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VISITOR’S GUIDE 2018-2019 FREE

THE SKY’S THE LIMIT:

CANADA’S MECCA FOR AIR SPORTS

destination WEDDINGS: SAYING ‘I DO’ IN PEMBERTON

An official publication of

MOUNTAIN BIKING:

CHALLENGING & unique TRAILS


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It’s no secret that I love Pemberton. Born and raised in the Pemberton Valley, I am the fourth generation of my family to call this beautiful valley home and this little slice of paradise has my heart. I know the valley and the people; I truly enjoy sharing my love of Pemberton with others and helping them to find the perfect property to call home. As a licenced Realtor® with over 13 years experience I have the skills, background and knowledge to guide you through the process with confidence. I look forward to helping you with your Pemberton real estate needs.

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Adventure begins here

contents Small town charm abounds

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Tourism Pemberton would like to thank our members and the community who make the Pemberton Valley and surrounding area an amazing place to visit.

Exploring Pemberton’s history on horseback

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ONE MILE LAKE OFFERS MORE THAN YOU THINK

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From the moment you enter the beautiful valley you can’t miss the magnificent Mount Currie known as Tz’sil by the Lil’wat Nation. Adventure truly does begin in the Pemberton area whether it be hiking, biking, sledding, fishing, swimming, camping, boating, horseback riding, paragliding, skydiving, golfing, heli hiking, biking, or a visit to our hot springs. Visit our historical Pemberton Museum, shop at our local Farmer’s Market every Friday from June to October, located in the unique Pemberton Community Barn. Tourism Pemberton sponsors the annual Slow Food Cycle Sunday, held the third Sunday in August and is – “A celebration of food, farmers and the joys of biking. ”Slow Food Cycle Sunday is an opportunity to connect—town folk and city folk, consumers with their food, people with the land. The future of food is local!” Slow Food Cycle Sunday is a 50 km cycle up and down Pemberton Meadows Road. Choose your own pace and do as much or as little of the route as you like. Visit Pemberton farms and other vendors. Purchase local produce, crafts and much more along the way. Planning a wedding? Pemberton has a variety of venues to select, with each highlighting our magnificent scenery. For more information on the many activities and businesses in the Pemberton area please download the FREE Tourism Pemberton App from Google Play or iStore or stop by our Visitor Centre. Enjoy your visit! Mark Mendonca Tourism Pemberton

ART IN THE VALLEY

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Saying ‘I do’ in Pemberton

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Pemberton: destination mountain biking

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Maps 20-21 local business Directory 22 New Ts’zil Learning Centre brings education, training, and culture together

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CELEBRATE WINTER

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where the sky’s the limit (and your new playground)

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Survive the Hurley, live the adventure

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2017-2018 Events

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Editor Alyssa Noel art director Whitney Sobool Production manager Karl Partington Cover Image Brad Knowles fly fishing. Photo by Scott Leboldus, courtesy of Pemberton Fish Finder Advertising Manager Susan Hutchinson SALES Tessa Sweeney, Amy Allen, Poppy Keulemans Writers Alyssa Noel, Dan Falloon, Brigitte Mah, Cindy Filipenko, Megan Lalonde, Braden Dupuis, Brandon Barrett publisher Sarah Strother Published by Whistler Publishing Limited Partnership. 103-1390 Alpha Lake Road, Whistler, B.C., V0N 1B1 Telephone: 604 938 0202 Email: sales@wplpmedia.com In co-operation with Tourism Pemberton Distribution by Tourism Pemberton 604 894 6175 © Whistler Publishing LP 2018 No reproduction in whole or in part without the express written permission of the publisher.

Visitors’ Guide 2018-2019

WHISTLER PUBLISHING Limited Partnership

Pemberton Visitors’ Guide 2018-2019 3


BREATHTAKING VIEWS of mount currie from north arm farm Photo by Dave Steers

Small town charm abounds Alyssa Noel

Top reasons why the valley is the best place to call home Pemberton isn’t your run-of-the-mill small town. Want proof? For one, not long ago, its downtown starred in a luxury car commercial in which a family transports itself into the idyllic village around a toy train track. But it’s not just its adorable village centre that makes Pemberton stand out; there’s also its quirky charm. For example, at one point, you could find a sheep named B.B. King strolling through the Pemberton Farmers’ Market. It’s also not unusual to spot folks on horseback sauntering through town. The list is endless, but we’ve come up with five reasons why Pemberton stands out from other B.C. towns. ®

1. Unique businesses. You won’t find any big box stores or chains in Pemberton. Instead, local ® ® entrepreneurs and restaurateurs have built unique, ® high-quality businesses that rival any you’ll find in ® 4® Pemberton Visitors’ Guide 2018-2019

the city. From acclaimed eateries like the long-time local favourite The Pony or beloved Barn Nork to charming coffee shops and lunch spots like Mount Currie Coffee Co. and Grimm’s Deli, you won’t leave hungry. 2. Trail access. The trails in Pemberton—for biking, running, hiking or horseback riding—are nothing short of magic. On one end of town you’ll find a matrix of trails that surround One Mile Lake. On the other, you’ll find endless kilometres that wind past waterfalls and wildlife through a lush green forest—every now and then offering a breathtaking view of Pemberton Meadows below. Whether you’re new to the trails and building up your fitness or a more established athlete looking for a challenge, you’ll find everything you need here. 3. Views. All of the communities that make up the Sea to Sky corridor are beautiful, but the views in Pemberton—situated in a flat, narrow valley—offer something special. One big reason: the behemoth that is Mount Currie towers over the town below. You can see it from nearly any spot in the village and it’s stunning in any season. Sure it’s fun

to climb up a mountain for a bird’s eye view, but in Pemberton, you can just step outside your door and be in awe. 4. Easy living. There’s a reason why people call city living a “rat race.” Between getting stuck in traffic or having to travel substantial distances between shops while doing chores, urban life often means a lot of travelling and waiting. In Pemberton, you can hop on your bike or walk out your door to do daily chores in one quick, painless trip. That means more time to do the things you love. 5. Edge of adventure. There’s a palpable feeling in Pemberton that you’re at the gateway to backcountry adventures. A short drive from downtown will take you up to the Duffey, a popular ski touring area, across the Hurley for snowmobiling, mountain biking and hiking or to the Rutherford where more activities await. The best part? It’s also a short drive back to Pemberton where you have your pick of places to grab a drink, some food and recount the weekend’s adventures. But be careful, if you’re a visitor you might never want to leave.


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trail ride with Copper Cayuse Outfitters Photo by Dave Steers

Exploring Pemberton’s history on horseback Megan Lalonde

Copper Cayuse Outfitters’ multi-day tours take visitors on a wild journey through the valley’s backcountry These days, Pemberton is best known as a mountain town and farming community. But before North America’s largest ski resort was located a few kilometres south, the Pemberton Valley was home to a booming mining community, where the main mode of transportation in the backcountry was horses, rather than mountain bikes or snowmobiles. That spirit is something that’s stuck around: the area has more horses per capita than anywhere else in B.C., according to Tourism Pemberton. During summer months, it’s common to see horses carrying riders through Pemberton’s downtown core, or crossing the highway on their way to the kilometres of horsefriendly trails. “There’s all kinds of riding in the valley,” explained Don Coggins, who runs Copper Cayuse Outfitters (CCO) ranch with business partner Dudley Kennett. “Anything from Western—which is what we do—mountain riding, to very gentle trail riding, to people doing all kinds of 6 Pemberton Visitors’ Guide 2018-2019

heavy-duty dressage. (And now) breeding (is one) of the newer areas that has developed and they’re developing quite a reputation for horses in the valley. It’s kind of neat because it does kind of go the whole gamut of riding and what people want—you name it, it’s here.” To that end, there’s no shortage of spectacular and scenic guided trail rides: a quick Google search will yield several tour operators in the Pemberton area that cater to riders of all ages and experience levels, offering everything from pony rides to hour-long trail rides to day-long excursions. But at CCO, one aim is to give guests a more extensive peek into Pemberton’s history, in addition to its stunning natural landscapes and terrain. While they offer the usual hourly horseback trips in Pemberton and full and half-day rides through their 4,000 hectare tenure in the Birkenhead Lake backcountry, they also run multi-day trips to other wilderness areas for those looking for a longer adventure. These longer tours include their three-day, two-night all-inclusive Historic Li-lik-hel Mine and Tenquille Lake expeditions. The tours follow trail networks originally carved into the mountainsides by horses packing out

heavy hauls of gold during the region’s mining boom. “We found there was lot of history in the area that was generated from horses—the area was opened with horses,” Coggins explained. “Mining was the first area that really took off here, and that was all done on horseback… We’re now reestablishing historic mining trails and setting up camps so we can take people back and show them the old mines that are back there.” The historical nature of the excursion is just one of the reasons why their tour is recognized by Destination Canada as a Canadian Signature Experience, Coggins added. Guides pair riders up with specific horses based on traits like temperament and ability. That most often leads riders to establish a strong bond with their horse over the course of the trip, Coggins explained. “You really get to know your horse, which is something you don’t really get in an hourly ride,” he said. “(Guests) tend to fall in love with the horses, and it’s funny, people will come back the next years and say, ‘I want such-andsuch a horse…’ They’ll remember the horse’s name, they won’t remember mine.”


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boardwalk on One Mile Lake Photo by Dave Steers

One Mile Lake offers more than you think dan falloon

From biking to yoga to environmental education, there’s something for everyone As you near Pemberton on the Sea to Sky Highway and look to your right, One Mile Lake might seem pretty unassuming. But if you pop in and stick around awhile, you’ll find plenty to do. In addition to supreme swimming, One Mile Lake Park also offers easy access to mountain biking trails, the Sea to Sky Trail, the local disc golf course and fitnesscircuit information. If you pull into the parking lot near One Mile Lake Park at the southwest side of the lake, one of the first sights you’ll see as you approach the water is The Paddle Barn. The rental business, owned by Mike and Laura Zgud, offers stand-up paddleboards and other ways to enjoy the refreshingly cool water on one of the community’s blazing hot days.

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The Paddle Barn also offers stand-up paddleboard yoga and fitness classes beginning in July to allow health-minded folks to keep active in a unique way. Class sizes tend to range from five to 12 people, including instructors. “Instead of just thinking, ‘Oh, I’m just going to get my workout in, get my yoga practice in,’ it’s quite a bit more of an experience being out there and connecting with nature at the same time,” Laura Zgud says. “You’re floating out on the water, with the mountains and the views in the morning that are really beautiful.” While taking the classes on a standup paddleboard certainly takes more athleticism than doing them on dry land, Zgud tries to keep the offerings as accessible as possible, with participants employing as many points of contact with the board as necessary. “You definitely have a lot more core stability that comes into play when you take out the boards onto the water. That ups the level of the class as well, because anything you find easy or you wouldn’t think is a difficult pose in a regular class has a whole new challenge to it when

you bring it out on the water,” she says. “We tailor the classes depending on how many classes you’ve done and who is in it … A lot of it is being comfortable out on a board. Once they’re more comfortable, the shaking from being nervous is gone and there’s a lot more balance.” As for anyone with worries about falling into the lake? “You jump in the lake at the end anyways,” Zgud says. “It’s really not a big deal.” Zgud says class schedules for the summer hadn’t been finalized at press time, but to check out thepaddlebarn. com for more information. At the northeast portion of the park is the One Mile Lake Nature Centre, which is open on weekdays while its camps are in session. Stewardship Pemberton Society executive director and program coordinator Sarah Jones says anyone interested is welcome to pop in through its “open-door policy.”


Photos by Dave Steers

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Slow Food Cycle highlight of summer The Slow Food Cycle is a highlight on most locals’ social calendars each year—and for good reason.

2018

Families and friends get together to ride their bikes down Pemberton Meadows Road—one of the most beautiful stretches of highway around—stopping along the way to dine on food grown by farmers. What could be better? Well, add to that the opportunity to meet the farmers themselves. Traditionally, many along the route add some flare to their farm stands with art, crafts and even wrestling.

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“Inside, we have lots of animal mounts from all over, most of which have been donated very kindly by members of the public or by families who have children that attend nature camp,” she says. But those who come by after hours still have plenty to explore, including the four-byeight-metre Lillooet River watershed model, which Jones says is the only piece of its kind in the province since it was unveiled last year. “It helps to demonstrate the ecological processes of the water cycle of the Lillooet River watershed,” she says. “It also helps to ground people in place and celebrate the vast and diverse watershed in which we live. It’s pretty incredible.” Jones says the centre recently added place names to the model, ranging from Whistler and Blackcomb Mountains all the way to Pemberton and extending to Lillooet and Anderson lakes, as well as into Pemberton Meadows. The centre also boasts a native plant garden, which has signs identifying plants in English, Latin and Ucwalmícwts, the language of the Lil’wat Nation. The signs also explain the traditional uses of each plant. Stewardship Pemberton has signs at two other spots in the park, one at the main beach and one at the dog beach. For more information, visit stewardshippemberton.com.

10 Pemberton Visitors’ Guide 2018-2019


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Ryan Scoular - Dzunukwa Spirt Mask Photo by Brenda Bakker

HIROKO TAKAYA - WILLOW BASKET Photo by Hiroko Takaya

meg gallup - pottery Photo by Meg Gallup

Art in the valley Brigitte Mah

Meet some of Pemberton’s talented artists who draw inspiration from the land

Hiroko Takaya, basket maker and weaver (bearinaforest.com)

With its rugged landscape that offers stunning peaks, crystal clear lakes and pristine wilderness, Pemberton is a natural source of inspiration for dozens of artists of various mediums. And while each has spent years becoming masters of their form, the humility and respect they possess is as simple as the rustic farms they live around. For visitors to the valley: there’s no better way to take home a piece of Pemberton than with their unique works of art.

While some artists use only what they see in nature, Hiroko Takaya uses what she actually finds. A primarily self-taught basket weaver who combines First Nations and European styles of basketry with Japanese weaving, Takaya roams the vast land around Pemberton collecting fallen materials to turn into hand-woven pine baskets, willow baskets, necklaces, bracelets, ornaments, wall hangings, and purses. Her desire for each item is to create unique baskets that are functional and reflect the natural beauty of their materials.

Meg Gallup, potter (meggallup@shaw.ca)

Valerie Butters, painter (valeriebutters.com)

Meg Gallup’s unique, functional, hand-sculpted stoneware mugs are a long-time staple at the Mt. Currie Coffee Co. Gallup has been gas-firing her pottery in Pemberton since 1979, drawing inspiration from the clay, glazes and her kiln since then. Gallup prides herself on creating art that is functional and strives to bring beauty, design and colour to items used every day in homes everywhere. Her pieces, which range from mugs to vases to serving bowls, can be found in the summer at the Pemberton Farmers’ Market every Friday.

While many artists work close to their canvases, Valerie Butters keeps herself several feet away by taping bamboo poles to the ends of her paint brushes. This allows her to give up control so she can work in abstracted realism, embracing and reflecting the tension between reality and imagination. The vivid and colourful “The Spirit Series” is her most recent work and is a contemporary response to the legends and land in Pemberton and on the coast.

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Gernot Dick, painter (artwalker.space) Drawing from the raw beauty and power of the natural landscape that surrounds him, Gernot Dick aims to make art that excites and awakens people to look deeper at the land and their social values— and, in doing so, heal all that is around them. His paintings, drawings and photos reflect his life of an alpinist, marathoner, whitewater canoeist, and competitive skier. Ryan Scoular, carver (ryanscoularcarvings.ca) A third generation First Nations carver who began his training in the Kwakwaka’wakw carving style at age nine, Ryan Scoular combines both traditional West Coast Native art with modern and contemporary art. He has created a wide variety of carvings including masks, headdresses, panels and totem poles. His carvings are found in galleries and private homes across North America and Europe. Discover the full breadth of artists in Pemberton through the Pemberton Arts Council at pembertonartscouncil.com.


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A wedding ceremony in front of mount Currie Photo by Darby Magill Photography

Saying ‘I do’ in Pemberton Brigitte Mah

How Spud Valley became a coveted wedding destination Majestic peaks, endless pastoral fields, blue skies, and large farmhouses. Pemberton’s small town charm and sprawling meadows have been inspiring couples to leave the city and tie the knot in the country for several years, though recently more and more brides and grooms have been choosing Pemberton as the place for their destination wedding. Although it’s a good two-hour drive from Vancouver and only 30 minutes from Whistler, the number of Pemberton weddings has grown from 56 in 2015 to well over 100 in the past three years. Part of the reason for the increase is the town’s old-world charm, with its focus on wholesome food and family. “We have this laidback, casual vibe in Pemberton and a lot of that is attributed to the fact that the weddings we host in Pemberton are on farmland 14 Pemberton Visitors’ Guide 2018-2019

or they’re in nature. They’re outside with Mount Currie as your backdrop so it lends to that laidback, outdoorsy feeling and a lot of people are drawn to that,” said Carlee Cindric, owner of Pocketful Productions, a Pemberton wedding and event planning company. A recent change in 2016 to the definition of “agritourism” on Agriculture Land Reserve (ALR) land also helped boost the number of weddings in the area, since the regulations now permit private owners to host up to 10 weddings on their property a year. And there’s one other draw to having your wedding in Pemberton: you can make it completely your own. Unlike hotel weddings, where the only additional personal touches that couples have to make are the colour of the flowers on the tables, the take home favours or the dance playlist, Pemberton weddings are all à la carte. Everything from napkins, tents, lights, chairs,

utensils, linen, music, flowers, food, and decor is up to the bride and groom. While that amount of organization may seem daunting, it’s something more and more couples are choosing to do, giving them complete creativity to run with any theme and look they want. Because most weddings take place on private farmland, where couples rent the entire home, the possibilities for ideas are endless. Fill the wide open grassland with couches or tents for your guests, ride into your ceremony on horseback, paddle up in a kayak, string a thousand mini lights overhead, or wade through waist-high grass; it really is only limited by your imagination. Before you choose Pemberton for your dream wedding, there are a few things to consider: 1. You’ve got to love the outdoors. Chances are you are drawn to Pemberton because you want an outdoor wedding. That means you are at the mercy of Mother Nature, so consider options for shade and rain and even a thunderstorm. If you’re willing to roll


Welcome to an environment, atmosphere and menu that is rooted in local culture and food. WE OFFER A PLACE WHERE PEOPLE FEEL NOURISHED AND AT HOME. CREATING CUISINE WITH ALL THE RICHES OF OUR VALLEY AND BRINGING FOOD AND PEOPLE TOGETHER AT TOWN SQUARE.

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be prepared for mother nature Photo by Taylor Roades

with whatever nature throws your way you’ll have a blast — and quite possibly some of the most dramatic pictures around. 2. You don’t have to import anything to your wedding — except maybe your future in-laws. Pemberton may be small but it is chock full of wedding talent, from bakers to caterers to hair dressers to florists to photographers. 3. It is entirely possible to have a completely local wedding, from locally sourced food to flowers to art and decorations. 4. You’ll want to consider accommodation. While Pemberton is growing there are limited number of lodgings so get creative with tents, trailers, vans or buses. If you’re shuttling guests to and from Whistler plan a sizeable line item for that in your budget. 5. Book a year out. The popular farmhouses book up quickly, as do the top photographers. Once you have your location and photographer dialed, the rest will easily fall into place. Regardless of the type of wedding you plan in Pemberton — whether it’s small and rustic or large and boho — you’ll have the most memorable day.

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Pemberton Visitors’ Guide 2018-2019 15


it doesn’t take long to pedal to incredible views Photo by Laurence Crossman-Emms

Pemberton: destination mountain biking Dan Falloon

The valley offers riders unique, challenging terrain Picture yourself in downtown Pemberton, perhaps at the local Bike Co. hub, getting ready to hop on your steed. Within five minutes, you can be riding some of the province’s best singletrack. “Assuming you could get here, you wouldn’t even need a car. You could do everything on your bike,” Pemberton Off-Road Cycling Association president Ian Kruger says.

the best climbing routes in the world and that really facilitates a different style of adventure, a different kind of adventure. I think we’re a good spot to come and have an adventure.” Kruger says the “backbone” of the network is the Happy Trail-Waco-Nimby-Middle Earth climb near the Mackenzie Forest Service Road. Meanwhile, near One Mile Lake, there isn’t quite as much elevation, but Kruger highlights the Sea to Sky-Piece of Cake-Murse Made-News Flash connection as a worthwhile ride.

classic,” he says. “You ride up to Mosquito Lake, you look back at the valley, and that’s super fun.” Stiles, who has lived in Pemberton for nearly three decades, says he’s grateful to live in the Sea to Sky and encourages visitors to ride all three of the corridor’s hot spots, if possible. “Squamish is all about loam and roots and the big forest. Whistler has got lots of alpine, but Pemberton has completely different climbing. Pemberton’s dry. We get riding early. The dirt’s not great here, but we have lots of rocks and it’s a great course,” Stiles says.

But if you want to make the most of the town’s trails, your legs and lungs had better be ready for a workout, according to Kruger.

Pemberton Valley Trails Association board member Bill Stiles’ personal favourite ride is Econoline to Cross Town Traffic, which is essentially a microcosm of his preferred riding features.

Stiles explains most trails around Pemberton will provide a challenge even to some visitors who boast plenty of trail experience.

“The real draw for people coming to Pemberton is our climbing trails,” Kruger says. “We have some of

“That section of trail has it all—old school, new school, fast (riding), rock drops, that’s a Pemberton

“If you’re not riding Whistler, Squamish or Vancouver, Pemberton is a bit of a step up for people,” he says.

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Pemberton Bed & Breakfasts and Inns

See p.20 for a full map of Pemberton

After a quiet peaceful sleep, wake up to the natural beauty of the Pemberton Valley and enjoy majestic views of Mount Currie from your choice of one of our informative and pampering B&Bs.

www.pembertonbandb.com 1.

Log House Bed & Breakfast Inn - 1357 Elmwood Drive

2.

1

Greenwood Country Inn - 1371 Greenwood Street

3.

2

Lillooet River Lodge - 1428 Pemberton Farm Road West

LEGEND: Highway 99 Paved Roads BC Rail

Relax and unwind in an exquisite yellow cedar log home. Six unique guest bedrooms with private bathrooms, full breakfast and outdoor hot tub. Ideal for groups, families and corporate retreats. The Log House B&B Inn is close to all amenities and enjoys stunning mountain views. t tf e w

604-894-6000 1.800.894.6002 loghouseinfo@loghouseinn.com www.loghouseinn.com

Custom built post and beam home in superb & quiet location above Pemberton. Outstanding panoramic views from the sun terrace with pond & hot-tub. Choose between private B&B Rooms or self-contained Suites with full kitchen and separate entrance. Free and strong WIFI. German & English spoken.

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Trails

Experience great hospitality, the moment you arrive at the beautiful cedar log home. Located on 4 acres along the Lillooet River, offering spectacular views of Mount Currie. Enjoy a continental or full breakfast. Our rooms, with a king (can be split into two singles) or queen size bed, are air conditioned and have a full bath en suite. Free WI-FI, English, German and French spoken. t 604-966-8246 e lrlbandb@telus.net w www.lillooetriverlodge.com Water

Parks/ Greenspace

Residential

Commercial

REMEMBER WHEN STORES SOLD EVERYTHING? Featuring many Canadian quality brands Western Wear & Boots • Laurentian Chief Moccasins, Mucklucks & Tshirts • Large Workwear Department Mens • Women and Childrens Clothing & Accessories • Hats, Outdoor Clothing & Outerwear Musical Instruments & Accessories • Canadian Hand-Crafted & Themed Souvenirs Well we’re one and we are celebrating over 60 years of serving Pemberton 1956-2018

“If we don’t have it, you don’t really need it” Come visit us and see for yourself!

7437 Prospect Street (604) 894-6233 Pemberton Visitors’ Guide 2018-2019 17


Image: Flynn Media Productions

pemberton’s trails are accessible from early in the spring until well into autumn Photo by Laurence Crossman-Emms

One advantage Pemberton provides in general is its weather, as spring comes more quickly than in Whistler and riders are able to scratch their itch earlier than those elsewhere. Kruger says prime time for riding comes in spring and fall, as summers can be quite hot and the dirt certainly sees the effect. “It’s always fun to ride, but summer can be a little looser and a little more challenging,” he says. “Our tackiest dirt is probably now (early April) until the end of June and then we start cranking up again in September through October and November.” Stiles explains the network has developed over the past quarter century. With the exception of just a couple, all trails were built through volunteer labour to help foster riding in the community. “We have volunteer trail days and tons of guys who go work on the trails for the love of sport,” he says. “Pemberton’s unique that way in that we’re not like Squamish or Whistler with mass amounts of funding.” And with that grassroots, DIY attitude toward its trails, it’s of the utmost importance for visitors to show reverence and respect for the community’s infrastructure. “By and large, we’re a town for the people who live here and these trails have grown organically as a public amenity. That provides a unique flavour—there’s a lot of buy-in and a lot of ownership for the trail network by the community,” Kruger says. 18 Pemberton Visitors’ Guide 2018-2019

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RENTALS SALES SERVICE TRAIL MAPS

s to do 9 9 t h in g 2018 Summerissue 2 volume 12:

the insiders’ guide to whistler

WHISTLER

PEMBERTON

137-4370 Lorimer Road

1-1392 Portage Road

ridegiant@giantwhistler.ca (604) 938-9511

pemberton@bikeco.ca (604) 894-6625

The Insiders’ Guide to Whistler

A N ’T YOU C

DO

T H I SN

T OHW OUT IT

(in the Marketplace)

OPEN 10-6 EVERY DAY

WIT

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(next to The Pony)

BIKECO.CA

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FAQwhistler.com Pemberton Visitors’ Guide 2018-2019 19


Central Pemberton A

B

C

D

E

F

1

2

3

4

COMMUNITY BARN

COTT ON

LAUREL

WOO

D

FLINT

5

LUPIN

6

BALSAM

7

MILE ONE NATURE CENTRE

LEGEND: 8

Highway 99 Paved Roads BC Rail Trails Water Parks/ Greenspace

9

Residential Commercial

SEA TO SKY TRAIL

20 Pemberton Visitors’ Guide 2018-2019

G


Greater Pemberton H

I

J

K

L

M

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Tyax Wilderness Resort & Spa

1

CARPENTER LAKE GUN LAKE

GOLD BRIDGE

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DOWNTON LAKE

BRALORNE

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2

SETON LAKE

SS

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PA EY RL

ANDERSON LAKE

MT. MEAGER

LILLOOET RIVER

FACE MTN.

4

D’ARCY

BIRKENHEAD PROVINCIAL PARK

TENQUILLE LAKE

BIRKENHEAD LAKE

CAYOOSH RANGE

DEVINE

TO LILLOOET

BIRKEN

LILLOOET RIVER RYAN RIVER

MT. RONAYNE BIRKENEAD RIVER

5 SUGERLOAF MTN.

PEMBERTON ICEFIELD

DUFFY LAKE

PLACE GLACIER

PEMBERTON MEADOWS RD

CAYOOSH MTN.

OWL CREEK

MT. MILLER MILLER CR

IPSOOT MTN.

6

RUTHERFORD CR.

IVEY LAKE

PEMBERTON CR.

MOUNT CURRIE

99

JOFFRE LAKES PROVINCIAL RECREATION AREA

MILE PEMBERTON ONE LAKE

TWIN ONE CR.

NAIRN FALLS PROVINCIAL PARK

MT. CALLAGHAN

SOO RIVER

GREEN RIVER

MT. CURRIE

JOFFRE GROUP

LILLOOET LAKE

TWIN TWO CR.

99

7

LEGEND:

GREEN LAKE

WHISTLER

Highway 99

WEDGEMOUNT LAKE

GARIBALDI PROVINCIAL PARK

LIZZIE LAKE

Paved Roads Water

8

Parks/ Greenspace Camping

TO SQUAMISH & VANCOUVER Innergex

Pemberton Visitors’ Guide 2018-2019 21


Pemberton Business Directory ACCOMMODATIONS B4

B4

Lillooet River Lodge

F7

Pemberton Valley Lodge

pembertontrails.com

L6

K1

Tyax Wilderness Resort & Spa

1 Tyaughton Lake Road, Gold Bridge | 250 238 2221

L6

barn nork

D6

B5

Town square restaurant

c6

Grimm’s deli

D6

D6

Mount Currie Coffee Co.

2-7331 Arbutus Street | 604 894 3388

b4

106-7445 Frontier Street | 604 894 8884

L6 k5

L6

Blackcomb Helicopters

pocketfulproductions.com | 604 938 3800

B5 A5

Animal Barn

Scotiabank

SQUAMISH LILLOOET REGIONAL DISTRICT 1350 Aster Street | 604 894 6371

B6

North Arm Farm

Village of Pemberton

7400 Prospect Street | 604 894 6135

B5

Pemberton General Store

B5

Pemberton Valley Hardware rona

pembertonfarmersmarket.com 7437 Prospect Street | 604 894 6233 7426 Prospect Street | 604 894 6240

B5

Pemberton Valley Supermarket



C5

9960 Heliport Road | 1 800 330 4354

Tourism Pemberton Members Maps Grid Reference (map page 20-21)

7438 Prospect Street | 604 894 3663

RECREATION L6

3-7438 Prospect Street | 604 894 2009

7433 Prospect Street | 604 894 1050

Pemberton Farmers’ Market

FESCUES

1690 Airport Road | 800 668 7900

Pemberton Valley Wellness

e7 pocketful productions

C5

FISH & RICE

7433 Frontier Street | 604 894 0016

B5

Whistler Real Estate Company - pemberton

1888 Highway 99 | 604 894 5379

pemberton valley beer works

8324 Meadows Lane | 778 879 4033

B5

L6

The Black Squirrel Restaurant & Pub 1730 Airport Road | 604 894 6197

Pemberton chamber / VISITOR Centre

1-1348 Portage Road | 604 894 6740

stay wild

Local Motion Therapy

D6

remax Sea to Sky Real estate - Pemberton

RETAIL & relaxation C5

Connections

Corner Highway 99 & Portage Road | 604 894 6175

lisa hilton

5-7331 Arbutus Street | 604 894 5166

106-7433 Frontier Street | 604 894 5303

Black’s Hot wheels

110-1411 Portage Road | 604 894 5525

Danielle Menzel

1411 Portage Road | 604 894 6616

7439 Frontier Street | 604 894 6433 / 604 894 3364

B5

C6

lisah@wrec.com | 604 902 4589

2021 Portage Road, Mt. Currie | 604 894 6093

B5

3-1384 Portage Road | 604 894 1223

danielle@wrec.com | 604 698 5128

DINING

Big Sky Dental

106 – 1436 Portage Road | 604 894 5111

C5

REAL ESTATE D6

D6

1380 Aster Street | 604 894 9436

The Meadows at Pemberton

1730 Airport Road | 604 894 6197

1490 Sea to Sky Highway (99) | 604 894 2000

AC gas

7432 Prospect Street | 604 894 1701

Pemberton & District Museum & Archives society Pemberton Valley Trails Association

Log House B&B Inn

1357 Elmwood Drive | 604 894 6000

B5

7455 Prospect Street | 604 894 5504

1428 Pemberton Farm Road | 604 966 8246

A5

SERVICES

Big Sky Golf & Country Club

1690 Airport Road | 800 668 7900

Greenwood Country Inn

1371 Greenwood Street | 604 894 5607

C1

L6

pemberton Bike Co.

1-1392 Portage Road | 604 894 6625

Pemberton Farmers market Fridays 3-6:30pm, June 1 – Oct 26 inclusively

Pemberton & District Museum & Archives Society

Located in Pemberton Downtown Community Barn

7455 Prospect St. Open May – Nov, 10am – 5pm 604-894-5504

Join us for ‘Tea & Tales’ every Tuesday at 2pm in July and August.

Email: info@pembertonfarmersmarket.com www.pembertonfarmersmarket.com

For current info visit our website: www.pembertonmuseum.org

We can provide activities for groups of all ages. Guided Tours available all summer long

A great way to start the weekend! 22 Pemberton Visitors’ Guide 2018-2019


Pick up a fresh copy every Thursday for your Pemberton News RMOW top

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WE ARE MORE THAN JUST TIRES

The Pemberton Valley Trails Association is a non-profit charitable society tasked with the construction and maintenance of our local single track trail network. for information on our trails

www.bigskyDental.ca

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HOURS OF BUSINESS ARE MON - FRI 8:00 - 5:30

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Book online: www.therapypemberton.com 1384 Portage Rd. (next to the Pony Restaurant)

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Mon. to Thurs. 9-6, Fri. 9-7 & Sun. 10-4 #1-1348 Portage Road, Pemberton


TS’ZIL LEARNING CENTRE IS SET TO OPEN IN FALL 2018 Photo submitted

New Ts’zil Learning Centre brings education, training, and culture together Cindy Filipenko

Líl’wat Nation builds cutting-edge post-secondary facility in Mount Currie As you turn off Highway 99 onto the Lillooet Lake Road you’ll notice a gorgeous new building on your left-hand side. With great swaths of glass and timber, the building, surrounded by trees and mountains, settles into the stunning West Coast rainforest setting. Welcome to the new Ts’zil Learning Centre, a new post-secondary institution in the Sea to Sky Corridor and one of a handful in Canada that are run by First Nations. In Ucwalmícwts, the language of the Líl’wat Nation, Ts’zil means mountain that slides. The building is not far from the foot of Ts’zil, also known as Mount Currie. The Líl’wat Nation is slated to open the doors to its new 22,000 sq. ft. post-secondary education facility, Ts’zil Learning Centre, in fall 2018.

most defining features is the building’s s7ístkeninspired focal point. A tribute to the pit houses that Lilwat7úl (the true Líl’wat) lived in prior to European contact, the dramatic, circular, logframed gathering space is both the physical and spiritual centre of the building. The s7ístken will be used for ceremony and celebration, a place for people to witness, learn and participate in Líl’wat Nation’s cultural protocols.

“It’s exciting to bring education, training, and culture together. People will walk through the door and be able to access all these resources and it will allow us the opportunity to collaborate to better serve the needs of our students,” says Lisa Fisher, Ts’zil’s Manager of Advanced Education and Training.

Helping ensure the reclamation, retention and celebration of Líl’wat culture, the Líl’wat7úl Culture Centre will also be housed in the building. This move will make the centre, previously housed on the second floor of Úl’lus Community Complex, more accessible to visitors. Tourists will enjoy touring the centre with a knowledgeable and friendly staff member, learning about Líl’wat Nation’s history on the land, and viewing artifacts and regalia of this area’s First People. But perhaps more importantly, the inclusion of the Lil’wat7úl Culture Centre in its space will put culture front and centre at Ts’zil, building on the facility’s core learning philosophy based in Líl’wat cultural renewal, holistic learning and personal growth.

Even as it’s under construction, there is no denying the new school design is spectacular. One of its

For the past 20 years, Ts’zil has operated in a warren of well-worn portable classrooms. Despite the

24 Pemberton Visitors’ Guide 2018-2019

modest facility, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous students from the region have achieved academic and career success as a result of the diversity of programs the centre has offered. As well, students have been able to access cultural teaching through a variety of unique offerings such as Líl’wat Nation Language and Culture Certificate program, a two-year university credit program. Operating in partnership with Capilano University, Ts’zil has served as a stepping stone for post-secondary student since the ’90s, offering adult basic education, academic upgrading, business certificates and other programs like Carpentry Level One, when funding permitted. From early childhood education workers to carpenters, many locals have been able to acquire their educations at home, in the northern end of the Sea to Sky Corridor. It’s also worth noting that many members of Ts’zil’s first carpentry cohort have applied their skills to the new building. The new, purpose-built Ts’zil Learning Centre, airy, open and architecturally innovative, is sure to attract more students to its excellent academic upgrading career-training programs. Whether it will become a community hub is yet to be seen, but the welcoming architecture indicates that it is well positioned to fulfill that need.


CROSS COUNTRY SKIING AT nairn falls

winterfest fireworks

Photo by Dave Steers

Photo by Dave Steers

Celebrate winter Alyssa Noel

Pemberton features an array of fun activities for snowy months

trails every day except for Monday afternoon (when the club uses the area).

will be in the same location and that’s something guests can bank on.”

Pemberton might have a reputation as a summer hotspot with endless hiking, world-class bike trails and picturesque picnic locations.

Another free option is Big Sky Golf, which also presses classic ski tracks—and showcases some of the most stunning scenery around. (Visit them on Facebook for updates on conditions.)

On Dec. 31 from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. guests can drop in to the community centre and enjoy crafts, face painting, a dance performance and movies indoors, as well as a campfire, marshmallow and hot dog roasting and a s’mores station outdoors—to name just a few activities.

But did you know the community also boasts an array of fun activities for the winter months too? For one, there’s some of the best snowmobiling in the corridor. One popular option is the Rutherford Creek Trail. Run by the Pemberton Snowmobiler Club, a day fee will get you groomed access to the area—all the way up to the stunning Pemberton Ice Cap. Looking for more guidance: She Shreds is a local company that offers snowmobiling clinics and guided adventures for both men and women. If self-propelled adventures are more your style, pack up your cross-country skis and head to Nairn Falls. Spud Valley Nordics, the local cross-country ski club, presses tracks in the campground, located at the entrance to town. The public is welcome to hit the

And, of course, there’s plenty of fun to be had on One Mile Lake when conditions are right and the lake is safe to skate, play hockey and ice fish on. Winterfest first launched nearly 14 years ago to celebrate exactly those activities—and Pemberton winters in general. Last year, after a few years of challenging weather conditions, organizers came up with a solution: they moved festivities indoors to the Pemberton and District Community Centre and turned it into a family friendly New Year’s Eve celebration. “Our intent is to host another pop-up event at One Mile Lake with ice fishing and skating, pick-up hockey and curling,” says Carlee Cindric, who helps put on the festival. “I’d love to see that in the future. It will now be a New Year’s Eve celebration. It’s not ice or weather dependent. It

“(Last year), people were inside and warm and cozy,” Cindric says. “The day was gorgeous, so we had sledding on the hill at the community centre and pick up hockey on the patio.” The events culminated in an early New Year’s Eve countdown for kids, as well as fireworks. “For Winterfest, we pride ourselves on the fact that everything is free and accessible to families,” Cindric says. “It celebrates the end of the year and brings in a new one.” To learn more about Winterfest visit pembertonwinterfest.com.

Pemberton Visitors’ Guide 2018-2019 25


the pemberton valley has become a mecca for souring sports, thanks to favourable weather and unparalleled views Photo by Randy Lincks/coastphoto.com

where the sky’s the limit (and your new playground) Brandon Barrett

The Pemberton Valley has become known as Canada’s mecca for air sports

producers over the years to create dynamic, highflying action sequences for the screen.

Jim Orava has over three decades of flying experience under his wings.

Home to the 2012 and 2017 Canadian National Paragliding Championships, Pemberton is considered, at least by those in the know, as Canada’s undisputed mecca for air sports.

The paragliding pilot has taken to the skies in a multitude of far-flung locales; in the last year alone, he and his wife have scored a bird’s eye view of Mexico, northern India, Guatemala, and the rugged peaks of the Himalayas. And yet, whenever he returns to B.C., he’s reminded why he’s chosen to live the last 30 years in the Pemberton Valley. “Anytime you come back to Pemberton, you realize it’s just an absolutely magical place. The scale and the differences in terrain we have here are comparable to the Himalayas,” he says. The founder of Cayoosh Expeditions, which also organizes kayaking and hiking experiences, Orava’s true passion is for paragliding, and his company was the first to offer flights to guests back in the early ‘90s. Since then, he and his wife have competed in countless competitions around the globe, and Orava has even consulted with several Hollywood and TV 26 Pemberton Visitors’ Guide 2018-2019

“In the soaring sport community, Pemberton has a reputation for delivering big flights and epic scenery,” explains Tyler Gillies, president of the West Coast Soaring Club. “It’s definitely one of the best spots, if not the best spot, to paraglide in Canada.” Pemberton’s obvious appeal for aerial enthusiasts has to do first and foremost with its jaw-dropping sightlines, offering unimpeded views of snowcapped peaks and shimmering glaciers—and even the odd grizzly bear. “It’s an opportunity to see the whole area from a completely different perspective that people don’t get otherwise,” he muses. “It’s a very serene, subliminal experience. There’s nothing else that really compares to it.” The area is also popular with skydivers, hang-gliders, parachuters and even the odd wingsuit flyer.

“It’s spectacular scenery to jump out of a plane from, and it’s certainly spectacular for gliding. It’s also perfect for gliding because of the thermals you get there,” says Gillies, who explained that the temperature variance between the Pemberton Valley bottom and the alpine offers the ideal conditions for gliding. For those looking to get their first taste of paragliding, Cayoosh Expeditions offers tandem flights with a certified pilot. Orava concedes many suffer from cold feet in the moments before setting off from one of two Pemberton launch-points—one at 2,275 feet above sea level, and the other at roughly 4,300 feet. “A lot of tourists feel they’re scared of heights. The interesting thing, and it’s such a psychological thing, is the second that you’re flying and you’ve isolated yourself from the ground, you suddenly realize there’s nothing to be afraid of. Normally, it’s such a dreamy situation that you ask yourself: ‘Why haven’t I done this before?’” For more on Cayoosh Expeditions visit cayooshexpeditions.ca. Sea to Sky Paragliding information can be found at seatoskyparagliding. com. More information on Whistler Skydiving is available at whistlerskydiving.ca.


Your Pemberton Real Estate

CONNECTION Call or text 604-230-8167 anytime Email frank@frankingham.com

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Downtown Pemberton

Surrounded by spectacular views and amazing recreational possibilities, Pemberton is the ideal place to begin your adventure, anytime of year. We invite you to download our Tourism Pemberton App for our community event calendar, local business directory, things to do and more! It’s FREE from the App Store and Google Play.

tourismpembertonbc.com

604.894.1701 www.acgas.ca CHOOSE LOCAL Open an account and save at any of our three locations: AC Gas Station – 7432 Prospect Street, Pemberton AC Petroleum Cardlock – 7338 Industrial Way, Pemberton AC Petroleum Cardlock – 8056 Nesters Road, Whistler

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Survive the Hurley, live the adventure Braden Dupuis

After exploring Pemberton, head down the dirt road to Bralorne and Gold Bridge The Hurley River Forest Service Road—connecting the Pemberton Valley with the communities of Gold Bridge and Bralorne to the Northwest—is a route with a lot of history. So much so that locals have set up a website commemorating the notorious stretch of road— ISurvivedTheHurley.com. “It has a long history, in terms of its reputation,” says Debbie Demare, who has served the region as its representative on the Squamish-Lillooet Regional District’s board of directors since 2011. “Today it’s a much better road.” That’s good news for the region, as tourism continues to contribute massively to the local economy. “The Hurley is really the essential piece,” Demare says. The area welcomes all kinds of visitors— international sightseers, adventure tourists, mountain bikes, heli-skiers—but they’re all drawn by a single common element: remoteness. 28 Pemberton Visitors’ Guide 2018-2019

“It is a world-class experience, and we’re super careful to balance that message with the fact that it’s also extremely important habitat for a variety of wildlife, including the grizzly bear,” Demare says, adding that anyone planning a visit should come prepared.

“He and I have coffee once a week,” she says. “We talk about the past and we talk about the future, and so the community is pretty tight.”

“Preparation and learning about where you’re going is the key part, but man—there is no experience like it. It is amazing.”

“In the wintertime we are a full-fledged, full-blown heli-ski operation,” Reimer says. “We have four helicopters which are Bell 212s, which take out 10 guests per day, and we’re running mostly four full helicopters throughout the season.”

Here are just a few of the potential options for your northbound adventures.

TYAX LODGE AND HELISKIING One of the longest-standing operations in the area is the Tyax Lodge, which celebrated its 30th anniversary in December 2016. “It’s crazy when you consider that all of the things that we’re doing now were created 30 years ago in a much different building and infrastructure environment,” says managing director Heather Reimer, adding that the man who built the lodge, Scott McKenzie, still lives in the valley just up the road.

The lodge offers two completely different products in the winter and summer.

After a deep spring clean the lodge relaunches for its summer offerings of mountain biking, horseback riding, float plane tours and more. The lodge’s hotel contains 29 rooms, with an additional 24 beds counted amongst outlying chalets. The majority of visitors come from Europe, and countries like Germany, Austria and Switzerland, Reimer says. “They have similar topography and similar backcountry in the alps, however … we don’t have


BRALORNE ADVENTURE LODGE Photo by Blake Jorgensen

Snowmobiling adventures abound over the hurley

tyax LODGE

Photo by Blake Jorgensen

Photo by Randy Lincks.com

thousands of years worth of people actually living in the wilderness,” she says. “So when they’re coming here, I think they’re truly trying to find the way that Europe used to be, because they’re always enamored with the fact that we’re out here ‘in the middle of nowhere.’”

The lodge was originally launched as just a place for people to stay, until the pub in Bralorne closed down leaving no place for people to get food, Roberts says.

Finding a spot at the lodge in the wintertime is not a snap decision—bookings for 2019 were already about 60-per-cent sold out for 2019 in late March.

“In the winter it’s offered as all-inclusive, three meals a day,” Roberts says. “You get your really good breakfast, you pack lunch to go out riding all day, and dinner when you get home.”

That’s when she and her partner, professional chef Diego MacDugall, were brought onboard.

Head to tyax.com to plan your trip.

BRALORNE ADVENTURE LODGE Where Tyax is the longstanding, big lodge on the block, relative newcomer Bralorne Adventure Lodge offers a different take on backcountry exploration. Visitors can book the 10-bed, four-bedroom house all to themselves—personal chef included. “It’s beautiful,” says lodge manager Jane Roberts. “It’s got a big open kitchen, big dining room, and it’s on about nine acres, right in the town of Bralorne.” The lodge was started by pro photographer Blake Jorgenson, pro snowmobiler Chris Brown and pro mountain biker Darren Berrecloth. “They’ve got the bro crew going beautifully,” Roberts says with a laugh.

Visitors to the lodge are free to adventure as they please—whether that means sledding, biking, hiking or anything else in between. “We do quite often get groups of guys who are doing a stag party, and we’re actually booking a few small weddings and things like that,” Roberts says. “It’s an interesting setup, and we’re sort of feeling our way and trying to figure out what works and what sells.” But in the end, it’s all about the remote wilderness. “I think that’s what people enjoy, is the remoteness,” Roberts says. “Bralorne is a town of under 50 people. Gold Bridge down the hill is another town of under 40 people, and that’s it. So I think people really enjoy that, and we’re the closest remote wilderness you can get to from the Vancouver, Whistler area. Once you get up here, you feel like you’re 10, 12 hours away from civilization.”

Find out more at bralorneadventurelodge.com.

HERITAGE AND HISTORY The region also has much to offer for history buffs, Demare adds. “This is an area just full of the age-old mining experience,” she says. “We have our Haylmore Heritage Site that we’re developing, and that acts as our tourism information centre as well.” The info centre—located at the entrance to Gold Bridge—usually opens before the May long weekend and closes in September. The town of Bralorne, meanwhile, is home to the local museum, and acts as something of a heritage site itself. “It’s going to stay a heritage town, because we’ve protected it,” Demare says. “It’s a great experience, especially for that drive-through kind of person … that’s a great thing for them to do, is to go up and drive around Bralorne, look at the old houses, look at the old vehicles, and take a tour through the museum and learn about the background and mining history, and the history of the people who lived here. “We are very authentic.” Learn more about the area at brvca.ca. Pemberton Visitors’ Guide 2018-2019 29


Pemberton Events 2018/19 MAY

WI Plant & Bake Sale Nimby 50 Bike Race Museum Opens PORCA Toonie Race (Tuesdays) BMX Racing (Thursdays)

june

Annual Rotary Golf Tournament 4 x 4 Rally Mountain Movement Dance Recital PSS Graduation WI Strawberry Tea (Berry dependent) Children’s Art Festival BMX Racing (Thursdays) Farmers’ Market (Fridays)

May 5 May 26 May 17 May 1, 15, 29 Weekly June 1 June 2 – 3 June 13 June 16 June 26 Date TBC Weekly Weekly, starting June 1

July

Canada Day July 1 Spud Run July 1 Tea & Tales at the Museum (Tuesdays) Weekly, starting July 10 BMX Race for Life (Charity for BC Children’s Hospital) July 13 BMX Provincal Qualifier July 14 Art & Garden Festival Date TBC Subaru Ironman Canada July 29 BMX Racing (Thursdays) Weekly Farmers’ Market (Fridays) Weekly

September

Library Book Sale Terry Fox Run Pemberton Lions Barn Dance BC Rivers Day PORCA Toonie Race (Tuesdays) BMX Racing (Thursdays) Farmers’ Market (Fridays)

October

North Arm Farm Pumpkin Patch Oktoberfest Fundraiser Lumpy’s Trifecta Farmers’ Market (Last Farmer’s Market of the Year) Get your Spook on Early

Date TBC September 16 September 22 September 23 September 11, 25 Weekly Weekly October 1 – 31 October 13 October 14 October 26 October 27

November

Glamour & Glitz Remembrance Day Service Mountain of Art, Annual Gala & Fundraiser

December

Pemberton Christmas Bazaar Santa PAWS Pemberton Valley Lodge Gingerbread Project PSS Breakfast with Santa Lil’wat Chirstmas Craft Fair Pemberton Winterfest

February 2019

August

Rosalind’s Tea Party (Benefit for Pemberton Safe House) Slow Food Cycle Sunday Art on the Farm BMX Scholarship Race PORCA Toonie Race (Tuesdays) Tea & Tales at the Museum (Tuesdays) BMX Racing (Thursdays) Farmers’ Market (Fridays)

August 12 August 19 August 19 August 23 August 28 Weekly Weekly Weekly

BC Family Day Dine & Dance in the Dark Spud Valley Loppet

Date TBC November 11 Date TBC Date TBC

December 31 February 18 Date TBC Date TBC

march 2019

Seedy Saturday Pemberton Lip Sync Battle

april 2019

Pemberton Lions Easter Egg Hunt

Date TBC Date TBC April 21

don’t miss out! June 1–October 26 Pemberton Farmers’ Market Fridays at the Community Barn

august 19 Slow Food Cycle Sunday Annual farm to farm cycling event

December 31

Winterfest New Year’s Celebration A FREE, family friendly event

For up-to-date event information: www.tourismpembertonbc.com or download the FREE Tourism Pemberton App Mobile-Alt 30 Pemberton Visitors’ Guide 2018-2019


Profile for Whistler Publishing

Pemberton Visitors Guide 2018  

The official guide to Pemberton for Tourism Pemberton

Pemberton Visitors Guide 2018  

The official guide to Pemberton for Tourism Pemberton

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