Issuu on Google+

C O M M U N I T Y

MATTERS T H E W I N S T O N - S A L E M F O U N D AT I O N

Community Newsletter | September 2006

Black Philanthropy Initiative and Winston-Salem State University to Host Emmett Carson Lecture INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNIZED CATALYST for progressive social change and philanthropy, Emmett Carson,

munity foundation. Since his arrival in 1994, the Foundation has received national recognition for its grantmaking and com-

will be speaking in Winston-Salem on Thursday, September 14. Sponsored by the Black Philanthropy Initiative of The Winston-Salem Foundation and Winston-Salem State

munication efforts as it increased its assets from $186 million to $600 million. Previously, Carson was the first manager of the Ford Foundation’s worldwide grantmaking program on philanthropy and the nonprofit sector. He also has worked for the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies and the Congressional Research Service.

University, Carson will explore how African-American philanthropy can build a strong community. The lecture will be held at WSSU in Dillard Auditorium in the Anderson Center from 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. A reception will immediately follow in the Anderson Center. Both are free and open to the public, but registration is required. To register go to ww.wsfoundation.org or call the Foundation at 725-2382. Carson is a renowned speaker and has published over 75 works on philanthropy and social justice. Currently, Carson is president and CEO of the Minneapolis Foundation, a com-

THE BLACK PHILANTHROPY INITIATIVE WAS CREATED TO CELEBRATE THE TRADITIONS OF SHARING IN THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN COMMUNITY AND TO EXPAND THE MODELS OF CHARITABLE GIV-

WE INVITE YOU TO LISTEN, LEARN AND CHALLENGE YOUR OWN PERCEPTIONS OF PHILANTHROPY THROUGH THESE INFORMATIVE SESSIONS. PLEASE JOIN US!

ING THROUGH EDUCATION AND ENGAGEMENT. THIS INITIATIVE IS LED BY A GROUP OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN VOLUNTEERS THAT UNDERSTAND THE IMPACT GIVING HAS MADE IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF OUR COMMUNITY.

OUR LOGO IS THE WEST AFRICAN ADINKRA SYMBOL NYAME NTI WHICH MEANS STAFF OF LIFE, TRUST AND FAITH. THE WINSTON SALEM FOUNDATION IS NORTH CAROLINA’S OLDEST FOUNDATION AND

THE BLACK PHILANTHROPY INITIATIVE OF THE WINSTON-SALEM FOUNDATION IS PLEASED TO PRESENT LECTURES FEATURING LEGENDS AND LEADERS IN THE FIELD OF BLACK PHILANTHROPY.

THROUGH THE BLACK PHILANTHROPY INITIATIVE, WE HOPE TO ENSURE THAT BOTH PHILANTHROPY AND ITS BENEFITS ARE AVAILABLE TO ALL.


THE POWER OF UNRESTRICTED GIVING Tameka O’Neal is one such person benefiting from the unrestricted flow of support coming from the Harris Fund. Born and raised in Winston-Salem about 100 years after Carl Harris, Tameka possesses determination reminiscent of Carl — she has already studied at Winston-Salem State University and Davidson College and she plans to enroll soon at Guilford College and Forsyth Tech as she pursues a career in healthcare — but she also faces dramatically different economic and social challenges. Thanks to her participation in the Individual Development Account Program, which is partially funded by the Harris Fund, Tameka is learning a variety of life-changing financial tactics, such as how to manage the CARL HARRIS AND TAMEKA O’NEAL income from her two jobs, save THE STORIES money for a home and utilize tax OF CARL AND ANNIE strategies. Making the most of the advice and support of this HARRIS AND TAMEKA O’NEAL — Carl Harris knew unique program, Tameka hopes to buy a home in 2006. what it was like to work hard and experience success. Born in As a single mother of two boys, Tameka hopes her 1881, he seized the many opportunities of a young nation that TO GIVE BROADLY is powerful and grand. In the diverse work of community building and bettering, people who give openly perform an extraordinary kind of generosity. When a supporter of the Foundation invites us to guide the movement of a donation, we call this unrestricted giving. The power of such generosity is truly unparalleled. An unrestricted gift to the foundation is a gesture of good faith — one we depend on to fulfill our mission of serving the residents of Forsyth and surrounding counties. Every unrestricted gift goes directly to funds that make competitive grants to the community, not to operating support for the Foundation.

rewarded imagination and perseverance. Determined to make a

quest for knowledge and self-sufficiency will inspire her sons

mark in his hometown of Winston-Salem, Carl had a habit of

to become as educated, focused and independent as she is. Like Carl Harris — a man she never knew but whose un-

achievement — from his work in a law firm that would grow to become the city’s largest to his ascent through the ranks of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, where he rose from salesman to vice-president to board member. Carl’s dear wife Annie, also a Winston-Salem native, worked actively as a member of the couple’s church while Carl became a charter member of the Winston-Salem Rotary Club. Grateful for their good fortune and believers in community service, the Harrris’ established a fund at the Winston-Salem Foundation that would help people in their beloved city even after they were gone. Trusting the foundation to steer responsibly their substantial contribution — at almost $2 million, it is the largest sum ever given to the Foundation for an unrestricted fund — Carl and Annie created a powerful and adaptable resource to improve the lives of people in our community.

restricted generosity helped her long after he was gone — Tameka understands that success comes to those who keep going forward with conviction.

CHECK OUT THE NEW LOOK OF OUR WEBSITE! IN AUGUST THE FOUNDATION’S WEBSITE RECEIVED AN OVERHAUL. THE NEW DESIGN MAKES IT EASIER FOR DONORS, STUDENTS, AND NONPROFITS TO FIND THE INFORMATION THEY NEED. IN THE COMING MONTHS, WE WILL BE ADDING ADDITIONAL FEATURES MAKING IT EVEN EASIER TO MAKE DONOR RECOMMENDATIONS, APPLY FOR STUDENT AID AND GRANTS, AND LEARN ABOUT WHAT IS HAPPENING AT THE FOUNDATION. BE SURE TO VISIT US AT WWW.WSFOUNDATION.ORG.


The Women’s Fund of Winston-Salem Launches THE FACE OF PHILANTHROPY has begun to change in our country. There are new, fast-growing trends that are allowing more people to become involved with charitable giving and create impact in the places they care about most. One of the newest trends is women’s funds; a chance for women to join together in an engaging and meaningful way and give back to their community. By combining their financial resources and working with others committed to the same cause, women are able to make high-impact grants to improve the lives of women and girls in their community. There have been hundreds of women’s funds established across the country and even internationally. Two of the closest are in Asheville at The Community Foundation of Western Carolina and in Charlotte at The Foundation for the Carolinas. Combined, these two funds

A group of diverse, local women are creating The Women’s Fund of Winston-Salem. They are committed to providing grants to institutions and initiatives that address

are comprised of over 450 members, and over the past year

for three years. Each individual member and collective group

made grants totaling $476,000.

member will annually receive one vote in determining the organizations/programs to receive funding

the ever changing needs of all women and girls in our community and to building a community of women philanthropists by raising awareness and educating women and girls about the power of philanthropy. All women and girls are invited to participate and thus realize their power to make a difference in our community. Women may participate in the fund through either individual or group membership. For an individual membership, women are asked to contribute $1,200 per year for three consecutive years. For group membership, women may also form a group of up to twelve women/ girls and who collectively contribute a total of $1,200 per year

from The Women’s Fund. Contributions to The Women’s Fund can be made with cash, stock, credit card or donoradvised funds. For more information about how to become involved with The Women’s Fund, go to www.wsfoundation.org and click on Leadership Initiatives or contact Keri Muuss at The Winston-Salem Foundation, 336-725-2382 or womensfund@wsfoundation.org.

SAVE THE DATE FIRST ANNUAL WOMEN’S FUND OF WINSTON-SALEM CELEBRATION NOVEMBER 15 KEYNOTE SPEAKER: TRACY GARY WILL SPEAK ABOUT THE POWER OF WOMEN’S PHILANTHROPY AND HOW IT IS TRANSFORMING COMMUNITIES.

“... a chance for women to join together in an engaging and meaningful way and give back to their community.” C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S [ 2 – 3 ]


Foundation Creates Executive Vice President Position THE WINSTON-SALEM FOUNDATION announced that it has named Lisa P. Purcell as executive vice president. The newly created position will oversee internal operations

SEVERAL HIGHLIGHTS OF THE FOUNDATION’S SEVEN-YEAR STRATEGIC PLAN INCLUDE: • Grow the Foundation’s assets to $400 million • Grant $30 million annually, including $6 million

of the Foundation. Purcell joins the Foundation with a long

in competitive grants and $1 million in student aid

history of successful leadership and the development of highly

• Administer 1,500 funds

effective teams.

• Expand the Foundation’s leadership role in the

Purcell is the former vice president of consumer marketing of Sara Lee Underwear and Sleepwear. She has been a member of the Winston-Salem community since 1993 when she joined the Sara Lee Corporation and has held numerous senior management positions. Previously, she held various managing roles with Pepsico. She received her M.B.A. from the University of North Texas and a B.A. from the University of Georgia. “The creation of the executive vice president position is an important step in our current seven-year strategic plan,” noted Scott Wierman, Foundation president. “The Foundation’s plan steers us in the direction of continued community leadership and asset growth. In order to accomplish these things, we realized that we needed someone managing the internal day-to-day operations so that I can focus on the Foundation’s engagement in the larger community.” While Purcell will focus her expertise on the internal operations of the Foundation, Wierman will focus his attention on the Foundation’s external relationships. His time will be spent moving forward the Foundation’s strategic plan in community

community • Represent the community through diverse leadership, donor composition, and grant recipients • Create a charitable hub for philanthropic activity in all forms “Our strategic plan is an aggressive one, but one that we feel is necessary for the community’s long-term health,” said Wierman. “Having Lisa on staff will help move us forward so that by 2012, we will have achieved our goals.” LISA PURCELL, EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT OF THE WINSTON-SALEM FOUNDATION

leadership, asset development, and board development.

FOUNDATION WELCOMES NEW DEVELOPMENT OFFICER

SIONAL ADVISORS. SHE WAS PREVI-

ACTIVITIES INCLUDE SERVING ON

OUSLY EMPLOYED AT HIGH POINT

THE BOARD OF CRIMESTOPPERS OF

UNIVERSITY AS THE DIRECTOR OF

HIGH POINT AND ASSISTING WITH

ALUMNI & PARENT RELATIONS.

CHILDREN’S MINISTRY AT GREEN STREET BAPTIST CHURCH WHERE

MARISA RAY JOINED THE FOUNDATION STAFF IN AUGUST AS A

RAY EARNED HER BACHELOR OF

SHE ATTENDS WITH HER FAMILY.

DEVELOPMENT OFFICER. SHE WILL

ARTS DEGREE FROM FURMAN

SHE IS MARRIED TO KEVIN M. RAY,

PARTICIPATE IN ALL ASPECTS OF

UNIVERSITY AND A MASTER OF

WHO SERVES AS A DETECTIVE WITH

CARRYING OUT THE FOUNDATION’S

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION WITH CON-

THE HIGH POINT POLICE

ASSET DEVELOPMENT PLAN AND

CENTRATION IN NONPROFIT

DEPARTMENT. THEY HAVE TWO

CULTIVATING RELATIONSHIPS WITH

ORGANIZATIONS FROM HIGH POINT

DAUGHTERS.

PROSPECTIVE DONORS AND PROFES-

UNIVERSITY. HER COMMUNITY

MARISA RAY, THE WINSTONSALEM FOUNDATION DEVELOPMENT OFFICER


COUNCIL ON FOUNDATIONS RECOGNIZES THE FOUNDATION FOR COMPLIANCE WITH NATIONAL ACCOUNTABILITY STANDARDS THE WINSTON-SALEM FOUNDATION has been recognized for having organizational and financial practices that are in accordance with the National Standards for the U.S. Community Foundations. The Council on Foundations (www.cof.org) and leaders of the community foundation field created the National Standards in 2000 to aid community foundations in establishing legal, ethical, and effective operational practices that would show the foundations’ transparency and financial responsibility in light of the increased public scrutiny of foundation practices. “Adopting and adhering to high standards is the best way we can demonstrate our ongoing commitment to maintaining the trust of our donors and the entire community,” said Scott Wierman, president of The Winston-Salem Foundation. “We are committed to reaffirming the honesty and integrity that are a hallmark of our Foundation.” Intended both as a blueprint for internal organizational development and as a tangible set of benchmarks for external assessment of performance, the 43 National Standards address six key areas of community foundation operations: • Mission, Structure, and Governance, including standards defining broad accountability, compensation, independ-

• Communications, including openness to public scrutiny and frequent communication about activities and finances. In order to achieve Confirmation of Compliance with the National Standards, a community foundation must undergo an extensive review of their organizational and financial policies and procedures. The review is performed by trained, experienced community foundation practitioners. U.S. community foundations serve tens of thousands of donors and administer more than $31 billion in charitable funds. Of the nearly 700 community foundations in the United States, 500 have pledged to comply with the National Standards.

WINSTON-SALEM CAMPAIGN COORDINATING COMMITTEE THE WINSTON-SALEM CAMPAIGN COORDINATING COMMITTEE EXISTS TO COORDINATE THE SCHEDULING OF CAPITAL CAMPAIGNS OF $500,000 OR MORE CONDUCTED BY FORSYTH COUNTY ORGANIZATIONS. THE CALENDAR SHOWS THE ORGANIZATION,

ence, fiduciary responsibility, and representation of the

THE MONTH OF CAMPAIGN KICK-OFF, AND THE CAMPAIGN

community.

AMOUNT. THIS CALENDAR CAN ALSO BE ACCESSED ON THE

• Resource Development, including parameters for administration of funds, disclosures to donors and commitment to building long-term resources for varied community issues and causes. • Stewardship and Accountability, covering prudent investment and management of funds, transparent record-keeping, use of funds for their intended purpose, annual audits, and public availability of financial information, including standards related to due diligence and community responsiveness. • Grantmaking and Community Leadership, including standards related to broad and open grantmaking programs, due diligence, and responsiveness to changing community needs. • Donor Relations, encompassing guidelines for informing, educating, and involving donors in responding to community needs.

FOUNDATION’S WEBSITE AT WWW.WSFOUNDATION.ORG UNDER PUBLICATIONS AND RESOURCES/RELEVANT LINKS.

2006 QUALITY EDUCATION ACADEMY

JAN

$1 MILLION

FAMILY SERVICES

APR

$3 MILLION

SCIWORKS

OCT

$3 MILLION

THE SALVATION ARMY

JAN

$3.5 MILLION

SAWTOOTH CENTER FOR VISUAL ART

APR

$2 MILLION

RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE OF W-S

SEPT

$2.5 MILLION

TWIN CITY YOUTH SOCCER ASSOC.

JAN

$2.6 MILLION

HOSPITAL HOSPITALITY HOUSE

APR

$6 MILLION

TRIAD ACADEMY

SEPT

$2 MILLION

2007

2008

C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S [ 4 – 5 ]


2006 ECHO Award Winners AT THE FOUNDATION’S COMMUNITY MEETING IN MAY, THE FOUNDATION AND ECHO COUNCIL PRESENTED THE 2006 ECHO AWARDS. THESE INDIVIDUALS AND GROUPS WERE RECOGNIZED FOR ACTIVELY BUILDING SOCIAL CAPITAL IN OUR COMMUNITY. EACH RECEIVED A $1,000 GRANT FOR THE NONPROFIT OF THEIR CHOICE.

KATY HARRIGER AND JONATHAN MILNER — It is said that teaching is one of the world’s most respectable professions. Every day teachers must face the bureaucracy of administration, the complexity of challenged learners, and the limited amount of teaching time while managing to inject some fun and excitement into their daily routines. Lucky for students, there are those special, one-in-a-million teachers who go beyond their academic call of duty. While science and math are concrete subjects, a concept like social capital reaches into the realm of the intangible and challenges students to think beyond their books. Katy Harriger and Jonathan Milner challenge their

room, for bridging the education gap between white students and students of color. Through their civic leadership, Katy and Jonathan send advocates out into communities to spread the word about social capital, and to build it along the way. Katy and Jonathan were nominated by Libby Booke.

students every day to consider the impact of our trust-based

resources. Patricia Gardea builds social capital by working to

connections on society. Katy and Jonathan don’t work together on a daily basis as a

PATRICIA GARDEA — The rapidly changing demographics of our community have prompted many to contribute to building resources for emerging populations. An even more difficult challenge is to connect those resources with those who seek

strengthen trust in the community. As an advocate for the

plant seeds in young social capitalists who go on to positively

growing Latino community, Patricia connects organizations such as the Hispanic League of the Piedmont Triad to other

impact their communities. Katy and Jonathan’s commitment

non-Hispanic organizations in an effort to bridge cultures, cre-

college instructor and a high school teacher, respectively, but they

to teaching social capital as a way to stimulate young minds illustrates how one’s personal

ate partnerships, and build trust. By day, Patricia works as outreach coordinator at the Children’s

Museum of Winston-Salem. Many values can extend into profesof her co-workers would say that sional responsibilities in a way she frequently goes beyond her that benefits community. appointed duties to ensure that Though they never contheir offerings, programs, and sulted one another about exhibits expose the visitors to a teaching techniques and curvariety of cultures. “The museum riculum, both teach from the (FROM LEFT TO RIGHT) SCOTT WIERMAN, DEBORAH WOOLARD, sponsored a Hmong exhibit and text Bowling Alone, authored LYNDON BRAY, KATY HARRIGER, JONATHAN MILNER, PATRICIA Pat went far above her job responby social capital guru Dr. GARDEA, JIM LAMBIE sibilities as a coordinator to Robert Putnam. increase her awareness of Hmong communities so that she was Katy and Jonathan not only teach the concepts of social able to share their history with visitors,” wrote Patricia’s ECHO capital and the power of expanding your social circle beyond those like you, they also “walk the talk” as models to their students. Jonathan was a recipient of a teaching grant that The Winston-Salem Foundation administers that allowed him to accompany some of his Career Center students to Kenya and explore a culture unlike ours in the United States. Katy’s affiliation with a community education advocacy group in WinstonSalem expanded her passion, beyond her Wake Forest class-

Award nominator. Outside of work, Patricia spends her free time serving as a volunteer who truly cares about equity and achievement within underserved populations. It sometimes can be risky to step outside of your culture, or community, and invite others to a common table, for a common good; but our community is fortunate to have people like


Patricia who take that risk in hopes of building a community that is good for everyone. She was nominated by Charlene Davis. LYNDON BRAY — The giving of time, talent, and treasures is the modern definition of philanthropy. Lyndon Bray’s aboveaverage volunteer service and community investment in all these areas earns him the title of philanthropist. Lyndon’s commitment to building social capital is a demonstration of active philanthropy. He vigorously gives his time, talents,

diverse group and engage in service activities throughout the community. The group of 23 students has volunteered at AIDS Care Service, the Ronald McDonald House, Horizons Residential Care, Brenner’s Children’s Hospital, and other organizations. They engage in at least one community-service project per month, and the youth plan and execute all aspects of each project. It’s uncommon for students who don’t share a school to share such enriching experiences that benefit the community. The trusting and cooperative relationships among the members of the

and money to causes he is pas-

teen council are an example of what

sionate about, committing to a dimension of social capital our community ranks high in —

we hope for in our future leaders. Their civic leadership in the community makes them excellent role models for their high school peers and other young adults. Host Homes Teen Council was nominated by Mable Stevenson.

giving, and increasing another dimension of social capital — HOST HOMES TEEN COUNCIL MEMBERS ARE CONGRATvolunteering. ULATED BY FOUNDATION PRESIDENT SCOTT WIERMAN Lyndon volunteers at the AND FOUNDATION COMMITTEE CHAIR JIM LAMBIE Community Care Center, helping DEBORAH WOOLARD — In our society, differences can those without medical insurance receive quality health care. sometimes be viewed as deficiencies. Those whose differences He is also a board member of Partners for Homeownership, take shape as physical and mental disabilities often endure an organization that helps provide affordable housing. He also works with Winston-Salem Youth Arts Institute to involve dis- discrimination, hatred, and even indifference. It takes a strongwilled advocate to successfully organize the uplifting of a comenfranchised youth in expressing themselves. Lyndon goes out munity’s special needs population. of his way to form meaningful relationships with those he Deborah Woolard’s dedication to working on behalf of helps to serve and encourages other volunteers to do so as well. those with disabilities has resulted in several programs and Lyndon subscribes to the notion that if you teach a man resources for the community. One notable resource is a social to fish, rather than giving him a fish, he’ll eat for life. Many club for teenagers with disabilities. Through this club, who know him would not describe his acts of philanthropy as Deborah has provided an opportunity for these teens to build charity; rather, he empowers those who seek resources to help meet their own needs. Not only is Lyndon a philanthropist, in modern terms, he embodies the traditional definition of philanthropist as

bonding social capital and to socialize informally. Youth who are often forgotten or ignored enjoy some of the same social interactions provided to their non-disabled peers.

well: one who loves humankind. Lyndon was nominated by Sharee Fowler and Stephanie Abdon.

In 2005, Deborah connected various organizations that support the disabled community to provide resources for a monthly gathering for parents. That gathering has evolved into

HOST HOMES TEEN COUNCIL — It is refreshing when a group of students, with no regard to their differences, can come together for a worthy cause — the community. This is exactly what a group of teens has done through their membership in a teen council. The Host Homes Teen Council is a multi-racial, multiethnic group, with members from every Forsyth County high school. They work to build bridging social capital within their

a program model for supporting parents of disabled children, enabling them to build their own social capital. As the parent of a son with Down syndrome, Deborah wanted there to be fewer obstacles for other parents who attempted to navigate the system. She has been able to seek solutions not just for her and her family, but for the greater good of her community. Deborah was nominated by Bill Donohue. C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S [ 6 – 7 ]


Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Winston-Salem, NC Permit No. 406 860 West Fifth Street Winston-Salem, NC 27101-2506 Telephone 336-725-2382 Toll Free 866-227-1209 Fax 336-727-0581 www.wsfoundation.org

FORSYTH COUNTY STUDENTS RECEIVE WILLIAM H. AND LENA M. PETREE SCHOLARSHIPS ESTABLISHED IN 1996 to honor William H. and Lena M. Petree, the scholarship provides funding in various amounts for tuition and fees for four consecutive years. The scholarship is awarded to graduating, high school seniors who have demonstrated academic progress in high school and have a minimum unweighted GSP of 3.5. Students must also have demonstrated willingness for self-help, leadership, school services, and community service during high school.

2006 RECIPIENTS ELISA NICOLE GREENWOOD

CHRISTINE ELIZABETH TRETHAWAY

REYNOLDS HIGH SCHOOL

REYNOLDS HIGH SCHOOL

INTENDED MAJOR: JOURNALISM

INTENDED MAJOR: PRE-LAW

CHRISTINA GRACE HELMS

JOHN WALLACE WREGE

EAST FORSYTH HIGH SCHOOL

MT. TABOR HIGH SCHOOL

INTENDED MAJOR: BIOSTATISTICS

INTENDED MAJOR: BUSINESS

SAMANTHA LEE QUAVE NORTH FORSYTH HIGH SCHOOL INTENDED MAJOR: THEOLOGY


Community Matters Sept 2006