Whistler Magazine Summer 2020

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SUMMER/ FALL 2020

WHISTLER’S PREMIER P U B L I C AT I O N S I N C E 1980

M AG A Z I N E BIKING’S 2020 RENAISSANCE FABULOUS FLOWER ART 19 [COVID] THINGS TO DO

DINING AL FRESCO COMPLIMENTARY MAGAZINE For safety (and your future reading pleasure) please take this copy with you

Whistler’s patios are perfect for fun times with your social circle

MAPS | SHOPPING | HOMES | PEOPLE


MOUNTAIN GALLERIES PRESENTS EXHIBITION & SALE OF NEW WORK BY TOP CANADIAN ARTISTS

Shannon Ford

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contents ARTS SCENE: Flower Power 19

DEPARTMENTS

BY ALYSSA NOEL

Editor’s Greeting 6

MOUNTAIN BIKING: Riding’s Renaissance 24

Trail Mix:

BY ALISON TAYLOR

19 Things to Do During a Global Pandemic 10

FACES OF WHISTLER: Way of the Water 30 BY BRADEN DUPUIS

WHISTLER HOME: The Best View in Town 38 BY ALISON TAYLOR

Mountain Roots 16

Shopping Whistler 58 Services Directory 65 Maps 66

FINE DINING: Pillars of the Scene 47 BY BRANDON BARRETT

CASUAL DINING: Al Fresco Feasting 52 BY GAIL JOHNSON

WINE: Perfect Patio Pours 57 BY SAMANTHA RAHN

COVER PHOTO BY LOGAN SWAYZE

JUSTA JESKOVA

Patio dining is the perfect way to indulge with friends, while staying safe this summer.

CONTRIBUTORS

Originally from Alberta, ALYSSA NOEL is Pique Newsmagazine’s assistant editor. She has an M.A. in arts and culture reporting, and her work has appeared in SPIN magazine, The Province and OnEarth.

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BRANDON BARRETT is features editor for Pique Newsmagazine. He is the 2018 recipient of the John Collison Investigative Journalism Award. In his free time, he is a theatre producer, performer and playwright.

KEILI BARTLETT was born and raised on the East Coast. Now a reporter for the Squamish Chief newspaper, she moved west after graduating from the University of King's College to chase stories and climb mountains.

BRADEN DUPUIS is a transplanted Saskatchewan flatlander lost in the Whistler mountains. He spends his days working as a reporter for Pique Newsmagazine. His mom thinks he is brilliant.

GAIL JOHNSON is an award-winning journalist who writes regularly for the Globe and Mail, Yahoo Canada and the Georgia Straight and is a food columnist for CBC Radio.



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editor’s message

WHAT WE KNOW FOR SURE ABOUT WHISTLER

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S T H E W O R L D C O M E S TO T E R M S with living in uncertain times, there has never been a better time to take stock of the things we know for sure; to remind ourselves that though some things change, others remain true and constant. This is what we know for sure about Whistler. We know that on a clear, blue-sky day, the mountains can quite literally take your breath away with their grandeur. We know that our lakes are clean, full of fresh water, perfect for cooling off on a hot summer’s day. We know that our forests can make you feel at one with nature—a feeling that does the body, and the soul, good. We know that we have a massive outdoor playground on our doorstep with arguably the best mountain biking and hiking trails in the world to keep us healthy and happy. This spring, Whistler, like so much of the world, changed in remarkable ways, with a collective

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ALISON TAYLOR Editor

shuttering almost all of its doors as businesses coped with the fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic. In the months that followed we learned some more things about ourselves, things that perhaps we’ve overlooked in our endless pursuit of fun in the mountains. We learned that we have neighbours we can count on and leaders that we have faith in. We learned that we are a close-knit community of like-minded souls who care about each other and our environment, a community that cares about Whistler’s future and the ideals on which this town was built—having fun, pushing the limits, soaking up all nature has to offer and setting our

sights higher as we make the most of life. Now, more than ever, we understand that this is truly what sets us apart. This has always been Whistler’s allure, that often difficult-to-pinpoint feeling that draws people to our mountains and keeps them coming back. And so Whistler’s raison d’etre remains, while so much else around us has changed. It will not be business as usual this summer. Dining out will be a different experience and social distancing will change the way we enjoy some of our beloved activities. Yet, we hope you will find some much-needed respite in our town this summer, find peace in our mountains, happiness in our forests, and healthiness in our activities, just as we do. And, we trust you will help us keep our community safe with compassion and kindness along the way.

Alison


Carbon Neutral tourism flights since 2017


SUMMER/FALL 2020

What is your favourite social distancing activity in Whistler? GENERAL MANAGER, ADVERTISING/OPERATIONS

Catherine Power-Chartrand EDITOR

Alison Taylor

I’ve been spending so much time on my mountain bike this summer. This is the year I tackle Lord of the Squirrels!

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Keili Bartlett Brandon Barrett Braden Dupuis Gail Johnson Alyssa Noel Samantha Rahn PHOTOGRAPHERS & ILLUSTRATORS

Solo bike rides on the Valley Trail, followed by socially distanced après in the driveway.

Jorge Alvarez David Buzzard Abby Cooper Justa Jeskova Aiden Legge Darby Magill Amanda Oster & Stephen Li Logan Swayze Getty Images Tourism Whistler

Biking with hubby and friend Teresa all over Whistler. Discovering places we have never been before!

My favourite socialdistancing activity in Whistler is getting out into the backcountry and hiking in the alpine–especially once the wildflowers arrive. Golf is my new COVID sport. It took a pandemic to make me pick it up, but now I’m hooked!

PRESIDENT, WHISTLER PUBLISHING LP

Sarah Strother ACCOUNTING

Heidi Rode CIRCULATION/DISTRIBUTION

Denise Conway

Whistler Magazine (ISSN-0835-5460) is published twice annually by WHISTLER PUBLISHING LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, a division of GLACIER MEDIA GROUP 103-1390 Alpha Lake Road, Whistler, B.C., Canada, V8E 0H9 Phone 604-938-0202 | Fax 604-938-0201 | Toll-Free 1-877-419-8866 Email: cpower@whistlermagazine.com Also publishers of Pique Newsmagazine, weekly on Thursdays, and FAQ, published twice yearly. piquenewsmagazine.com | faqwhistler.com

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the natural approach

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TRAIL MIX

BY ALISON TAYLOR

19 THINGS TO DO [ DURING A GLOBAL PANDEMIC ]

TOURISM WHISTLER/JUSTA JESKOVA

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WHILE SO MUCH HAS CHANGED throughout the world in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, some constants have remained, especially in Whistler with its fresh air, abundant forests, majestic mountains and unbeatable outdoor adventures. Check out Tourism Whistler’s Doors Open Directory (whistler.com/doors-open) for the most up-to-date information on local businesses. In the meantime, here are 19 “Socially Distancing” Things to Do during your time here. Restrictions may apply and some activities will be different from normal.

CATCH THE BEST VIEWS IN TOWN

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H E LO N G - AWA I T E D R E - O P E N I N G of Whistler Blackcomb comes just in time for summer 2020. While it will look and feel a little different than in years past, there’s no changing the spectacular view from the mountains. Don’t miss out on a ride via the recordbreaking PEAK 2 PEAK Gondola, an 11-minute journey spanning Whistler and Blackcomb mountains. There is a reason why this is one of the Canadian Signature Experiences highlighted by Destination Canada. You have to experience it yourself to see why. whistlerblackcomb.com

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TOURISM WHISTLER/JUSTA JESKOVA

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GET THE LOW DOWN ON LOCAL DOCKS

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V E R Y W H I S T L E R L A K E H A S I T S S W E E T S P O T for sunbathing and lounging. And, during a Whistler summer, dock real estate becomes prime real estate in the resort. You’ll find great docks in most Whistler parks, including some floating ones. For some cheeky fun, you can head to Whistler’s most infamous dock at Lost Lake. Tucked further into the park, away from the main swimming area, is the “nudie dock” where clothing is optional. It’s a throwback to Whistler’s early days and, peeling off your clothes and doing a flying naked leap into Lake Lake is a local tradition that stands the test of time.

FOREST BATHING The Japanese call it shinrin-yoku: “shinrin” meaning forest and “yoku” meaning bathing. It means going into the forest and soaking in all of its many benefits: the smell of the trees, the sounds of the forest, the quietness, the stillness, the sense of feeling alive. All of these things help rejuvenate the body, the mind and the soul. This makes shinrin-yoku, or forest bathing, a very deliberate practice. With thousands of acres of forest full of western hemlock, Douglas fir, western red cedar and more, there is ample opportunity to experience the many benefits of shinrin-yoku in Whistler. Check out tours through Canadian Wilderness Adventures (CWA).

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ENJOY THE RIVER OF GOLDEN DREAMS

TOURISM WHISTLER/MIKE CRANE

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O C A L P I O N E E R A L E X P H I L I P, O W N E R O F W H I ST L E R ’ S first lodge, loved to take honeymooners on a romantic paddle down the River of Golden Dreams under the light of the moon. It was a perfect journey from the Rainbow Lodge on Alta Lake, which Philip built in 1914, down the five-kilometre river to Green Lake. It is said that Philip named the river in honour of those journeys. But that’s not the only story of how the river got its name. According to the Whistler Museum and Archives Society, in 1930 a popular folk song by The Boswell Sisters spoke of a peaceful river: “Down the River of Golden Dreams, drifting along, humming a song of love…” While there is some debate about how the river was actually named, there is little doubt that it’s the perfect name for this Whistler waterway whether you navigate it by canoe, kayak, paddleboard or inner-tube. Check out Backroads Whistler, Canadian Wilderness Adventures (CWA) or The Adventure Group (TAG).

GET CULTURAL AT THE SLCC

c The stunning Squamish Lil’wat Culture Centre (SLCC) is a 30,000 square foot cultural facility built to tell the history of the local First Nations—Squamish Nation to the south of Whistler and Lil’wat Nation to the north. The SLCC is set to open this summer, with social distancing measures in place, so guests can enjoy the art installations and artifacts, grab a bite to eat at the Thunderbird Café or wander through the forest along the Salish Stroll. Check out slcc.ca for details.

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VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS/GETTY IMAGES

TOURISM WHISTLER/JUSTA JESKOVA

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H E R E A R E S O M A N Y WAY S T O E X P LO R E W H I S T L E R ’ S backcountry. Tours are open for the summer season from canoeing to ATV’ing, Jeep tours, ziplining, rafting adventures and more. This is a great way to maintain social distancing but have an adventure at the same time, all while getting a get a sense of Whistler’s big and bountiful backcountry. Check out The Adventure Group (TAG), Canadian Wilderness Adventures (CWA) and Ziptrek.

TOURISM WHISTLER/MOMENT FACTORY

BACKCOUNTRY BONANZA

EXPERIENCE VALLEA LUMINA Embark on this magical walk through the rainforest at night where you’ll see glowing fish jumping through the river, talking trees telling their stories and enchanted creatures along the way. This is a multimedia night walk suitable for all ages. Book with The Adventure Group (TAG). >>

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c Hit the paved Valley

TOURISM WHISTLER/MIKE CRANE

Trail via bike or on foot for a true sense of Whistler beyond the Village. The Valley Trail is 40 km of paved trail connecting Whistler’s neighbourhoods, lakes, viewpoints and picnic spots. Stay to the right of the yellow line.

8 BIGGEST BIKE PARK

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MAKE A SPLASH

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Make it your mission this summer to take a dip in all five valley lakes—Green Lake, Alpha Lake, Alta Lake, Nita Lake and Lost Lake.

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HERE’S SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE at the biggest mountain bike park in the world, the Whistler Mountain Bike Park. The Fitz and Garbanzo zones will set the stage for the long-awaited summer opening as the downhill fun begins. COVID-19 protocols are in place to enjoy the bike park as safely as possible.

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VALLEY TRAIL ADVENTURES

TOURISM WHISTLER/MIKE CRANE

TRAIL MIX

DISCOVER THE ANGLER’S PARADISE

c Go out with local tour guides and discover a fisherman’s paradise in local rivers and remote alpine lakes. Fly-fish or spin cast for Rainbow trout, Dolly Varden, char or salmon. Full-day or half-day tours are available. Check out whistler.com.

AIM FOR A HOLE IN ONE

ID WORK/GETTY IMAGES

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O M E T I M E S I N G O L F , T H E S T A R S A L I G N . It was late morning, mid-July last summer, when Nicklaus North’s director of golf, Andrew Smart, stood on the 12th hole of the championship course, and stepped up to the tee. Behind him, cameras were rolling; the Golf Channel was filming a feature on Whistler through its travel arm, the Golf Advisor Roundtrip, featuring Whistler’s four renowned golf courses. Smart picked his 7 iron for the 173-yard drive over the water. The 12th hole is an island green par 3, rated one of the toughest in the province. It’s also one of the most picturesque with a bridge over the water to the green. Smart swung; his ball landed in the middle of the green… and rolled into the cup! A holein-one caught on film—not a bad promotion for golf in Whistler. “As I said on the telecast, ‘I don’t get to walk across this bridge without a putter very often!’” jokes Smart. Put your skills to the test this summer at one of our four championship courses: the Arnold Palmer-designed Whistler Golf Course, the challenging uphill flow of the Fairmont Chateau Whistler, the scenic Big Sky course in Pemberton, or Nicklaus North, designed by the “Golden Bear” Jack Nicklaus. You can also test your skills at The Meadows in Pemberton or at the Furry Creek course to the south.


TOURISM WHISTLER/JUSTA JESKOVA

13 STOP TO ADMIRE THE ART

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O C AT E D I N T H E H E A RT O F T H E V I L L AG E , T H E AU DA I N Art Museum is a must-visit during your stay in Whistler, spacious enough to meet the health and safety requirements for the pandemic. The museum is home to the largest private collection of art by B.C.’s famed Emily Carr as well as an amazing display of First Nations masks.

JUMP OFF!

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histler Bungee is keeping people on their toes this summer! Jumpers can make their way south of Whistler to the bungee bridge, located in the forest over the rushing Cheakamus River. There, they will consider a jaw-dropping 50-metre (160-feet) bungee jump. Jump masters will wear face masks/ shields and all jumpers must wear face masks. Or, check out Whistler’s ziplines. There’s nothing quite like the feeling of stepping off high platforms to soar high above the coastal rainforest. Check out Superfly with The Adventure Group (TAG) and Ziptrek Ecotours.

Find your bus in real-time

bctransit.com/nextride Use NextRide to plan your journey and experience Whistler your way.

DINE IN OR TAKE OUT

Whistler restaurateurs are back in businesses, finding innovative ways to maintain social distance in their restaurants as well as follow COVID-19 protocols. This is the perfect time to revisit an old favourite haunt or find something new. >>

TOURISM WHISTLER/JUSTA JESKOVA

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Transit Info 604·932·4020 bctransit.com/whistler

@WhistlerTransit

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TRAIL MIX

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TAKE A HIKE There is no better summer to check off some of those long-awaited hikes. Explore Whistler’s “ghost town” with a walk to Parkhurst; discover the Ancient Cedars north of town; or, go a little further afield and get into the alpine at Rainbow Falls. Check out whistler.com.

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FTER EIGHT YEARS, A LOCAL COMPANY is breathing new life into an old Village venue. The Whistler Racket Club Group has taken over the lease at Whistler’s only tennis club with a goal of creating a familyfriendly space and programming that goes beyond the three indoor and four outdoor tennis courts and pickle ball courts. “We’re trying to create something really fun for the whole community,” says owner Jamie Grant, co-founder of The Whistler Racket Club Group and former head tennis pro. And that includes tourists too. Grant and partners have big ideas of growing the business beyond rackets with yoga and dance as well as expanding the outdoor patio and revamping the indoor lounge space. He added: “Even if you don’t play tennis, you will love to join in the activities.” 14

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MAKE SOME RACKET

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2020

JUSTA JESKOVA

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c Throughout the spring and early summer, Blackcomb Helicopters continued its work as an essential service in B.C., working in wildfire suppression, Search and Rescue efforts as well as ambulatory flights. As of June, Blackcomb Helicopters is back in business with its breathtaking tourism adventures from helipicnics and heli-hiking to heli-fishing and heli-yoga. There is truly no better way to get away from the crowds and experience the natural grandeur of B.C.’s Coast Mountains. blackcombhelicopters.com. Or book a tour with headlinemountain holidays.com

HEATH MOFFATT PHOTOGRAPHY

TAKE FLIGHT

SHOP LOCALLY After enjoying your day in the mountains whether biking, hiking, swimming, sightseeing, and exploring, don’t miss out on the local shops where you can find a little piece of Whistler to take home with you, whether it’s local soap or jewellery, or local beer and chocolate. W

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Whistler’s Premier Shopping Centre

Whistler Kitchen Works The Royal Taste of India

EXPERIENCE WHISTLER’S PREMIER SHOPPING CENTRE. OFFERING A VARIETY OF SPECIALTY BOUTIQUES, RESTAURANTS AND PROFESSIONAL SERVICES. Owned and Managed by

www.headwaterprojects.ca

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TRAIL MIX MOUNTAIN ROOTS BUY LOCAL, BUILD COMMUNITY

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here’s little doubt Whistler offers endless creative inspiration. Here’s what some of the locals are up to as they find ways to live, work, create and set down roots in this mountain town. —Keili Bartlett

MOORE IS MORE c ANDREA MOORE’S

W O LV E S A R E M U C H L A R G E R T H A N T H E I R R E A L - L I F E inspiration. This Whistler-based artist has her work featured at Mountain Galleries at the Fairmont, and she creates movement with loose brushstrokes and neutral, earthy tones. Moore, who visited a wolf sanctuary in order to get more closely acquainted with her muse, captures the spirit of each animal. She has also created live art at the Whistler Farmers’ Market. Mountain Galleries co-director and manager Liz Peacock says Moore is good at multitasking—often painting and talking at the same time. Moore is equally enthusiastic about meeting dogs, and often is commissioned for canine portraits.

W H E N S H E WA S 1 0 Y E A R S O L D , Terri Gercovich made a toy entirely from scrap wool. Now, the creator of Re:creation Designs still sources her materials from scraps, whether it’s an old cinder box or endof-roll fabric usually destined for the landfill. The name is a play on the word “recreation,” inspired by Whistler’s natural beauty and abundance of outdoor activities. It also refers to reusing and recycling and recreating. Gercovich’s designs include lightweight linen dresses that protect from the sun’s harsh rays while thermo-regulating. The durable fibers are biodegradable, and get softer with age and wear. Complete the look with a unique scrap brass and crystal necklace. Each piece tells its own story that Gercovich is happy to share. Find her online at recreationdesigns.ca.

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COURTESY FUNCTIONAL PIE

SLOW FASHION

LAST SUMMER, WHISTLER’S FIRST distillery raised a glass. What started as a pet project for distiller Kwang Chen, Montis Distilling is now set to celebrate its first year in business this June. Alongside the staple vodka and “big and bold” gin, the Function Junction-based business has also been a distiller of hand sanitizer, which has been available to the community throughout the COVID pandemic. While you could leave the distilling to the experts, Montis Distilling also offers the chance to become your own gin distiller. “Spirits are so subjective,” Chen says. If you have a great idea for a gin flavour, work with the experts at Montis to create a custom batch. Book through montisdistilling.com. The minis (50 ml) are the perfect size to take a little taste of Whistler home with you!

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COURTESY MONTIS DISTILLING

COURTESY RECREATION DESIGNS

GINSPIRATION

LIFE OF PIE c MUCH LIKE THE PEOPLE IT FEEDS, Functional Pie Pizzeria’s influences come from around the globe. Owner Leigh Scott says the focus on quality ingredients—think 20 per cent full-fat mozzarella, fresh-cut veggies, traditionally cured meats—makes all the difference in its classic taste. Functional Pie is fresh from the oven, having celebrated its first year in operation last November. While there is no delivery option, you can take out from their Function Junction location or take a seat inside or out. Scott says he is especially proud of Functional Pie’s vegan and gluten-free options; the glutenfree dough is sourced from a flour mill with roots in Italy. Check the menu out online at functionalpie.com. W


We invite you to keep your passion for adventure alive,

P: Blake Jorgenson

responsibly, and discover a new pace in the Whistler you’ve always loved.

OPENLY MINDFULLY CONFIDENTLY DIFFERENTLY RESPONSIBLY SENSIBLY

SIMPLY

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DUAL ADMISSION CULTURAL PASS Whistler’s Essential Arts + Culture Experience

SLCC

Purchase pass at whistler.com/arts | Plan your visit at slcc.ca and audainartmuseum.com


arts scene

PETALS IN SUNLIGHT, BY VALERIE BUTTERS, FROM ADELE CAMPBELL FINE ART GALLERY.

FLOWER POWER FROM THE MOUNTAINS TO GARDENS AND GALLERIES, FLORAL INSPIRATION ABOUNDS IN WHISTLER

STORY BY ALYSSA N O E L

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R O W I N G U P, VA L E R I E B U T T E R S moved a lot. With a fighter pilot father, the family jumped from Northern Quebec where she was born, to Manitoba, to Germany and finally to Ottawa, where she attended high school. But throughout all that upheaval there was one constant: the garden. “My dad is a big gardener and we’ve always had lots of flowers and all sorts of different perennials,” Butters says. “It’s how we spent our time together as a family. Gardens were familiar. We could be in a different country, but we had that common thread of gardening.” When she moved to Montreal to attend art school, Butters kept that family tradition alive. “It started as an inexpensive muse in art school … As far as flowers go, they range from every colour in the world. They can have their own little story, own little personality, their own gestures. There’s no limit to the possibilities that they can provide to an artist.” Several artists, whose work you can find in Whistler,

turn to flowers for inspiration. While mountains and wildlife might get most of the spotlight in the local arts scene, it’s not surprising that the intricate blooms, both in valley gardens and untamed in the alpine, are getting a little attention too. With a decade of Sea to Sky gardening under her belt, Butters’ artistic process starts in her flower garden. She solely paints flowers—but not the still life bouquets you might imagine. Rather, she puts an expressionist spin on her subject, capturing the movement, texture and mood. “If I have a painting of peonies, I want to give the idea of delicate softness, fluttering petals,” she says. “You still get that feeling of delicate and soft without getting into too many details.” Most often she paints from a physical arrangement of flowers she brings into her studio. Because of the short growing season for some varieties, that can mean a flurry of work in a short period. “I cut my flowers, put them in a vase and put them in the studio,” she says. “I’ve got little tables all over the place.” >>

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ABOVE: GIFTS IN YOUR LIFE, BY GAIL JOHNSON. TOP RIGHT: FRESH PICKED, BY GAIL JOHNSON. BOTH PIECES ARE FROM MOUNTAIN GALLERIES AT THE FAIRMONT.

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T H AT A P P R O A C H I S S I M I L A R to Gail Johnson’s. Based on Vancouver Island, she and her husband grew 20 acres of fruits and vegetables and two additional acres of fresh and dried flowers—and sold them at their market—for 30 years. While running the market required creativity, it wasn’t until she decided to retire in 2000 that Johnson finally had a chance to pursue art—a career path she started decades earlier when she thought she was going to be a medical illustrator. “I started painting and I was really at a loss,” she says. “I’d had this incredibly busy, rewarding, hard-working career. How did I transfer that to painting? I felt this real intuition to go down into our fields with a canvas and crack open a beer and start painting. At that time the flowers were still in bloom and I was just captivated by it. In a nutshell, that’s how I got into flowers. It was my tie-in. I thought, ‘How can I start painting and honour what we have done?’” Like Butters, Johnson’s paintings put a unique flair on flowers. She says flowers offer “bones to hang a painting on.” While she also paints landscapes and seascapes, the shape of flowers “are so wonderful and the colour sucks me in every time,” she says. “Even a bouquet is so much fun to paint. I like to capture movement and sense of air or wind or whatever is going through them. It has to have a feeling that there’s air breathing around it. They’re very fun and challenging.” >>


WHISTLER GALLERIES AUDAIN ART MUSEUM 4350 Blackcomb Way 604-962-0413

A AD DE EL LE E C CA AM MP PB BE EL LL L F F II N NE E A A RT, RT, W WH H II SS T T LL E ER R

audainartmuseum.com ADELE CAMPBELL FINE ART GALLERY In the Westin Resort & Spa 604-938-0887 adelecampbell.com ART JUNCTION GALLERY & FRAME STUDIO 1068 Millar Creek Road, Function Junction

pa i n t i n g s

sculpture

j e w e l l e ry

604-938-9000 artjunction.ca MOUNTAIN GALLERIES AT THE FAIRMONT In the Fairmont Chateau Whistler 604-935-1862 www.mountaingalleries.com THE PLAZA GALLERIES 22-4314 Main Street 604-938-6233 plazagalleries.com THE GALLERY AT MAURY YOUNG ARTS CENTRE

w h i s t l e r ’ s c a n a d i a n a rt d e s t i n at i o n at t h e w e s t i n , w h i s t l e r

4335 Blackcomb Way 604-935-8410 artswhistler.com SQUAMISH LIL’WAT CULTURAL CENTRE 4584 Blackcomb Way 1-866-441-SLCC (7522) slcc.ca VINCENT MASSEY STUDIO 8605 Forest Ridge Drive 604-905-8363

classic

c o n t e m p o r a ry

vincentmasseypottery.com WHISTLER CONTEMPORARY GALLERY In the Hilton Resort 604-938-3001 (main) In the Four Seasons Resort 604-935-3999 whistlerart.com

adelecampbell.com WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2020

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While MacLaurin painted her late husband Don’s coffin with his beloved red MG car, hers is a stunning work of art covered in local wildflowers. “I have my coffin up in the garage,” she says. “When people come and visit we have to go up and see my coffin.” Why wildflowers? “Wildflowers, I love,” she says. “And why not?” Still very much alive with her coffin stowed away and her artistic inspiration flowing, MacLaurin also painted wildflowers on a pair of her neighbour’s skis. “People ask around about it,” she says. “On two different skis I painted 17 different wildflowers because that’s how many I know and loved.” Valerie Butters is represented in Whistler by Adele Campbell Fine Art. You can find Gail Johnson’s work locally at Mountain Galleries. Isobel Maclaurin is a member of Arts Whistler and paints regularly in her Alpha Lake studio. W

COURTESY ISOBEL MACLAURIN

ISOBEL MACLAURIN, HOWEVER, FINDS painting flowers easy. To be fair, though, she has several decades of experience behind her. Deemed “Whistler’s first artist,” the spry and outgoing 88-year-old, is perhaps best known for her bold wildflowers—sometimes painted in a realistic style and other times taking on a largerthan-life approach. You can find some examples of that at Rainbow Park where her murals are featured. “I have them all over the place,” she says. “Big murals of animals and flowers and the mountains at Rainbow.” While MacLaurin’s style and subject matter have varied wildly over the years, her love of the bright red paintbrush, purple lupins, and orange tiger lilies found in the Whistler alpine have made consistent appearances in her work—from magazine covers to her sundeck to her coffin. Yes, you read that right.

TOP: ONE OF ISOBEL MACLAURIN’S MANY FLOWER PAINTINGS. RIGHT: MACLAURIN IN HER YARD, WITH HER PRE-BUILT COFFIN, WHICH SHE HAS PAINTED WITH HER BELOVED WILDFLOWERS.


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©2020 Marriott International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Offer valid for stays booked through September 30, 2020 for stays through December 20, 2020 at participating Marriott International hotels. Must quote promotional code D3Q to receive offer. Member Rates with additional discount can only be booked by Marriott Bonvoy Members. Early check-out not permitted. Should early check out be necessary discount will be reversed upon check out. Limited number of rooms are available for this promotion. Tax and Daily Resort Fee are additional. Offer does not apply to groups of 10 or more rooms. Offer cannot be combined with any other promotions. Blackout dates and other restrictions may apply. Rates are per room, per night and based on availability at the time of reservations.. Photo: Tourism Whistler/Justa Jeskova

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mountain biking

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STO RY BY A L I S ON TAYLOR

That all hung in the balance this spring as the COVID19 pandemic swept the globe, looking ready to cast its pall over Whistler with a disastrous summer season for mountain biking. The spectre of the bike park not opening at all loomed large as May long weekend’s traditional opening day came and went; WORCA (the Whistler Off Road Cycling Association) lost more than half of its budget as its biggest funding source was cut to 30 per cent, straining the local non-profit charged with maintaining and building trails; and one of the biggest Whistler draws of all, the 10-day Crankworx mountain biking festival, was cancelled. Summer’s outlook was bleak. But quietly, against the backdrop of global and local trials and tribulations and things quite out of Whistler’s control, mountain bikers began hitting the trails. Lots of them. And now mountain biking could very well be Whistler’s silver lining to the COVID-19 cloud. >>

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JUSTA JESKOVA

F I V E Y E A R S AG O , W H I ST L E R TO O K an in-depth look at the economic spin-off of its renowned mountain biking scene to truly understand its importance to the resort. The numbers came as no surprise. The study showed that mountain biking in Whistler was responsible for a staggering $75.9 million in economic activity in B.C. If Whistler needed any definitive proof that it was the mecca of mountain biking, this was it. The results fuelled the long-burning fire to push mountain biking’s boundaries even further, both within the world’s biggest bike park and in the valley beyond it.


TOURISM WHISTLER/JUSTA JESKOVA

SETTING THE STAGE FOR SUMMER

JUSTA JESKOVA

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TOP: PART OF THE BEAUTY OF RIDING IN WHISTLER IS THE WILDLIFE AND THE SCENERY. ABOVE: BRIDGES ARE AN INTEGRAL PART OF THE WHISTLER FLOW.

hen WORCA president Dale Mikkelsen learned in the spring that the Resort Municipality of Whistler, WORCA’s largest single grant provider, was chopping its funding from $120,000 to $40,000, he knew it would be a challenging summer. With WB closing ski operations in mid-March, unseasonably warm weather, and a push-back from other communities to keep mountain bikers at home due to COVID-19 concerns, riders began hitting the trails in Whistler en masse, way earlier than ever before. WORCA was unprepared. “Normally we’re ahead of the riders but this year the riders were ahead of us,” says Mikkelsen. “That created an urgency for us.” WORCA focused on the task at hand— getting the trails ready and encouraging riders to report conditions. The goal was simple: to do as much trail work as possible before the funding ran out, which was estimated to happen around the end of June. But then the community stepped up to the plate with individuals and businesses chipping in with donations. WORCA’s treasurer went to work to figure out if the non-profit would qualify for federal COVID assistance. It did. And it soon became clear that WORCA would be able

to maintain trail crews throughout the summer and keep Whistler’s multi-milliondollar trail assets in good shape. Mikkelsen says simply of the outpouring of local support: “People that choose to live in this town want to live here because of the amenities we have.” Meanwhile, WORCA developed the virtual Toonie Rides. This virtual ride replaced WORCA’s long-standing, weekly Thursday night tradition where local mountain bikers would gather and tackle a given trail or trails in a race/ride format. The new virtual Toonie format is designed to be completed via the Trailforks app at any time during the week. The first Toonie saw an impressive 193 riders; forty per cent were women. The virtual Toonie could be a new development that’s here to stay, admits Mikkelsen of its success. All signs are pointing in one direction: “For WORCA, what we’re realizing… is that our trail ridership will probably be the highest it’s ever been,” he says of the summer ahead. “We’re gearing up for a very busy season on the trails.” To its credit WORCA hasn’t missed a beat, looking after the trails for locals and tourists alike.


THE BUSINESS OF BIKING

A

t Coastal Culture, a locally owned bike shop located in Creekside, co-owner Ryan Brown says they had more calls this spring about new bikes than ever before. The phone was ringing off the hook as demand and interest skyrocketed. Bikes quickly disappeared from stores. Typically, Brown would suss out his potential customers with a few questions: What kind of biker are you? Downhiller? Commuter? Cross-country? Are you looking for a hard-tail, a dual suspension? What he found was many customers looking for an entry-level bike, looking for something to tackle trails like Whistler’s Lost Lake network, the perfect gateway for beginner/ intermediate mountain biking. He also saw a lot of older bikes coming in from local and Vancouver customers looking for an overdue tune up as riders rediscovered an old pastime. As spring wore on, and the bike park remained closed, diehard downhillers also started looking for Enduro bikes so they could hit the cross country trails in the valley. Brown muses about the different factors that played a role in this resurgence such as the inability to play team sports, the lack of gym facilities and the fact that families were cooped up at home and looking for an outlet to get active. Canadians, unlike people in many other countries, were allowed outside in the spring as the pandemic ravaged other places. Whistlerites, in particular, made the most of their backyard playground. Biking was the ultimate way to exercise with a handful of friends but remain socially distant too. For many it was a lifeline to staying healthy, fit and mentally strong in very stressful times. The boom was a saving grace for bike businesses like Coastal Culture which revamped its operations to accommodate the provincial safety rules and regulations. “COVID has affected a lot of businesses very differently,” says Brown with a nod to the businesses struggling in the face of the pandemic. How many new baseball gloves were sold this spring? How many soccer cleats? How many people were spending money on summer camps? Bike sales, however, surged. That includes e-bike sales, which have been steadily growing in popularity year over year. E-bikes are allowed on most Whistler trails and bike rentals are available in the resort, offering yet another enticement to the sport. >>

EXPERIENCE WHISTLER DIFFERENTLY THIS SEASON Be kind, be calm and be safe Practice physical distancing, wash your hands often, and avoid touching your face Support local businesses Stay home if you are sick

whistler.ca

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BIKE PARK OPENING

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he Whistler Mountain Bike Park may not look and feel as it has in years past but, as of late June, two chairlifts will be running, giving mountain bikers the fast track to their downhill fun. “It’s important for the community and it’s important for us,” says Marc Riddell, director of communications with Vail Resorts, of the push to get the bike park operational this summer.

Whistler Blackcomb will enforce social distancing while in the lift line, as well as the requirement for a face covering while in line. Bikers must ride the chairlift with people in their riding party. The enforcement of these new measures may create some delays. Whistler Blackcomb will manage capacity on a daily basis and there may be a cap on access if it cannot maintain regulations. “We are hyper focused on putting measures in place that meet the requirements at the time,” says Riddell of the provincial health and safety requirements. “We’re going above and beyond. “It’s going to be a different feel when you come to the bike park.” Patrol will also look different this year as patrollers will be in Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) when they respond to calls. Recognize your limits, cautions Riddell, and ride trails within those limits.

FROM HEART-STOPPING

TOURISM WHISTLER/JUSTA JESKOVA

Though opening was delayed by several weeks, Riddell says the company is aware of the pentup demand. It will not, however, be business as usual, he cautions.

DOUBLE BLACK TRAILS TO CRUISEY GREENS, THERE IS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE.

STAYING THE COURSE

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t was a blow for so many—racers, organizers, businesses—when the Enduro World Series (EWS) and the Crankworx team made the crushing decision to cancel the rest of the reason. Local enduro racer Julia Long was coming out of a third-place finish in Whistler at the EWS last year, looking to make her mark with a strong race year ahead. Plan B meant she was on the trails in Whistler instead, perhaps not riding as hard as she does during training, but putting in some miles on her bike. “It’s awesome to see a lot of people riding,” says Long of the excitement on the local trails. Brown adds that part of the beauty of Whistler is that with 200 plus trails and hundreds of kilometres of riding, it’s easy to keep your distance. And there’s something for every level from the green trails of Lost Lake to the double black diamonds that give Whistler its hard-core riding reputation. “One thing that blows me away about riding in Whistler is it’s just so spread out still,” says Brown. “There’s so much to ride.” It costs $60 for a WORCA membership.

That money goes towards keeping Whistler’s trails in great shape as well as developing new trails. “Sixty dollars is probably the cheapest season pass you’re going to get anywhere,” says Mikkelsen. “Whistler has an amazing asset. But it happens on the back of a notfor-profits and volunteers.” In late June WORCA announced it was raising $10,000 to get to work on Chipmunk Rebellion, a blue trail in the south end of town linking in to the nowiconic alpine riding adventure trail, The Lord of the Squirrels. The first $4,000 raised would be matched by a private donor who lives in Hong Kong and visits Whistler every summer; yet another example of Whistler’s reach as a global mountain biking destination. Check out worca.com. Think about spending some money on Trail Karma, donating right from your phone through the Trailforks app. Or, if you can, volunteer some hours. While the dust has yet to settle on the short and long term impacts of COVID-19 on Whistler and beyond, mountain biking is setting up for a summer to remember. W

“ONE THING THAT BLOWS ME AWAY ABOUT RIDING IN WHISTLER IS IT’S JUST SO SPREAD OUT STILL. THERE’S SO MUCH TO RIDE.” –Ryan Brown


THINGS TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

I

f this is your first time exploring Whistler’s mountain biking trails, be prepared before you go.

COURTESY CANADIAN WILDERNESS ADVENTURES

It’s always best to understand your level—a Whistler blue trail is often more challenging than a blue trail elsewhere! To get your bearings, start off in Lost Lake Park. Lost Lake’s Zappa trails in particular are the best way to figure it out. These trails, named after singer/songwriter Frank Zappa with names like Dwarf Nebula, Gee I Like Your Pants and Jelly-Roll Gumdrop, are well-maintained blue level trails located in the heart of the Village. Lost Lake is also home to wide, pea-gravel, green-rated trails. Download the Trailsforks app to help you as you explore Whistler’s mountain bike trails. Or hire a local guide to give you the inside scoop. If mountain biking seems too challenging, try your hand at e-biking. One thing is for certain, no matter where you stand on the oft-contentious e-bike debate, e-bikes are here to stay. This is a fun and easy way to make your way around Whistler, going further afield than you could possibly imagine in a safe and enjoyable way. Rent an e-bike and begin on the Valley Trail.

E-BIKES ARE A GREAT WAY TO GET HIGH INTO WHISTLER’S ALPINE.

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faces of whistler

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WAY OF THE BY PADDLEBOARD, CANOE, RACING BOAT OR WAKEBOARD, THESE WHISTLER LOCALS MAKE THE MOST OF OUR RIVERS AND LAKES

STO RY BY B R A DEN DU P U I S

L ERIC WIGHT OF BACKROADS WHISTLER, WITH ITS BASE AT LAKESIDE PARK, IS READY TO HIT SUMMER.

DAVID BUZZARD

THE WATER THIS

IKE SO MANY BEFORE HIM, WHEN ERIC WIGHT arrived in Whistler in the mid ’70s, it was for the skiing. Living in Vancouver at the time, Wight and some friends saw a picture of Whistler Mountain in a magazine, captioned with a promise that it would soon be world famous. Say no more—they packed up and headed north, setting up shop in an old loggers’ cabin near Nita Lake. “It was great,” he recalls. “We were right between Nita and Alpha lake in this old cabin; we would just walk up to the Creekside lifts and Dusty’s and Southside Deli, and it was just awesome.” Back then, Whistler’s five pristine valley lakes and countless alpine aquatic offerings were basically an afterthought, and Whistler wasn’t exactly considered a major summer tourism draw. “In those days, what was there? There was no grocery store. We had a laundromat, two gas stations, and about seven or eight bars,” Wight says, noting that back then, you had to make sure at least one of your roommates had a car (for grocery trips to Squamish), and summers were typically spent working in the city. “Because summer in those days, there was A: no work, and B: no work,” Wight quips. Those lakes, though … definitely some potential there. By 1982, Wight was living in the resort year-round, and in 1985 he started his own business: Backroads Whistler. >>

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MAUREEN HARRIMAN SAYS WHISTLER’S PEACE, ITS MOUNTAINS AND ITS QUIETNESS MAKE IT A UNIQUE PLACE TO TRAIN.

Originally focused on bike rentals and tours, today the tour operator puts its emphasis on Whistler’s water, operating out of a prime location at Lakeside Park. “The lake rentals are busy, but the River of Golden Dreams is so famous and so, so great,” Wight says, of Backroads’ biggest draw. “It’s like you go from this developed resort in the Village, and within minutes you’re in the forest and you’re on this kind of wilderness river, with flowers on the bank and eagles soaring overhead and the beavers swimming around. It’s super cool.” The burgeoning popularity of the River of Golden Dreams is just one reflection of Whistler’s newest reality: the skiing still rocks, but more and more are coming to realize that summertime is where the real fun is.

AIDEN LEGGE

ROWING HER BOAT

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W A N D E R D O W N T O A LT A L A K E at the right time—typically in the morning or early evening hours, when the wind is at its calmest—and you might catch Maureen Harriman rowing in her single scull, training for her next big race. “Being out on the water is fantastic. I mean, it’s so peaceful,” the Masters level athlete and former Canadian National Rowing Team member says. “So I do love to just get in my single and go out … you have a beautiful lake, you can see the mountains, it’s very quiet so we have a very unique place to train. We don’t actually have a rowing club, but it’s a really nice environment to train on.” Harriman is an otolaryngologist—a doctor specializing in ear, nose and throat ailments—with offices in Whistler and Burnaby, while also doing operations out of the hospitals in Squamish and Surrey. >>


UPWARDS AND ONWARDS Photo: Haley Lorraine, Tara O’Grady, Paul Bride

Adventure awaits in the great outdoors. The Sea to Sky Gondola is located 2kms south of Squamish between Vancouver and Whistler.

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Photos: Chris Christie & Haley Hardy

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JORGE ALVAREZ

ABOVE: STEVE LEGGE ENJOYS ONE OF WHISTLER’S LAKES WITH HIS KAHUNA PADDLEBOARD. LEFT: ROWER AND DOCTOR, MAUREEN

COURTESY MAUREEN HARRIMAN

HARRIMAN.

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She balances her hectic work schedule with her hours training on Whistler’s lakes, as well as her family life (Harriman is also a mother of three). “Everything has to be scheduled, so I do plan my time to be on the water, I plan my time to be in the office, but it does take a lot of juggling … I don’t watch a lot of TV, that’s for sure,” she says with a laugh. “It’s busy, definitely, but I think it keeps me in a better balance than just doing only sport or just doing medicine.” Harriman rowed “quite seriously” in her younger years, before taking a 15-year break. She credits friend Diane Ziff for getting her back on the water once she and her family settled in Whistler. “I always loved it, I was just really busy, and I didn’t really know that there was a place for people that were doing it,” she says, adding that she initially

didn’t plan on competing again. “But then all these opportunities came up for Masters rowing,” she says. “I got introduced to a lot of different people internationally that I row with, and a lot of races, and so it’s been really fun. The whole Masters athletics was new to me and I’ve been really enjoying it.” Not just enjoying it, but excelling at it: Harriman still races every year, with great success (including recent Canadian and World Championships wins in her single scull). With its ease of access to water, active lifestyle and inspiring array of local athletes, Whistler plays a big role in Harriman’s success on the water, she says—though she couldn’t do it without the support of her husband Dave and three children Gabby, Eric and Jacqui.


THE PADDLEBOARD KING HAVING WHAT HE DESCRIBES AS AN “ECCENTRIC BRAIN,” there are likely few places in the world that could accommodate the varied interests of Steve Legge. As it turns out, Whistler has been the perfect place to make a home, grow a business, raise a family and, give back to the community. Since arriving in Whistler in 1986, Legge has been both a pro skier in the winter and pro golfer in the summer, a consultant for Head Ski Products and Freeride Athletes, head coach of the Canadian Alpine Snowboard team, and a long-established realtor, now with Engel & Völkers, working in residential and commercial real estate, among other things. And since 2010, he’s been the owner/operator of Kahuna Paddleboards. In his first year, he had just five stores selling his boards—a wider, more stable paddleboard than was on the market at the time—with a goal of eventually getting his product in 50 stores. “THAT’S WHAT Ten years later, Kahuna boards are found in 82 stores across Canada, and PEOPLE DON’T Legge is now eyeing growth in markets REALIZE, IS IN THE like Australia and New Zealand. SUMMER HOW “It’s very social, and it’s an easy sport, and not only is it easy, it’s a great MUCH WATER form of recreation,” Legge says, adding LIFESTYLE THERE that he’s heard of injuries to ankles, hips, knees, shoulders and more that IS HERE, AND were rehabbed with the assistance of PADDLEBOARDING paddleboards. IS BECOMING Add to that its versatility— paddleboard yoga anyone? How about A MASSIVE PART some paddleboard fishing?—and it OF IT.” might just be the perfect summertime tool for use on Whistler’s waterways. – Steve Legge “That’s what people don’t realize, is in the summer how much water lifestyle there is here, and paddleboarding is becoming a massive part of it,” he says. And it doesn’t stop there. Foiling is next on Legge’s radar, another way to enjoy the water by floating over it. In 2017, Legge began making foils, fins and boards for surfing and wakesurfing, and Stinger Foils was born. Like Wight and so many others before and after him, Legge understands Whistler’s true appeal. “I moved to Whistler for the winter, and stayed because of the summer,” he says. “I’ve been around the world, honest to god. I’ve coached in Chile, I’ve coached everywhere you could think of, I’ve been to almost every ski hill. There’s nothing better than here, and I can honestly say that. “Once you’re here, it’s like, why would I go anywhere else?” W

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whistler home

LIVING WITH THE BEST VIEW IN TOWN PRIVACY IS PARAMOUNT AT STONEBRIDGE OASIS

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STORY BY ALISON TAYLOR PHOTOS BY AMANDA OSTER & STEPHEN LI

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ABOVE; THE STATE-OF-THE-ART KITCHEN LOOKS OUT OVER BOTH WHISTLER AND BLACKCOMB MOUNTAINS. RIGHT: PERFECT FOR LARGE FAMILY GATHERINGS, THE DINING TABLE HAS SPACE FOR 20.

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HISTLER HOMES ARE DESIGNED WITH THE VIEWS IN MIND. Few homes, however, rival the view from 5454 Stonebridge Drive and what realtor John Ryan calls its “front row location” to Whistler. He still remembers the first time he looked out the floor-to-ceiling windows, the valley expanse laid out before him and North America’s biggest ski resort ahead. There were four shinny games on the frozen lakes below; skiers and snowboarders were swooshing downhill; the coastal rainforest was blanketed in fresh snow. “It was so picture perfect Canadiana,” recalls Ryan. Change the season and the frozen white ice turns deep blue with glacier-fed lakes and rivers; hockey sticks are replaced with colourful canoes, sailboats and paddleboards slicing through the water; the world’s biggest and best mountain bike park is in full swing. You can’t help but just stare outside… and want to feel a part of all that action. That’s exactly what appealed to the owners—a U.S. family who came to Whistler for a holiday and soon realized they wanted a second home here. “They fell in love with Whistler in the summer,” says Ryan, highlighting its peace and quiet, its fresh air, its forests. The design of this house is geared exactly to that—the kitchen, the 20-person dining table, the living room, the master bedroom, are all set out along that “front row” view to Whistler. >>

IT’S EASY TO RELAX AND UNWIND IN THIS COMFORTABLE MEDIA ROOM.

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ABOVE: THE MASTER BEDROOM IS LOCATED ON THE MAIN FLOOR, WITH MORE AMAZING VIEWS.

THE SAUNA AND SHOWER ARE PART OF THE GYM FACILITIES,

BELOW: THE WINE CELLAR, LOCATED ON THE LOWER LEVEL, FEATURES THE SAME WARM WOOD

LOCATED IN THE LOWER LEVEL OF THE HOME.

FINISHINGS AS THE REST OF THE HOME.

T H A T ’ S N O T T O T A K E A W AY F R O M what’s inside too: 10 bedrooms, 11 bathrooms, home gym, separate guest wing, library, wine cellar, lap pool, hot tub. At more than 8,300 square feet, it could easily feel lavish and cavernous. And yet, this home feels understated and warm, unpretentious with its natural stone and light millwork and West Coast contemporary design—a classic Whistler post-and-beam construction creating that elevated sense of comfort and coziness. Ultimately, however, this home is designed to let Whistler’s natural environment speak to its grandeur. Privacy is paramount. Unlike many Whistler homes, built side by side in ski in/ ski out locations, Stonebridge has the luxury of seclusion without losing that immediate connection to Whistler life. “You can’t see the house from the road,” explains Ryan. “No one knows what’s beyond that gate which is very appealing.” Set on more than eight acres, the property also has space for a private helicopter pad. >> 42

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2020


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ABOVE: STONEBRIDGE IS AN OASIS NESTLED HIGH ABOVE THE VALLEY, WITH UNPARALLELED VIEWS OF NORTH AMERICA’S BIGGEST SKI AND MOUNTAIN BIKE RESORT. BELOW: THE SPECTACULAR OUTDOOR LIVING SPACE SETS THIS HOME APART.

R E N O W N E D L A N D S C A P E A R C H I T E C T PA U L S A N G H A , who designed the outdoor space as part of a 2016 renovation after the house was built the previous year, describes the experience of arriving at this home as an “unveiling” to that dramatic and spectacular view. Anticipation builds as you wind up through the Stonebridge subdivision, tucked away on the west side of Whistler; it grows as you pass through the private gate, up along the driveway, past wild rocky outcrops until you pull into the courtyard with its three-car garage to the side. There is a mounting sense that something is waiting for you just beyond… ’til you get to that perfect-picture panorama. Sangha was tasked with finding a way to make the house part of the natural environment—adding bursts of wildflowers for a softer look amid the massive dark rocks, layering the landscape with trembling aspens set before the coastal rainforest with its towering hemlocks and Douglas firs. Key to Sangha’s design was a new outdoor pavilion, located off the family room. This large all-season area is covered and heated and includes a state-of-the-art pizza oven and striking wood-burning fire place. “That became an integral part of the house,” says Sangha of the pavilion space. It’s a unique space in Whistler, adds Ryan: “It’s as good as this town gets.” Stonebridge is a quiet haven on the edge of the bustling resort, an exclusive subdivision set high above the town and tucked close to the forest with easy access to some of Whistler’s best hiking and biking trails. In fact, it’s so appealing that the current owners have bought another lot in the subdivision to build another Whistler dream home with yet another spectacular view. W 44

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FRESH TRAIL AIR IS THE BEST SELF-CARE!

Enjoy the safe, vast outdoors with bike gear for the entire family at our Whistler Village locations: in the Hilton Whistler Hotel & Spa

in the Hilton Whistler Hotel & Spa

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Explore the beauty, wonder and adventure of your own backyard! Just a two-hour drive from Vancouver, B.C., Fairmont Chateau Whistler offers an unforgettable mountain experience with endless opportunities to discover. With its own on-site golf course, luxurious slopeside pools and award-winning dining options, Fairmont Chateau Whistler offers a truly memorable experience, for less than you’ve imagined. Take advantage our BC Residents Offer, and enjoy savings up to 20% off.*

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*Summer rates from CAD $239 per night, based on double occupancy in a Fairmont room. Subject to availability at time of reservation. Daily resort experience fee of $20 CAD per room, per night plus applicable GST and Provincial Hotel Tax applies. Proof of British Columbia residency will be required upon check-in. Standard cancellation policy applies. For full terms and conditions, please visit www.chateau-whistler.com/offers


fine dining

PILLARS OF THE SCENE MEET THREE CHEFS WHO HAVE EACH HELPED SHAPE WHISTLER’S CULINARY CULTURE IN THEIR OWN DISTINCT WAYS

STORY BY BRANDON B ARRE T T

DAVID BUZZARD

C

O M PA R E D T O M A N Y O F its European counterparts, Whistler as a ski destination is still in its budding teenage years, having launched its namesake ski property in 1966, and only truly arriving on the international radar in the lead-up to the 2010 Winter Olympics. As a destination for exquisite fine dining, Whistler is younger still. After all, it was only with the construction of the Village in 1980 that the resort opened its first fine dining restaurant. These days, with more than 100 restaurants on offer catering to the many tastes and appetites of a global ski mecca, there’s no question that Whistler has carved out its own niche on the culinary scene. Bold, indulgent, and B.C. to its core, the ingredient-driven cuisine of Whistler has been shaped by the talented hands and ambitious vision of the chefs who have set down deep roots here. In a town known for constant change and high staff turnover, these longstanding pillars of the restaurant community have bucked that trend, putting their distinct mark on a culinary scene that has become the envy of resort destinations around the globe. >>

BEARFOOT BISTRO EXECUTIVE CHEF MELISSA CRAIG

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2020

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MELISSA CRAIG EXECUTIVE CHEF, BEARFOOT BISTRO

SIGNATURE DISH: BLACK COD AND DUNGENESS CRAB Craig was careful not to specify a particular preparation when she was asked to name her signature dish. “Anything with black cod and Dungeness crab,” she says. Growing up on Vancouver Island, Craig fell in love with Dungeness crab at a young age. She picked black cod as a distinctly B.C. ingredient that international clients aren’t usually exposed to. “Even when I go back east (as a guest chef), I fly with my fish from here. I’m very seafood-focused in that sense,” she says. 48

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2020

ARAXI AND IL CAMINETTO EXECUTIVE CHEF, JAMES WALT.

“I DO TAKE A LOT OF IDEAS FROM MY YOUNGER INTERNATIONAL STAFF, MAYBE HELP THEM WITH THE TECHNIQUE AND THEN WE FINALIZE A DISH.” – Melissa Craig

JAMES WALT EXECUTIVE CHEF, ARAXI & IL CAMINETTO

J

ames Walt has officially come full circle. The farm-to-table pioneer has always had an affinity for the rich culinary traditions of Italy, a passion he not only got to indulge during his time cooking at the Canadian Embassy in Rome, but more recently as the Executive Chef at Il Caminetto, where he took over the reins in 2017. Walt’s influence in Whistler stretches back more than two decades. In 1997, he was hired at Jack Evrensel’s Araxi, Whistler’s longest-running fine-dining restaurant, where he oversaw a new menu that moved more towards ingredientforward, locally driven cuisine—years before the locavore movement became de rigueur. “There was a real food culture that was starting to happen here, coinciding with what was going on in the world in general. People were really starting to become aware of what they were eating,” he says.

DAVID BUZZARD

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ince opening 25 years ago, Bearfoot Bistro has been known as the place to go to for unbridled decadence. In a town known to indulge, that’s no small feat. But the award-winning fine-dining restaurant located in the Listel Hotel has pared back that approach over the years without losing its sense of grandeur. “Way back when, maybe one dish would have 12 steps on it. My food now is not simpler, but getting away from molecular gastronomy,” explains Executive Chef Melissa Craig. “Still using technique but focusing on flavour and textures. I always love textures, even if it’s just a carrot on the plate.” Craig cut her teeth at the Sooke Harbour House on Vancouver Island, where she developed a deep passion for seafood. Although Bearfoot has traditionally cast a wider net when sourcing top-shelf ingredients, more recently, Craig has put the focus back on the abundance of high-quality products available in her own backyard. “We’re using a lot more local, as we can, and I think there’s more opportunity for that with more farms and different collaboratives of farms getting together and doing more deliveries. It’s a lot more accessible,” she says. Despite having earned a litany of industry accolades, including the 2008 Gold Medal Plate at the Canadian Culinary Championships, Craig remains a student of the industry, constantly on the lookout for inspiration on her annual food-inspired travels alongside husband and Bearfoot founder André Saint-Jacques, as well as from her younger staff. “I’ve just worked with André for so long, I think he trusts my palate and my style—and I know my style has changed over the years,” she says. “I do take a lot of ideas from my younger international staff, maybe help them with the technique and then we finalize a dish. It’s interesting having fresh blood in the kitchen. That’s what keeps it interesting.”


Walt has taken that regional focus—along with the close ties he’s forged with local farmers—to Araxi’s sister restaurant, Il Caminetto, where his penchant for simply prepared, seasonal ingredients has meshed perfectly with the Italian culinary ethos. “Italy is kind of like farm-to-table times a hundred, because the whole country cooks that way,” Walt says.

SIGNATURE DISH: MISO-CRUSTED SABLEFISH IN SMOKED TUNA BROTH Walt’s cooking ethos—simple, fresh, delicious—doesn’t just apply to Italian cuisine. His delicate miso-marinated sablefish is a B.C. tweak on a classic Japanese recipe, and has been a fixture of Araxi’s menu since 1999. In fact, it became so popular that owner Toptable Group has transported a version of the dish to its famed Vancouver seafood restaurant, Blue Water Cafe, as well as its New York City sushi bar, Oceans. Typically served with seasonal vegetables and chewy soba noodles, no dish better exemplifies Walt’s naturalistic approach to cooking. “It’s everything I like in food,” he says. “It’s a really good product treated really lightly and accented with natural flavours and things that belong with it. With me, it’s the simple stuff: things that are meaningful and speak of the time and the place.” >>

french at heart

west coast soul

2129 Lake Placid Road www.reddoorbistro.ca

604.962.6262

The Nijjar family is pleased to introduce you to the Royal Taste of India. Our chefs provide the essence of traditional Indian Cuisine with a modern touch, preparing each dish to your specifications. Our sister company Kismet Estate Winery, located in Oliver BC, produces VQA quality red & white wine to pair with our exotic menu.

Fine Dining & Take Out WHISTLER MARKETPLACE

604-932-2010 Open ALL DAY from 11am to late

Indian cuisine that uses a palette of flavours ~ you’ll feel as if you’re halfway around the world! Open 7 days a week for Lunch & Dinner NEW IN THE HILTON WHISTLER RESORT Overlooking Mountain Square, Whistler Village | 604-932-9900

www.indianmasalabistro.com WWW.THEROYALTASTEOFINDIA.COM WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2020

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WOLFGANG STERR EXECUTIVE CHEF, WHISTLER BLACKCOMB

WHISTLER BLACKCOMB EXECUTIVE CHEF WOLFGANG STERR.

COURTESY WHISTLER BLACKCOMB

W

histler Blackcomb Executive Chef Wolfgang Sterr perfectly summed up the transformational shift the ski resort’s on-mountain dining has undergone in recent years with one anecdote. “You can take the Rendezvous Lodge as one of the projects we did in 2014—when before we would be opening boxes of products that would go in the deep-fryer, we changed to opening boxes of gai lan, beans, mushrooms and fresh ingredients that are finished in front of the guest with an international flair,” he says. The German-born, Swiss-raised chef joined Whistler Blackcomb in 2011, and has since made it his mission to completely overhaul the menus at North America’s largest ski resort to provide more organic, nutritional ingredients prepared in the culinary styles guests from nearby urban centres were already well versed in. “Cleaner food, more nutritious food, more international flair with local ingredients, and then put together in a way that could rival a restaurant in Seattle or Vancouver,” Sterr explains. “Before we would benchmark against other ski resorts, but let’s face it, other ski-resort food wasn’t that great. Then we switched gears through early 2012, 2013, by really benchmarking what the local client in Vancouver was eating and looking for.”

European Comfort Locally Sourced – Tandoor Oven – – Great Vegetarian/Vegan Selection –

Tandoori Grill Indian Cuisine 4368 Main St. # 201, UPSTAIRS, at corner of Northlands

604 .905.4900 LUNCH SPECIALS

We serve free-run Butter Chicken or Veggie fare with three side dishes for $15 incl. tax from 11.30 am - 2.30 pm.

MENU AND ONLINE OPTIONS:

Local’s favourite patio

RESERVATIONS AND PICK-UP ORDERS: TandooriWhistler.com DINNER DELIVERY: WhistlerDineIn.com VANCOUVER VENUE: OriginalTandooriKitchens.com

Lunch and Dinner daily - open 1pm to 10pm Town Plaza  (604) 938-1879

DINNER FROM 5 PM OPEN EVERY DAY UNTIL 9:30 PM

carambarestaurant.com

Tripadvisor Awards of Excellence: 2013-2019

Wood fired pizza, steak, pasta and seafood

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2020


A long-time vegetarian and dedicated ultra-runner, Sterr understands the power of food as fuel. It’s what helped inform the menu changes at Whistler Blackcomb, as well as the conversion, in 2015, of the Raven’s Nest, perched atop the Creekside Gondola, into the first all-vegan eatery at a North American ski resort. “I’m usually the butt end of any joke from my peers when it comes to meat-eating, but, in the end, I think they understand that a well-balanced diet and what you put into your engine is the performance you’re going to get out of it,” says Sterr.

SIGNATURE DISH: ZUCCHINI PASTA WITH LEMON ZEST When it comes to food, Sterr prefers to let the ingredients speak for themselves. “I’m very simplistic when it comes to food. I don’t necessarily use a lot of spices. I like to utilize what Mother Nature has to offer … preparing (food) in a way that gives you the maximum amount of flavour, but also combining it with keeping the nutritional value very high,” he says. “For me, it is a lot more about performance than it is the taste and texture of it, which is maybe not what you want to hear. It’s a raw and simple approach to food.” W

DINE-IN TAKEAWAY DELIVERY OPEN 4PM - 10PM DAILY

sushivillage.com | 604.932.3330

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2020

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casual dining & cocktails

AL FRESCO FEASTING ENJOY WHISTLER’S PATIO SCENE WITH YOUR SOCIAL CIRCLE

ASDFSDF STO RY BY GAIL J O HNS O N

Nothing can quite whet the appetite like fresh, clean mountain air. As such, patios abound in Whistler, as much a part of the town’s cultural makeup as its epic mountain biking, its lakeside adventures and its glorious scenic hikes. Here are three places that lift al fresco eating to higher elevations. BASALT WINE & SALUMERIA

S

ituated right on Village Stroll in the heart of the action, Basalt Wine & Salumeria’s patio is just as ideal for people-watching as it is for grazing. With pretty overhead lights and stone surround, the place might transport you from the Coast Mountains to Europe. Think wine bar, where you feel unhurried and where languorous conversations unfold over olives and warm bread. “The patio vibe is cozy, sophisticated, and relaxed,” says restaurant manager Amy Huddle. “Our charcuterie boards make for lovely summer noshing. Summer is a time to lighten up, slow down, and enjoy the nature Whistler provides. Nothing describes this better than a bottle of wine and a board of hand-selected cured meats, house-made terrines and locally sourced cheeses. You can people watch while slowly enjoying a casual meal, meant for sharing with friends.” You can build your own artisanal board with diverse, top-notch ingredients. Cheese selections include rustic Le Douanier from Quebec, bold Welsh cheddar, house-made labneh, and Jersey Blue from Golden Ears Cheesecrafters. Cured meats run the gamut from Italian truffle salami to bison salami by North Vancouver’s Two Rivers Speciality Meats. B.C. wine gets star billing at Basalt, but this summer there is also a new spritz menu, building on the popularity of the Aperol Spritz, that Italian aperitif cocktail with its distinctive bright orange colour—the ideal cocktail for an après on a sunny patio.. Huddle also highlights this summer’s Basalt Belini. The cocktail includes Italian prosecco and a refreshing spoonful of specially made white peach Lucia Gelato sorbeto for the perfect locally made sweet addition. “It’s nice and cool for the summer,” says Huddle. “It goes nicely with the charcuterie board. >>


FIREPLACE FOR THOSE COOLER SUMMER EVENINGS.

DARBY MAGILL

THE BASALT PATIO FEATURES A


ABBY COOPER

STONESEDGE KITCHEN

DAVID BUZZARD

T

THE STONESEDGE KITCHEN PATIO IS THE PERFECT PLACE TO GATHER WITH CLOSE FRIENDS AND ENJOY SOME FRESH WEST COAST AND EAST COAST OYSTERS.

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2020

ucked on the edge of Whistler Village, Stonesedge Kitchen has been a locals’ favourite since it opened in 2014. Off the main stroll’s beaten track, the patio is lively without feeling crowded. Come summer, with its comfy loungers and high-top tables, it’s one of the few spots that gets late-afternoon sun, perfect for those who prefer to avoid peak heat. The West Coast-focused menu (with small plates meant for sharing as well as full meals) could be described as premium casual, but executive chef’s Bobby Fresh’s standards are anything but relaxed. “We feature the best of B.C.,” says General Manager Chad DeAbreu. “Inspired by the surrounding mountains, fields, farms, and waters of the Pacific Northwest, the team’s delicious creations are simple but flavourful and made with seasonal, sustainable meat and produce.” For a signature summer Stonesedge experience, try the fresh West Coast and East Coast oysters. “Our oysters are served with our homemade “Notorious H.O.T. Sauce,” fresh blueberry white wine mignonette, and horseradish,” says DeAbreu. “The variety of oysters we serve is always changing, but you can expect to see Kusshi, Pacific Kiss, and Salt Lake Select.” DeAbreu suggests pairing the oysters with a glass of Mionetto Prosecco or a bottle of Simonnet Febvre Chablis or a French 75 cocktail. “It’s a classic cocktail with gin, lemon, sugar and prosecco,” he says. “It’s light, refreshing and delicious.” >>


IC AUTHENTR VIBE WHISTLETHE oN SpoRTS E ENS R C S BIg ACoS, HomE ofoTTS ANd TATER TIBLE INCREd HES SANdWIC oWNEd LoCALLy R TEd ANd opE A

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AIN ST. 14 M #21T- U4P3FR OM THE (JUS GS) OLYMPIC R@IN US FOLLOWSW STLER STINKY HI

OPEN LATE Mon. to Sat. till 3 a.m. Sun. till 2 a.m.

(604) 932-0410 4368 Main Street


COURTESY FAIRMONT CHATEAU WHISTLER

THE FAIRMONT’S SANGRIA IS THE PERFECT COMPLEMENT TO THE THREE-COURSE PATIO MENU.

FAIRMONT CHATEAU WHISTLER— WOODLANDS ROOFTOP

W

hen you think of higher elevations in Whistler you typically think of a spot high in the mountains. But one of the best views in town, on the edge of Whistler Village, is open to the public this summer with a pop-up patio restaurant. The rooftop terrace at the Fairmont Chateau Whistler will be a patio favourite this summer every Friday and Saturday with a set BBQ menu. “We knew that most people would really prefer to dine outside (this summer),” says Wendy Hargreaves, the Fairmont Whistler’s director of sales and marketing, of the reason to open the Woodlands Rooftop patio to the public to help ease the restrictions put in place for the COVID-19 pandemic. The large rooftop terrace, which can accommodate up to 120 people at a time, is fully tented for inclement weather. Two full walls will open up during sunny summer evenings. The three-course family-style menu will include mouthwatering meats from the grill including a 6 oz striploin with the Fairmont’s signature spice, smoked pork ribs and rotisserie chicken. The salads, including a refreshing watermelon salad topped with a lime dressing, will change throughout the summer, featuring ingredients that are in season. And Chef Isabel Chung’s favourite—grilled corn with chili lime aioli, feta cheese and cilantro—will be one of the featured side dishes. The perfect complement to this al fresco dining experience is the Fairmont’s white sangria, combining the best white wines from the Okanagan region along with seasonal fruit. “It is a harmonious blend of Okanagan white wine varietals and B.C. fruit,” says Food and Beverage Administrator Samantha Cailler. “Using a white wine is light, refreshing, crisp and is the perfect summer sipper.” An evening at Woodlands Rooftop will also include live music. The set menu is $49 per person. Hargreaves recommends making a reservation through Open Table or calling the hotel. W 56

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2020


S U M M E R P O P - U P R E S TA U R A N T

MuLive sic!

ON FAIRMONT CHATEAU WHISTLER’S BEAUTIFUL ROOFTOP TERRACE!

3-COURSE FAMILY-STYLE

SUMMER BBQ

$49

PER PERSON TAXES EXTRA

EVERY FRIDAY & SATURDAY EVENING THIS SUMMER! CHATEAU-WHISTLER.COM Reserve your spot today on Opentable.com or by email: whistler.restaurants@fairmont.com

To FROM:

Catherine Power-Chartrand

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GENERAL MANAGER

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E O P L E WAT C H I N G O N W H I ST L E R ’ S patios is one of the top pastimes during the summer, and nothing makes it better than having a great glass of wine in your hand. This goes for the legendary patios of Whistler’s restaurants and bars, your hotel balcony and even your home deck. Enjoying a glass of B.C. sparkling wine in the fresh mountain air is true luxury. There’s no need for a special occasion, other than good company, to pop a bottle of Summerhill Cipes Brut. The Cipes family are pioneers of the traditional method in B.C. (following the same process used in the Champagne region of France to produce Champagne). This award-winning sparkling wine is also organic. The patio at Summerhill overlooking Okanagan Lake in East Kelowna is one of the valley’s finest, if you make the trip to the Okanagan. Rosé has been popular for many years, and a classic south-of-France gem is just the ticket for a Whistler summer. Gris de Nabor, from Chateau de Nabor, makes a perfectly pale, dry rosé from the region of Gard, tucked in between Provence, Languedoc, and the Rhone, near the Mediterranean Sea. Have a glass for Happy Hour at The Raven Room, or grab a bottle at the Nesters Liquor Store for your own patio pleasure. When your patio is serving up juicy burgers, smoky roast veggies and hearty fare, or you need a rich red as the sun sets behind the mountains, spice it up with a great Syrah. Craggy Range Gimblett Gravels Syrah comes from a blessed Hawkes Bay vineyard on the North Island of New Zealand. Dark fruit and savoury notes make it perfect for BBQ fare, and the family behind this award-winning, world-class winery have been part of our Whistler community for more than 40 years. And finally, last year the top white of the Whistler Cornucopia ”Top 20 Wines” competition, as judged in blind tasting by top professionals, was a local chardonnay from Lillooet’s Fort Berens winery. It’s lightly oaked and perfect for any patio and a diverse array of foods, produced just 95 kilometres from Whistler Village as the crow flies. Take the scenic two-hour drive north over “the Duffey” (Highway 99) from Whistler to enjoy their patio overlooking the dramatic Fraser Canyon. —Samantha Rahn is the Fine Wine Ambassador for Select Wines, 2013 VIWF Sommelier of the Year, and longtime Whistler/Pemberton local. W

Go

r

P

PERFECT PAIRING BY SAMANTHA RAHN

k

ENJOY THE OUTDOORS WITH THESE EXCELLENT SUMMER WINES

BONNY MAKAREWICZ

PERFECT PATIO POURS

be

e

IMPORTANT PROOF!

PLEASE RESPOND WITHIN 24 HOURS.

ADVERTISING PROOF FOR

WHISTLER MAGAZINE

SUMMER/FALL 2020 ISSUE.

Please check this proof very carefully and indicate any corrections to be made. RESPOND BY EMAIL TO cpower@whistlermagazine.com OK to print as per this proof.

&

NEW PROOF needed with changes/corrections as indicated

Fresh

Cell: 604-932-1672

Cold

Cold Beer to go, Growler fills, Kegs, Rotating Cider tap, Wearables & Beeraphenalia! Function Junction 10 mins. south of Whistler Village 604-962-8889

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2020

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shopping whistler

OPEN FOR BUSINESS Many Whistler retailers are ready to welcome customers again this summer, all while following provincial COVID-19 safety regulations. With little-to-no opportunity to shop these past four months, Whistler Magazine lends a helping hand this summer, highlighting on-trend items from locally made honey to cool shorts that can be found right here in Whistler stores.

ROXY GO TO THE BEACH ELASTICIZED DENIM SHORTS These lightweight 100 per cent cotton denim shorts have a casual and unrestricted relaxed fit, with a mid-rise waist and elasticized waistband with drawcord. Available from The Quiksilver Store.

PYRRHA DIRECTION TALISMAN PENDANT Handcrafted using reclaimed sterling silver, bronze and 14K gold with conflict-free stones, Pyrrha jewelry features authentic wax seals and imagery from the Victorian Era. Each iconic talisman is designed to inspire the wearer with its symbolic meaning culled from heraldry. Available from Ruby Tuesday Accessories Ltd.

BUTTERFLY TRANSFORMATION SILK SCARF This beautiful 100 per cent silk scarf was inspired by the artwork of Jack Shadbolt— Butterfly Transformation Theme 1981, acrylic on canvas, in the Audain Art Museum Collection. The scarf is available at the Audain museum gift store.


Shopping Areas Nesters

UPPER VILLAGE

Village North

WHISTLER VILLAGE

ENGAGEMENT RING Gorgeous Canadian diamond and Canadian gold engagement ring, made in Canada. Available in white, yellow or rose gold, and priced from $2295. Specially designed by and available from Keir Fine Jewellery.

FUNCTION JUNCTION

To Va n

cou

ver

WHISTLER CREEKSIDE

Whistler Village is the hub of

WOMEN'S HELIUM HYBRID HOODED JACKET Lightweight and packable, this hybrid down liner combines warm down padding on front and back with stretchy jersey panel sides and sleeves for the perfect combination of core warmth and comfortable layering. Wear it alone for dry conditions or layer under a shell for extra warmth. Made using responsibly sourced down that is traceable through the Track My DownÂŽ program. Available at Peak Performance.

activity at the base of the mountains. A pedestrian-only paradise, it offers over 200 stores, galleries, restaurants and bars.

Village North is centred around

Whistler Marketplace, which offers a supermarket, liquor store and many fine shops and amenities.

Upper Village, situated at the

base of Blackcomb Mountain, is another walking-only area with many wonderful stores, restaurants and galleries.

Nesters is just two minutes north of Whistler Village and offers a variety of shops and restaurants, with a liquor store, grocery store and restaurants. WHISTLER FACE MASKS Help support the Whistler Blackcomb Foundation by purchasing a fun and comfortable face mask. There are three to choose from, each one representing a different iconic image from the Whistler area generously provided by legendary photographer, David McColm. These non-medical face masks are breathable, reusable and washable with stretchy earloops for maximum comfort. Masks will arrive early July for free local pick-up, or there is a small fee for domestic shipping. Limited quantities available! All proceeds go to support Sea to Sky Community Charities. Order online at whistlerblackcombfoundation.com >>

Rainbow Plaza, a five-minute

drive north of the Village, has a grocery store, liquor store, coffee shop, gas station and more.

Whistler Creekside, a

five-minute drive south of the Village, is a shopping area near the base of Whistler Mountain.

Function Junction is just 10

minutes south of Whistler Village and offers hardware, organic groceries, breweries, bakeries and many more shops and services.


shopping whistler

REMNANT BEAR T-SHIRT This men’s T-shirt with a colourful morphed bear/mountain design is available in black or dark teal, at Cool as a Moose.

GLUTEN FREE FORAGER PALE ALE Whistler Brewing Company has sought out only the best ingredients to brew this glutenfree amber pale ale that has a brush of malt character with a complement of hops. Available from Whistler Brewing Company.

OAKLEY FLAK 2.0 XL SUNGLASSES The XL edition offers a standard size frame with enhanced lens coverage, and every millimeter of the peripheral view is optimized with High Definition Optics in a durable yet lightweight design that takes performance to the next level and brings style along for the ride. Available with Prizm lenses to enhance colour, contrast and detail for an optimized experience. Available at the Oakley Store.

VANS BEACH HYBRID MEN’S SHORTS New for Spring 2020, these Vans Beach Hybrid Shorts are great for a dip in the lake, and then quick dry to wear around town! Available at Showcase Snowboards.

>>

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2020


Travel restrictions getting you down!? Join us in our emporium of wonder, where we’ve travelled to the corners of the world, bringing you the most thoughtful gifts. We have curated over 3,000 items that will inspire you to read, write, create, converse, think & build. (604) 935-7878 shop.getthegoods.ca get_the_goods_whistler 217-2063 Lake Placid Road, Creekside Village, Whistler

Artisan Pizza

Best

Breakfast Sandwich

GreenLake Station.com STOP at Whistler Chevron, CafĂŠ & Store 8110 Crazy Canuck Drive Hippest little gas station yo u ever did see

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2020

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shopping whistler COWS GREY SOCKS Treat your feet to a cute pair of Adora Bull socks, made of 95 per cent Polyester and 5 per cent Spandex. Available at Cows.

ROCKY MOUNTAIN CHOCOLATE BOMBS “Bombs” are like truffles after a day at the gym. They have a chocolate centre, which is dipped in caramel, then dipped in chocolate, then topped with delicious toppings. They come in a variety of flavours— cheesecake, creme brulée, and nutella, just to name a few. Available at Rocky Mountain Chocolate.

JELLYCAT STUFFIES The name JellyCat was dreamt up by a child who loved jellies and cats and giggled at the thought of the two together. The silliness of the name was a great reflection of the design and so it stuck! The Great Glass Elevator Candy Shop always carries a great selection of JellyCats for every season.

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WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2020

MONKEY BUSINESS CORKERS ROBOT Make the most of your bottle corks with these Corkers. Great as a gift or as a fun activity for yourself! These cute, collectible Robots spark up your dinner and make the best out of your wine corks. An original addition to the wine bottle you bring to dinner. Each set includes the parts required for one Corker. Cork not included. Available at Get the Goods. BURTON KIDS' SPURWAY TECH CREW LONG SLEEVE SHIRT This versatile, lightweight sweatshirt keeps kids comfortable through wild adventures. Made with Dryride Ultrawick to provide moisture-wicking breathability, this sweatshirt has thumbholes at the cuffs for easy layering and a kangaroo pocket. Bluesign® approved materials use only safe chemicals and reduce impact on both humans and the planet during manufacturing, and have a lifetime warranty. Available at Mountain Kids Outfitters. >>


FRESH PRODUCE FRESH BAKERY ORGANIC FOOD DELICIOUS SEAFOOD SPECIALTY MEATS BULK FOODS Located at the base of the Whistler Village Gondola 604.932.4100 O P E N

L A T E

DELIVERY SERVICE FRIENDLY PHARMACIST NUTRITIONAL ADVISORS

2019

HEALTH FOODS

A Charming & Unique Selection of Gifts & Kitchenware Dinnerware • Linens • Gadgets Candles • Glassware Practical Kitchen Accessories & More

en& VisWitoorrsks stvoleriter ofKitLoch Whi cals A Fa Since 1994

ketplace Located in Whistler’s Mar

604-938-1110

Where the Locals Shop! OPEN EVERY DAY

8am-9am Only for Seniors/People at Risk 9am-10pm for Everyone | 8am –6pm Pharmacy Located 1km north of Whistler Village at 7019 Nesters Rd. Phone: 604-932-3545 Pharmacy: 604-905-0429 Save time by shopping online:

www.nestersmarket.com

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2020

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SALEME FAYAD PHOTOGRAPHY

shopping whistler

MITCHELL'S SOUP CO. SOUP MIXES Mitchell’s offers a wide variety of dried soup, stew, chili and dahl mixes that are handmade in small batches right here in B.C. These artisan mixes are delicious, easyto-make meals the whole family will love. Available at Nesters Market and Fresh St. Market.

FAIRMONT CHATEAU WHISTLER WILD ROOFTOP HONEY Fresh local honey, harvested from hives on the rooftop of the Chateau Whistler! The rooftop garden and terrace is home to four beehives and a one-of-a-kind bee hotel, specifically designed to attract solitary pollinator bees. These “sweet” new initiatives are part of the Fairmont’s Green Partnership program, helping the local environment by providing bees to pollinate area gardens and parks. The honey can be purchased in Portobello, at the Fairmont Chateau Whistler. W

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services Directory

To advertise in the Services Directory, call Catherine Power-Chartrand at 604-932-1672

PROVEN RESULTS –

I’m with you every step of the way Specializing in Residential and Investment property in Whistler

AVIS RENT A CAR - WHISTLER

Carolyn Hill, ASSOCIATE BROKER

Wide variety of mid and full size cars for exploring Whistler and area! MINI VANS, 4x4s, 10-Passenger Vans, CARGO & 16' CUBE VANS

PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

Delivering the Dream – Whistler cel: 604-907-0770

ONE WAY RENTALS AVAILABLE TO VANCOUVER OR FROM YVR AND DOWNTOWN VANCOUVER TO WHISTLER

email: chill@whistlerbuyer.com www.whistlerbuyer.com

Cascade Lodge Lobby | 604.932.1236

Voted Whistler’s Best Realtor

sheri.warm@abglocalmarket.ca | Avis.com

TM

Everything you need for your Health, Beauty and Convenience, right in the heart of Whistler Village Prestigious Beauty Boutique Full Service Pharmacy offering Travel Vaccinations & Medication Reviews Prescription Deliveries and much more

STUDIOS

Yoga and wellness services in the heart of Whistler Village! We offier many different styles to suit all levels of practice. Our class cap of 15 maintains personalized attention and a sense of community.

Whistler Village (near The Keg & Movie Theatre)

604-905-5666 www.shoppersdrugmart.ca

BOOKING ONLINE OR BY PHONE IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

604-935-2020 info@whistleryogacara.com www.whistleryogacara.com

Whistler’s In Resort Specialists Vacation Rental Services for Condos, Townhomes & Homes OWNER VACATION RENTAL SERVICES • Check-in Services • Housekeeping & Maintenance Services • Owner Direct Websites Administration • In-resort Contact

GUEST SERVICES • Book Accommodation • Book Concierge & Activities • Resort Information

LOCAL KNOWLEDGE. EXPERT ASSISTANCE. RELIABLE RELATIONSHIPS

www.whistlerreception.com | info@whistlerreception.com

604-966-0999

We’ve got you covered.

Pick up the latest issue of Whistler’s favourite read, on stands every Thursday

Private Whistler and Vancouver Transfers and Tours @luxurytransport

www.luxbus.com

604.522.8484

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2020

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Whistler Village & Upper Village Map A

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S

1

T

U

V

VILLAGE WALK PEDESTRIAN PATHS ROAD

2

BUILDINGS

BL

AC

3

PARKING LOT

KC

OM

B

MEDICAL CENTRE

4

W AY

INFORMATION TRANSIT STOP

TO LOST LAKE

5

VANCOUVER BUS TAXI LOOP

6 7 8

LOT 5

9 LOT 1 LOT 2 ES D I A L CR

LOT 4

AY BLACKCOMB W

SKIERS PLAZA

L

MARKETPLACE

N

AI

M

GATEWAY

ST

14

BLVD ANDS L H T R NO

15

P LOO

L VI

GE GATE BLVD VILLA

VILLAGE SQUARE

COUVER TO VAN

16

O SKY SEA T

17

TO PEMBERTON

66

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2020

HWY

AG

ST

OLL

VI

LL

R

E AG

VILLAGE G R E

A

ES TR

E LANE AG ILL

TOWN PLAZ

MAIN ST

13

L OL

V

12

WHISTLER OLYMPIC PLAZA

EN

LORIMER RD

SUN

11

TL W HIS

WAY ER

SPRINGS LANE

LOT 3

10

DRIVING RANGE

W

X

Y

Z


P: David McColm

OUT THERE STARTS HERE

ENJOY A SAFE SUMMER IN WHISTLER Discover your launchpad to our Outer Spaces safely, with an airborne adventure that offers unforgettable views in every direction.

whistlerblackcomb.com/besafe

WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2020

67


Home is the place you feel... Comfortable. Secure. Relaxed. Connected. Happy. _____________.

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604 932 5538 whistlerrealestate.ca 68 WHISTLER MAGAZINE SUMMER/FALL 2020