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WHISTLER’S PREMIER P U B L I C AT I O N S I N C E 1980

SUMMER/ FALL 2016

M AG A Z I N E WONDERFUL WATERWAYS WORLDCLASS ART EXPERIENCE CRAFTY ABOUT BEER FASHION | HOMES DINING | PEOPLE

ground

COVERING

So many different ways to get around and have a blast in Whistler

www.whistlermagazine.com

Compliments of


(604) 932 5999 Located at the base of Whistler Mountain

LONGHORNSALOON.CA


contents COVERING GROUND | COVER FEATURE:

Going the Distance. 20

See more and do more. A rundown of all the different ways to get around and have a blast in Whistler BY DAN FALLOON

Exploring, Whistler Style. 26 Casual fashion for hiking the trails, picnicking by the lake and an evening at a local pub BY LOGAN SWAYZE

Make a Splash! 37

Exploring Whistler’s wonderful waterways with your kids BY BRIGITTE MAH

JUSTA JESKOVA

CONTRIBUTORS

REBECCA ALDOUS has lived in the Sea to Sky corridor for close to a decade. As a kid, she spent summers with her family hiking and camping in the area’s amazing alpine. Her curiosity about the world around her led to journalism.

BRANDON BARRETT is a reporter with Pique Newsmagazine. Originally from Guelph, Ontario, he arrived from Medellin in 2012 where he was reporting South American news to an international audience for Colombia Reports.

BRADEN DUPUIS is a transplanted Saskatchewan flatlander lost in the Whistler mountains. He spends his days working as a reporter for Pique Newsmagazine. His mom thinks he is brilliant.

Ex-pat Winnipegger DAN FALLOON serves as Pique Newsmagazine’s sports editor. Away from the keyboard and camera, you’ll find him pickin’ guitar or at the microphone doing stand-up.

CINDY FILIPENKO writes for newspapers, TV, magazines and corporate clients. It doesn’t matter what she writes, her goal is the same: to tell a compelling story. cindyfilipenko.com


The Great Bear Rainforest Captivating Group Exhibition

Doria Moodie

Opening June 18, 2016

Exhibition Travels to our Jasper & Banff Galleries June 27, 2016

V I S I T U S I N T H E U P P E R V I LLAG E Fairmont Chateau Whistler | Open Daily | 604.935.1862 Embracing the Past, Celebrating the Present and Investing in the Future Mountain

@MntGalleries

Galleries at the Fairmont

W W W . M O U N T A I N G A L L E R I E S . C O M

Jasper Park Lodge | Banff Springs | Chateau Whistler


contents GALLERIES: World-Class Art Experience. 44 BY ALYSSA NOEL

FACES OF WHISTLER: Eco Champions. 50 BY LISA RICHARDSON

WHISTLER HOMES: Beyond the Lines. 52 BY REBECCA ALDOUS

FINE DINING: Farm-to-Table Freshness. 66

DEPARTMENTS Editor’s Greeting. 8 Trail Mix. 12 Bits and bites of information about summer in Whistler

Events Calendar. 18 Recreation Guide. 40

BY BRANDON BARRETT

Shopping Whistler. 58

CASUAL DINING: License to Grill. 79

Services Directory. 88

BY BRADEN DUPUIS

AFTER HOURS: Crafty About Beer. 85 BY CINDY FILIPENKO

SOCIAL PAGE: Scene in Whistler. 90

COVER PHOTO: Hiking on Whistler Mountain. Clothing supplied by Helly Hansen. Photo by Logan Swayze, www.coastphoto.com

DAVID MCCOLM

CONTRIBUTORS

BRIGITTE MAH is a writer living the dream in Squamish, B.C. When she isn't pecking at her keyboard, she can be found climbing rock somewhere high.

Originally from Alberta, ALYSSA NOEL is editor of the Whistler Question newspaper. She has an M.A. in arts and culture reporting, and her work has appeared in SPIN magazine, The Province and OnEarth.

For a kid whose favourite sport was reading, LISA RICHARDSON’s evolution into mountain culture writer and adventurer was unexpected. Words remain her obsession, but the more dirty and selfpropelled life is, the better.

TESSA SWEENEY moved to Whistler in 2000 and contributes to many local publications. She enjoys the beauty of the outdoors and all of the wonders that resort living has to offer.

STEVEN THRENDYLE has been writing about adventure tourism and outdoor recreation since 1985. “Beyond the skiing and mountain biking, Whistler is a community of impassioned residents and I love visiting.”


faLL / winter coLLection SPRING/SUMMER COLLECTION2014 2016

Located in the town PLaza on the ViLLage StroLL, juSt uP from the oLymPic ringS. whiStLer. 604-905-1183. www.Peak-whiStLer.com


BRAD KASSELMAN, WWW.COASTPHOTO.COM

editor’s greeting

READY? AND ACTION!

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CATHRYN ATKINSON, Editor

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2016

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onsider the ways of getting around Whistler and enjoying what the resort has to offer. There are several types of travel by foot. You can stroll past the shops or through our cultural offerings like museums and galleries, jog the trails in the valley, or hike our alpine paths into divine meadows. Hit the water and there you can be buffeted by the wind in sailboats on Alta Lake, swim in the refreshing waters of Lost Lake, glide along the River of Golden Dreams in a canoe, or kayak the rough and ready Cheakamus River. What else? Sit in a gondola and take in the distant panoramas or watch a black bear and her cubs graze below. Alternatively, you can take a helicopter ride over glaciers and lakes into nearby Garibaldi Provincial Park, or zipline through the temperate rainforest canopies of ancient cedars, safely buckled in, laughing in delight and watching a river rush below. And, of course, the summer feast of action in the resort would not be complete without the bicycle. There is mountain biking in the Whistler Mountain Bike Park or along the many trails in and around the community. There is road riding on the highway to the north and south of the resort, too. Organized competitions such as Crankworx in August, and informal weekly meetups thanks to the Whistler Off Road Cycling Association (WORCA) teach how to ride at the resort or improve skills. Getting around this civilized wilderness can be as simple or as challenging as you like. The choice is yours. There is plenty of action for the youthful and exuberant of all ages, and there are slower, more contemplative places to wander, watch and listen. For this summer’s issue, Whistler Magazine is exploring exploration. Tens of thousands of visitors will be here, finding their moments in the sun (and rain), constructing memories with friends and loved ones. They will be covering important terrain, both the topography of Whistler around them and the more private, interior distance they go in their hearts and minds, thanks to this unforgettable place.


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photo credit: The Lost Duck

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SUMMER/FALL 2016 GENERAL MANAGER, ADVERTISING/OPERATIONS

Catherine Power-Chartrand EDITOR

Cathryn Atkinson ART DIRECTOR

Shelley Ackerman

Has a serious case of FOMO, therefore can be seen out and about in Whistler attending anything social, especially during Cornucopia!

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Rebecca Aldous Brandon Barrett Braden Dupuis Dan Falloon Cindy Filipenko Brigitte Mah Alyssa Noel Lisa Richardson Tessa Sweeney Steven Threndyle PHOTOGRAPHERS & ILLUSTRATORS

Likes drinking a glass of Fort Berens wine while camping in her van down by the river.

David Buzzard Coast Mountain Photography Mike Crane Pascale Gadbois Justa Jeskova Kristen McGaughey Gabi Moeller Jon Parris Claire Ryan Logan Swayze Dave Steers Adam Taber

An hour's kayaking across Alta Lake, followed by a glass of wine at the Cure Lounge is a slice of heaven.

Wishes there were a zipline from his workplace in Function Junction to the Crystal Lounge stage.

Loves commuting to work on her mountain bike from Emerald, riding the Valley Trail and single track all the way to Function Junction.

PRESIDENT, WHISTLER PUBLISHING LP

Sarah Strother ACCOUNTING

Heidi Rode

CIRCULATION/DISTRIBUTION

Denise Conway

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Whistler Magazine (ISSN-0835-5460) is published twice annually by WHISTLER PUBLISHING LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, a division of GLACIER MEDIA GROUP

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103-1390 Alpha Lake Road, Whistler, B.C., Canada, V0N 1B1 Phone 604-938-0202 | Fax 604-938-0201 | Toll-Free 1-877-419-8866 Email: cpower@whistlermagazine.com Also publishers of The Question, weekly on Tuesdays, Pique Newsmagazine, weekly on Thursdays, and FAQ, published twice yearly. whistlerquestion.com | piquenewsmagazine.com | faqwhistler.com

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One-year (2 issues) subscription: $20 within Canada, $30 to the USA, $45 overseas. Call to charge to VISA, MasterCard or American Express. Copyright © 2016, by Glacier Media Group.

All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced in any form without prior written permission of the publisher.

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2016

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winter? There’s summer skiing — just like there was in the 1960s, when Nancy Greene-Raine and Toni Sailer operated their summer camp on Whistler Mountain. By the early 1980s, the summer scene switched to the Horstman Glacier on Blackcomb Mountain, and it’s still the scene for hundreds of happy shredders taking part in ski camps, who come up to work on their latest X-Games and Dew Tour routines during the off season. Campers and coaches are given priority before noon each day, while the paying public can start loading on either the Horstman or Glacier t-bars from noon until 3 p.m. daily.

BODY LANGUAGE

M

USCLES SORE from the descent down the Wedgemount Lake trail? Then check out Whistler’s many spas. The Fairmont Chateau Whistler, the Westin Resort, The Hilton Resort, the Four Seasons Resort, the Summit Lodge and Pan Pacific Whistler Village all provide in-house spas. But the buzz amongst spa goers centres around two establishments that are a few kilometres outside Whistler Village. The Spa at Nita Lake Lodge in Creekside is on the shores of one of Whistler’s prettiest lakes and offers its famous Kundalini massage treatments. And it says something about the popularity of the Scandinave Spa that many Whistlerites make sure that their friends and relatives visit it when they’re in town.

GOOD FOOD ON WHEELS

PHOTOS COURTESY FACEBOOK.COM

c WHY WAIT for

ADAM TABER

SUMMER SKIING

could change your life? Certainly, many participants in the annual Wanderlust Festival (from July 28 to August 1) can attest to the transformational power of yoga classes, deep meditation, farmto-table gourmet meals, and of course the majestic beauty of the Coast Mountains. This year’s festival features the usual roundup of inspirational speakers and yogis, as well as the reggae-inflected sounds of Steel Pulse. And, yes, there are Stand Up Paddleboard yoga classes, too. For more information visit www.wanderlust.com/festivals. As well, yoga classes can be found around the resort at a variety of studios throughout the summer, and at Whistler’s many spas.

BRAD KASSELMAN, WWW.COASTPHOTO.COM

c WHAT IF A weekend in Whistler

by Steven Threndyle

MIKECRANEPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

trail mix

YES TO YOGA

H

DUPS BURRITOS

CHEESES CRUST

CARTE DIEM

UNGRY BUT not wanting to leave the beach in search of good grub? Visitors to three Whistler parks this summer will be able to taste convenience and good street food as part of the municipality’s food truck pilot program. Lost Lake, Rainbow and Spruce Grove parks will each have one food truck on site daily. Participants include Caveman Grocer, The Smokin’ Buddha, Carte Diem — Seize the Souvlaki, Dups Burritos, The Schnitzel Shack, Cheeses Crust, and Good Mood Food. The food trucks will be available from July 1 to Sept. 5, noon to 4 p.m.

THE WRITERS’ STUFF BOOKWORMS UNITE, you don’t need to be a hard-core athlete to enjoy what Whistler has to offer. Indeed, writers from all over the world have been smitten by Whistler’s peaks and valleys, and it should come as no surprise that each October, a troupe of local writers hosts the annual Whistler Writers Festival. The festival serves both writers, through practical workshops and events, and readers, through readings and receptions. Last year, presenters included diverse CanLit voices such as award-winning Lawrence Hill and poet Susan Musgrave. www.whistlerwritersfest.com.


Bears, Eagles & More

F

ROM BALD eagles feasting on the carcasses of spawning salmon, to black bears nose down in a field of alpine wildflowers, Whistler is wonderful for wildlife viewing. Often these creatures are found in popular public places — near the side of the road, underneath a chairlift, or soaring majestically above the mountain

peaks. Keep an ear out for whistling marmots in the alpine regions, and prepare to be amused at lunchtime by the aerial antics of whiskey jacks and Steller’s jays. Of course, the best chance to see them (and learn in-depth about their habitat) is to take an organized wildlife tour. In the summer, Whistler Blackcomb employs bear experts and

operates tours to explore a lush meadow and fecund forest environment that is home to over 60 black bears. The resort is a world leader in bear habitat protection. Whistler Discovery Tours utilizes rugged Land Rover 4x4s to transport wildlife viewers to spots that are seldom visited, even by locals. They run a variety of bearwatching tours; sun-

rise and sunset tours are popular with photographers, while the Ancient Rainforest Experience is focused on eagle viewing and the beauty of the forest canopy. Further south in Squamish, many companies offer bald eagle tours during the winter months down the Squamish River, one of North America’s prime eagle-watching areas.

A TEST FOR ATHLETES

CATHERINE POWER-CHARTRAND

T

HE PHENOMENON that is the Ironman triathlon is one of the most grueling events open to the weekend-warrior class. The Subaru Ironman Canada takes place in Whistler on July 24 and is a full-length competition that sees participants swim 2.4 miles on Alta Lake, ride 112 miles up to and around the Whistler Olympic Park and Callaghan Valley area, going north to Pemberton, followed by the return to Whistler and a 26.2-mile full marathon, with the running portion of the race taking place along the spectator-friendly Valley Trail. New for 2016 is the “half” Ironman, known as the 70.3, for those not wanting to compete in the full event. For more information visit www.ironman.com.

c BILLED AS the most ambitious culinary event in Whistler’s history, Skyhigh: A Dinner with Altitude sets a high bar — a gourmet dinner prepared by chefs at the worldfamous Bearfoot Bistro, and served at a table inside each of the Peak 2 Peak Gondola’s 28 cabins. Waiters have just 90 seconds to prepare food and pour wine for each of the 10 patrons inside the cabin, for each course. Skyhigh takes off on Saturday, June 25. Price per gondola is $8,500 and includes the pre-dinner cocktail reception, the six-course dinner, with wine pairing served on the Peak 2 Peak Gondola and the postdinner party at the Bearfoot Bistro for up to 10 guests. This year’s event is sold out.

DAVE STEERS

ILLUSTRATION BY CLAIRE RYAN

PHOTO COURTESY BEARFOOT BISTRO

GOURMET MEALS, MEMORABLE SETTINGS

c WHEN IT comes to outdoor dining options in and around Whistler, the annual Longtable at North Arm Farm in Pemberton is simply one step beyond what anyone might even think is possible. Utilizing only fresh meats and produce from the abundant Pemberton Valley, Araxi Whistler chef James Walt fashions a four-course meal, literally from scratch, for over 300 guests at one sitting. Dinner guests can meet the farmers and suppliers and tour the organic fields where the produce for the menu originates. The price ($159 plus tax and tip, in 2015) also includes wine pairings put together by Araxi wine director Samantha Rahn. Get on the 2016 information list at araxi.com/longtable.


trail mix FORE! THOUGHTS c BACK IN 1982, when Whistler launched its

ILLUSTRATION BY JON PARRIS

ambitious plans to become an international four-season resort, much of the focus was on attracting golfers — due primarily to the fact that golfing in the mountains was still a relative rarity in British Columbia. Stepping out into the fresh alpine air, grabbing the club you need and deciding your angle, is one of the most relaxing ways to experience Whistler and the region. In 1983, the Arnold Palmer-designed Whistler Golf Course opened right in the middle of the brand new Whistler Village, and over the past three decades it has been joined by the famous (and lengthy) Fairmont Chateau Whistler course, designed by course maestro Robert Trent Jones Jr., and Nicklaus North, laid out by Palmer’s arch-rival from the 1960s and early ’70s, Jack Nicklaus. In Pemberton, 20 minutes north, there are The Meadows at Pemberton and the Big Sky Golf and Country Club.

MUSIC: Food for the Soul

BRAD KASSELMAN, WWW.COASTPHOTO.COM

W

histler and Sea-to-Sky residents know that there’s always a hot new DJ, indie group, blues band, hip-hop artist, or folk singer playing somewhere… and chances are you won’t need to buy a camping pass to see them; they might even be busking for free. But if you love fes-

tivals, the lineup for the Pemberton Music Festival represents many styles. Headliners are Pearl Jam, The Killers and J. Cole. Other acts include Snoop Dogg, Bassnectar, Wiz Khalifa, Die Antwoord and Ice Cube. Pemby Fest takes place from July 14 to 17. Listening to music by the world’s best artists, grooving with your friends and enjoying some of B.C.’s finest mountain scenery creates a vibe unlike any other. There are camping options available

or scheduled buses daily from Whistler. As well, the Performance Series, sponsored by the Resort Municipality of Whistler, brings pop and rock, classical and country to the Whistler Olympic Plaza throughout the summer. As Whistler Magazine goes to press, the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra has been confirmed for its annual visit. The remaining performers’ names are pending.

c LOOKING FOR a way to learn more about this beautiful community? Check out the Whistler Museum and Archives. There’s no charge, but you certainly won’t mind making a donation once you see the exhibits inside. Exhibits celebrate early Whistler movers and shakers like Eldon Beck (the urban planner who laid out the innovative pedestrian-only Whistler Village) and Nancy Greene-Raine, (Canada’s Athlete of the Half-Century). Open daily from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., the museum is located behind the Whistler Library on Main Street.

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2016

@whistlersmag

whistlermag

Early Whistler planning drawings, by Eldon Beck.

COURTESY WHISTLER MUSEUM & ARCHIVES

MOUNTAIN STORIES


UNLIMITED GOLF ONE OF MANY EXCLUSIVE FAIRMONT GUEST PRIVILEGES*


trail mix

Mountain Roots NURTURE LOCAL BUSINESSES, NURTURE PLANET EARTH GABI MOELLER PHOTOGRAPHY

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histler’s businesses add character, quality and charm to its vibrant community. Celebrate our diverse and colourful mountain culture — shop locally, shop sustainably. It’s an investment that sees the community blossom. — Emma Taylor

LOCAVORE HEAVEN c NORTH ARM FARM is a family-run, 60-acre working farm located 35 km north of Whistler in the Pemberton Valley. Every Sunday from June to October, rain or shine, locals and visitors flock to buy the Sturdy family’s scrumptious organic fruit and veg at the Whistler Farmers’ Market, located in the Upper Village. North Arm Farm has operated at the market for over 20 years and also supplies some of Whistler’s top restaurants, including Araxi, Bearfoot Bistro, Basalt and Alta Bistro. Nibble on North Arm’s delicious blueberries, strawberries and raspberries while soaking up the sunshine and taking in the market. www.northarmfarm.com

KELP & CLAY

INTRICATE, ONE-OF-A-KIND JEWELRY c TESS KLEIN’s distinctive, coastal mountain-inspired jewelry is not to be missed at the Whistler Farmers’ Market every Sunday from June until October. Klein handcrafts her stunning one-of-akind necklaces, bracelets, earrings and rings from sterling silver, gold and copper. Her intricate, signature crocheting style was handed down from her Swedish mother, Casja, and each piece is meticulously creates a unique, quasi-medieval look. A different technique blends semi-precious stones with silver wire. Klein is also showing at Four Seasons Resort Whistler every Thursday, Friday and Saturday during the busy summer months as part of their artists-in-residence program. www.tessklein.com 16

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2016

PALEO TO-GO c SATISFY THE caveman in you — get delicious paleo meals delivered straight to your doorstep, made entirely from scratch by Whistler-based husband and wife team Kara and Travis McMaster. Established in 2012 and expanding rapidly, Caveman Grocer’s fresh and frozen foods contain no grain, gluten, dairy, soy and no refined sugars. Meats are all free range, grass fed and cage free, with no antibiotics or hormones and sourced locally from Pemberton farms where possible. Simply go online, choose a meal plan or à la carte and await your delivery. www.cavemangrocer.com

c POTTER HUSBAND and weaver wife Vincent and Cheryl Massey are respected Whistler artisans, operating out of their home-based studio and gallery in Alpine Meadows, 4 km north of Whistler Village (by appointment only). Cheryl’s exquisite baskets and wall hangings are woven from kelp, cedar and tule rush while Vincent is a master of pottery, crafting colourful clay bowls, tiles, dishes, teapots and more. Vincent studied at the West Surrey College of Art and Design in Farnham, England, learning traditional English and Japanese firing techniques of salt, wood and raku, and establishing himself as a professional artist after several apprenticeships. Both artisans’ work is also for sale at the Crystal Lodge Gallery and the Audain Art Museum gift shop. www.vincent massey pottery. com W


Whistler’s Premier Shopping Centre

Grocery Store

Whistler Kitchen Works The Royal Taste of India

EXPERIENCE WHISTLER’S PREMIER SHOPPING CENTRE. OFFERING A VARIETY OF SPECIALTY BOUTIQUES, RESTAURANTS AND PROFESSIONAL SERVICES. Owned and Managed by

www.headwaterprojects.ca

JEEP Blackcomb ADVENTURES Mountain & Callaghan Valley

canadianwilderness.com canadianwilderness.com 604.938.1616 CANADIANWILDERNESS.COM canadianwilderness.com

604.938.1616 604.938.1616 Carleton 604.938.1616 Lodge Across from the Whistler gondola

CANADIAN WILDERNESS ADVENTURES

SSTTAAYYWWILIDLD


events calendar

FESTIVALS

SPORTS & RECREATION

May 20-23

May 28

July 8-10

WHISTLER CHILDREN’S FESTIVAL

The Great Lawn in Whistler Olympic Plaza is transformed into a paradise for youngsters, with workshops, singers, circus acts and big tents. www.whistlerchildrens festival.com

37 km mountain bike race covering the single-track, climbs and descents that Pemberton is famous for. www.nimbyfifty.com June 2-5

RED BULL 400

OUTERBIKE WHISTLER

A multi-day expo of the best bike and bike gear in the world. www.outerbike.com/summer-whistler June 4

THE NORTH FACE WHISTLER HALF MARATHON

Starting and finishing at Olympic Plaza with 10 k, 5 k, 1 k and children’s category. www.whistlerhalfmarathon.com

July 28 – Aug. 1

WHISTLER HALF MARATHON

WANDERLUST WHISTLER

MIKECRANEPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

September 24

SEA TO SKY ALL BRITISH RALLY

October 13-16

WHISTLER WRITERS FESTIVAL

For both readers and writers, with practical howto workshops for scribes and readings from local, national and international authors. www.whistler writers fest.com

June 11

HELLY HANSEN COMFORTABLY NUMB TRAIL RUNNING RACE

23+ km single track mountain course through forests with sweeping views. www.comfortablynumb.ca

August 12-21

CRANKWORX WHISTLER FREERIDE MOUNTAIN BIKE FESTIVAL

The premier festival of all things to do with freeride mountain biking, with free concerts and top riders. www.Crankworx.com September 10

RBC GRAN FONDO WHISTLER

An epic 122 km road bike ride from Vancouver to Whistler on the Sea to Sky Highway. www.granfondowhistler.com MUDDERELLA

TOUGH MUDDER WHISTLER

The famous and wild obstacle course race where teamwork is everything. www.toughmudder.com June 25

TENDERFOOT BOOGIE TRAIL RACE

50 mile, 50 km and 28 km options between Squamish and Whistler. www.trailwhisperer.ca/Tenderfoot/ June 25

TOUGH MUDDER HALF WHISTLER

Try the 8 km half version of the full Mudder, new to Whistler this year. www.toughmudder.com WHISTLER LONGBOARD FESTIVAL

ADAM TABER

New this year, the inaugural Subaru IRONMAN® 70.3 Canada as well as the full IRONMAN Canada. www.ironman.com

June 18-19

July 1-3

WANDERLUST FESTIVAL

July 24

SUBARU IRONMAN CANADA AND 70.3 CANADA

A celebration of yoga, music and good living featuring yoga and meditation teachers plus free concerts and more. www.whistler.wanderlust festival.com

Check out the cars as they arrive in Whistler Olympic Plaza after a scenic drive up the Sea to Sky Highway. www.seatosky allbritishrally.com

MIKECRANEPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

Four days of outdoor fun intersecting where winter meets summer. Sporting adventures as well as arts and culture events. www.greatoutdoorsfest.com

The steepest 400-meter race in the world challenges runners to conquer the ski jumps of Whistler Olympic Park. www.redbull.com/400

NIMBY FIFTY XC MOUNTAIN BIKE RACE

JUSTA JESKOVA

GO FEST, WHISTLER’S GREAT OUTDOORS FESTIVAL

July 19

RED BULL 400

A multi-day downhill skateboard event. www.whistlerlongboard.com July 13

BC BIKE RACE

The seventh and final day of the multi-stage bike race across B.C. www.bcbikerace.com

September 24

MUDDERELLA WHISTLER

Mudderella is a world-class 8 to 11 km obstacle course challenge, designed by women for women. www.mudderella.com October 15

WHISTLER 50 RELAY AND ULTRA MARATHON

This eight-person, 50-mile relay race or solo ultramarathon is centred around Whistler Village and the winding Valley Trail system. www.bcathletics.org/Whistler50RelayUltra/


ADAM TABER

VANCOUVER SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

FOOD & DRINK

ARTS & MUSIC

June – Oct.

Various Dates

WHISTLER FARMERS MARKET

Excellent produce and artisan crafts on Sundays in the Upper Village, plus Wednesday afternoon markets in July and August. www.whistlerfarmers market.org July 29-31 BULLEIT BOURBON CANADIAN NATIONAL BBQ CHAMPIONSHIPS

The best in grilling action with the masters from across Canada and the U.S. battling it out. www.whistlerblackcomb.com August 20

WHISTLER PRESENTS OUTDOOR SUMMER CONCERT SERIES

Free music at Whistler Olympic Plaza. www.whistler.com/events July 1-2

VANCOUVER SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA IN WHISTLER

The Vancouver Symphony Orchestra returns to Whistler for two special performances on Canada Day (July 1) and July 2. www.whistler.com/events PEARL JAM HEADLINES THE PEMBERTON MUSIC FESTIVAL

CANADIAN CHEESE ROLLING FESTIVAL

PEARLJAM.COM

Held on Blackcomb mountain during Crankworx, competitors chase an 11-pound wheel of cheese downhill. www.canadiancheese rolling.ca August 21 PEMBERTON SLOW FOOD CYCLE SUNDAY

A slow-food-inspired pedal through the valley of Pemberton’s farmland. www.slowfoodcycle sunday.com September 16-18 WHISTLER VILLAGE BEER FESTIVAL

The best in B.C. and Pacific Northwest craft beers are celebrated with a fun weekend in Whistler Olympic Plaza. www.wvbf.com November 10-20 CORNUCOPIA FOOD AND DRINK FESTIVAL PRESENTED BY BLUESHORE FINANCIAL

Whistler’s 10-day extravaganza of food and wine. www.whistlercornucopia.com

July 14-17

PEMBERTON MUSIC FESTIVAL

The coast’s major music festival held in the Pemberton valley. www.pembertonmusic festival.com September 1–November 31 ARTWALK

The work of regional artists on display at pop-up and established galleries all around the resort. artswhistler.com For up-to-date event listings and information, visit piquenewsmagazine.com or whistler.com

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COVERING GROUND | COVER FEATURE

Going the Distance

LOGAN SWAYZE, WWW.COASTPHOTO.COM

SEE MORE AND DO MORE. A RUNDOWN OF ALL THE DIFFERENT WAYS TO GET AROUND AND HAVE A BLAST IN WHISTLER

STO RY BY DA N FA L LO O N


Y

ou might use planes, trains and automobiles to make your dream vacation happen. And once you arrive you’ll discover that the action is just beginning. In Whistler, it is easy to explore exploration. Our methods of sightseeing are varied and fun, with options that are accessible for all ages and inclinations. You’ll get around our remarkable terrain in remarkable ways. See for yourself how going the distance means covering physical terrain on Whistler’s mountains and valleys, and how the impact of such beauty is taken to heart. Without further ado, here are the best ways to explore the resort on foot, in the water and through the air.

Covering GROUND

HIKING IN THE HEAVENS AND VALLEYS WHISTLER BLACKCOMB IS a world-class destination for mountain biking (and skiing, snowboarding), but hikers can also find a magical side to the mountains. At the height of the summer, hikers can access approximately 50 km of trails via Whistler Blackcomb’s Peak 2 Peak Gondola. “We have suggested routes for signature trails that

basically range from anything from a one-hour hike up to a three- to four-hour advanced hike,” WB public relations coordinator Sarah Morden says, likening options at the easier end of the spectrum to “strolls” in the alpine. Some of the more popular, longer trails, Morden explains, are Overlord and High Note trails. “High Note takes you up to (Whistler) peak and it’s got really iconic views,” she says. “Overlord is on Blackcomb, so it takes you to Lakeside Loop and, again, offers iconic views. It’s a really beautiful walk through the alpine environment.” Hikers should be conscious of mountain conditions before heading out, as there can still be snow higher up even after it has disappeared from the valley. “If you’re going earlier in the season, you may run into some snow, so you’ll want to have some really solid footwear, definitely not flip-flops,” she says. Other packing necessities include water, snacks and a map. Another important hiking opportunity is the Sea to Sky trail, part of the Trans-Canada Trail. Due to link Pemberton, Whistler and Squamish, it is not yet fully connected, but still offers wonderful forested sections to explore. In Whistler itself, the Valley Trail is easily accessible to all and links the community. Many use it to trail run or even get to work. >>

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TWO-WHEEL CELEBRATIONS

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hether you’re a hard-core dirt jumper or an amped-up downhill racer, the ten-day mountain biking celebration known as CRANKWORX, which takes place from Aug. 12 to 21, simply cannot be missed. The showcase event at Crankworx is the Kokanee Slopestyle competition, complete with the dramatic Big Air jump at the finish, where the world’s best riders go big and stick their landings, or taste dirt if they biff. Crankworx is more than just Whistler’s biggest summer spectator sport, though, it’s also an awesome place to try out high-end mountain bikes from the world’s foremost manufacturers. CRANKWORX If road biking is more your style, then sign up for the RBC GRAN FONDO, a day-long ride that starts in downtown Vancouver and ends up in Whistler Village. The big attraction here (aside from the scenery, of course) is the opportunity for a hassle-free ride on the Sea to Sky Highway, which is largely closed to automobiles during the event. Although you’ll see some of Canada’s top racers in attendance, it’s important to recognize that the Fondo is not a sanctioned race, it’s as much a leisurely spin with multiple rest stops and Instagram moments. — Steven Threndyle

JUSTA JESKOVA

ADAM TABER

TABER

22

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2016


And in the Callaghan Valley is the Medicine Trail, a nature walk along an old trapper’s path run by Canadian Wilderness Adventures, where you can learn about traditional living under huge cedars. For the ultimate experience, you might want to take a helicopter to the most extraordinary places in the region. Headline Mountain Holidays offers fully guided trips to remote hot springs and to unforgettable ice caves on the massive Pemberton Icefield, the southernmost in Canada. Meanwhile, Coast Range Heli Adventures offers bird’s eye views of the resort and beyond, showing what lies beyond the hiking trails, including hidden waterfalls and more. More information is available at www.whistlerblackcomb.com, www.canadianwilderness.com, www.whistler.com/activities/ valley-trail/, www.seatoskytrail.ca, www.headlinemountain holidays.com, or www.coastrange.com.

MOUNTAIN BIKING A SUMMER FAVOURITE ONE OF WHISTLER’S main summer draws is its vast array of mountain-biking options. From cross-country trails across the resort to the downhill thrills of the Whistler Mountain Bike Park, riders can find the pull of gravity challenging them, or quiet moments of peace in endless forests. With 144 days of riding this season at the bike park, there are trails, jumps and other challenges to whet riders’ appetites. New to the bike park this year is the Creekside Zone, providing access to the rides and trails from Creekside Base. It’s recommended for advanced and expert riders. There are also adults-only summer gravity Enduro camps (www. summergravitycamps.com) to teach mountain-biking skills. Novice cross-country riders can cruise on the trails near the Village to get their footing and then, when they feel comfortable, try more challenging terrain that requires effort and skill. Whistler Off Road Cycling Association (WORCA) president Craig Mackenzie says those interested in trying out biking can easily rent bikes from a number of local businesses. “They can start out at Lost Lake on the trails there, and then move up,” Mackenzie says. WORCA runs Toonie Races each week for members (and check out Youth Toonies for teens), so called because it costs $2 to take part. Sign up on the group’s website www.worca.com. For information on Whistler Mountain Bike Park and its many options, visit www.whistlerblackcomb.com.

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OUTSTANDING ATV VISITING WHISTLER’S BACKCOUNTRY on wheels is possible thanks to all-terrain quad bikes (ATVs) and select trails and old logging roads designated to support them. ATV drivers can even reach the summits of local mountains and see stunning vistas that are otherwise only available to skiers and snowboarders in the winter, and alpine hikers in the summer. And no experience is necessary; all training is provided. Whistler ATV offers nine different tours and includes Whistler and Blackcomb Mountains (www.whistleratv.com); Canadian Wilderness Adventures offers four tours of varying lengths on Blackcomb and in the Callaghan Valley (www.canadian wilderness.com). >>

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JUSTA JESKOVA

Susan Point’s bronze sculpture, Timeless Circle.

WALK ON THE CULTURAL SIDE

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2016

ADAM TABER

I

t may not always feel like it, but Whistler isn’t exclusively about high-octane fun. One way to get active while embracing the resort’s artistic side is coming soon: the CULTURAL CONNECTOR project is currently underway in Whistler Village and is expected to be finished later in 2016. The connector is a dedicated walkway that will bring together the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre, the Audain Art Museum, Whistler Public Library, Whistler Museum and Archives, Maury Young Arts Centre and Lost Lake PassivHaus. Mayor Nancy Wilhelm-Morden says brochures and digital itineraries will be available this spring and early stages of work include pathway improvements near the library and better sightlines near the Maury Young Arts Centre toward the Audain Art Museum across the street on Blackcomb Way. “Work began on it last year and it will be rolled out over the next several years,” Wilhelm-Morden says. “It’s to show people the way to the six cultural institutions… The brochure will show you the way that you can move between (them) — and some of the things to look for along the way like pieces of public art.” Meanwhile, the Susan Point bronze sculpture Timeless Circle was unveiled on March 1 in front of the Maury Young Arts Centre. The project, a legacy from the 2010 Winter Olympic Games, displays 86 faces representing the people who came here from around the world. Vancouver-based Point is an Order of Canada recipient who works in the Coast Salish First Nation tradition. She said in a previous interview that she’s excited to see people interact with her work: “It will be installed in such a way so that it is touchable. People can have physical contact.” For more information: www.whistlermuseum.org, www.audainartmuseum.com, www.whistlerlibrary.ca, www.artswhistler.com, www.crosscountryconnection. ca/lost-lake/passivhaus/, www.slcc.ca.

Covering WATER SAILING AN ALPINE LAKE WHISTLER MAY BE known for its mountains, but don’t miss out on the great lakes, too. In particular, Alta Lake provides picturesque alpine views on all sides. One way to soak it all in is on a sailboat through the Whistler Sailing Association. Though not officially a tour company, head coach Francois Hebert explains that visitors of all abilities can come down to their headquarters on the lake’s west side. “(Visitors) have a few different options — they could charter a boat or rent a boat for a few hours if they already have some sailing experience,” Hebert says. “We also offer private lessons for anybody wishing to improve their skills. We can get somebody to show them around the lake.” The WSA’s community sailing days, a Sunday drop-in session where people can get 90 minutes of supervised sailing, will return this year. “It’s really a clinic. It’s designed for people who have never sailed and they get a taster. They can try it out and get out on the water,” Hebert says. There will also be first-timer clinics offered during GO Fest weekend during the Victoria Day long weekend in May. Hebert says those looking to take part don’t need to bring much as all the equipment is supplied. Just dress for the weather. And though the vessels may look small, Hebert stressed they’re what Olympians use and will provide sailors with a great test. “These little boats are where you learn all the skills (that are) totally transferable to anything bigger. It’s a bit more challenging to sail a small boat. It requires more balance, more agility,” he said. For more information on the WSA, visit www.whistlersailing.com.


Below ground. Above expectations.

SCOTT BRAMMER, WWW.COASTPHOTO.COM

SCOTT BRAMMER, WWW.COASTPHOTO.COM

TRIPADVISOR

Covering AIR ZIP-LINING FOR EVERYONE ANOTHER WAY TO experience Whistler is to get above it all, and there’s no better way to do that than to rip on a zipline. Explorers can cruise all over our mountains through the services of local tour operators in Ziptrek and Superfly Ziplines. Ziptrek has made headlines for its Sasquatch Line, which clocks in at roughly two km in length, making it the longest in North America. It runs only in the summer with two people going side by side; zippers are over 600 feet in the air and reach speeds of over 100 km per hour! Visitors can do the line on its own or package it with either of the company’s two other tours, the Eagle or the Bear, to make a bigger day. Ziptrek’s director of marketing, Warrick Hubbard said anyone aged six and up is welcome to come for a ride, noting they have welcomed guests up to age 92. When out on the line, zippers can just take a basic sit-up-straight-and-look-ahead approach, or do something a little wilder. “When you’re out on the zipline, you get a 360-degree view,” he said. “(The harness) does allow you to move so people can spin and if they’re so inclined, they can flip upside down if they want.” Superfly, meanwhile, operates in Whistler’s backcountry and boasts two of the longest lines in Canada at a kilometre long and 150 metres above the ground. As well, its lines are side-by-side, so pals can launch at the same time and enjoy the sights together. For more information, visit www.superflyziplines.com and www. ziptrek.com. W

Britannia Mine Museum opens up a little-seen world that fascinates all ages!

• Underground Tour & Train • Mineral Exhibit • Gold Panning • Interactive Exhibits & Film BritanniaMineMuseum.ca “Unbelievable experience!” TRIPADVISOR REVIEW

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2016

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COVERING GROUND | FASHION

EXPLORING, WHISTLER STYLE N THE COOL morning it’s time to put the leash on the dog and hit the trail. Later, a lakeside picnic delivers lunch and feeds the mind with fresh air and good company. And in the evening, why not take your better half out for a game of pool and a meet up with friends? It’s the best of Whistler good times. With the help of Whistler retailers, Nicole and Graham show us how to explore Whistler in style. FASH IO N PH OTO S BY LO GAN SWAY Z E WWW.COASTPHOTO .CO M

It’s a gorgeous day for Tyler to take her people friends out for a walk in the forest. Graham is wearing a Hicks Jacket, Lite Softshell pant and R&D tee, while Nicole sports a Hicks print jacket, Lavvu print tights in knockout pink and a Track tee. All clothing is available at Peak Performance.


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Standing on the dock of Alta Lake, Nicole shines in an En Creme Full Moon top, Publish Sienna pant, Olive & Oique Feather Trim hat, and necklace, all from The Beach. The Herschel Market Tote is from Provisioner, and her Bueno Keely sandals and Skol Design ring are available at Soles of Whistler. Graham wears a fedora from Ruby Tuesday, a Brixton tee and Nixon watch from Provisioner, Matix Gripper pants, Vans Era Decon shoes and Oakley Sunglasses from Showcase.


Nicole wears a Pink Stitch Nira cami from The Beach, and the Golden Dawn necklace, bracelet and earrings from Ruby Tuesday.


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Graham wears a Cheap Monday Air Denim shirt from The Beach, Matix Gripper pants and Oakley sunglasses from Showcase, and a Pyrrha “Challenge Pendant” necklace from Ruby Tuesday.


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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2016


Great Canadian Design

Fairmont Chateau Whistler 4599 Chateau Blvd. 604 938 2019

golf and dining tranquility Nicole takes the cue at the Cinnamon Bear Bar & Grille at the Hilton, in a Desigual Elicia halter dress, Mavi Samantha jacket and Shereen de Rousseau necklace

World-class Golf, designed by Jack himself Clubhouse and Restaurant... Lakeside and Spectacular

Graham sports an RVLT tee, English Laundry shirt, Mavi Zach jeans and a Knotz bracelet. All clothing and jewelry available at OC2. W

everyone welcome! WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2016

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Extraordinary by naturE

Photos: Paul Bride & TaraOGradyPhoto.com

Located between Vancouver and Whistler along the Sea to Sky Highway, the 10 minute gondola ride provides sweeping views of Howe Sound, the coastal mountains and pristine forests. Once at the top, enjoy a thrilling suspension bridge, local cuisine in the Summit Eatery and year-round adventures.

For details and to save on liFt tickets, visit seatoskygondola.com.


COVERING GROUND | FAMILY FUN

MAKE A

splash!

EXPLORING WHISTLER’S WONDERFUL WATERWAYS WITH YOUR KIDS

T

he mountains that flank Whistler may beckon to hikers and bikers, but while their peaks draw the eye upwards, there’s a world of activities waiting in the valley. Families (and everyone else!) can try out swimming, fishing, rafting and stand-up paddleboarding to cool off for the summer, have fun, and play around in paradise. >>

STO RY BY B R I G I T T E M A H P H OTO S BY G A B I M O E L L E R

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[ FISH TALES ]

T

here’s a popular saying among backcountry skiers: you have to earn your turns. For some people, that idea extends to the dinner table, and nothing is more satisfying than catching your own meal. Whistler’s lakes and rivers are filled with five types of salmon and three types of trout, ready for kids or adults to catch and release, or catch and serve for dinner.

Whistler Fly Fishing offers guided tours, a flyfishing school, and trips around the region and beyond. Whistler Fishing Guides have offered fly fishing services since 1988. And Valley Fishing Guides in Brackendale offer professional fly fishing trips in Whistler and Squamish.

Pemberton Fish Finder specializes in guided family fishing trips, and will enthusiastically teach kids how to catch their first fish — something they’ll never forget and will always appreciate. There are many lodges in the region, too. Whichever way you and your family choose to play in Whistler’s waters, you’ll have the adventure of a lifetime. After all, it’s impossible not to make everlasting memories when you’re with the people closest to your heart.

SWIMMING AND BEACHES When temperatures rise, Whistler’s five lakeside beaches become populated with barbecues, dogs and volleyball games. Rainbow Park on the shores of Alta Lake is a regular destination for families, and is often thought of as the beach that has it all. With its sandy shoreline, volleyball nets, built-in barbeques and a floating dock, it’s an easy place for a family to pass a day together. And the kids will love the water playground at Meadow Park, which includes squirters, a slide and water cannons. Running a close second is Lost Lake, which is only a short walk from the Village and boasts

picnic tables, shallow waters and a concession stand — an ideal location when the kids’ stomachs begin to growl. Lakeside and Wayside Parks, on opposite sides of Alta Lake, are smaller and more local hangouts for families, and offer barbeques, picnic tables, and sandy beaches. Both parks have pedal boats and other equipment to rent. Whistler wouldn’t be a resort town without a list of swimming pools attached to four- and fivestar hotels. Most hotels offer kid-friendly indoor and outdoor pools and hot tubs, allowing families to safely get their splash on but be close enough to the room for naps or showers.

With five lakeside beaches, there is plenty of water fun to choose from. 38

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2016


CANOEING AND KAYAKING A little known fact: before there were skiers, there were paddlers. Families can experience the original Whistler sport on the calm waters of Alta Lake, in either a canoe or kayak. For an unforgettable experience, paddle the River of Golden Dreams and meander from Green Lake to Alta Lake through five kilometres of old-growth forest, reed-covered river banks, beaver dams and mountain backdrops while searching for bears, eagles, otters, bats, raccoons, fish and herons.

RAFTING For families who like to live on the more adventurous side, rafting is a fun way to cool off and see Whistler from a different perspective: a rushing river. Kids as young as six can join adults and float along the Cheakamus, a gentle river that bobs and meanders through oldgrowth forests and rocky beaches. Ten-year-olds can ride the bouncy Green River and experience the jostle of rafting in whitewater, while the adrenaline seekers who are over 12 can experience the rush of the Elaho, a thundering river with Class 3 and 4 rapids.

STAND-UP PADDLEBOARDING Whistler’s newest water sport is making waves with families — possibly because it is one of the easiest activities to do. The SUPs are so wide and stable that you can do yoga, read a book, float, nap — or even put a (lifejacketed) child on it! Alta Lake and the iconic River of Golden Dreams are the most popular places to paddle along. Rentals are available. W

The dog days of summer: SUPing is a new way to make waves.

HORSEBACK ADVENTURES In The Callaghan Valley

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galleries

WORLD-CLASS ART EXPERIENCE THE AUDAIN ART MUSEUM DRAWS VISITORS TO ITS STUNNING COLLECTION OF B.C. ART

O

NLY ONE TREE WAS REMOVED during the construction of the Audain Art Museum. Nestled into dense, lush greenery, the museum’s long, angular design was influenced entirely by its surroundings, said architect John Patkau when the Audain opened in March, becoming a new, outstanding addition to Whistler’s cultural life. “Because (it’s built on a floodplain) the building is elevated above the ground, which creates all sorts of interesting relationships to the way you approach the building, crossing the bridge… this very extreme (space) constraint proved to be a wonderful opportunity as well,” Patkau said. Cont'd on page 47

STO RY BY A LYS SA N O E L P H OTO S BY PAS C A L E G A D B O I S 44

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2016


START YOUR OWN COLLECTION

fresh air and work on their art outside of the gallery in the hubbub of the market. “We embrace this opportunity to connect with visitors and the community through a series of artist demonstrations,” said gallery manager Liz Peacock. In the past, artists have ranged from sculptors to jewelry designers and painters. Visit them Sundays, from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m. There is also a major summer exhibition to raise awareness for the Great Bear Rainforest, opening on June 18. Works by Doria Moodie, Maureen Enns, Charlie Easton, Karel Doryuter, Brent Lynch, Shannon Ford, Jim Vest and Randy Hayashi explore the experiences of the artists in this special region of wilderness on British Columbia’s central coast.

W

histler is also home to two dozen commercial art galleries, with a wide selection of styles and mediums on offer this summer. ADELE CAMPBELL FINE ART GALLERY Cameron Bird might be an accomplished Canadian painter, but 25 years ago if you had labelled him a wunderkind you wouldn’t have been exaggerating. Bird was just 17 when he joined the roster at the Adele Campbell Fine Art Gallery when it first opened. On July 23, his work will be featured alongside sculptor Vance Theoret in one of the gallery’s biggest summer exhibits. “Cameron and Vance are great friends and neighbours in their hometown of Lac La Hache, B.C.,” said the gallery’s Louise Rains. “They often work and exhibit together — a great pairing.” While Bird focuses on bright, colourful landscapes of nature, Theoret revels in forest creatures. His soapstone sculptures of bears make up part of the show. Both artists will be on hand at the public opening to offer painting and sculpting demonstrations in the courtyard of The Westin, which houses the gallery.

WHISTLER CONTEMPORARY GALLERY

MOUNTAIN GALLERIES AT THE FAIRMONT Over the last five years, the Mountain Galleries at the Fairmont has helped fine art become part of the scene at Whistler’s farmers’ market. Every Sunday during the summer and into fall, the gallery invites one of their artists to enjoy the

From top: Learning From The Past, by Cameron Bird, at the Adele Campbell Fine Art Gallery; Watching, by Doria Moodie, at Mountain Galleries at the Fairmont; Courchevel, by Ross Tamlin, at Whistler Contemporary Gallery; Photo from the Where are the Children? exhibition at the SLCC.

This summer, Whistler Contemporary Gallery is showing progressive pieces from up-and-coming artists. “We do have landscapes, but we try to keep away from that because it’s covered by other galleries (in Whistler),” said gallery director Jeanine Messeguer. New pieces include an oil and charcoal painting by Montreal artist (by way of Bulgaria), Ognian Zekoff, a painting featuring various cities’ names by New Zealand-born, Australian artist Ross Tamlin and a piece with tiny, colourful people from a bird’s eye view, by Canadian Jane Waterous. The gallery prides itself in seeking out work from respected creative minds of the moment. “Basically, what ties our (gallery) together is really just having work of a certain calibre,” Messeguer said.

“We go to all the major art fairs for emerging or established artists. When we see artwork of a certain calibre we approach the artist for representation. Some of these artists are showing at top galleries around the world.”

SQUAMISH LIL’WAT CULTURAL CENTRE Although not a commercial gallery, the Squamish Lil’wat Culture Centre (SLCC) offers insights into the artistic and cultural lives of the region’s two indigenous communities. This summer the SLCC has been transformed into a photo gallery, filled with hundreds of images depicting the lives of residential school students. Where are the Children? Healing the Legacy of Residential Schools will be on display until Oct. 15. Developed in 2001 by artist Jeff Thomas of the Six Nations Reserve in Ontario, the collection travelled across the country before making its way to the stunning SLCC, tucked into Whistler’s Upper Village. “It’s a story through time, essentially, of the commencement of the Indian Residential Schools in the 1880s to almost present day in the ‘90s,” said Brady Smith, executive director of the centre. “It’s bringing to light what took place over a generation of time in Canada…. There are hundreds of images; it takes up an entire gallery space. “I wasn’t privy to any of this growing up, nor was it in my curriculum at school. We can all learn from what (the country) has done correctly or incorrectly.” W

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2016


Top: James Hart created The Dance Screen to go on display at the Audain Art Museum. Below: Yoshi Karasawa, left and Michael Audain donated their art collection and built the Audain Art Museum for the public to enjoy.

Cont'd from page 44 With its dark exterior and floor-to-ceiling windows lining the connecting halls between gallery rooms, the building also glows like a lantern at night. “Every measure has been taken to make (gallery spaces) as quiet as possible,” Patkau added. “You really have extremely quiet places where the art is really allowed to shine.” The Audain houses centuries of world-class British Columbian art. That art — derived almost entirely from the extensive collection of Michael Audain and Yoshi Karasawa, who built the museum to house it — is organized thematically in seven galleries containing 183 pieces. An additional gallery also features short-term visiting exhibits. For his part, Audain has remained stoic when speaking about the museum — save for one aspect. “I will come back and when I come back, I want to watch children going through and hear what their reaction is to the art,” he said, during a media preview prior to its opening. Audain grew up in Victoria where there was no public art gallery at the time. Because of his interest in making the art museum accessible, it is free to children under 16, with an open invitation to young people from Whistler and beyond. Visitors will be stopped in their tracks by James Hart’s The Dance Screen (2013), a large, ornate carving that takes up an entire wall in >>

WHISTLER’S CANADIAN ART DESTINATION AT THE SHOPS AT THE WESTIN PAINTINGS SCULPTURE JEWELLERY

www.adelecampbell.com WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2016

47


the Chrystal Gallery, and which shares the space with rare historical First Nations masks. “One of the things that was very important within this space was to draw a linkage between the historical work and contemporary First Nations artists,” said curator Darrin Martens. “Jim Hart — who is of Haida ancestry — is an example of the rich heritage of this province.” From there, visitors move on to the Whistler Blackcomb Foundation gallery where the room is lined with 24 Emily Carr paintings — the largest display of her work in Canada. For this gallery, Michael Audain purchased Carr’s masterpiece The Crazy Stair for a record-breaking $3.93 million in 2013. Head into the Barbeau-Owen Gallery for a similar record-breaking feat: 15 paintings by the artist E.J. Hughes are on loan from the gallery’s namesake couple, Jacques Barbeau and Marguerite Owen. It’s the largest display of Hughes’ art in one gallery. In the Teresa and Tom Goutreau Gallery, visitors will find “a space that explores land and people and ideas,” Martens said. That includes work by 20th century artists Jack Shadbolt, Gordon Smith and Bill Reid. A stunning shift in medium follows with another space dedicated to Vancouver’s

photoconceptualists, including Stan Douglas, Jeff Wall and Rodney Graham. The room glows with large-scale, backlit photos. “(They) continue to look at Vancouver as a source of inspiration — and the ways in which to comment on it socially and culturally as well,” Martens said. Next is an extensive display of modern and post-modern First Nations masks, each markedly unique and hung around the room at eye level, displaying both tradition and remarkable carving talent. “The artists are taking traditions and expanding them and, I would say, in new and exciting ways, they are pushing the medium to new heights,” Martens said. Finally, the permanent collection is capped off with three galleries of work by First Nations and non-First Nations artists displayed next to each other. It ranges from traditional masks to Sonny Assu’s installation made up of copper Starbucks cups on a Hudson’s Bay blanket in the middle of the floor. The next touring exhibit is the Masterworks from New Brunswick’s Beaverbrook Gallery. It will include works by Salvador Dali, Lucian Freud, J.M.W. Turner and Henri Mattisse. For more information, visit www.audainartmuseum.com. W

Emily Carr fought to be recognized as an artist until the day she died. No wonder she preferred trees over people. Get to know Emily as well as many other British Columbia artists through a remarkable collection of west coast visual art in Whistler. Emily Carr (1871-1945) Quiet (detail), c. 1942, oil on canvas, 130.0 x 86.0 cm Gift of Michael Audain and Yoshiko Karasawa Audain Art Museum Collection, 2015.006 Photo courtesy of Heffel.com

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audainartmuseum.com 604.962.0413

whistler galleries ADELE CAMPBELL FINE ART GALLERY Open daily from 11 a.m. in the Westin Resort 604-938-0887 ART JUNCTION GALLERY & FRAME STUDIO Open Tuesday to Saturday from 11 a.m. 1068 Millar Creek Road, Function Junction, 604-938-9000 BLACK TUSK GALLERY Open daily from 11 a.m. in the Hilton Resort, 1-877-905-5540 THE CRYSTAL LODGE GALLERY Crystal Lodge, 4154 Village Green, 604-902-5483 FATHOM STONE ART GALLERY & STUDIO In the Hilton Resort, with daily drop-in carving classes, 604-962-7722 JAMES STEWART SCULPTURE #112-4295 Blackcomb Way, 778-846-9959 MARK RICHARDS GALLERY Open daily from noon in the Hilton Resort, 604-932-1911 MOUNTAIN GALLERIES AT THE FAIRMONT Open weekdays at 9 a.m. and weekends at 8 a.m. in the Fairmont Chateau, 604-935-1862 THE PLAZA GALLERIES Open daily from 10 a.m. at 22 – 4314 Main Street, 604-938-6233 THE GALLERY AT MAURY YOUNG ARTS CENTRE Open Monday to Friday from 9 a.m., Sunday from 4 p.m. at 4335 Blackcomb Way, 604-935-8410 SQUAMISH LIL’WAT CULTURAL CENTRE Open daily from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. 4584 Blackcomb Way, 1 866 441 SLCC (7522) SUZANNE JOHNSTON STUDIO GALLERY Open daily from 11 a.m., in the Westin Resort, 604 -935 -3444 VINCENT MASSEY STUDIO 8605 Forest Ridge Drive, 604-932-6455 WHISTLER CONTEMPORARY GALLERY Hilton Resort, 604-938-3001 (main) Four Seasons Resort, 604-935-3999


faces of whistler

eco

CHAMPIONS SUSTAINABILITY AND THE ENVIRONMENT AREN’T JUST BUZZWORDS IN THE RESORT “ W E’ V E R UN OUT OF T IM E for procrastination,” said MP Elizabeth May, leader of Canada’s Green Party. She spoke those words to a packed house in Whistler after returning from COP21, the 21st gathering of the signatories to the 1992 UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, in Paris in December 2015. Nations committed themselves there to keeping average global temperature increases to no more than 1.5 degrees Celsius, and intensified their domestic goals to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. “It’s a very ambitious agenda,” May told the Whistler audience. “If we take them at their word, the leaders of our world, from 195 countries, committed our societies, our economies, all nations, to go off fossil fuels completely, as soon as possible. All Canadians need to do what we can on every level to help.” How can Whistler do its part? Whistler Blackcomb has been steadily moving towards a zero operating footprint in carbon emissions, and generates enough clean energy through the Fitzsimmons Creek microhydro power project to meet its annual energy demand. Schoolkids have been advocating for a ban on plastic bags for years. The Resort Municipality of Whistler has tracked its energy expenditures and greenhouse gas emissions for a decade. AWARE, the Association of Whistler Residents for the Environment is active at the grassroots level. But leaving planet-saving fun to Greens and cute kids is no longer enough. Three Whistlerites embedded in the ecology movement talk about challenges to answering the climate call. >>

CHEE YING HO

STORY BY LISA RICHARDSON PHOTOS BY PASCALE GADBOIS


SYLVIA DOLSON

CHEE YING HO, DIRECTOR, WHISTLER CENTRE FOR SUSTAINABILITY

W

HISTLER WAS one of the first communities to start building frameworks around sustainability — the Whistler Centre for Sustainability now shares those frameworks with clients around North America, based on the assumption that one of the most effective ways to make positive environmental change is through city hall. Ho, a former teacher and lifelong world-changer at heart, moved to Whistler seven years ago to lead the centre, and her team is now working out how to fulfil their mission and talk about sustainability “without necessarily hitting people over the head with the ‘s’ word.” That has meant innovations like hosting a TEDx event, (the first in Canada), and a Social Venture Challenge, to launch businesses with an environmental slant. “Unlike most communities, Whistler is doing an amazing job tracking its performance and is scoring well on most quality of life and economic indicators,” says Ho. “Where Whistler does have targets in the environmental area, we’re making progress but perhaps not as fast as desired. More effort is certainly required if we’re going to meet targets of close to zero GHG emissions by 2060.” Given a magic wand, Ho would transform Whistler into a much more shared mobility community, with “more carsharing, car-pooling and transit, more staycations, less meat-eating, with everyone on 100 per cent renewable energy, all buildings with near passive house efficiency, and plenty of closed-loop business systems, where very few byproducts of production end up in landfill.” A tall order, indeed, but Ho holds on to her optimism. After all, the leveling out of global greenhouse gas emissions in 2014, the rise of the sharing economy and increasing investment in renewable energy are positive trends.

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SYLVIA DOLSON, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, GET BEAR SMART SOCIETY

A

FTER 20 years as the voice for black bears in Whistler, Sylvia Dolson is disheartened. A lamentably bad berry crop in 2015 meant 37 orphaned cubs from the Lower Mainland and Sunshine Coast had to overwinter in an animal shelter, Critter Care in Langley — three came from Whistler. “It’s really not a happy time for cubs,” she says. “In early August (last year) there was no natural food left.” Climate change is impacting berry production, the main food source for black bears. “When their system went into hyperphasia (when bears eat much more food to prepare for winter hibernation), there was just nothing there.” Dolson speculates that mothers travelled further afield to seek food, attempting to cross highways only to be hit by cars, or encountering other fatal conflict, leaving their cubs unprotected. “We’d never seen this. It’s completely unprecedented,” says Dolson. Dolson came to Whistler in 1996 from Ontario. A two-year road trip culminated in Whistler, where the front page headline the day she and her husband arrived read “Garbage bear destroyed.” She followed her curios-

ity to a meeting, and pretty soon was running the Get Bear Smart Society, representing Whistler’s resident population of 50 to 60 black bears. “Bears are really well designed to sustain their own population, if we let them,” Dolson explains. When impregnated in May or June, fertilized eggs remain in a state of delayed implantation in the female bear. Only if she is fat enough when she goes to den, will the eggs implant, yielding two to six cubs, depending on how much food she was able to consume through the fall. Dolson’s passion for the bears has only intensified over the years. She’s taken thousands of photographs of them in the wild and published several books. “For a lot of the photos I took, I walked up the mountain to get them. You see so many animals when you’re quietly walking. Walking is key.” But the advocacy has been consuming. “It’s emotionally draining when your clients get killed all the time.” And the root cause of the problem is that people are becoming increasingly disconnected from the natural environment. “If we’re to have any success changing people’s behaviour, we need to change attitudes and emotions. People have to experience nature. There’s no other way to connect to it — you have to go out into the woods.”


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AYBE IT’S because he is a paramedic by training that Arthur De Jong has always taken the vital signs of Whistler Blackcomb’s (WB) environment seriously. A ski patroller before becoming the manager of mountain operations on Blackcomb in 1990, he was a lonely green voice within the organization for years. A fuel spill on the mountain was his “spear in the chest” moment. “As operators, we had very good due diligence for guest safety, but we had no due diligence when it came to environmental safety. I had to make a choice. We had to change or we’d end up dealing with more of the same,” he recalls. That operational mindshift, combined with following the mountains’ shrinking glaciers — an “in your face” symptom of a warming planet — made De Jong an early advocate for the environment, bringing it to ROI (Return on Investment), protocols, and practical action models, transforming WB’s company culture, making it an industry leader in sustainable resort operations, and winning him recognition as a leader in sustainability and clean capitalism. He’s never been comfortable with greenwashing, though. “If I was in a room full of experts on sustainability and I had to defend the ski tourism business, I’m not sure if I actually could on environmental grounds. But in this century, with this growing population, the only way we’re going to pull off an improving global society is in a partnered collective form. We all have the same house — it’s call the biosphere. “And tourism is a great bridge builder. A social glue. It brings society and cultures together, and we become more accepting of each other. It raises our capacity to problem solve.” W

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SUNDANCE HOUSE HINTS TO ITS BUILDER’S PASSIONS

tT

he house sits on a flat outcrop of a hillside. It’s sleek, bold and has down-to-earth sophistication. A closer look at the Sundance property in the new Southland development lends subtle hints about the house’s owner and builder. Windows facing south and north on either side of the living room are framed with low-maintenance aluminum. There’s a big mudroom, ready to be filled with ski boots, hiking shoes and mountain bike helmets. Then there’s a large space dedicated to recycling. >>

BEYOND THE LINES

whistler homes

STORY BY REBECCA ALDOUS PHOTOS BY KRISTEN MCGAUGHEY


The living room of the 4,510-sq.-ft. Sundance house in the Southlands development features fir wood ceilings, fir and oak floors and large sliding doors that open to the outdoor living area.

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Above: The master bedroom overlooks the waterfall to the left, a touch of Zen and wilderness within reach. The bedroom has its own private exit to the patio. Right: Clean lines and simple white walls lend a masculine air to the master bathroom, which features a deep soaker tub and separate shower with rain head. All faucets are by Kohler. 54

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2016

The house pulls in an 84 rating in the energy guide — 11 points higher than the industry standard. During its construction there was very little waste, with blasted rocks used in the driveway foundation and wood waste burned in a furnace during construction. The easy, alpine elegance respects its surroundings. The home’s environmental footprint is low and its upkeep hassle-free, leaving its residents with time to enjoy what the resort offers. “I have to live my plans,” the home’s owner Tim Regan of Vision Pacific explains. “I am like all the other Whistler residents. I have lots of bikes, lots of skis, lots of gear.” Regan is a self-proclaimed want-to-be-architect and used his company to construct the home. As a student, he chose to attend the University of Western Ontario largely because he found its campus more architecturally stimulating than that of Queen’s University. With little student housing to speak of, Regan renovated a residence to create units. He ended up walking away from university with not only a bachelor’s degree, but $50,000 in his pocket and a valuable lesson. “I learned that my instincts were right. I found that I was good at predicting markets.” Regan moved to Whistler in 1989 to work for Blackcomb Mountain as a manager. In 1992 he struck out on his own, creating the company that has built some of the highest- >>


Left: Light from a height is a key feature in the open kitchen in the Sundance house. The kitchen comes complete with a custom-made stainless-steel hood fan and Wolf six-burner range with glass backsplash. It also features integrated Sub-Zero appliances, including the fridge, freezer, mini-bar fridge and dishwasher. A stainless steel Kohler double sink rests in the central island of the kitchen, within easy reach.

Above: The large outdoor living area faces the south mountains beyond lush lawns, rock outcrops and forest. Patio space becomes an outdoor room adjacent to the fine interior, wonderful to relax on as the sun sets on warm summer evenings.

FRESH TRACKS

Top: With room to swing a Lexus or Ferrari, the spacious driveway leads to a double car garage. The front door entry is close by. Above: An important focal point for the property, the custom-made waterfall can be seen from many angles and rooms in the house. It is a rare kind of water feature and a luxury.

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PROUD ARCHITECT OF THE FEATURED HOME WHISTLER/NORTH VANCOUVER, BC PETER BUCHANAN, ARCHITECT AIBC CONTACT 604 842 3350 PETER@NORTHARCHITECTURESTUDIO.CA

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cabinfeverinteriors.com •604.935.3838 •Vancouver •Whistler •BC

Why own Real Estate?

selling luxury estates in Whistler. His client list includes Vancouver Canucks hockey team’s owner Francesco Aquilini. In 2012 he cut the ribbon of the employee housing option of the project in Rainbow — 48 units dedicated to the mountain’s workers. “I thought Whistler wasn’t going to work unless an employee could live here,” Regan says. In all projects, Regan takes a team approach. Sundance was no different. At the table with him was architect Peter Buchanan of North Architecture Studio, the man behind Vancouver International Airport’s new wing. Working with Regan on the home has been a lot of fun, Buchanan says. Both place environmental values close to the core of their esthetics. The West Coast has its own standout architectural features, easily spotted around Whistler, Buchanan notes. There’s a growing interest in the “modern mountain” feel, which draws upon mid-century modernism. “The Sundance home harkens back to that inside–outside connection,” he says. Like Regan, Buchanan is an avid skier and mountain biker. He grew up on the North Shore mountains and will be suiting up in the epic marathon cross-country mountain bike race, the NIMBY 50. Buchanan is soon to become a Whistler resident, too, as he has sold his North Vancouver property and is building a home in Emerald Estates this summer. “I have cheques in the box for big projects. Now I am interested in smaller, regional works. I am also looking forward to living in a smaller mountain community, rather than the city,” Buchanan said. The two are teaming up for future Whistler projects, including homes in Treetop, White Gold and Lakecrest. W

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shopping whistler

GLAMOUR AND

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PURCHASE TREASURES OF ALL SORTS AT OVER 200 STORES AROUND TOWN

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UR MOUNTAIN town welcomes a new host of travellers and thrill seekers in the spring and summer months, when Whistler becomes a mecca for downhill and cross-country bikers, hikers and sightseers. To kit them out, shop shelves are stocked with the latest and greatest in sports gear and fashions of the season. Whistler offers more than 200 shops to peruse between adventures. Explore the best of the shopping scene while enjoying the outdoors on the Village Stroll, or venture out into the valley for something special. — Tessa Sweeney

Relax and refresh with a beverage. Enjoy Deep Cove Gin with your favourite tonic, shaken with vermouth or straight up on the rocks. Crafted in Deep Cove’s smallbatch distillery in North Vancouver, this gin is a local palate pleaser. Influenced by the flavours of the Mediterranean, they’ve blended rosemary and olives with traditional botanicals to create a savoury, artisanal spirit. Visit the BLACKCOMB LIQUOR STORE next to the Fairmont Chateau Whistler or NESTERS LIQUOR STORE just north of the Village to buy a bottle. Prices vary per location.

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2016

A visit to the WHISTLER GOLF COURSE and Nike’s new concept store is a must for the golf enthusiast. Fly high, fly long with the Nike Vapor Fly Pro Driver. The design features a lighter crown and lower centre of gravity for high and long-ball flight. The new hyperflight face allows for extreme ball speed across the entire face and the tour-preferred pearshape head has been designed for enhanced workability. Nike Vapor Fly Pro Driver $499

This Tiger Woods polo is designed for the modern golf athlete who wants to be ahead of the competition. Features include circular-knit cotton mesh for ultimate stretch, breathability and moisture management, with integrated circular-mesh side panels. Available at the

WHISTLER GOLF COURSE. Tiger Woods VL Max polo, Cotton Blade $115


>>

WHISTLER SHOPPING AREAS Nesters

UPPER VILLAGE

Village North

WHISTLER VILLAGE

cou

ver

WHISTLER CREEKSIDE

FUNCTION JUNCTION

To Va n

Explore Whistler’s picturesque lakes on a locally crafted stand-up paddleboard. Kahuna Paddleboards offer a variety of sizes and styles. An inflatable board from their iSUP series makes a great option for people on the move. Available for purchase at SPORTSTOP SOURCE FOR SPORTS and SHOWCASE SNOWBOARD SURF & SKATE in the Village, the 10’6” iSUP Braddah (AT) is light, strong and thick so you don’t have to sacrifice performance. A paddle, dual-action pump, coil leash, fin and repair kit are all included. All of the items fit nicely into their wheelie bag/backpack combo so you can roll your new purchase through the airport on the way to your next adventure. $1499

Whistler Village is the hub of activity at the base of the mountains. A pedestrian-only paradise, it offers over 200 stores, galleries, restaurants and bars for excellent shopping and nightlife. Village North is located

right beside the main Whistler Village, centred around Whistler Marketplace, which offers a supermarket, liquor store and many fine shops and amenities, with free parking.

>>

Upper Village, situated at the base of Blackcomb Mountain, is another walking-only area with many wonderful stores, restaurants and galleries. Nesters is just two minutes north of Whistler Village and offers a variety of shops and restaurants, with a liquor store, grocery store and restaurants. Whistler Creekside, just a

five-minute drive south of the Village, is a shopping precinct near the base of Whistler Mountain. Free parking.

Function Junction is just 10 minutes south of Whistler Village and offers hardware, organic grocery, a brewery, bakery and many more shops and services.


shopping whistler If you love colour, you will love this “Golden Dawn” necklace and earring set from Ayala Bar Design’s new Hip collection, available at RUBY TUESDAY ACCESSORIES. These pieces are 100 per cent handcrafted using a variety of textiles collected from all over the world. Ruby Tuesday is located just over the bridge on the Village Stroll and is a popular stop for those looking to add some kick to their wardrobe. Necklace $239.95 Earrings $94.95

Visit OC2 in Mountain Square for the perfect summer outfit. This boutique offers unique fashions for men and women, and carries a broad range of clothing, accessories and footwear from Canadian and international designers. Be sure to layer your summer dress with a jacket in preparation for the odd mountain chill. Desigual sleeveless dress $129 Mavi Samantha jacket $138

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2016

The Beauty Boutique in

SHOPPERS DRUG MART carries the finest names in perfume. Treat yourself with an eau de toilette or eau de perfume from Chanel’s “Chance” collection. With four different fragrances, you are sure to find your perfect match. Prices range from $95 to $168

Arc’teryx’s new Atom SL Hoody is the ideal summer-weight insulation piece for active outdoor enthusiasts looking for one piece that does it all. This versatile, compact and lightweight jacket is a unique hybrid, featuring a wind resistant and DWR treated body with breathable fleece underarm and side panels for ventilation. The hoody is available at the ARC’TERYX STORE, ESCAPE ROUTE and CAN-SKI Village and Westin locations. $240 >>


2014 MillarBC Creek Rd. Whistler camplifestyle.ca 1066 Millar Creek Road,1066 Whistler camplifestyle.ca

TAKE A TASTE OF WHISTLER HOME

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shopping whistler accessories ltd.

It’s not what you need...

KEIR FINE JEWELLERY in the heart of the Village will add some sparkle to your day. This iconic Inukshuk pendant is exclusive to Keir. Set with a Canadian diamond and made of certified 14k Canadian gold, this piece will remind you of your Whistler experiences for years to come. The Inukshuk is available in white, yellow or rose gold with three different sizes to choose from. Starting from $595

It’s what you want. Proudly supporting local designers. Whistler Town Plaza 604.905.6290

Your locally owned Whistler Health Food Store

Convenient Village Location Sports Nutrition | Vitamins Electrolytes | Homeopathy Natural Body Care Protein and Energy Bars

#104, 4359 Main St, Whistler info@quantumvitamins.ca

www.quantumvitamins.ca 62

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2016

This is the perfect gift for the foodie in your life! Inspired by Pique Newsmagazine’s “Chef’s Choice” column this book offers a collection of delicious recipes from some of Whistler's favourite chefs. It’s the perfect addition to any kitchen. Available at ARMCHAIR BOOKS, NESTERS MARKET, WHISTLER KITCHEN WORKS and online at www.chefschoicecookbook.com $24.95 >>

>>


Function Junction 2

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Whistler’s Largest Grocery Store

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RD

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shopping whistler

Whistler’s many parks and beaches provide the perfect backdrop for al fresco dining. Get the tools you need to host your picnic or BBQ at WHISTLER HOME HARDWARE in Function Junction. Step upstairs to the Home Expressions showroom where you will find an abundance of housewares including indoor and outdoor dining accessories to suit any style. LR Heritage print cooler tote $25 Indoor/outdoor cushion $45

Head north to Whistler’s Upper Village to find the

UPPER VILLAGE MARKET and fill your picnic cooler with delicacies from SeaChange Seafoods. Crafted on B.C.’s Salt Spring Island, these selections offer authentic West Coast flavours. If you can control the urge to consume them immediately, they are also a popular gift food that can be taken home and shared with friends and family. Wild Smoked Sockeye Salmon $26.99 Smoked Salmon pâté $13.99 W >>

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VINTAGE SKI COLLECTION A charming & whimsical selection of ski-inspired tableware & linens Mugs • Coasters • Dinner Plates Platters • Bowls • Clocks Guest Towels • Soap Dispensers

N WORKS WHISTLER KITCfoHE r gifts, home A favorite store ce 1994 decor & kitchenwarecesin 604-938-1110 rketpla

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fine dining

DAVID BUZZARD

FARM-to-

Fairmont Chateau Whistler executive chef Isabel Chung with Pemberton AAA beef ribeye.


freshness CHEFS AND FARMERS DELIVER TOP-QUALITY, SEASONAL INGREDIENTS FROM THE SEA TO SKY HERE ARE THOSE who haven’t forgotten the simple joys of eating simply. Here in the Sea to Sky, renowned for some of the tastiest produce north of California, a coterie of chefs, restaurateurs and farmers have gone back to their roots by championing fresh, local ingredients for gastronomic, environmental and ethical reasons — and Whistler’s world-class dining scene is reaping the rewards. Here are just a few of the esteemed restaurants and farmers that have taken that approach to the next level, dishing out locally sourced ingredients that showcase the bold flavours and rich agriculture of the Sea to Sky. >>

STORY BY BRANDON BARRETT

GABI MOELLER PHOTOGRAPHY

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JUSTA JESKOVA

TABLE


VISIT FAIRMONT.COM/WHISTLER Open 11:30 a.m. to 12:00 a.m.


Nita Lake Lodge executive chef Dean Hossack with cedar paper-wrapped Kuterra salmon with Pemberton sunchokes and baby kale, prawns and white wine sauce.

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ITA LAKE LODGE used to be something of a hidden gem in Whistler’s crowded accommodation sector. Tucked away into the resort’s original ski-in neighbourhood of Creekside, it sits on the scenic shores of Nita Lake, away from the hustle and bustle of the Village. But the boutique hotel hasn’t stayed off people’s radars for long, earning industry accolades that include being named as the No. 1 resort in Canada by readers of Condé Nast Traveler last year. And key to that acclaim is the hotel’s signature restaurant, AURA, which highlights the best ingredients of B.C. in a casual, lakeside setting. Whether it’s Kuterra salmon raised by the 'Namgis First Nation, or the earthy black trumpet mushrooms foraged from the nearby forest, the care that goes into each plate is clear on first bite. “Everybody has the same-old, same-old product on their menus, but when you can get something that stands out that was grown just up the road from us, it’s absolutely amazing,” beamed executive chef Dean Hossack. “Where else can you get greens that are still (fresh) from the morning after being picked (at Rootdown Farm in Pemberton)?” Open for breakfast and dinner daily, Aura tweaks its menu in the summer on a near-weekly basis, reflecting whatever produce is at its peak freshness. It forces Hossack’s team of chefs to stretch themselves and stay adaptable to the unique ingredients that come in. “It really does create creativity,” Hossack said of the seasonal approach to his menu. “We work our best to control our costs and set certain things for each menu, but then having the ability to bring in whatever we can for vegetables, is great. “It really does give the chefs a spark… Sometimes they might get something in they’ve never seen before.” >>


PERFECTLY INSPIRED Executive Chef Bradley Cumming focuses on fresh, local ingredients, paired with carefully-selected regional wines for a truly West Coast dining experience. GRILLANDVINEWHISTLER.COM FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 604.935.4344

PERFECTLY LOCATED, AT THE WESTIN RESORT & SPA, WHISTLER:

Spectacular Mountain Views

Sustainable Seafood

Slopeside On Whistler Mountain

Neapolitan Style Pizzas

Whistler’s Best Patio


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DAVID BUZZARD

House-made ricotta, charred eggplant puree, semi-dried Pemberton tomatoes, young salad leaves and basil oil, from Alta Bistro.

ICK CASSETTARI knows how easy it is to objectify food. As head chef at the ALTA BISTRO he sees it often. “If you objectify beef, you just think of it as a steak,” he said. “But if there’s a story behind that steak — where did it come from? Who’s the farmer? How far away did it come from? Of course that story translates to the plates, the passion and the flavours you’re projecting.” The modern French spot, located on the outskirts of the Village, has sustainability ethics in its DNA. The menu is tweaked every few weeks to reflect in-season ingredients and, when that’s not possible, the chefs will add to its preserve library, which covers an entire wall of the restaurant with pickled ingredients to be used another day. “The vegetables produced here are amazing. You can do really simple preparations with them; you don’t have to do a lot,” said Cassettari. “The carrots we get, we don’t peel them, we use all the greens and they can be ugly as hell. We love them when they’re ugly, because it adds character. And that’s something that commercial farming has lost, the beauty of the ingredient itself. You get these big, crazy carrots that are forced out of these massive farms, and there’s zero flavour.” Cassettari believes the wider public will have no choice but to adopt a more regional and seasonal diet as the effects of climate change continue to take hold. “It’s not a matter of ‘should we be eating seasonally?’ — it’s that we don’t have a choice,” he said. “The seasons are getting shorter for vegetables and all of a sudden produce prices are ridiculous because they’re buying them from these far-away places.” Cassettari hopes to make people realize that eating seasonally isn’t an inconvenience. >>

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“You look forward to asparagus, for instance. It takes it away from just being a chore — you’ve got to eat everyday — to making it into something fun,” he said. “You get to go to the supermarket and think about what you get to eat that day. This is in season, it’s at its prime and it’s super tasty.”

COURTESY FAIRMONT CHATEAU WHISTLER

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HEN THINKING of a global luxury hotel chain the size of the Fairmont, it is understood that each of its 70-plus international locations will do food a little differently, depending its location. The FAIRMONT CHATEAU WHISTLER offers guests a glimpse into the local culture and flavours that make this region so distinct. “There’s always going to be the client who is looking for that specific thing they had (at another Fairmont), but I think the food and beverage >>

The Fairmont Chateau Whistler grows its own fresh herbs in a rooftop garden for use in its restaurants and bar.

aura

Fresh. Casual. Local. Inspired and influenced by our people, our produce and our place, AURA creates a casual and comfortable dining experience in a unique lakeside setting. Fresh and local, Chef Dean celebrates all things BC. New this summer; dine on our expanded patio and enjoy stunning views of nita lake!

COMPLIMENTARY VILLAGE SHUTTLE AND UNDERGROUND PARKING AVAILABLE NITA LAKE LODGE, 2131 LAKE PLACID RD, WHISTLER BC | 1 888 755 6482 | 604 966 5700 WWW.NITALAKELODGE.COM/DINING | @NITALAKELODGE | #NITALAKELODGE 72

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2016


A PASSION FOR SEASONAL, NATURALLY. SAVOUR THE SEASON A pioneer of the farm-to-table movement, Executive Chef James Walt’s seasonal, market-driven menus are sure to delight. Located in the heart of Whistler Village, Araxi Restaurant + Oyster Bar is recognized worldwide for its excellence in food and hospitality, as does The Cellar by Araxi – Whistler’s premier space for private dining and special events. Summer Patio Weekend Brunch Dinner Nightly Oyster Bar

4222 village square araxi.com thecellarbyaraxi.com 604 932 4540

>>

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french at heart

west coast soul

Addictive Italian cuisine since 1996 Inviting service Two private dining rooms Dinner nightly 4319 Main Street at the Whistler Pinnacle Hotel 604.905.4844 Reservations recommended quattrorestaurants.com

2129 Lake Placid Road

604.962.6262 www.reddoorbistro.ca

TONIGHT’S WAITING

Located in Whistler Village at 4429 Sundial Place | 604.932.5151 Reservations available 7 days a week | kegsteakhouse.com

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DAVID BUZZARD

>>

Araxi executive chef James Walt with a selection of Pemberton produce.

team has an opportunity to impress upon them what we can do and how we can play into our strengths better,” said Isabel Chung, executive chef at the Fairmont Chateau Whistler. The hotel is home to numerous dining options, including The Wildflower Restaurant and its Four Diamondrated steakhouse, The Grill Room. “It’s really about working with the client and ensuring that they’re going to receive the quality they expect, but at the same time being true to who we are,” she added. The Fairmont sources ingredients from its own backyard and rooftop. Bartenders concoct specially-made cocktails from the hotel’s herb garden, and its ambitious apiary program features 12 rooftop beehives that chefs regularly raid for honey. Looking for a taste of the Pemberton Valley, just 20 minutes north of Whistler, that goes beyond its worldclass produce? Try The Grill Room’s 45-day, dry-aged AAA beef ribeye. It’s as succulent as it sounds. >>

CHRISTINE’S ON BLACKCOMB

Perched high in the Blackcomb Mountain alpine, inside the newly renovated Rendezvous lodge, Christine’s Restaurant elevates the definition of summer dining at Whistler Blackcomb. Through award-winning Head Chef Steve Ramey’s love for seasonal, fresh, and local ingredients, the menu at Christine’s showcases the flavour of modern West Coast cuisine. With panoramic views of the Coast Mountains, the experience is just as savory as the meal itself.

For more info & reservations 604.938.7437 whistlerblackcomb.com/christines

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The Nijjar family is pleased to have the Royal Taste of India in its fifth successful year. Our chefs provide the essence of traditional Indian Cuisine with a modern touch, preparing each dish to your specifications. Our sister company Kismet Estate Winery, located in Oliver BC, produces VQA quality red & white wine to pair with our exotic menu. Fine Dining & Take Out Catering Available WHISTLER MARKETPLACE

604-932-2010 Open ALL DAY from 11am to late

WWW.THEROYALTASTEOFINDIA.COM

A PASSION FOR SHARING, NATURALLY.

NOW OPEN FOR LUNCH daily from 11Am

SPANISH-INFLUENCED SMALL PLATES HOUSE-MADE CHARCUTERIE HANDCRAFTED COCKTAILs INSPIRED WINES

150 - 4222 village square baroso.ca 604 962 4540

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S AN EARLY pioneer of the locavore movement (one who eats foods grown locally whenever possible), ARAXI’s celebrated executive chef James Walt knows the unique environment of the Pemberton Valley, a 30-minute drive north of Whistler. And he’d stack Pemberton up against any betterknown food regions of the world. “I’d put it up against Napa Valley, the Okanagan, any of those regions. A lot of it has to do with the soil; it’s very sandy soil that’s high in loam and does really well with root vegetables,” Walt said. “The Lillooet River, before it was diked, it changed direction every year, so it was depositing soil every year, for millions of years,” explained Riley Johnson, owner of Pemberton’s Bandit Farms, which grows vegetables that appear on Araxi’s menu, and on menus of a handful of other Whistler restaurants. “Why does everything taste so good? It’s the soil. I want to say it’s me, but it’s not.” Walt is a Pemberton resident himself and works closely with the community’s farmers and growers, handpicking ingredients for his seasonally-minded menus — and, more than anything, that’s why the esteemed chef has underpinned his career on the farmto-table approach. “We owe it to the guests who come to the restaurant to know what it is they’re eating, where it came from and why the quality is the way it is,” explained Walt. The best representation of Walt’s refined, yet rustic style of contemporary cuisine manifests itself in Araxi’s popular Longtable Dinner Series, typically held every summer in Whistler, Vancouver and at Pemberton’s North Arm Farm. For the latter, Walt and his chefs prepare a family-style feast “literally out in the field,” made with ingredients picked from the farm only hours before. “We are more than happy to supply local restaurants and especially restaurants that understand the challenges we face as growers in our climate, in our location and have embraced the value of local food supply,” said Jordan Sturdy, owner of North Arm Farm. Sturdy, also the provincial MLA for the region, has seen a seismic shift in the chefs’ attitudes towards cooking local — and he’s hopeful it will continue. “We’ve been doing this for almost 25 years now, and the difference in those decades is just dramatic in terms of the primary focus of the chef, which back then was getting your delivery on time and getting a quality product at the cheapest possible price,” he said. “That’s now changed from the same two priorities — you want it when you want it and you want a good quality, but you’re also willing to look at what you’re getting as not so much of a commodity but as a contributor to that presentation on the plate and as a part of the customer experience. “The more people commit to buying and supporting local agriculture, the more opportunity there is and the more benefit there is to the grower.” W

a fork, a fork,

a glass, a glass, and 20 years of and 20 years of Magic

Magic... Thank you.

MODERN CANADIAN CUISINE OPEN DAILY FROM 3 PM · DINNER FROM 6 PM VALET PARKING 4121 VILLAGE GREEN | ADJACENT TO LISTEL HOTEL 604 932 3433 X 1 | BEARFOOTBISTRO.COM

#lovebearfoot WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2016

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TMC_2016.pdf

1

16-04-08

3:13 PM

– Tandoor Oven – – Great Vegetarian Selection –

Tandoori Grill Indian Cuisine 4368 Main St. # 201, Corner Northlands Blvd.

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604 .905.4900

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Restaurant and Take-Out

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ENTREES FROM $12

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We serve free-run chicken dishes from the Fraser Valley Farm K (raised with no added hormones or steroids), grass-fed lamb and OCEAN WISE (TM) Prawns and Fish

MENU: tandooriwhistler.com VANCOUVER VENUE: originaltandoorikitchens.com DINNER DELIVERY DIRECT: 604.966.6866 or whistlerdinein.com for online delivery (small charges apply) SPECIAL FEATURE Wild Vancouver Island Spot Prawn Masala

Lunch from 11:30 am Dinner from 5 pm

Whistler’s Best Patio

Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Sunday Brunch Whistler’s Best Patio - Lakeside! Daily Specials & Weekly Features Happy Hour 3-5PM Sun-Thurs for all up to date info and menus and to book online

tablenineteen.com 604.938.9898

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Table Nineteen at Nicklaus North Golf Course 3 minutes north of Whistler Village - Free Parking Reservations highly recommended EVERYONE WELCOME (no dress code for clubhouse)


casual dining

LICENCE TO GRILL

The feast from Dusty’s BBQ night, with a full rack of ribs with potato wedges, brisket sandwich with onion rings, the bucket of bones and pulled pork sandwich.

WHO DOESN’T LOVE A SUMMER BARBECUE? WHISTLER EATERIES HAVE GOOD TASTE

STORY BY BRADEN DUPUIS

S

UMMER ISN’T SUMMER until you’ve got your grilled-to-perfection preference on your plate in front of you and a cold beverage in your hand. Whistler’s chefs know their way around a grill. If you read that sentence nodding your head in approval, licking your lips and rubbing your growling belly, there’s one event in particular you can’t miss: The Bulleit Bourbon Canadian National BBQ Championships. “If you’re into food — and everyone’s definitely into food — it’s the event to come to,” says Josh Kearns, manager of DUSTY’S BAR AND BBQ in Creekside, where the championships are held at the end of each July. “Sunday is the big day, because Sunday is the day you get to eat pulled pork, brisket, smoked chicken — you get to eat the ribs,” Kearns says. “You come down and wander >>

PHOTOS BY DAVID BUZZARD WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2016

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A full-sized pig in the smoker from one of the competitors at the National Barbecue Championships at Dusty’s.

around here and there are anywhere from 30 to 50 teams sampling out their food.” If you’re not in town for the championships, fret not: Dusty’s serves up its own brand of barbecue daily. “We pull fresh ribs out of our smoker every three hours from the time we open the doors, throughout the entire day,” Kearns says. The ribs are always a hot seller, but Kearns also recommends Dusty’s Big BBQ Nachos, the brisket, or the pulled pork sandwiches. These are by no means the only places in town to get your barbecue fix — just head outside and follow your nose. And if you find yourself with an extra hankering for an amazing view to go with your grilled steak and chicken, check out the Mountain Top BBQ at the ROUNDHOUSE LODGE on Whistler Mountain every Friday, Saturday and Sunday evening. For more information on events and dates, visit www.whistlerblackcomb.com.

A

ccording to chef Bradley Cumming, the GRILL & VINE’s Saturday Summer BBQ Series at the Westin

Executive Chef Julian Owen-Mold re-invents traditional gastro pub fare by infusing the freshest regional ingredients into classic comfort food favourites. Unwind with a cool beverage on our sunny patio or catch the game on the big screen inside. Fuel up for your day with a hearty breakfast available from 7am or enjoy a delicious meal any time of day. Located at the Hilton Whistler Resort & Spa

HILTON WHISTLER RESORT & SPA t: 1 604 932 1982 4050 Whistler Way

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Resort and Spa has an ace up its sleeve. “It’s out on the Grill & Vine patio, which is beautiful. It’s the best patio in Whistler,” he says. “It’s a little hidden secret there, with beautiful mountain views and tons of sunshine.” The patio is a plus, but it’s the food that makes the meal and Cumming and his team have got all the angles covered, from summertime salads to corn and grilled vegetables, hand-crafted ice cream sundaes and, of course, the classic mac and cheese, “because demand calls for it,” Cumming says. “Every barbecue should have a little mac and cheese to go with it.” The main course barbecue options — all-you-can-eat, it should be noted — get switched every week, and include everything from smoked brisket and garlic ribs to Korean pork belly and honey glazed chicken. “It’s a nice little variety of barbecue items,” Cumming says. “We definitely try to keep switching it up, keep it fresh, keep it new, and try not to nail ourselves down too much so we’ve just got that flexibility of creativity.” For more information, visit www.grill andvinewhistler.com. >>

P'sil Bikadi prepares a smoked salmon on a cedar plank for the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre barbecue night.

CRYSTAL HUT SALMON BAKE

At 6000 ft by Jeep & AT V

canadianwilderness.com canadianwilderness.com 604.938.1616 CANADIANWILDERNESS.COM canadianwilderness.com

Carleton Lodge

604.938.1616

Across from the Whistler gondola

CANADIAN

SSTTAAYYWWILIDLD

WILDERNESS ADVENTURES

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fter a day spent hiking or biking around Whistler, sometimes you want to kick back with a nice, casual meal — and SIDECUT, at the Four Seasons has you covered. “It feels like you’re at a really nice backyard,” says chef Eren Guryel of the hotel’s Backyard BBQ Bash, held every Thursday. “People are in jeans or shorts, kids are playing, the band starts up and everyone is having a good time.” The main attraction is the threemetre-by-three-metre grill in the courtyard, firing up a tantalizing smorgasbord of choice: brisket, barbecue ribs, whole planks of salmon and the event’s signature suckling pig. Side dishes include a four-cheese macaroni and cheese, salads both pasta and traditional, as well as corn and other grilled vegetables. There are even some vegetarian options on the grill. “We do sear some tofu out there, and we have some great grilled vegetables. It doesn’t have to be all meat-centric,” Guryel says.

“PEOPLE ARE IN JEANS OR SHORTS, KIDS ARE PLAYING, THE BAND STARTS UP AND EVERYONE IS HAVING A GOOD TIME.”

Accentuate your backyard bash experience with the weekly, rotating drink special, and wrap it all up with a dessert selection that includes s’mores, chocolate cake and fruit salad. “We do a rotating selection of desserts, and the kids really get into that,” Guryel says. “With the music and beverages, the meat and vegetables, there’s something for everybody. It’s just an overall great experience, and I hope to see you here.” For more information, visit www. sidecutwhistler.com.

I

f you’re looking for something more than a grill — something unique and wrapped in history — look no further than the SQUAMISH LIL’WAT

CULTURAL CENTRE.

The SLCC’s Tuesday Night Barbecue Dinner and Tour goes beyond the already diverse, cultural menu, says chef David Li. “When you come to the barbecue, you do the whole First Nations walk through the building and learn the history of it, and then you are greeted by

a drummer before you sit down to eat,” he says. The meal incorporates First Nations song and dance performances, and a chance to interact with Li and his team as they prepare your food. The menu weaves traditional culinary aspects of both the Squamish and Lil’wat First Nations, and Li says in putting it together he uses meats and ingredients that would be found on the traditional lands. “We try to incorporate most of the (recipes) to relate it a bit to First Nations on every single (dish),” Li says, pointing to the fresh-baked cheese bannock bread and cedar-plank WestCoast salmon with maple glaze. There’s also the sage and roastedgarlic chicken, which uses Li’s custommade, SLCC eight-spice rub, made from herbs and spices traditional to both nations. Other menu items include buffalo smokies, seasonal grain or potato salad and a wild mushroom and barley pilaf. For more information, visit www.slcc.ca. W

HEALTHY EATING

FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY 20% OFF LUNCH MONGOLIEGRILL.COM | 604 938.9416

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LOCATED above the Cinema 8 across from Starbucks

FIND US


Indian cuisine that uses a palette of flavours ~ you’ll feel as if you’re halfway around the world! Belly Dancing every Friday from 6 to 10pm NEW IN THE HILTON WHISTLER RESORT Overlooking Mountain Square, Whistler Village

www.indianmasalabistro.com

OPEN LATE

Mon. to Sat. till 3 a.m. Sun. till 2 a.m.

(604) 932-0410 4368 Main Street

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MONT-TREMBLANT Quebec

WHISTLER British Columbia

QUEENSTOWN New Zealand

Unreal!

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The Ziptrek Ecotours adventure area is located directly above Whistler Village, in the spectacular temperate rainforest valley between Whistler and Blackcomb Mountains. Our Guest Services desk is in the Carleton Lodge across from the Whistler Village gondolas

604.935.0001 or 1.866.935.0001 84 WHISTLER MAGAZINE ziptrek.com

SUMMER/FALL 2016

AWARD WINNING:

GUEST APPROVED:


after hours

CRAFTY ABOUT

beer

A glass of Persephone Pale Ale, brewed on a beer farm in Gibsons, B.C., from the Dubh Linn Gate Irish pub.

BREWING PERFECTION WITH HOPS, FRUIT, COFFEE AND MORE

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ITH ITS twoday Whistler Village Beer Festival that attracts thousands, two (soon to be three) local breweries and taps too numerous to count from dozens of other craft breweries, Whistler is a beer lover’s paradise. Excellent-quality locally and regionally crafted beers are available for pouring into waiting glasses in all of the Village’s spectacular restaurants, patios, lounges and welcoming pubs.

THE WHISTLER BREWING COMPANY (WBC) introduced craft beer here in 1989. A pioneer in the Pacific Northwest small brewery movement that took hold in the 1980s, WBC now produces award-winning ales and lagers that are available throughout B.C. At any time, eight of the brewery’s rotating roster of beers are in production and available at the Tap Room attached to the brewery located in Function Junction, just a few minutes south of Whistler Village. As well as providing the opportunity to try some great beer and pub food, a visit to the Tap Room, with its industrial garage doors, 18–foot ceiling and

STORY BY CINDY FILIPENKO

funky decor provides a uniquely urban Whistler experience. And to learn what goes into making a WBC Whiskey Jack Ale or Powder Mountain Lager, you can combine a trip to the Tap Room with a tour of the brewery by booking online at www.whistlerbeer.com. WBC’s special menu includes four seasonal brews from their rotating roster, but the newly introduced Unique Brew Series will be the brewmaster’s opportunity to offer competition to the popular summer seasonal, Grapefruit Ale.

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histler’s second brewery is part of THE BREWHOUSE, a pub and restaurant located at the edge of Whistler Olympic Plaza in the Village. Featuring a microbrewery on the second floor of the premises, The Brewhouse guarantees a beer that has never seen the light of day, the primary reason beer goes “skunky.” In addition to offering both family and adults-only spaces inside, The Brewhouse has a large, bright patio that looks onto the Great Lawn so you can enjoy your Lifty Lager while contemplating how you’re going to pose for your photo next to the Olympic Rings. For more info visit www.mjg.ca. At the other end of the Village, you'll find two favourite locals’ pubs that you shouldn't miss. >>

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he DUBH LINN GATE, home to favourite Whistler bands the WhiskeyDicks and Ruckus Deluxe, has 21 different beers on tap. That’s 21 options to enjoy a traditional Irish 20-oz pint. Whether you're looking for something light and local or a meal-replacing Guinness, the Dubh Linn Gate provides an authentic Irish pub atmosphere. For more info visit www.dubhlinngate.com. Whistler’s original pub, TAPLEY’S, with its patio perfect for people watching, is the resort’s original drinking establishment. Known as “the locals’ living room,” Tapley’s has evolved from a place to kick back with a bottle of Canadian or Kokanee and watch the game, to a place where you can enjoy the game with a pint from one of the pub’s 20 on-tap beers. Tapley’s is also one of the five iconic Whistler bars owned by Gibbons Hospitality Group, which also co-owns Deep Cove Brewery (DCB) and produces the Whistler Village Beer Festival. DCB produces over a dozen types of beer (many made with corn or rye instead of barley). Gibbons serves DCB products at all its venues including the Longhorn Saloon. The Longhorn, with its massive patio at the base of the mountain, is the best spot to celebrate a great day at Whistler Mountain Bike Park. Thinking about it, just being in Whistler on a sunny, summery day is cause enough to celebrate.

THE FRIENDLIEST POUR

IN WHISTLER

at The Keg

DUBH LINN GATE IRISH PUB A WHISTLER LANDMARK FOR 18 YEARS

Come for the genuine Irish cheer, delicious pub fare including hearty breakfasts, live music and good times. Families welcome. LOCATED IN PAN PACIFIC MOUNTAINSIDE 4320 Sundial Crescent, Whistler WHISTLER | VANCOUVER Open for breakfast, lunch, dinner and dancing. Happy Hour 5-7pm. 604.905.4047 | dubhlinngate.com

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Daily Happy Hour Specials 3pm-4:30pm food & drinks 10pm-1am drinks FUNK NIGHT

Thursdays CANOSIS & FRIENDS

ALL LOVE NO CLUB Fridays & Saturdays TIM LIVINGSTONE

INDY-stry NIGHT

Sundays TyMETAL & FRIENDS

4429 Su n di al Pl ace. 604-932-5151 wh i stl erspo rtsbar.co m


The Whistler Village Beer Festival brings in beverages from more than 80 craft breweries and cideries to Whistler.

Whiskey Jack Ale and Powder Mountain Lager from The Whistler Brewing Company.

H

ard-core craft beer fans won't want to miss Gibbons’ three-day WHISTLER VILLAGE BEER FESTIVAL from Sept 16 – 18. The third weekend in September will see more than 80 breweries from Oregon, Washington and B.C. offering up more than 200 beers for 6,000 thirsty festival goers. This year the craft brewers will be joined by five B.C. craft cideries. Hosted in spectacular Whistler Olympic Plaza, the event also features some of the region's best live entertainment. Festivalgoers can also enjoy a number of satellite events throughout the Village including seminars, “unique cask” nights, food and beer-pairing dinners and some great parties. For more information visit www.gibbonswhistler.com. And a new brewing company joins the ranks this summer. COAST MOUNTAIN BREWING is a microbrewery due to open this summer in Function Junction. Owner and brewmaster Kevin Winter plans to offer his beer to restaurants and pubs. While every bartender in Whistler has his or her favourite brew to recommend, the one thing they all agree on is that the day of flat draft and limited choices are gone. So lift a pint and celebrate handcrafted excellence. W WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2016

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services DIRECTORY W H I S T L E R

MEDICAL

C L I N I C

Voted Best Dental Clinic New Patients & Emergencies Welcome

An apple a day doesn’t always keep the doctor away. Providing the Whistler community with full medical care for over 25 years. Whistler’s ONLY medical clinic with X-ray, Lab and Acute Care services on site!

For appointments call: 604-938-1550 #317 – 2063 Lake Placid Rd., Whistler

Walk-In Patients Welcome. www.whistlermedicalclinic.com 4380 Lorimer Rd. | Whistler BC | V0N 1B4 | Tel: 604-932-3977

100512-wmc-whistler-mag.indd 1

(next to Creekside Market) www.smilewhistler.com

12-10-15 11:35 AM

TM

ACUPUNCTURE | TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE LASER ACUPUNCTURE | NATUROPATHIC MEDICINE REGISTERED MASSAGE THERAPY OSTEOPATHY | ORGANIC FACIALS HOURS: OPEN DAILY FROM 10AM TO 6PM 208-4368 Main Street (next to the Whistler Eye Clinic) 604.962.8828 | whistlerintegrative.com

WHISTLER RECEPTION SERVICES

Providing a World Class Greeting in a World Class Resort

A Unique Central Check In – Concierge and In-Resort Contact for Guests, Owners and Managers of Vacation Rentals and Properties

WHISTLER VILLAGE IN DEER LODGE AND UPPER VILLAGE IN GLACIER LODGE

Call 604-966-0999 to set up a free consultation! www.whistlerreception.com / info@whistlerreception.com

Rentals Skills Tours

STUDIOS

Yoga and wellness services in the heart of Whistler Village! We offier many different styles to suit all levels of practice. Our class cap of 13 maintains personalized attention and a sense of community. BOOKING ONLINE OR BY PHONE IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

604-935-2020 info@whistleryogacara.com www.whistleryogacara.com

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whistler • 604.905.0071 • crosscountryconnection.ca 88

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2016

Whistler Village (near The Keg & Movie Theatre)

604-905-5666 www.shoppersdrugmart.ca


To advertise in the Services Directory, call Catherine Power-Chartrand at 604-932-1672

WANT TO TAKE A COPY OF THE WHISTLER MAGAZINE HOME? Whistler Magazine is available in more than 5,000 Whistler hotel rooms and over 100 tourist outlets. Hardcovers are in most rooms, and softcovers are available at the front desk to take with you.

Transit

@WhistlerTransit

Trip Planner

Free Shuttles

Transit Info 604·932·4020 www.bctransit.com

We’ve got you covered. TUESDAY, APRIL 5, 2016

FREE VOLUME 40 // ISSUE 14 // 32 PAGES www.whistlerquestion.com

3

Olympics returning?

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Community first

NEW SPRING MENU

Serving Whistler & Pemberton Since 1976

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Mountain safety

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SUNDAY - THURSDAY · 604 932 3433

FEATURE

Second home Caring for your vacation property P17

CULTURE

avvy control

Mountain top tales Multiplicity returns to WSSF P27

SPORTS

Whistler Cup Young racers hit the hill P21

ENVIRONMENT

Officials study local orphaned cubs Residents and visitors need to mitigate attractants as bears come out of hibernation, COS says Rebecca Aldous raldous@whistlerquestion.com

Officials are hoping this will be a better year for bears than last summer. In 2015, conservation officers were called to deal with an “unprecedented” number of orphaned bear cubs, Sgt. Simon Gravel of the Conservation Officer Service (COS) said. The Critter Care Wildlife Society took in 25 orphaned bear cubs from across B.C., more than double the society’s average. “It was definitely a precedent, we never saw that before,” Gravel said, noting many of the orphan cubs

were also underweight. As a result, the Ministry of Environment is examining the unusually high number of yearlings last fall, ministry spokesperson David Karn wrote in an email to The Question. “That work is underway, but the results are not yet available,” he said, noting the study looks at items such as food supply and population levels. Last bear season, conservation officers received 300 calls regarding the animals in Whistler, Gravel said. Many of the bears were relocated a BEARS P2

n 6125_WHI BC WheTransit o m bs s b Whistler ThesaMagazine ve live 3.5" x 2.25" Insertion date: Spring-Summer ain ler Mount

COMMUNITY

Pemberton set to meet Town hall meeting slated to discuss water issues P5

FOOD FUN: Samy Black and Ian Sales of Caveman Grocer dish out bowls of pad Thai during the Outdoor Eats food truck festival at the base of Blackcomb Mountain on Friday (April 1). Photo by David Buzzard/ www.media-centre.ca

330 Eagle Lodge at the Town Plaza ®

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This west facing 2 bedroom suite comes fully furnished and features a spacious, open living area, full sized kitchen and lots of afternoon sun. It is the perfect place to entertain your family and friends or prepare for your next Whistler adventure. Take in a concert at the Olympic Plaza, wander along the Village Stroll in search of your favourite shops, restaurants, nightclubs or walk to the lifts for a day on Whistler or Blackcomb Mountain its all just steps from your front door. Call us today for more information.

YOUR HOME, YOUR WHISTLER, YOUR WAY

RAY LONGMUIR ray@wrec.com 604.905.8464

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ON STANDS EVERY TUESDAY

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March 31st, 2016

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whistler’s weekly newsmagazine

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ON STANDS EVERY THURSDAY

Pick up the latest issue of your favourite read on stands, in coffee shops and at hotels throughout Whistler.

Aava Whistler Hotel At Nature’s Door Adara Boutique Hotel Aloha Whistler Alpenglow Alpine Vacation Accommodation Affordable Whistler Accommodations Aspens on Blackcomb Blackcomb Lodge Brew Creek Lodge Carleton Lodge Cascade Lodge Chapters Downtown Vancouver Clock Tower Lodge Club Intrawest Coast Blackcomb Suites Crystal Lodge Crystal Ski Holidays Delta Whistler Village Suites Executive Inn Fairmont Chateau Whistler Fairmont Gold Chateau Whistler Fairmont Vancouver Airport Four Seasons Resort Four Seasons Residences Glacier Lodge Glacier Getaways Glacier Resort Properties Granville Island Hotel Greystone Hilton Whistler Resort & Spa Horstman House Le Chamois Legends Listel Lodging Ovations Lost Lake Lodge Marketplace Lodge Marquise Mountain Memories Accommodations Mountain Vacation Planners Mountainside Lodge Nita Lake Lodge North Star Northern Comfort Accommodations Pan Pacific Mountainside Pan Pacific Village Centre Pemberton Valley Lodge Priority Property

Rainbow Retreats ResortQuest – all properties Riverside RV Resort Stoney Creek Resort Properties Summit Lodge Sundance Sundial Twin Peaks Westin Whistler Resort & Spa Whiski Jack Resorts Whistler Chalets Ltd. Whistler Executive Accommodations Whistler Home Holidays Whistler Peak Lodge Whistler Pinnacle Hotel Whistler Premier Properties Whistler Reception Services Whistler Resort Homes Whistler Resort Management Whistler Resort & Club Whistler Retreats Whistler Sportpak Whistler Vacation Club Whistler Village Accommodations Whistler Village Inn & Suites Wildflower Lodging Company Wildwood Lodge Woodrun Lodge WorldMark Whistler Whistler Bed & Breakfasts Many Vancouver hotels, retail outlets & other locations Armchair Books IGA Whistler Nesters Market Pemberton Supermarket Upper Village Market Whistler Blackcomb Whistler Visitor Centre Resort Municipality of Whistler Tourism Whistler

With thanks to these distributors for helping make Whistler Magazine the resort’s premier publication since 1980. WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2016

89


Canada Green Party Leader Elizabeth May speaks on the COP21 Paris UN Climate Change Conference at the Whistler Conference Centre in January.

DAVID BUZZARD

DAVID BUZZARD

Yoshi Karasawa, B.C. Lt. Gov. Judith Guichon and Whistler mayor Nancy Wilhelm-Morden cut the ribbon at the opening of the Audain Art Museum in March.

DAVID BUZZARD

Traditional drummers from the Squamish Lil'wat Cultural Centre lead a procession to open the new Salish Stroll, linking the SLCC to the Fairmont Chateau Whistler last June.

90

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2016

VSO conductor Bramwell Tovey leads the orchestra in “Oh Canada” during the Canada Day VSO concert in Whistler Olympic Plaza last July.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Whistler Mountain Ski Club FIS head coach and former world-cup skier Rob Boyd reads Radar the Rescue Dog at Whistler Blackcomb Kids Camp in an event to raise awareness of backcountry ski safety in January.

Araxi restaurant director Neil Henderson, centre, at the opening reception for the new Bar Oso restaurant in October.

Canadian World Cup Bobsleigh Gold Medalist, Chris Spring (right) celebrates his win in January at Buffalo Bill’s with DJ Peacefrog.

DAVID BUZZARD

ET Canada’s Erin Cebula with husband Shawn Lee enjoying an after-Cornucopia party at Buffalo Bill’s in November.

PASCALE GADBOIS

CATHERINE POWER-CHARTRAND

Dawn Pemberton and the Night Crawlers performing at Maury Young Arts Centre in October.

Whistler Magazine general manager Catherine Power-Chartrand grabs a selfie with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau when he and wife Sophie GregoireTrudeau spent a day skiing in Whistler in February.

DAVID BUZZARD

DAVID BUZZARD

Sea to Sky member of parliament Pamela GoldsmithJones, left, at the Whistler 40th Anniversary event at the Whistler Museum last September.

CATHERINE POWER-CHARTRAND

KEEP YOUR EYES OPEN — YOU NEVER KNOW WHO YOU MIGHT SEE!

DAVID BUZZARD

in whistler

DAVID BUZZARD

SCENE

Author Camilla Gibb reads from her memoir This is Happy, at the Whistler Writers Festival at the Fairmont Chateau Whistler in October. W


MAKE EVERY RUN AN ADVENTURE Make every trail the start of a new adventure. Thanks to the Wings Pro 2, enjoy a new running experience that gives you the confidence to handle the unexpected.

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THE NORTH FACE STORE DEER LODGE, ACROSS FROM THE BREWHOUSE, WHISTLER VILLAGE 604-938-7432 PHOTO: TIM KEMPLE

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Profile for Whistler Publishing

Whistler Magazine Summer 2016  

Whistler’s Premier publication since 1980

Whistler Magazine Summer 2016  

Whistler’s Premier publication since 1980

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