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SEPTEMBER 12, 2019 ISSUE 26.37

WWW.PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM

FREE AWARENESS

HOW A SPECIES PUT IN A PRISON The Devils Hole pupfish is nothing to mess with

16

TRASH TALK

Illegal dumping

reaches new lows

20

CHARGE IT

RMOW looks to add

more EV charging stations

62

POLKA ON

Put on your dancing

shoes and head to The Point


HOME IS WHERE THE BEER IS! Photo Credit: Tourism Whistler

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DANA JOLY ROSE COLEE MONICA SUAREZ

BEN HARTWELL ROLAND SCHULTZ

Come to Nesters Saturday from 11-3 to support your local WHISTLER GIRL GUIDES. Free lemonade and snacks The Girl Guides will selling BY DONATION, health and beauty products. (while supplies last)

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THIS WEEK IN PIQUE

46

62

36 The Devils Hole pupfish How a tiny endangered species put a man in prison. - By Paige Blankenbuehler / High Country News

16

ILLEGAL DUMPING

A fifth-wheel trailer and a

46

KEEP ON TRUCKIN’

Brendan Armstrong and

van full of trash are just two of the cast-off items littering the Cal-Cheak

Megan Rathwell earn St. Regis Cup wins at RBC GranFondo to lead Trek

area. Officials say the problem has gotten worse in recent years.

Red Truck to victory.

20

56

GOING ELECTRIC

Whistler council voted

ON STAGE

Lil’wat Nation playwright and actress

to support a grant application that could see 28 new electric vehicle

Yvonne Wallace gets set to debut her play, útszan, at the Maury Young

charging stations installed in the resort.

Arts Centre on Sept. 19.

30

TODDLER TIME

The Village of Pemberton is

62

CZECH MATE

Polka & Pilsner Night brings a

getting the ball rolling on a project that could see it build and own a new

delicious and refreshing taste of Czech culture to The Point Artist-Run

daycare building.

Centre this Friday, Sept. 13.

COVER I think it all comes down to your footprint, and how much you respect the world around you. - By Jon Parris 4 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019


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THIS WEEK IN PIQUE

Opinion & Columns 08 OPENING REMARKS Sorry to say there are no monkeys in this week’s editorial. Instead, we look

#103 -1390 ALPHA LAKE RD., FUNCTION JUNCTION, WHISTLER, B.C. V8E 0H9. PH: (604) 938-0202 FAX: (604) 938-0201 www.piquenewsmagazine.com

at how Whistler’s arts and music scene has been on a compelling new trajectory.

10 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR This week’s letters focus on fish. A pair of letter writers are

Founding Publishers KATHY & BOB BARNETT Publisher SARAH STROTHER - sstrother@wplpmedia.com

concerned about how BC Hydro isn’t working hard enough to ensure fish aren’t harmed in their operations.

Editor CLARE OGILVIE - edit@piquenewsmagazine.com Assistant Editor ALYSSA NOEL - arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

13 PIQUE’N YER INTEREST Writer Dan Falloon and his wife go where many have gone before:

Sales Manager SUSAN HUTCHINSON - shutchinson@wplpmedia.com Production Manager KARL PARTINGTON - kpartington@wplpmedia.com

Joffre Lakes Provincial Park. Through fresh eyes (and an early start), they prove even a couple flatlanders can handle it.

Art Director JON PARRIS - jparris@wplpmedia.com

90 MAXED OUT Max headed out into the wilderness only to find some unusual items in the fire pit. This

Advertising Representatives AMY ALLEN - aallen@wplpmedia.com TESSA SWEENEY - tsweeney@wplpmedia.com ANTHONY JOYCE - ajoyce@wplpmedia.com

week, he uses some math to calculate who’s really to blame.

Environment & Adventure

Sales Coordinator JO JANCZAK - traffic@wplpmedia.com Digital Sales Manager FIONA YU - fiona@glaciermedia.ca Production production@piquenewsmagazine.com CLAIRE RYAN - cryan@wplpmedia.com LOU O’BRIEN - lstevens@wplpmedia.com WHITNEY SOBOOL - wsobool@wplpmedia.com

34 SCIENCE MATTERS A new study out of Cornell University looks at the impact of the U.S. shale

Arts & Entertainment Editor ALYSSA NOEL arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

35 RANGE ROVER The Mountain Legacy Project has been using repeat photography to explore changes

oil and gas boom. Spoiler alert: it’s not great news for the planet.

Sports Editor DAN FALLOON - sports@piquenewsmagazine.com Features Editor BRANDON BARRETT - bbarrett@piquenewsmagazine.com

in Canada’s mountain landscapes. Read on to find out exactly how they go about it.

Reporters BRADEN DUPUIS - bdupuis@piquenewsmagazine.com BRANDON BARRETT - bbarrett@piquenewsmagazine.com JOEL BARDE - jbarde@piquenewsmagazine.com MEGAN LALONDE - mlalonde@wplpmedia.com

44 TRAVEL Steve MacNaull heads to Hollywood with his pooch Benji in tow. His friends had mixed reactions, but he argues Tinseltown is a dog-friendly holiday destination.

Classifieds and Reception mail@piquenewsmagazine.com

Lifestyle & Arts

Circulation and Accounts LAURA PRIOR - lprior@wplpmedia.com Office and Accounts Manager HEIDI RODE - hrode@wplpmedia.com I.T. and Webmaster KARL PARTINGTON Contributors G.D. MAXWELL, GLENDA BARTOSH, MICHAEL ALLEN, FEET BANKS, LESLIE ANTHONY, ALLEN BEST, ALISON TAYLOR, VINCE SHULEY, LISA RICHARDSON President, Whistler Publishing LP SARAH STROTHER - sstrother@wplpmedia.com Pique Newsmagazine (a publication of Whistler Publishing Limited Partnership, a division of Glacier Media) distributed to over 130 locations in Whistler and to over 200 locations from Vancouver to D’arcy. The entire contents of Pique Newsmagazine are copyright 2019 by Pique Newsmagazine (a publication of WPLP, a division of Glacier Media). No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the express written permission of the Publisher. In no event shall unsolicited material subject this publication to any claim or fees. Copyright in letters and other (unsolicited) materials submitted and accepted for publication remains with the author but the publisher and its licensees may freely reproduce them in print, electronic or other forms. Letters to the Editor must contain the author’s name, address and daytime telephone number. Maximum length is 250 words. We reserve the right to edit, condense or reject any contribution. Letters reflect the opinion of the writer and not that of Pique Newsmagazine. Pique Newsmagazine is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please contact (edit@ piquenewsmagazine.com). If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the web site at mediacouncil. ca or call toll-free 1-844-877-1163 for additional information. This organization replaces the BC Press council (and any mention of it).

ISSN #1206-2022 Subscriptions: $76.70/yr. within Canada, $136.60/yr. courier within Canada. $605.80/ yr. courier to USA. GST included. GST Reg. #R139517908. Canadian Publications Mail Product Sales Agreement #40016549.

52 FORK IN THE ROAD Turns out, the old adage “you are what you eat” is entirely true. Learn more about how food affects everything from your mood to mental health.

54 EPICURIOUS Former Olympian Julia Murray is on a quest to prove athletes don’t need animals for protein.

58 NOTES FROM THE BACK ROW With the opening of Hustlers this week, Feet Banks reflects on his favourite stripper memory. Hint: it involves ketchup.

60 MUSEUM MUSINGS The Fall Festival might be long defunct, but you can still meet Bo Bo the Clown and Willie Whistler in this week’s column.

64 PIQUECAL Admit it, you would do anything for puppies. Well, on Sunday, you can have fun and benefit some four-legged friends at the Putting 4 Puppies event at the Upper Village mini-putt course.

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6 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

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OPENING REMARKS

Shaking up Whistler’s arts and music scene ONE UNSEASONABLY chilly evening this August, crowds gathered around the stage at Whistler Olympic Plaza enraptured by a septuagenarian with boundless energy and a distinct warble. Buffy Sainte-Marie, a Cree CanadianAmerican musician who has won an array of awards over her 50-plus-year career, shared stories of her activism, displayed her

BY ALYSSA NOEL

arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

wide-ranging repertoire, and, as a whole, offered everyone in the crowd something to aspire to. To top it all off was a special, impromptu moment in which Lil’wat Nation drummers

a free outdoor series that has to have mass appeal and still draw discerning music fans. The names were big, the music compelling, and the genres diverse. Considering I serve as Pique’s arts editor, it’s perhaps not surprising to hear that I spent a lot of time thinking about Whistler’s arts and music scene. I could easily present an in-depth analysis here, but that might be anticlimactic after the monkeying around that was last week’s editorial. Instead, I’ll say this: Whistler’s arts scene has been on a remarkable upward trajectory since I first took this seat in 2012. And that’s never been more apparent than it has looking at the art events taking place this fall. For one, the Audain Art Museum (which is certainly to thank for its share of interesting art events in the resort in the last several years), is hosting its new

... it’s worth pushing the boundaries on what we expect a typical Whistler audience to enjoy—namely reggae, landscape art, or anything to do with mountain culture. in the crowd slowly and subtly broke into song as everyone was waiting patiently for an encore. It was not a show I ever thought I would see—for free, no less—in Whistler. The Whistler Presents Summer Concert Series officially wrapped up last weekend and I would argue it’s the best lineup I’ve seen in my seven years here. As a whole, it struck a perfect balance for

exhibit, Emily Carr: Fresh Seeing, starting on Sept. 21. Rather than an offering an array of Carr’s paintings, it will examine three specific years in her career and the impact it had on her work. Across the street at the Maury Young Arts Centre, Arts Whistler is also set to host the premiere of útszan, a one-woman play written and starring Yvonne Wallace, a member of the Lil’wat Nation who grew

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up in Mount Currie. The play—which centres around the relationship between an aunt and her niece and focuses on the importance of language—is running for four nights, which is a first for the venue in my memory. For context, even the uber-popular Chairlift Revue, which featured a series of skits that all take place on a chairlift, only ran two nights in a row. It’s a bold move on Arts Whistler’s part—putting on a one-person show that’s partly in Ucwalmícwts language—but one that’s worthwhile. Arts Whistler has spent the last several years establishing the fall season under the slogan “Fall for Arts.” Summer sports are winding down, October rain is arriving, and the mountains are not yet open. Why not head indoors (or, in the case of the Hear and Now Festival, throw on a sweater and enjoy some local bands around the village) and enjoy some time taking in art? It’s worked. With a non-stop list of shoulder season events, it’s worth pushing the boundaries on what we expect a typical Whistler audience to enjoy—namely reggae, landscape art, or anything to do with mountain culture. That’s not to say we should shun the tried-and-true favourites; rather, the time is right to expand offerings to include fresh, new, innovative art that, for whatever reason, we might not have been ready for. In the past, it’s almost seemed greedy to ask for world-class art alongside our world-class mountain sports. Now, it seems inevitable. So, if you want to see Whistler move in this direction, be sure to get out there and attend a new event or two this season. You just might be surprised by how much you enjoy something entirely different. n

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Stop BC Hydro impacts on steelhead and salmon

guarding the hen house) so they just dropped crucial areas of the monitoring. Federal Fisheries Minister Jonathan Wilkinson tells us that salmon are incredibly important to him, so it’s time for him to step up and stop this! Dave Brown // Whistler

It’s time for the Department of Fisheries and Oceans and the Province of B.C. to stop allowing BC Hydro to kill steelhead and salmon. DFO is letting the fox guard the hen house and instead of upholding the job of the regulator of Fisheries Act Authorizations, they let BC Hydro get away with killing large numbers of salmon and steelhead. They also have allowed BC Hydro to cancel monitoring programs, which have been used to quantify effects of stranding and minimum flows on egg-fry survival rates for steelhead, and to quantify the production of juvenile steelhead and salmon in the Cheakamus River. How can we manage fish populations, and quantify population-level effects of BC Hydro-caused fish kills, in the absence of these programs? DFO continues to allow BC Hydro to use ramping rates higher than the DFO recommended rate of 2.5 cm an hour on the Cheakamus River. BC Hydro is being allowed to set the terms for monitoring and fish mortality levels. BC Hydro are mandated to have an operating review of the Water Use Plan flows every 10 years. There was supposed to be a review of the flow regimes, which BC Hydro is way late in doing (for obvious reasons—fox

Attract employees with better wages

“How can we manage fish populations, and quantify population-level effects of BC Hydro-caused fish kills, in the absence of these programs?” - DAVE BROWN

On a recent visit to Whistler I was somewhat shocked by [Pique editor] Ms. Ogilvie’s Aug. 1 editorial piece relating to the town’s labour situation. Distilled down to its essence, it seemed that what was being proposed was the old labour model of indentured servitude. I understand that Whistler is to some degree a fantasy world, but in the real world the way businesses get employees is through competitive wages and benefits. The editorial seems to express the fear that offering such wages and benefits would make the “Whistler Experience” too expensive for people. Wow! Whistler is a destination for people fortunate enough to have excess disposable income. It seems what is being suggested is that the cost involved in creating the “Whistler Experience” should fall on the backs of the lowwage who keep the place running rather than on the more affluent patrons who could better afford to absorb it. It’s a rather sad commentary on the mindset of the times. Sincerely, Richard Schwartz // Longbranch, WA

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 6403 ST ANDREWS WAY BC Hydro’s logical fallacy I am writing this letter in response to The Squamish Chief’s Aug. 7, article (picked up by the Pique on Sept. 5) describing the fish stranding and kills as a result of operations at BC Hydro’s Cheakamus Generating Facility. As a defense, I have heard from several BC Hydro staff that, “people need to turn on

and simplistic. No one is expected to choose between power in their homes and the protection of fish. The two have nothing to do with one another. Same goes for the higher rates argument. We already pay the third lowest rate in a survey of electricity prices in 22 major cities. BC Hydro cannot justify killing fish in order to keep electricity rates low. Again, the two are not

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their lights” or “taking measures to adequately protect fish in the Cheakamus will mean higher hydro rates for customers.” I think BC Hydro has successfully messaged this either/or thinking to the public, and I want to dispel these arguments. Protecting fish or turning on the lights… this is a classic blackor-white logical fallacy. “If you aren’t for me, you’re against me.” This kind of thinking crushes discussion and totally disregards the middle ground; it is childish

related. And we have asked hydro numerous times to show us the numbers. If keeping more water in the Cheakamus River and using slower ramping rates is going to cost them the earth, let them prove that. Then at least we can have that discussion in the public realm. Please folks, don’t feel like your hydro is at risk if you support the protection of salmon and trout in the Cheakamus River, or any river where hydro has a facility. Axel Schreyer // Whistler n

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PIQUE’N YER INTEREST

Jerrys of the Day 3.0: The great outdoors NEARLY FIVE YEARS into my time in this province, one of my biggest failings has been that I don’t go out and enjoy the outdoors as much as I should. I’m no homebody recluse—my wife and I get out for walks in our neighbourhood or the odd lake swim when the beaches aren’t entirely overloaded, and I’ve received

BY DAN FALLOON sports@piquenewsmagazine.com

some ski and downhill biking instruction (as covered in past Pique features)—but hearing about my colleagues’ weekend exploits or even perusing social media and seeing some of the beautiful sights, I can’t help but feel like I’m leaving some adventure on the table. Part of it comes down to my prairie upbringing: the highest elevations in Winnipeg are old mounds of trash, so let’s just say the muscles I need to haul myself up a mountain are, for lack of a better term, undeveloped. And sure, I’ve slept in a tent plenty, but it was almost exclusively at a music festival and, to be frank, it didn’t take incredible navigation skills to rediscover home because it was where I left my two-

four. There also wasn’t the pervasive threat of wildlife snatching your meals—or, worse, thinking you were one. However, on Labour Day, I cast excuses aside as my wife, Kerilee, and I attempted our first (!) successful trip to Joffre Lakes Provincial Park. (We’d tried to go one offseason weekend a couple years ago, but even though there was no snow and ice on the ground in town, we were absolutely

securing a spot in the main lot provided a dopamine rush equivalent to scrambling half-a-kilometre up into the wilderness. After applying some sunscreen and making sure our packs had everything we needed, the two of us set off. After a gruelling five-minute trek, we made it to the first lake and, knowing this was a mere preview of what was in store, eagerly started the ascent to the Middle and Upper lakes, rather than give in to

In my mind, securing a spot in the main lot provided a dopamine rush equivalent to scrambling half-a-kilometre up into the wilderness.

not dressed properly when we arrived at the park.) I admittedly had my doubts about going on not only a weekend, but a long weekend, no less. Still, it was the last day of the weekend, so hopefully, those interested in the trek had already gone. We took no chances, setting our alarms earlier than we ever had on any prior holiday Monday, grabbed a coffee and muffin for the road, and were in the parking lot minutes after 8 a.m. In my mind,

the legend of city folk, who hit only the Lower Lake, aware their Instagram followers won’t know the difference. It didn’t take long before we realized we weren’t in Kansas anymore (hey, for all intents and purposes, the phrase works). “It’s going to be another hour of this?!” we collectively gasped, gazing at the incline ahead of us. Still, we made the point just to take small bites, even if it meant several seniors, regardless of their apparent fitness levels,

pushed past us, reinforcing that it is, in fact, a novice-level expedition. Getting to the Middle Lake was an absolute revelation, with a jewelled colour that words can’t aptly describe. Looking at this natural beauty, it’s understandable why so many people drive for hours, navigate/ create chaos, and exert themselves to see it. Neither of us love being in crowds, so it was a bit anxiety-inducing to traverse through the crowds lined up for the selfie log. Admittedly not sure if we’d initially press on to the third lake, we’d gained the confidence to continue, reckoning that if we could take on the inclines that we already had, what was a bit more? Welp, the scrambling required by the rocky portions in that section of trail were certainly a challenge, but ultimately, weren’t anything we couldn’t handle. After making it to the Upper Lake, Kerilee and I managed to find a relatively secluded spot to have our sandwiches and watermelon, and we even had a couple whiskey jacks say hello. The hike down was, well, somewhat better, though descents are low-key challenging when you’re getting help from gravity but don’t want ALL the help. Though we’re both still sore days later, we’re both eager to get out there and perhaps even try to sneak in another day adventure before the snow falls. n

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

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OUR ONLINE CONVERSATION It’s no secret Whistler residents are passionate about their pets. That might be one of the reasons why our story about the Resort Municipality of Whistler’s Animal Responsibility Bylaw—which received its first three readings at the Sept. 3 council meeting, and proposes a host of new fines for pet owners—received its fair share of attention on our Facebook page last week. So what did our followers think about the proposed updates?

One very important issue has been left out. Driving with a dog loose in the back of a pick-up! Risking the life of the dog and others. Secondly, maybe having owners attend obedience classes and possibly receiving a discount on licensing.

” “ ” “ ” “ ” “ ”

4K-$5K

$

The amount it costs the provincial government to dispose of an abandoned fifth wheel trailer.

DID YOU KNOW?

British Columbians are snapping up electric vehicles. In just over two weeks last May, 1,300 car orders were placed, compared to 3,270 in all of 2017. Whistler, meanwhile, has 15 electric vehicle chargers available, but plans are underway to try and increase that to 28. Read more about that this week on page 20.

THROWBACK THURSDAY

With our under-funded bylaw department, I wonder what if any difference this will make.

I’m crushed to learn I can’t have an elephant.

$400 for permitting dog fighting seems a little low.

Some of those fines are a joke! They should be at least 10X those amounts to make a real difference. $400 for dog fighting? Are you serious?

OF INTEREST

28

The inimitable Feet Banks wrote the cover feature eight years ago this week, about Whistler’s growing winter-sport film industry, pegged to the release of the much-anticipated Sherpas Cinema film, All.I.Can. To bring the reader into a week-long backcountry trip that accompanied these film shoots, he offered a vivid scene. “After a week without showering your baselayer starts sticking to your skin. Not just in the crotch and armpits either, that happens earlier on. By day six or seven you can actually feel the clothes fusing onto your body, the polypropylene so gummy with dead skin and sweat it becomes hard to tell where the flesh ends and the fabric begins.” It might not be the best advertisement for getting out there, but it might make you appreciate the hard work that goes into these productions. n Election Fever

Bears and berries

P.12

P.28

Trouble Andrew P.64

FREE PRO DOWN

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Serving sea to sky for 18 years

14 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

56% The increase in virtual visits to the Whistler Public Library last year over 2017.

LIGHTS

CAMERA

PASSPORT...

18.37

Mountain Psychology

September 15, 2011

|

WHISTLER’S WEEKLY NEWSMAGAZINE

| www.piquenewsmagazine.com


NEWS WHISTLER

Illegal dumping in Whistler area a growing problem ABANDONED VEHICLES AND TRAILER FOUND IN CAL-CHEAK

BY JOEL BARDE IF YOU’VE DRIVEN THROUGH the Cal-Cheak area recently, you may have noticed a new, incongruous addition to the landscape: An old fifth-wheel trailer with a giant penis spray painted on it. The flat area underneath the power lines, at the beginning of the Daisy Lake Forest Service Road, has become a hot spot for illegal dumping, a growing problem for the provincial agency responsible for cleaning up such sites in many areas in the region, including the Cal-Cheak. Alistair McCrone, the provincial recreation officer responsible for the Sea to Sky region, said that Recreation Sites and Trails BC spends between $5,000 and $10,000 a year cleaning up garbage, vehicles, and boats from illegal dumping sites in the corridor. To get rid of the fifth wheel, the agency will need to bring in a flatbed truck (at about $200 an hour) and then pay a tipping fee to properly dispose of it.

GARBAGE DAY The Conservation Officer Service’s Brittany Mueller says that the problem of illegal dumping is growing on the many backroads around Whistler. PHOTO BY JOEL BARDE

16 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

“I would think it would be in the order of $4,000-$5,000 to get rid of that RV,” said McCrone. “I’ve never dealt with something this big before… The biggest thing we have had [to dispose of] was a 16-foot boat.” The amount of trash being illegally

such as a fifth-wheel trailer. But he also said it may be related to the growing number of people living in vehicles on Crown land in areas around the community. With Whistler facing an acute housing crisis—it’s not uncommon to see people

“Based on my observations, I would say there is more waste and more garbage in the forest.” - ALISTAIR MCCRONE

discarded in the corridor appears to be growing, with some dumping construction debris, like drywall and cement, and others dumping garbage, said McCrone. “Based on my observations, I would say there is more waste and more garbage in the forest,” he said. McCrone estimates that much of the illegal dumping may stem from the fact that people simply don’t want to pay for a tipping fee at places like the Whistler Waste Transfer Station, or may face difficulty finding places to dispose of larger items

charging more than $700 a month to share a room—the so-called “van life” movement appears to be growing, placing added pressure on Crown land, where no-trace camping is permitted for up to 14 days. “It seems like a reasonable assumption that if someone is leaving the country, and they have an old, run-down RV that they couldn’t sell, they might abandon it,” said McCrone, noting that the vast majority of people are responsible. What’s clear is that there are significant impacts on the environment.

Brittany Mueller, a conservation officer responsible for the Whistler and Pemberton areas, spends a significant amount of time on the corridor’s backroads. She also sees illegal dumping as a growing problem. Just this week, she investigated and recommended charges under the Environmental Management Act against an individual who illegally dumped a large amount of debris at a site along the Green River FSR. Her investigation was assisted by the Pemberton Wildlife Association, which has a camera set up at the location and was able to provide photographic evidence. The Cal-Cheak, the Callaghan Creek Forest Service Road (FSR), the Wedge Creek FSR and the Soo River FSR are all problem areas, Mueller said. “It starts with vegetation, and then the next person might come in and leave some wood, and then the next person comes in, and it becomes drywall and tires,” she said. “It’s happening in places outside of public view.” Mueller said the illegal dumpers are showing “no regard” for the environment and wildlife, which can easily become conditioned to human food. Mueller recently came upon an abandoned van at the Cal-Cheak site. It was full of garbage—and its windows were left open, making the interior easily accessible to wildlife.


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TRAILER TRASH The flat area at the start of the Daisy Lake Road in the Cal-Cheak has become a hotspot for illegal dumping, with this abandoned trailer now landing on Recreation and Trails BC to clean up.

PHOTO BY JOEL BARDE

“It was full of garbage—everything and anything,” said Mueller, who quickly had it removed before an animal got into it. “This person went above and beyond to try to protect their identity, removing the plates and pulling the VIN,” she added. With illegal dumping a persistent problem up and down the corridor, the Pemberton Wildlife Association (PWA) has taken a leading role in stopping it, marshalling its volunteers to clean up sites in the Pemberton area and pressuring government to develop ways to mitigate it. Last spring, the PWA sent along a report, prepared by former Whistler Councillor Sue Maxwell, to the Squamish-Lillooet Regional District (SLRD) calling for an illegal dumping strategy.

knows where to take their waste products.” The Cal-Cheak area is located within the Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) boundaries. When asked for more information on what it is doing to curb illegal dumping, staff was unable to provide comment in time for deadline. According to the RMOW’s website, it can administer fines of $2,000 to people who dump illegally. (The public is asked to report incidents of illegal dumping to the RMOW at 604932-5535.) In McCrone’s view, the illegal dumping the region is seeing is related to a surging interest in backcountry recreation. He’s been monitoring counters at

“There is an urgent need to address illegal dumping before more land is negatively impacted.

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The report also listed a host of suggestions used in other jurisdictions to mitigate illegal dumping, including yardwaste disposal, supporting organizations to clean up sites immediately, and improving communications with the public regarding where to dispose of materials. “There is an urgent need to address illegal dumping before more land is negatively impacted,” said PWA president Allen McEwan in an email to Pique. “The longer we wait, the more work it will be to clean up the mess. Local governments and the SLRD should work towards convenient and affordable waste management options for all residents of the Sea to Sky corridor and embark on a public education program to ensure that everyone

various areas and noted a significant rise in visitation. “I’ve been looking at the recreational use at a whole bunch of iconic trails and campsites,” he said. “I see about a 145-percent increase from 2017 to 2018, and I’m expecting another similar increase this year.” And with more people coming, that means the problem of illegal dumping can naturally grow, even though it’s only a small minority of people who are bad actors, he said. “Any signage or any law gets 95 per cent compliance,” said McCrone. “But the other five per cent do what they want.” Anyone who observes unlawful dumping or polluting is asked to contact the COS RAPP line at 1-877-952-7277. n

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NEWS WHISTLER

Whistler has its work cut out for it on EV charging COUNCIL SUPPORTS GRANT APPLICATION FOR NEW CHARGING STATIONS

BY BRADEN DUPUIS WITH A LAW TO phase out gas vehicles now making its way through the provincial legislature (the Province of B.C. is eyeing 2040 for the switch to electric vehicles) and British Columbians buying electric cars at an astonishing rate (about 1,300 orders were placed over two weeks in May compared to a total of 3,270 in all of 2017, according to the New Car Dealers Association of B.C.), the Resort Municipality of Whistler has its work cut out for it in providing chargers for electric cars. “Right now in Whistler we have 15 publically available EV chargers … [which covers about] 0.24 per cent of the summer and 0.15 per cent of winter parking spots,” said environmental stewardship manager Heather Beresford, in a presentation to council on Sept. 3.

“Those seem like awfully small numbers to me, and we would like to be able to improve that.” Beresford was on hand to seek council’s support for an application to Natural Resources Canada’s Zero Emissions Vehicle Infrastructure Incentive Program for up to 50 per cent in matching funding for 14 dualport Level 2 charging stations. At an estimated total project cost of $240,000, the Resort Municipality of Whistler’s (RMOW) share would be $120,000. If successful, the project would add 28 new charging stations to the resort (though some existing chargers will be replaced): two dual-port Level 2 chargers in Lot 1, four in Lot 2, four in Lot 4, two at municipal hall and two at the Whistler Conference Centre. The RMOW’s share of the funds would come from the Climate Action Revenue Incentive Program (CARIP) and day lot capital improvement funding, while other cost-sharing opportunities are also

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Whistler is looking to increase the number of electrical vehicle chargers in the resort—but hurdles remain.

CHARGE IT

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being explored. The Day Lot Committee will cover the annual electricity cost from its revenue. The CARIP is a rebate for municipalities that have signed on to B.C.’s Climate Action Charter, allowing them to reclaim all of the

carbon taxes they have paid each year for direct local government operation costs. “We get about $50,000 a year back on that, and have been challenged to find projects to spend it on, but this is a great one,” Beresford said, adding that $60,000


NEWS WHISTLER for the project will come from the CARIP, while the other $60,000 will come from the day lot capital improvement fund. “The idea is to wrap the EV charger installation into some larger day lot parking improvement projects that are going to be taking place in 2020,” she said. Though council ultimately supported the application, Councillor Ralph Forsyth voted against it. “I’m not sold on the entirety of the argument. I want to achieve the goals, but I don’t want to label or saddle the taxpayer with the ongoing cost, and more importantly, the moral obligation to provide this service in perpetuity. Because there’s no exit strategy for us,” Forsyth said. “When there’s 1,000 lots in the day lots, and all the cars are electric—on this model, we’re paying for all of them, and I don’t see any scenario that gets us out of it. So for those reasons, I’m not going to support it.” Ted Battiston, general manager of corporate and community services, noted that, depending how empty the battery is, charging costs somewhere between 50 cents and $2. “Two dollars would be about as hard hit as you could ever get hit by somebody showing up bone dry and then topping the entire battery,” Battiston said. “So just to give you a sense of the costs, and that those are relatively small given the amount of charging this early on in the adoption.”

John Grills. “The early days of computers and cash systems … you would find out a couple of years later after your large investment that it’s now obsolete and you’re taking it out, so I’m glad there’s thought into maybe seeing up to 15 years, potentially, for some of these pieces,” he said. “It’s very encouraging, because it seems like it’s developing so quickly and just the volume, we hope, will grow as well.” But supplying electricity for new chargers will continue to be a barrier moving forward, Battiston said. “As we’ve looked through the parking lots, the day lots, these were locations that did support significant installations, but it isn’t easy to just pick spots wherever and believe that there is enough ampacity to support these additional chargers,” he said. “Over the last 10 years when I’ve been working on the project, it has been one of the barriers to installing more of them, is not having sufficient electricity on site or ampacity on site to support the additional load.” Further, BC Hydro won’t allow the installation of more capacity unless municipalities can prove they can use it, said general manager of infrastructure James Hallisey. “So even though some of the stuff in the day lots is pretty new, there isn’t much additional capacity there already waiting around, because hydro just doesn’t do

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“It’s exciting to imagine a future with broad, community-level charging infrastructure and many of our community members using electric vehicles...” - JACK CROMPTON

The charging ports are expected to last between eight and 15 years, and the system can also be restructured as things change in the future, Battiston added. “When the evolution is to a point where people are expecting to pay for electricity, they can be converted, and they’re future proofed for that, to collect revenues at some point in the future,” he said. The additional chargers are needed, said Coun. Jen Ford, though she would like to see more. “The No. 1 reason people say they can’t go to an electric vehicle is because of the range—range anxiety,” Ford said, noting that during a recent tour of some car dealerships, dealers were “actively talking me out of an electric vehicle, because, ‘Oh, you live in Whistler, you’ll never make it up the highway.’ “Which is frustrating, because we want to move in that direction.” Though the 28 new charging ports won’t vastly increase Whistler’s charging capacity, a more long-term strategy is on the workplan for this year, Beresford said—a fact that was encouraging to Coun.

september special things that way,” he said. “Unless they know you’re going to use it, they just won’t give it to you, which sometimes is a little frustrating to us, but it is their overall management scheme and it probably keeps the price of electricity around the province down.” Forsyth makes an interesting point, said Mayor Jack Crompton, adding that he’ll endeavour to work hard to ensure other orders of government pick up the cost moving forward. “I would say I don’t think because we’ve participated now means that in the future they can’t pick up increasing costs, and I hope they will,” Crompton said. Many people in the community who are purchasing electric vehicles are living on a budget, and working hard to be part of the transition, the mayor added. “I hope that this infrastructure is something that helps them participate,” he said. “It’s exciting to imagine a future with broad, community-level charging infrastructure and many of our community members using electric vehicles, so I’ll be supporting the resolution.” n

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NEWS WHISTLER

In-person visits down, virtual visits up at Whistler Public Library WPL ANNUAL REPORT PRESENTED TO COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE

BY BRADEN DUPUIS WHILE THE Whistler Public Library (WPL) welcomed 13 per cent fewer in-person visits last year (from 221,317 in 2017 to 195,304 in 2018), virtual visits were up 56 per cent (from 135,460 to 212,364). “That’s not something that is unexpected by me,” said library director Elizabeth Tracy in a presentation to Whistler’s committee of the whole on Sept. 3. “I think that some of this fluctuates with visitation to the resort, because we do serve a lot of visitors; it also reflects if there’s any changes to our temporary population as well, so temporary workers. “But I can see from the numbers of the last few years, we pretty much hold steady at around 200,000 people a year, and I think that’s working at a pretty good pace. That’s about 75 people per hour, which is pretty significant.” Tracy was on hand to present the

library’s 2018 annual report, detailing the successes and relevant facts and figures of the last year. The WPL is particularly proud of three initiatives, she said: the Deweyless Project (introducing an easy-to-browse, word-based classification system for the non-fiction section); additional comfortable seating in the fireplace lounge and a new home for the WPL’s teen collection; and strengthening the partnership with the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre (SLCC). “This year, in 2019, we were able to work with the SLCC on partnering over some programs,“ Tracy said, noting that the SLCC went through some strategic planning last year and identified generating more interest from the community as one of its goals. “So partnering with us enabled them to do more programming.” Some of that programming included a massive open online course, two film screenings, smudgings and more. “The partnership with them has gotten really strong and we’ll continue to do that

WARM WELCOME Re-imagining the library’s fireside seating was just one of the Whistler Public Library’s stated accomplishments last year. PHOTO BY JUSTA JESKOVA/COURTESY OF THE RESORT MUNICIPALITY OF WHISTLER

going forward,” Tracy said. While information requests, Wi-Fi usage and electronic material use were all up (12 per cent, 28 per cent and 15 per cent, respectively), total programs and total program attendees were both down (four per cent and 13 per cent, respectively). Total expenditures in 2018 were $1,342,609 (up three per cent from $1,300,256 in 2017), with the Resort Municipality of Whistler contributing $1,218,326. The WPL also took in $180,192 in revenue and grants last year (excluding donations and fundraising from third parties). Using figures from the American Library Association, the WPL added values to the different items and resources being used to give people an idea of what the return on investment is at the library.

“If you spent, which was last year, close to $1.5 million on the library, what you’re getting out of it is $6 million,” Tracy said. “So that’s an estimation of about $3.80 to every dollar, which I think is something that you all, and this community, should be very proud of.” Another point of pride for WPL staff is back-to-back nominations in the service excellence category for large businesses at the Whistler Chamber’s annual excellence awards, Tracy said. “Whether it actually comes to fruition or not, I am extraordinarily proud of this team and their ability to deliver quality customer service,” she said. “Particularly with the amount of themselves that they actually put out there when they work with people.” n

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NEWS WHISTLER

Paid parking still having an impact on local neighbourhoods COUNCIL BRIEFS: SEARCH FOR NEW WHISTLER CAO CONTINUES; FIVE-YEAR FINANCIAL BYLAW AMENDED

BY BRADEN DUPUIS WHEN THE Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) re-instituted pay parking in the Day Lots in 2017, it led to some unintended consequences. Neighbourhoods close to Whistler Village like Whistler Cay Heights saw their streets inundated with vehicles looking to avoid paying for parking. And the issue has yet to be resolved. On Sept. 3, council received a letter from Rob MacKay-Dunn highlighting continued concerns with parking on Painted Cliff Road in the Benchlands. Parking on the road has been “an absolute mess for a number of summers now, with no signs of getting any better, despite RMOW ticketing,” MacKay-Dunn wrote. “I realized I’ve been patiently sending photos and calling bylaw services since 2017 with little-to-no positive impact on the situation.” Accompanying MacKay-Dunn’s letter were several photos of parking on the street on Aug. 17. MacKay-Dunn asked the RMOW to consider restricting parking to only the uphill side of the street, opposite the residential driveways, and to actively tow vehicles that are illegally parked. “Again, another parking issue, this one is affectionately known as Lot 9,” said Councillor Cathy Jewett at the Sept. 3 council meeting. “What is happening in this neighbourhood is because of its proximity to the village. It is getting a lot of traffic parking there, not only because there’s no parking allowed at Lost Lake, but because people don’t want to pay for parking in the village, so they’ve inundated this neighbourhood. “Towing is something that we have to do. There’s people in front of fire hydrants, parked nose-in into lawns, blocking visibility, as well as creating a lot of garbage as well, so I hope that we’ll work on this.” Soon after receiving the letter, the RMOW limited parking on Painted Cliff to the odd side of the road, said Mayor Jack Crompton. “They’re actively working on addressing the parking challenges that we face there,” Crompton said. “It won’t be fixed overnight but I have already seen significant steps in the right direction up there, so I’m encouraged.” In a follow-up email, an RMOW spokesperson said proposed changes for

Painted Cliff also include installing No Parking Anytime signs every 40 metres or so. The RMOW has issued 48 tickets on Painted Cliff this year, along with 1,115 on Blackcomb Way and 248 on Spearhead Drive. Bylaw has also received nine complaints related to illegal parking and camping in the area this year. In studying the issue of neighbourhood parking last year, the RMOW determined the issue is more related to weather, desired destination and resort business than it is to pay parking. “People park in neighbourhoods when it is close to where they want to go,” the spokesperson said. “Also, the resort is busier and more occupied than it was pre-Olympics, therefore, more residents/tenants and their guests are parking on neighbourhood streets.” The Transportation Advisory Group will receive an update on summer 2019 parking this fall.

SEARCH FOR NEW CAO CONTINUES While the search for Whistler’s new chief administrative officer (CAO) continues—a posting for the position closed on Aug. 26, and a recruitment team is in the process of reviewing applications—some still have questions about the new role created for current CAO Mike Furey. On July 25, the RMOW announced that Furey will take on the newly created role of chief of strategic policy and partnerships. “Where was the transparency? Why did it get released last minute?” asked local resident Dawn Titus, referencing segments of Whistler’s Official Community Plan that speak to creating trust, transparency and the community budget. Though Titus said Furey’s new role will cost taxpayers “over half a million dollars,” Crompton questioned her math. The role will begin when the new CAO is in place (likely late 2019, according to the RMOW) and end in early 2021, lasting just over a year. Furey was the RMOW’s top earner last year, with a total remuneration of $246,043. He will carry on in the same terms as his current contract. “I will say we take staffing very seriously at the municipality, and we don’t do that in public,” Crompton said. “Council has over three years left in our term and we have an ambitious set

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NEWS WHISTLER << FROM PAGE 23

FIVE-YEAR FINANCIAL BYLAW AMENDED

of priorities. While there has been great progress to this point, this position allows us to have a smooth transition to a new CAO as well as get some important work done on some priorities that council has.” But does the new CAO “need someone else to create a transition?” Titus asked. “I don’t believe that was done when our last CAO came on board.” It is a new approach, Crompton said, and the intent of the new position is to “take on some of those strategic priorities that we have in front of us,” he said. In his new role, Furey’s areas of focus will include: provincial and First Nations relations; oversight for Resort Municipality Initiative and hotel tax plans and reporting, as well as Resort Collaborative participation and leadership; participation on Whistler’s Strategic Planning and Economic Partnership committees; and housing. A spokesperson for the RMOW said it is unable to say how many people applied for the CAO position, citing its human resources policy. “Recruitment for executive positions often takes many months to complete. It is too early in the process to confirm when we expect the role to be filled,” the spokesperson said in an email. “The RMOW will update the community once a candidate has been selected and the recruitment process is complete.”

An amendment to Whistler’s 2019-2023 fiveyear financial plan bylaw making several changes to the municipal budget received first three readings at the Sept. 3 council meeting. The changes include directing more money to the Whistler 2020 Development Corp (WDC) to advance affordable housing in Cheakamus and the Meadow Park Sports Centre for its expansion project; reallocating water infrastructure and sewer capital spending for various projects; and increasing the budget for Valley Trail lighting near the village. On May 28, council amended the five-year financial plan bylaw to allow a one-time transfer of $200,000 from the housing reserves (representing the bulk of the current housing reserves balance) to the WDC to develop 100 units of employee housing on Parcel A in Cheakamus. But with WDC indicating it will need “significant additional funding” for the project, the RMOW will commit to the regular, ongoing transfer of its online accommodation provider tax revenue to the WDC until the project is complete (likely at the end of 2021). The total value is expected to be about $1.3 million. “It’s going to be used for building housing,” Crompton said of the additional funds. “WDC is moving forward [with] the most important housing projects in our

PARKING PATROL Parking on Painted Cliff Road in Whistler’s Benchlands has become ‘an absolute mess’ in recent summers, says a local resident. PHOTO BY BRADEN DUPUIS

community. Council is committed to funding their operations and making sure that we build housing.” The amendment will also move $372,221 to general fund capital expenditures for the Meadow Park project, as well as $68,500 to the same fund for lighting on a stretch of Valley Trail between Village Gate Boulevard and Lorimer Road. Four water infrastructure projects need bigger budgets for 2019, to the tune of $600,000, while a fifth, the White Gold

Water Main Upgrade, is expected to be underspent by the same amount. As such, the $600,000 will be moved from the White Gold project to the four other projects, resulting in no net change to the overall 2019 water capital budget. Three sewer infrastructure also need bigger budgets this year, to the tune of $140,000. That money will be moved from the sewer main project, which was completed under budget in 2019. n

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20th ANNIVERSARY!


NEWS WHISTLER

Upcoming Vital Café looks at Whistler’s role in Truth and Reconciliation FREE PANEL DISCUSSION WILL BE LED BY FIRST NATIONS ACTIVIST AND WHISTLERITE LINDA EPP

BY BRANDON BARRETT WHEN WHISTLER’S Linda Epp tells people about surviving the Sixties Scoop, a time when Indigenous children around Canada were forcibly removed from their families to be put up for adoption or into foster homes, she often gets a similar response. “‘Oh, what’s that?’ They don’t know,” she said. “People think that it happened hundreds and hundreds of years ago, or they don’t know what they can actually do to help. So I think this conversation is vital to have in the community.” Epp, a Sechelt Nation member and long-time Indigenous activist, is leading the latest Vital Café panel talk, hosted by the Community Foundation of Whistler (CFOW), on Truth and Reconciliation. The event is scheduled for Tuesday, Sept. 17 at the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre (SLCC). Representatives from the Squamish and Lil’wat Nations, the SLCC, and WorkSafe BC, where Epp also works, have been invited to attend. Epp said it’s important to spark a community dialogue on how

Whistler can better support efforts around Truth and Reconciliation at the local level. “I think it’s a big topic and people are scared to talk about it. They don’t know how to go about talking about it or they don’t know what they can actually do. I’ve seen that for years,” she said. “I think Step 1 is attending this event and talking about it.” The organizer of Whistler’s Sisters in Spirit Vigil, which pays tribute to Canada’s missing and murdered Indigenous women and returns Oct. 4, Epp was inspired to invite WorkBC and other local employers after reading WorkBC’s most recent business plan. “We have a WorkBC location now in Lil’wat Nation at the Tszil Learning Centre and they’re trying to include Indigenous people in the work and [recognizing] how important they are,” she explained. “I think that a lot of local businesses can follow suit and think about what they can do in terms of including Indigenous people in the workforce.” But it’s not just employers who should be part of the conversation, Epp believes, but the average citizen as well. “What can people actually do? They can connect and communicate on a personal level with an Indigenous person

SPARKING DIALOGUE Indigenous activist Linda Epp will be hosting a Vital Café panel discussion on Truth and Reconciliation on Sept. 17. PHOTO SUBMITTED

or community in whatever aspect they can, in whatever way they feel comfortable,” she said. “It’s about actually just understanding being human and seeing the human behind the trauma that has happened in the past.”

Epp’s panel discussion is one of nine the CFOW will host by year’s end. Libby McKeever, Vital Signs project coordinator, said the organization wants to “delve in a little bit deeper into some other topics that people really care about that keep bubbling to the surface.” The CFOW has already hosted Vital Cafés on topics including mountain ecology, climate change, poverty and food security. The goal, McKeever said, is not to lead community action, but rather spark dialogue. “Our mandate is to inspire others to pick up the gauntlet and go forward,” she explained. “It’s meant to basically inspire people so that we all can affect change, we can all do positive things.” The CFOW will also produce a series of podcasts featuring each past Vital Café host to discuss the topic at hand at greater length. The topics will be available online and will air on Whistler FM this fall. “This is a way to keep [these issues] fresh in people’s minds,” McKeever said. Vital Café: Truth & Reconciliation is free to attend and open to anyone. For more information, visit whistlerfoundation.com/ vital-signs. n

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A BIG THANK YOU TO ALL FOODWORX PARTICIPANTS! A total of $5,135.85 and 785.60 pounds of food donations for our foodbank were raised by 26 local businesses over a period of 14 days! THANK YOU to all for supporting food security initiatives in our community!

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MAN’S BEST FRIEND Pro skier Rory Bushfield, pictured here with Dex, has teamed up with Blair Harper to

launch a premium dog food delivery service that donates a portion of every sale to the Sarah Burke Foundation. PHOTO SUBMITTED

Dog food delivery service honours the late Sarah Burke

Opening Reception Friday, September 27, 2pm – 4pm A NEW EXHIBITION AT THE SLCC

DEX KNOWS BEST, CO-FOUNDED BY RORY BUSHFIELD, DONATES PORTION OF EVERY SALE TO SKIER’S FOUNDATION

BY BRANDON BARRETT WHEN CANADIAN freeskiing icon Sarah Burke died in a tragic training accident in 2012, her dog Dex proved to be a significant source of comfort for husband and fellow pro skier Rory Bushfield. Burke first spotted the German shepherd cross in 2011 huddled under a car in Mount Currie, and Bushfield urged her not to take the dog home. “But looking back, I’m so thankful. I love that dog,” Bushfield said. “When Sarah passed away, without Dex, man, I don’t know what I would’ve done. She kept me around all my friends, I had my support. And she just loved me unconditionally.” Bushfield is now one half of the duo behind Dex Knows Best, a premium dogfood delivery service that has caught the eye of Michele Romanow, tech entrepreneur and star of CBC reality show, Dragons’ Den. Teaming up with part-time Whistlerite Blair Harper, who previously worked with both Bushfield and Burke as a sponsor and manager with Monster Energy, Bushfield said the idea for Dex Knows Best came from an urge to give back. A portion of every sale goes to the Sarah Burke Foundation, which hands out two $7,500 grants to promising youth skiers a year. “I wanted to make some actual money that we could donate to make a difference. I also love dogs to death,” Bushfield said. The concept emerged from what Harper saw as a gap in the market. “I actually found the need for dog food delivered to the house because my wife and I had young children and were busy and would have appreciated that extra service,” he explained. “There was nobody I could find that was really doing it well and so we saw an opportunity.”

Launched last November, the company auditioned for a spot on Dragons’ Den earlier this year, but didn’t make the cut. They made such an impression, however, that Romanow eventually agreed to bring Dex Knows Best on with two of her companies: venture capital firm, Clearbanc, and marketing firm, Acquire Agency. With Romanow’s help, Dex Knows Best will begin rolling out a national marketing campaign this month. “Since we’ve on-boarded with Michele, they’ve done a forecast on where they think they can take us to in terms of new sales,” Harper said. “That’s really helped us open our eyes and say, ‘Holy, this is actually real.’ It gives us a sense of where this can take us.” Along with the convenience of nationwide delivery, the appeal of Dex Knows Best is in the quality of its product. Using “a very clean, limited-ingredient diet,” the food is high in protein and free of grain, corn, wheat, soy and other by-products. Bushfield said he’s already heard of the health benefits of the product from dog owners. “I get reports of people saying their dog was having seizures and … it hasn’t had one since they switched the dog food. People said their dogs’ coats are 10 times shinier. A lot of great feedback,” he said. “It seems like a lot of people are on it, man. Everywhere I go, I don’t have to bring Dex’s food anymore because all my friends have bags of their own.” Looking back, Bushfield said it would have been easy to launch “a ski brand or something” in his post-ski life, but he’s proud to have started something with a charitable component that would have appealed to Burke. “I think she’d be proud to know that the dog she found under the car is now feeding all the dogs around the land,” he said. To learn more, visit dexknowsbest.com. n

Curated by Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre’s Mixalhítsa7 Alison Pascal, this heartwarming exhibit celebrates the faces and family of the SLCC. Learn about our Ambassadors’ deeply-rooted connections to our immersive cultural centre, and the passion they share in belonging to Skwxwú7mesh Lil’wat7ul.

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NEWS WHISTLER

Body found floating in Lillooet Lake POLICE BRIEFS: WINDSOR MAN LIGHTS SHIRT ON FIRE; MOUNT CURRIE MAN BREACHES CONDITIONS

BY BRANDON BARRETT A BODY HAS BEEN recovered from Lillooet Lake, east of Pemberton, police have confirmed in a release. At 1 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 9, Pemberton RCMP received a report of a body found floating in the 25-kilometre lake, which is surrounded by Garibaldi Provincial Park to the west and the Lillooet Range to the east. Police attended, alongside the BC Coroners Service, and recovered the body. The matter remains under investigation. The BC Coroners Service confirmed unidentified human remains were recovered from the lake, but would not provide any additional details at this early stage of the investigation. In a follow-up phone call on Tuesday, Sept. 10, Sgt. Rob Knapton with the Whistler RCMP said, “We can’t really talk about whether [the death] was suspicious or not until we have a better idea of what happened.”

No further details on the death will be released at this point, police said. Check back with Pique for more on this developing story. As always, news tips can be sent to edit@piquenewsmagazine.com.

DRUNK WINDSOR MAN LIGHTS T-SHIRT ON FIRE FOLLOWING ARREST Whistler police put out a fire before any damage was caused after a drunk Windsor man tried to light his own shirt ablaze following his arrest last week, according to a release. At about 9 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 7, Whistler RCMP received a complaint of an intoxicated person walking along Highway 99 near Blueberry. When officers located the man, he was on the road shoulder and “having difficulties walking,” police said. The 28-year-old told Mounties he was trying to get to Vancouver International Airport. The man was arrested under the Liquor Control Act due to concerns for his safety,

BODY RECOVERED Lillooet Lake, where a body was discovered on Monday, Sept. 9. Police continue to investigate. PHOTO BY MEGAN LALONDE

police said. While in custody at the Whistler RCMP detachment, police said the man “attempted to start a fire by lighting his T-shirt on fire, however, it was put out before any damage was caused.” Police continue to investigate.

MOUNT CURRIE MAN ARRESTED OVER BREACH OF COURT CONDITIONS, POLICE SAY A Mount Currie man was arrested last week after he breached his court-imposed

conditions stemming from an earlier case, police said in a release. On Tuesday, Sept. 3, at 5 p.m., Pemberton RCMP received a 911 call before the caller promptly hung up. After attending the residence where the call originated from, investigators learned that the caller had been in touch with another individual he was prohibited from contacting due to a case that remains before the courts. The 55-year-old man was arrested and later released with a promise to appear in court. n

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NEWS WHISTLER

BEST FOOT FORWARD After years of barefooting in and around Whistler, Tommy Gaudet recently hiked to Wedgemount Lake—and the lack of footwear didn’t slow him down.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Barefoot hiker takes on Wedge TOMMY GAUDET HAS BEEN BAREFOOTING IN AND AROUND WHISTLER FOR YEARS

BY JOEL BARDE TOMMY GAUDET has thick skin—on his feet, that is. After years of barefooting in and around Whistler, he recently hiked to Wedgemount Lake (arguably the most difficult in Garibaldi Provincial Park) in bare feet. And according to Gaudet, at this point, the lack of footwear doesn’t even slow him down. “I’m actually finding that I hike quicker in bare feet,” said Gaudet. Hiking barefoot means you are extra focused on where you place your feet, making sure that your foot lands in just the right spot, he explained. For Gaudet, the 14-kilometre hike wasn’t especially noteworthy, having completing numerous hikes, including up to Cheakamus and Rainbow lakes, without shoes. Since adopting barefooting over 10 years ago, Gaudet said he’s kept injuries to a minimum, save for a couple small punctures to his feet. The only times he likes to sport shoes is when it’s really cold or hot, he said, adding that “black pavement on a 35 degree day is something you have a hard time with.” Gaudet said he was introduced to the barefoot life through an ex-girlfriend. “I liked it and stuck with it,” he said. “Over the years, the skin under my feet has gotten a bit thicker, and it just feels easier and easier.” Gaudet recently moved to Revelstoke after about a dozen years in Whistler, where worked as a manager at Creekside Market. Whistler, he said, has a strong barefoot scene. “I think the number of people who are outdoorsy and connected with nature is greater than in other cities,” he said.

That said, there are limits to where Gaudet will take his barefooting ways when visiting the village. “If I’m planning to go shopping, I usually have flip flops in my bag, so I can put footwear on when I go to restaurants,” he said. “I respect that not everyone has the same vision as me as far as barefooting goes.” Chris Posiak, Gaudet’s best friend, said his bud’s passion for barefooting comes from an honest place. “He’s just happy without shoes on,” he said. The two have climbed together

PARTICIPATE IN THE WHISTLER VITAL SIGNS “I respect that not everyone has TRUTH & RECONCILIATION: the same vision WHISTLER, HOW ENGAGED ARE WE? as me as far as It’s your chance to share how you feel about making connection barefooting goes.”

Connect and Engage Survey

- TOMMY GAUDET

Join us at September’s Vital Café

with others in Whistler.

Notable First Nations community leader Linda Epp guides a panel Truth & Reconciliation. Complete the survey and ENTER TO on WIN FUN PRIZES from Canadian Wilderness extensively; something that Gaudet, Adventures, Then, we break intoScandinave smaller groups forand McCoos Whistler Golfout Club, Spa naturally, also likes to do barefoot. a guided conversation. Go to whistlerfoundation.com/vital-signs to complete the survey before May 4th Without climbing shoes—which point your toes towards one focal point, making it easier to get holds—Gaudet is still a strong climber. “I have a picture of him on a 5.12a that he climbed with no shoes on,” said Posiak. anonymous, but “We’re talking *the somesurvey seriousisgrading. anvery email is required Not light stuff. He’s determined and for entry focused … I guess he’s just one of those guys who doesn’t want to rely on anything in life.” According to Gaudet, his feet are built up to the point where even difficult hikes like the Wedge are easy. “After so many years, it just feels like a carpet,” he said. n

September 18, 2019 5:00 - 7:00 pm

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SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

29


NEWS PEMBERTON & THE VALLEY

Village of Pemberton looks to expand daycare offerings COUNCIL BRIEFS: POTENTIAL OCP AMENDMENT FOR SUNSTONE RIDGE; 2018 ANNUAL REPORT

BY JOEL BARDE VILLAGE OF PEMBERTON (VOP) council took an important step to help alleviate the community’s acute daycare shortage at its Sept. 10 regular council meeting. Council approved the application of a $3-million grant for an additional building that would be constructed on the same lot as the Pemberton Children’s Centre and be used to expand the number of spaces it offers. A recent report on Pemberton’s daycare situation—presented to council by Lisa McIntosh of Sea to Sky Community Services this summer—found that there are currently only 12.5 spaces for every 100 children (aged 12 and under), which is well below the provincial average of 18.4 spaces for every 100 kids. Council’s decision came as positive news to Maude Ash, executive director of the Pemberton Children’s Centre. “It’s really exciting,” she said, following the meeting. “This is something we have been discussing for years now. As a nonprofit operation, it would take a very long time to fundraise the money to actually make it happen.” If successful, the VOP would be the owner of the building, and the Pemberton Children’s

STOKED The Pemberton Children’s Centre’s executive director Maude Ash, assistant manager Ola Perkins, and board member Maja McCloskey (left to right) were on cloud nine following the Village of Pemberton council’s Sept. 10 decision. PHOTO BY JOEL BARDE

30 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

Centre would be the operator/lessee. As part of its application, the VOP is required to provide a conceptual drawing to the province. The VOP will therefore allocate up to $10,000 from its 2019 budget to complete it (though VOP chief administrative officer Nikki Gilmore said she is hopeful that the end sum for the drawing will be less). During the meeting, council discussed redirecting the money from funding allocated for the design of a new municipal hall.

think we have to be proactive and seize this opportunity to provide more daycare.”

OCP AMENDMENT VOP council also directed staff to move forward with a process that could see a minor amendment to the VOP’s Official Community Plan (OCP). The amendment is being advocated for by Sunstone Ridge Developments Ltd., which would like to create nine new 2,000-square-metre “estate lots” on land

“This is something we have been discussing for years now. As a nonprofit operation, it would take a very long time to fundraise the money to actually make it happen.” - MAUDE ASH

Following the meeting, Richman said that creating a new municipal hall has been on the VOP’s radar for years, as there are space constraints with the current building. That said, he noted that it is getting late in the year, and that the money would be well spent on the conceptual drawings for the daycare building. “This is an important need,” said Richman. “We just had that childcare report and now this opportunity is here. I

currently designated “Hillside Special Study Area” (in anticipation of future OCP-level planning work and additional rezoning application work, according to VOP staff). Moving forward, VOP staff will ask the project proponent to consult various stakeholders—including Lil’wat Nation and the Squamish–Lillooet Regional District— and host a public information meeting about the proposed change. Richman said he looks forward to

hearing what the public has to say about the Sunstone proposal, noting that it is important to be mindful of any potential impact to the hillside it sits on. “I’m always conscious of where we put density in housing,” he said. “I want to make sure that the development does not detract from that landscape.”

2018 ANNUAL REPORT Council also received the VOP’s annual report during its Sept. 10 regular council meeting. Put together by staff, the 2018 Annual Report catalogues the VOP’s strategic priorities and what was achieved over the past year. In a letter included in the report, Gilmore highlighted the Community Forest Partnership Agreement with Lil’wat Nation, the construction of the Friendship Trail Bridge, and the VOP’s new comprehensive zoning bylaw as highlights for 2018. Gilmore also highlights advancement to high-speed internet access. “As the way that people receive information is increasingly online, the Village is proud to have facilitated an agreement with TELUS to provide high-speed internet to our residents,” wrote Gilmore. “Pemberton’s contribution towards the infrastructure was made possible through generous contributions from Pemberton’s development community, specifically Alpi Group, Alture Properties (Crestline), The Ridge at Pemberton … Sunstone Ridge Development Ltd., and Tiyata Village at Pemberton.” n


NEWS PEMBERTON & THE VALLEY

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Bedrooms:

New report highlights need for affordable senior housing in Pemberton DRAFT ACTION PLAN TO ADDRESS AFFORDABLE HOUSING EXPECTED IN OCTOBER

BY JOEL BARDE A NEW REPORT looking into the housing needs of Village of Pemberton (VOP) seniors calls for additional seniors housing, including independent, semi-independent, assisted living and long-term care options. “It basically puts numbers to the needs we knew we had,” said Mayor Mike Richman, following the Sept. 10 VOP regular council meeting. “There are no real surprises in it—but definitely, some of the numbers are stark.” The report, carried out by CitySpaces Consulting Ltd., found that Pemberton (with a median age of 36.2) has a younger population compared to the SquamishLillooet Regional District (SLRD) (37.2) and the province (43). That said, seniors (defined as people over 50 in the report) still make up a significant portion of Pemberton’s population, with 20 per cent of the community falling into the category. Drawing from BC Statistics’ forecasts— which look at population trends across the SLRD—the report states that there will be “substantive” growth among elderly residents in the region. Between 2019 and 2029, the population of residents between the ages of 50 to 64 is expected to rise by 29 per cent, and the population of residents for those between 65 and 74 is expected to increase by 49 per cent. The region is also projected to see an increase of 117 per cent for those between the ages of 75 and 84, and a 108-per-cent increase for those 85 years of age and older. The anticipated demographic change is in line with national trends, as the so-called Baby Boomer generation ages. Pemberton does have one non-market independent Seniors’ Housing Project, located at the end of Flint Street, known as the Pemberton Lions Villas. The report calls for the creation of more housing like it. “Based on feedback from stakeholders,

there is a need for additional non-market semi-independent seniors housing in the community, particularly given the 75-person waitlist at Lions Villa,” states the report. Marnie Simon, a board member of the Pemberton Valley Seniors Society, took part in some of the engagement sessions for the report and said it represents a positive way forward. “The main thing is to have some more affordable and accessible housing,” she said. Having served on the Whistler Mature Action Community, Simon said that she would like to see something similar to the Whistler Housing Authority in Pemberton. “I think the Whistler Housing Authority model is a good model,” she said. But whatever is built needs to be close to the downtown core, as the VOP’s transportation options remain inadequate for the needs of seniors, said Simon. “We don’t have a taxi service, let alone a bus service,” she said. Overall, Simon is complimentary of mayor and council’s commitment to create an age-friendly community. “I have always found that the council and mayor have been open to the advocacy that seniors do with regards to making an age-friendly society here,” she said. “I do believe that they’ve tried as hard as they can to improve things for seniors. We’ve always felt very supported.” With the report received (along with an updated affordable housing report), VOP staff will now go to work developing recommendations for the Village to improve its overall affordable housing stock. Richman said that there are a host of options available to the VOP, including potentially offering density bonuses to developers, and working jointly with developers and BC Housing to create affordable homes. “We’ve had numerous conversations with potential developers who are looking at our area,” said Richman. “I want to make sure they understand that this action plan is coming out.” n

Bathrooms:

4

PHOTO BY JOEL BARDE

3

LISA HILTON* lisah@wrec.com 604 902 4589

#26 COTTONWOOD COURT

$599,000

7408 COTTONWOOD STREET

A must see bright and spacious end unit in beautiful Cottonwood Court! This home features an open layout over 3 levels with a BBQ deck off the kitchen, sizable laundry room, and a single car garage for all of your toys! Bedrooms:

Bathrooms:

3

2.5

DAN SCARRATT* dan@wrec.com 604 938 4444

10004 KOOCHA ROAD

$399,000

ANDERSON LAKE

Classic A-frame just steps from Anderson Lake. This cottage offers plenty of potential to create your own getaway or even potential for year round living. It sits on a bright rectangular lot, just steps from the public beach and boat launch. Bedrooms:

Bathrooms:

1

1

DANIELLE MENZEL danielle@wrec.com 604 698 5128

3008 TENQUILLE PLACE

$254,000

SUNSTONE, PEMBERTON

Great opportunity to build your own house design on this sun drenched lot. Sitting just above the valley floor it offers views of Mount Currie and all day sunshine, with the ability to have a suite as a mortgage helper. Lot Size:

4,239 sqft

ERIN MCCARDLE STIEL erin@wrec.com 604 902 0520

* Denotes Personal Real Estate Corporation

604 894 5166 | WHISTLERREALESTATE.CA SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

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DISPATCHES OUT OF RANGE

Starting the conversation DEATH CAFÉ, AN INTERNATIONAL MOVEMENT, HELPS ATTENDEES WITH END-OF-LIFE CONCERNS

BY DAN FALLOON THERE ARE PLENTY of conversations that can be difficult to start, but once you get going, all parties are better off for it. Perhaps the most difficult of those revolves around death and dying, but there’s a movement afoot to help make the discussion far more palatable. Led by facilitator Christina Prevost, Whistler had its first-ever Death Café at the Whistler Public Library on Sept. 8. “There’s a lot of talk about anti-aging and trying to stay alive longer, but the bottom line is we all are going to die and we all know it intuitively, but we don’t want to talk about it,” Prevost said. Prevost has observed death closely in her professional life, as she was a nurse and, more recently, became a “death doula” helping people prepare to pass on by making advance care plans and taking care of clients’ legacies. One of the major benefits to talking openly about death, she has seen, comes with dealing with the passing of a loved one. “People are in shock, usually, when family members have died, especially when things are not organized in advance,” she said. “There’s some delayed grief reaction, so I think the more you prepare people and the more you talk about it, the less of a shock it is.” As for the event itself, little is set in stone, as those in attendance can openly

DISCUSSING DEATH Whistler’s first Death Cafe was held on Sept. 8, while another is coming in October. The meetings allow for frank discussions of death. PHOTO BY SYDA PRODUCTIONS/WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

32 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

talk about aspects of death they would like to bring up. Prevost explained her role is to provide the opportunity and only lend a steering hand when necessary. “I host it, but I’m really just a facilitator who sits back and assists with the conversation if they stall. It’s amazing when you do get people together to talk about it. You start with an introduction about, ‘Why did you come to the Death Café?’ and that in itself starts the conversation,” she said. “There are things brought up with each person that’s introduced, then it goes from there.” Also key is ensuring that those in

of being hidden.” Prevost explained that the conversation can meander whichever way it will, and there’s no designated end point that the group needs to reach. “It’s just having the conversation. People begin to realize what’s important for them or what they need to talk about,” she said. Of course, there are several threads regarding death that the attendees can pull at. It can do with one’s own mortality or grief from another’s death. Topics can range from practical to philosophical, as well. “People might want to talk about,

“There’s a lot of talk about anti-aging and trying to stay alive longer, but the bottom line is we all are going to die and we all know it intuitively, but we don’t want to talk about it.” - CHRISTINA PREVOST

attendance understand that they are in a safe setting and can broach the topics they’d like. “My role is that people know that it’s a safe environment, there’s confidentiality. It’s really just a conversation and there’s no agenda. It’s just really whatever comes up and what people want to talk about,” she said. “In our society, it’s kind of the last taboo and people don’t openly talk about it because it seems morbid or it’s seen as a negative thing. “We’ve repressed it to the point of it kind

‘What are the new green options?’ … ‘I have trouble with my family members. This is what happened.’ People want to talk about grief—we are not a bereavement, counselling, or support group—but people will just talk about it. People might share resources they’ve used, and then we’ll move on,” Prevost said. “Some people want to talk about legacy—how do they want to be remembered? Or, if you only had 30 days left to live, what would matter most to you? What would you want to do and accomplish?” As the conversation is participant-

directed, some who show up don’t necessarily know what they want to talk about when they walk in the door, but then gain some perspective once the ball gets rolling. Prevost said those who attended the first Death Café were in the 50-plus range, though accounts of other events across the world describe folks from all age ranges showing up to take part. Though, as a mountain resort, Whistler is often associated with a younger demographic, Prevost stressed that there is an aging population in place here as well. “Whistler has an older population. There are a lot of people that have been in Whistler for 20, 30, 40 years, or they’re selling their homes in Vancouver and moving up permanently,” she said. “They’re into their 50s and 60s and want to have these conversations.” Prevost herself became involved in the movement through her training as a death doula after being provided with a wide variety of resources at the time. She looked into the Death Café, and also attended a similarly modelled Death Over Dinner event in Calgary to find out more. The movement was started as café mortel by Swiss sociologist Bernard Crettaz in 2004, with Jon Underwood of the United Kingdom later taking up the Death Café mantle in 2011. The non-profit program is now offered in more than 65 countries. Though only a handful showed up for the inaugural session, Prevost has higher hopes for future events, including at the Whistler Museum and Archives on Oct. 28 at 7 p.m. “It’s a conversation on life and living and what death means to us,” she said. “It’s more of a meditation, not on dying, but on living life.” n


DISPATCHES OUT OF RANGE

BY ALLEN BEST allen.best@comcast.net TELLURIDE, COLO. – Telluride voters in November will decide whether to institute a 2.5 per cent special tax on short-term rentals. This is in addition to normal lodging taxes. A divided town council had declined to adopt such a tax last year. This drive to put a tax before voters was initiated by a group of citizens who believe that the proliferation of short-term rentals in the community made available through Airbnb and other booking platforms had hurt the housing market for working locals, explains the Telluride Daily Planet. Pepper Raper, one of those behind the vote, defended the excise tax as a means to provide revenue for affordable housing. “A vote for affordable housing is a vote for the economy,” she said, according to the Planet’s account of a recent meeting. “We want a workforce that can be here on time.” But there is much opposition. Stacey Ticsay, who has a cleaning business centered around short-term rentals, told council members she can pay her mortgage because of Airbnbs. “They fill a niche in our economy. They attract price-sensitive visitors.” Michael Martelon, of the Telluride Tourism Board, echoed the warning of ski company chief executive Bill Jensen, who discouraged the town council last year from adopting such a tax by warning of unintended consequences. The council heeded Jensen’s advice, voting 5-2 against going forward with such a tax last year. This time, council members agreed to put it before voters, but with little enthusiasm. If adopted, the total state and local taxes levied on lodging in Telluride would reach 15.15 per cent, says Kevin Geiger, the town attorney. It is currently 12.65 per cent. The local taxes include two per cent for the airline guarantee program. It gets even more complicated, he says, as Telluride has only three true commercial hotels that are taxed under Colorado law as commercial properties. Other units are classified as residential property. The former is taxed at 29 per cent of assessed value, and the latter at seven per cent. The three hotels would be exempted from the tax, under the thinking that they are already paying their fair share. Telluride has been one of the most ambitious developers of deed-restricted affordable housing going back to the ‘90s, when it adopted a half-cent sales tax to finance affordable housing. Each year, it has had at least one project go forward. “It’s fair to say that they have had for many years a multi-faceted, comprehensive approach to community housing. They have done a whole lot of different things, all in combination, to produce a very effective program,” says Melanie Rees, an affordable housing consultant with broad expertise in mountain resort towns of the West.

Last year it was a boarding house with 18 single-occupancy units and 14 doubleoccupancy units. The single-occupancy units are about 18.5-square-metres (200 square feet) in size. The complex has two shared cooking spaces. Telluride has also invested in three tiny houses, similar to those put into place at Basalt by the Aspen Skiing Co. as a temporary fix to the problems it has in recruiting employees. Geiger says 70 to 80 individuals have been housed in new affordable housing projects in the last year. Two more projects are going forward now, with occupancy expected by November. Together the projects will provide 26 units with one- to four-bedroom configurations.

ASPEN SKIING CEO ACCUSES LOCAL SKIERS OF PASS SNOBBERY ASPEN, Colo. – After a bum snow winter in 2017-2018, Aspen was blessed last winter. The ski season lasted 168 days, the longest since the ski area opened in 1946. It also had a busy winter. Lift lines tended long. And there was an easy target: purchasers of the Alterra Mountain Co.’s Ikon Pass. Somebody even produced a bumper stick: “Stop Ikonizing Aspen.” The pass offered by Alterra, which is partly owned by the Crown family, owners of the Aspen Skiing Co., provided five to seven days of skiing at the Aspen-area ski areas. And they did arrive at Aspen, according to a report by Mike Kaplan, the ski company’s chief executive. In both a recent report to the Aspen City Council and a later public meeting covered by Aspen Times, Kaplan defended the Ikon Pass as a strategic way to introduce Aspen to new and non-traditional audiences and diversify its customer base. The irony, he said, is that the company often gets criticized for catering to the rich and famous. He called the pushback “blatant snobbery.” Of the Ikon Pass skiers, 70 per cent were new to Aspen, and many were from Colorado’s Front Range. He said 13 per cent of Ikoners were younger than 18 compared to three per cent of customers overall. Ikon pass users aged 25-34 were 27 per cent compared to 19 per cent of the company’s overall customers. Kaplan cited one day, described by the Times as the “fabulous powder Sunday of March 3” when 3,420 skiers and snowboarders were at Aspen Highlands, one of the company’s four ski areas. A 40-minute lift line occurred. The ski company concluded that 129 of the 800 skiers on the lift were Ikon Pass-holders and 400 were local pass holders. Without the Ikon Pass-holders, the line would have been 36-minutes long. That argument didn’t wash with local resident Try Kinkead. “We pay a premium price expecting a premium product. It’s not a question of who, but rather how many,” he wrote in a letter published in the Times. n

August 29 - September 8, 2019

2018

Mountain news: Telluride to consider 2.5% tax on short-term rentals

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC OPEN HOUSE Regarding Rezoning Application RZ001162 A Proposal To Rezone Property Located at 4800-4814 Glacier Lane; The Resort Municipality of Whistler invites interested members of the public to attend an open house on:

MONDAY SEPTEMBER 23, 2019 FROM 5:00 PM TO 7:00 PM At The Whistler Conference Centre, 4010 Whistler Way (Fitzsimmons Room). RZ001162 proposes to amend the existing RM13 zone (Residential Multiple Thirteen) that would allow for development of a new 6-storey building containing 60 employee restricted apartment units for use by staff associated with Whistler Blackcomb (Vail Resorts). The purpose of the open house is to provide the public with information about Rezoning Application RZ001162. The applicant will present information on the proposed employee housing development, and municipal staff will describe the rezoning consideration process including applicable evaluation criteria, studies that may be required, and legislated procedures. The presentation will commence at 6:00 P.M. Members of the public will be provided the opportunity to ask questions and provide written comments. For more information on Rezoning Application RZ001162, refer to View Active Applications on the RMOW website https://my.whistler.ca/OnlineServices/ourcity/prospero/search.aspx or contact the Planning Department at 604-935-8170.

Rezoning Application RZ001162 4800 – 4814 Glacier Lane

Resort Municipality of Whistler whistler.ca

34 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

SCIENCE MATTERS

Fracked gas heats the planet, but supporters say it’s a solution THE BEST WAY to address climate disruption is… burn more fossil fuels? It doesn’t make sense, but that’s what industry, media and governments want us to believe. To profit as much as possible from fossil fuels before markets fall under the weight of climate chaos and better alternatives, industry and its allies tell us fracked gas is a climate solution. It’s not. A new study shows it’s as bad as or worse for the climate than other fossil fuels. Cornell University researchers found alarming increases in atmospheric methane since 2008 can likely be pinned on the U.S. shale oil and gas boom.

BY DAVID SUZUKI Methane is a potent greenhouse gas responsible for one-quarter of current global heating. It only stays in the atmosphere for about 12 years before it breaks down and gets reabsorbed into natural systems, but it causes a lot of damage while it’s there. It traps heat at a rate close to 85 times higher than carbon dioxide over 20 years. CO2 not absorbed by vegetation and oceans— where it causes acidification and other problems—can remain in the atmosphere for thousands of years. Methane is produced by biogenic (plant- and animal-based) sources, including tropical wetlands, rotting organic waste, cow burps and pig manure. It’s also produced by leaks and “flaring” during fossil-fuel development, especially fracking. Although some question the Cornell findings, arguing that the methane spike is mainly from biogenic sources, Cornell professor Robert Howarth maintains methane emissions from the (mostly fracked) natural gas industry are much higher than industry and government report. Research by the David Suzuki Foundation and St. Francis Xavier University found that’s the case in B.C. Other researchers conclude methane emissions are underreported in Alberta. Howarth argues that because methane from fracked gas, like plant and animal methane, is lighter than gas from other fossil-fuel development, some emissions attributed to biogenic sources likely come from fracking. He concludes that “shalegas production in North America over the past decade may have contributed more than half of all of the increased [methane] emissions from fossil fuels globally and approximately one-third of the total increased emissions from all sources globally over the past decade.” According to a Vox article, the U.S. is responsible for 89 per cent of shale gas production, with Canada making up the rest—and the industry is expanding rapidly, thanks in part to political support. Because methane only remains in

the atmosphere for a short period but has enormous impact, reducing or eliminating methane emissions is a quick, effective way to lessen the threat of climate chaos. As the foundation and others have noted, capturing and selling gas now leaked or flared would be a cost-effective solution. But the inordinate amount of power the fossil-fuel industry holds over many governments means there’s little appetite to even admit there’s a problem, let alone solve it. The U.S. government is reversing regulation of methane leaks from oil and gas—something industry didn’t even ask for! Canada isn’t much better. Although the federal and B.C. governments have promised stronger regulations around oil and gas industry methane emissions, they’re committed to massive industry expansion. A National Observer report claims, “Three LNG projects in Squamish and Kitimat would require over 13,000 new fracking wells over the next 30 years between them.” Research has also found the B.C. Oil and Gas Commission, the industry regulator, often puts fossil-fuel interests ahead of the public’s. In a report for the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, Ben Parfitt found industry faced no consequences after building dozens of illegal wastecontainment dams in northeastern B.C.—one as high as a seven-storey building—without filing any plans.

... there’s little appetite to even admit there’s a problem, let alone solve it.

The commission held a report for four years that showed gas wells leaking and contaminating groundwater, releasing it only after it was given to a journalist. The commission sat on another report for four years that showed companies were violating rules designed to protect caribou and habitat. Fracking causes numerous other problems, from earthquakes to water depletion and contamination—even health issues including birth defects, cancer and asthma. Renewable energy is cost-effective, efficient and comes with far fewer pollution and climate problems than all fossil-fuel energy. The solution to fossil-fuelled climate chaos is to burn less, not more. David Suzuki is a scientist, broadcaster, author and co-founder of the David Suzuki Foundation. Written with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor and Writer Ian Hanington. Learn more at davidsuzuki.org. n


RANGE ROVER

The Mountain Legacy Project CLIMATE CHANGE is doing a number on everyone, but most particularly on those who work in the areas of wildlife and land management. Environmental and ecological changes are happening so rapidly that it’s impossible to properly plan for even the immediate future. A lot of this has to do with the fact that scientists and managers are sure changes are occurring, but are not always able to measure them as far back as they’d like in order to set a baseline for their magnitude. But what if there was a way you could know

BY LESLIE ANTHONY how things were before this crazy atmospheric meltdown began? Turns out there is— particularly in Canada’s western mountains. For more than 20 years, the University of Victoria’s Mountain Legacy Project (or MLP; mountainlegacy.ca) has used repeat photography to explore just this type of change in Canada’s mountain landscapes. Beginning with archival historical photos, MLP researchers determine the precise location from which each shot was taken, then head out to re-photograph the image. The historic and modern images are then aligned and analyzed, and the results made available to scholars, students, government agencies, and the public at large. Working with longstanding partner Library and Archives Canada, as well as UVic Libraries, Canadian Mountain Network, and other organizations, MLP researchers look to understand how and why mountain ecosystems, landscapes, and

VISUAL PROJECTION The University of Victoria’s Mountain Legacy Project has used repeat photography to explore changes to Canada’s mountain landscapes. PHOTOS SUBMITTED

human communities change over time. Fortuitously, Canada holds the world’s largest collection of historic mountain images (about 120,000 of them—mostly as six-by-four-inch glass-plate negatives). The earliest, dating to 1861, are from the Canada/ USA Boundary Commission survey along the 49th parallel, while the majority derive from mapping efforts between 1888 and the 1950s. As of 2017, MLP teams had repeated more than 7,000 of these photos to elucidate landscape-level changes in glaciation, alpine advancement, vegetation infilling/ encroachment, and wildfire effects. The project’s beginnings trace to University of Victoria professor Eric Higgs and his former Masters student, Jeanine Rhemtulla, now a professor at the University of British Columbia. In 1996, while both were at the University of Alberta investigating forest change in Jasper National Park, they were standing together at a lookout over the Athabasca River when Rhemtulla remarked that it would be interesting to be able to see what the valley looked like a century ago. This notion was repeated in passing to park warden Rod Wallace, whose response was that he thought a box of photos taken by surveyor/cartographer Morrison Parsons Bridgeland back in 1915 might be gathering dust under someone’s desk. Higgs and Rhemtulla found it and dove deep into the 735 mesmerizing images, figuring out where Bridgeland had been standing when he took them, and then re-shooting more than 100 in the next few years. The “Bridgeland Repeat Photography Project” eventually morphed into the “Rocky Mountain Repeat Photography Project,” which in turn begat the MLP. Mary Sanseverino, a research associate with MLP (one of four staffers, three of whom, like Sanseverino, have a computerscience background) speaks passionately of every place she’s been able to visit for the project, and gives outreach talks to students, other researchers, mountaineers

and the general public on the MLP’s work. She happily explained to me how a typical re-creation is done. “To start, you have to do a lot of work before even stepping out the door,” she notes. “In the end, for every hour in the field, you’ll spend three to five hours at the computer—obtaining and preparing digital copies of historic images, figuring out where they’re taken from, then dealing with what you bring back.” Once the location is determined, images are grouped into shooting “stations”—e.g., five shots in different directions may have been taken from one single station. Then 8.5-by-11-inch prints of each shot are made and taken into the field. Using the photos and knowledge of the original camera, an MLP crew can line up a station to within a metre of where the photographer once stood. “From the photo we can see the angle and field of view,” says Sanseverino. “And so, if I know the size of˙ the negative, which I usually do, I can also tell the focal length. In these old shots it’s mostly 100. Then we try to go a little wider on the re-shoot to avoid distortion in the corners.”

Not only is it a technical process, but an expensive one to put crews in the field, so working efficiently is key to using limited funding as expeditiously as possible. “If you can re-shoot six places in a day that means you’ve really nailed your stations beforehand and probably also have a fast helicopter pilot; more typically we’ll get two to three stations done in a day,” she says. “We also take wind speed and other field observations of the environment. Then there’s post-production alignment, the analysis of the changes we see, and the curating of the material. It’s a lot of work, but pretty rewarding because of the amount of information generated.” With such a comprehensive set of mountain photography to draw from, and the obvious effects of climate and landchange history the recreations depict, not only do wildlife and land managers, ecologists, and geologists have much to learn from the MLP, but so does the world. Leslie Anthony is a Whistler-based author, editor, biologist and bon vivant who has never met a mountain he didn’t like. n

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

35


FEATURE STORY

HOW A SPECIES PUT IN A PRISON The Devils Hole pupfish is nothing to mess with

By Paige Blankenbuehler / High Country News

36 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019


FEATURE STORY

T

hey passed around a bottle of Malibu rum as gunshots bellowed into the desert night. A trio of young men had set up camp near the unincorporated town of Crystal, 130 kilometres outside of Las Vegas, Nev. As recently as 2005, the tiny town hosted two brothels, but by April 2016, it was pretty much empty, ideal for carefree camping on a moon-like stretch of desert, the perfect place to pass

around a bottle and a shotgun for some bunny blasting. As often happens on a night like that, things went downhill. Drunk on rum and the roar

of the gun, the three men fired up an off-road vehicle and drove away from camp. Riding in back was Trent, a chestnut-haired, bearded 27-year-old, who carried the shotgun and blasted away at road signs as they tore across the Amargosa Valley and Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. They headed toward a remote unit of Death Valley National Park: Devils Hole, a deep pool inside a sunken limestone cavern. The area’s surrounded by three-metre-tall fencing, a fortress erected to protect an endangered species of pupfish found there. Trent shot at the gate to the pedestrian walkway area and then shot the surveillance camera and yanked it from its mount. Then he and one of his companions, Steven, stumbled into the enclosure. Steven was so intoxicated that it took him multiple tries to clear the fence. Inside the enclosure, he paused to empty his bladder. Filled with mischief, Trent lunged toward his partner and punched him in the crotch with a left hook. Then, as Steven stumbled over to a large boulder to vomit, Trent dropped the shotgun, stripped off his clothes, and slipped into the deep warm water of Devils Hole. He didn’t know it yet, but that would prove to be his worst mistake of the night. SIXTY THOUSAND YEARS AGO, a narrow fissure opened up in the Amargosa Valley, releasing water pooled deep in the earth and creating Devils Hole, the opening to an underwater cavern. Scientists disagree over just how it happened—whether by way of underground tunnels, ancient floods or receding waters—but several desert fish were separated from the larger population and trapped in Devils Hole. There, a tiny sub-population—the Devils Hole pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis)—evolved in extreme isolation for tens of thousands of years, eventually, according to scientific consensus, becoming an entirely new species. Today, visitors to Devils Hole get a rare window into one of the Mojave Desert’s vast aquifers. Steep limestone walls surround a tiny opening into turquoise water. Divers have descended more than 120 m into the cave without reaching the bottom. The water is so deep that earthquakes on the other side of the world cause it to slosh, shocking the fish into spawning. The environment in Devils Hole is so remote and extreme that scientists have long puzzled over how the pupfish can live there at all. Still, a modest population has managed to survive on a shallow, sloping rock shelf that gets just enough sunlight—only four hours per day at its peak—to allow algae to grow for the fish to eat. The Devils Hole pupfish are truly unique. The males are a bright blue, the females a subdued teal, and they’re only about 2.5 centimetres long. They are more docile and produce fewer offspring than their cousins, which are found in pockets ranging from the Southwest toward the Gulf of Mexico. The Devils Hole pupfish lacks the pelvic fin that enables its kin to be vigorous swimmers. But it is able to thrive in temperatures far warmer than similar species can tolerate. Trapped by geology in a consistent 34-degree Celsius womb, Devils Hole pupfish have nowhere to go. In fact, they have the smallest geographic range of any known vertebrate species on Earth. The pupfish were among the first species to be protected under the Endangered Species Preservation Act of 1966—along with the American alligator, the California condor and the blunt-nosed leopard lizard—and that protection was carried over to the Endangered Species Act of 1973. At the time, around 220 survived in Devils Hole, but since the 1990s, the species has been in significant decline, sinking to just 35 fish in 2013. Today, there are modest signs that the population is growing; the last population count was 136. The tiny fish has become an icon for those looking to protect endangered species and their habitat, but it’s a target of deep resentment in Nevada, and particularly in Nye County, where, according to critics, the interests of an obscure fish are pitted against the livelihood of local agricultural families. The issue has tested water rights in this arid part of the American West and raised questions about how far officials should go to save a handful of imperiled fish. The drunken invasion of its habitat in 2016 was not unprecedented: Dozens of trespasses have been documented throughout the decades. But such crimes are difficult to investigate and rarely prosecuted. This time, however, would be different.

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

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FEATURE STORY A car streaks down the Bob Ruud Memorial Highway west of Pahrump, Nev. Luna Anna Archey/High Country News

THE IN DEVILS HOLE IS SO THAT SCIENTISTS HAVE OVER HOW LONG THE PUPFISH THERE AT ALL.

Right: Kevin Wilson ascends from the Devils Hole pool, reachable through the gate of a locked enclosure. Luna Anna Archey/High Country News

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38 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019


FEATURE STORY ON MONDAY, MAY 2, 2016, Kevin Wilson, an aquatic ecologist and manager of the Devils Hole research program, arrived at the National Park Service outpost in Pahrump, Nev., a beige, low-key building in the middle of anti-fed country. “We have some news you won’t like,” one of his research associates told him, gesturing toward a surveillance video playing on her computer screen. Wilson peered at the images just as one of the three trespassers tried—and failed—to clear the fencing before barging his way in on the other side of the enclosure. “As I watched the surveillance footage, I could tell they had definitely been drinking,” Wilson told me when I visited in February. “But it was really just the one guy that had actually gotten in the pool that concerned me the most.” Wilson, who is 51 with dark gray hair and bright blue eyes, wears his green uniform comfortably, a slight potbelly protruding above his belt. He jokes often, but the deep wrinkles in his face, tanned from years in the unforgiving Nevada sun, give him a stern appearance. Normally, the nocturnal visitors would have been caught by a motion sensor that triggered a loud alarm. But a barn owl roosting in the area had caused too many false alarms, and rather than spook the bird, officials had disabled the device. So once the men broke in, they felt no real urgency to leave. Little did they know that multiple cameras captured their every move. A small earth tremor that occurred over the weekend had prompted Wilson’s staff to review the footage. “Obviously, we saw much more than we had been expecting,” Wilson said, raising an eyebrow. The video continued to play in Wilson’s office. As one man swam, another remained at the edge of the water, while the drunkest one leaned against a rock. The swimmer climbed out of the water, dragged himself over the algae-covered shelf and got dressed. Then the party fled on their off-road vehicle. Wilson paused the video and backed it up. The man who fired the shotgun and plunged into the pool had left a few things behind— his wallet and cellphone. The next morning, in the fog of a hangover, he broke in to Devils Hole to retrieve them, ignoring the empty beer cans and his underwear, which was still floating in the water. Wilson reviewed one particular piece of

footage, a view from an underwater camera, over and over: A foot plunged through the placid, algae-filled water onto a shallow shelf—the only breeding area in the world for the Devils Hole pupfish. The man had waded in at the most inopportune time possible, in late April, the peak breeding period for the pupfish. “I couldn’t immediately tell if any fish were harmed,” Wilson told me. “But I decided to do a site visit to find out for sure.” That morning, Wilson, his research team and a bevy of law enforcement officials assessed the damage. The area reeked of vomit; beer cans were scattered around and Trent’s underwear still floated in the water. The group huddled around for a closer look. In the pool, a single bright blue pupfish was also floating on the surface—dead.

IN FEBRUARY, WILSON TOOK ME TO THE SCENE OF THE CRIME. Wilson has dedicated a good portion of his life to pupfish. He first visited Devils Hole in the 1970s, when he was just eight years old, tagging along with his geologist mother. Those early visits to national parks and camping trips with his family helped inspire his post-graduate work: the first-ever holistic study of the Devils Hole pupfish. And then the perfect job opened up at the perfect time. “As soon as I defended, this permanent position to study the Devils Hole environment and the pupfish opened up. I’ve been here ever since,” Wilson told me as we stood near the edge of the pond, as

The Devils Hole pupfish evolved in extreme isolation for tens of thousands of years. Olin Feuerbacher/Wikimedia

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FEATURE STORY Scorpion Task Force leader Paul Crawford. A custom fourwheeler, driven by the suspects—spotted on Craigslist by one of the investigators—helped crack the case. Luna Anna Archey/High Country News

“THE FACT THAT THE VEHICLE AND THAT WE WERE ABLE IT ON TO CRAIGSLIST WAS THE ONE AND THAT ALLOWED THE CASE ... ” TO MOVE MORGAN DILLON cold raindrops began to fall. Just paces away, pupfish flitted through the water. The 2016 trespass swiftly activated an intricate legal enforcement network designed to protect the fish. After reviewing the footage and finding that a pupfish had indeed died as a result of the incident, Wilson notified the National Park Service at Death Valley and in Washington, D.C., as well as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Nevada Department of Wildlife and the Nye County Sheriff’s Office. A team called the Scorpion Task Force was assembled. Its leader was the Park Service Investigative Services’ Paul Crawford, a seasoned Brooklyn-born detective with a constellation of freckles across his face. In 2012, he was the lead detective investigating the murder of ranger Margaret Anderson in Washington’s Mount Rainier National Park. Based in Boulder City, Nev., and nearing retirement in 2016, Crawford decided to make the trip to Devils Hole. He would supervise two other men: Morgan Dillon and Josh Vann. Dillon, a detective for the Nye County Sheriff’s Office, jumped at the chance to work on the case. “I was excited that I might have an opportunity to go all the way down to the pupfish pool and

40 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

see the fish,” Dillon told me. “I originally Stoppers tip form. Meanwhile, back at the and wild spaces. went to college to be a wildlife biologist. Nye County Sheriff’s Office, Dillon showed From the 1920s through the 1940s, the I’ve always been passionate about that and his colleague, Sgt. Thomas Klenczar, an Park Service managed land mostly for still like to read scientific articles on the off-road aficionado, video stills of the tourists to enjoy. In one of the agency’s pupfish. Me, personally, though—I wasn’t customized vehicle. “We were really just founding documents, Interior Secretary smart enough to be a scientist, so I became BS-ing about it,” Dillon said. “But he’s Franklin Lane described developing the a detective instead.” into OHVs and is always on Craigslist, so parks as a “national playground system.” Vann, a ranger at Death Valley National he decided to take a look.” Minutes later, The prevailing attitude at the time was that Park, worked alongside Dillon. At Devils Klenczar and Dillon found the vehicle on protecting a rarely viewed species like the Hole, they gathered three empty beer cans Craigslist. It had been listed for sale just Devils Hole pupfish was a project “better as well as two empty boxes that had held one day prior to the drunken break-in. left to another agency,” according to Kevin shotgun ammunition, two live rounds “The fact that the vehicle was so unique Brown, an environmental historian who and multiple spent shotgun shells. Dillon and that we were able to quickly find it on authored a 2017 Park Service book on the attempted to fingerprint the beer cans and Craigslist was the one and only piece of history of Devils Hole. swabbed them for DNA evidence. He even this that allowed the case to move forward,” With no entity charged to oversee Devils collected the underwear and entered it into Dillon said. Hole and the pupfish, the deep cavernous the case file. Dillon used the phone number from the pool gained fame among locals. The area, Abundant surveillance footage gave the Craigslist ad and a house number in one of with the pupfish swimming serenely within detectives clear images of the three suspects’ the photos of the Yamaha to come up with the it, was subject to constant trespass. To this faces. “We see you, and now we’re going owner’s name. A photo of the man—Steven day, locals often refer to Devils Hole as the to find out who you guys are,” Crawford Schwinkendorf of Pahrump—matched one of “Miner’s Bathtub.” remembers thinking. The four-wheeler those on the Devils Hole footage. In 1950, an ichthyologist named Carl stood out most: a blue Yamaha Rhino, with Hubbs excoriated the Park Service for its flamboyant stripes along its doors. “It was refusal to protect Devils Hole. Early the altered with a second seat, extended roof, following year, Lowell Sumner, a Park skid plates up front. It wasn’t something THE EARLY 20TH CENTURY WAS AN Service biologist, visited Devils Hole and these guys bought and just drove off the lot,” ANXIOUS ERA for the National Park did a pictorial study of it. He argued that Crawford said. “Those are a dime a dozen. Service. The fledgling agency hemmed and it was in the national interest to include We would have never found them.” hawed over its identity and whether or not it this geological wonder in Death Valley On May 6, Crawford put out a Crime- included a responsibility to protect wildlife National Monument. In 1952, President


Harry Truman added the Devils Hole But Dillon had yet to reach Sargent. “I unit to Death Valley National Monument was afraid that Schwinkendorf and Reyes under the Antiquities Act, specifically would get to Sargent and spook him. I felt mentioning the “peculiar race of desert like I was running out of time.” fish,” and declaring that all of the species That afternoon, Dillon called Sargent. and ecosystems of Death Valley would “He told me that he heard I was looking for be protected. “It was incredibly forward- him,” Dillon said. “He was very cooperative looking at that time,” said Patrick Donnelly, and forthcoming.” The Crime-Stoppers tip the Nevada state director for the Center for had gone viral, and in the days since it went Biological Diversity. “That was really what public, Sargent told Dillon he had received began this saga of the role that pupfishes “hundreds of messages” and even a few ended up playing in battles down the road.” death threats. He admitted that he had taken off his clothes and gone swimming in the pool. “I was showing off for my friends,” Sargent said, “and I wanted to see how deep ON MAY 9, 2016, THE SCORPION TASK it was.” His demeanor was extremely polite, FORCE—Dillon, Klenczar and Vann— Dillon remembers, and they spoke on the drove through Pahrump, Nev., to meet their phone for several minutes. first suspect in person. The harsh beauty of “Sargent asked me, unprompted, if I had the desert around Pahrump clashes with the run his criminal history,” Dillon told me. severity of the city’s neon glow. Under the “I have so much to tell you,” Sargent surrounding Black Mountains, the desert’s said to Dillon. “I’m a convicted felon. I sage seems greener, the needles of its barrel know that I can’t have a gun, that I can’t be cactus redder and the flash of the nearby around guns. I wasn’t intending to shoot casinos, motels and fast-food chains even that night and was just going to hold the brighter. One street is named “Unicorn,” spotlight while the others shot.” There another “Tough Girl.” “Don’t Tread on Me” was a pause—a long-enough silence that flags wave above many front doors. The Dillon thought the phone might have been locals elected brothel owner Dennis Hof to disconnected. “But because of the drinking, the State Assembly, a month after the self- I shot as well,” Sargent told him. proclaimed pimp and so-called “Trump of Sargent had been convicted of grand Pahrump” died of a heart attack on his 72nd theft of money and property three years birthday, at a bash attended by notorious earlier in San Bernardino, Calif. He had Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio and the porn star struggled with addiction for most of his Ron Jeremy. teenage and early adult years, but since The detectives located the suspect’s then, he had cleaned up his life and home and walked to the door. Steven returned to his hometown, Indian Springs, Schwinkendorf, dark-haired, six feet tall Nev. He lived in a trailer and often saw his and topping 200 pounds, answered it, son Logan, who was then only one month facing Dillon, his arms crossed. A small old and lived with his in-laws in town. boy, Schwinkendorf’s son, peeked around Sargent later admitted to knowing his legs. Dillon showed the photos from about the pupfish and their endangered the surveillance video and asked him if the status, but insisted he didn’t mean to harm vehicle was his. Schwinkendorf admitted them. His drunken break-in was a slip, he that it was and explained that he had said, a momentary lapse of judgment. already traded it in as part of a deal for a new four-wheeler. “Is this you?” Dillon asked, pointing to one of the men on the video, according to TRENT SARGENT’S SWIM was just the investigation transcripts. Schwinkendorf most recent threat to the existence of the said it was. The other two suspects had Devils Hole pupfish. Back in the late 1960s, come to his house for a barbecue before after the National Park Service began its they went camping, he said. “We had first studies and population counts, the been drinking quite a bit,” Schwinkendorf Cappaerts, a family who owned a large admitted. He told the detectives that the ranching operation in Pahrump, decided to trio then went to Ash Meadows to shoot dig a number of wells on their 4,850-hectare rabbits. Schwinkendorf said he had only ranch just a few clicks from Devils Hole. vague recollections of being at Devils Hole, When the Cappaerts began pumping, though he remembered vomiting; his the water level in Devils Hole dropped, friends had teased him about it. exposing large parts of the algae shelf. Schwinkendorf identified his That exposure, the Park Service argued, companions—Edgar Reyes, a Las Vegas decreased algae production and limited local, and Trenton Sargent, the skinny- the pupfish’s spawning area, which in turn dipper—and gave Dillon their phone reduced its chance to survive. The aquifer numbers. level lowered so drastically that it alarmed The next day, Dillon called the other not only Park Service staff, but also the suspects. He first dialed Reyes, who didn’t U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Nevada answer, though he quickly phoned back. Department of Wildlife. The park’s staff Dillon remembers Reyes saying he was ordered the Cappaerts to stop pumping. scared. “I woke up, and my face is plastered The Cappaerts said they had spent a lot all over everywhere on the internet,” Reyes of money drilling the wells and changing said. He admitted to the trespass and their farming operation, and that they confirmed that the shotgun belonged to intended to go right on pumping without him, but he said that all three of them had limitation under “Absolute Dominion,” also been shooting it. “Not long after speaking known as the “English Rule,” a 19th-century to him, I got a call from his attorney,” Dillon common-law doctrine adopted by some told me. U.S. states that allowed landowners to

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FEATURE STORY Josh Sargent holds a photograph of his children, Bella and Trent. Trent has his own son, Logan, on his lap. Luna Anna Archey/High Country News

“I MADE A . … I’M NOT A BAD PERSON, YOUR HONOR, AND I TAKE FOR MY ACTIONS AND THE I COMMITTED. TRENT SARGENT use as much groundwater as they pleased. (Nevada had actually abandoned Absolute Dominion in favor of prior appropriation for both surface and groundwater decades earlier.) The Park Service argued that the special status of Devils Hole pupfish under the Endangered Species Act and its habitat’s status as a national monument trumped the Cappaerts’ rights to the water. The Cappaert case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, testing the power of the Antiquities Act and the weight of the new Endangered Species Act. In 1976, the High Court affirmed the federal government’s right to maintain water levels sufficient to support the pupfish, even at the expense of water rights held by nearby ranchers. The decision enraged the residents of Nye County. The attorney representing the Cappaerts argued, “There are two endangered species here: the pupfish and the American rancher,” and said the federal government had chosen a fish over the people. A Pahrump newspaper editor even threatened to throw the pesticide Rotenone into the sunken cave to “make the pupfish a moot point.” The community

split into factions, and anger pervaded the air. Warring bumper stickers—“KILL THE PUPFISH” and “SAVE THE PUPFISH”— were plastered on cars, street signs and office buildings across the Southwest. But the decision has stood the test of time. In the late 1970s, the Cappaert family sold their ranch. The land has since changed hands a number of times, eventually becoming the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. Had that case gone any differently, had the Park Service not decided that part of its mandate was to protect the species and stop the Cappaerts from pumping— had Truman not designated Devils Hole a national monument in the first place—the Devils Hole pupfish might now be extinct, though Pahrump would probably be a little greener. “If it weren’t for that decision, the Amargosa Valley would have been pumped dry a long time ago,” Wilson, the biologist, told me recently. “There would be no Death Valley, no Devils Hole, no Devils Hole pupfish—but there would be a whole lot more golf courses, I bet.” The Devils Hole pupfish, a tiny species that has survived such obstacles, represents

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a paradox for Wilson, who would not live in Pahrump were it not for Devils Hole. He told me that adjusting to a life in the gravel-covered, billboard-lined city was difficult for him and his wife, a Canadian, who, after a few years in Nevada, finally found her niche in, of all things, golf. “I do wish I could just pick up and move Devils Hole and put it somewhere with a higher standard of living,” Wilson told me. “But it’s worth protecting—and worth punishing people who threaten this little species. “The most important advances in science have come from the edges of what’s possible—from the most extreme environments,” Wilson said. “We have a lot to learn about how the Devils Hole pupfish has even been able to survive.”

TRENT SARGENT TURNED HIMSELF IN just after Memorial Day and pleaded guilty to violating the Endangered Species Act, destruction of federal property, and possessing a firearm while a felon. A few days before his October sentencing, he

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submitted a letter to U.S. District Judge Andrew Gordon, who would decide his fate. “I’m not one to make excuses for what I have done wrong and I’m not going to start now,” he wrote, in all capitalized, slanted script. “I made a stupid mistake. … I’m not a bad person, your honor, and I take full responsibility for my actions and the crimes I committed. … I would like to ask you to accept this letter to you as my verbal ‘handshake’ that upon my release I will complete all stipulations given to me by the courts and you will not see me again in your courtroom.” On the afternoon of Oct. 25, 2018, Sargent stood quietly beside his lawyer in a Las Vegas courtroom as Judge Gordon handed down his sentence: A total of 12 months and one day—nine months specifically for his violation of the Endangered Species Act—in the custody of the Federal Bureau of Prisons. Once he is released from the Los Angeles Metropolitan Detention Center, Sargent must pay nearly $14,000 in restitution to the National Park Service, along with a $1,000 fine. He’s also forbidden to enter federal public lands for the rest of his life.

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FEATURE STORY Four months later, I journeyed to BECAUSE THERE ARE SO MANY Indian Springs, Nev., an unincorporated ENDANGERED SPECIES, society is forced community of fewer than 1,000, where to make difficult choices about which Sargent has lived for most of his life. It’s ones to protect, and to what lengths we home to Creech Air Force Base and the should go to save them. Climate change Desert Warfare Training Center. I met has quickened the pace of extinction, Sargent’s family at their spacious and and already the number of critically warmly lit doublewide manufactured endangered species exceeds our ability to home. There was a chill in the air and a save them all. blustery wind, but his mother, Norine, sat The Devils Hole pupfish, serene, outside, watching her grandchildren jump obscure and tiny, has survived a very on a trampoline in the yard. Trent’s father, long time in an unkind place, just one Josh, joined us a few minutes later, home drunken night or one jug of poison away from work at the Nevada National Nuclear from oblivion. It is a wonder, to be sure. Security Site, where he’s been employed as But how far do you go to save a species an ironworker for 30 years. like this? For Wilson and the others I had assumed that the Sargent family at Death Valley National Park, it means would consider what happened to their surrounding this biological wonder with an son unfair. But I was wrong. In fact, they impenetrable cage. Biologists occasionally defended the Endangered Species Act feed the fish and clean out Devils Hole as if with a conviction that surprised me, and it were a giant aquarium. They even have a they knew a lot about Devils Hole and the backup population held in a huge climatepupfish that swam there. Norine recalled controlled tank nearby, insurance against the family taking trips to Devils Hole when outright extinction. Protecting the species Trent was a boy, teaching him about the means harsh punishment for anyone who pupfish. “Trent would just as soon give kills even just one fish, according to Patrick first aid and mouth-to-mouth resuscitation Donnelly of the Center for Biological to that little pupfish than have this thing Diversity, which offered a $10,000 reward go on and on,” Josh Sargent said. He for help in identifying the drunken skinnyacknowledged that his son was paying the dipper and his friends. “We desperately necessary price for his actions. “He knows wanted justice for this. If they didn’t get about endangered species, and he takes the book thrown at them, what’s stopping responsibility for what he did.” others from doing whatever they want and The Sargents’ home was filled with eliminating an entire species?” pictures of family, including several of Since the incident, Devils Hole has Trent throughout the years. In one, the become an even more formidable fortress. beaming 12-year-old holds up the first The Park Service capped its towering fences fish he ever caught, a minuscule rainbow with additional barbed wire. The public trout. But now Trent can’t visit public can only view the sunken cave from a lands or use a firearm. “Trent grew up distance now, more than six m above it. hunting and fishing,” Norine said. “And And inside the fenced viewing area are even now he’ll never get to go hunting with his more cameras, motion sensors and “No dad ever again.” Trespassing” signs. Had that fateful evening unfolded just “I hate it,” Wilson told me this winter. slightly differently—had that single pupfish “I hear from the public all of the time— not died—Trent would very likely be sitting ‘Why does this place look like a prison?’ in the living room with his family. Sometimes People get really upset that they can’t it is a bitter pill for the Sargents to swallow. get a closer look. But it’s just what we “I understand the way people feel about have to do—to stop people from doing the fish,” Josh Sargent said. “But what if stupid things.” someone runs over a cat? Are they going to stop and make sure the cat is alive? No, I This story was originally published in don’t think so. They’re just going to keep on High Country News on April 15, 2019. It truckin’. But Trent kills a fish—and certainly is reprinted here with permission. Read not intentionally, and he’s in prison. … We’re the original story at hcn.org/issues/51.6/ not trying to defend him; the Sargent family endangered-species-how-a-tinyis deeply sorry for what happened.” endangered-species-put-a-man-in-prison. n

Josh and Norine Sargent, right, pose in their Indian Springs, Nev., home, filled with Southwestern memorabilia, hunting trophies and family portraits. “Trent grew up hunting and fishing,” Norine said. “And now he’ll never get to go hunting with his dad ever again.” Luna Anna Archey/High Country News

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TRAVEL & ADVENTURE

s e k a t i j Ben t, stay at h g i l f a k so boo h on a hike to , y l d n e i r f is dog- take your pooc n w o t l e s Tin tel and o h e u q i t a bou od sign o w y l l o H the

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TRAVEL & ADVENTURE

B

enji loves his cushy new dog bed. The bone-shaped squeaky stuffed toy is a thoughtful gift. The sunny afternoons spent at the rooftop pool and bar are perfect for relaxing and people watching. And the morsels of seared ahi tuna secreted to him from his dad’s salad on the restaurant patio are delish. It’s definitely a dog’s life at the boutique Hotel Chamberlain West Hollywood. While my little Bichon Frise-cross has a famous name, he is not a star. He’s simply accompanying me on a vacation to Los Angeles that’s become very canine-centric. “We know people love to travel with their dogs,” said Booking.com Canada regional manager Sherlee Taylor. “That’s why we included pet-friendly as one of the 200 passions on Booking. com’s new Passion Search engine. That’s how Benji and I discovered the Hotel Chamberlain. I punched in pet-friendly and Hollywood to Passion Search and up popped the 114-room property, welllocated on a quiet street just a block from buzzy Santa Monica Boulevard and three blocks from the famous Sunset Strip. Once unpacked at the Chamberlain, it’s time to hit the town. And what’s more iconic than the Hollywood sign? So we trek the Hollywood Hills with Bikes and Hikes L.A. owner and guide Danny Roman. Mid-way up the trail the views are sweeping from downtown to the beachfront communities of Venice and Santa Monica and the Pacific Ocean beyond. But really the goal of all these hikes is up-close proximity to the sign. Rounding a corner on the Hollyridge Trail, it appears in all its 14-metretall, 106-metre-long glory: Big white letters spelling HOLLYWOOD on the mountainside. Roman’s done this hike hundreds of times, but still joins me in a “wow” moment.

After all, while it’s shallow, the sign is imposing and a symbol of all the fame and riches associated with Tinseltown. Then we snap into photo-shoot mode. Benji is poised at the edge of the trail to get his picture taken with the Hollywood sign looming behind. Roman and I also take turns posing with Benji and the sign. When I first told friends and family I was jetting off to Hollywood with Benji, reactions ranged from “That’s great” to eye rolling and even one “That’s ridiculous.” Yes, on some level it’s absurd to fly your dog 2,400 kilometres on an Air Canada jet just so he can hike to the Hollywood sign with you. But, on another level, that’s the point. We’re doing this because we can, and it’s just so fun to have your dog along on as many of life’s adventures as possible. Benji travels comfortably in his carrier under the seat in front of me and loves the attention a handsome fluffball gets in airports, cabs, hotels and on the streets. He also loves our long walk from the Chamberlain early one morning to the epicentre of Hollywood where the Walk of Fame is. We check out Lassie’s star, naturally, Benji mugs for a picture in front of the famous Chinese Theatre and tries to kiss an actor dressed as Superman who will pose with tourists for tips. We also absolutely have to stop at Shake Shack, the New York City institution that has set up its first West Coast outpost on Santa Monica Boulevard in West Hollywood. Of course, I order Benji the Pooch-ini sundae of frozen custard topped with a dog biscuit. We’ll also have meals on the dogfriendly patios of Marco’s and Pink Taco restaurants for great pizza and tacos, respectively. When we get back home to Kelowna, Benji resumes hiking with me at a local park, eating out of his own bowl and sleeping in his own bed, no Hollywood attitude whatsoever. Check out Booking.com and BikesAndHikesLA.com. ■

MAXIME BERNIER

Story and photos by Steve MacNaull

PEOPLE’S PARTY

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Two misrepresentations of People’s Party of Canada (“PPC”) policy exist in an opinion piece by G.D Maxwell that appeared in the September 5 print edition of the Pique NewsMagazine. We at the PPC welcome both free speech and legitimate criticism of our policy. Misrepresentation of our positions is entirely something else. First, on the topic of global warming, the PPC accepts that global warming is occurring and that some small portion might be caused by CO2 emissions from human activity. Beyond that, nobody, including both G.D. Maxwell and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (“IPCC”), can say how much global warming is due to natural processes and how much is due to human activity, of which CO2 emissions are only a part of the total. The reason nobody knows this answer is that the IPCC was given restrictive terms of reference from the outset. These instructions, written Maurice Strong under the guidance of the Rockefellers, and issued to the IPCC by the United Nations, are to look into all human causes of global warming and to ignore any natural causes. This fatal deficiency built into the IPCC reports renders them unsuitable as a basis for sound policy making. If it turns out that CO2 is only a minor contributor to global warming, the Green policy of gutting our fossil-fuel-based economy in order to reduce CO2 emissions, at the immediate expense of our prosperity, would be a monumental blunder that would clearly not serve Canadian interests. And make no mistake; it is Canadians’ interests that the People’s Party wishes to serve. We are beholden to no one. The last climate scare was in the early 1970s. At that time we were warned of impending crop failures due to global cooling. 50 years before that, we find yet another reversal, as revealed in this article from a century ago: “The Arctic Ocean is warming up, icebergs are growing scarcer, and in some places the seals are finding the water too hot. Reports from fishermen, seal hunters, and explorers all point to a radical change in climate conditions and hitherto unheard-of temperatures in the Arctic zone. Exploration expeditions report that scarcely any ice has been met as far north as 81 degrees 29 minutes. Within a few years it is predicted that due to the ice melt the sea will rise and make most coastal cities uninhabitable.” — from an Associated Press report published in The Washington Post on Nov. 2, 1922. For those interested in discovering what the Greens are not telling us, some excellent videos to explain PPC policy on global warming are provided here: https://www.bebb2019ppc.ca/global_warming Second, the PPC has no policy of “nuking supply-side management”. We are advocating buying back existing quotas from farmers who hold them, at their depreciated valuation, and in a staged manner over a number of years. The savings to the poorest 20% of Canadian households will average $339 per household annually. More on this policy can be found here: https://www.peoplespartyofcanada.ca/supply_management_ making_dairy_poultry_and_eggs_more_affordable SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

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SPORTS THE SCORE

Armstrong helps Trek Red Truck to GranFondo crown RATHWELL WINS WOMEN’S RACE AT RBC GRANFONDO

BY DAN FALLOON BRENDAN ARMSTRONG captured both individual and team honours at the RBC GranFondo Whistler on Sept. 7. The Vancouver resident won the St. Regis Cup division of the 122-kilometre road cycling race from Stanley Park to Whistler Village, crossing the line two minutes and 16 seconds ahead of a pack of riders led by runners-up Alexander Murison and Nigel Kinney. In a race where the winners are in a tight pack more often than not, Armstrong was thrilled to be able to have the spotlight to himself coming in across the finish. “It felt great. I’ve got a lot of friends and family from the Sea to Sky corridor and a lot of them are here today, and to come into the line solo like that is a really special way to do it,” said Armstrong, who attended Squamish’s Quest University. As well, with Armstrong and Murison both part of the Trek Red Truck Racing squad, the team handily walked away with the men’s title in the St. Regis Cup chase. With seven of the top 19 riders coming from the Trek Red Truck team, the opportunity was there to create a winning

HOGGING THE PODIUM Team Fun Hog (at right) celebrates its third-place finish in the RBC GranFondo’s St. Regis Cup mixed event. Lotus Cycling Club (centre) won while Helijet (left) was second. PHOTO BY DAN FALLOON

46 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

lane for one of the riders, and Armstrong said it just happened to break his way. “We’ve got a really strong team here and the thing we went with into today was really good depth in our team. We’ve got strong riders the whole way through our roster, so we really needed to play off that,” he said. “For me, today, it just ended up being me in the break, so it turned out well for me.” Armstrong explained that he was part of a trio for much of the latter half of the race, but managed to break away with the finish nearing.

took home the mixed team honours. Rathwell acknowledged that she didn’t get off to the greatest start, though she ultimately managed to dodge downed riders and other obstacles to get to the front of the pack and eventually take over the lead. “I actually wasn’t positioned really well in the group. I was kind of at the back coming up to Taylor Way and it was pretty chaotic. There was some crashing, so I was trying to move up on Taylor Way and I wasted a lot of energy, I think, trying to get

“For me, today, it just ended up being me in the break, so it turned out well for me.” - BRENDAN ARMSTRONG

“I followed an attack coming out of Squamish with two other riders. We rode together pretty much all the way to Whistler, and just coming into Whistler, the attack started going and I rode solo pretty much all the way to the line,” he said. On the women’s side, Trek Red Truck also came away with the St. Regis Cup team title, with Victoria’s Megan Rathwell leading the way to the win. Rathwell came in more than five minutes ahead of runnerup Claire Cameron and was more than seven minutes up on third-place finisher Grace Menning. Lotus Cycling, meanwhile,

from Taylor Way to the Cypress area on the Upper Levels,” she said. “I was working pretty hard and I was pretty happy just to get into the front group there. For me, my goal was to make it to Squamish in the front men’s group and then see how I felt at that point. “I felt pretty good, for some reason, at that point,” Rathwell added with a laugh. Near the 80-km point, Rathwell fell back of the group, though she was still proud to hang with them for as long as she did. Plus, Rathwell came through well clear of the other competitors in the women’s

category to win handily. “I was keeping tabs on where the other women were,” she said. “It was hard because there were so many men, but I remember hitting Furry Creek near Squamish and that was the biggest climb of the day at that point. Most of the women I accounted for, and a couple of them I hadn’t seen when I went up the climb. I was thinking they were ahead of me. “I didn’t know if there were any in front of me, so I wasn’t sure until I crossed the line and they said I had won.” In prior GranFondo events, the women had separate start times from the men, but this time around, there was a huge mass start that clumped everyone together. And even though Rathwell admittedly took the race a little less seriously than in her previous attempts, her competitive juices kicked in and she smashed her personal best on the course.

LOCALS HIT MIXED PODIUM Whistler residents in the St. Regis Cup contest were: Justin Homewood (41st); James Hallisey (159th) and Marla Zucht (160th), while Pemberton’s Trevor Hopkins was 132nd. Hallisey, Hopkins and Zucht all helped Team Fun Hog to third in the mixed division. Squamish’s Brandi Heisterman, also part of Trek Red Truck, was 203rd. Zucht said the early part of the race was difficult with so many riders moving so quickly, but the Team Fun Hog riders


SPORTS THE SCORE

Wellness Talks Nesters Market and Pharmacy offers wellness talks at its Whistler location. Join RHN and Certified Plant Based Chef Sarah Uy, Carissa Beu, RHN and Post Partum Doula Dana Lemmon and Jasmin Wong each week for inspirational whole health ideas.

STRONG MAN Brendan Armstrong shortly after crossing the RBC GranFondo finish line on Sept. 7. PHOTO BY DAN FALLOON

managed to sort themselves out. “You’ve got to be very fast. The peloton [main group] is moving at a very quick pace and there’s probably 30 or 40 people in each group,” she said. “Our team was riding not completely together, but we could see each other as we moved along the Upper Levels.” One team member, Ted Battiston, was caught up in a crash of roughly 40 people on the Upper Levels, suffering road rash

Covey (121st); John Hyatt (154th); Dwayne Kress (161st); Jason Louttit (184th); James Hyndman (199th); William Geddes (215th); John Axsen (219th); Ron Enns (300th); Alex Hinkson (303rd); Julian Wells (338th); Matthias Shorter (348th); Thomas Legg (365th); John Legg (366th); Michael Legare (396th); Jeff Riemer (398th); Melanie Levesque (399th); Phil Beauregard (465th); and Benoit Reneault (483rd).

“It definitely becomes nervewracking as you’re seeing these accidents occurring or having to ride through them...” - MARLA ZUCHT

and a broken rib. Zucht said while the team members weren’t initially aware that one of their own was down, it was still harrowing to see so many riders crash during the race. “It definitely becomes nerve-wracking as you’re seeing these accidents occurring or having to ride through them, seeing the riders injured on the road,” she said. “It puts a damper on your ride, for sure. You’re looking to see if you know anybody and of course, we did.” Meanwhile, in the GranFondo event, Missouri City, Texas’ Jaco Cronje and Seattle’s Laura Matsen Ko were the top men’s and women’s finishers, respectively. Numerous Sea to Sky locals took part. Those in the top 500 were: Jack McKillop (18th); Kelly Servinski (31st); Dave Heisler (68th); Mark Haldenby (102nd); Brennan

In the 152-km Forte event, which includes a climb up Cypress Mountain, Vancouver’s Michael Matthews and Quebec’s Laurence Baril were the top men’s and women’s finishers. Finishers from the Sea to Sky were: Bob Barnett (30th); Ken Chaddock (55th); Kris Duncan (68th); Sabrina Larose (89th) and Shannon Susko (190th). In the 55-km Medio, Karine Gosselin of Montreal was the first rider in while David Rosen of Saanich was the top men’s competitor. Local finishers were: Theresa Eriksson (14th); Claudie Simard (47th); Tom Honey (48th); Embyr-Lee Susko (94th); and Chris Susko (95th). Roughly 5,000 riders took part in this year’s event. For more, check out racedaytiming.ca. n

Liver The Super Food TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 17, 10:30 A.M. WITH CARISSA BEU, WELLNESS ADVISOR Please join Carissa as she discuses the benefits and contraindications for eating the nutrient dense food, liver. An ancient super food that has fallen to the wayside and out of favor but for some people may be essential to health

Carissa Beu has trained as a Naturopath and Aromatherapist hailing from one of the top Natural Medicine colleges in Australia. She is currently studying Ho-meopathy through CCHM and has a colourful creative side as she crafts like a demon, dances and play several instruments. She also LOVES cats. You can find her most days in the Nester`s wellness department ready to help you heal yourself.

Wellness Desk 604-932-3545 Ext 322

7019 Nesters Rd. Whistler, B.C.

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

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SPORTS THE SCORE

Cruz wraps season with third-place finish PEMBERTON DOWNHILLER ALSO THIRD OVERALL IN JUNIOR MEN’S STANDINGS

BY DAN FALLOON LUCAS CRUZ WRAPPED up his junior downhill career on the podium. Competing at the final Mercedes-Benz UCI Downhill World Cup at West Virginia’s Snowshoe Mountain Resort, the Pemberton rider slipped into third place behind France’s Thibaut Daprela and Australia’s Luke Meier-Smith. “I was really trying to focus on pedalling where I could. It was a pretty flat track compared to all of the other ones, but it had big rock gardens and really technical jumps, so wherever I could, I was doing pedal strokes and trying to keep my speed high,” he said. While one might not consider the heart of Appalachia to be prime mountain bike country, Cruz was pleasantly surprised with Snowshoe’s inaugural World Cup. “Coming into it, everyone was a little skeptical of how it would work out because we all heard that it was a super tiny venue and there was no internet, no cell service. We were just way out in the boonies,” he said. “It was actually the complete opposite. It was an amazing run. We had really good weather and the race went super smoothly

with really tight times. It was the best finale we could ask for. “We had a huge turnout and there were crazy American fans lining the entire track from top to bottom, so it was really cool to see.” Entering the race, Cruz was jostling for third place in the overall standings

Amaury Pierron and American Charlie Harrison for the win. Mark Wallace was the top Canadian in 21st while part-time Whistlerite Kirk McDowall took 23rd. Whistler’s Finn Iles crashed in practice and opted to sit out the race for precautionary reasons. No Canadian women raced in the elite or junior divisions.

“I’ll definitely ride a lot more with good friends and push each other this winter so that when we come into 2020, we’re ready for elite.” - LUCAS CRUZ

with fellow Canadians Patrick Laffey and Eliot Jamieson, and knew going in that whichever of them performed best in the final race would stand on the season podium. Jamieson took sixth in the race while Laffey was 10th. Squamish’s Seth Sherlock, meanwhile, ended up 19th. In the elite men’s division, Great Britain’s Danny Hart topped France’s

Cruz was especially thrilled to hit the podium after missing the medals by just 0.01 seconds at the UCI World Championships at Mont-Ste-Anne, Que. the weekend prior. “That was a tough one, for sure,” he said. “I thought I had a really great run, but I had a slow leak that started in about the last quarter of the track so I just cased the jumps at the bottom and that lost the

WHISTLER WOMEN’S HOCKEY Join us for fun hockey every Whistler Women’s Thursday night September to April. All Hockey abilities welcome! Join us for fun hockey every DRAFT NIGHT: October 3rd Thursday night September to April. SIGN UP: 7:45pm | ON ICE - 8:30pm All abilities welcome! LOCATION: Meadow Park Not sure the league is for you? Come andour tryfun it out Sept 20 games & 27 Join us for pre-season at Meadow Park at 8:30pm & th th 10pm September 19 and 26 . (pre-registration required)

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podium margin for me, I think. “Going into Snowshoe, I was determined to get that third-overall podium spot.” Admittedly, it was doubly disappointing to have the narrow miss given how special it would have been to secure that accomplishment, as well as the memento, on home soil. “It was a tough one for sure because we had lots of friends and family come out. There were tons of people there and, obviously, I really wanted to do well,” he said. “I feel like I did everything I could and I was in a position where I definitely could have won it as well. “It was a tough race but I’m happy with how it ended up.” Still, Cruz was pleased to go home with two podium appearances this season, as well as three other top-five placements. He felt he grew as a rider and is more confident making the jump into the elite men’s division in 2020. “I definitely feel like I’m way more confident on my bike now. It kind of clicked at Crankworx, riding with all my friends and just pushing each other, feeling more comfortable riding fast,” he said. “I’ll definitely ride a lot more with good friends and push each other this winter so that when we come into 2020, we’re ready for elite.” n

2019 DEMO bikes ON SALE!


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SPORTS THE SCORE

Madsen wraps Xterra season in second WHISTLER TRIATHLETE HAD TO ENDURE ‘HELLISH’ WEEK BEFORE UTAH RACE

BY DAN FALLOON KARSTEN MADSEN COULD be forgiven if his head wasn’t fully in the game heading into the Xterra USA/Pan Am Championships in Ogden, Utah on Sept. 7. Between travel hassles, illness and a missing bike, the Whistler triathlete had more than his share of challenges on his plate. Still, a model of consistency all season, Madsen managed to place second behind only New Zealand’s Sam Osborne. Madsen came in looking for his second win in as many weeks, though in the Dominican Republic, he downed just one other elite competitor in Branden Rakita. However, Osborne, the third-place finisher at the 2018 World Championships, put up what Madsen said was his best race of the year to run away with the victory by nearly three-and-a-half minutes. “Right off the gun, he took the swim out really hard,” he said. “On the swim, I got dropped quick but then I made my way into

the leaders’ group. Then on the bike, I rode up to him again on the first climb, and then he dropped me again on the bike and I had to ride back up to him.” Madsen took some encouragement that he was, at times, keeping up with one of the circuit’s top racers on his game, but acknowledged that he still sees a gap in where he is and where he’d like to be. “It was again another indication that there’s work that still needs to be done before Maui (the World Championships), but there’s another indication that I can race with these guys,” he said. “I can be in the conversation in Maui and if I have my perfect day, I believe that there’s an opportunity for me to win.” Given that he was racing while others were resting, Madsen was feeling fatigue during the Utah contest. It started with the airline losing his bike on the way back from the Dominican Republic after a flight that was severely delayed by Hurricane Dorian. He was also rear-ended near the Denver airport before driving down to Utah, and in the days leading up to the race, felt himself coming down with a sore throat.

RUNNER-UP Whistler’s Karsten Madsen clinched second in the Xterra overall standings. PHOTO COURTESY OF KARSTEN MADSEN

“I’m still happy with my effort on the race day. You’ve got to push all the negative away and you just focus on what you can do,” he said. In the Dominican Republic, Madsen said there was some uncertainty surrounding the race with Dorian nearby. However, the storm avoided the area and Madsen was granted the opportunity to complete a unique race. “It’s like basically going through the rainforest jungle of the Dominican. It was fairly bushwhacked trails but you would get all these gnarly cuts on your forearms

from the vines as you ride through,” he said. “You’re riding through these shanty towns, riding through people’s backyards. The hills that you do are super steep but they’re not really straight-up mountain bike trails. They’re more how people walk from village to village.” Madsen explained that since the hurricane sucked the energy out of the area, there was no breeze on race day, and therefore, no reprieve from the blazing heat. “It was a crazy hot day. No breeze.

SEE PAGE 51

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SPORTS THE SCORE

BC Parks announces e-bike policy SPORTS BRIEFS: D’ARTOIS SIXTH AT CARDRONA; GAYTON, WAREHAM TOPS AT BARS OF FURY

BY DAN FALLOON LIKE MANY OTHER landholders have recently announced before it, BC Parks is allowing some e-bike use on trails where mountain bikes are allowed. In a release on Aug. 27, BC Parks announced that Class 1 e-bikes are allowed on trails where mountain bikes or other cycling is already allowed. Class 2 and 3 e-bikes are allowed only on routes designated for motor vehicles, depending on the park. Class 1 e-bikes are defined as having no throttle and are pedal-assist only, and reach a maximum speed of 32 kilometres per hour before the motor cuts out. Class 2 and 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and/or throttle actuated, with Class 2 bikes having the 32 km/h cut-off and Class 3 having a 45 km/h cut-off. All three classes of e-bikes are defined as having a maximum continuous motor wattage of 500 watts. In the Sea to Sky, parks that allow cycling that will be affected by the policy change are: Brandywine, Garibaldi, Alice Lake and Birkenhead provincial parks. Brandywine and Garibaldi have allowances for only Class 1 e-bikes, while Alice Lake and Birkenhead accept all three classes, depending on the area of the park. While allowing the e-bikes, BC Parks acknowledged the potential hazards they can bring. “Cycling in parks can have an impact on trails and wildlife,” the BC Parks press release states. “Electric bikes allow more riders to use trails and reach areas that were previously limited to a few visitors, leading to increased pressure on sensitive wildlife and ecosystems.” For more information, visit www.env. gov.bc.ca/bcparks/recreation/biking.

D’ARTOIS TAKES SIXTH AT CARDRONA Whistler halfpipe skier Simon d’Artois opened his 2019-20 FIS World Cup season at Cardrona Alpine Resort in New Zealand on Sept. 7. With a score of 87, d’Artois finished 8.6 points back of winner Birk Irving of the United States, while fellow Canadian Noah Bowman and American Aaron Blunck rounded out the

podium. Other Canadians included Brendan MacKay in fourth, Sam McKeown in ninth, Dylan Marineau in 15th, Andrew Longino in 16th and Evan Marineau in 27th. In the women’s event, Rachael Anderson was the top Canadian in 10th while Amy Fraser took 15th. China took the top two spots with Kexin Zhang edging Eileen Gu for the victory. Russia’s Valeriya Demidova placed third.

GAYTON, WAREHAM TOP BARS OF FURY RACE Several of Whistler’s top downhillers came together for quite the race from top to bottom on Sept. 7. Racing from Top of the World down Ride Don’t Slide and Earth Circus into Creekside Village, Shane Gayton and Keren Wareham came away with the overall men’s and women’s wins. Gayton completed the course in 23 minutes and 57.85 seconds (23:57.85) to hold off Squamish’s Lee Jackson and Whistler junior Wei Tien Ho. Wareham, listing her hometown as London, U.K., came down in 28:08.75 to best Wanaka, New Zealand’s Melissa Newell and Whistler’s Michelle Chang. As for age division winners, Gayton came away with the male open 17-plus win, while Whistler’s Alice Mathews took that honour on the women’s side. Wareham topped the master female 30-plus division, while Adam Dagg won the master’s men 30-to-39 contest. Ariel Lindley, meanwhile, won the veteran male 40-plus division while Ho was the junior winner, earning the male 14-to-16 victory. Full results are online at whistlerblackcomb.com.

WALKER SECOND AT REGIONAL CONTEST Whistler golfer Stewart Walker very nearly got the opportunity to take his game to Augusta. With the chance to compete at the famed Augusta National Golf Club the week before next year’s Masters, Walker placed a narrow second at the Drive, Chip & Putt regional qualifiers at Washington state’s Chambers Bay Golf Course. Walker scored a 144 in the boys 14-and-15 division behind only Howard Shu of Saratoga, Calif., who scored 155. Walker will serve as an alternate. n

KARSTEN MADSEN FROM PAGE 50 No wind. The water temperature was like bathwater,” he said. Heading into World Championships, Madsen is going to ramp up his training, perhaps completing a running race or two, in advance of the Oct. 27 contest in Hawaii. With a season-long grind turning into a short-term bonanza, Madsen reasoned that it’s worthwhile to take a no risk, no reward attitude.

“Once you have one more race in the year, and especially a one-off race where there’s no series money—it’s just all one day, it’s winner take all—you’re not really playing it safe,” he said. “You increase your training pretty dramatically. “You have to have two things happen: you have to not get injured and you have to not get sick.” n

P A W S I K S XC SATURDAY OCTOBER 12, HILTON RESORT & SPA 9:00 - 11:00 Equipment Drop Off 11:00 – 11:30 SWAP Early Entrance for Members 11:30 – 2:00 SWAP Open to the Public 2:00 – 3:00 Cash/ Equipment Pick Up

SALE OF NEW AND USED XC SKI EQUIPMENT & CLOTHING Youth Program registration opening this month! Details coming soon. Sign up online:

WHISTLERNORDICS.COM

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED REGISTER ONLINE

The 9th annual

ANYONE AND EVERYONE! NEW COURSE!

The Whistler 50 is open to everyone, with distances ranging from 7km to 80km. We have both competitive and recreational categories to rst-time relay participants to experienced ultra-marathoners! Race Date is October 19, 2019 Teams can be made up of 2, 4, or 8 people, or run as a solo ultra! Participate with a group of girlfriends, buddies from the bar, ce to put in a team – there’s something for everyone!

Register by Oct 14th by Midnight New this year - 50 Km Ultra To sign up go to www.bcathletics.org/Whistler50RelayUltra/

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

51


FORK IN THE ROAD

Eat your reds—and greens YOUR BRAIN’S BEST BEHAVIOUR STARTS WITH YOUR GUT SURE, SURE, we’re all busy with all that back-to-school, back-to work stuff this time of year. But wait a sec! Before you shove that muffin or little honey cruller in your mouth because you didn’t have time to make yourself a decent lunch before you left home—and now have even less time to grab a nice big salad or tasty bowl of pho, which is making you feel even more stressed out and less able to

BY GLENDA BARTOSH concentrate—know that that dear old guru of healthy eating, Adelle Davis, had things right in at least one regard. You are, indeed, what you eat. Ms. Davis, who, ironically, died from cancer some 45 years ago, was a confident, outspoken nutritionist from Indiana not without her critics and controversies. She was as famous for her information as her misinformation (sound familiar?), including the out-there notions that magnesium could treat epilepsy and megadoses of vitamins were good for you (they can actually harm you). Still, she remained popular and influential for decades after the Second

A LITTLE HELP FROM YOUR FRIENDS Fresh fruits and veggies, especially raw, like this gorgeous array at Mary’s Garden in the agricultural land reserve in Surrey, are rocket fuel for your brain. PHOTO BY GLENDA BARTOSH

52 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

World War, spreading the word about the importance of good nutrition to North Americans, especially housewives eager to learn about same and hear from a new (read: non-male) authority figure. Adelle thought of herself as a newspaper reporter, gathering information about healthy eating and disseminating it to others. The public responded in spades. At some point, Associated Press compared her to Ralph Nader, whose classic, Unsafe at Any Speed, was kicking around about the same time. Publishing a string of best sellers whose titles all started with the exhortation, “Let’s…” (as in, Let’s Get Well, Let’s Eat Right to Keep Fit, and more), Ms. Davis’ popularity hit high tide about the same time Francis Moore Lappe’s Diet for a Small Planet drifted into the food conversation. (See more about Diet in my “Less meat = less heat” column, Pique, Aug. 15, 2019.) Full disclosure: I had titles from all three authors on my bookshelf at some time in my increasingly misty, distant, Californiadreamin’ past. It was never true, as Ms. Davis repeatedly advocated during her career but never came to rue—even a teeny bit—that simply eating the right foods would prevent cancer. She insisted, even at the end, that her multiple myeloma was due to eating junk food in college, and x-rays. Many of us sniggered, not necessarily meanly, at the irony of it all. But she was right in other ways. Her assertion that the food industry floods us with bad-eating “propaganda” is still pretty right-on, as we old hippies used to say. Evidence still supports her disavowal of sugar and her famous quote, “Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince (or princess)

and dinner like a pauper.” Now her popular axiom, you are what you eat, is proving true in more ways than one, especially when it comes to our beautiful brains. From mood and well-being to mental health and the ability to concentrate or handle stress, scientists are proving how connected our guts are to our brains. And it’s all due to microbes: Different microbes, good and bad, that we ingest intentionally and otherwise (some might transfer with something as innocent as an intimate kiss) as well as what goes on with our own personal gut microbiomes, including what we feed them. According to New Scientist, the World Health Organization ranks depression as the No. 1 cause of disability, affecting at least 300 million people around the world. Severe depression affects 15 per cent of women after pregnancy. But even depression is on the list of ailments that the right microbes can help us overcome. Ms. Davis would love it. Studies show that microbes in our guts produce neurotransmitters that impact our brains several ways: via the vagus nerve that connects them with our stomachs; by influencing immune cells in our guts that produce chemicals that can affect the brain; and by producing other chemicals that get into our bloodstream and can also impact the brain (yes, they pass through the blood/ brain barrier). Early evidence shows that some microbes like the bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus, which is found in some yogurts, (one more reason to read your labels), have a strong anti-anxiety effect on mice. Other bacteria, think of them as bad microbes,

result in symptoms in mice like typical human depression. You know the feeling— anxiety, difficulty concentrating, and a desire just to curl up in a ball and sleep. Good microbes in your gut thrive on fibre from a wide range of plant-based foods, so a diet loaded with whole grains, pulses like lentils and chickpeas, and lovely leafy greens is perfect for our guts—and brains. Greens like kale, chard and spinach are especially good as they’re also loaded with iron, which we all need more of as we eat more plant-based foods. Scientists also point out you don’t need non-food probiotic supplements for a healthy gut—in fact, those can be as bad for you as Adelle Davis’ mega-doses of vitamins. But your gut (and brain) will love all those pickles and fermented or cultured foods like kimchi I talked about last time. Plus probiotic foods like yummy yogurt and kefir, even good cheese. As for those fruits and veggies with a nice red colour—radishes, tomatoes, red beets, radicchio, pink grapefruit and, especially, watermelon—they deliver the fibre healthy gut micro-organisms love, as well as lycopene, a nonvitamin A carotenoid that gives them their distinctive colour (and powers solar cells: “Here comes the sun,” Pique, June 6, 2019). Lycopene also shows promising goodhealth impacts, including anti-cancer ones. Dearly departed Adelle might have the last laugh after all. Glenda Bartosh is an award-winning journalist who’s excited to see that Ralph Nader is alive and well, and still pumping out books like To the Ramparts. See you there with a crossbow. n


MEADOW PARK SPORTS CENTRE SWIM • SKATE • SWEAT • SQUASH

Meadow Park Sports Centre is located 4 km north of Whistler Village. OPEN DAILY: 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Last entry by 9:30 p.m.

GROUP FITNESS SCHEDULE THU 12

FRI 13

SAT 14

KickStart 6:10-7:10a.m

Total Body Conditioning 7:30-8:30a.m.

Run, Jump, Throw 9-10a.m. NEW!

Low Impact Circuit 7:30-8:30a.m

Low Impact Circuit 9-10a.m.

Barre TRY IT Sculpt FOR $5

Circuit 9-10a.m.

Endure 6:10-7:10a.m NEW!

MON 16

TUE 17

WED 18

KickStart 6:10-7:10a.m

Endure 6:10-7:10a.m

KickStart 6:10-7:10a.m

Circuit 9-10a.m.

Low Impact Circuit 9-10a.m.

NEW!

Boost Your Health 9-10a.m.

TRY IT Sunday FOR Parent $5 Fun Day and Baby Workout Fitness 10-11a..m. 10:30-11:30a.m.

10:30-11:30a.m.

Zumba 12:15-1p.m.

SUN 15

Low Impact Circuit 7:30-8:30a.m

Total Body Barre Conditioning Sculpt 10:30-11:30a.m. 9-10a.m. Zumba 12:15-1 p.m.

Zumba NEW! Gold 10:30-11:30a.m.

TRY IT Zumba Parent FOR $5 10:30-11:30a.m. and Baby Fitness 10:30-11:30a.m.

Strong Hearts 12-1p.m. NEW!

Gentle Fit for Seniors 1-2p.m.

TRY IT Mini FOR $5 Ballet (3-4yr olds) 11:45-12:30p.m.

Gentle Fit for Seniors 1-2p.m.

Barre Fit 11:45-12:45p.m.

PWR! Moves 1:15-2:15p.m.

TRY IT Intro FOR $5 to Ballet (5-7yr olds) 12:45-1:30p.m.

PWR! Moves 1:15-2:15p.m.

Strong Hearts 12-1p.m. NEW!

Spin TRY IT and FOR $5 Pump 6:45-7:45p.m.

TRY IT Yoga FOR $5 for Kids (5-8yr olds) 1:45-2:30p.m.

Gentle Fit for Seniors 1-2p.m.

FLEXIBLE REGISTRATION FITNESS CLASSES ‘Flex-reg’ classes have a separate fee and allow you to register for classes on the days that fit your schedule. REGISTERED FITNESS CLASSES Registered fitness classes have a seperate fee and a defined start and end date. Pre-registration is required for the entire set of classes.

TRY IT Grrrls’ FOR $5 Boot Camp 4:15-5p.m.

PWR! Moves 1:15-2:15p.m.

Zumba 6:20-7:20p.m.

Zumba 6:20-7:20p.m.

Coming Soon!

All other classes are included in the price of admission. See exact schedule of classess at the sports centre or online at: whistler.ca/recreation

Stretch and Restore Yoga 8-9p.m.

ARENA SCHEDULE THU 12

W/OT Drop-In Hockey

FRI 13

Drop-In Hockey

SAT 14

SUN 15

8:15-9:45a.m.

MON 16

55+ Drop-In Hockey

8:15-9:45a.m.

8:15-9:45a.m. Drop-in Hockey 10-11:30a.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-2p.m.

Public Skate 6:30-8p.m.

Public Skate 6:30-8p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

TUE 17

Drop-In Hockey

10-11:30a.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

WED 18

Drop-In Hockey

10-11:30a.m. Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 6:30-8p.m.

Meadow Park Sports Centre is expanding its cardio room and adding a newly designated stretching room.

POOL SCHEDULE THU 12

FRI 13

SAT 14

SUN 15

MON 16

TUE 17

WED 18

CLOSED - RE-OPENING SEPT 24

whistler.ca/recreation | whistler.ca/notices | 604-935-7529  @RMWhistler |  @rmwhistler |  @rmowhistler

Services will not be disrupted during construction. whistler.ca/notices


EPICURIOUS

Julia Murray helps get you ‘hooked on plants’ at vegan dinner, movie screening RAVEN ROOM HOSTING DINNER TO COINCIDE WITH THE PREMIERE OF THE GAME CHANGERS

BY BRANDON BARRETT ATHLETES TEND TO CARE a lot about protein. Like a lot. “Athletes are worried about proteins all the time, and it’s a total myth. You can get all the protein you need from a plant-based diet,” says retired freestyle skier and 2010 Olympian Julia Murray. As the vegan movement continues to gain momentum in the mainstream, you’re starting to see more elite athletes adopt a plant-based diet. From tennis superstar Venus Williams to NBA all-star Kyrie Irving, veganism is no longer a niche diet in the world of sports, with athletes recognizing its many associated health benefits, including decreasing cholesterol, blood pressure, the risk of heart disease and weight loss. “A lot of research out there shows the plant-based diet is the way to go for longevity and disease prevention, clearer skin. It’s also the best thing you can do for the environment, which I think people are starting to realize,” said Murray, a registered holistic nutritionist and plantbased chef. Murray, who runs a vegan food blog called Hooked On Plants, recently approached The Raven Room to host a vegan dinner to coincide with the worldwide premiere of The Game Changers on Sept. 16. Produced by James Cameron, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jackie Chan, Formula 1 racer Lewis Hamilton, No. 1-ranked tennis player Novak Djokovic and NBA player Chris Paul, the film follows former UFC fighter James Wilks on his path to a vegan diet. Throughout the film, Wilks travels around the world to meet with leading scientists and nutritionists, as well as dozens of top athletes, who convince him that everything he had been taught about protein is wrong. “This movie is going to bust a lot of myths,” Murray said. Although she isn’t vegan herself, Raven

PLANT LIFE Olympian Julia Murray knows athletes are obsessed with protein—and the registered holistic nutritionist is here to tell them they can get all the protein they need from a plant-based diet. PHOTO SUBMITTED

Room chef Erin Stone does dabble from time to time, and appreciates the creativity a plant-based meal can inspire. “I feel like, these days, you have to have that as part of your menu. I also like the

making it vegan.” For the Sept. 16 dinner at the Raven Room, Stone has crafted a multi-course menu that incorporates a variety of cuisines from around the world. The meal starts off

“I feel like, these days, you have to have that as part of your menu. I also like the challenge and the creativity that goes behind it.” - ERIN STONE

challenge and the creativity that goes behind it,” she said. “So it’s not just something generic: a pasta, salad or something you’d find anywhere. I like trying to reinvent a dish that I might serve with meat, but then

with a roasted beet salad, with a beet pesto, balsamic and crispy kale. That’s followed up with a mushroom pate made with walnuts, beans, onions and truffle oil, served with crostinis from vegan Creekside bakery,

BReD, and then a bao bun (a popular North Chinese street food) filled with jackfruit. For the main course, guests will have their pick of three entrées: “meatless balls” served with veggie noodles and a fire-roasted tomato sauce; Stone’s take on a BLT salad served with cured eggplant, rice, barley, lettuce and fresh heirloom tomatoes; and a flavourful Thai laksa curry in a coconut broth, served with tofu, broccoli, zucchini, mushrooms and crispy puffed rice. “Playing with a dish and playing with food, that’s the most enjoyable part of the job as a chef. That’s your art,” Stone said. “It’s more fun when you try something different.” The dinner kicks off at 6 p.m. and will be followed by a screening of The Game Changers at Village 8 at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $30, available at eventbrite.com. Search for “Pre-Game-Changers Movie Dinner with Hooked on Plants.” n

Sea to Sky

CALL FOR FUNDING APPLICATIONS Applications are now being accepted for our October 1st, 2019 Fall Funding Deadline. The Whistler Blackcomb Foundation is dedicated to providing nancial support to Registered Canadian Charities whose activities provide benet to residents of the Sea to Sky Corridor in the areas of health, human services, education, recreation, arts & culture and the environment. Special emphasis is placed on children, youth and family programs. For more information, eligibility requirements and to download an application form please visit our website at www.whistlerblackcombfoundation.com or contact Mei Madden, Executive Director at 604-938-7321 | mmadden@whistlerblackcombfoundation.com

54 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

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ARTS SCENE

One-woman show brings Lil’wat language to life in útszan YVONNE WALLACE STARS IN PRODUCTION, RUNNING FROM SEPT. 19 TO 22 AT MAURY YOUNG ARTS CENTRE

BY ALYSSA NOEL PLAYWRIGHT AND ACTRESS Yvonne Wallace is overcome with emotion when she envisions the question-and-answer session that will follow her one-woman show, útszan (to make things better). The show primarily focuses on a woman named Celia who tries to teach her niece, Margaret, to speak Ucwalmícwts, the traditional Lil’wat language. But, of course, there’s much more meaning to be unpacked in the story, which is why Wallace decided to add the post-production conversation. “I think we have to remember that Canada [had] a strategy that left Indigenous people out of many conversations,” she says. “On every level, a dialogue between two people is essential to move forward and [foster] healing that needs to happen. I want people to ask questions about our language and I want people to know where to source help if they need it. I want to create a safe space where people can just have a full experience. I don’t want them to walk away without understanding.” Wallace first started writing the play three years ago as her graduating project

CENTRE STAGE Yvonne Wallace’s play, útszan, opens at the Maury Young Arts Centre on Sept. 19. PHOTO SUBMITTED

56 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

from the liberal arts program at Capilano University. While she grew up in Mount Currie, she didn’t become fluent in Ucwalmícwts, so part of the writing process was learning the language. While she was encouraged to include translations in the production, she opted, instead, to ensure the context of the play would be clear for non-Ucwalmícwts speakers.

They intersect in a very integral way to who we are and how we behave in the world.” While the show will see its world premiere at the Maury Young Arts Centre on Sept. 19, with shows running until Sept. 22, Wallace performed a version of it in April last year for an invited group of about 70 people, which included family and Lil’wat members. “It was one of my best days,” she says.

“The part that feels huge to me is my connection to identity. We have, across Canada, this saying that ‘the people and the land are one.’ But I believe that a lot of our cultural teachings are so deeply rooted in our language.” - YVONNE WALLACE

“I’m of the mindset that [learning the language is] not difficult at all,” she says. “The part that feels huge to me is my connection to identity. We have, across Canada, this saying that ‘the people and the land are one.’ But I believe that a lot of our cultural teachings are so deeply rooted in our language. That serves into the same teaching that the people and the land are one; the language and the people are one.

“It was a beautiful mix of elders, teachers, faculty from the university, and youth … [With] the younger students, we went into the First Nations lounge at Capliano University and had lunch together. Before I even arrived, these youth where serving our elders, making them feel welcome and having a conversation. It was the kind of perfect day I imagined it to be after working on it for three years. It wasn’t so much

about me as it was about practicing all these things that make us beautiful as a people.” The show is running for four days in Whistler, which includes an evening show each night and matinees on Sept. 19 and 20 as well. It is the most extensive run of shows in the theatre in recent memory. For Mo Douglas, executive director at Arts Whistler, which is hosting the performance, it’s an important addition to the Fall for Arts lineup. “It’s a big deal. We want Canada to know about this. It’s a good example of using art as a pathway [to reconciliation],” Douglas says. “It’s bold and we’ve been talking about wanting to do a project like this.” Tickets are just $5 and Arts Whistler is coordinating transportation from Mount Currie. “We want to make sure there’s no reason you can’t be here,” Douglas adds. It was important for Wallace, too. “It really does feel like a community event where everyone is involved,” she says. “That really is just a dream come true. There’s no other way to say it for me. If I hang up my theatre hat for the rest of my days, I’ll feel like I’m fully accomplished.” Útszan opens at the Maury Young Arts Centre on Sept. 19 with a show at 1 p.m. and another at 7 p.m. Evening performances run until Sept. 22 with a second matinee at 1 p.m. on Sept. 20. The suggested age is 13 and older. Tickets are $5 at www.showpass.com/utszan. n


ARTS SCENE

Whistler actor making his mark on Vancouver theatre scene MATT PAYNTER WON EV YOUNG AWARD FOR MOST OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE FOR HIS STAR TURN IN NEWSIES

BY BRANDON BARRETT Credit: Scott Brammer

MATT PAYNTER can’t remember a time when he didn’t want to be an actor. Coming from a family of dedicated film junkies, Paynter says that, as a kid, he was “always really quick to jump up and try to entertain groups of people.” The 22-year-old Whistler native has continued that trend into his adult years. The only difference is, these days, he’s entertaining much larger groups. A recent graduate of Capilano University’s acting program, Paynter faced that classic artist’s dilemma after high school: “There actually was a moment where it was like, ‘Am I going to do acting or a science—you know, something responsible, and become an adult?’” he recalls. Still unsure of which path to take, Paynter travelled to Southeast Asia on a gap year to do some soul searching. It was there he came to an important realization. “I went to Vietnam and Eat Pray Love’d myself, and I realized what I really wanted to do was always acting, so why not just do it?” So far, it’s proven to be the right call. Since making the move to Vancouver three years ago, Paynter has landed roles in a number of notable productions throughout the Lower Mainland. He played the reserved Colonel Brandon in Cap’s production of Sense and Sensibility, a role he says was the hardest he’s ever played. In a “baroque punk” version of Molière’s 1672 The Learned Ladies, he modelled his character off of British indie rocker Alex Turner, lead singer of the Arctic Monkeys, and even played the band’s 2014 hit, “I Wanna Be Yours,” to open the show. But it was his turn at Theatre Under the Stars in Stanley Park this summer as newsboy tough Morris Delancey in the musical comedy, Newsies, that truly reaffirmed that he had made the right career choice. “That was just a really special show right from the get go,” Paynter said of the two-month run, which earned him the EV Young Award for Most Outstanding Performance. “Just to get the opportunity to have that much stage time and really figure out what’s working and what isn’t, and how I prepare during the day and what leads to the most grounding performance, was really helpful. That’s what I’ve taken away from Newsies more than anything. It was amazing. It was unbelievable.” Although theatre “is always going to be the real part of the industry I’m in love with,” Paynter has also dipped his toes into screenwriting and directing, the latter he has taken to like a duck to water.

audainartmuseum.com

Discover the unexpected and explore an outstanding collection of Canadian Art CURTAIN CALL Whistler’s Matt Paynter stars at Clitandre in a ‘baroque punk’ version of Molière’s 1672 play, The Learned Ladies.

• Kids 18 & under are always FREE

PHOTO SUBMITTED

“I really want to write, direct and act, but I can see my career in like 30 years going just to directing, if that’s what’s available to me. I find it just as rewarding as acting,” he said. “I wasn’t expecting that. I was really nervous to direct. I just found a lot of success in it really quickly and continue to find success in it and it’s just something I’m comfortable in now and am confident doing.” One thing you often hear about Vancouver’s acting community is just how competitive it can be. Moving from Whistler’s grassroots theatre scene to cutting his teeth in the Lower Mainland, Paynter says he feels the competition, but refuses to let it get to him. “That competition doesn’t help you as a performer. You can’t go into an audition scenario comparing yourself to everyone else. There is no comparing yourself to other people because everyone’s different. It’s just whoever is right for the part,” he says. “It can be easy, if you don’t get cast, to go, ‘Oh well, I guess I wasn’t right for the part.’ I think that’s actually the right attitude to have: you need to roll with the punches. You can’t survive in the industry if you’re taking everything personally.” Next up for Paynter is the rock musical, American Idiot, which runs at the Centennial Theatre in North Vancouver from Nov. 5 to 10. “Beyond that, it’s really important for me to keep doing theatre, so that’s where my brain is,” he says. “I got this advice from my musical director at Newsies … He told me, do straight plays, do film, do everything because that’s what it takes to have a career in what I want to do. You need to be able to do everything.” For the multi-hyphenate Paynter, he’s already well on his way. n

• Open late Friday until 9pm with Yoga & Adult Art Drop-ins • Family Studio Sundays 12-4pm

Credit: Sonny Assu, It was, like, a super long time ago that ppl were here, right?, 2014

Admission $18 Adults & Seniors | FREE Ages 18 & Under Location 4350 Blackcomb Way – between Day Lots 3 & 4 Hours Open 10am – 5pm Daily, 10am – 9pm Friday, Closed Tuesday

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

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NOTES FROM THE BACK ROW

The sweet smell of money strippers I ONLY KNOW a few things about strippers, but one of them is that they are very good at separating a person from their money. The other is that they smell phenomenal.

BY FEET BANKS It was early January 2000 and, like most of Whistler, the crew and I were headed to Las Vegas to drink vodka-Red Bulls and walk around in circles hobnobbing at the annual snow industry trade show. We were hoping to raise funds for our first ski movie. I didn’t even have enough cash to pay for the trip. Walking into the Royal Bank, I noticed there were ketchup bottles everywhere.

UNCOVERED Hustlers, about a crew of ex-strippers, opens this week.

PHOTO COURTESY OF STX FINANCING LLC ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

“What’s up with these?” I asked the teller. “It’s ketchup on your RRSPs month!” “I need to take $1,000 out of mine,” I replied. “I’m going to Vegas.” This was not the answer she was looking for, but I was 23 at the time and not convinced RRSPs were going to be any good at all when the government collapsed and the world started to end. Vegas seemed like a wiser call. Upon landing, that thousand bucks lasted almost eight hours. Our hotel was mellow (as legit gangster rap aficionados we stayed at the Maxim, where Tupac was shot) but everywhere else was a shit show and renting a limo seemed like the best option to save time. After that, someone, it might have been the limo driver, suggested the Crazy Horse 2, and a few (let the record show: a few, not all) of us thought that sounded OK—any strip bar good enough to have a sequel seemed worth checking out. It was, in a “pinch-me-is-this-real?” kind of way. The girls were very kind and they smelled delicious. The secret, we learned, is in the combination of scents. It’s

LIVE MUSIC! TUESDAY

BLACKS’N’BLUES WITH SEAN ROSE

not one perfume or cream, but rather the way your moisturizer compliments your shampoo, body wash, deodorant and more. It’s a bouquet. And there went my thousand bucks worth of RRSPs, on Night 1 of five. As my buddy Mikey said on the ride home at 6 a.m., “Well, we arrived in a limo and we left in a cab.” To be fair, we ate dinner with some of that money—beef dip and chicken fingers, extra ketchup. The reason I bring it up is because Hustlers opens this week at the Whistler Village 8. It’s based on a true story and stars Constance Wu (Crazy Rich Asians), Julia Stiles (10 Things I Hate About You) Keke Palmer (Akeelah and the Bee) and Jennifer Lopez (Out of Sight) as a gang of ex-strippers who weather the economic meltdown by running a brilliant-untilit-wasn’t heist scam on rich, mostly douchey, Wall Street dudes. As a true crime picture, Hustlers plays out well, but the real magic here comes from the performances (Lopez is already generating Oscar buzz) and the

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58 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

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fresh direction from Lorene Scafaria (The Meddler), who brings nuance and humanity to the story and subject matter. (It shouldn’t have been hard to figure out that women would be better at making movies about strippers than men, but apparently it’s taken this long.) Hustlers is definitely worth cashing some RRSPs in for. My buddies and I didn’t pick up any ski movie sponsors in Vegas (Chili got a bunch of free socks though) but we somehow managed to make that ski flick anyhow, despite losing our good friend Brett Carlson in a road gap accident along the way. Brett’s legacy is being immortalized with a lounge and shotski in the brand new Kees and Claire Hut up at Russet Lake. The grand opening of that incredible hut project takes place Saturday, Sept. 21, with a ribbon cutting up at the hut and an afterparty at the conference centre where Arc’teryx will premiere their latest film The Spearhead. You should come. I don’t think there will be strippers, but stranger things have happened (and if Johnny Thrash shows up anything is possible…). n

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ARTS NEWS

American War hits disturbingly close to home

VILLAGE 8 SHOW SCHEDULE

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13TH – THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19TH

AUTHOR OMAR EL AKKAD TO TAKE PART IN THE WHISTLER WRITERS FESTIVAL THIS FALL

BY ALLI VAIL

OPEN DAILY 3 PM - 1 AM

IT FEELS IMPOSSIBLE to write about Omar El Akkad’s prescient American War without acknowledging realities south of the border and climate change. His novel spans decades but starts in 2074 America. The country is embroiled in civil war after fossil fuel is banned by the government and a handful of southern states secede, unwilling to give up gas. Life is complicated by severe climate change and displacement. Louisiana-born Sarat Chestnut ends up in Camp Patience, a place for refugees near the northern border. Here, she meets an older man who radicalizes her to fight for the glorious Southern cause. He whispers about the past: of Spanish moss, fertile land, smoked pigs, peaches, key lime pie. “How much of it was real and how much pleasant fantasy didn’t matter. She believed every word,” El Akkad writes. Here are the echoes of President Donald Trump’s “Make America Great Again” and emphasis on false nostalgia. El Akkad’s novel weaves whispers of the past and present to create a probable and terrifying future. It’s clever social commentary wrapped around compelling fiction. Good guys, bad guys, right, wrong— it’s murky. Sarat is a rare woman of fiction in that she’s not generally “likable.” I like her: she’s lumbering, spiteful, uncompromising, arrogant, unsympathetic and, depending on perspective, has a skewed moral compass. We understand her actions only via the perspective of others and the format of the novel: the central story supplemented by

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Whistler Writers Festival on Oct. 19.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

from the narrator about refugees: “We carried signs calling them terrorists and criminals and we vandalized the homes that would take them in. It made me feel good to do it, it made me feel rooted; their unbelonging was proof of my belonging.” There is a sense that history will repeat in a new place, at a different time. As one man says to Sarat: “My people have created an empire. It is young now, but we intend it to be the most powerful empire in the world. For that to happen, other empires must fail.” It is chillingly predictive. Good thing summer is almost over; a beach read this is not.

“How much of it was real and how much pleasant fantasy didn’t matter. She believed every word ... ” - OMAR EL AKKAD

witness stories, university textbook syllabi, and government files. This is a story of war, framed around a woman’s need for revenge because of the war. When someone congratulates her on an act of violence, Sarat is unmoved. “Revenge,” she echoed. “Revenge, revenge. I hurt one man. Do you think it was just one man who hurt me?” El Akkad demonstrates his understanding of humanity and news headlines through insights like this one

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El Akkad will be at the Gala at the 2019 Whistler Writers Festival on Saturday, Oct. 19 at 8 p.m. He will be in conversation with moderator Bill Richardson and fellow author Maude Barlow as they discuss how their book’s topics of pressing global issues, told in fact and fiction, can spark change. Find your tickets at www.whistlerwritersfest.com. Alli Vail is a writer living in Vancouver and a graduate of Simon Fraser University’s Writer’s Studio Online program. n

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SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

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MUSEUM MUSINGS

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FOX Y M O R O

FUN FEST

Willie Whistler takes a ride with Bo Bo the Clown during the Fall Festival in Village Square. WHISTLER MOUNTAIN SKI CORPORATION COLLECTION

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FIRST 100 TICKETS $30 NEXT 150 TICKETS $40 tickets available on eventbrite.com

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W H I T N E SS

NAT MOREL

Welcoming fall in Whistler BY ALLYN PRINGLE IT MAY TECHNICALLY still be (and

free shuttle back to village

$5 DRINKs doors at 8pm funk soul house animal print party!

at times even feel) like summer, but for many people the beginning of September signals the beginning of fall. While many people will spend this weekend celebrating a certain beverage at the Whistler Village Beer Festival, in the 1980s, this weekend would have featured a celebration of the upcoming season with the Whistler Fall Festival. The Fall Festival was first organized by the Whistler Resort Association (WRA, now known as Tourism Whistler) in 1981. At the time, Whistler Village was beginning to emerge from a craze of construction and Blackcomb Mountain was looking forward to its second season of operations. There was a lot to celebrate in Whistler and the festival featured many of the growing community’s arts, crafts, sports and activities. One of the local characters showcased at the Fall Festival was Willie Whistler, the new mascot of the WRA. Willie’s name came from a “Name the Whistler Marmot” contest for children in the area in which the winner, eight-year-old Tammi Wick, won a Blackcomb season pass. The mascot was created to promote Whistler at local and other events and the Fall Festival, which included time each day to “Meet Willie Whistler,’’ was his first big event. The festival also featured local artists and artisans who demonstrated their crafts in the village, including pottery, fibre spinning, stained glass, and painting. Performers over the weekend included acts such as Evan Kemp and the Trail Riders, the Alpini Band, and local favourite Doc Fingers, as well as dance performances and Bo Bo the Clown. For visitors and residents alike, the Fall Festival offered different ways to see the Whistler Valley. Snowgoose Transportation offered free, 50-minute bus tours, showing off everything from residential areas to the gondola base in Creekside to the Blackcomb Daylodge. To see the valley from the above, participants could enjoy a flight from Okanagan Helicopters, take advantage

of Blackcomb Mountain’s offer of free chairlift rides, or, subject to wind conditions, go up in Chuck Bump’s hot air balloon, billed at the festival as the “World’s Largest Hot Air Balloon.” Perhaps not surprisingly, sports and competitions also featured prominently at the Fall Festival. Spectators could take in volleyball, pro/celebrity tennis matches that paired pro players with notables from politics, business, and media, a softball game between the Whistler Contractors Association and the Whistler A’s, or even a parachuting demonstration. For those looking to compete, the Waiters Race challenged Whistler’s servers to run a timed obstacle course without spilling a drop, and the Labatt’s Great Whistler Water Race relay covered four lakes and the River of Golden Dreams through canoeing, kayaking, swimming, and windsurfing. Though the Fall Festival was primarily about showcasing Whistler, it also raised money for several different causes. On the Sunday, Whistler hosted a run as part of the first national Terry Fox Run, raising over $7,600. The proceeds from a beer garden hosted by the Whistler Athletic Society that evening were also donated towards cancer research. Local causes benefited as well. The WRA donated enough funds from the Village Centre beer garden to replace the snowmobile of the Alta Lake Sports Club that had been destroyed in a fire. Umberto Menghi, who was then opening his new restaurant Il Caminetto, contributed to the festival by both providing the fireworks display for the Saturday evening and hosting a gala dinner at Myrtle Philip School to benefit the Whistler Health Care Society. According to Glenda Bartosh of The Whistler Question, the first Fall Festival was about far more than raising money and generating revenue for the resort. She reported that the festival “created laughter, high energy and a true appreciation of what Whistler is all about.” The WRA must have agreed, as they continued to organize the Fall Festival for at least three more years. n


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1 QUITE THE TREK Members of Trek Red Truck Racing (centre) celebrate their men’s division win at the RBC GranFondo Whistler on Sept. 7. Pender Racing (left) was second and West Coast Reduction (right) took third. PHOTO BY DAN FALLOON. 2 CHILKO CHILLING Chilko, one of Pique’s resident good boys, took a break while exploring the alpine last week. PHOTO BY ALYSSA NOEL. 3 CAMPFIRE CHATS A group of friends warmed up by the fire during a late-summer camping trip east of Pemberton. PHOTO BY JEN TREPTOW. 4 BIRTHDAY BASH: Lorena (middle) just arrived from Switzerland in time to celebrate her 19th birthday with Camille and Julien, in Whistler on Monday. PHOTO BY CATHERINE POWER-CHARTRAND. 5 GREAT GOLFER Stewart Walker placed second in the boys 14-and-15 division in the Drive, Chip and Putt regional championship at Washington state’s Chambers Bay Golf Course on Sept. 8, which qualified Walker as an alternate for the national event at Georgia’s Augusta National Golf Club next spring. PHOTO SUBMITTED. 6 WALDORF WELCOME Whistler Waldorf School’s new Grade 1 students were officially welcomed to the grade school by faculty and older students during the school’s annual Rose Ceremony last week. PHOTO COURTESY OF WHISTLER WALDORF SCHOOL.

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MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

Czech out The Point and polka the night away POLKA & PILSNER NIGHT INCLUDES DANCE LESSONS, LIVE ACCORDION AND CZECH CUISINE

BY BRANDON BARRETT SHARON SCHRUL will be the first to admit the accordion isn’t exactly the sexiest instrument around. “When I was learning, it was not cool to play that instrument. That’s the reality,” says Schrul. “Playing the piano or the guitar, and even the drums, that was really cool. But the accordion was like, womp, womp.” The accordion’s apparent uncoolness didn’t discourage Schrul from picking the instrument back up after a lengthy hiatus, however. First learning the accordion at the tender age of seven, Schrul gave it up in her teenage years—only to rekindle her passion for polka nearly 40 years later. “I took formal lessons in my younger years, during my youth. Then, basically, life

CZECH MARK Sharon Schrul recently picked up

the accordion after nearly a 40-year hiatus. She plays alongside violinist Raddim Koppitz at The Point Artist-Run Centre on Sept. 13 as part of Polka & Pilsner Night. PHOTO SUBMITTED

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happened. You know, marriage, mortgage, kids, that whole thing. So it got put aside,” she says. “In the last few years, I’ve picked it up again.” The misunderstood instrument has also had an unintended side effect for Schrul. “I do have a mental health issue, and with music being my passion, the accordion

Point Artist-Run Centre, a night of live music, traditional Czech beer and food (goulash, anyone?) prepared by Petr Cagasek, and polka lessons led by Adela Smazilova. Like a lot of her Czech compatriots, Smazilove grew up learning to polka. “If you grow up in Czech Republic, mostly everybody goes to dance lessons. If

“It makes me feel good to put a smile on people’s faces and if I can do that, I’ve achieved my goal. It gives me a purpose to play.” - SHARON SCHRUL

has become part of my overall self-care practice. It just makes me feel good. I don’t know how to explain it,” she says. “It makes me feel good to put a smile on people’s faces and if I can do that, I’ve achieved my goal. It gives me a purpose to play.” Schrul will be putting her rekindled love affair with the accordion on full display this weekend for Pilsner & Polka Night at The

you go to balls, like evening entertainment, everybody can do that,” she says. “It’s like learning to walk.” Attendees will get to learn the basics of polka, including a sidestep, a promenade step, and a spin. “You’ll be able to move around the dance floor freely in that rhythm,” she says. “It has many other options how to dance it,

depending on where you’re from, so people have their regional variants, but this is the common one. It’s very easy.” Smazilova and Schrul, along with Point regular Isla Robertson, came up with the idea of a Czech-themed night after seeing a polka band perform at a village hotel. “It was really successful and everyone thought, ‘Hey, it’s nice not to just get drunk in a house and have an entertainment like that,’” she says with a laugh. Landing in Whistler five years ago, Smazilova said Whistler’s small-but-mighty Czech community has only grown, and she’s happy to share a piece of her culture with the rest of the community. “There’s a lot of [Czech] people coming for the working holiday visa,” she says. “When you go to the village these past two, three years, you just hear the language everywhere.” Polka & Pilsner Night is set for Friday, Sept. 13. Doors are at 6 p.m., with dinner served at 6:30 p.m. Dance lessons kick of at 7:30 p.m. Advance tickets are $30 with dinner, or $15 for show and dancing only. Get yours online at thepointartists.com/events.html or in person at Armchair Books. n


MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

Feel the good vibrations at Sound Bath Sanctuary FORMER ROCK DRUMMER MIKE REED HOSTING 90-MINUTE SOUND-HEALING SESSION

BY BRANDON BARRETT MIKE REED wants to clarify one thing right off the bat. “I just want to be clear: I’m not a hippie,” he says with a laugh. “I treat this very scientifically.” If you had to picture the type of guy who hosts “sound bath sanctuaries”— sound-healing sessions involving a range of percussive instruments and throat singing—Reed is probably not who you would envision. A former punk rock drummer, Reed came to sound healing after going through a rough patch in his life. “I went through some hard times and was looking for ways to heal myself,” he says. “I came across sound healing, and once I experienced it, I was like, ‘I need to do that.’ It totally resonated with me because it’s musical and I knew immediately I could do it.” Reed typically starts off the experience with some breath work, before playing the ocean drum, which, naturally, mimics the soothing sound of waves crashing into the shore. He usually follows that up with a number of crystal singing bowls, before moving onto “the main event”: the gong. “I build everything up to the gong,” he explains. “The gong is like a cleaner. It penetrates and washes through you and all the atoms in the body and realigns everything. It’s sort of like sonic Drano, it just clears everything.” For the finale, Reed normally incorporates throat singing, a way to fill the space “with a lighter vibration and bring some musicality to the ears.” Despite its New Age associations, sound healing has, in fact, been practised in various forms for centuries. Dating back to the Ancient Greeks, Egyptians and vedic scriptures of India, sound healing is still practiced today by a host of different cultures as a way to reduce stress and create a sense of inner peace. “It’s becoming more and more mainstream and I think you’ll see a lot more of it once people start to realize the power that sound and vibration can have on the body,” Reed says. “It’s been said that sound therapy is the medicine of the future. It’s also the medicine of the ancient past. People have been using sound healing for thousands of years.” Sound healing therapy has also shown to have medicinal benefits for people with a variety of issues, both physical and mental, Reed says. “I have seen a lot of different [responses]. People have come up to me after to say that it helped with their physical pain,” he notes. Sound healing can also improve sleep, reduce blood pressure, and help mitigate depressive or anxious feelings, adds Reed. “Any feelings of anxiety you can regulate

SEPTEMBER

"MUSIC IN THE MOUNTAINS" AT TYAX

GOOD VIBRATIONS Mike Reed hosts “Sound Bath

Sanctuary,” a 90-minute sound-healing session involving Tibetan singing bowls, ocean drums, and even a gong, on Sunday, Sept. 22 at Space Coworking in Function. PHOTO SUBMITTED

in your nervous system, so it improves emotional regulation,” he says. “In that state, while you’re in that deep relaxation, your body is doing a self-healing process, and that includes the adrenal glands and the nervous system.” Typically, when someone experiences the different vocal tones, frequencies and vibrations of a sound bath, “the part of the mind that’s thinking and analytical and trying to figure out what it’s hearing, it can’t quite figure out what to grab onto,” Reed explains. That can lead to a “theta brainwave state,” one of five frequencies our brain experiences, typically the barely conscious period just before sleep. A theta state borders the conscious and subconscious worlds, and promotes learning, healing and growth. “A sound bath is almost like involuntary meditation,” Reed says. “When you go into this theta state, or meditation, you go from your sympathetic nervous system and switch over to what’s called the parasympathetic nervous system. That moves you from your fight-orflight, or innate problem-solving state of consciousness to resting and digesting. “You ultimately come out of the experience almost reset and cued up to a higher vibration.” Reed is hosting a 90-minute sound bath at Space Coworking, behind Home Hardware in Function Junction, on Sunday, Sept. 22, starting at 7 p.m. Participants are asked to dress comfortably and bring a yoga mat, blanket and cushion for comfort, as well as eye covering. Tickets are $35, available at eventbrite.ca. Search for “Sound Bath Sanctuary in Whistler.” n

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SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

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PIQUECAL

YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL EVENTS & NIGHTLIFE For a complete guide to events in Whistler, visit piquenewsmagazine.com/events

WHISTLER YOUTH BAND

THU

9.12

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES, PERMANENT COLLECTION

Docents will provide visitors with an introduction to the Audain Art Museum and its permanent collection. Visitors will be encouraged to explore the galleries afterwards. These drop-in tours are free with the purchase of admission or museum membership. 604-962-0413. > 1 pm > Audain Art Museum

COMMUNITY

Let the trumpets sing! The Whistler Youth Band is a beginner band for youth ages 10 and up. Grab an instrument and make music with friends. > 6-7:30 pm > Myrtle Philip Community School

WE’RE BACK FOR MENTAL HEALTH We’re Back for Mental Health is a unique supper club, concert and dance with performances by Fabulous George and The Zodiacs and Vancouver’s own Barney Bentall. During dinner, the talk will focus on mental health, then move into entertainment, with a silent auction and other prizes. Funds raised will go to The Kelty Patrick Dennehy Foundation. $50. > 6:30 pm > Buffalo Bills

MUSIC

BNI MOUNTAIN HIGH

BNI provides a positive and structured environment for development and exchange of quality business referrals. It does so by helping you build personal relationships with dozens of other qualified business professionals. Register by emailing melissa@ betterbrainhealth.info. $20. > 6:45-8:30 am > Whistler Chamber Boardroom

WOMEN’S KARMA YOGA

Drop in for weekly yoga classes led by an all-female team of Certified 200 Hour Yoga Instructors. Includes mat use and childminding. All women, all ability levels welcome. This program is made possible by yoga instructors and childminders donating their time. Contact us to join the team. Free. 604-962-8711. > 9-10 am > Whistler Women’s Centre

ACTIVATE AND CONNECT FOR SENIORS 50+

Connect with friends, new and old, through weekly activities. Meet at Whistler Community Services Society. In partnership with Mature Action Community. > 9:30-11 am > Whistler Community Services

PARENT INFANT DROP-IN

An opportunity to develop a supportive social network with other parents of young babies. Speakers and a public health nurse are often in attendance. Free. > 11 am-12:30 pm > Whistler Public Library

ROTARY CLUB OF WHISTLER MILLENNIUM

Join the Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium to learn about what the club is doing to support your local community and international projects. Lunch is available for $20. Everyone welcome. > 12:15 pm > Pan Pacific Mountain Side

DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB

The club meets every week and visitors are welcome. For a partner, please call Gill at 604-932-5791. > 1-5 pm > Whistler Racquet Club

64 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

GREG NEUFELD

Armed with a guitar, stompbox and one of the best soulful voices you will ever hear. > 5-7 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

CAT MADDEN AND MARCUS RAMSAY

CZECH POLKA NIGHT

RUCKUS DELUXE

WVBF SIGNATURE EVENT: MASTER CRAFTERS: HAZE CRAZE

Cat Madden and Marcus Ramsay bring the noise with this foot-stomping, booty-shaking blues-rock style that everyone can enjoy! Playing catchy originals and tasty covers that you know and love. Free. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

Ruckus Deluxe features former Cirque Du Soleil lead singer Chad Oliver and Grammy-nominated violinist Ian Cameron on mandolin, fiddle, and electric guitar. > 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

THURSDAY LOCALS’ NIGHT

Come join our legendary locals’ night every Thursday, kicking off the night with a game of skate at 9 p.m. followed by DJ Praiz and friends throwing down some dope tracks. Prizes to be given away each week include concert tickets, snowboards, electric sunnies and skateboards! Email info@garfinkels.ca for guest list and VIP options. 604-932-2323. > 9 pm-2 am > Garfinkel’s

COCKTAIL DANCE PARTY

Start your weekend early with a handcrafted cocktail. Then hit the dancefloor or rock our legendary dancing cage with help from DJ Peacefrog. > 7 pm > Buffalo Bills

THROWBACK THURSDAYS

Come lounge out, dance and listen to all the throwback hits one could need. For guest list and VIP reservations, visit tommyswhistler.com. > 9 pm > Tommys Whistler

Celebrate the end of summer Czech-style with live accordion music by Sharon Schrul, polka dance lessons with Adela Smazilova and a Czech feast by local expat Czech cook, Petr Cagasek. Then dance the night away! Tickets available at thepointartists.com and Armchair Books. $30 with dinner; $15 show only. > 6 pm > The Point

Master Crafters, presented by Grimm’s Fine Foods, will be returning for #WVBF2019 and this year the future is looking hazy. Choice breweries will bring their best hazy brew to this blind taste test competition. DJ Stache will be playing the platters at this event. Ticket includes 8 x 4oz. samples. $30. > 7:30-10:30 pm > Longhorn Saloon

COMMUNITY

WELCOME CENTRE MULTICULTURAL MEET UP

Come and say, “hi” if you are new to Canada and Whistler! Everyone and every age is welcome. Casual meet up, workshops, information about living in Canada. Check calendar at www.welcomewhistler.com for full details. Contact info@welcomewhistler.com or 604-698-5960. > 9:30 am-noon > Whistler Public Library

KARAOKE WITH JACK-QUI NO

Put it on the rocks and call it a show! Hosted by Jack-Qui No. > 8 pm > The Living Room @ the Pangea Pod Hotel

LIVE MUSIC AT BRICKWORKS Live music every Tuesday and Thursday > 8 pm > Brickworks Public House

EVAN KINSELLA

Evan Kinsella is soul-drenched folk, hip-hop artist based out of Squamish performing solo, and collaborating with musicians and producers coast to coast. Inspired by social justice, the healing power of music, travel, and love, his music is written from the heart and aims to invoke positive minds. Free. > 8:30-11:30 pm > Brickworks Public House

Join us for a night of funk, house, disco and retro remixes with DJ Mary Merlin & friends. Happy hours until 11pm. Level Up cards accepted. For guest list and group perks email guestlist@moejoes.com. > 9:30 pm > Moe Joe’s

BAND CAMP

Band Camp is a local talent development night at Black’s Pub. This is where new talent to Whistler debuts and artists who have been honing their skills at jam nights make their debut. This week it is Nicole and Alex a.k.a. Hot Licks on guitar and vocals from 9 pm. Free. 604-932-6408. > 9 pm-midnight > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

Books, songs, and rhymes for preschool children, accompanied by a caregiver. > 10:30-11 am > Whistler Public Library

JUMMAH SALAH (FRIDAY PRAYER) THURSDAY NIGHT FUNK FEATURING DJ DAKOTA

He spins old school and new school, ya need to learn though, he burns baby BURNS … like a hip-hop inferno! No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

There will be a weekly “Jummah Salah” (Friday Prayer) held at the Maury Young Arts Centre Multi-Purpose Hall. It is open to all and everyone is welcome. There is no cost for this event. Organized by the BC Muslim Association. > 1:30 pm > Maury Young Arts Centre

WHISTLER YOUTH CENTRE DROP-IN

THROWBACK THURSDAYS WITH MR. TWITCH

Enjoy a musical journey of nostalgia curated by Mr. Twitch. Disco-funk-hip-hop-house and whatever else. Old-school vibes, remixes, mash-ups and new stuff to keep you on your toes. Free. 604-962-0601. > 9 pm-midnight > Three Below

PRESCHOOL STORY TIME

DISCOTECH

FRI

9.13

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES, PERMANENT COLLECTION > 1 pm > Audain Art Museum

WALK AND TALK SERIES, SPECIAL EXHIBITION

Docents will provide visitors with an introduction to the Audain Art Museum and its special exhibition. Visitors will be encouraged to explore the galleries afterwards. > 5:30 pm > Audain Art Museum

For ages 13 to 18. We offer ping pong, a skateboard mini-ramp (skateboards and helmets to borrow), free Wi-Fi, Xbox One, PS3 & PS4, guitars, board games, a projector and widescreen TVs. Free. 604-935-8187. > 3:30-11 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

MUSIC

ZAAC PICK

Zaac Pick plays folk-pop with a reputation for compelling lyrics and haunting melodies. Free. > 5-7 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge


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ONGOING & DAILY ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WHISTLER MUSEUM

Learn more about Whistler’s culture and history. Now open by donation. > Daily 11am-5pm, Thu until 9pm > Whistler Museum

THE CULTURAL CONNECTOR: A JOURNEY OF ADVENTURE AND DISCOVERY

Grab a Cultural Connector guide and explore Whistler’s world of culture. As you follow the Cultural Connector route, you’ll discover the stories that enrich Whistler’s culture, the venues that celebrate it and the milestones that we’ve achieved along the way. The pathway will lead you through beautiful surroundings and six cultural institutions: Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre, Whistler Museum, Whistler Public Library, Maury Young Arts Centre, Lost Lake PassivHaus, and Audain Art Museum. Free. > Ongoing > Maury Young Arts Centre

COMMUNITY

GAMES CAFE

Come in and enjoy a massive selection of popular games. Sunday to Thursday. > 4-8 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

party DJs mixing the best in hip hop, rap, R&B and party anthems. Whistler’s most energetic dancefloor. > 9:30 pm > Moe Joe’s

FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE

Live music by Whistler favourites, Red Chair. > 9:30 pm > Tapley’s Pub

CHAMPAGNE FRIDAY SEPT 13 GARFINKEL’S

LIVE MUSIC

Solo artists perform every week, except on the first Friday of every month when they swap out for a full band. No cover, no lineups. > 6-9 pm > Whistler Brewing Company

CHAMPAGNE FRIDAY

Kick off your weekend at Garf’s. Get on the guest list and join the party: info@garfinkels.ca. > 7:30 pm > Garfinkel’s

FIRE IT UP FRIDAY LADIES’ NIGHT

We have a gift for all ladies. Enjoy a glass of champagne then hit the dance floor and dance the night away with DJ Peacefrog. Info@buffalobills.ca for guestlist or table bookings. > 7 pm > Buffalo Bills

T RILEY AND THE BOURBON REBELS

T Riley and the Bourbon Rebels offer up a night of fantastic music, from old school jazz to upbeat swingy rock. The season opener for Arts Whistler Live! mixes it up with classic standards, re-vamped pop hits, and even a few originals, offering an entertaining array of music for dancing or groovin’ in your seat. Join us at 7pm for a high energy swing dance workshop to get you warmed up for the evening ahead, then check out the show at 8pm. 19 and up. Includes cash bar. Tickets available at showpass.com/t-riley. $15 advance; $20 at the door. > 7 pm > Maury Young Arts Centre

Come down to Tommy’s Whistler and set the bar high for the weekend. DJ Dre Morel spinning pop, rock and hip hop beats all night long. For guest list and VIP reservations, visit tommyswhistler.com. Let us know if you are celebrating for a gift from us to you! > 9 pm > Tommys Whistler

KARAOKE NIGHT

“I Will Survive” won’t sing itself, so come over to Whistler’s longest-running karaoke night and belt out all your favourite hits. Arrive early to avoid disappointment. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

RUCKUS DELUXE

> 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

FEEL GOOD FRIDAYS

Start the weekend off right with music by B.C.’s finest

FRIDAY NIGHT ALL LOVE NO CLUB Shake off your work week by grooving to deep cuts featuring classics and future gems ... you can’t help but move to the beats! No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

Fine Italian Cuisine

Zero Ceiling Fundraiser Dinner September 21st

BUFFET DINNER $5 HIGHBALLS $5 DRAFT

Live Entertainment Limited Seating Reservations ONLY 3 COURSE SPECIAL BEGINS SEPT 24TH $35 SUN-THURS $45 FRI-SAT

SPORTS

WHISTLER TRI CLUB SWIM SQUAD

Triathlon focused swim squads. Full details at whistlertriclub.com/training-sessions. Free to members for fall (includes entry into Meadow Park). Nonmembers $8 drop-in (includes entry into Meadow Park). > 6-7:15 am > Meadow Park Sports Centre

INDOOR PICKLEBALL DROP-IN

Have fun playing the fastest growing sport in North America. All levels welcome. Free paddle rental. For more, call 604-932-1991. $10. > 4-6 pm > Whistler Racquet Club

ZUMBA MASTER CLASS WITH INTERNATIONAL PRESENTER MARIO GUTIERREZ

A 1 1/2 hour Zumba Fitness party with Mario Gutierrez from Israel. He is a much sought after presenter and educator internationally. Mario is talented, witty and passionate. You will love dancing with him. Tickets are

CELEBRATING

OVER 20 YEARS IN WHISTLER

Reservations Recommended menus are available for viewing/ download on our website.

4319 Main Street 604.905.4844 Quattro at Whistler

quattrorestaurants.com SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

65


PIQUECAL TOURISM WHISTLER/JUSTA JESKOVA

EVENTS + FESTIVALS

SPORTS

WHISTLER VILLAGE BEER FESTIVAL SPARTAN WHISTLER (SATURDAY & SUNDAY) KIDS RACE 2019 Not to be missed, the Main Event kicks off on Saturday, featuring more than 140 beers and ciders to sample, live music, food trucks and more! Weekend general admission tickets and weekend all access passes gives you access for both Saturday and Sunday. Cheers! $50. > 12-5 pm > Whistler Olympic Plaza

Our mission is to inspire children to develop a love for fitness at an early age. We provide safe, age appropriate obstacle course race venues to build participant confidence, while enjoying a thrilling outdoor activity. > 7:30 am-3 pm > Whistler Blackcomb

MUSIC

WHISTLER PARKRUN ZAAC PICK

> 5-7 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

WEEKEND GETAWAYS

Whistler’s newest nightclub and lounge turns it up every Saturday night with VIP tables and a party not to miss out on. DJ Dre Morel spinning pop, rock and hip hop beats all night long. For guest list and VIP reservations, visit tommyswhistler.com. Let us know if you are celebrating for a gift from us to you! > 9 pm > Tommys Whistler

BROTHER TWANG

Come wind down your ski day or ramp up your Saturday night festivities with the boys from Brother Twang. > 9 pm-midnight > FireRock Lounge

KAL MOLLISON WHISTLER VILLAGE BEER FESTIVAL SEPT 14 WHISTLER OLYMIPIC PLAZA

limited to 40. Don’t miss out! $40 Advance; $50 at the door. 604 938-3643. > 8-9:30 pm > Meadow Park Sports Centre

SEA TO SKY

PEMBERTON FARMERS’ MARKET

Pemberton Farmers’ Market brings together Pemberton area producers and consumers creating a marketplace for vibrant collections of fresh produce, delicious food, unique art and more. Come meet and support local “makers, bakers and growers,” enjoy live music every Friday from June to October. Free. 604-966-4422. > 3-6:30 pm > Pemberton Downtown Community Barn

REFRESH MARKET

Refresh Market returns to the West Coast Railway Heritage Park on Sept. 13 and 14! Shop the selection of handmade, vintage and locally designed clothing, ceramics, food, jewelry, art, housewares and more from 75 artists, makers and small shops, plus food trucks, tin type portraits and more. $3-$5. > 4-9 pm > West Coast Railway Heritage Park (Brackendale/Squamish)

MOUNTAIN MUSE FESTIVAL

A celebration of community music and art throughout venues in town. Live music playing along with an art walk. Dance on Saturday afternoon in the Barn. Everyone welcome. > Sep 13 > Pemberton

SPARTAN RACE WHISTLER TRAIL 10K 2019

Spartan Trail is a no-obstacles foot race through rugged wilderness, overseen by legendary race directors from the world of trail running. With a 10k (6.2 mile) race at all events and a Half Marathon (13.1 mile) at select locations, there’s a Spartan Trail for everyone. > 10 am-3 pm > Whistler, Blackcomb

SEA TO SKY

COPPER & FIRE AT BRITANNIA MINE MUSEUM

Discover Mother Nature’s artistic side at our annual arts event. Artists from Vancouver and the Sea-to-Sky region will be onsite offering artist demonstrations and showcasing their “of the earth” art. $20. 604-896-2233. > Sep 14, 10 am-3 pm > Britannia Mine Museum

REFRESH MARKET LIVE @ BLACK’S

SAT

9.14

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES, PERMANENT COLLECTION > 1 pm > Audain Art Museum

Every Friday and Saturday, party with local and touring musicians at Black’s Pub. > 9 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

RUCKUS DELUXE

> 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

WALK AND TALK SERIES, SPECIAL EXHIBITION > 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

It’s Whistler’s No. 1 stop for stag and stagette parties. DJ Turtle and friends mix up everything from hip hop, R&B, new rap, dance hall and Top 40 bangers. Email guestlist@moejoes.com for VIP and group perks. > 9:30 pm > Moe Joe’s

COMMUNITY

SINGING WITH THE BABIES

SATURDAY NIGHT ALL LOVE NO CLUB

FAMILY TOGETHER TIME

SUPREME SATURDAY

Learn songs and rhymes to soothe and entertain baby while encouraging early language development. For kids up to walking age. Free. > 11-11:30 am > Whistler Public Library

A parent-directed hour with board games, crafts and a story corner with felt puppets. A drop-in program for families of all ages. Free. > 3:30-4:30 pm > Whistler Public Library

> 6-10 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

Refresh Market returns to the West Coast Railway Heritage Park on Sept. 13 and 14! Shop the selection of handmade, vintage and locally designed clothing, ceramics, food, jewelry, art, housewares and more from 75 artists, makers and small shops, plus food trucks, tin type portraits and more. $3-$5. > 10 am-5 pm > West Coast Railway Heritage Park (Brackendale/Squamish)

35TH ANNIVERSARY CONCERT LADIES’ NIGHT

WHISTLER YOUTH CENTRE DROP-IN 66 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

Kal Mollison, frontman of acclaimed Canadian indie band Sandcastle Theory, builds on-the-fly vocal and instrumental arrangements, mixing solo acoustic renditions of classic pub and college rock tunes with live loops and beats. Free. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

Whistler parkrun is a free 5 km community fun run or walk held every Saturday over spring and summer. All levels and abilities welcome, walkers, runners, kids, strollers and dogs. Join us every Saturday at 9 a.m. at Lost Lake Passivehaus. Free. > 9-10 am > Lost Lake Passive Haus

He got your blood pumping last night, now satiate your thirst for amazing cocktails and unique beats with tyMetal’s eclectic DJ feats. No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

DJ Nikky from Vancouver brings the Whistler’s biggest weekend party and best vibe. VIP champagne parades along with the hottest hip hop and remixes! For VIP and guest list, email info@garfinkels.ca. > 10 pm > Garfinkel’s

The Meadows at Pemberton Golf Course 35th Anniversary Party! (1730 Airport Road, Pemberton B.C. 604-894-6197) Join them on Sept. 14 to celebrate their 35th Anniversary with: She Stole My Beer, Marble Canyon, and Steep Creek, plus DJ Foxy Moron. $45. 604-894-6197. > 2-10 pm > The Meadows (Pemberton)

MOUNTAIN MUSE FESTIVAL > Sep 14 > Pemberton (Pemberton)

SUN

9.15

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES, PERMANENT COLLECTION > 1 pm > Audain Art Museum


PIQUECAL WALK AND TALK SERIES, SPECIAL EXHIBITION > 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

COMMUNITY

OPEN MIC JAM NIGHT

An open stage invitation for all who can sing, perform or even just wanna jam out with our house band. Whistler’s longest-running jam night every Sunday at Crystal Lounge. All instruments are provided. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

MUSIC

PATRICK GAVIGAN > 5-7 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

plays together. Movement is encouraged and your preschooler’s early language and literacy development is supported. For more information, please come to the library, call 604-935-8436 or email youthservice@ whistlerlibary.ca. Free. > 10:30 am > Whistler Public Library

MARTINI MONDAY WHISTLER FARMERS’ MARKET

The market hosts an average of 90 local vendors showcasing fresh fruit, produce, artisan crafts and food products. > 11 am-4 pm > Upper Village

RED CHAIR

A proper four-piece rock band playing all your radio favourites and originals. Free. > 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

SUNDAY SESSIONS

PUTTING 4 PUPPIES

Putting 4 Puppies is a mini-golf tournament to raise funds for Whistler Animals Galore. Includes a $500 top prize, best dressed competition, live DJs, silent auction and a sunset patio afterparty at Merlin’s. The event will be held at the Upper Village mini-putt course. > Sep 15 > Upper Village

EVENTS + FESTIVALS

WHISTLER VILLAGE BEER FESTIVAL MAIN EVENT > 12-5 pm > Whistler Olympic Plaza

The best locals’ party in Whistler. > 9 pm > Tapley’s Pub

WHISTLER SINGERS COMMUNITY CHOIR

MEATY MONDAY

Sport and beer—what more do you need? How about a chance to win our famous meat raffle? Proceeds donated to charity. > 9 pm > Tapley’s Pub

COMMUNITY

SUNDAY NIGHT THEORY

tyMetal’s diversified taste translates to deep cuts featuring classics and future gems, guaranteed to tweak your brain stem! No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

The Crystal Lounge hosts trivia every Monday night! Bring your friends and test your knowledge for a night of fun, laughs, prizes and the chance to “burn your bill.” Conditions apply. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

CHAD OLIVER

SPORTS

Ruckus Deluxe singer Chad Oliver hits the Dubh Linn Gate stage with his stellar solo act comprising of amazing covers, and inspiring originals. Free. > 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

> 7:30 am-3 pm > Whistler Blackcomb

MONDAY MIX MADNESS

PATRICK GAVIGAN

He’s top of the food chain and he’ll sweep away the Monday pains. He’ll shock your brain, the one and only DJ Gainz. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

Vancouver-based singer-songwriter formerly of the 99.3FM CFOX Seeds-winning band theTURN. Free. > 5-7 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

THE END

Parallel 49 will be behind the bar serving up the very best of their brews at the Ending Party to the 2019 Beer Festival. With DJs Badge and Bobs spinning, this will be a Jerry’s Disco to remember. > 8 pm > The Living Room @ the Pangea Pod Hotel

SOULFUL SUNDAYS

Soul Club Whistler spinning that funky soul soundtrack. > 9 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

MON

9.16

This drop-in program is for kids two to four years and it focuses on early literacy through music, rhyme, stories and movement. Free. > 10 am > Whistler Public Library

Moe Joe’s is transformed into a psychedelic, UV-infused rave cathedral, as Fidel Cashflow, Zapps and La Dooda cook up an aural feast of house and electro beats. Arrive early to beat the line. > 9 pm > Moe Joe’s

Get your resume reviewed, learn about the local labour market, job search tips, and more. All services are free. For details, call 1-877-932-1611 or go to WhistlerESC.com. > 3-6 pm > Whistler Public Library

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Whistler, how engaged are we? Notable First Nations community leader Linda Epp guides a panel discussion about the meaning of Truth & Reconciliation and how to weave it into daily practice. Then, we break out into smaller groups for a guided conversation. Free. > 5-7 pm > Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre

IPHONE PHOTOGRAPHY

Photography from an iPhone can be high quality and just as admirable as conventional photography. Rory Tucker, a professional photographer with a big Instagram habit, will share tips and techniques to improve your mobile photography, including how to shoot, edit, and share. This class requires an iPhone 5 or newer. Call 604-935-8435 or email publicservices@ whistlerlibrary.ca to claim a spot. > 6-8 pm > Whistler Public Library

MUSIC

COMMUNITY

MUSIC & WORDS

VITAL CAFE: TRUTH & RECONCILIATION

SPORTS

WHISTLER TRI CLUB SWIM SQUAD

> 6-7:15 am > Meadow Park Sports Centre

PATRICK GAVIGAN > 5-7 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

BINGO

Channel your inner granny and dominate bingo at the locals’ living room. > 8 pm > Tapley’s Pub

WORKBC EMPLOYMENT SERVICES DROP IN THE SUNDAY GLOW PARTY

A community choir for adults in the Sea to Sky corridor. Everyone is welcome—no auditions—just the desire to sing with others. A broad range of music is sung from classical to pop tunes. Performances include two formal concerts, plus community events. > 7-9 pm > Myrtle Philip Community Centre

TRIVIA NIGHT

SPARTAN WHISTLER KIDS RACE 2019

MUSIC

> 7:30 pm > Buffalo Bills

TUE

9.17

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

LIVE MUSIC AT BRICKWORKS > 8 pm > Brickworks Public House

RHYME & SONG

This program gives toddlers, parents and caregivers the opportunity to learn songs, rhymes and finger

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67


PIQUECAL BLACK ‘N’ BLUES

Blues night with Sean Rose. > 8 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

WED

SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

9.18

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

JENNAMAE TOGADO

JennaMae Togado, the only Whistler local giving you some acoustic R&B! Soulful, powerful and sultry. Sounds you can vibe out and sing along to. Free. > 8:30-11:30 pm > Brickworks Public House

ALLSORTS

Bringing a wide variety of sounds to your Tuesday evening, ED:WIN will be playing “AllSorts” of music to get you dancing down at Three Below every Tuesday night. Listen to hip hop, R&B, house, garage and disco! Free. > 9 pm-1:30 am > Three Below

CHAD OLIVER

> 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

KARAOKE NIGHT > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

TOMMY TUESDAYS

DJ Dre Morel and weekly guests turning it up every Tuesday night all summer long. Pop, rock and hip hop to crank up your Tuesday night. For guest list and VIP reservations, visit tommyswhistler.com. > 9 pm > Tommys Whistler

TUESDAY TURNTABLISM WITH DJ PRAIZ

Hip hop, drum and bass and jazz mixes that transcend eras, beats that burn hard and sooth like aloe vera. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

SPORTS

WHISTLER CYCLING CLUB TUESDAY RIDES

Whistler Cycling Club rides for A, B and C level road riders. See www.whistlercyclingclub.ca for details. Free with club membership. > 5:15-8 pm > Whistler Village Sports

WALK AND TALK SERIES, PERMANENT COLLECTION > 1 pm > Audain Art Museum

PAGE TO SCREEN: THE GUERNSEY LITERARY & POTATO PEEL PIE SOCIETY

Head to the library for a brand-new movie series, in which they feature book-to-film adaptations! The first book-to-film will be The Guernsey Literary & Potato Peel Pie Society, by Mary Ann Shaffer. Free. > Sep 18, 7-9 pm > Whistler Public Library

COMMUNITY

MAC (MATURE ACTION COMMUNITY) COFFEE/ BRUNCH & CONNECT

This is for the 55-plus community to get together and chat, enjoy coffee/tee and snacks, play cards and board games and we’ll also have occasional guest speakers. Cranked offers any MAC member a 20-per-cent discount on any food or beverage item they order during this event. Feel free to view the “Whistler Mature Action Community” Facebook page or contact Kathy White at chair@whistlermac.org for more details. > 10 am-1 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

INTERACT CLUB OF WHISTLER

Interact is a club for young people ages 12-to-18 who want to make a difference in their community. Mentored by the Rotary Club of Whistler and Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium, the club includes students from Whistler Secondary School, Waldorf, Spring Creek and Myrtle Philip who want to join together to tackle the issues in their community they care most about. > 4-5 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

QUEER WEDNESDAYS

We reserve the prime family-style table by the Ola Volo mural for our LGBTQ2+ family. Get your game (or gay’m) on. > 5-8 pm > The Living Room @ the Pangea Pod Hotel

BOARDS, BEER AND BINGO SEPT 18 PANGEA POD HOTL

STRATEGIES YOUR WELLNESS BRAND NEEDS FOR 2020

Join us for an evening of networking and learning as we invite Lindsay O’Donnell from Piquant Marketing to discuss how wellness brands can get ahead in 2020 with their marketing, sales and growth. This is the perfect event for wellness brands and products that offer online sales or bookings. > 7-9:30 pm > SPACE

INDUSTRY NIGHT

Live music from Neverland Nights. > 6 pm > Buffalo Bills

FOXY GET FUNKY

Whether you know her as DJ Foxy Moron or just Ace, you know she kills it on the vinyl. Join us as this homegirl legend spins you silly. > 8-11 pm > The Living Room @ the Pangea Pod Hotel

BOARDS, BEER AND BINGO

Pow Bingo Night with DJ Foxy Moron. $2 per sheet, prizes for winners. All proceeds go to the Downtown Women’s Centre, which provides homeless women with amenities, food and a safe place to go. > 8 pm > The Living Room @ the Pangea Pod Hotel

JAM NIGHT

Jam Night with Kostaman and friends every Wednesday night from 9 pm. > 9 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

WHISTLER BMX WEEKLY RACES

Whistler BMX races every Tuesday at the track in Cheakamus Crossing. All bikes, all ages, all levels welcome! Registration on site at 5:30 pm and racing starts shortly after 6 pm. Volunteers always needed! $3-$7. > 5:30-7 pm > Whistler BMX Track

WE RUN WHISTLER: GROUP TRAIL RUN

Join us for our weekly run as we explore more of the awesome trails Whistler has to offer. Check our Facebook page (facebook.com/groups/werunwhistler) for weekly updates. Visit werunwhistler.com to plan your September running. #werunwhistler rain or shine! Free. > 5:55 pm >Location TBC - check online for details

68 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

GET TO KNOW THE ROTARY CLUB OF WHISTLER

The Rotary Club of Whistler is inviting interested folks to a Walk and Talk With Wendall, a walking tour of Whistler history highlighting the club’s many contributions to the community over the past 42 years. Meet at Whistler Blackcomb guest relations, followed by refreshments at Black’s at 6 pm. > 5 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

LET’S GET QUIZZICAL

Brush up on your general knowledge for quiz night every Wednesday with Whistler legend, Quizmaster Stache. > 9-11:55 pm > Three Below

WILDIN’ OUT WEDNESDAYS FEATURING DJ GAIN

He’s hot, he’s sicker than your average, Gainz comin’ through mixin’ tracks like a savage. No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

MUSIC SPORTS

MICHAEL FABRO MOUNTAIN SPIRIT WHISTLER TOASTMASTERS

Build communication, public speaking, and leadership skills with Mountain Spirit Whistler Toastmasters. Everyone welcome. > 5:30-7 pm > Pan Pacific Mountain Side

Michael Fabro is a Canadian acoustic pop-rock performance artist. With a focus on crowd-pleasing hits and infectious vocal hooks, the young artist has fused multiple styles into a dynamic live act. Free. > 5-7 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

INDOOR PICKLEBALL DROP-IN > 9:30-11:30 am > Whistler Racquet Club


ASTROLOGY

Free Will Astrology WEEK OF SEPT 12 BY ROB BREZSNY

ARIES (March 21-April 19): John Muir (1838–1914) was skilled at creating and using machinery. In his 20s, he diligently expressed those aptitudes. But at age 27, while working in a carriage parts factory, he suffered an accident that blinded him. For several months, he lay in bed, hoping to recuperate. During that time, Muir decided that if his sight returned, he would thereafter devote it to exploring the beauty of the natural world. The miracle came to pass, and for the rest of his life he travelled and explored the wilds of North America, becoming an influential naturalist, author, and early environmentalist. I’d love to see you respond to one of your smaller setbacks—much less dramatic than Muir’s!—with comparable panache, Aries. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Of all the children on the planet, three per cent live in the U.S. And yet American children are in possession of 40 per cent of the world’s toys. In accordance with astrological omens, I hereby invite you to be like an extravagant American child in the coming weeks. You have cosmic permission to seek maximum fun and treat yourself to zesty entertainment and lose yourself in uninhibited laughter and wow yourself with beguiling games and delightful gizmos. It’s playtime! GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The ama are Japanese women whose job it is to dive to the sea bottom and fetch oysters bearing pearls. The water is usually cold, and the workers use no breathing apparatus, depending instead on specialized techniques to hold their breath. I propose we make them your inspirational role models. The next few weeks will be a favourable time, metaphorically speaking, for you to descend into the depths in quest of valuables and inspirations. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Renowned Cancerian neurologist Oliver Sacks believed that music and gardens could be vital curative agents, as therapeutic as pharmaceuticals. My personal view is that walking in nature can be as medicinal as working and lolling in a garden. As for music, I would extend his prescription to include singing and dancing as well as listening. I’m also surprised that Sacks didn’t give equal recognition to the healing power of touch, which can be wondrously rejuvenating, either in its erotic or non-erotic forms. I bring these thoughts to your attention because I suspect the coming weeks will be a Golden Age of non-pharmaceutical healing for you. I’m not suggesting that you stop taking the drugs you need to stay healthy; I simply mean that music, nature, and touch will have an extra-sublime impact on your well-being. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If you visualize what ancient Rome looked like, it’s possible you draw on memories of scenes you’ve seen portrayed in movies. The blockbuster film Gladiator, starring Russell Crowe and directed by Ridley Scott, may be one of those templates. The weird thing is that Gladiator, as well as many other such movies, was inspired by the grandiose paintings of the ancient world done by Dutch artist Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836– 1912). And in many ways, his depictions were not at all factual. I bring this to your attention, Leo, in the hope that it will prod you to question the accuracy and authenticity of your mental pictures. The coming weeks will be a favourable time to get fuzzy and incorrect memories into closer alignment with the truth, and to shed any illusions that might be distorting your understanding of reality. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I don’t know if the coming weeks will be an Anais Nin phase for you. But they could be if you want them to. It’s up to you whether you’ll dare to be as lyrical, sensual, deep, expressive, and emotionally rich as she was. In case you decide that YES, you will, here are quotes from Nin that might serve you well. 1. It is easy to love and there are so many ways to do it. 2. My mission, should I choose to accept it, is to find peace with exactly who and what I am. 3. I am so thirsty for the marvellous that only the marvellous has power over me. Anything I cannot transform into something marvellous , I let go. 4. Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one’s courage.

5. It was while helping others to be free that I gained my own freedom. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “When you’re nailing a custard pie to the wall, and it starts to wilt, it doesn’t do any good to hammer in more nails.” So advised novelist Wallace Stegner. I hope I’m delivering his counsel in time to dissuade you from even trying to nail a custard pie to the wall—or an omelet or potato chip or taco, for that matter. What might be a better use of your energy? You could use the nails to build something that will actually be useful to you. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “I hid my deepest feelings so well I forgot where I placed them,” wrote author Amy Tan. My Scorpio friend Audrey once made a similar confession: “I buried my secrets so completely from the prying curiosity of other people that I lost track of them myself.” If either of those descriptions apply to you, Scorpio, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to secure a remedy. You’ll have extra power and luck if you commune with and celebrate your hidden feelings and buried secrets. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “No Eden valid without serpent.” Novelist Wallace Stegner wrote that pithy riff. I think it’s a good motto for you to use in the immediate future. How do you interpret it? Here’s what I think. As you nourish your robust vision of paradise-on-earth, and as you carry out the practical actions that enable you to manifest that vision, it’s wise to have some creative irritant in the midst of it. That bug, that question, that tantalizing mystery is the key to keeping you honest and discerning. It gives credibility and gravitas to your idealistic striving. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The coco de mer is a palm tree that grows in the Seychelles. Its seed is huge, weighing as much as 18 kilograms and having a diameter of 48 centimetres. The seed takes seven years to grow into its mature form, then takes an additional two years to germinate. Everything I just said about the coco de mer seed reminds me of you, Capricorn. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you’ve been working on ripening an awesome seed for a long time, and are now in the final phase before it sprouts. The Majestic Budding may not fully kick in until 2020, but I bet you’re already feeling the enjoyable, mysterious pressure. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): If you throw a pool ball or a bronze Buddha statue at a window, the glass will break. In fact, the speed at which it fractures could reach 4,828 kilometres per hour. Metaphorically speaking, your mental blocks and emotional obstacles are typically not as crackable. You may smack them with your angry probes and bash them with your desperate pleas, yet have little or no effect. But I suspect that in the coming weeks, you’ll have much more power than usual to shatter those vexations. So I hereby invite you to hurl your strongest blasts at your mental blocks and emotional obstacles. Don’t be surprised if they collapse at unexpectedly rapid speeds. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In the 13th century, the Italian city of Bologna was serious about guarding the integrity of its cuisine. In 1250, the cheese guild issued a decree proclaiming, “If you make fake mortadella . . . your body will be stretched on the rack three times, you will be fined 200 gold coins, and all the food you make will be destroyed.” I appreciate such devotion to purity and authenticity and factualness. And I recommend that in the coming weeks, you commit to comparable standards in your own sphere. Don’t let your own offerings be compromised or corrupted. The same with the offerings you receive from other people. Be impeccable. [Editor: Here’s this week’s homework:] Homework: Saul Bellow wrote, “Imagination is a force of nature. Is this not enough to make a person full of ecstasy?” Do you agree? FreeWillAstrology.com

In addition to this column, Rob Brezsny creates

EXPANDED AUDIO HOROSCOPES

In-depth weekly forecasts designed to inspire and uplift you. To buy access, phone 1-888-499-4425. Once you’ve chosen the Block of Time you like, call 1-888-682-8777 to hear Rob’s forecasts. www.freewillastrology.com

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR A STRUCTURAL CHANGE TO A LIQUOR LICENCE ESTABLISHMENT LOCATION: 2131 Lake Placid Road LICENCE TYPE: Liquor Primary APPLICANT: Nita Lake Lodge Nita Lake Lodge’s Cure Lounge and Patio is a liquor primary licensed establishment seeking to add liquor service to the Lodge’s spa esthetics area on the ground floor. The licensee has applied to the Liquor and Cannabis Regulation Branch to increase capacity to allow for a maximum of 30 patrons in this spa space. No changes to the hours of liquor service are proposed. Residents and owners of businesses may comment by writing to: Planning Department Resort Municipality of Whistler 4325 Blackcomb Way Whistler, BC V8E 0X5 PETITIONS WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED. To ensure the consideration of your views, your written comments must be received on or before October 10th, 2019. Your name(s) and residence address (or business address if applicable) must be included. Please note that your comments may be made available to the applicant and local government officials as required to administer the licence process. SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

69


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A C C O M M O D AT I O N LISTINGS, DEFINED: Long Term Rentals

Monthly rental accommodation that is available to local renters for a minimum of 12 months.

REAL ESTATE OUT OF TOWN AMAZING LAKE FRONT CABIN ON LILLOOET LAKE $240,000

Shopping and Donation hours: 11am - 6pm, 7 days a week 8000 Nesters Road 604-932-1121

Short Term Rentals

Monthly or seasonal rental accommodation that is available to local renters for less than 12 months, or where the rental price varies throughout the year. Foxy, sexy, raven haired, olive skinned Mediterranean beauty available for sensual massage sessions. Enquire for further information, availability and rates text/call: (604)262-5183

Vacation Rentals

Nightly and/or weekly rental accommodation, available to visitors over a short period of time.

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS

Come visit our showroom for all your renovation and supply needs For Free consults and Quotes call 604-935-8825 Located in function junction mariomarble@shawbiz.ca

1 Acre, 100 Feet of Water Front, Dock, Wood Stove, Fireplace, Demand Hot Water, Propane Stove, Propane Heater, Solar Panel, 1 Bed Plus Loft, Shower and Tub. Crown Lease. Go to www.grandmanor.ca/cabin for Pictures. Email grandmanorguesthouse@gmail.com 604-812-2715 grandmanorguesthouse@gmail.com http://www.grandmanor.ca/cabin

BUSINESS FOR SALE Looking to Sell Taxi Winter Business License- 6 months from November to April, which is a part of Whistler Taxi. It covers 11 shifts per week and selling with vehicle, 2013 Toyota Prius fully equipped as a taxi. Selling both for $30 000 OBO. Taxi has potential to generate $35 000 or more for a season. For further information please call at 604-902-0619 or e-mail at oksanaukr@yahoo.com.

持持持持持持持持持持

Come and visit Whistler’s funkiest thrift store and get (almost) everything you need for your EPIC season! Winter clothes, skis, boards, boots, bindings, goggles, toques and more! As well as all the usual stuff to make that rented closet feel like a palace. You may even find some hidden treasure you never knew needed.

Re-Build-It Centre

Furniture, appliances, kitchen cabinets, doors, plumbing, tools, flooring, hardware, lumber, lighting and more! Open 10am-5pm, 7 days a week 1003 Lynham Road, Function Junction 604-932-1125 Recycle, Re-build and Re-invest in your community. All proceeds support 28 programs and services such as the food bank, outreach services, and counseling assistance offered by Whistler Community Services. www.mywcss.org Like us on Facebook @ Whistler Community Service Society

GARAGE SALES PEMBERTON

Garage Sale,

Showroom #103-1010 Alpha Lake Rd.

FLOORING

SHAW CARPET & FLOOR CENTRE

Family owned & operated

Open Monday through Friday 8:30 - 4:30 Saturday 10:00 -4:00 Sundays and Evenings by appointment only. 3-1365 Alpha Lake Road Whistler, B.C, V0N1B1 Phone 604-938-1126 email shawcarpet@shaw.ca

Sat. Sept.14 • 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

long term rental management services

ALWAYS HIRING ALWAYS HIRING

STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! DEALERS AND BIKINI CLAD CADDIES. ESCORTS MAKE ANY PARTY AMAZING!! STRIPPERS TOPLESS BLACKJACK DEALERS 6 0SEXY 4 -SKI9 INSTRUCTORS! 38-6456 For the Time of Your Life! MAKE ANY PARTY AMAZING! www.roxysinwhistler.com

604 -938 - 6 4 56 For the Time of Your Life!

roxysinwhistler.com roxys_in_whistler

Property Owners seeking Annual or Seasonal Rental Income from screened Tenants, please contact one of our 6 Rental Agents to discuss revenue, services & fees.

simon Westwood 604-967-1195 simon@WhistlerProperty.com Forrest chittick 604-902-7178 forrest@WhistlerProperty.com rosie Blaser 604-932-8864 rosie@WhistlerProperty.com

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MARKETPLACE

HOME SERVICES BUILDING AND RENOVATIONS

WHISTLER FURNITURE CO

BEDS IN STOCK! SAME DAY DELIVERY! MATTRESSES-BUNK BEDSSOFA BEDS-CUSTOM SOFAS

Helene Huang 604-902-0608 helene@WhistlerProperty.com Duane Kercher 604-932-7849 duane@WhistlerProperty.com

VIEW AVAILABLE RENTAL LISTINGS AT:

WhistlerProperty.com 70 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

Tools, Collectibles and MUCH more.

FURNITURE

licenseD rental agents:

CLEANING

1360 Fernwood St. Pemberton

Queen mattresses from $289.99 Bunk Beds from $699.99 Sofa beds from $1099.99

NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

whistlerfurniture.ca 2-1020 Millar Creek Road

604.938.4285

Wiebe Construction Services Serving Whistler for over 25 years

VACATION RENTAL CLEANING & PROPERTY MAINTENANCE Housekeeping - daily, weekly monthly Move in/out & Construction Cleaning IICRC Professional carpet cleaning Caretaker Services FRIEND US ON:

CALL SARA

604.848.8987 sara@goldmedalcleaning.ca goldmedalcleaning.ca

MOVING AND STORAGE

• Kitchen and Bath • Renovations & Repairs • Drywall • Painting • Finishing • Minor Electrical & Plumbing

Ray Wiebe 604.935.2432 Pat Wiebe 604.902.9300 raymondo99.69@gmail.com

big or small we do it all! Call 604-902-MOVE www.alltimemoving.ca


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HOME SERVICES

HEALTH & WELLBEING

HEALTH & WELLBEING

Services

Community

MOVING AND STORAGE

MOVING AND STORAGE

COUNSELLING

SALON & SPA

GENERAL NOTICES

ReStoRAtion

We Added More Containers!

WALSH StoRAge

SPACE NOW AVAILABLE!

+ Central Location,

Pemberton Industrial Park 1944 Stone Cutter Place Owner Residence On-Site

5 Minutes North of Whistler Village Shipping Containers + Insulated With 1.5” Foam Ceiling, Walls and Doors + Pre-wired 20-Amp Service With Overhead Light, Duplex Plug and Heater on Shelf

8 x 10 COntAIneRS

100

$

+ tax per month

2 hRS fRee tRuCk tIMe

160

Overhead Doors, Light, No Heat now available + Paved, 24/7 fenced & gated access.

CONTACT

604.966.8080 8080Nesters@telus.net www.nestersstorage.ca

Website: ashlintippercounselling.com Email: ashlintippercounselling@gmail.com Phone: (604) 916 8979

one month *

free

OPEN / 7 DAYS WEEK

* PREPAY 3 MONTHS GET 4TH FREE

604.932.1948

1209 Alpha Lake Rd., Function Junction

www.a1ulock.com

NORTHLANDS

STORAGE STORAGE SPACE AVAILABLE

BEST PRICES IN WHISTLER FURNITURE, CARS, BOATS & MOTORCYCLES ETC STORAGE AVAILABLE

BEST

PRICES

Call Mike Walsh

mike.walsh@walshrestoration.ca

WHISTLER’S #1 NEWS SOURCE

SERVICES

Grrrls’ Boot Camp

Youth, young adults, adults, family therapy and sport performance counselling.

Parent and Baby Fitness,

MEETING PLACE

Mon & Fri, 10:30-11:30 am

Welcome Centre at Whistler Public Library - Information, support, community connections and ESL practice groups for newcomers and immigrants. Meet people, make connections, volunteer, build your communication skills in English. Multicultural Meet Up every Friday 9.3012pm.604-698-5960 info@welcomewhistler. com FB: WhistlerWelcomeCentre

P: 604-935-0968 E: Greg@McdonnellCounselling.ca W: McdonnellCounselling.ca

Mondays, 4:15-5 pm

Barre Sculpt Tues & Thurs, 10:30-11:30 am

Barre Fit Wed, 11:45-12:45 pm

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

TRAVELLING? EXCESS BAGGAGE? INTERNATIONAL SHIPPING?

27%

Rational, Compassionate Psychotherapy

Spin and Pump www.whistlerwag.com

Thurs, 6:45-7:45 pm www.whistler.ca/recreation 604-935-PLAY (7529)

WHISTLER’S #1 NEWS SOURCE

info@mannixfreight.com Let us send them home for you while you travel the world! www.mannixfreight.com

VOLUNTEERS Big Brothers, Big Sisters Sea to Sky Volunteer to Mentor- just 1hr/week - and make a difference in a child's life. Call 604892-3125.

SPORTS & ACTIVITIES

EXPERIENCE THE DIFFERENCE... Services

HEALTH & WELLBEING PHYSICAL THERAPY

Sally John Physiotherapy ONE-ON-ONE PHYSICAL-THERAPY

REGISTERED PHYSIOTHERAPIST

BIOELECTRIC MASSAGE, BIOELECTRIC FACIALS + MYOFASCIAL RELEASE APPROACH

FALL SPECIAL

90 min. $35 off any + treatment

body & mind

• CHINESE MEDICINE • ENERGY WORK • RELIEVE CHRONIC AND ACUTE PAIN AND INJURIES • REVITALIZE THE MIND•BODY•SPIRIT • DECREASE SIGNS OF AGING

indulge in a spa day this september

IN HOME PHYSIOTHERAPY AVAILABLE

locals discount available for all regular priced spa treatments ask our team for further details

17 years of making orthotics

OUT NOW!

@TheSpaAtNitaLakeLodge

2131 lake placid road

‘Sally John Physiotherapy’

Lum

located at Nita Lake Lodge free parking and village shuttle

2997 Alpine Cresent (Alta Vista) www.sallyjohnphysiotherapy.com

enjoy our organic 60-minute body scrub with massage for only $130 available daily, september 1st - 30th not valid for RMT or with any other package or discount.

CUSTOM-MADE ORTHOTICS at competitive prices for ski boots & shoes, including training shoes.

(604) 698-6661

nita reset

Valid until Oct. 1st when you mention this ad! Friday through Wednesday.

IN WHISTLER

604.932.1968

604 905 8347

as recommended by:

MASSAGE BEST STORAGE

TEXT OR CALL

M.Ed., RCC, SEP CREATE CHANGE

MANNIX FREIGHT SERVICE WHISTLER’S

U.S.

4 hRS fRee tRuCk tIMe

+ Limited Number 10’x8’ Containers,

ETHICAL · LUXURY

Exchange Rate

Emotional distress can be difficult to manage on your own. The goal of Ashlin Tipper Counselling is to promote health and happiness by providing welcoming, kind, supportive, non-judgmental, goal-oriented, practical, clinically-based emotional support.

+ tax per month

604 698 0054

ROTARY CLUBS OF WHISTLER & PEMBERTON

Pemberton Rotary Club at the Pemberton Community Centre, Wednesdays at 7:15am www.pembertonrotary.ca

E

8 x 20 COntAIneRS

$

NOTICES

Tuesdays at 7:15 a.m. BG Urban Grill: 604-905-5090 & Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. at the Pan Pacific, Mountainside. www.whistler-rotary.org

USE A WALSH CUBE TRUCK FOR FREE TO MOVE YOUR POSSESSiOnS TO WALSH STORAgE

8080 Nesters Road Whistler, BC

+ 20’ (one-trip)

H A I R S T U D I O

LO V

STORAGE

THE V.I.P LOUNGE

WALSH

SELL

SEL F

8080 NESTERS

Services

RENT

www.RevitalizeMeWhistler.com

604-902-8092

604 966 5715

Whistler’s only dedicated wedding magazine. WHISTLERWEDDINGMAGAZINE.COM

www.nitalakelodge.com

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

71


new weight of ‘WEST’ letters new blue colour

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EDUCATION

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

CLASSES & COURSES

orginal

45 HRS 122 West is seeking an energetic individual to join our team as our full time cashier and customer service attendant. The job is retail oriented with a strong focus on furniture and décor. REQUIREMENTS: • Exceptional customer service skills • Excellent computer skills • Retail experience is preferred • Experience with visual merchandising is preferred • Able to learn quickly and retain detailed information • Be a contributor to the overall 122 West team Full-time Hours: Wednesday to Sunday Please submit a resume to sales@122west.ca or in person: in store at 321-2063 Lake Placid Rd. Tuesday-Thursday, 10am-6pm. We thank all applicants for their interest; however only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

We’re looking for great people to join our team! If you are passionate about food and creating great culinary experiences, we may have the perfect fit for you.

Now Hiring:

Kitchen and Support Staff We hire great people, train them well and provide plenty of opportunities to learn and grow. It’s part of the reason we’ve been named among the Top 50 Employers in Canada since 2003. If you are hardworking and enjoy working in a fast-paced environment, apply today at The Keg Steakhouse + Bar in Whistler Village.

SERVICE TECHNICIAN

Please reply to alpinelock@telus.net with a resume and cover letter outlining your suitability and qualifications for the position. No drop-ins or phone calls please, apply only by email.

 Planning & budgeting  Customer journey  Understand value proposition & 4 P’s Available as part of our Marketing & Media Management Program

NEXT CLASS STARTS: OCTOBER

On successful completion you will receive a WAS Certificate.

Contact us to reserve your space. info@WhistlerAdventureSchool.com

WhistlerAdventureSchool.com

604.962.2220 COMMUNITY LISTINGS

Great opportunity for a super motivated/organized person to excel in the field of hardware installation and lock technician services.

The successful individual will have experience in carpentry and/or building maintenance. Any experience in low voltage electrical and/or hotel card access systems will prove very beneficial. Good communication and customer service skills as well as a strong work ethic are essential to this position.

The highlights of the course are:  Marketing measurement & KPI’s  Key strategy & branding components

Applicants may apply in person daily between 3pm and 5pm and/or email their resume to whistler@kegrestaurants.com

Compensation starting at $24-$30 depending on skill level. Includes: Health Benefits, Mobile Phone Plan, Ski Pass

MARKETING STRATEGY

ARTS & CULTURE Arts Whistler - Full arts & culture listings. Comprehensive artist directory & programs, events & performances year-round. For info 604-935-8410 or visit www.artswhistler.com

is currently hiring for the following positions:

Excavator opErator class 1 truck DrivEr loaDEr opErator Please send resume to

admin@tktcontracting.ca

Pemberton Arts Council - Connect with other artists, writers, artisans, musicians & help make Pemberton a vibrant arts community. Call 604-452-0123 or visit www. pembertonartscouncil.com Pemberton Writers - Meet with other writers to review and critique monthly. Opportunities for writing in a comfortable and creative setting. Email crowley7@telus. net

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE Sea to Sky Singers - Invites new & former members to join us for an exciting new term, the spring & fall terms culminate with a concert. Choir meets Tues, 7-9pm at Squamish Academy of Music, 2nd Ave. Veronica seatoskysingers@gmail.com or 604-892-7819 www.seatoskysingers.net

NORTH ARM FARM

Whistler Community Band - Rehearsals on Tuesdays 7 - 8:15 pm CONTACT whistlerchorus@gmail.com FOR LOCATION

Staffing up for Thanksgiving season

Line Cook

CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS

Front of House Service

Donate Used Clothing & Household Goods- To be distributed to local charities by Sharon 604-894-6656 for pick up.

Daytime with some evening events. Truly local, absolutely Family. Passion required. Experience valued. Info@northarmfarm.com 604 894 5379 or come and introduce yourself

72 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

Playground Builders: Creating Play Building Hope - Playground Builders is a registered charity that builds playgrounds for children in war-torn areas. Learn more, volunteer or donate at www. playgroundbuilders.org


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THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Sea to Sky Community Services - running dozens of programs in Whistler to help people through times of crisis and with everyday challenges. www.sscs.ca 1-877892-2022 admin@sscs.ca Stewardship Pemberton Society and the One Mile Lake Nature Centre- Connecting community, nature and people through education, cooperation, and community involvement. www.stewardshippemberton. com Whistler Health Care Foundation raises funds for improving health care resources and services. New board members welcomed. Contact us at info@ whistlerhealthcarefoundation.org or call Karen at 604-906-1435.

The Sweetest Job In Town! We’re Hiring! For the right candidate we offer a Ski Pass and Competitive Wages.

Full time & part time positions available. Work in a fun environment and with a great team!

SPORTS & RECREATION Alpine Club of Canada Whistler Section - Outdoor club focused on ski/split board touring, hiking, mountaineering and skills training. More info: accwhistler.ca Trip Schedule: accwhistler.ca/trips/

Apply in person with resume at our store in Whistler’s Marketplace. Staff accommodation in village available for select staff. GreatGlassElevatorCandyShop.com

CARPENTERS / FRAMERS WANTED • 4 on 3 off or 5 on 2 off a week depending on your preference. • Medical and Dental Benefits. • Good potential for future growth within the company. • Competitive wages. • Looking for journeymen, lead hands and assistants. • Currently hiring carpenters for framing and concrete forming projects - high end estate home/commercial and residential mix between Whistler/Pemberton.

Please send resume to admin@thorworksconstruction.com Or call Brandon: (604) 902-8467 Or both.

Griffin Squadron Squamish Air CadetsOpen to youth 12-18yrs at Don Ross Secondary School on Tues at 6:30pm. Pemberton Valley Trails AssociationMeets the second Wed of each month. 7pm at the Pemberton Recreation Centre. Call 604-698-6158 Sea to Sky RC Flyers - Model Aeronautics Association of Canada Club active in the Sea to Sky Region flying model airplanes, helicopters and multi-rotors. Contact S2SRCFLY@telus.net Whistler Adaptive Sports Program Provides sports & recreation experiences for people with disabilities. Chelsey Walker at 604-905-4493 or info@whistleradaptive. com Whistler Martial Arts offers - Kishindo Karate for kids age 4 and up, Capoeira and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu for kids and adults. Also Kickboxing, Judo, Yoga and Bellyfit for adults. Call Cole 932-2226 Women's Karma Yoga - Thursdays, 9-10, ongoing by donation and childminding provided. Whistler Women's Centre: 1519 Spring Creek Drive. Drop-in for weekly yoga classes led by an all female team of certified yoga instructors. All women, all ability levels welcome. hswc.ca | 604-962-8711

EXCITING CAREER OPPORTUNITIES APPLY TODAY! Diamond Resorts Canada Ltd., Whistler, BC

Tour Receptionist & Transport Coordinator (Full Time) Eligible successful candidates may receive*: • Extensive benefits package which may include; ski pass or wellness allowance, disability coverage, travel insurance and extended health and dental. • Discounted employee rates at any Diamond Resort International resort. • Full-time work year round and a FUN work environment. *eligibility and conditions based on DRCL policies and practices set out in general terms and conditions of employment.

Email your resume with the position you wish to apply for to: embarc_hr@diamondresorts.com

CARPENTERS & APPRENTICE CARPENTERS Opportunity to become a part of a great team Competitive wage Long term full time work available Apprenticeship opportunities Sponsorship opportunities To apply email randy@ringmaster.ca or call 604-916-0087

Resort Municipality of Whistler YOUTH ACTIVITIES 1st Whistler Scout Group - outdoor & adventure program for girls and boys aged 5-17. Times and locations vary. More info: http://1stwhistlerscoutgroup. webs.com. Contact scoutsatwhistler @gmail.com or 604-966-4050. Whistler Children's Chorus Rehearsal Tuesdays at MILLENNIUM PLACE (4 - 5:30 pm) contact whistlerchorus@gmail.com Whistler/Pemberton Girl Guides Adventures for Girls age 5 & up. Sparks & Brownies (Gr K,1,2,3) Guides (Gr 4,5,6) Volunteers always welcome. coastmountaingirlguides@gmail.com

Employment Opportunities · Capital Projects Supervisor, Facility Construction Management · Program Leader · Senior Planner · Lifeguard/Swim Instructor · Operator Trainee - Utilities Group · Wastewater Operator Resort Municipality of Whistler whistler.ca/careers

Refreshingly Unique & Affordable

ASSISTANT MANAGER & SALES ASSOCIATE We are looking for a reliable, self-motivated individual who loves to work with people. Shifts would vary including alternating weekends once fully trained. Previous retail and merchandising experience preferred. What we offer: Awesome work environment, Competitive salary, bonuses & the opportunity to work where you live, while saving time and money ($2 p/h) on your commute! If you want to work with an amazing team email your resume to: smallpotatoesbazaar@telus.net 104-7445 FRONTIER STREET, PEMBERTON, BC 604-894-6002 LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

73


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EXCLUSIVE LUXURY LAND ROVER EXCURSIONS

COMMUNITY LISTINGS YOUTH ACTIVITIES Whistler Youth Centre - Drop - in: Fridays 3:30 - 11 PM & Saturdays 6 - 10 PM for ages 13 - 18. Located downstairs in the Maury Young Arts Centre (formerly Millenium Place). We offer: a Ping pong table, Pool table, Skateboard mini ramp w. skateboards and helmets to borrow, Free Wi-Fi, Xbox One, PS3 & PS4, Guitars, Board games, Projector and widescreen TV's. Facebook THEYC Crew, www.whistleryouthcentre. com or call 604-935-8187.

FULL TIME / PART TIME

Red Door Bistro is looking for

NATURE TOUR GUIDE

BUS PERSONS DISHWASHERS Full time and part time available.

Competitive wages, tips, and staff meal every shift. Staff discounts at Roland’s Pub.

Guide Income ranges from $25 to $35+ per hour

LEISURE GROUPS Duplicate Bridge Club- Whistler Racquet Club reconvenes in late fall. The club meets every week and visitors are welcome. For partner, please call Gill at 640-932-5791.

QUALIFICATIONS: • Must have BC Class 5 drivers license • Wildlife Tour Guiding & Outdoor photography skills are a bonus

Knitty Gritty Knit Night- Held every Tues 6-8pm. Free evening open to everyone with a love for knitting/crocheting. Beginners welcome. For location and further details email knittygrittywhistler@gmail.com or find us on facebook.

* If you are passionate about wildlife & nature, we can train you!

Apply in person with resume or email to info@reddoorbistro.ca

Please forward resumes to info@whistlerdiscoverytours.com

Coast Mountain Veterinary Services is looking for, Full-Time Receptionist Veterinary Technician/Assistant at our hospital in Creekside.

JOIN THE MONGOLIE CREW! We are hiring full time & part time:

Candidates for Vet Tech or Nurse/Assistant position must have experience monitoring hospitalized patients (administering fluids, medications, recording vitals, etc) taking radiographs, assisting with venipuncture, processing laboratory samples etc.

PART TIME BARTENDER GRILL COOKS HOSTS

Equally as important is a great attitude and someone that works well with a team to deliver exceptional service to our clients and the highest level of medical care to our patients.

(PART TIME & FULL TIME) Hourly wage + tips, flexible schedule, fun & fast-paced work environment, staff meals. Learn how to cook with flair!

Please forward your resume and cover letter if you are interested in this position to Jonathan Kirby,

Send your resume to careers@mongoliegrill.com Or drop off your resume in person before 5pm!

Mountain Spirit Toastmasters- Builds communication, public speaking, and leadership skills . Wednesdays at the Pan Pacific Mountainside - Singing Pass Room, 5:30-7pm. Email contact - 8376@ toastmastersclubs.org www.whistler. toastmastersclubs.org

Pemberton Women's Institute - Meets the third Mon of each month in the activity room at St. David's United Church at 7:30pm. New members welcome. Linda Ronayne at 604-894-6580

Rotary Club of Whistler - Meets Tuesdays AM & PM www.whistler-rotary.org

Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium Meets every Thurs at 12:15pm at Pan Pacific Mountainside. 604-932-7782

Shades of Grey Painters Meets twice a week - Tuesdays, Watercolour, 11.00am-2.30pm @ The Rec, Pemberton. Thursdays, Acrylic, 1.00pm-3.30pm @ The Amenities Building, Pioneer Village, Pemberton. We are like-minded people that get together & paint. Gretchen is the painting coach. $5 to attend.

jonathan@coastvet.com Whistler Reads - Meets to discuss a new book every eight weeks. Go to bookbuffet. com & click on Whistler Reads for the latest book/event. Paula at 604-907-2804 or wr@ bookbuffet.com

DOUG BUSH SURVEY SERVICES LTD. is looking for a

SURVEY FIELD TECHNICIAN With a two or three year college or technical school program in geomatics. Three years experience and proficient in the use of robotic survey instruments and GPS equipment for engineering and building construction layout, topographic site surveys, site improvement surveys and precise monitoring. Experience with AutoCAD Civil 3D also an asset to assist in office with computations and drawing preparation. Please call Ian @ 604-932-3314 or email @ ian@dbss.ca #18-1370 Alpha Lake Rd. Whistler BC V0N 1B1 Serving Squamish, Whistler and Pemberton

74 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

COMMUNITY CENTRES

GUEST SERVICES AGENT

Pinnacle Hotel Whistler has an opening for a full time or part time guest services agent. We are looking for a customer service professional who will help our guest enjoy their experience at our hotel. Duties include check in and checkout of guests, concierge and reservations. Experience preferred but we will train the right person. Please contact Roger Dix   rdix@pinnaclehotels.ca or ph: 604-938-3218

Maury Young Arts Centre - Whistler's community centre for arts, culture & inspiration. Performance theatre, art gallery, daycare, youth centre, meditation room, meeting facilities. www.artswhistler.com or 604-935-8410

Pemberton & District Community Centre - Located at 7390 Cottonwood St. Fitness Centre, facility rentals, spray park, playground, children, youth, adult & seniors programs. For more info 604-894-2340 or pemrecinfo@slrd.bc.ca


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MUSEUMS

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Pemberton and District Museum and Archives Society - Located at 7455 Prospect St. Open: May to Nov annually from 10am-5pm. Guided tours and activities for all ages. Join us for "Tea & Tales" every Tuesday at 2pm in July and August. Some seasonal closures. Closed on holidays. www.pembertonmuseum.org

PM Server Assistant In Room Dining Server Steward Front Desk Agent Concierge Security Officer Commis2 Commis3 Pastry Commis2

Squamish Lil'wat Cultural Centre Explore First Nations Art Galleries, and Interactive Exhibits. Gift Shop & Cafe are in our admission free area. Open Tuesday'sSunday's per week. 10am-5p.m..

Whistler Museum & Archives Society Explore interactive exhibits, listen to local stories & discover Whistler's journey. Open daily 11am-5pm, 4333 Main St. www. whistlermuseum.org or 604-932-2019

Chef de Partie Bell Attendant Guestroom Attendant Purchasing Receiver Private Residence Receptionist Private Residence Door Attendant Shuttle Driver Spa Attendant

The Four Seasons team is looking for these roles to start immediately.

PROFESSIONAL NETWORKING

$500 signing bonus available for all hires

Whistler Breakfast Club Meets monthly at 6:45-8:30am at Whistler Chamber office. Offering a chance for business owners to meet and "speed network" with other business owners to build their circle of contacts and collaborators in the Sea 2 Sky Corridor. Learn more at facebook.com/ whistlerbreakfastclub

Details:

PICK UP YOUR COPY TODAY

Come Grow Sport with us at our Whistler Olympic Legacy Venues

FOR SENIORS Activate & Connect - Come join us Thursday mornings 9:30am to 11:00am at Whistler Community Services for a weekly drop in program for seniors 50+. Everyone welcome, in partnership with Mature Action Community. www.mywcss.org

Mature Action Community (MAC) - Represents seniors in Whistler and welcomes new members. MAC meets for fun and interaction with local seniors and those just visiting on Thursday mornings from 9:30 to 11:00 a.m. at the Whistler Community Services Community Room for Activate and Connect. Come join us for coffee and socializing while engaging in fun activities. Check us out at www.whistlermac. org or view our schedule on Facebook Whistler Mature Action Community Group page.

Whistler Premier Resorts, Whistler’s leading property management firm is currently recruiting! What We Offer You:

Competitve Wages Health & Wellness Benefits Full Time/Part Time Positions Supportive Team Environment Current Career Opportunities:

• GUEST SERVICES AGENT • • GUEST SERVICES SUPERVISOR • APPLY TODAY AT PEOPLE@WHISTLERPREMIER.COM

Outreach Services - Free confidential support for adults dealing with the challenges of social wellness. Please call our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker.

Pemberton Men's Shed - Weekly social meetings WED. 11-2 in the Seniors/youth Rec. bldg. beside library. Social meeting with BYO Bag lunch, card games and pool/ snooker. Help out in YOUR community, operating the Pemberton Tool Library.

Incentive Bonus and Ask about accommodation.

Women of Whistler - Group that provides opportunities for Whistler businesswomen to network, gain knowledge & share ideas in a friendly, relaxed environment. Learn more at www.womenofwhistler.com

We offer competitive wages, a unique environment, seasonal bonuses, staff discounts and benefits.

Whistler Chamber of Commerce - Is the leading business association in Whistler that works to create a vibrant & successful economy. Learn more about the programs & services at www.whistlerchamber.com

Please apply online via jobs.fourseasons.com

Spirit Pass Financing Available

For seasonal full time roles Check our website for seasonal opportunities at our 3 venues Visit our website to view current postings and to apply: www.whistlersportlegacies.com/careers

www.whistlerwag.com

Lost and Found? If you spot a stray animal or have lost an animal, call WAG at 604-935-8364. WAG operates a lost and found service to help reunite lost pets with their families.

WEST ELECTRIC IS HIRING:

Service Electrician and Apprentices email resumes to: office@westelectric.ca SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

FOR SENIORS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Senior Citizen Organizations - Is an advocacy group devoted to improving the quality of life for all seniors. Ernie Bayer 604576-9734 or ecbayer2@gmail.com

ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY

ResortQuest Whistler is currently hiring:

· Night Audit

START YOUR HOSPITALITY ADVENTURE TODAY! We are currently recruiting for the following positions:

Room Attendant

· Maintenance · Room inspector Benefits include - activity allowance, extended medical, RRSP match, opportunities for growth and more. To apply for this opportunity, please specify the position and email your resume and cover letter to: beth.fraser@resortquestwhistler.com We thank all applicants for their interest but only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

Overnight In-Room-Dining Server Night Cleaner, Stewarding Dishwasher

$500 SIGNING BONUS FOR ALL HIRES STAFF HOUSING AVAILABLE | SKI PASS DISCOUNT WELLNESS ALLOWANCE | GLOBAL HOTEL STAY DISCOUNTS COMPETITIVE WAGES | EXTENDED MEDICAL BENEFITS GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT FOR FULL DETAILS AND TO APPLY, PLEASE VISIT:

WHISTLER

Scandinave Spa is recruiting for the following positions:

Spa Assistant Director WHAT YOU’RE BRINGING • Commitment and Dedication

• Work with a great team • Enjoy discounts at Aura Restaurant, Cure Lounge and Fix Café • Recieve staff rates at our award winning spa • Staff accommodation available • Free parking Current positions include: Room Attendant, Barista, Banquet Captain, Banquet Server, Server Assistant, Expediter, Steward and Garde Manger

Visit www.nitalakelodge.com/careers to learn more

• Your own unique experience

Re-Build-It Centre - Daily 10:00am to 5:00pm. Accepting donations of furniture, quality used building supplies & new items. Deliveries and pickups available for $35. Call 604.932.1125, www.mywcss.org, rebuildit@ mywss.org Regional Recycling - Recycle beverage containers (full deposit paid) electronics, appliances, batteries, Lightbulbs, drop-off times are 9am-5pm on Nesters Rd. Pick up service 604-932-3733 Re-Use-It - Daily 11:00am to 6:00pm, Donate all household goods in good shape. Accepting bottles & cans, old electronics, anything with a cord, and light fixtures for recycling. All proceeds to WCSS. Call 604.932.1121, www.mywcss.org, reuseit@ mywcss.org. The Association of Whistler Area Residents for the Environment (AWARE) Whistler's Natural Voice since 1989. Regular events, project and volunteer opportunities. www.awarewhistler.org info@awarewhistler.org The Mountain Village Social Gathering Join us at one of our regular social gatherings on the last Wednesday of every month. There is a group of us at The Mountain Village who are forming a sustainable, multi generational neighbourhood based on the co housing model. WHAT IF... Housing wasn't just a place to live, but rather, a way of life? To find out more, visit our Facebook page @themountainvillage or go to our website www.themountainvillage.ca

• Teamwork and interpersonal skills • Effective leadership and management skills

FAMILY RESOURCES

WHAT WE ARE OFFERING • Bath access anytime for you and a friend • Free yoga classes • Extended health benefits • Free massage after 3 months probation • Subsidized staff accommodation • Great work environment focused on work life balance Don’t miss out. Apply now at https://www.scandinave.com/en/careers/location/whistler/

SUBSCRIPTIONS - 52 $76.70/YEAR

CANADA - REGULAR MAIL

ISSUES

$136.60/YEAR

CANADA - COURIER

$605.80/YEAR USA - COURIER

PAY BY MASTERCARD, VISA OR AMEX. TEL. 604-938-0202 | FAX. 604-938-0201

76 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

Healthy Home, Healthy Planet - Expert in green cleaning offers tricks, info & advice on the best way to green clean your home or work space! Call France 604-698-7479. Free private presentation on request. www. healthylivingwhistler.com

Housekeeping Houseperson

SCANDINAVE SPA

We think that you’ll LOVE working at Nita Lake Lodge!

Earthsave Whistler - Providing info & support to people who are interested in making healthier, greener, more peaceful food choices. earthsavewhistler.com

Baby/Child Health Clinics - Free routine immunizations & newly licensed vaccines for purchase, growth & development assessments & plenty of age appropriate resources avail. By appointment 604-9323202 Camp Fund - Provides financial assis-tance to enable children of financially restricted families to attend camp. Call WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. www.mywcss.org Families Fighting Cancer In The Sea To Sky - We are a non profit partner with Sea to Sky Community Services. We provide financial and practical support to children and parents with dependants diagnosed with cancer. Please contact us on our confidential email: ffcseatosky@gmail.com, visit our Facebook Page or website www. familiesfightingcancer.ca


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COMMUNITY LISTINGS FAMILY RESOURCES

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Outreach Services - Free confidential support for adults and families experiencing challenges with mental health, food insecurity, housing insecurity, substance use, misuse or addiction, employment, eating disorders, violence in relationships, roommate conflict or homesickness. Contact our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker or visit www. mywcss.org. Pemberton Parent Infant Drop-In Facilitated by Capri Mohammed, Public Health Nurse. Every Mon 11am-12:30pm at Pemberton Public Library. Pemberton Strong Start Family Drop-InA play group for you and your under-5 child. Signal Hill Elementary, Mon, Tues, Wed & Fri, 9am-12pm. Thurs only 12pm-3pm. Call 604894-6101 / 604-966- 8857 Whistler Public Library - Open Mon-Thurs 10am-7pm, Fri 10am-6pm, Sat & Sun 11am5pm. Music & Words, Mon 10am. Rhyme & Song, Tues 10:30am. Parent & Infant dropin, Thurs 11am. Preschool Story Time, Fri 10:30am. Singing with the babies, Sat 11am. Call 604-935-8433

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KidsArt - Provides financial assistance to enable children of financially restricted families to participate in arts and culture education. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. www. mywcss.org. Kids on the Move - Provides financial assistance to enable children of financially restricted families to participate in sport programs. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. www. mywcss.org.

RENT

OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS

We are the Spa for you If you are looking for a new place to call home: • We manifest positive energy • We have a long term and loyal team • We treat you fairly and look out for your wellness • You are listened to • We give you proper breaks and time to set up between services • We offer extended medical benefits • We have potential staff housing at affordable rates • You can enjoy $5.00 cafeteria meals • You have the opportunity to work for other Vida locations in slow season We are here for you. Vida Spa at the Fairmont Chateau Whistler is currently recruiting: REGISTERED MASSAGE THERAPIST (signing bonus RMT only) SPA PRACTITIONER GUEST SERVICE AGENT To join our unique Vida family, email Bonnie@vidaspas.com Vida Spas - Vancouver & Whistler Live well. Live long. vidaspas.com Thank You for applying Only those considered will be contacted.

The Bearfoot Bistro, Whistler's premier fine dining restaurant is growing its service team.

Be part of the action to deliver exceptional fine dining experience to guests in an award-winning and high volume dining room.

We are hiring for the following positions:

Host Server

Food Runner

We offer year-round or seasonal employment, industry leading wages, medical services plan, staff meals, staff discounts and more... Please send your resume to info@bearfootbistro.com or apply in person between 3:30 pm to 5:30 pm. 4121 Village Green | Adjacent to Listel Hotel 604 932 3433 | bearfootbistro.com

SOCIAL SERVICES Access to Justice - Need legal advice but are financially restricted? Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to find out more or visit www. mywcss.org. Counselling Assistance Available - WCSS subsidizes access to a private counselor for $35-$50/hr depending on financial need. Contact an outreach team member at 604932-0113 www.mywcss.org Counselling Assistance - WCSS subsidizes access to a private counsellor depending on financial need. Contact an outreach worker at 604.932.0113 or visit www.mywcss.org. ESL Volunteer Tutor Program - Volunteer one-to-one tutoring for new immigrants & Canadian citizens. For more information or to register, contact the Whistler Welcome Centre info@welcomewhistler.com or call 604.698.5960

COOKS, SERVERS, SANDWICH MAKER/ DISHWASHER. Experience an asset but not essential. Apply in person or online to catering@alpinecafe.ca

Food Bank, Pemberton - Run by Sea to Sky Community Service. Open every second Monday. 604 894 6101 Food Bank Whistler - Located at 8000 Nesters Road, every Wednesday from 10am to noon. For emergency food bags, please call 604.935.7717. www.mywcss.org/foodbank Healthy Pregnancy Outreach ProgramLearn how to prepare healthy affordable meals at this outreach program. Sea to Sky Community Services 604-894-6101

Pick up our SUMMER 2019 issue now Find it on select stands and in Whistler hotel rooms

Is hiring (FULL TIME) OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR Wages are very competitive (based on experience), great perks and benefits. Come join the best team in Whistler! Interested applicants please email your resume to or contact Samantha at skeenan-naf@Crystal-Lodge.com

WIDE OPEN WELDING IS CURRENTLY LOOKING TO FILL THE FOLLOWING POSITION:

FABRICATOR/ERECTOR Please forward your resume to contactus@wideopenwelding.com

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

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SOCIAL SERVICES

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Meadow Park Rec Credit - If you are financially restricted, you may be eligible for a $131.20 municipal recreation credit. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak with an outreach worker. www.mywcss.org.

North Shore Schizophrenia Society Services for family, friends & community. Mental illness info, support & advocacy. Call Chris Dickenson at 604-966-7334

We are currently interviewing:

Carpenters Carpenters Helpers Labourers Level 2 First Aid Attendant Please submit resume to: info@evrfinehomes

Whistler’s Premier Estate Builder

VISION PACIFIC CONTRACTING LTD. is hiring: EXPERIENCED CARPENTERS CARPENTER HELPERS LABOURERS We offer: • Extended Health and Dental benefits for you and your family • We will sponsor and pay for your work permit & visa • 20cm snow rule & mental-health bike days • Flexible schedule & awesome staff parties! • Work-life balance is as important to us as it is to you! 25 Years in business • Whistler’s award winning custom home builder www.vispacific.com

Elementary Grades Teacher (full time) Elementary Grades Teachers (part time and on-call)

Administrative Assistant / Registrar (full time, excluding school holidays) BC Teaching Certificate or eligibility required. Waldorf Teaching Certificate or commitment to Waldorf teacher training required. For more information and to apply visit our website. whistlerwaldorf.com

WRM Strata Management is expanding and we have an excellent career-building opportunity for a Licensed Strata Agent in our Whistler office. We are looking for someone who can manage a portfolio of strata properties with strong organizational abilities, an understanding of budgets and who has high standards of customer service. We offer great growth potential, a competitive salary, extended health coverage and an annual ski/recreation benefit. Please email tess@wrm.ca with your resume.

SUMMER

78 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

Support Counselling - For women regarding abuse & relationship issues. No charge. Call 604-894-6101

Whistler Community Services Society Outreach Services Now Available Monday to Saturday at our new location - 8000 Nesters Road (next to WAG) 604.932.0113 www. mywcss.org

Whistler for the Disabled - Provides info for people with disabilities on what to do & where to go. Visit www. whistlerforthedisabled.com

Whistler Housing Authority - Long term rental & ownership housing for qualified Whistler employees . Visit www. whistlerhousing.ca

Whistler Mental Health & Addiction Services - If you or someone you know needs help with a mental health issue or substance misuse or addiction problem, we can assist. Mon-Fri 830am-430pm. 604-6986455

Whistler Multicultural Network Settlement information, social support and programs for newcomers and immigrants living/working in Whistler. 604-388-5511 www.whistlermulticulturalnetwork.com

EDITION

OUt NOW!

RMOW Rec Credit - If you are financially restricted, you may be eligible for a $127.60 municipal recreation credit. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 www.mywcss.org

Victim Services - Assists victims, witnesses, family members or friends directly affected by any criminal act or traumatic event. Call 604-905-1969

Currently Seeking for the 2019-2020 School Year

Teachers (part time and on-call)

Pearl's Safe Home - Temporary shelter for women & children experiencing abuse in relationships. Locations in Whistler & Pemberton avail 24/7. All services are free. 1-877-890-5711 or 604-892-5711

Send your resume to info@vispacific.com

Whistler Waldorf School Inspiring a Genuine Love of Learning

High School Drama, PE, Fine Arts, French, Science, Math

Outreach Services - Free, confidential support for youth experiencing challenges with mental health, food insecurity, housing insecurity, substance use, misuse or addiction, employment, eating disorders, violence in relationships, roommate conflict or homesickness. Contact our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker or visit www.mywcss.org.

the insiders’ guide to whistler

Whistler Opt Healthy Sexuality Clinic - Professional sexual health services at a reduced cost. Free HIV testing. Clinics at Whistler Health Care Ctr, 2nd floor on Tues 4:30-7:30pm. Winter hours Thurs. 5:00pm7:00pm. Confidentiality assured.


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Whistler WorkBC Employment Services Centre - Provides free one-stop employment services to job seekers and employers. Drop in services at the Pemberton Library Thursdays 1-5 PM, and at the Whistler Public Library on Mondays from 3-6 PM. For more information visit www.WhistlerESC.com or call us at 604-932-1600

SUPPORT GROUPS Are you troubled by someone's drinking? AlAnon can help. Al-Anon meeting, multi-purpose room, 2nd floor, Whistler Health Care Centre, Wednesdays, 6:30 pm. 604.688.1716 Birth, Baby and Beyond - Join a registered counsellor and meet other moms with the opportunity to ask questions and share experiences in a safe, welcoming and nonjudgmental setting. Call 604.932.0113 for more information or visit www.mywcss.org. Concussion Support Group - WCSS is offering a recurring 8 week program to support people living with persistent postconcussion symptoms. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak with an outreach worker about upcoming sessions or visit www.mywcss.org.

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SOCIAL SERVICES Whistler Women's Centre - Provides confidential support, resources, referrals and advocacy for women living in the Sea to Sky corridor. All services are free of charge and include access to emergency safe housing, child/youth counselling, play space and computer access. Drop-In Centre open Mon 12-230, Tue-Thu 12-5. 1519 Spring Creek Drive. You can also access our services at the Whistler Public Library on Mondays from 3-6 p.m. www.hswc.ca or call (604)962-8711. 24 HR Crisis Line: 1-877-890-5711

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THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS

Serving BC for over 30 years

The Bearfoot Bistro, Whistler's premier fine dining restaurant is growing its Kitchen team.

Be part of the action to deliver exceptional fine dining experience to guests in an award-winning and high volume dining room. We are hiring for the following positions:

Pastry Chef Pastry Cook

Line Cook Dishwasher

We offer year-round or seasonal employment, industry leading wages, medical services plan, staff meal, staff discounts and more... Staff housing is available for all kitchen positions. Please send your resume to info@bearfootbistro.com or apply in person between 3:30 pm to 5:30 pm. 4121 Village Green | Adjacent to Listel Hotel 604 932 3433 | bearfootbistro.com

Busy Structural Steel Fabrication business in Pemberton is seeking to fill multiple positions within the company.

• Full Time Experienced Steel Fabricator • Full Time Labourer • Full Time Office Assistant Interested candidates to send Resume and CV to info@wwswelding.ca.

Epilepsy Support Group- For individuals & families seeking guidance or support. Contact eswhistler@gmail.com Immigrant Peer Educators - Immigrants providing support and information for those who may be experiencing challenges adjusting to a new culture. 604-388-5511 info@whistlermulticulturalnetwork.com Pregnancy and Infant Loss - Facilitated by a registered counsellor, this program is designed for couples and individuals who have experienced loss of a child, either before or after birth. Please call WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak to an outreach worker for more information or visit www. mywcss.org. SMART Recovery Whistler (SelfManagement and Recovery Training) A Cognitive-Behavioural group for individuals with substance abuse con-cerns. Drop-in: Registration is not necessary. Wednesdays 5:30-7:00pm Whistler Health Centre (2nd floor-group room)

Coastal Mountain Excavations (est. 1975) is a Civil Construction and Snow Services company serving the Sea to Sky Corridor and beyond. We are currently recruiting:

SNOW PLOW OPERATOR – BOBCAT SNOW PLOW OPERATOR – LOADER SAND TRUCK DRIVER *Full and part-time positions available *Winter wage minimum hours/earnings guarantee program available

Email resume to careers@coastalmountain.ca

RELIGION Jesus Rock Of Ages Ministry- A bible based church that holds services at Millennium Place's main floor theatre at 4:30pm. www. jesusrockofages.com Roman Catholic Church- Come celebrate mass at Our Lady of the Mountains, Whistler on Saturday 5pm, Sunday 9am, Tuesday 5:45pm, Wednesday 7pm, Thursday/Friday 5:45pm. St. Francis of Assisi, Pemberton on Sunday 12:30pm and Friday 9am. St. Christopher's, Mt. Currie on Sunday 11am. 604-905-4781

www.whistlerwag.com

Don’t forget to scoop the poop! It’s not fun to step in, or to see around town. Help keep Whistler clean and pick up after your dog.

Pick up our SUMMER 2019 issue now Find it on select stands and in Whistler hotel rooms

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: CHILD AND YOUTH THERAPIST Title: Location: Status: Reporting to: Wage/Salary: Start Date: Closing Date:

Child and Youth Therapist Master’s Degree in Counselling Psychology or Equivalent Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. .8FTE to 1.0 Full Time (4 days per week or 5 days per week) – Part Time Negotiable School Principal Commensurate with Experience August 27, 2019 Post until position is filled

Summary: Xet’olacw Community School is a Lil’wat Nation school situated 35 minutes north of Whistler, BC in the Mount Currie Community. The School is a modern, dynamic institution with a strong First Nations curriculum as well as academics from N to 12. Xet’olacw Community School is looking to hire a full time child and youth therapist for their school. The child and youth therapist will work with students aged 4-19 within a school based setting. In addition to being trauma informed, flexible and having experience working with Indigenous students, preferred therapeutic modalities include narrative therapy, expressive arts, and CBT. The successful candidate will demonstrate clear boundaries, strong ethics and a firm understanding of informed consent. The successful candidate will be able to both understand and honour the impact of the history of colonialism on Indigenous communities in their work with the students, their families, the staff and the community. Key Qualifications and Attributes: • A Master’s Degree in Counselling Psychology or equivalent • Excellent communication skills; confidence to role model these skills and engage in them • Be registered with the BCACC, CCPA (certified member) and/or the BCTF • Ability to liaise (or learn to liaise) between Indigenous and nonindigenous culture, work within a team, on various teams and independently • Flexibility and collaborative team player • Engages in consistent and healthy self-care practices • Open to Learning

Come Grow Sport with us at our Whistler Olympic Legacy Venues

We offer competitive wages, a unique environment, seasonal bonuses, staff discounts and benefits. Ask about accommodation.

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RELIGION Sea to Sky Healing Room - For Blessing/Prayer/Encouragement In the Community Church building, 7422 Dogwood Street, Pemberton. Every 1st and 3rd Wednesday: 4-6 PM

Whistler Athletes’ Centre

(High Performance Training and Accommodation) Kitchen Porter / Lodge Attendant Lodge Attendant Handyperson Supervisor, Housekeeping

Whistler Sliding Centre

(Bobsleigh, Luge & Skeleton) Head Coach, Skeleton Human Resource Generalist (for all venues) Track Worker Track Medical Responder

Whistler Olympic Park

Heavy Duty Mechanic Groomer Operator Equipment Operator Sport Coach Assistant Nordic Coach Operations Worker, Summer Ski Patrol

Visit our website to view current postings and to apply: www.whistlersportlegacies.com/careers

Whistler Church- Join us for worship and fellowship around Jesus. Sunday 10 am at Myrtle Philip Community School, 6195 Lorimer Rd. Nursery, Sunday School to gr. 6, Youth gr. 7 and up. Call Pastor Jon 604-7983861 / Kelvin 204-249-0700 or www.whistlerchurch.ca

FUR & FEATHERS Get Bear Smart Society - Learn more about coexisting with bears. To report a conflict, garbage or attractant issue call 604-905BEAR (2327) www.bearsmart.com

Pemberton Wildlife Association Advocates for the conservation of fish, wildlife & wilderness recreation. Also offering target shooting & archery facilities. www.pembertonwildlifeassociation.com

WAG - Whistler Animals Galore - A shelter for lost, unwanted, and homeless cats and dogs. Let us help you find your purrfect match...adopt a shelter animal! For more info 604-935-8364 www.whistlerwag.com

Key Deliverables: • Provide therapy to children and youth aged 4-18 and carry a caseload of individual clients, co-facilitate group therapy and maintain appropriate records. • Participate in school based teams, inter-agency teams and develop mental health resources when needed • Liaise and attend meetings with other health care professionals and service providers when requested by clients (to best support a circle of care and mental health) and with appropriate informed consent. Key Responsibilities: • Arrive each school day by 8:30 a.m. Be available after hours and on holidays under extenuating circumstances for at risk students and their families. • Create a schedule that outlines your therapeutic caseload and that honours the scheduling needs of the school (and individual classrooms). • Co-facilitate or facilitate teaching classes, group therapy and super courses. • Provide therapy and classroom psychoeducation that is culturally competent, has a clear beginning, middle and end and that is tailored to the needs of the individual or group. • Be available for debriefing and support for staff regarding mental health in the classroom and to support the mental health of the students on your caseload. • Participate in peer supervision and personal supervision as needed or requested. • Be open to participating in culturally oriented activities (including but not limited to; stein Valley hiking, Outdoor-based super courses, learning Ucwalmicwts words and phrases). Send cover letter and resume including references. Upon receiving your information an applicant’s Declaration and Agreement will be sent to be signed. Contact Information:

Verna Stager, Education Director Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 Phone: 604 894-6131 / Fax: 604 894-5717 glenda.gabriel@lilwat.ca

We thank for your interest; however, only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

80 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

Hiring Full & Part-Time Class 2 Drivers • Excellent hourly wage • Steady Year-Round Work • Season End Bonus

Required Skills and Experience: • Class 2 (w/ Air Brake) License Preferred • Class 4 Unrestricted License accepted (if willing to upgrade) • Training for Class 2 License upgrade available for selected candidates • Customer service skills Please send resume to info@vipwhistler.com

PICK UP YOUR COPY TODAY


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Quantum Health is Hiring! We are looking for Registered or aspiring Nutritionist with excellent customer service and a strong background in retail.

Please apply 604-905-7790

info@quantumvitamins.ca 117-4368 Main St. Local taxi owner/operator looking for experienced drivers with class 4 commercial driving license or willing to get one. Excellent income for the winter season ( $20+ per hour). Daytime and evening shifts are available, please call 604-902-0619 The Body Shop Shop Manager Looking for an inspirational leader with enthusiasm for our brand and believe in the way we do business. With beauty retail expertise that is second to none, you will drive the store and the team to deliver retail excellence, strong sales results and engaging customer experience. Competitive SALARY, Ext. Medical benefits, Bonuses. robyn.camley@thebodyshop.com www.thebodyshopcareers.com Whistler Personnel Solutions Now hiring FT, PT, and temp whistler-jobs.com 604-905-4194

The Pony Restaurant-All Positions The Pony restaurant is currently seeking applicants for the following positions: Line cook: day and night shifts available. Must have 3+ years experience, competitive wages and bi-weekly tip out. Dishwasher: Evening shifts, entry level position.Wages + bi-weekly tip out. Bartender: Experience necessary, part time position. Server: must have experience in similar fast paced role. Please email or drop off your resume to The Pony events@thepony.ca

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

NESTERS MARKET & WELLNESS CENTRE

NOW HIRING AT OUR WHISTLER LOCATION If you are a student 15 years or older, we have flexible hours and we want you!

Grocery Clerks Produce Clerks Deli Clerks Meat Clerks Bakery Clerks Juice Bar Clerks E-mail or drop in your resume to: bruce_stewart@nestersmarket.com please cc ian_fairweather@nestersmarket.com or call us at 604-932-3545 PERKS • Competitive wage – Depending on expereince • Access to medical and dental benefits for full time applicants • Percentage discount from store bought goods • Flexible and set schedule • Relative training

DIVERSE CONSTRUCTION COMPANY WITH

Residential/Commercial projects ACROSS THE SEA TO SKY CORRIDOR

WE ARE CURRENTLY HIRING

Looking for a dog to adopt? Look for WAG’s bright orange bandanas on dogs being walked by volunteers! These dogs are looking for their forever home. 604.935.8364 www.whistlerwag.com

Site Supervisors Carpenters Carpenters Apprentice Labourers We offer; employee benefits and full time employment year round. TO APPLY: CALL 604.935.2683 or EMAIL DCOTE@COASTCONSTRUCTION.CA

LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 2004 • $241.50 Bi Weekly Staff Housing (Incl bills) • Staff Meals & FREE COFFEE • 15% Grocery Discount At “The Grocery Store” • Local Customer Base • Competitive Wages • Parties, Perks & Positive Vibes

“Great Team & Awesome Staff Housing” - Irelands Finest Export PADDY BRANGAN POP INTO SEE IAN AT DELISH CAFE OR EMAIL ian@whistlergrocery.com

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Media Sales Account Manager Squamish, BC. Do you enjoy meeting new people and are comfortable starting conversations? Are you self motivated and a quick learner? Do you work well in team environment and have sales experience? If you answered yes to all of the above, this is the career for you! The Squamish Chief - a division of Glacier Media is looking for a Media Sales Account Manager to join our growing sales team in Squamish!

PLAY HERE

Here is what we are looking for: • You have sales experience and are comfortable making cold calls and setting up/leading meetings with new and existing clients. • Building and maintaining client relationships with your exceptional communication skills comes easy to you. • You are detailed oriented and have experience in sales and marketing. • You possess strong organizational skills and have the ability to multitask in a fast paced environment. • You strive to meet monthly sales targets as set out by your Manager. • You are a goal oriented individual with a positive attitude and a willingness to learn. This is what we have to offer: • Competitive base salary with an uncapped commission structure. • Comprehensive health and dental coverage and extended benefits. • Car allowance • Cell phone allowance • Quarterly and annual bonuses when sales quotas are met • Training and ongoing support (full new employee onboarding with our sales trainers!) • An opportunity to join a leading full service advertising/marketing agency in Canada.

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Please send a cover letter and your resume to: Fiona@glaciermedia.ca We look forward to hearing from you!

Staff housing available We are seeking flexible, hardworking and hard playing

FRONT DESK AGENT FULL-TIME BELLMEN HOUSEKEEPERS/HOUSEMAN MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN PART-TIME AND FULL-TIME HOURS AVAILABLE

PART-TIME NIGHT AUDIT

Please apply if you can bring your smile and positive energy to our team and our guests! Please email your resume to: roberto@aavawhistlerhotel.com Thank you for your interest. Only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted

82 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

RESTAURANT MANAGER Seeking a full-time Restaurant Manager to help inspire, develop, oversee and manage our front-of-house team.

Your next big adventure starts here.

The Restaurant Manager will join the existing leadership team, helping oversee day-to-day operations and uphold Araxi Restaurant’s exceptional levels of hospitality. Qualifications • Previous restaurant leadership experience is required • WSET Level 2 or equivalent is an asset Excellent training and growth opportunities available within an award-winning restaurant group. We offer year-round full hours, competitive wages, gratuities, extended medical & dental, accommodations, potential for future growth within the company, and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants. Please email your resume & cover letter to:

careers@araxi.com


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Now Hiring for the Following Positions:

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FRONT DESK MANAGER

Hilton Whistler Resort & Spa Hospitality

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Sushi Village is looking for their next Front Desk Manager! A great opportunity for a hands-on, on the floor manager, with tons of personality and the customer focus at the heart of it.

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~ AWESOME PEOPLE WORK HERE ~

Apply online on hr@hiltonwhistler.com or in person Monday to Friday from 9am to 4pm We thank all interested applicants, however only those selected for an interview will be contacted 84 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

Responsibilities: • Ensure daily front desk operations function as efficiently as possible to maximize a positive dining experience • Lead by example! Offer hands on management style with strong leadership skills • Personality! Shine bright and look after our extensive return clientele • Additional responsibilities will include any of the following; Staff Schedules, Cash Management, Event & Group Bookings Education/Qualification: • University or College designation in Hospitality or Culinary Management an asset • Minimum 3 - 4 years’ experience leading teams in a hotel or reservations environment Working Conditions: • Must be available to work evenings, holidays and weekends as business dictates • Long periods of standing, walking and talking If you think you've got the passion, desire and experience we're looking for, please send us your CV info@sushivillage.com with a little about you! All applicants must speak fluent English, be eligible to work in Canada, and provide two work references.


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Certified Dental Assistant for busy family dental clinic

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Part-time Dental Hygienist Hours negotiable with competitive wage. Email “info@pembertonvalleydental.ca” or fax to 604-894-6934 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

85


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WHISTLER’S RE-IMAGINED ITALIAN RESTAURANT

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The Blackcomb Lodge join our team We offer competitive wage, flexible We offer competitive wage, flexible work work, schedules, a benefi variety of benefits schedules, a variety of ts including including employee discounts, training employee discounts, training & development, & development, career advancement career advancement opportunities and more! opportunities and more! •

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apply online now coastcareers.ca

The storied restaurant offers a modern taste of Italy to bring a fresh, contemporary style of dining to the mountain.

CURRENT OPPORTUNITIES FRONT-OF-HOUSE Food Expeditor Server Assistant Host / Hostess

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86 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

NOW HIRING:

MECHANIC

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NOT YOUR AVERAGE OFFICE VIEW. NOW HIRING: GENERAL MANAGER WHISTLER, BC

CLIQUE Hotels & Resorts is seeking an experienced General Manager for our newest property located in beautiful Whistler, BC. This luxurious property features 150+ rooms, easy access to hiking and biking trails, ski in/out access, outdoor pool/hot tub, fitness center, ski valet, meeting space and free shuttle bus to Whistler Village. YOUR ROLE AS GENERAL MANAGER to oversee all aspects of the Hotel operations including; Guest Services, Sales & Marketing, Housekeeping, Maintenance, Finance, Team Building and Staff Development.

THE IDEAL CANDIDATE will have a minimum of 4 years’ experience in a mid-sized property as General Manager or Senior Operations Manager. Preference will be given to those with a Hospitality or Hotel Management Degree.

This position will be provided with a very competitive six figure salary plus incentive plan, along with fully paid Medical/Dental/Vision and educational allowance. Clique Hotels & Resorts believes that our continued success is a direct result of the amazing people who consistently strive for service excellence while creating memorable experiences for our guests, owners and colleagues. One of our core principals includes investing in our team through educational opportunities, and helping our people advance through promotion from within.

TO APPLY FOR THIS NEW & EXCITING OPPORTUNITY IN WHISTLER, BC SEND YOUR RESUME IN CONFIDENCE TODAY TO

HR@CLIQUE.CA

Housekeepers Needed

Signing Bonus & Great Benefits! Both Full Time & Part Time available!

Sharing your passion for the corridor?

The Four Seasons Housekeeping team is looking for Guestroom Attendants for contracts starting immediately or for summer hire! Candidates will receive a $500 signing bonus. Benefits include Guaranteed housing, one meal per working shift, health & medical after 90 days, a winter leisure package, and more!

. Looking for mature, year round, committed team players for our Whistler locations and our new Squamish location. . Full time position (option for 4 or 5 day work week). MUST be available weekends. Evenings required in peak season. . Customer Service skills a top priority. Luxury sales experience helpful, retail experience preferred plus the ability to have fun! . Second language will be a huge asset (Mandarin, Spanish, Japanese etc.) . Competitive wages based on experience . Competitive sales commissions, excellent perks inc. Extended medical/dental, health and wellness bonus, birthday bonus credit after 3 months. Resumes to be dropped off at either Whistler location or emailed to tina@Keirfinejewellery.com Please indicate which location you are applying for (Whistler or Squamish)

Details:

Please apply online via jobs.fourseasons.com SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

87


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PUZZLES ACROSS

1 Olfactory stimulus 6 Finish a pie crust 11 Ward off 16 Vision-related 21 Lead or copper 22 Come about 23 Lickety-split 24 View from Giza 25 Speaker’s need 26 Salary increase 27 Like Rambo? 28 Melodies 29 Did a slow burn 31 Giraffe features 33 -- banana 34 Fasting season 35 Continuing story 36 Utah city 37 Briny expanse 38 Caravan stops 39 Fall blooms 41 Pier 44 Remnant 46 Put on guard 49 Primeval 50 Free from tension or discord 52 Globs 57 Give-go link 58 Sister’s girl 60 Pick up 62 Haystack find? 63 Canada Dry products 66 Oohed and - 68 Good hoppers 70 Car with four doors 71 Make possible 73 Trout habitats

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75 77 78 79 81 82 83 86 88 90 93 95 97 101 102 104 106 107 110 112 114 115 117 119 121 122 124 126 127 128 130 131 133 137 139 141 145 146 147

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Soul Digital watch readout Go over again Tailoring job Disparaging remark Swiss cheese holes Fools Scoundrel Ramp alternative Gists Gunk Put in a log Infraction Kimono fastener Headpiece Painful spots Etna’s island Long-winded ones Football shapes Saddle extra Thong Acid in milk Digital correspondence Blow, as a volcano Flight dir. Gasoline additive Camelot royal According to Nile reptiles Paper holder Be sincere Contemporary Tend the furnace Mouths, in zoology Bwana’s track Pestered Actor -- Cronyn Tip for a calligrapher Tropical swayers

5

148 149 151 153 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163

DOWN

1 Faulty 2 Ms. Zellweger 3 Playful swimmer 4 Sci-fi invader 5 Island welcomes 6 Thick wire 7 NEC competitor 8 Cupcake finishers 9 Pondered 10 Come before 11 Wool givers 12 Eco-friendly feds 13 International agreements 14 Reverberated 15 Big cat 16 Autumn mo. 17 Abdul or Prentiss 18 Pitchfork parts 19 Singer -- Cara 20 Prices 30 Rocker -- John 32 Small hill

9 4 1 7 6 8 3 7 8 1 9 2 5 9 8 6 5 4 9 5 6 8

MEDIUM

Unfavorable Skilled Draw forth Up to Make extremely happy Stray calf Lucky number Coats with gold Soda-bottle size Use Artgum Stand in good -Final authority (hyph.) Cause goose bumps

# 29

36 Trying experience 38 Stares rudely 40 Lamb’s pseudonym 42 Musical symbol 43 Eucalyptus muncher 45 Untold centuries 46 More prudent 47 In agreement (2 wds.) 48 Speeder’s undoing 50 Milder 51 Small birds 53 Protective shelter 54 In a strange way 55 Put 56 Mails out 59 Singe 61 Toe covers 64 Helps a hoodlum 65 Deli serving 67 Crusoe’s creator 69 Grass fungus 72 Authoritative proclamation 74 Gestures 76 Haik wearers 80 Mentor 82 Construct 84 Vocal group 85 Urbane 87 Weirder 89 Tall flower 90 High-born 91 “Das Boot” craft (hyph.) 92 Thin-barked tree 94 Acting class 96 Tail end 98 Buenos - 99 Envelope closer

8 4

9

9 5

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8 6

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100 103 105 108 109 111 113 116 118 120 123 125 127 129 131 132

Pumps up Watch feature Lethargy Flight board info Because Location Imitated Army off. Dalai Lama’s city What’s in Tawny predator Disconnects Opposite of bratty Hedge Usually Becomes frayed

133 Window covering 134 Henry VIII’s house 135 Alpha opposite 136 French Legion headgear 138 Ranking higher 140 “-- vincit amor” 142 Persona non - 143 Organic compound 144 Tractor pioneer 147 Hang fire 148 Too 150 Golf-ball stand 152 Large green parrot 154 Check-cashing needs

LAST WEEKS’ ANSWERS

1 9

6 4

9 6 4 7 3 6 8

3

1 3

MEDIUM

# 30

Enter a digit from 1 through 9 in each cell, in such a way that: • Each horizontal row contains each digit exactly once • Each vertical column contains each digit exactly once • Each 3x3 box contains each digit exactly once Solving a sudoku puzzle does not require any mathematics; simple logic suffices.

LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY: MEDIUM

6 2 4

7 9 8 3 4 6

2 7 3 1 5 2 1 9 8 9

6 5 5 1 3 9 4

MEDIUM Solution, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com# 31

6

7 1 5 7

2 3 8 4 9 MEDIUM

1 8

6

4 8

9

6 9 5

9 5 8 1 5 1 3 # 32

ANSWERS ON PAGE 83

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

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MAXED OUT

The 80-20 rule, camping edition AS IT DOES FOR SO MANY other things in life, I suspect you can apply the 80-20 rule to explain the garbage I keep finding where people have camped before me. While I try to limit the times I camp where others have, on a road trip it is inevitable. But I digress. The 80-20 rule, if you’re not familiar with it, is one of those gems of insight that business consultants come up with to explain the obvious to the myopic, who feel better paying someone $3,000 a day to tell them the same stuff their staff has been trying to tell them for years for a pittance. Who wouldn’t trust someone charging so much? It suggests 80 per cent of your customers really only provide 20 per cent of your profits and vice-versa; 20 per cent

SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

BY G.D. MAXWELL of them drop a wad and account for 80 per cent of your revenue. Like any chestnut of wisdom, it is a blunt instrument but carries a kernel of truth. The 80-20 rule explains things like VIP lounges at airports, champagne in first class, valet parking at impossibly expensive restaurants, the $10,000 optional dark sky headliner in bespoke Rolls Royces and why you see 80-year-old wankers with 20-yearold pneumatic blondes on their arms. I also imagine it explains the bizarre things I find left behind in fire pits and around campsites. Eighty per cent of the people only produce 20 per cent of the trash and the 20 per cent who leave behind the bulk of garbage, trash, human waste and cigarette butts should be paddled out to the centre of the lake and dropped in with a sizable chunk of cement tied to their legs if karma actually works...which it doesn’t. They are pigs and it’s damn insulting to real pigs for me to call them that. It never ceases to amaze me, for example, that people who have evolved enough to be able to light fires whenever and wherever they want to, still haven’t grasped the simple fact that aluminum foil does not burn. For all its brilliance and manifold uses, aluminum foil only has three outstanding physical characteristics. One, when you wad it up and toss it on the floor, it drives cats crazy—recognizing there are many who would say making a cat crazy is more akin to a short putt than a drive. Two, if you have a lot of fillings in your teeth and make the mistake of believing someone who says chewing a piece of foil is cool, you will see sparks fly out of your mouth, which is unquestionably cool but hurts like hell for the next several days and likely requires a trip to your dentist. Don’t ask how I know. Finally, if you wrap aluminum foil around a potato, drop it into a fire, let it burn for a couple of hours and take it out, you will have an overcooked, charred lump of potato, in ash-covered but otherwise unaffected aluminum foil.

90 SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

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It may be man’s quest to overcome the laws of nature, or the timeless desire to achieve some magical, alchemical transformation, but I suspect it’s more likely laziness and a total lack of concern for their surroundings that move people to try and burn foil. The paradox of why they drive all the way to a remote lake or semi-wilderness site to conduct this experiment, like so much of human nature, still eludes me. While ubiquitous, foil is not the most puzzling thing I find in abandoned fire rings

Moron One: “Whoa dude, the freakin’ speaker just quit workin.’” Moron Two: “Throw it in the fire.” Moron One: “But the foil’s not all burned up yet, man.” If you have an active imagination, you can almost understand finding a burnedout speaker in a fire pit, I can hear you say. Okay, how about a core sample? After spending the day backtracking over miles of logging roads in the forest outside of the Middle of Nowhere—according to the

If you can’t deal with this inevitable camping moment, I’d recommend you stick to hotels.

and around campsites. At a tiny, perfect lake in northern BC—site of an apparent potato massacre or abandoned garden— someone tried to burn a speaker out of his car radio. I assume it was a him because I can’t imagine any woman would ever think sitting around a fire trying to burn a speaker was cool, but hey, I could be wrong? I’m sure there is a story behind the charred speaker but I suspect it is a short one.

GPS—I once found myself not exactly lost but unexpectedly on the shore of a stunning lake that turned out to be at about the same elevation as Pika’s. It was a chilly, drizzly, alternately bright and dark B.C. kind of day. Being short on sun and long on altitude, I was well along the path to hypothermia when the sun began to set, a supposition on my part since I only noticed the sky getting

darker, not the sun going down. While my numb fingers picked foil out of the fire ring, I uncovered a cylindrical hunk of rock. It was about 20 centimetres long, blackened, polished, and marbleized? It was clearly a drilling core sample from God knows where. Even I can’t make up an interesting story about how in the world it might have found its way into someone’s campfire but not surprisingly, it didn’t burn either. But one has only to walk a few metres outside the ring of fire and light to find the ultimate disgust of the 20 per cent, although I often wonder whether blaming it on 20 per cent is enough, so ubiquitous is the Garden of Human Waste in most places camped without the amenity of an outhouse. Birds do it, bees do it and humans generally do it at least once a day. It, assuming all goes well, is one of life’s little pleasures. But judging from the abandoned TP flowers left helter skelter around campsites, many people are short on knowledge and long on disgust. Without getting graphic, I can only recommend, again, anyone heading anywhere lacking either indoor plumbing or outhouses pick up the slim volume, How to Shit in the Woods, now in its third edition. If you can’t deal with this inevitable camping moment, I’d recommend you stick to hotels. Happy camping. n


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ALPINE MEADOWS

EVA LAKE VILLAGE, NORDIC ESTATES

Looking to build your future Whistler Chalet, this large Lot offers unique building opportunity to capture the unique Alta Lake & Mountain vistas.

An expansive home with stunning views perched in the exclusive Sunridge Plateau. The home has ski in access, yet within walking distance of Whistler Village center. 5.5 bedroom plus 6 bathrooms and big patios. Book your viewing and make it a home ! $5,390,000

5 bedrooms/5.5 bathrooms – plus revenue suite. 2 car garage, level entry, hot tub, corner lot. A quality, custom build mountain home offering space and comfort throughout - 4 bedrooms c/w bathrooms! $2,995,000

Eva Lake Village is a conveniently located complex within the Nordic Estates neighbourhood that is occupied by employees or retirees of Whistler and as a result offers a wonderful feeling of community. $499,000

Ruby Jiang *prec

Bob Daniels

Maggi Thornhill *prec

3108 Hillcrest Lane

3807 Sunridge Place

$2,680,000 (GST Exempt)

Kathy White

604-616-6933

8228 Valley Drive

778-834-2002

31-2230 Eva Lake Road

604-932-7997

604-905-8199

CREEKSIDE

WEDGE WOODS

VILLAGE - THE HILTON

SQUAMISH DOWNTOWN

Spacious 1 bdrm, quartershare property at the base of the Creekside Gondola. One week/month can be used for personal enjoyment/rental revenue. Hotel features; hot tubs, pool, lounge, movie theatre, games room & much more! $110,950

Situated on a private cul de sac, this newly constructed 3,669 sq ft home has 4 bedrooms plus a 2 bedroom suite. Made for entertaining and relaxing this is your perfect Whistler getaway. $2,988,000

Ground floor studio suite with easy access out your private courtyard to the pool deck, spa, gym and lounge patio. Enjoy unlimited owner usage or hands off rental through the Hilton management team. Good revenues! $229,000

Premium Corner Penthouse Unit. 2 Bedroom 1 Bath, 827Sf With Amazing Views. Located In Vibrant Dowtown Squamish. Ready By December 2019 $595,000

Kerry Batt

Allie Smith

Rob Boyd

Jody Wright

206D-2036 London Lane

9088 Corduroy Run Court

604-902-5422

169–4050 Whistler Way

604-698-7024

620 – 37881 Cleveland Ave

604-935-9172

604-935-4680

PEMBERTON BENCHLANDS

PEMBERTON

PEMBERTON

SQUAMISH

Brand new 3.5 bed home with suite. Double garage, lge mudroom for all your winter gear, custom kitchen that extends to a covered patio and flat, treed backyard. Walking distance to downtown, schools and trails. $1,390,000

Move in ready! Spacious 3 bed townhouse in central Pemberton. End unit, private garden area with partial views. $579,000

4.5 gorgeous riverfront acres walking distance to Village of Pemberton. Beautiful home offers 4+ bedrooms, 3.5 bathrooms, large rec room, and loft. Plenty of decks and patios and outstanding year round sun and views. $1,695,000

Great Value 2,350 sq ft Townhouse. 3.5 Bed / 3 Bath. Sunny patio with hot tub & direct access to park & playground, dbl garage, hardwood floors, workshop & storage. Central location close to schools & shops. $799,900

Suzanne Wilson

Peter Lalor

Laura Wetaski

Rachel Edwards

1319 Eagle Drive

37-7408 Cottonwood Street

604 966 8454

1527 Fraser Road

604-902-3309

48-40632 Government Road

604 938 3798

Whistler Village Shop

Whistler Creekside Shop

Squamish Station Shop

36-4314 Main Street · Whistler BC V0N 1B4 · Phone +1 604-932-1875

325-2063 Lake Placid Road · Whistler BC V0N 1B2 · Phone +1 604-932-1875

150-1200 Hunter Place · Squamish BC V8B 0G8 · Phone +1 778-733-0611

whistler.evrealestate.com

whistler.evrealestate.com

whistler.evrealestate.com

Engel & Völkers Whistler *PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION ©2018 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage is independently owned and operated. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified.

604-966-4200


SOLD

1531 Highway 99

$975,000

NearVillageofPembertonthisrare2.5acrepropertyistheidealhobbyfarm/gardenopportunity withinacomfortablewalkingdistancetoVillageandschools.Existingoutbuildingsprovide necessarystoragefortackandfeedaswellasequipment/tools.Otherstructuresprovideshelterfor horsesandotherfarmanimals.Thehomeis2levelwith3bedroomsupand2down.

Michael d’Artois

5

604.905.9337

#217 - 4360 Lorimer Road

$684,000

#3I - 2300 Nordic Drive

$195,000

This 1/10th share townhome includes 4 spacious Bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, media room, and fully furnished right down to the placemats and towels. Offering its own private hot tub, bbq, as well as being Ski in, Ski out, directly onto the Dave Murray Olympic run, these homes are managed by Fairmont Heritage Place, which includes all of the amenities of a luxury hotel.

Mike Nauss

4

604.932.9586

#3 - 3502 Falcon Crescent

$2,395,000

Lot 1 Heather Jean Properties

$1,150,000

Unique property opportunity in Lillooet Lake’s gated community, Heather Jean properties. This is a 4045 sq ft 7 bedroom home over two levels on 1.89 acres, with truly spectacular lake and mountain views from huge sundeck. Heating options include two woodstoves, two fireplaces and a forced air system with heat pump for AC purposes.

Patrick Saintsbury

7

604.935.9114

6471 Balsam Way

$2,599,000

This renovated and upgraded one bedroom unit is located in the center of everything. Walk out of the building and you find shopping, banks, restaurants, liquor stores, shops for everything, post office and the tennis center is across the street. The free shuttle bus stops right in front of your building and the clinic is right next to your complex.

Stroll to the Village or bike to the beach on Alta Lake from this 4 bedroom and loft townhome. Part of a small and private strata located on Blueberry Hill, just above the Arnold Palmer Whistler Golf Course. Recent updates include new paint throughout, refinished wood floors, new carpet and new plumbing fittings.Matterport 3D Showcase: rem.ax\3falcon

This lovely home has 4 bedrooms, large family room and office in addition to the main living/ dining room. The yard offers privacy with lots of room to play and garden, is fully irrigated & backs on to green space and a gently flowing creek. Heated floors in the bathrooms, entrance and Kitchen adds another layer of comfort. Matterport 3D Showcase: rem.ax\6471balsam

Richard Christiansen

Sally Warner*

Sherry Baker

604.907-2717

1

4.5

604.905.6326

NEW PRICE

1 Garibaldi Drive

$1,179,000

Wonderfully secluded 4 bdrm/ 3 bthrm. home or getaway only minutes to Whistler creekside. This well built, well kept home is located in Black Tusk Village, a gated community with lakes and trails. Enjoy the expansive, sunny deck with carport below for all the toys. A large entry level room is a perfect family/ games area.

Ted Morden

4

604.938.3606

9120 Emerald Drive

Open House Sat 2 pm to 4:30 pm

$1,495,000

Beautifully renovated 4 bedroom chalet, located on a large lot in the peaceful Emerald Estates. Bright, open concept living space, leading out onto 1, of 2 spacious patios that invite the afternoon sunshine. The recent renovation includes new windows and doors, heated flooring, as well as new plumbing and electrical. Matterport 3D Showcase: rem.ax\9120

Ursula Morel*

604.932.8629

5

604.932.1315

3

3129 Hawthorne Place

$3,195,000

A Family Home walking distance to Whistler Village. Large Master Suite on the upper level with two ensuited bedrooms off the family room. Two Flex spaces provide for an office or small bedroom. The 15,179 sq foot lot is beautifully treed for privacy and allows for expansion of the home. Matterport 3D Showcase: rem.ax\3129

Ann Chiasson

3

604.932.7651

Just Reduced

#114D - 2020 London Lane

$115,900

2578 Snowridge Crescent

$6,200,000

C1 - Adventures West

$1,395,000

Enjoy all of the benefits of luxury condo ownership at the base of Whistler Mountain at a fraction of the cost. This 1 bed/1 bath quarter ownership property in Evolution offers custom finishings, contemporary design & comes fully equipped. Building amenities include: outdoor pool, hot tub, sauna, steam room, games room, exercise room & media room.

Enjoy the views of Whistler Peak and the Dave Murray Downhill from your patio Hot Tub. Picture your family skiing or riding home for lunch. Walking down to Dusty’s or shopping without having to get into your car. In the summer the bike park is right there as well. Fine dining is a short walk, as are the two lakes in the Creekside Area.

Lakeside 4 bedroom sleeps nine. Rare Lakeside offering on Whistler’s finest private beach with a private outlook to the expansive lawns. There are lockups for your water toys at the waters edge and a secure private storage room for your bikes. Just minutes from the Village this is the best four season location there is.

Bob Cameron*

Bruce Watt

Chris Wetaski

604.935.2214

1

WHISTLER OFFICE 106 - 7015 Nesters Road, Whistler, BC V8E 0X1 604.932.2300 or Toll Free 1.888.689.0070 *PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

remax-whistler.com awarded best website 2018 by Luxuryrealestate.com

Property Management remaxseatoskypm.com

604.905.0737

5

604.938.2499

4

PEMBERTON OFFICE 1411 Portage Road, Pemberton, BC V0N 2L1 604.894.6616 or Toll Free 1.888.689.0070

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Pique Newsmagazine 2637  

Pique Newsmagazine for September 12, 2019

Pique Newsmagazine 2637  

Pique Newsmagazine for September 12, 2019

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