based where youth sections are linked to the life of young people in their formal education system. Specialized National Schools run by Scouts New Zealand such as the Walsh Memorial Flying School had its 44th session in early 2011. This is a prestigious avenue to promote scouting to non-Scouts and a good training ground for Scout members.

Facts & figures Year Founded: 1953 WOSM Member: 1953 Membership 2011: 19,927 International Events Hosted: 7th APR Scout Conference, 1970 5th AP Rover Moot, 1986 3rd AP Jamboree, 1978 14th APR Scout Conference, 1984 11th AP Jamboree, 1990 16th AP Jamboree, 1995 2nd AP Venture, 1995

The chocolate fund raising programme held countrywide is perhaps one of many success stories raising over $200,000 in 2010 which aims to increase scout groups joining the event. National Chairman Noel Walker led the New Zealand team, together with International Commissioner George Fairbairn, National Chief Scout Executive Chris Hooper, National Secretary Murrey Charlesworth. The regional team was led by the 1st Vice Chairman Prakorb Mukura, consultant Kirsty Brown, Regional Director Abdullah Rasheed, and Desk Officer Prassanna Shrivastava.

The CNV Chronology

45


20 stop th

Cambodia Scouts

Since joining WOSM in 2009, Cambodia Scouts expand to over 5,700 members, extend services to various community work, and focus on capacity building to put in place a functional youth programme and sufficient training for unit leaders.

Expanding membership and extending services March 2011 was a dynamic month for Cambodia Scouts with three Scouting events happening in a row in Phnom Penh. Foremost was CNV began on 14th March, a significant meeting of leaders to enhance their knowledge and understanding of the current situation of Cambodia Scouts. 1st Vice Chairman Prakorb Mukura led the simple opening ceremony at the Council of Ministers complex by an active interaction on the major needs of this new association.

46

The CNV Chronology

From the reports, Cambodia Scouts are widely involved in community and social services. These cut across many areas ranging from good sanitation to environment awareness, from maintaining public order in large national events to cleanliness around the city. They are active in the outdoors educating the public on proper disposal of garbage, traffic control and tree planting in nine provinces. Thousands volunteered in the renovation of school libraries. Over 850 Scouts have camped together, explored and learned new skills in preparation for the planned first National Scout Jamboree.


At the meeting, options were explored on how to make community based scouting stronger by looking at new horizons – the streets, half-way houses, orphanages, delinquent centers, and prisons – and tapping the help of international agencies who are presently running social projects in these areas. Cambodia Scouts, which became a WOSM member in 2008 has over 10,305 members. They are supported by over 900 adult leaders. The plan to increase membership calls for vigorous training of more unit leaders. For this, an Assistant Leader Training course was set for November 2011 and basic training courses for adult leaders were planned.

Facts & figures Year Founded: 1934 WOSM Member: 2008 Membership 2011: 10,305 International Events Hosted:

APR Programme and Training Commissioners Forum, 2009

Comprising the regional team were 2nd Vice Chairman Dr. Mukyuddin bin Sarwani, Committee member Nicholas Tan and Consultant Mohamed Ali Khalid and the executives of the regional office. At the Cambodian side were highly distinguished Scout leaders including two Vice Presidents, Mr Tuon Siphann and Mr Kong Uok; Chief Commissioner Phan Sokim; Secretary General Mr. Lak Sam Ath and both the Programme and Adult resources Commissioners and their Deputy Commissioners.

The CNV Chronology

47


21 stop st

Nepal Scouts

The last few years was a time for steady progress. It was also a period of novelty for self sufficiency, for launching a new Scout section, and for sustaining relations with various partners.

Exemplifying sound financial base In April 2011, the Regional Scout Committee was back in South Asia for the CNV in Nepal. Using the eight key indicators in the CNV guideline, the meeting was a healthy discussion among the national commissioners and the visiting team. Their sharing of ideas and knowledge clarified various concepts. Nepal Scouts also showed extensive progress in recent years, at the same time, they were open to suggestions of strengthening other departments. One of which is the recommendation to create a National Youth Council and inviting young adult members to

48

The CNV Chronology

the National Executive Board and to the National Council. One initiative is the introduction of a new section called Adventure Section, roughly equivalent to the Venture Scouts section. Their properties and financial investments make the association an excellent example of a NSO in a developing country that has sound financial base and a good spread of income sources. Other developments include the enhancement of PR and communication. The e-newsletter was launched in March 2011. Partnership projects with Finland make the dissemination of the strategic plan and leadership development more


feasible at the district level and this is seen to have a good impact on implanting the Vision 2020 of Nepal Scouts. The National Council adopted the 2011-2013 strategic plan in early April. As an integral part of the CNV, the dialogue with young people from a nearby district identified the need to further build up Scouting across the country as it is felt that most people are not aware of its values. Some young people also said that greater use of IT could be an added attraction for young people to join. Regional Scout Committee 2nd Vice-Chairman Dr Mukhyuddin led the CNV team together with Committee Consultant Mohamad Ali Khalid and APR Programme Sub-Committee Chairman Jose Eduardo C Delgado, supported by the Regional Director Abdullah Rasheed and Director of Adult Resources Thian Hiong-Boon. Chief Commissioner of Nepal Scouts and member of the Regional Scout Committee Shree Ram Lamichhane led his 20-member team of Commissioners, Executive Committee and staff. The CNV mission is also jointly undertaken with the WAGGGS APR Vice-chairperson Ms. Normala

Facts & figures Year Founded: 1952 WOSM Member: 1969 Membership 2011: 23,722 International Events Hosted:

APR Fund Raising Seminar, 1977 APR Multipurpose Workshop, 1995 3rd SAF Scouts Friendship Camp, 2005 APR TTL Workshop, 2008 6th APR Scout Leaders Summit, 2009

Baharudin and WAGGGS Regional Director Mengfui Wu. Prior to the CNV mission, one-week consultancy work from the Regional Office was led by Thian Hiong-Boon to provide direct support to NSOs. This consultancy made it possible for 16 national commissioners and staff to review and formulate tactical plans and develop tools for implementing Youth Programme, organizational structure, Adult in Scouting, and creating clear job description for all positions.

The CNV Chronology

49


22 stop nd

Bhutan Scouts Association

Scouting in Bhutan is fast growing, and has one of the highest densities in membership. Scouting plays a major role in contributing to the country’s sole development philosophy of Gross National Happiness (GNH).

Scouting contributes to country’s developmental philosophy From Kathmandu, the visiting team went to the Century Youth Village in Thimphu for the CNV to Bhutan Scouts Association (BSA) on 28 April. Regional Scout Committee ViceChairman Dr Mukhyuddin led a five-member team from the Asia-Pacific Region. BSA Chief commissioner Chencho Dorji involved his team including Karma Tenzin, Norbu Dhendup, Pema Wangchuk, Kinley Dorji, and Rinchen as well as members of the Programme Committee Ms. Tshering, Jigme and training team member Ms. Choden Dorji Wangmo.

50

The CNV Chronology

The CNV team believes that Scouting in Bhutan plays a major role in contributing to the country’s sole developmental philosophy of Gross National Happiness (GNH). Any further development of Scouting is aimed at enhancing the country’s goal of over all education for its citizens especially the young people. Among many other developments in BSA during its less than two decades history are the creation of a comprehensive life skills manual and training for leaders. The construction of a breathtaking campsite is in progress. The association also boasts of a large number of trained leader trainers, a practical solution to recruiting more unit


leaders to facilitate the expansion of Scouting. The committee also noted the introduction of community-based Scouting which already has recruited a strong team of volunteers. A strong media personality has developed their strategies to function independently and to get 400 active volunteer leaders to help. The CNV team had a courtesy call on the President of the Bhutan Scout Council and Minister of Education, Thakur Singh Powdyel, who reiterated that Scouting values are useful and most needed for the country and the recent First SAARC Scout Camp held in Bhutan was a vivid example of such contribution. He stressed that GNH and Scouting complement each other.

Facts & figures Year Founded: 1973 WOSM Member: 1999 Membership 2011: 20,888 International Events Hosted: 1st SAF Friendship Camp, 2002 APR Sub-Regional Workshop on Risk Management, 2006 APR Communications Forum, 2010 SAARC Camp, 2011

BSA was admitted to WOSM in 1999 and currently has over 19,000 members making it one of the NSOs with the highest scout population density.

The CNV Chronology

51


23 stop rd

Polynesia Scouts Council

Scouting in French Polynesia started in 1986 and was admitted as an associate member of the Asia Pacific Region in 2001. Since then, it has been growing steadily as a unifying force in a very diverse environment.

Government recognizes Scout training as diploma The CNV in May 2011 affirmed that Scouting in Polynesia enjoys the recognition and support of the government, including the training scheme which is accredited by the government as a diploma. Polynesia Scout Council has over 1,800 members and more than 400 adult leaders.

52

The CNV Chronology

Key personalities were present at the simple CNV opening led by Roger Marama, President of Des Eclaireurs et Eclaireuses Unionistes. The President of Polynesia Scout Council Leone Revault welcomed the CNV team comprised of John Ravenhall, former Regional Scout Committee member; Regional Director Abdullah Rasheed; Prassanna Shrivastava of WSB Asia-Pacific Regional Office and senior members of the four Scout Associations of Polynesia Scout Council.


The hosts arranged a special meeting with the City Mayor, a great supporter of Scouting, who unveiled the Polynesia Scout Council marker.

Facts & figures

high standards of French Laws in the country.

Year Founded: 1947 with “Eclaireur et Eclaireuses de France” WOSM Member Membership 2011: 1,728 International Events Hosted:

The training scheme’s accreditation as a

CSPSA Forum and Management Seminar, 2008

National Training Commissioner Dominique Pastor took this opportunity to share the adult training scheme which, he says, meets the

diploma makes it more attractive to young adults to take up training.

The CNV Chronology

53


24 stop th

The Singapore Scout Association

What makes Scouting in Singapore unique is that it thrives well in a highly urbanized and multi-cultural environment. Even more remarkable is that Scouting outlived a century of changes and development in its nation’s history. Today Singapore Scout Association is one of the oldest and active youth organizations in the country, celebrating its 100 years in 2010.

Singapore exemplifies urban Scouting Singapore Scout Association President Noel Hon welcomed the Committee NSO Visit (CNV) that took place at the national HQ in May 2011. He said that the committee visit is a demonstration of the international nature of Scouting where good practices in governance and initiatives of NSOs could be shared. Indeed SSA Commissioners highlighted some of their successful experiences in fundraising, partnership projects and effective adult leadership training. It was reported that approximately 70% of funds come mainly from

54

The CNV Chronology

four sources: Job Week, Donation Draw, Scout Charity Golf, and Scout Charity Premiere. The association has also laid a strong financial rules and procedures. With support systems in place, SSA continues to provide fun-filled, exciting activities and programme where Scouts can explore, discover and learn. SSA is one of the pioneer NSOs to initiate the Scouts of the World Programme. The visiting team comprised of 1st Vice Chairman Prakorb Mukura, 2nd Vice Chairman Dr Mukyuddin bin Sarwani, Regional


Consultant Mohammed Ali Khalid and Regional Director Abdullah Rasheed. APR Director for Youth Programme Syd Castillo supported the visiting team. Prakorb Mukura stressed that the visit is more than a review. “It is also about fellowship�, he said. The visiting team had the opportunity to meet the Chief Scout and President of Singapore His Excellency S.R. Nathan, who is a prime supporter of Scouting in the country. Among the SSA key leaders joining the CNV were Chief Commissioner Tan Cheng Kiong, Executive Director Effendy Rajab, Assistant Chief Commissioner Andrew Ang, and Assistant Chief Commissioner Ho Chee Heng. Other Commissioners namely Dr. Jeffrey Ho, Chay Hong Leng, Malcolm Tan and Chow Hock Lin provided inputs to the discussion.

Facts & figures

Year Founded: 1910 WOSM Member: 1966 Membership 2011: 11,299 International Events Hosted:

9th APR Scout Conference, 1974 1st APR Financial Management Workshop, 1994 18th APR Scout Conference, 1995 1st APR Youth Forum, 1995 APR Course for Leader Trainers, 1995 Adult Resources Management Techniques Workshop, 1999 3rd APR Scout Supply Workshop on Scout Supply Service Management cum Trade Fair, 2000 5th APR Air/Internet Jamboree, 2009 MoP Network Training of Community Leaders, 2012

Some 20 young people, mostly Senior Scouts, gathered for the dialogue with the CNV team. One Scout said that Scouting provides a different kind of experience, especially when it comes to international friendship.

The CNV Chronology

55


25 stop th

Persekutuan Pengakap Malaysia

Malaysian Scouts are keen on reinforcing the national concept of “1 Malaysia” with Scouting’s core principle of being open to all races and creeds, and to live in harmony in a multi cultural, multi religious and multi ethnic society.

Malaysia Scouts’ extensive work on risk management Highlighted at the Committee NSO Visit (CNV) in Malaysia is the extensive work of the Scout association in producing a comprehensive standard operating procedure for risk management to ensure the safety of members in all Scouting activities. This work has been going on for the past three years, prompted by Malaysia’s participation in the APR Risk and Safely Management workshop held in 2003. Prof Dato Dr Mohd Zin leads the risk management working team of eight members.

56

The CNV Chronology

They prepared the basic risk management policy in Bahasa which Malaysia Scouts adopted in April 2011. Many value added courses were organized for trainers at state and national level. The standard operating procedure is expected to be ready by 2012 and could be a valuable resource for other NSOs in the region. Malaysia is the 25th country to undertake the CNV Programme, from 1st to 3rd October 2011. Regional Scout Committee Vice Chairman Prakorb Mukura led the visiting team with Committee members Dr Azrul Azwar, Shim Ho, consultant Kirsty Brown, sub committee chairman Janaprith Fernando, Regional Director


Abdullah Rasheed and Desk Officer for Malaysia Syd Castillo. Chief Scout Dr Dato Shafie Mohd Salleh spearheaded the host team, along with many Assistant National Chief Scout Commissioners and Chief Scout Commissioners of many states. Among key indicators discussed were constitution, youth programme, adult resources, financial resources, communication and partnership. The visiting team also cited the keen enthusiasm of ideas were shared on how to integrate “1 Malaysia� in the youth programme package.

Facts & figures

Year Founded: 1910 WOSM Member: 1957 Membership 2011: 47,473 International Events Hosted:

APR Public Relations Seminar, 1997 18th APR/9th Malaysia Jamboree, 1997 7th APR/5th Malaysia Jamboree, 1982 11th APR CD Seminar, 1980 4th APR Scout Conference, 1964 APR Seminar on Public Relations, 2000 APR Programme Development Workshop on Scout Section, 2003 Learning Organization Seminar, 2004 APR Marketing Workshop, 2006 APR Workshop on ICT in Scouting, 2007 APR CLT, 2009 6th APR Scout Youth Forum, 2009 23rd APR Scout Conference, 2009 APR Workshop on Membership Growth, 2010 6th APR Air/Internet Jamboree, 2010 APR Workshop on Environment Education in Scouting, 2012

The CNV Chronology

57


26 stop th

Kiribati Scout Association

For almost 20 years since joining WOSM in 1993, Kiribati faces challenges in reaching out to young people in the scattered atolls of Kiribati. They remain steadfast in overcoming those challenges to offer Scouting at the most basic level.

Crossing distances to the Final Stop Now the 26th and final stop: the island nation of Kiribati located in the central Pacific Ocean. The series of CNVs to 26 National Scout Organizations in the Asia-Pacific Region that started in 2008 concludes its full round with the Kiribati Scout Association (KSA). The visit took place in Tarawa, the capital. Over 25 Scout Leaders, including some commissioners and unit leaders of various Scout groups are meeting under the leadership of Chief Commissioner Mr. Kantera Baurerei

58

The CNV Chronology

Tebwebwe. The CNV Team was comprised of former Regional Scout Committee member John Ravenhall, Regional Governance task Force Chairman Alex Wong, with Abdullah Rasheed and S. Prassanna Shrivastava from the Regional office. On the first day of the visit, local leaders shared the present status of Kiribati Scout Association on eight major indicators: Constitution, Mission and Vision, Management, Youth Program, Adult Resources, Relationships and Communication, Resources Development, Research and Development.


Now 20 years old since becoming a member of the World Organization of the Scout Movement in 1993, the local leaders and the visiting team identified major challenges that KSA has been facing over the years. They discussed solutions and immediate actions that need to be taken to strengthen the organization’s overall capability to develop Scouting and extend services to young people in the islands.

Facts & figures Year Founded: 1927 WOSM Member: 1993 Membership 2009: 1,186 International Events Hosted Multi Purpose Seminar, 2008

Representatives from the Ministry of Youth and the National Parliament attended the meeting, and expressed to support the KSA in strengthening the Scout Movement.

The CNV Chronology

59


AAPPRR SSCCOOUUTT CCOOM MM MIITTTTEEEE –– NNSSOO VVIISSIITT ((CCNNVV)) UUNNDDEERRTTAAKKEENN APR Scout Committee - NSO Visit (CNV) Undertaken

No.

Dates of Visit

RSC Members

1.

Indonesia

17-19 March 2008

John Ravenhall Prakorb Mukura

2.

Pakistan

15-17 May 2008

Prakorb Mukura Jejomar C. Binay

3.

Taiwan

05-07 June 2008

Tan Cheng Kiong Prakorb Mukura

4.

Brunei Darussalam

19-20 August 2008

Jejomar C. Binay Prakorb Mukura

5.

6.

Thailand

Macau

27-29 Sept. 2008

20-21 October 2008

7.

Philippines

15-17 January 2009

8.

Papua New Guinea

26-27 March 2009

9.

Maldives

10-12 May 2009

10.

Japan

01-03 June 2009

11.

Mongolia

17-19 June 2009

12.

13.

60

Country (NSO) to Visit

Sri Lanka

Korea

17-19 January 2010

11-13 March 2010

14.

India

05-07 May 2010

15.

Fiji

10-12 June 2010

The CNV Chronology

CNV Team

APR Executives

Abdullah Rasheed Abdullah Rasheed S Prassanna Abdullah Rasheed Thian Hiong Boon Abdullah Rasheed Luz Taray

Jejomar C. Binay Mohammed Ali Khalid Oh Sang Gyoon

Abdullah Rasheed Syd Castillo

Jejomar C. Binay Mohammed Ali Khalid Prakorb Mukura

Abdullah Rasheed S. Prassanna

Mohammed Ali Khalid Dr. Mukhyuddin Oh Sang Gyoon Hj Zainal Abidin John George Ravenhall Alex Wong Mohammed Ali Khalid Dr. Mukhyuddin M Fazlur Rahman Prakorb Mukura Kirsty Brown Fazlur Rahman Dr. Yung, Chaur-Shin John Ravenhall Shree Ram Lamichhane Prakorb Mukura Dr. Mukhyuddin Chao, Shou-Po Mohammed Ali Khalid

Abdullah Rasheed Syd Castillo Abdullah Rasheed S. Prassanna Abdullah Rasheed Thian Hiong-Boon

Abdullah Rasheed Luz Taray Abdullah Rasheed Syd Castillo Abdullah Rasheed Thian Hiong-Boon

Prakorb Mukura Dr. Mukhyuddin Nicholas Tang Ning

Abdullah Rasheed Luz Taray

Fazlur Rahman Shree Ram Lamichhane Prakorb Mukura

Abdullah Rasheed Thian Hiong-Boon

John Ravenhall

Abdullah Rasheed S. Prassanna


16.

Hong Kong

23-25 July 2010

17. Bangladesh

18.

19.

20.

21.

22.

23. 24.

25.

26.

Australia

New Zealand

Cambodia

Nepal

24-26 September 2010

27-29 November 2010

01-03 December 2010

14-16 March 2011

23-25 April 2011

Bhutan

28-30 April 2011

Polynesia

05-06 May 2011

Singapore

27-29 May 2011

Malaysia

01-03 October 2011

Kiribati

10-11 July 2012

Dr. Chao, Shou-Po Prakorb Mukura Dr. Chao, Shou-Po Mohammed Ali Khalid Dr. Mukhyuddin Shree Ram Lamichhane Prakorb Mukura

Abdullah Rasheed Luz Taray

Abdullah Rasheed S. Prassanna

Prakorb Mukura Fazlur Rahman Mohammed Ali Khalid

Abdullah Rasheed S. Prassanna

Prakorb Mukura Mohammed Ali Khalid Kirsty Brown

Abdullah Rasheed S. Prassanna

Prakorb Mukura Dr. Mukhyuddin Nicholas Tang Ning Mohammed Ali Khalid

Abdullah Rasheed Syd Castillo

Dr. Mukhyuddin Mohammed Ali Khalid Jose Eduardo Delgado

Abdullah Rasheed Thian Hiong-Boon

Dr. Mukhyuddin Mohammed Ali Khalid Jose Eduardo Delgado

Abdullah Rasheed Thian Hiong-Boon

John Ravenhall Dr. Mukhyuddin Prakorb Mukura Mohammed Ali Khalid Prakorb Mukura Shree Ram Lamichhane Dr. Azrul Azwar Sang-Ho Shim Janaprith Fernando Mohammed Ali Khalid Kirsty Brown Alex Wong John Ravenhall

Abdullah Rasheed S. Prassanna Abdullah Rasheed Syd Castillo

Abdullah Rasheed Syd Castillo

Abdullah Rasheed S. Prassanna

The CNV Chronology

61


! Need-based analysis of NSOs emerging from the CNV Need-based analysis of NSOs emerging from the CNV Recommendations Recommendations Areas of Need

Countries

Review the separation of Constitution and PoR

Bangladesh, Mongolia, PNG, Scouts of China

Review/Revise constitution vis-Ă -vis WOSM Guideline for drafting a national constitution

NZ, Australia, Bangladesh, Japan, Sri Lanka, Korea, Hong kong, Fiji, India, Mongolia, Maldives, Macau, Thailand, Brunei Darussalam, Pakistan, Indonesia, Cambodia, Nepal, Bhutan, Singapore, F Polynesia

Review Organigram/ Organizational Structure

Bangladesh, Fiji, India, Korea, Sri Lanka, Mongolia, Fiji, Maldives, Brunei Darussalam, Scouts of China, Pakistan, Cambodia, Nepal, Bhutan, Singapore, French Polynesia

Review/ emphasize Vision Statement

Cambodia, Malaysia

Review/implement national strategic plan

Bangladesh, Fiji, India, Sri Lanka, Maldives, PNG, Macau, Scouts of China, Indonesia, Nepal, Bhutan, Singapore

Develop or review or update educational objectives for each section

NZ, Bangladesh, India. Korea, Hong Kong, Sri Lanka, Japan, Maldives, Brunei Darussalam, Pakistan, Indonesia, Nepal, Bhutan, Singapore, French Polynesia, Malaysia

Program Review/ Age-range review/ quality program

Bangladesh, Fiji, Sri Lanka, Mongolia, Japan, Maldives, PNG, Philippines, Macau, Thailand, Brunei Darussalam, Pakistan, Indonesia

Emphasis on Rover Section/ Educational Objectives of the Rover Section

Hong Kong, Korea, Sri Lanka, Japan, Philippines, Macau, Thailand, Pakistan, Indonesia, Cambodia,

Adopt World Programme Policy/ Review Youth Program

Cambodia, Nepal

Establish Youth Forum

Mongolia, Japan, Nepal

Involvement of young people in decisionmaking

Fiji, India, Korea, Sri Lanka, Japan, Maldives, Brunei Darussalam, Scouts of China, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, malaysia

Review Scouts Advancement Scheme

Fiji, Mongolia, Maldives, PNG, Indonesia, Nepal, singapore

Adopt the Scouts of the World

India, Korea, Sri Lanka, Japan, Scouts of China, Indonesia, Bhutan

Research on needs of young people

Bangladesh, Fiji, Cambodia, f polynesia

Adopt/Review NARP

Bangladesh, India, Sri Lanka, Mongolia, Maldives, PNG, Philippines, Brunei Darussalam, Pakistan, Nepal

Form Adult Support Committee/ put in place AIS Policy

Fiji, Maldives, PNG, Malaysia

Review National Training System

Fiji, Bangladesh, Korea, Mongolia, Maldives, PNG, Brunei Darussalam, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Nepal

62

The CNV Chronology


Awards System/Recognition of Leaders

Fiji, Sri Lanka, Mongolia, Maldives, PNG, Indonesia, Bhutan

Emphasis on quality of leaders/ Update training scheme

Scouts of China, Indonesia, Nepal

Review job description of positions/Terms of Reference

Fiji, Sri Lanka, Mongolia, Japan, Maldives, Malaysia

Lack of leaders/lack of trained leaders/Recruitment of more leaders

Australia, Korea, Cambodia

Membership Growth/ Membership Target/ Retention of Members

Hong Kong, Korea, Japan, PNG, Scouts of China, Nepal,

Establish Membership Registration System

Fiji, Mongolia, PNG. Thailand, Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia, Cambodia, Bhutan, Malaysia

Increase community-based groups/ outof-school

Korea, Maldives, Thailand, Fiji, Mongolia, Philippines, Nepal

Study Balance in the ratio between leaders and Scouts

Hong Kong, Japan, Brunei Darussalam, French Polynesia

Financial Policy/ Financial Rules and Procedures

Fiji, Mongolia, Maldives, PNG, Brunei Darussalam

National Scout Foundation

Pakistan, Bangladesh, Brunei Darussalam

Maximize/diversify income sources

Bangladesh, Fiji, Korea, Sri Lanka, Japan, Maldives, PNG. Thailand, Brunei Darussalam, Scouts of China, Pakistan, Indonesia, Cambodia, Nepal

Protection of Intellectual Property/ Registration

India, Sri Lanka, Mongolia, Nepal

Strengthen Image/ Image Study, Imagebuilding

Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Thailand, PNG, Maldives, Indonesia, Nepal, Malaysia

Marketing Strategy/ Marketing Communication/

India, Sri Lanka, Mongolia, Japan, Maldives, Philippines, Macau, Pakistan, Cambodia, Malaysia

Use of ICT to communicate with members

Fiji, Sri Lanka, PNG, Pakistan, Maldives

Strengthen Partnerships

Hong Kong, India, Korea, Sri Lanka, Nepal

Sharing expertise with other NSOs

Australia, Hong Kong, India

International Relations/ exchange programs

Macau, Hong Kong

Evaluation of every event

India, Sri Lanka, Mongolia, Maldives, Thailand, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia

! !

The CNV Chronology

63


CNV Part II: Evaluation Tool Qualities of an Effective National Scout Organization 1. CONSTITUTION The Constitution governs the rules of the NSO. Constitution must be considered in light of other complementing policies. It is important that the Constitution and, if applicable, any other policies are reviewed on a regular basis and any intended changes to the Constitution are notified to the Region. Consider the review of NSO Constitution in light of the elements listed below. Name and Emblem The name of the NSO must bear the word “Scout” and the emblem with the World Scout logo. Does the NSO’s name bear the word “Scout” in English or local language? Yes c No c Does the NSO’s emblem integrate the World Scout logo? Yes c No c Constitution & By-Laws Provides rules of the organization, i.e. policy, organizational elements and general rules including the Vision, Mission, Objectives of the Movement, Purpose, Principles and Methods, Membership, Organs, Structure, Appointments, Functions, Meetings, General Provisions, Amendment Provisions etc. Does the Constitution & By-Laws provide the rules of the NSO? Yes c No c What other policy documents are in place related to rules of the NSO? ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ When was the NSO Constitution & By-Laws last reviewed? Has the revised Constitution submitted to the World Scout Committee/World Scout Bureau? Yes c No c Legal Protection and Recognition Legally recognized by country of existence and legally protected under an appropriate charter at the world level. Are Scouting names, logos etc protected under copyright or trade laws of the country? Yes c No c If yes, how are they protected ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ Organizational Issues a. Payment of WOSM registration fee; b. Submission of annual reports to WOSM; c. Attendance in world/regional events; d. Implementation of policies adopted by World Scout Conferences, i.e. World Programme Policy, World Adult Resources Policy, Policy on Membership Fee, Policy on Youth Involvement in Decision Making etc.; e. Exercise of voting rights at World/Regional Scout Conferences; f. Adoption of effective membership registration system; g. Close liaison with WOSM, its regional office and other NSOs; h. Active involvement in national development activities.

64

The CNV Chronology


Does the NSO comply with all the above WOSM policies? Yes c No c If No, what are the areas lacking or need improvement: _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________

2. MISSION and VISION The Mission and Vision of the NSO defines the aims and objectives of the NSO to its members and to the broader community. The Mission Statement of the NSO must be the Mission Statement of the World Scout Movement, there is only one mission statement for world Scouting. The vision must reflect the overall paradigm of the development of youth in our local communities. Mission Statement NSO mission is identical with the WOSM mission statement (Mission of the Scout Movement). Is the NSO using the WOSM Mission Statement? Yes c No c Vision of NSO Vision reflects the over-all paradigm of the most preferred or desired goal to be achieved for the allaround development of the youth; Vision should be directed to fulfill the over-all aspiration of society. Does the national vision for Scouting reflect Yes c No c If No, attach the vision statement Aim and Objectives Develop strategic plan in achieving the mission of the Movement; Set long term goals and objectives. Has the NSO developed a strategic plan towards achieving the Mission and Vision? Yes c No c If yes, when was it adopted? ____________________________ Does the NSO regularly review the plan to ensure that the NSO is continually achieving its Mission and Vision? Yes c No c If Yes, when was it last reviewed? ____________________________ If No, when is it schedule to be reviewed? ____________________________

3. MANAGEMENT It is imperative that NSOs have a clear distinction between the rights, responsibilities and duties of NSO management and local groups and it is very important that unity exists between these two groups. The practice of democracy is important in the management of the NSOs All organizational units in the NSO should be lean, flexible and responsive to organizational structures and cultures in order to meet the challenges of rapidly changing socio-economic environments. The NSO must ensure information on organization effectiveness is shared through the movement and indicators are used to measure the effectiveness. Organizational Structure All organisation units in the NSO have lean, flexible and responsible structures; Communication network; Decision making; Finance, National Headquarters, Campsite, Hostels Does the NSO regularly review and evaluate the effectiveness of its organization structure? Yes c No c If Yes, when was it last reviewed? ___________________________________________ If No, when is it schedule to be reviewed? _____________________________________ The CNV Chronology

65


Management Style & Decision Making Democratic decision making processes must exist, with representatives of young people. Do democratic structures, such as the National Council, Executive Committee, etc exist in the decision making process? Yes c No c If Yes, does the structure include young people to be involved in the decision making process? Yes c No c If No, when is it likely to be reviewed? ________________________________________ Does your National Council meets annually? Yes c No c When did it meet last? ___________________________________________________ How often does your National Executive Committee meet? c Monthly c Quarterly c Bi- annually c Annually When did it meet last? ___________________________________________________ Does your members of the Executive Committee/ Commissioners/ Committee/ Task Force have “Terms of Reference� or Job Description? - Executive Committee c Yes c No - Commissioners c Yes c No - Committees c Yes c No - Task Forces c Yes c No If No, when is it likely to be in place Area: _____________________ Year: ______________ Area: _____________________ Year: ______________ Systems Sound Management System, Income Generating Program, Fee Collection; Membership Registration System. Does the NSO have an effective organizational and administrative structure? c Yes c No Does the NSO have a committee/ person responsible for Organizational Development? c Yes c No Does the NSO have a membership registration system? c Yes c No Does the communication system allow a response mechanism at all levels? c Yes c No

4. YOUTH PROGRAMME World Scouting represents the largest voluntary worldwide youth movement known for the educational methods used to develop young people. Therefore it is imperative that NSOs provide relevant, interesting and challenging youth programs. Research Periodic research and analysis on human behavior and the needs of young people in their community. Does the NSO regularly conduct analysis on the needs of young people? c Yes c No If Yes, when was the last analysis conducted? Policies Ensure a competent youth program committee is tasked to formulate attractive program. Is the World Programme Policy adopted? c Yes c No

66

The CNV Chronology


Does the NSO have a National Programme Committee? c Yes c No Does the NSO have a National Programme Commissioner? c Yes c No Review NSOs regularly review the youth program to ensure that they are responsive to the needs and interests of young people. Does the NSO review the youth program for all sections of the movement? c Yes c No If Yes, list the dates of review for each section: Year: ___________ Section: ___________ Year: ___________ Section: ___________ Year: ___________ Section: ___________ Year: ___________ Section: ___________ Year: ___________ Section: ___________ Has the NSO reviewed its advancement scheme? c Yes c No If No, when is it going to be reviewed? __________________________________ In the advancement scheme, how many Scouts earned the highest award in the previous year? Rover Section: ____________________________ Scout Section: ____________________________ Consultation All reviews should include regular consultation with young people. If reviews are conducted do they include regular consultation with young people? c Yes c No Activities Activities are interesting and challenging whilst meeting with the objectives of the movement; regularly events are conducted for young people e.g. Jamborees. Does the NSO run events for young people regularly at national level? c Yes c No If Yes, please provide details: Activity ______________ ______________ ______________ ______________

Duration ______________ ______________ ______________ ______________

Year ______________ ______________ ______________ ______________

How do you determine that in these events, activities are interesting and challenging? ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ The Scout uniform Review of Scout uniform to ensure acceptability and expectation with the community, particularly the youth. Has the NSO conducted a survey on the Scout uniform? c Yes c No If Yes, when? _____________ If yes what actions were taken?

If No, when is it likely? _____________

The CNV Chronology

67


5. ADULT RESOURCES Adults leaders at all levels from the local group to the top Leaders influence the running of the Scout Movement. It is imperative that there are policies that effect the management of adults in scouting and that these incorporate support mechanisms at all levels. The NSO must have a National Adult Resource Policy (NARP) that goes beyond the provision of competency-based training and include the continual professional growth of adult volunteers. The NSO must adopt and implement the World Adult Resources Policy and the Adults in Scouting framework. National Adult Resources Policy (NARP) The NARP should be implemented in order to effectively manage Adults in Scouting. Has the NSO adopted World Adult Resources Policy and the Adults in Scouting (AIS) framework? Yes c No c Is the NARP developed and implemented? Yes c No c If Yes, are the procedures and tools available to effectively implement the policy? Yes c No c If No, what is the plan of the NSO in developing and implementing NARP? ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Review of Adult Resources Regular review of NARP and Adults in Scouting is required. Has the NSO developed indicators to measure the effectiveness of the NARP? Yes c No c Does the NSO have a National Training System/ Scheme? Yes c No c If Yes, when was the training system/ scheme last reviewed? Does the NSO have a National Adult Resources Committee? Yes c No c Does the NSO have a National Adult Resources Commissioner? Yes c No c If No, who is entrusted to undertake the Adult Resources aspects at all levels? Does the NSO have a National Training Committee? Yes c No c Does the NSO have a National Training Commissioner? Yes c No c Caring about Volunteers Volunteers are essential for the growth of Scouting and efforts must be made to take care of them What measures are in place to take care of the volunteers in terms of support, encouragement and training?

6. RELATIONSHIPS and COMMUNICATIONS NSOs need to review the systems and communications tools they use to run and promote the organisation both internally and externally. A clear communication strategy should be developed outlining the needs and requirements of all audiences. Traditional methods of communications and relationships have changed in light of globalization. It is important that NSOs considered their relationships and communications methods in light of the changing environment in which they are placed.

68

The CNV Chronology


Communication Strategy To develop a comprehensive, consistent and dynamic communication strategy to enhance the public profile of scouting to both internal and external audiences; image and visibility of the movement; recognize and use marketing strategies as a key driver for the financial and membership growth of scouting. Has the NSO developed a comprehensive communication strategy? Yes c No c What are the communication tools currently used by the NSO? ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Does the NSO have a Marketing Strategy? Yes c No c If Yes, does the strategy work towards reaching new markets while responding to the current market? Yes c No c Does the NSO have a Committee or a Task Force? Yes c No c If No, what measures are intended for the future? Networking Partnerships are developed and are a key priority in the Strategic Plan of the NSO. Is the development of key partnerships included in the Strategic Plan of the NSO? Yes c No c

7. RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT Resources development is ensuring that the NSO utilities all business skills to allow it to make the most of its resources. NSO’s should be asset rich and have limited liabilities. This area of the NSO needs to be managed by the right people so that others can focus on the Mission of Scouting. Finance Generation Maximize the use of existing resources within the NSO to influence finance generation and ensure that the right people are managing this facet of the NSO. Does the NSO establish partnerships with external partners in order to attain financial stability without the reliance on a single or limited source such as membership fees/ government subsidy? Yes c No c Does the NSO promote effective management and maximize the profitability of existing assets? (Camp and Hostels, Investments etc.) Yes c No c Is there a group of experts/individuals focusing on finance? Yes c No c If Yes, please some highlights: ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Financial Management Financial Management is the most important aspect in the management of any organization as it has direct impact on the resources and image of the organization. Each NSO shall have a Financial rules and regulations and an effective management system that provides flexibility, transparency and check & balance in the management of assets/cash and properties of the organization. Does your NSO have Financial Management Policy? Yes c No c

The CNV Chronology

69


Does your NSO have Financial Rules Procedures and tools for effective implementation of Financial Resources Policy? Yes c No c Does your NSO conduct internal Audit? Yes c No c Does your NSO conduct external Audit? Yes c No c Is the Annual Audit report published and circulated? Yes c No c Effective/efficient supply service Does the NSO have effective and efficient Scout supply services? Yes c No c The Scout supply services are at what levels? only National c Sub-National c

at all levels c

8. RESEARCH and DEVELOPMENT It is important for NSOs to ensure that they are up to date with the changing trends of the communities that they are based in. In order to be effective and efficient the NSO must continually understand the needs of their audiences and able to cater them through review, research and development. This step towards research and development could begin with NSO evaluating/assessing the success of its youth activities, adult leader training, effectiveness of organizational Structure etc., resulting in the identification of challenges and finding solutions for development. Review and Assess Review all areas of the NSO Does the NSO regularly review and assess its achievements and results in the critical areas? Yes c No c If Yes, when was the last NSO review conducted? Year: ______________ What area: ______________ Research Conduct research to ensure that NSO stays relevant to the changing needs of its target group Does the NSO continually consider research to ensure they are relevant to the needs of society? Yes c No c If yes, when was the last review/ research? Year: ______________ What area: ______________ Development Develop all areas of the NSO if deemed necessary to keep up with the changing trends. Does the NSO regularly develop specific areas to reflect the outcomes of review and research? Yes c No c If yes, when was the last review/ research? Year: ______________ What area: ______________

70

The CNV Chronology


The CNV Chronology

71


World Organization of the Scout Movement Asia-Pacific Region October 2012 www.scout.org/asia-pacific

72

The CNV Chronology


The CNV Chronology

73


The CNV Chronicle