Page 1

JUNE 6, 2019 ISSUE 26.23

WWW.PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM

FREE SUNSHINE

Here comes the sun … And bacteria-powered solar cells perfect for cloudy days

16

BETTER TOGETHER

Mountain town

organizations gather to talk mental health

26

UNDER DISCUSSION

Victims of sexual

assault could soon be examined locally

70

FRESH SOUND

Aude Ray is back with

her third album, Dreamcatcher


NATURE IS AT YOUR DOORSTEP LEADING REAL ESTATE EXPERTS SINCE 1978

#110 2222 CASTLE

1426 POPLAR STREET

7903 RYAN CREEK ROAD

Situated in a quiet, central location, this townhome is within walking distance to Creekside.

A 3 bedroom home with 1 bedroom mortgage helper on the most central street in Pemberton.

Beautiful and private 36 acres of ALR zoned farmland only minutes from downtown Pemberton.

Bedrooms:

Bedrooms:

2222 CASTLE DRIVE, WHISTLER CREEK Bathrooms:

3

2

LINDSAY GRAHAM lindsay@wrec.com 604 935 9533

Square Feet:

1200

$1,199,000

PEMBERTON

3

Bathrooms:

2

LISA AMES

lisaa@wrec.com 604 849 4663

Square Feet:

2600

$769,000

PEMBERTON Bedrooms:

Bathrooms:

6

LISA

4

HILTON*

lisah@wrec.com 604 902 4589

Square Feet:

2254

$1,695,000

#206 TOWN PLAZA

#219C EVOLUTION

9050 ARMCHAIR PLACE

Prime location in the centre of the village. This condo is beautifully renovated with mountain views.

Evolution offers the most refined Quarter Ownership with a front row location in Whistler Creekside.

Lot 15 is one of a select few private acreages with frontage on Green River and Southern exposures.

4314 MAIN STREET, VILLAGE Bedrooms:

Bathrooms:

1

MARIKA

1

KOENIG*

marika@wrec.com 604 905 2838

Square Feet:

570

$749,000

2020 LONDON LANE, WHISTLER CREEK Bedrooms:

2

Bathrooms:

RAY LONGMUIR ray@wrec.com 604 905 8464

2

Square Feet:

1076

$292,500

WEDGEWOODS Lot Size:

1.129 acres

ROB PALM*

rob@wrec.com 604 905 8833

$1,449,000 604 932 5538

WHISTLERREALESTATE.CA *Personal Real Estate Corporation


KAREN CARANZA KEN SMART JASON VANDERSHOOT

NAMI HOSOO IAN BARTLEY

SATURDAY, JUNE 8, 2PM

The Courageous Mountain Rangers The Courageous Mountain Rangers are a four piece Bluegrass acoustic string band from Whistler/Pemberton. They can be found at Nesters Market, this Saturday, in the produce section (if it is raining), or outside by the front doors (if the sun is shining).

THE WORLD’S FIRST PLANT-BASED BURGER THAT LOOKS, COOKS, AND SATISFIES LIKE BEEF WITHOUT GMOS, SOY, OR GLUTEN.

BEYOND MEAT

Plant-Based Burgers 2x 113g Burgers

Pharmacy & Wellness PRESCRIPTIONS WHILE YOU SHOP 9am to 7pm. 7 days a week.

2018

BEANFIELDS

LOOK IN-STORE FOR EVERYDAY VALUE CARD SAVINGS!

7

Bean Chips Non-GMO, Gluten-Free, 156g

$ .99 EACH

3

$ .49 EACH

VEGA PROTEIN NUTRITION SHAKE Take your plant-based protein shakes on-the-go with Vega’s ready to drink options. Each bottle offers a shelf-stable shake with rich chocolate or tasty vanilla flavor, plus 20 grams of protein, vitamins and minerals, 4 grams of fiber, and omega-3’s. Simply chill in your fridge and throw into your purse or gym bag anytime you need a boost.

604.932.3545 604.905.0429

Nesters Market Pharmacy

nestersmarket.com

7019 Nesters Road (Just 1 km north of Whistler Village)

Prices Effective At Whistler Nesters From: Thursday, June 6th to Wednesday, June 12th, 2019. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Sale limited to stock on hand. Some items subject to Tax, plus deposit, recycling fee where applicable.


THIS WEEK IN PIQUE

50

70

40 Here comes the sun … And bacteria-powered solar cells perfect for cloudy days. - By Glenda Bartosh

16

MENTAL HEALTH

With May being Mental Health

50

TOE THE LINE

The Whistler Half Marathon

Awareness Month, more than 60 leaders from 10 mountain communities,

returned for its ninth year to sunny skies and plenty of volunteers. Care

including Whistler, gathered in Colorado to strategize.

Nelson and Alexandre Ricard earned the victories.

32

62

GRIZZLY RECOVERY

How one wildlife

CYCLE CELEBRATION

Mountain Bike

biologist is helping connect fragmented grizzly bear populations in the

Heritage Week is back with speakers series, films, and a retro ride—all to

East Kootenays.

celebrate one of Whistler’s favourite sports.

34

VANISHING GLACIERS

Should we be

70

FRESH SOUND

Local singer-songwriter Aude Ray

thinking about last ascents? Safe mountain travel requires stable conditions

is back with her third album, Dreamcatcher. She explains how, sometimes,

and fair weather, but as the globe warms, that’s becoming harder to find.

taking the road less travelled can pay off.

COVER Having worked in the solar industry in the mid-90’s, I found this to be such an interesting article about this evolving method of generating power from the sun. Such a bright future...pun intended - By Karl Partington 4 JUNE 6, 2019


4330 NORTHLANDS BLVD, WHISTLER

achieve a

AG PLASTIC B

FFURTEUREE

LER help WHIST

7 DAYS 8AM - 9PM

Freshness Selection Location PERFECTLY IMPERFECT

Frozen Fruit

7

$ 99 each

AAA Certified Angus Beef Eye Of Round

$13.21kg

Fresh Boneless Pork Loin Rib Chops

$8.80/kg

Fresh Family Pack Chicken Leg Back Attached

$5.05/kg

3

$ 99

Organic Microwave Popcorn

2 1 $ 49/100g 1

Black Forest Ham

$ 19/100g

Smoked Chicken Breast

$ 99/100g

Marinated Vegetable Salad

BAKERY 249

6 pack, 340g $

Hoagie Buns Baked Fresh in Store

Wholegrain Cracked Wheat Bread Baked Fresh in Store

420g

6

$ 99 each

Hot House Tomatoes BC

GROCERY LIBERTE

Large Eggs

500-750g

CRAVE Frozen Dinners

2 for

5

Organic $ Lemonades 946ml

Dozen

Yogurt Assorted Varieties

LAIKI Rice

SANTA CRUZ

$3.28/kg

Romaine Lettuce California

BORN 3

Mini Wheats, Vector, Corn Flakes, Raisin Bran 850g-1.22kg

00

1 $ 49/lb 1 99¢ each

$ 29 each

Long English Cucumbers BC

Jumbo Cereal

2

$ 49 each

PRODUCE

255g-297g

KELLOGG’S

5 $ 99/lb 3 $ 29/lb 2

$ 99/lb

DELI

1.75kg

WHOLE ALTERNATIVES

MEAT

Crackers

VEGA Plant

100g

Based Protein Bars

CLASSICO Pasta

45g-70g

Sauce

OLD DUTCH Potato PUREX

283g-320g

650ml

Chips

220-255g

Bath Tissue

Your Neighbourhood Food Store

15 rolls

3 3 $ 99 each 3 $ 99 each 2 $ 99 each 2 $ $ 2 FOR 4 $ 2 FOR 6 $ 99 each 6 $ 99 each

$ 99 each

WE ARE NOW HIRING for ALL POSITIONS

Available to start immediately. Apply in person.

*not valid when purchasing gift cards. *excluding tobacco products. EXPIRES June 12, 2019. Not valid with any other coupons. One coupon per customer, per day. Valid only at MarketPlace IGA Whistler at time of purchase only.

*not valid when purchasing gift cards. *excluding tobacco products. EXPIRES June 12, 2019. Not valid with any other coupons. One coupon per customer, per day. Valid only at MarketPlace IGA Whistler at time of purchase only.

All Prices Effective THURS. JUNE 6 - JUNE 12, 2019

We reserve the right to limit quantities.

Full-service deli, In-store bakery & Floral Department Not valid if combined with PLU 91911

91910

604-938-2850

www.marketplaceiga.com

Not valid if combined with PLU 91910

91911


THIS WEEK IN PIQUE

Opinion & Columns 08 OPENING REMARKS World Oceans Day is June 8—let’s focus on what we can each do to

#103 -1390 ALPHA LAKE RD., FUNCTION JUNCTION, WHISTLER, B.C. V8E 0H9. PH: (604) 938-0202 FAX: (604) 938-0201 www.piquenewsmagazine.com

protect our waterways, from refusing to use single-use plastics to cleaning our lakes and rivers.

10 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR A letter writer calls for more transparency and oversight in

Founding Publishers KATHY & BOB BARNETT Publisher SARAH STROTHER - sstrother@wplpmedia.com

government, while another believes independent candidates are destructive to the country.

Editor CLARE OGILVIE - edit@piquenewsmagazine.com Assistant Editor ALYSSA NOEL - arts@piquenewsmagazine.com Sales Manager SUSAN HUTCHINSON - shutchinson@wplpmedia.com Production Manager KARL PARTINGTON - kpartington@wplpmedia.com Art Director JON PARRIS - jparris@wplpmedia.com

13 PIQUE’N YER INTEREST Writer Joel Barde tells us why it’s OK to be a “bandwagon jumper” when it comes to cheering on sports teams at the national level.

102

Advertising Representatives AMY ALLEN - aallen@wplpmedia.com TESSA SWEENEY - tsweeney@wplpmedia.com ANTHONY JOYCE - ajoyce@wplpmedia.com

MAXED OUT Max ponders what it means for Canada to join the ranks of those nations that have

committed genocide.

Environment & Adventure

Sales Coordinator EMMA WILKINS - traffic@wplpmedia.com Digital Sales Manager FIONA YU - fiona@glaciermedia.ca Production production@piquenewsmagazine.com CLAIRE RYAN - cryan@wplpmedia.com LOU O’BRIEN - lstevens@wplpmedia.com WHITNEY SOBOOL - wsobool@wplpmedia.com

38 SCIENCE MATTERS Climate change and biodiversity should be top headline news, says

Arts & Entertainment Editor ALYSSA NOEL arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

39 RANGE ROVER Writer Leslie Anthony relives an amazing ski and cycling journey from Mt.

environmentalist David Suzuki in his column this week.

Sports Editor DAN FALLOON - sports@piquenewsmagazine.com Features Editor BRANDON BARRETT - bbarrett@piquenewsmagazine.com Reporters BRADEN DUPUIS - bdupuis@piquenewsmagazine.com BRANDON BARRETT - bbarrett@piquenewsmagazine.com JOEL BARDE - jbarde@piquenewsmagazine.com MEGAN LALONDE - mlalonde@wplpmedia.com

Kosciusko, Australia’s highest point, to the ocean.

48 TRAVEL Writer Steve McNaull explores Wiesbaden, including taking to the waters naked at Kaiser Friedrich Therme, a Roman-style bath in the German spa-town.

Classifieds and Reception mail@piquenewsmagazine.com Circulation and Accounts LAURA PRIOR - lprior@wplpmedia.com Office and Accounts Manager HEIDI RODE - hrode@wplpmedia.com I.T. and Webmaster KARL PARTINGTON Contributors G.D. MAXWELL, GLENDA BARTOSH, MICHAEL ALLEN, FEET BANKS, LESLIE ANTHONY, ALLEN BEST, ALISON TAYLOR, VINCE SHULEY, LISA RICHARDSON President, Whistler Publishing LP SARAH STROTHER - sstrother@wplpmedia.com Pique Newsmagazine (a publication of Whistler Publishing Limited Partnership, a division of Glacier Media) distributed to over 130 locations in Whistler and to over 200 locations from Vancouver to D’arcy. The entire contents of Pique Newsmagazine are copyright 2019 by Pique Newsmagazine (a publication of WPLP, a division of Glacier Media). No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the express written permission of the Publisher. In no event shall unsolicited material subject this publication to any claim or fees. Copyright in letters and other (unsolicited) materials submitted and accepted for publication remains with the author but the publisher and its licensees may freely reproduce them in print, electronic or other forms. Letters to the Editor must contain the author’s name, address and daytime telephone number. Maximum length is 250 words. We reserve the right to edit, condense or reject any contribution. Letters reflect the opinion of the writer and not that of Pique Newsmagazine. Pique Newsmagazine is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please contact (edit@ piquenewsmagazine.com). If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the web site at mediacouncil. ca or call toll-free 1-844-877-1163 for additional information. This organization replaces the BC Press council (and any mention of it).

ISSN #1206-2022 Subscriptions: $76.70/yr. within Canada, $136.60/yr. courier within Canada. $605.80/ yr. courier to USA. GST included. GST Reg. #R139517908. Canadian Publications Mail Product Sales Agreement #40016549.

Lifestyle & Arts

58 FORK IN THE ROAD Writer Glenda Bartosh is grateful that “clean eating” is trendy, but warns shoppers to look out for foods washed with chlorine-ish water, which is allowed by Health Canada.

60 EPICURIOUS Calling all honey lovers: June is National Pollinator Month, and the Fairmont Chateau Whistler is buzzing with all sorts of exciting offerings in celebration of the bees.

66 NOTES FROM THE BACK ROW This week, our columnist Feet Banks sings the praises of Keanu Reeves—who has his acting chops on display in both action flicks and rom-coms this week.

68 MUSEUM MUSINGS This week, the column looks back on the bike shops that kept Whistler’s wheels turning when mountain biking was first emerging in the resort.

74 PIQUECAL BioBlitz welcomes plenty of scientists—and free events—to Whistler this weekend. Don’t miss the Night Critters session on Saturday evening at Alpha Lake Park.

W NE

G IN T S LI

Tyndall Stone Lodge Walk to everything Whistler Village has to offer in this fully equipped, 1 bedroom plus loft condo, fully furnished, vaulted ceilings, full kitchen, gas fireplace, sundeck with mountain views, in-suite washer and dryer, underground parking, outdoor pool and hot tub. Nightly rentals permitted.

$909,000

FULLY FURNISHED 1/4 OWNERSHIP CONDO/HOTELS IN WHISTLER CREEKSIDE

CONTACT JAMES FOR AVAILABILITY THINKING OF BUYING OR SELLING? CALL JAMES FOR MORE INFORMATION.

6 JUNE 6, 2019

De live ring the Dream – Whistler

JAMES COLLINGRIDGE

CALL JAMES, THE LEGENDS & EVOLUTION SPECIALIST Direct: 604-902-0132 Toll Free: 1-888-689-0070 james@whistlerrealestate.net www.whistlerrealestate.net

CAROLYN HILL

PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

WHISTLER, BC

604-907-0770

chill@whistlerbuyer.com ~ whistlerbuyer.com


EN OP

LY DAI

LOCAL OWNE LY DA OPERA ND TED

T0 M A 7 PM 10

OUR WEEKLY SPECIALS JUNE 6 - JUNE 12, 2019

604.938.9301

Feeding the Spirit of Whistler Since 1988

BC GROWN

AMBROSIA APPLES

99

¢/LB

WASHINGTON GROWN

FRESH ASPARAGUS - FIRST OF THE SEASON!

3.99/LB

8.80/KG

CALIFORNIA GROWN

FRESH BROCCOLI CROWNS

2.69/LB

5.93/KG

GOLD "JET FRESH" PINEAPPLE

3.99

EACH

ROOTDOWN FARMS

ORGANIC GREEN KALE

2.99

BUNCH

MAPLE LODGE

SMOKED CHICKEN

1.89

100G

RESER'S

SALADS

2.99

454G

TORTILLAS

3.99

240G

BAKER BOYS

CINNAROLLS

6.99

840G

ACT II

MICROWAVE POPCORN

2 FOR $3

234G

ROBIN HOOD

FLOUR

4.99

2.5KG

KRAFT

SALAD DRESSINGS

2 FOR $4

HELLMAN'S

MAYONNAISE

5.99

HEINZ

BEANS OR PASTAS

2 FOR $3

COMPLIMENTS

LONG GRAIN RICE

5.99

COMPLIMENTS

SODA POP

2 FOR $3

OLYMPIC

KREMA YOGURTS

3.99

650G

CREEKSIDE'S OWN

SUNDRIED TOMATO PORK SAUSAGE Made Fresh

1.69

/100G

PARADISE VALLEY

FRENCHED BONE IN PORK LOIN CHOPS

9.99/LB

ARGENTINIAN

WILD & RAW PRAWNS

12.99

FREE RANGE CHICKEN THIGHS

6.99/LB

HAWAIIAN

2.18/KG

BELLA CASARA

BURRATA

9.99

250G

FIELD ROAST

VEGAN FIELDBURGERS Hand Formed Patties made from Barley, Carrots, Celery, Onion, Garlic & Mushrooms -

7.99

$

4 PACK

SUNLIGHT

LIQUID LAUNDRY DETERGENT Sensitive Skin, Lemon Fresh or HE

9.99

$

4.43L

CREEKSIDE'S OWN

SEAFOOD CAKES

Crab or Lobster Made Fresh Instore Daily

2 FOR

Locally Grown in Pemberton!

Crunchy Coleslaw, Macaroni or Potato

LA TORTILLA FACTORY

Soft Italian Cheese with a Creamy Centre

$

Picked ripe and flown here for the best eating Pineapples on the market

ROSSDOWN FARMS

Flour, Power Green or Multigrain

Just Heat and Serve! Careful - Habit Forming!

Butter or Butter Lovers

All Purpose or Wholewheat

8 Flavours to choose from

Regular, Light, Olive Oil or Vegan

6 Varieties to choose from

17 Flavours to choose from

Plain or Vanilla

Instore from Paradise Valley Free Range Canadian Pork

Free Range Canadian Pork

Peeled and Deveined

Boneless & Skinless - Humane Society Approved

6

$

398ML 2KG 2L

22.02/KG 454G 15.41/KG

PEANUT BUTTERS Smooth, Crunchy or Chocolate Peanut Butter

FRONT END • GROCERY DELI/ BAKERY • MEAT/ SEAFOOD PRODUCE

350G & 750G Jars Locally Made in Sunny Sidney by the Sea, BCC.

25% OFF

Please apply in-store (look for Kent, Don or Joanna), or online at www.creeksidemarket.com

VILLAGE

710-890ML

ISLAND NUT ROASTERY

COME JOIN THE CREEKSIDE MARKET FAMILY!

LOCATED IN CREEKSIDE

250ML

OPEN DAILY

7AM–10PM

604.938.9301


OPENING REMARKS

Troubled waters THERE IS LITTLE DOUBT that Whistler has some of the best water in the world. We only have to turn on the tap to enjoy it—a pleasure and a human right I would argue, though it remains unavailable to millions globally including thousands here in Canada.

BY CLARE OGILVIE edit@piquenewsmagazine.com

Our waterways and our oceans are part of the foundation of our existence, and as Canada, indeed the world, celebrates World Oceans Day on June 8, let’s think about what needs to be done to protect them. (In 2009, the United Nations designated June 8 as World Oceans Day, a sister to Earth Day after urging from Canada. World Oceans Day Canada began immediately thereafter.) The United Nations estimates that about 3 billion people use seafood as a main protein

becoming increasingly oxygen-deprived, and if that trend continues, so will our air, and so will we all. The area of “dead zones,” (areas with insufficient oxygen to support most life) in the open oceans have increased by 400 per cent since 1950, and the dead zone areas in coastal waters have increased by 1,000 per cent, says GO2NE. But it is not just the open oceans in peril. Closer to home, Canada has the longest coastline in the world, bordering three oceans, each of which is a diverse ecosystem. Think of the Hudson Bay estuaries, which host the world’s largest beluga whale calving area. More than 55,000—about a quarter of the world’s population—migrate every year from their winter ranges to the mouths of the Seal, Nelson and Churchill rivers. Currently, the globe is busy protecting the open oceans in an effort to meet international conservation targets— countries have made commitments to the United Nations to  protect 10 per cent  of marine areas by 2020. Canada is busy being part of this, but what is crucial for

“Coastal waters have a greater diversity of species and face more immediate threats from energy extraction, tourism, development, habitat degradation and overfishing than open oceans.” -DAVID SUZUKI

source, and more than 200 million people are employed in work related to marine fisheries. And scientists have estimated that various forms of oceanic life produce somewhere between 50 and 70 per cent of the oxygen in our planet’s atmosphere. But the oxygen is not just important for us—water creatures need it too. The UN’s  Global Ocean Oxygen Network (GO2NE) recently found that the seas are

biodiversity is the protection of shorelines. “Coastal waters have a greater diversity of species and face more immediate threats from energy extraction, tourism, development, habitat degradation and overfishing than open oceans,” wrote environmental activist and scientist David Suzuki in a column last fall. “For example, coral reefs cover less than 0.1 per cent of the ocean floor but are home to 25 per cent of all

marine species.” We also know that our Pacific Coast is vulnerable to greater risks of oil spills from the sevenfold increase in tanker traffic that would come with the Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion. And what about the plight of the 76 remaining resident orcas on B.C.’s South Coast? We also know that our oceans are choked with plastics. Scientists believe 80 to 90 per cent of plastics entering our oceans come from land, while some is litter along our ocean beaches most plastics flow down our streams, creeks, lakes and rivers to our oceans. Think about the pollution in our own waterways—the River of Golden Dreams suffers the yellow-dinghy scourge every summer, and cast your mind back to the incredible amount of waste taken out of lakes every summer in the Great Lakes Clean Up event. In 2016, the World Economic Forum warned “there will be more plastics than fish in our oceans by 2050 if we continue on the path we are on.” We now dump eight million tonnes of plastic into our oceans every year, killing and harming marine life. What can you do? There are some very simple things to remember. Don’t buy any drinks in plastic bottles, carry your own water bottle, recycle all your plastics properly, don’t use single-use plastics (bags, cutlery, straws, stir sticks—you get the idea) and try wherever possible not to buy things or food wrapped in plastic. The power of biodiversity is all around us, not just in our waterways and oceans. While you think about World Oceans Day on Saturday also consider attending Whistler’s 13th annual BioBlitz organized by the Whistler Naturalists (BioBlitz is a 24-hour race against the clock to count as many species as possible—mammals, birds, plants, frogs, fish, bugs). Sessions are open to the public all weekend long. To find out more, go to www.whistlernaturalists.ca n

55 ACRES OF LAND IN PEMBERTON

DL5148 Enjoy almost 1000 feet of Lillooet River frontage from this magnificent 55 acre parcel of private, waterfront land, 20 minutes to downtown Pemberton. Located approximately 25 miles north of Whistler, this property offers a creek, trees and wildlife.

!

LD SO

With limited inventories of available homes for sale, and prices near all time highs, it continues to be an opportune time to sell! Why not call and enlist my services today?

ASKING PRICE $498,000

Dave Brown

Personal Real Estate Corporation

davebrown@wrec.com www.davesellswhistler.com www.davesellswhistler.com / www.whistlerrealestateblog.ca Cell: 604 905 8438 / Toll Free: 1 800 667 2993 ext. 805

8 JUNE 6, 2019

IN THE MARKET?

Sotheby’s unparalleled global reachalong with our local expertise, bring very powerful results to our clients in Whistler and from around the world.

1074660 BLACKCOMB WAY  $709K

Call to arrange a complementary market evaluation of your home today!


ARE YOU READY?

The SasqUatch® WAKES FROM HIBERNATION JUNE 8th

Ride The SasqUatch®

The longest zipline in Canada & the USA! Ziptrek Ecotours hosts a selection of breathtaking zipline tours. Our wilderness adventure area is located directly above Whistler Village, in the spectacular temperate rainforest valley between Whistler and Blackcomb Mountains.

Discover eco-exhilaration®

ziptrek.com 604.935.0001


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Where is the transparency and oversight? House Speaker Darryl Plecas shocked British Columbians with his bombshell report last year on inappropriate staff spending at the B.C. Legislature: Designer fashions, globetrotting travel, lucrative pension top-ups, watches, luggage and, of course, the famous wood-splitter. As one reads about wood splitters being purchased and moved to the home of a senior bureaucrat in Victoria, $80,000 for four steps in Vancouver, hundreds of thousands spent on budget covers in Ottawa or a door-opening contract of $95,000 in the Senate, one can’t help but wonder what goes on in our little town when it comes to giving out (municipal) contracts. More specifically, who controls the flow of untendered award contract spending and what percentage of our spending is being handed out without any competitive bids or elected oversight? Wanting to know, I did what most citizens feel is the proper course of action and filed a Freedom of Information (FOI) request, which is readily available online, that I hand delivered to municipal hall. The request specifically asked for a list from 2018 of all untendered contracts including the name of the company (no numbers please), the amount and the

purpose of the contract with a total. These award contracts are presumed to all be under $25,000 as per the rule, although in many other jurisdictions, the limit is often exceeded for a multitude of reasons, one being the fact that no one really seems to care. To be clear, the Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) has a policy that allows for any work valued at less than $25,000 to be awarded without tendering or competition. Interestingly, this is the same limit set on most federal government tendering as well. With the RMOW annual budget well under $100 million and the

federal government with a budget of about $400 billion (4,000 times larger!), having the same award limit seemed highly unnecessary and untethered. Shouldn’t we be tendering anything over $5,000, maybe? Anyway, this was just starting to get interesting. I got a quick response from the RMOW records department regarding the FOI request. Kudos to them for a quick response. Unfortunately, to be frank, they said they do not have a list or a total of untendered award contracts. I repeat, there is no centralized data on how often money is spent without

Di

OP spla E y 1p N Su Suite m- nd 4p ay m

tendering, who is getting these contracts, who is approving them, how much they cost, or, if in fact many are between $24,000 and $25,000 and just under the amount that requires transparency, vetting and competition. Confirming if individual companies are getting multiple contracts each year, which are all just shy of $25,000, could also be enlightening. If this information is recorded somewhere, it is not available to the public through an FOI. Seems that someone must have such a list somewhere if only to show how much value they are getting for the dollar. If someone wants a report or information on something and this information does not exist then the (municipality is) not permitted to create it. The mayor (Jack Crompton) confirmed himself, in response to my surprise at the lack of this key information, that they were in the throes of budget meetings but that, “We do not intend (at this time) to develop the document you are requesting.” Check that. They do not intend to review these amounts or totals as part of the budgeting process. Seems like an invaluable tool in the toolbox for keeping costs under control and avoiding unnecessary tax increases. Not so, says the mayor. There are no plans to quantify and utilize this information in the budgeting process. I see this approach as intentionally obtuse and bordering on incompetence, with a healthy opportunity for cronyism as required. It should be noted as well that Mayor Crompton is using his anecdotal observations to ensure that all

11-1350 Cloudburst Drive $1,899,000 A contemporary mountain home in Cheakamus Crossing. In-floor radiant heating throughout, gas range & fireplace, private hot tub and double car garage. Stunning views and unparalleled access to all of Whistler’s outdoor recreational activities. Under construction, completion 2019

Steve Shuster

t: 604.698.7347 | e: steve@steveshusterrealestate.com www.steveshusterrealestate.com 10 JUNE 6, 2019


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR this work is being done in a cost effective and sustainable way. He is “proud” of it. Regardless of the fact that “it” has actually never been clearly defined, measured or tested and there is no mechanism to do this. We apparently needed a two-inch-thick preliminary report on toilets, which may allow us to save on toilet paper long term by literally

Many of the current councillors talked a lot about spending and prudence during the election. They might want to look at what most experts would agree is the low-hanging fruit of competitive tendering. This would save 15 to 30 per cent and ensure the best value for money. Perri Domm // Whistler

“Many of the current councillors talked a lot about spending and prudence during the election. They might want to look at what most experts agree is the low-hanging fruit of competitive tendering. This would save 15 to 30 per cent and ensure the best value for money.”

52 SUNPATH Enjoy spectacular views of Blackcomb Mountain from this centrally located, spacious, onelevel, 3-bdrm townhome. Zoned for nightly rentals, features include; year round heated outdoor pool, hot tub and underground parking. $1,750,000 WHISTLER’S #1 RE/MAX AGENT

sally@sallywarner.ca 106-7015 Nesters Rd, Whistler

604-932-7741

propertiesinwhistler.com

Marshall Viner PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

PremieretoLifestyle Neighbourhood Register atWhistler’s marshallviner.com receive weekly real estate updates

2724 Millars Pond Crescent • 3 Bdrms + Den + Recreation Room, 3.5 Bath family home • Adjacent to Millars Pond Park and Valley Trail

- PERRI DOMM

• Ideal floorplan, immaculate home and property for a Whistler family

using the report, but when it comes to the millions and millions of dollars spent without any elected oversight, the mayor’s opinion, based on personal observations, is all we need? Don’t bother to look here! Not sure who may be getting the wood splitter in Whistler but the optics of such a naïve approach is startling. Time for a $5,000 cap and full disclosure.

Being independent is destroying us Although Max’s opinion piece was titled “Independent, but at what cost?” I couldn’t find the answer (Pique, May 30). Though I doubt there is even a sliver of interest, since it is critically important if we can and want to avoid complete climate breakdown, I thought I should answer his question: Being independent is costing at least

• Minutes to Creekside lifts, Spring Creek Elementary School

$2,299,000 T 604 .935.2287 E marshall@marshallviner.com

marshallviner.com

PIQUE WINS TOP CANADIAN WRITING AWARDS Pique Newsmagazine was awarded seven writing awards in the Canadian Community Newspaper Awards for 2019. Winners were announced on June 4. The national competition celebrates the best in community publishing from across the country. Newspapers of similar circulation size compete against each other and are judged by industry experts. “Pique’s team strives at all times to tell the stories that matter to our readers in print and online,” said editor Clare Ogilvie. “We are fortunate to have a newsroom of writers who are multi-award-winning reporters who value contextual reporting, transparency and facts. The newsroom and our columnists are supported by an amazing and creative production team, all of whom are committed to the best in journalism. Recognition by our peers through these awards is humbling and inspiring. “This is all possible because we live in a place with such a supportive community— this is what allows us to pursue stories and stay relevant—and we are very grateful.” Pique’s sports editor Dan Falloon took gold for Best Sports Coverage, while news reporter Braden Dupuis took the top prize in the Best Business Writing category for “Waiting for the smoke to clear.” Pique also took silver in the business category for reporter Joel Barde’s “Modular Housing is coming to the Sea to Sky—and it’s here to stay.” Barde and news reporter and features editor Brandon Barrett also took silver for Best Feature Series, for their work covering the grizzly bear issue in 2018. Falloon won silver in the Best Historical Story category for his “Steep Measures,” while in the Best Environmental Writing category, Dupuis took silver for “A Call to Action.” Dupuis also won bronze in the Best Historical Story category for his “Lessons for Whistler’s aspiring councillors” feature. n

Write to us! Letters to the editor must contain the writer’s name, address and a daytime telephone number. Maximum length is 450 words. Pique Newsmagazine reserves the right to edit, condense or refrain from publishing any contribution. Letters reflect the opinion of the writer and not that of Pique Newsmagazine.

New Price | $7,990,000 2952 High Point Drive, Kadenwood

Sensational contemporary mountain oasis located in the exclusive ski-in/ ski-out Kadenwood development; North America’s only neighbourhood that can be accessed by a private residents only gondola. Renowned Canadian architectural firm; Battersby Howat have created a true masterpiece and the well thought out floor plan and interior space absolutely have to be seen to be believed. Walk in through the front door into the spacious foyer and be blown away by concrete, glass & rich red cedar highlights and features that are truly one of kind. The floor plan for this outstanding chalet has been carefully thought out to capture jaw dropping mountain & surrounding terrain views that one will never tire of enjoying – no matter the time of year! Notable perks of this home include a spacious gym, plenty of storage, 2 outdoor fireplaces, heated BBQ area & private hot tub. Call today to make your appointment to view this absolutely fascinating mountain home! Welcome to the Best Place on Earth!

Maggi Thornhill Personal Real Estate Corporation Mobile +1-604-905-8199 Maggi.Thornhill@evcanada.com

©2019 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.

JUNE 6, 2019

11


Five bedroom home with revenue suite This high-quality Whistler style home is now available in Alpine Meadows. The lot boasts over 10,800 sq.ft, and allows ample flat parking for seven cars plus a generous sized double garage. Soak in the mountain views from the hot tub after a full day of enjoying everything that Whistler has to offer. Now priced at $2,695,000

Laura Wetaski

604-938-3798 laura.wetaski@evcanada.com

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR the life of humanity and likely the life of nature. We all have our individual make-beliefs. We mostly inherit them but we can tweak the made-up beliefs of others to make them our own. Once we have our mind set on them we

“By re-entering politics, Jody Wilson-Raybould and Jane Philpott make us weaker.” - DOUG BARR

Whistler

Nick Davies, Whistler local and experienced family lawyer practising across BC and Yukon.

Call at 604-602-9000 or visit www.macleanlaw.ca Maclean Law is headquartered in Vancouver with offices across British Columbia.

close it “like a steel trap.” Our made-up beliefs all conflict. They divide us. They separate us from each other and nature. They make us independents. They restrict possible interdependent self-creation and result in certain independent self-destruction. Our make-believe keeps us small-minded. Despite the massive amount of knowledge that has been acquired since the birth of humanity, particularly in the last few hundred years, we are still trying to fill the void like the first man. Some of the scientists who keep track of our progress toward self-destruction say it is almost completed and there is nothing we can do to prevent the inevitable. A year or so ago, others gave us a chance and about a decade to turn ourselves around. Getting rid of plastic straws notwithstanding, we have yet to make the necessary turn.

CR CRABAPPLE CORNER

WHISTLER GOLF COURSE OLD GROWTH GIANT CEDARS

VA LL EY TR AI L

2246 BRANDYWINE WAY Bayshores

Mountain Psychology and Neurofeedback Centre

Stephen L. Milstein, Ph.D., R. Psych. BC #765 - 604.938.3511 Dawna Dixx Milstein, OT. COTBC # AA0201 - 604.938.3523 Whistler: #107 - 4368 Main St, Whistler, B.C. V0N 1B4 Squamish: 38077 2nd Ave, Squamish, B.C. // 604.848.9273

12 JUNE 6, 2019

strength, a diversity of make-believe is a fatal weakness. By re-entering politics, Jody WilsonRaybould and Jane Philpott make us weaker. They will remember us (as) being the species with unknown potential that became so small minded they let their reaction to nothing destroy everything. Doug Barr // Whistler n

AB DR APP IVE LE

SINGING CEDARS 8TH HOLE TEE BOX

Serving sea to sky for 18 years

This is not make-believe. It is not fake news. We need no evidence other than continuing politics to conclude we are still heading in the wrong direction. Contrary to Justin (Trudeau’s) small-minded opinion, rather than being a

FOR THE RECORD In last week’s Pique, May 30, in the “Opening Remarks” we reported that the province had boosted its education budget ”from $580 million to $6.6 billion,” due to an editing error. In fact, the budget was boosted by $580 million. Pique regrets the error. n

6642 CEDAR GROVE LANE Whistler Cay Estates 5 BED MAIN HOUSE + 2 BED SUITE / 2835 SQFT Location! Proven revenue producer operating as a staff house. Unique location backing on the valley trail and the Whistler Golf Course. Walk and bike to everything! $2,499,000

2-2101 WHISTLER ROAD Highpointe

4.5 BED / 3 BATH / 2475 SQFT

1.5 BED / 1 BATH / 597 SQFT

Classic Whistler ski chalet! Great layout, double car garage, walk to Creekside Gondola.

Completely renovated turn key townhouse zoned for nightly rentals. Walk to Creekside Gondola!

$1,929,000

$679,000

604. 902 .61 0 6 josh@myseatosky.com whistlerrealestatemarket.com RE/MAX Sea to Sky Real Estate • 105-4360 Lorimer Rd, Whistler


PIQUE’N YER INTEREST

Why I’m jumping on the Raptors’ bandwagon ON THURSDAY, I joined a group of friends at a bar and watched a basketball game (from start to finish) for the first time in the better part of a decade. Like many, I count myself among a much-maligned contingent of sports fan: the bandwagon jumper. But in my view, there should be no

BY JOEL BARDE jbarde@piquenewsmagazine.com

shame in it. It is, of course, a great time to cheer for the Raptors, Canada’s only NBA basketball team, who appear to have a real shot at winning the league finals. Kawhi Leonard, the Toronto-based team’s star player, has been leading a phenomenal playoff run. Yet many fear he will decamp to another team next year. So who knows if this streak will be repeated anytime soon. I know this tidbit from reading the many primers that have popped up for people like me—the part-time follower. With titles like, “A bandwagon fan’s guide to the Toronto Raptors,” they are immensely helpful for people who want the backstory.

Other important things I have learned? Point guard Kyle Lowry works (really) hard and is a fan favourite; The Raptors are up against the Golden State Warriors who are playing for their third straight championship; and Canadian rapper Drake is a really, really big Raptors’ fan. Admittedly, I already kind of knew this last item—the rapper’s cultural

tributes to Kevin Durant and Steph Curry (star Warriors players, apparently)—as signs of a hidden agenda. Personally, I find all the handwringing about Drake a bit absurd. Seeing a superstar rapper so exuberant, so invested in his team is refreshing. As I watched Game 1 of the finals, I kept wondering why Sportsnet doesn’t

In an age where cynicism runs rampant, I find myself encouraged by the unbridled joy that’s on display.

significance is too big not to have noticed. What I didn’t know is just how polarizing his courtside behaviour is, with one Montreal Gazette writer recently calling out Drake’s “clownish antics (that) deflect attention from a very good Toronto team.” Others point to two mysterious tattoos on Drake’s left arm—which appear to be

pan to him more often, or maybe even hand him a microphone and let him conduct the post-game interview? Basketball, it seems, is one of those sports that embraces the spectacle, where players and fans are allowed, and even encouraged, to have big personalities. This stands in stark contrast to professional hockey, where star players

are nearly always understated and quick to deflect attention away from themselves. In an age where cynicism runs rampant, I find myself encouraged by the unbridled joy that’s on display. Thousands of Torontonians have been packing into Jurassic Park, a public square, to watch the game, and Canadians from coast to coast are embracing the team. Why wouldn’t I want to be part of that? If there is one unfortunate aspect of being a bandwagon jumper, it’s knowing what you missed—the spectacular plays that led to this moment. That includes Leonard’s Game 7 buzzer-beater against the Philadelphia 76ers. The ball literally bounced on the rim four times before finally dropping. Watching the replay is incredible, but seeing it live would have been next level. Yet at least I’m finally tuned in, with a grand new interest to enjoy, albeit for a brief amount of time. If you are like me, and perhaps feel a twinge of guilt about your lack of devotion, don’t. Canada appears to be having a moment, embracing a sport with broad appeal. And real fans seem to be happy for newcomers to join the party. ■

OFF ROAD BUGGY TOURS

SAVE $20 NOW

W I L D E R N E S S ADVENTURES

CANADIANWILDERNESS.COM

604 938 1616 CARLETON LODGE

JUNE 6, 2019

13


FIRST PIQUE

OUR ONLINE CONVERSATION

The amount of sunscreen thought to wash into the oceans each year.

8M

This week, Pique’s online readers were curious about what it meant, exactly, to be “sobercurious,” as writer Cathy Goddard investigated in our previous issue’s cover story. Many were happy to see a spotlight shone on an alcohol-free lifestyle—a choice that’s most often hidden by the overwhelming glare of Whistler’s drinking scene.

I would love to see more pubs and bars carry good (non-alcoholic) beers,” wrote one follower.

Others chimed in with their experience staying sober in Whistler, adding

“ ” “ ”

I still go out and meet friends for drinks ... I just have something without alcohol,

Not hard to do really, have been sober for at least a decade.

Let’s hope people aren’t confusing a cinnamon bear or light coloured black bear for a grizzly. Colour is not the best way to confirm a grizzly. Large tall front shoulders with a big hump above the shoulders. We don’t need trails closed all year from false reports.

OF INTEREST

Need car insurance with ICBC? We do Autoplan! Visit your ICBC agency at Nesters Plaza. David Livesey Financial Advisor

David Livesey & Associates Inc 212-7015 Nesters Rd | Whistler 604-938-6100 | www.cooperators.ca/David-Livesey-Associates

Not all products available in all provinces

14 JUNE 6, 2019

dumped into our oceans every year, killing and harming marine life.

DID YOU KNOW?

When mountain bikes first hit the logging roads in the valley in the early 1980s, most riders had to head to Vancouver for any mountain-bike-specific parts and maintenance. A couple of shops were starting to pop up around that time: Jim McConkey’s shop sold bikes in the summer months, Doris Burma operated a small bike shop out of a trailer (Doris was passionate about mountain bikes and famed for her Cheakamus Challenge precursor race called “See Colours & Puke,” a wild mountain-bike race reportedly meant to be completed on mushrooms), and in the autumn of 1985, Backroads Whistler owner Eric Wight opened a shop, too.

THROWBACK THURSDAY

As we get ready to enjoy summer and the amazing backcountry that surrounds us, we need to remember to enjoy it responsibly. In 2011, Pique explored safety in the woods in the winter and summer and offered some key tips in its cover feature “Surviving the backcountry.” Said writer Stephen Smysnuik, “No one’s saying, ‘Avoid the backcountry.’ The landscape is there to be enjoyed, and should be enjoyed. It’s how people enjoy it—whether they assess the risks properly and take the necessary precautions—that will determine how much enjoyment they actually take out of it. “The backcountry is there for people to enjoy responsibly,” said then-Whistler RCMP Staff Sgt. Steve LeClair in the feature. “People are welcome to use it like any other recreational area, but we want people to enjoy it responsibly and make sure that they’re safe.” n

4:35.781

Hydrogen Buses

Everest Anniversary

P.12

P.28

Daniel Wesley P.60

FREE LIFESAVERS

The time it took Whistlerite Finn Iles to take fourth at the second UCI Downhill World Cup of the season in Fort William, Scotland on June 2.

12,700 tonnes

BACKCOUNTRY U.S. and Canadian search and

18.21

Home Auto Life Investments Group Business Farm Travel

Another story that garnered big interest online detailed a possible grizzly sighting on Rainbow Lake Trail last month. Read one comment:

tonnes The amount of plastic

May 26, 2011

|

WHISTLER’S WEEKLY NEWSMAGAZINE |

SURVIVAL

rescue teams push education

www.piquenewsmagazine.com


NEWS WHISTLER

Making connections in support of mental health MOUNTAIN TOWNS MEET IN COLORADO FOR KATZ AMSTERDAM FOUNDATION CONVENING

BY BRADEN DUPUIS WITH MAY BEING Mental Health Awareness Month, more than 60 nonprofit, local government and health care leaders from 10 mountain communities gathered in Boulder, Colo., from May 29 to 31 for the firstever Katz Amsterdam Foundation Convening. The event was designed to bring professionals working in mental and behavioural health together to establish a foundation for shared learning, said Beth Ganz, executive director of the Katz Amsterdam Foundation (launched last year by Vail Resorts CEO Rob Katz and his wife Elana Amsterdam, with a commitment of almost $100 million). “One of the main goals of the Katz Amsterdam Foundation is to connect mountain communities, people working in mental and behavioural health in the mountain communities to each other, and so this convening was really the start of that,” Ganz said. “We wanted to bring everybody together with the goal to create the foundation of the relationships and connections that we hope can really foster shared learning, teaching, and sharing across the communities.” The format for the conference featured “a little bit of everything,” Ganz said, from

COLORADO CONNECTIONS Mountain communities face many of the same challenges when it comes to addressing mental health. PHOTO SUBMITTED

16 JUNE 6, 2019

sharing personal stories to presentations of different programs from the mountain communities. “We did a lot of small group work where we looked at the challenges that communities face, and while every community is incredibly unique, it was really eye-opening to see how the challenges we all face are very similar,” she said. Some of those shared challenges include

centre is, or where the social services are, where is the women’s centre where is the food bank, in a very fun way,” she said. “Some different organizations were interested in bringing that into their community, so I got to share a little bit about that.” As for what caught her attention, Kaya said she was impressed with a warming centre launched by Lake Tahoe to support

“We will keep connecting, keep sharing, keep learning from each other.” - BETH GANZ

a lack of professionals (largely driven by housing availability), the continued stigma around mental health issues and a lack of a sense of belonging, said Gizem Kaya, program and community development manager with the Whistler Community Services Society. On that last point, Kaya said many people at the convening were excited about the local Connect Whistler Week, which helps newcomers to the resort find the services they may need. “We discussed stigma and then connectedness during the convening, and Connect Whistler Week does a really good job of bringing newcomers and acquainting them with services, and where the healthcare

its homeless population in the winter months. “It’s amazing work that seems very difficult to do, but just giving people a warm place to sleep on the coldest nights ... that seems like very impressive work to me,” she said. Addressing the more systemic issues around mental health starts with education at a young age, Kaya added. “If we continue social emotional learning in schools we are going to see that ripple effect later, and for people who are past that education piece now, we try to create a sense of connectedness, and we build community,” she said. “We remove the stigma from (accessing mental health

services), and we make ourselves available. We take care of each other; we take care of our neighbours.” Kaya also wanted to acknowledge the support of the Katz Amsterdam Foundation in Whistler to this point, highlighting its assistance in expanding WCSS’ outreach services and counselling assistance, as well as the school lunch and healthy choices programs. “Thanks to these services we are able to fill in gaps that exist within our system, (which) allows us to provide super lowbarrier services in treatment as well as prevention areas,” she said, adding that the foundation gave WCSS $100,000 in 2018, $100,000 in 2017 and $333,000 in 2016 through the Whistler Blackcomb Foundation. The biggest takeaway from the convening, from Ganz’s perspective, was just how connected the communities really are. “We share related professions of course, but more importantly, we share a desire to really make a difference and to help others, and to ignite our passion to face tough issues and strive towards goals together that will really, truly help create healthy communities,” she said. As for what’s next, the goal is to “keep it up,” Ganz said. “We want to really create an effective learning community of these folks and others in our communities who are working on these issues every day,” she said. “So we will keep connecting, keep sharing, keep learning from each other.” Head to www.katzamsterdam.org for more. n


NEWS WHISTLER

FANTASTIC END UNIT #26 - 38455 WILSON CRESCENT SQUAMISH • $546,000

Residents reminded to stay vigilant on wildfire

• Bright, private, end-unit townhome with generous main floor layout. • 3 Bedrooms, 2 baths with walk-in closet and ensuite entrance off master. • New front & back deck areas great for BBQ’s, kids and gardening.

NEW BLACKWELL REPORT CLOSE TO BEING FINALIZED

• Terrific location with central playground, easy walkability to estuary and downtown.

BY BRADEN DUPUIS WHILE THERE HAVE been 256 wildfires in B.C. so far this year, only 42 were active as of June 4—and only one in the Coastal Fire Centre, which includes Whistler and the Sea to Sky—but as wildfire season ramps up, the message from local officials remains one of vigilance. “Keep an eye out. Don’t fear to call. Call 911. We’ll go search it out,” said Whistler Fire Rescue Service Chief John McKearney. With Whistler sitting at a high firedanger rating, things like backyard burning and illegal campfires remain a concern, though McKearney said the WFRS is not seeing a lot of either lately. “When we got into the extreme (fire danger rating) those few days there, we did the patrols. My staff have had to go and dismantle some areas in and around Cheakamus Crossing there, there was a common place where people tend to have a big campfire there,” McKearney said. “They’re dismantling these makeshift campfire areas, so getting the message out. “(But) we’re not (seeing a lot of them). I think there’s a good heightened awareness by our residents.” WFRS crews are attending to the fires to educate, first and foremost, but do have the ability to ticket up to $500, McKearney said. “We can’t afford a fire in our community, so it’s got to take hold right away,” he said. “If they’re unaware, that’s one thing. If

support for the FireSmart program and improvements to policy and process. The work on Cheakamus Lake Road is wrapping up this month, with more to come, said Resort Municipality of Whistler environmental stewardship manager Heather Beresford. “They managed to clear 40 hectares, and it’s part of a bigger project—they’re going to continue in the winter of 2019-20 to get another, hopefully, 40 hectares done,” Beresford said, adding that all told, the area has about 110 hectares prescribed to be thinned. “We’re just taking it in chunks because it’s a lot of work to get done.” Combined with thinning work on the west side of the highway, along the Callaghan Forest Service Road, the fuel breaks will “hopefully slow down a fire and give firefighters a place to defend our valley,” Beresford said. “There’s been work done below the Cheakamus Crossing neighbourhood as well, and then we could hopefully defend and slow down, control the fires there before they get into the main part of the valley.” The Kadenwood project is about halfway done (and should be wrapping up in the next six weeks or so), while the Rainbow project is waiting on funding announcements from the province, and could get underway this fall or the spring of 2020, Beresford said. Looking further into the future, a new draft report from fire consultants B.A. Blackwell & Associates Ltd. is close to being finalized. “They developed the next about 10 years

DANA FRIESEN SMITH • REALTOR® SEATOSKYDREAMTEAM.COM • 604.902.3878

CUSTOM HOMES • RENOVATIONS • DESIGN

Your one stop shop for design build services in the Sea to Sky Corridor 604 938-0688 www.peakventures.ca MEMBER OF THE CANADIAN HOME BUILDER ASSOCIATION

“Keep an eye out. Don’t fear to call. Call 911. We’ll go search it out.” - JOHN MCKEARNEY

they’re unwilling, that’s another.” Anyone who does see people having illegal campfires, improperly disposing of cigarette butts or otherwise endangering the community, should politely speak up, he added. “It’s everybody’s responsibility, and if you see an action that could jeopardize the community, respectfully speak to that action,” he said. The RMOW’s 2019-to-2023 proposed project list includes $639,540 for wildfire protection in 2019 (plus another $591,000 from provincial grants), and $3,448,900 from 2020 to 2023. Whistler’s wildfire protection program will target three key areas in 2019: wildfire fuel reduction (on Cheakamus Lake Road, near Kadenwood, in the Rainbow interface area and around priority critical infrastructure areas), public education and

worth of work, and we’ve got some priority areas up around the high school, in behind Spruce Grove, and down around Spring Creek towards the Cheakamus Crossing neighbourhood,” Beresford said. FireSmart community chipper days and strata workdays are also back this year, as is the adopt-a-trail campaign (which is looking for volunteer groups to help FireSmart sections of the Valley Trail). Anyone interested in either can email FireSmart coordinator Scott Rogers at srogers@whistler.ca. Head to www.whistler.ca/firesmart for more. Residents and visitors are reminded to report all fires in Whistler immediately by dialing 911. Fires outside of Whistler should be reported to the BC Wildfire Service at 1-800-663-5555 or *5555 toll-free on most cell networks. n

Offered Sundays - Thursdays

Reservations recommended

apres daily in the lounge from 3-5 pm oyster specials & bar menu dinner from 5 pm

4222 village square

604 932 4540

www.araxi.com JUNE 6, 2019

17


NEWS WHISTLER

New rules for drones now in effect OPERATORS MUST PASS ONLINE EXAM, REGISTER THEIR DRONES

BY BRADEN DUPUIS UNMANNED FLIGHT enthusiasts take note: As of June 1, new federal regulations for drones in Canada are now in effect. The new rules (which apply to drones weighing between 250 grams and 25 kilograms) are now in place for all drone operators, whether they fly for fun, work or research, though nothing will change for those flying smaller or larger drones. The regulations have two main categories of operation: basic (minimum age 14) and advanced (minimum age 16). Operators will have to pass an online exam and get a pilot’s certificate, and will be required to register their drones and mark them with the registration number. Aircrafts must not reach heights greater than 122 metres above ground and stay away from air traffic. Those wishing to fly outside the rules must obtain a special flight operations certificate from Transport Canada. Basic operators are required to fly at least 30 metres horizontally from (and not overtop of) bystanders, and all relevant sections of the Criminal Code (relating to things like air safety, breaking and entering,

mischief, trespassing, voyeurism and privacy) still apply to drone operators. Penalties include fines of $1,000 for flying without a licence, flying an unregistered or unmarked drone and flying where you aren’t allowed (like near emergency operations such as forest fires or advertised events like outdoor concerts or parades), and $3,000 for putting aircraft and people at risk. Fines for corporations breaking those rules are even higher ($5,000 to $15,000) and anyone who deliberately flies near an aircraft’s flight path faces up to $25,000 in fines and prison time. The new rules are good, but do leave some room to evolve, said Whistlerite Paul Hothersall. With a masters in systems engineering and a background in the aerospace industry, Hothersall has more experience than most, having worked with drones of varying sizes going back to the early 2000s. These days, he uses drones for both work and personal filming. The cost ($10 to take the basic online exam) is trivial, he said, and there are some great educational opportunities in requiring people to pass an exam—though some of the new requirements might be “on the overly cautious side.”

UNLIMITED SCANDINAVIAN BATH ACCESS MONDAY-FRIDAY

18 JUNE 6, 2019

- JENNIFER SMITH

“A lot of (the questions) have to do with cross-country wayfinding and directional stuff with a crosswind, and stuff over 200 nautical miles … not very accessible, and it’s not very relevant to something where the initial licence is for a line-of-sight, short-range, never more than 500 metres (drone),” he said. “They’ve gone from no rules, with, ‘this is what you should be doing,’ to, ‘You have to have a licence, you have to do this.’”

POKE - PHO SAMURAI COBB SALAD

Treat your body and mind to an escape from daily stress with our June one month pass.

199

“It takes a lot for all the pieces to come together.”

The new rules don’t change much for Whistler Blackcomb (WB), said senior specialist of communications Jennifer Smith. “We are private property, so regardless of the changes, anyone looking to fly on the mountain still needs permission and the circumstances which warrant providing access for drone coverage are limited,” Smith said in an email, noting that WB does fly drones for its own productions, but remains in complete control in those cases. “The mountain is not a commercial shoot location, other than for partner brands, and our film and television role is limited to scenes we can host without affecting our operation,” she said. “For those editorially based story pitches where producers really want to approach us with a drone query, we ask for $10 million Drone Operator’s insurance ($5 commercial general liability insurance and $5 million unmanned aerial vehicle liability insurance) and we then need to approve the plan, co-manage the shoot and it needs to work for our business. “So it takes a lot for all the pieces come together.” Read the new rules in full at www.tc.gc. ca. n

NE W S UM M E R D IS H E S

One month pass

$

“Some 13-year-old kid wants to get into this, interested in electronics or engineering or flight or whatever, and gets told he has to do all this studying,” Hothersall said, noting that many of the exam questions are lifted from the exam for a standard private pilot licence.

& AGEDASHI IS BACK! Now serving Gluten Free Teriyaki, Sauces & Dressings SCA N DI N AVE.COM 1 888 935 24 23

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK, 11AM - 10PM 2011 INNSBRUCK DR. CREEKSIDE · 604.935.0055


Display Suite OPEN Sunday 1pm - 4pm

Basalt Living

Whistler FINAL 6 UNITS

RELEASED Units now available: #7: 3 Bedroom + Flex Room, 3.5 Bathroom - $1,899,000 #11: 3 Bedroom + Flex Room, 3.5 Bathroom - $1,899,000 #15: 4 Bedroom, 3.5 Bathroom - $1,849,000 #16: 4 Bedroom, 3.5 Bathroom - $1,799,000 #17: 4 Bedroom, 3.5 Bathroom - $1,799,000 #18: 4 Bedroom, 3.5 Bathroom - $1,849,000 A collection of 24 contemporary luxury mountain homes located in Whistler’s newest community, Cheakamus Crossing. Enjoy in-floor radiant heating throughout, 10 ft ceilings in the main living area, gas range & fireplace and double car garage. Features a Masterchef’s kitchen with Sub Zero fridge, Wolf stove, U-Line wine fridge and waterfall quartz countertops. Stunning views and unparalleled access to all of Whistler’s outdoor recreational activities.

Steam shower Large covered decks Private Jacuzzi hot tub Electric blinds in master bedroom and living area Charging station for an electric car Pre-plumbed for air conditioning Concrete demising wall DON’T MISS OUT ON ONE OF WHISTLER’S LAST NEW HOME DEVELOPMENTS.

Steve Shuster t: 604.698.7347 | e: steve@steveshusterrealestate.com


NEWS WHISTLER

Backcountry safety org redoubles efforts to reach ESL communities RON LAM RECENTLY PRESENTED TO 70 CANTONESE SPEAKERS IN BURNABY MALL

BY JOEL BARDE RON LAM —an AdventureSmart BC volunteer—recently gave a presentation to about 70 Cantonese speakers at a Burnaby mall, highlighting various ways to stay safe when travelling in the backcountry. “In the Chinese community, there is hardly anything like this,” remarked Lam. Many in the audience were new immigrants from Hong Kong, he added. “They’ve been going out more frequently ... and it is important to educate them because everyone thinks that, ‘It will never happen to me,’” said Lam. According to Sandra Riches, program coordinator with AdventureSmart BC, Lam’s efforts are one part of a broader initiative. “We want to reach the ESL demographic, which is very diverse in the Lower Mainland and up the (Sea to Sky)

corridor,” said Riches. To that end, AdvenureSmart BC— which has a mandate to reduce the number and severity of search-and-rescue calls— is working with Avalanche Canada and various multicultural organizations, said Riches. “These are new Canadians and tourists and residents who have lived here, or (recently) moved here,” said Riches. “They love the outdoors, and they want to access it—whether it’s hiking, biking, paddling, non-motorized outdoor recreation.” With an annual budget of about $500,000 AdventureSmart BC relies on volunteer members like Lam to help get out its safety messaging. Riches said that the organization is keen to work with individuals who speak second languages and can help in its efforts. “(Lam’s) keen to reach that demographic, where we can’t with my staff,” said Riches. “We don’t speak Mandarin, or Cantonese,

MEET AND GREET Ron Lam, a volunteer with AdventureSmart BC, is helping the organization get its safety message out to Vancouver’s Cantonese-speaking community.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

or Spanish ... He’s able to reach that group uniquely.” This summer, AdventureSmart employees will be partnering up with ESL volunteers at busy trailheads such as the Grouse Grind, said Riches. “That’s where we know that demographic is frequenting, and that’s where I would like to have Ron (Lam) and the others join us, so we can meet the needs of the hikers in different languages,” she said. Current AdventureSmart materials are only published in French and English. “That’s why I’m taking a different angle and recruiting volunteers who can help us faceto-face,” said Riches.

Fertility consultations now available in Whistler! We are delighted to announce the opening of our satellite office at the Whistler Medical Clinic to bring our brand of excellence in fertility care to the patients of the SeaͲtoͲSky Corridor. PCRM is Canada’s largest Fertility Clinic, with offices in British Columbia and Alberta. We provide a full spectrum of fertility services including consultation, IUI, IVF, Egg freezing, and reproductive genetics. Talk with your health care provider today for a referral to see us.   If you have questions, call us at 604 422 7276 or visit us at:





BC        AB   Toll Free 





Whistler Burnaby Surrey  Vancouver Edmonton 1 866 481 7276

20 JUNE 6, 2019

pacificfertility.ca



201Ͳ4380 Lorimer Road 500Ͳ4601 Canada Way 1201Ͳ13737 96 Avenue 507 West Broadway 9888 Jasper Avenue

According to Lam, the AdventureSmart message resonates in the Chinese community. He noted that 64-year-old Chun Sek Lam and 43-year-old Roy Lee vanished while snowshoeing on Cypress Mountain back in 2016 “They belonged to a hiking group, which had some GPS location device, but they did not use that at the time,” said Lam. Lam believes it is incumbent on park administrators to implement signage in multiple languages to accommodate the diverse groups who are enjoying the trails. But in the meantime, he will carry on getting the safety message out. “I do enjoy it because it gives me a chance to help people,” said Lam. n


Discover Sunstone Master Planned: a thoughtfully planned neighbourhood on a sunny, south facing forested hillside.

TOWNHOMES

HOMESITES

ELEVATE YOUR LIVING

ROOM TO GROW

Spacious, elegant homes feature open-concept layouts and unobstructed views complete with expansive decks and large garages thoughtfully designed for your active Pemberton lifestyle.

24 carefully planned lots ranging from 8,900 sq ft

Community: Green space, parks, community garden and access to hiking and biking trails from your backyard. Access: Adjacent to recreational amenities and new Friendship Trail. Various sizes of single-family building lots, estate lots, as well as multi-family home options. Views: Amazing, elevated views of Mount Currie and the Pemberton Valley. South Facing: All day sun. Great Value: 25 minutes from Whistler yet a fraction of the price.

from $649,000

Now selling. ElevateSunstone.com

KAROLEENA HOMES starting from $1.2 million

from $279,000

to 19,700 sq ft. Situated on a sunny south-facing hillside adjacent to trails, amenities and recreation.

Now selling. SunstonePemberton.com

Keith McIvor 604-935-2650 1-800-667-2993

appointment, call 604-935-2650 sunstonepemberton.com

The developer reserves the right to make changes and modification to the project design, specifications and features without notice. E&O.E.


NEWS WHISTLER

WedgeWoods affordable housing rezoning submitted DISCUSSIONS REMAIN AROUND SLRD REGIONAL GROWTH STRATEGY

BY BRADEN DUPUIS A PROPOSAL FROM the developers of WedgeWoods Estates north of Whistler to add some affordable housing to their project is moving ahead with the submission of a formal rezoning application to the SquamishLillooet Regional District (SLRD)—but some discussions still remain around the SLRD’s Regional Growth Strategy. The affordable housing types envisioned in the proposal include family-style apartments and townhomes—enough to house 50 to 60 families—and would cater to those who are making good money but having trouble getting into the housing market. The proposal aims to offer affordable housing by removing the serviced land as a cost component (by offering it on the basis of $1—typically, the land makes up one third of the cost allocation for a development). The result is a proposed average sale price in WedgeWoods of $420,000 for a 1,350-square-foot townhouse (compared to $603,167 in Pemberton and $1,772,126 in

Whistler, based on MLS sales over the past six months), and $270,000 for an 825-squarefoot apartment (compared to $409,633 in Pemberton and $627,594 in Whistler). “We believe strongly that this is a good project, it has a clear community need, and if it’s judged on its own merits, it should proceed,” said proponent David Earhardt. The proposal was back before the SLRD board at its Committee of the Whole meeting on April 25, where it was heard that a small portion of the proposed development is not included in the SLRD’s Regional Growth Strategy (RGS) mapping, Earhardt said. With both Whistler and Squamish also requesting changes to their mapping in the RGS, SLRD staff suggested the change to WedgeWoods’ own mapping be considered in the same discussion. The board will discuss the changes to the RGS at its June 26 meeting. When the proposal was presented to the board at its March 20 meeting, SLRD directors expressed interest, but had concerns about the added density on the highway, and in a community that is lacking services like a grocery store (see Pique, March 25). To address some of the concerns heard,

in an updated presentation to the Committee of the Whole, the developers proposed the creation of north and southbound lay-bys and bus shelters, a pedestrian-activated highway crossing and a car sharing service for the development. For fire protection, the creation of a volunteer fire department (with a fire hall and fire truck paid for by the developers) is also proposed. Whistler director (and acting chair at the April 25 meeting) Jen Ford said she’s interested in seeing what staff comes back with in regards to the rezoning, and that she hopes the developers are moving in the right direction. “I hope (the concerns are) addressed through some definitive planning around what’s needed by a community of this size, because this is a pretty significant addition to the bed base there,” she said. Construction on WedgeWoods began in 2008, with the first of six planned phases (constituting 108 lots in total) completed in 2010. Through the new proposal, the developers stand to gain “a few more single-family market lots,” Earhardt said,

as well as cheaper infrastructure costs for the entire subdivision. But the idea was born from the desire to fill a need in the community, Earhardt said. “We’re short two doctors in Whistler, because they don’t have housing … there is fire, there is police, there is the small business owners. There is a huge list of people who have made their lives in Whistler, have been there three years, five years, and really need to be given a break,” he said. “And that’s who we’re targeting … they’re the heart and soul of the community.” The public will be invited to provide input on the project through a formal public hearing process (details to be announced). “I hope to hear from the public,” Ford said. “I encourage the public to come out and understand what’s being proposed, not only the public in Whistler, (but) in Pemberton, in the rest of the regional area, as well as in WedgeWoods itself, because when you offer a public opportunity to be heard, it’s so important that people take that opportunity.” n

Open House June 9th 2 to 5pm Onsite

22 JUNE 6, 2019


NEWS WHISTLER

RCMP reminds public to keep vehicles locked POLICE BRIEFS: INAPPROPRIATE ACTIVITY AT HOT SPRINGS; WHISTLER RCMP SET TO HOST ANNUAL OPEN HOUSE ON JUNE 8

BY MEGAN LALONDE POLICE ARE REMINDING residents to keep their vehicle doors locked, and valuables safely stowed out of sight after a series of thefts over the weekend. Over a 24-hour period between Saturday, June 1 and Sunday, June 2, Whistler RCMP responded to seven files in the Alpine Meadows area where vehicles had been ransacked and items stolen, according to a release. In one report, the vehicle itself was stolen. Police said the grey, 2015 Ford F150 pickup truck with British Columbia license plate PL143T was taken between 8 p.m. on Saturday evening and 10 a.m. on Sunday morning. The items stolen from the remaining vehicles, including money, electronics, sunglasses, wallets, credit cards and other small items, were all left in plain view, according to police. “RCMP have identified that in all but one file the vehicle doors were left unlocked and in some cases the keys for the vehicles were also left inside,” stated the release. “While RCMP are working to identify the suspect in this rash of thefts, police are once again reminding the community that these crimes appear by all accounts to be crimes

of opportunity.” To that end, police are urging residents to lock their doors and remove valuable items from their vehicles. If you reside in the Alpine Meadows neighbourhood and have home security cameras or vehicle dash cam video, police ask that you review it during the evening hours of June 1 to June 2 and report anything suspicious you might see to police.

room over the weekend. On Tuesday, June 4, Pemberton RCMP received a complaint from two families who witnessed a couple having intercourse in public, police said in a release. A number of families were camping at Skookumchuck Hot Springs on Saturday, June 1 when, at approximately 8 p.m., two families observed a couple who were engaged in sexual activity in full public

“RCMP have identified that in all but one file the vehicle doors were left unlocked ...”

WHISTLER RCMP TO HOST ANNUAL OPEN HOUSE

- WHISTLER RCMP

Police also caution anyone who sees the stolen vehicle not to approach it or any of the occupants and to instead call 911, Whistler RCMP at 604 932-3044 or Crimestoppers.

RCMP LOOK FOR HOT SPRINGS COUPLE Pemberton police are looking to speak with a couple who probably should have gotten a

lbs. with long, wavy, light brown hair and glasses, while the female was described as 5’4 and 140 lbs. with dark brown or black hair. The couple was driving a white Toyota Yaris and may have been staying at the campground over the weekend. If you were in the area over the weekend and may have seen this couple or their vehicle, police ask that you advise the Pemberton RCMP at 604-894-6634 or Crimestoppers.

view, despite the fact that small children were present. According to the release, the parents identified themselves and repeatedly asked the couple to take their activities to a private location. Despite these requests, the couple persisted. The couple is described as two Caucasian individuals between 25 and 30 years old. The male was about 5’8 and 140

Do you have plans this weekend? The Whistler RCMP detachment is hosting its annual open house this Saturday, June 8, from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. Police vehicles, boats, ATV’s and snowmobiles will be on display, while the RCMP’s police dog service and emergency response team will also be present. Mountain bike owners may want to pencil in a stop by the detachment, as 529 Garage will be on hand and set-up to offer free bike registrations. Members will be out and about dressed in Red Serge and available for photos, while attendees can enjoy a free barbecue, with RCMP members accepting donations for Cops for Cancer. ■

Serving the corridor for over 25 years!

Karen and her associate Krystle worked extremely hard on our mortgage for us. We have worked with her throughout the years and she is attentive and professional. It made the biggest investment of our life much easier with her guiding us through each step. I am happy to have found her and I have no doubt we will work together again in the future! - B & B Burton

SPRING FEATURE 3 COURSE VILLAGE SIGNATURE DINNER $35

$5 ASAHI BEER & 1/2 PRICE HOT SAKE Add a side of Prawns, Salmon or Scallops to any entrée for $10 Eileen Craig is dedicated and professional getting the job done and can be very knowledgeable with the new tougher financing rules.I highly recommend Eileen she is my first choice for referring business too. - L.H.

karengarrett.ca / eileencraig.ca

Located at 106 - 7015 Nesters Rd Whistler BC V8E 0X1

24 JUNE 6, 2019

SUNDAY - THURSDAY Located in the Hilton Resort & Spa overlooking the Village Stroll

| 6pm – close |

(excluding holidays)

reservations recommended

teppanvillage@shaw.ca • 604.932.2223 • teppanvillage.ca


BLACKCOMB GONDOLA NOW OPEN

THE 360 EXPERIENCE JUST GOT ELEVATED On June 8th, the Blackcomb Gondola opens for its inaugural summer as part of the 360 Experience. This new, world-class, 10-person gondola is the fastest and most comfortable way to get up Blackcomb Mountain.

BLACKCOMB GONDOLA HOURS June 8 – 21

10am – 5pm

June 22 – September 2

9:30am – 5pm

September 3 – 13

10am – 5pm

September 14 – October 14

10am – 5pm (Sunday – Friday) 10am – 8pm (Saturday)

whistlerblackcomb.com


NEWS WHISTLER

Deal to provide sexual-assault exams locally under discussion VCH DOESN’T HAVE $12,000 NURSE-TRAINING COSTS ‘IN BUDGET’: PEMBERTON MAYOR

BY JOEL BARDE AFTER YEARS OF ADVOCACY, residents of Whistler and Pemberton may soon be able to get sexual assault forensic exams locally. Tired of waiting for the region’s health authority to fund the initiative, the Sea to Sky Regional Hospital District—a SquamishLillooet Regional District (SLRD) body that serves residents of Squamish, Pemberton, Whistler and Areas C and D—is considering funding nurse training so that victims of sexual assault can be examined. According to Village of Pemberton (VOP) Mayor Mike Richman, a Regional Hospital District board representative, Vancouver Coastal Health (VCH) has left the Hospital District little choice. “As much as it leaves a bad taste—that VCH is not willing to pay for this—we are willing to fund it through the Hospital District anyway,” said Richman, during a May 29 regular VOP council meeting “VCH has said that it would cost about $12,000 (to do) the training and that they don’t have it in their budget.”

Women’s rights advocates say there is a major gap in the system when it comes to accessing the exam—which can be drawn on as crucial evidence in sexual-assault cases— in the Sea to Sky corridor. Under current service levels, if you are sexually assaulted in Whistler or Pemberton and want to undertake an exam immediately, your options are to travel to Squamish— where it is offered between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m., Monday to Friday—or to Vancouver. The exam is not offered in either Whistler or Pemberton. The situation has long been decried by the Howe Sound Women’s Centre, which maintains it presents a significant barrier to justice. While VCH has said it believes service levels are adequate, Pique has learned that the regional health authority is currently in discussions with the Regional Hospital District to address this issue. Under the potential agreement, the Hospital District would shoulder the costs to train four nurses to conduct the exam at a cost of about $3,000 each. Paying for training would represent a change in the role of the Hospital District,

Whistler's Favourite Steakhouse In 1998, Canada's Premier Steakhouse opened on the mountain. After 20 years, we're proud to be named Whistler's Best, year after year.

Four-Course Spring Menu Start with our famous Cheese Toast, then choose from a selection of Hy's favourite appetizers, entrées and desserts.

4995

$

Sunday to Thursday

HY’S STEAKHOUSE WHISTLER | 4308 MAIN ST ( I N T H E D E LTA H OT E L ) | 6 0 4 .9 0 5 .5 5 5 5 | H Y S S T E A K H O U S E.C O M

26 JUNE 6, 2019

which traditionally pays for capital projects and equipment. Ashley Oakes, executive director of the Howe Sound Women’s Centre, said she applauds the plan, adding that she believes sexual assaults are underprosecuted and underreported in Whistler and Pemberton because of lack of access to the exam. The fact that women can only have access to an exam from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Squamish General Hospital is not good enough, said Oakes. “Frankly, that’s just not the most common time for a woman to be sexually assaulted.” While the exam can be undertaken within seven days of an assault, it is important for victims to be able to access to it within their communities, said Oakes, adding that organizing travel to and from Squamish or Vancouver is an added challenge for victims. “The longer a woman waits, the less likely they would be willing to go get it done,” she said. Nationwide, sexual assault is already underreported and underprosecuted, said Oakes, pointing to the most recent Statistics

Canada survey (2017), which states that around one in 20 sexual assaults were reported to police, and of those, about 14 per cent were determined to be “unfounded,” meaning no charges were brought by police. Oakes said that official sexual-assault rates in Whistler are higher than the

“...we are willing to fund it through the Hospital District anyway.” - MIKE RICHMAN

provincial average and that she “often” hears of instances where sexual assaults go unreported in the community. “We need to be able to support a victim immediately,” said Oakes. “The ideal scenario is that that there would be 24-hour access to a sexual-assault examination by a nurse in (Pemberton, Whistler and Squamish.)” (According to Whistler RCMP, there


NEWS WHISTLER were 16 reported sexual-assault files in 2016, 20 in 2017, and 18 in 2018, which have been concluded or are currently being investigated.) Whistler Councillor Jen Ford, who chairs the Hospital District, said it is committed to improving access to the exam. Whistler, she added, has a young, transient population, and many people “don’t have support networks,” she added. Young people aged 15 to 24 years have the highest rate of sexual assault (71 incidents per 1,000 population), according to Statistics Canada. This is more than double the next highest rate, 32 per 1,000 population for 25 to 34 year olds. “We want our community to be well supported,” said Ford. “Whether they are here for a year or their whole life, we want people to feel that they have the medical support and the justice support that anyone should have.” The funding proposal is still in its “early days,” added Ford. “I’m hoping we can find a way (to fund the training).” This service gap is seen elsewhere in the province as well. “It is a provincial challenge, (and) a challenge for small, rural communities that we need addressed for the best outcomes for our communities,” said Ford. Local MLA Jordan Sturdy—who has long called for better access to the exams— believes the nurse training should be paid for by VCH, which operates with provincial funds.

“It’s a bit of a slippery slope,” said Sturdy, of the current Hospital District proposal. “If the Regional Hospital District is going to start paying for operational services, is this the beginning of a change in the responsibility for healthcare in the province of British Columbia? “I can understand why there is an impatience around improvement of the service, but I am concerned that it is taking on a provincial responsibility.” Sturdy said that he has pressed the issue directly with VCH, as well as in the legislature, bringing it up as recently as May 28 with Health Minister Adrian Dix. But so far, he said, he is disappointed with the lack of action on the file. “Given our demographics in the corridor, I think more attention needs to be paid to this file,” said Sturdy. Reached for comment, Insp. Kara Triance, officer in charge of the Sea to Sky RCMP detachment, said she in favour of better access to the sexual assault forensic exams. “Whistler RCMP strongly supports the initiative to obtain a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner in Whistler, and believes it will be an asset to our community at large,” she said in an email to Pique. “The Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner program could be instrumental in furthering investigations and convictions of sexual offenders.” VCH did not respond to Pique’s questions on the issue by deadline. n

INDULGE YOUR

Inner Foodie

Please join us in the Cinnamon Bear Grille and sample some of our culinary delights freshly prepared daily by our Executive Chef, Julian Owen-Mold and his Team. TRIO MENU $39 Available from 5pm-9:30pm, all week. Your choice of one starter, one main and one dessert.

KIDS EAT FREE Available every Friday 5pm-8pm. For every adult entrée purchased, your kids meal is free.

BUILD YOUR OWN BURGER Available every Wednesday 1pm10pm. Start with your classic burger $12 and then be as creative as you want. Each additional topping is $2

MOULES-FRITES & BELGIAN MOON BEER $20 Available every Saturday 5pm-8pm. Choose your style of steamed mussels accompanied with a Belgian Moon Beer.

LA PASTA COCCO $17.50 Available every Thursday 5pm- 8pm. Choose from our selection of pasta dishes.

LOBSTER SEASON IS IN FULL SWING! Full lobster at half price

50

% OFF

Offered à la carte or as part of the 3-course & 5-course Spring menu options.

SUNDAY - FRIDAY | LIMITED TIME OFFER

Come taste Canada’s best lobster exclusively at Bearfoot Bistro.

DAILY OYSTER SPECIAL from 5 to 7 pm

$15.95 /doz

4121 VILLAGE GREEN ADJACENT TO LISTEL HOTEL 604 932 3433 | BEARFOOTBISTRO.COM

ALL PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO APPLICABLE TAXES. OFFERS CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER PROMOTION OR DISCOUNTS.

JUNE 6, 2019

27


NEWS WHISTLER

Naturespeak: BioBlitz focuses on big and old trees BY KRISTINA SWERHUN THIS YEAR IS WHISTLER’S 13th annual BioBlitz, an event to share knowledge about all living things and to collect scientific data on what species live here. In the past 12 years, BioBlitz scientists have documented over 1,300 species for the first time. The focus this year is on B.C.’s big and old trees and we have some exciting presentations Friday night. Andy MacKinnon and Shaun Muc will speak about B.C.’s big-tree registry, the reasons why big trees are such amazing creatures and why they are so important. Local tree detective Bob Brett will also introduce some of Whistler’s oldest trees that are accessible by walking, biking, or an easy drive. New to BioBlitz this year is a tree climbing crew from Expedition Old Growth. These experienced climbers specialize in taking people up into the canopy to experience a view that very few people in the world have experienced. During BioBlitz they’ll be collecting select canopy life for our scientists on the ground to identify. We’re excited to see what treasures they discover! Our other public event will be on Saturday night where a collection of some of B.C.’s leading scientists will share

TREE TIME Check out trees like the thuja plicata ancient cedars at BioBlitz this weekend. PHOTO BY BOB BRETT

their Finds of the Day and updates from whatever area they are studying. The event will conclude at Alpha Lake Park where there will be a variety of presentations and demonstrations on topics from tree climbing and animal tracking, to night critters like owls, bats and night insects. Another way the public can be involved is to join our iNaturalist Contest. INaturalist is a free app and website (iNaturalist.org) where the public can help contribute to

BioBlitz. Once you create an account and join the “Whistler to Pemberton BioBlitz 2019” project, your sightings from June 3 to 9 will be recorded for BioBlitz. For every sighting you will get one entry in the draw to win one of our prizes: a $100 gift certificate to Nesters, a $100 gift certificate to the Bike Co, or a ZipTrek Eagle tour for two (see Naturespeak, Pique, May 30). Our BioBlitzing days are Saturday and Sunday where we will be covering

Whistler to Pemberton, from forest floor to canopy, and from valley bottom wetlands to mid-elevation. Our group of nearly 60 visiting and local scientists includes junior scientists from the local schools who will be learning what a day in the life of a field biologist is like. One of our most rewarding aspects of BioBlitz is engaging with local students. If you know someone at Spring Creek Elementary or Myrtle Philip Community School, there’s a good chance one of our scientists will be giving their class a presentation either Thursday or Friday. Presentations vary and include nature walks, slide shows, and a chance to use dissecting microscopes. A few of the science and biology classes at Whistler Secondary are also getting special BioBlitz presentations. We hope you’ll join us for BioBlitz!

FREE BIOBLITZ EVENTS • Friday, June 7, 7:30 p.m. at Legends Hotel: B.C.’s Big & Old Trees.  • Saturday, June 8, 7:30 p.m. at Legends Hotel: Finds of the Day and Updates from the Field. • Saturday, June 8, 8:30 p.m.-ish at Alpha Lake Park: Demonstrations and Night Critters. Naturespeak is prepared by the Whistler Naturalists. To learn more about Whistler’s natural world go to Whistlernaturalists.ca.

3 COURSES FOR

$ CALL US CRAZY! WE ARE EXTENDING OUR SPECIAL

59

STARTING JUNE 9 THRU FATHERS DAY TO

GOING OUT FOR DINNER, GO LOCAL! LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED FOR OVER 33 YEARS.

JUNE 20

604.932.5565 CALL FOR RESERVATIONS

www.rimrockwhistler.com

28 JUNE 6, 2019


20th ANNIVERSARY!


EST.2006

Immigrating great people to a great country. We are experts in Canadian immigration law with an established reputation for delivering results. Our Roadmap Consultation identifies options for immigrating to Canada or hiring a foreign worker. Our clients agree this is a vital step to achieving their immigration objectives. Head Office in Whistler: 201 – 4230 Gateway Drive

(inside the Whistler Chamber of Commerce)

Brooke Finlay, Partner & Managing Director, RCIC #514337

Our kids and their teachers:

WORTH INVESTING IN

Authorized by the Government of Canada to represent applications to the Minister of Immigration. Brooke graduated top of her class from UBC’s Certificate in Immigration: Laws, Policies and Procedures program and was recognized by the Canadian Association of Professional Immigration Consultants for her academic achievements.

E:

Call us at 1-888-266-1161 info@whistlerimmigration.com w: whistlerimmigration.com

Spring Reminders

Level 2 Watering Restric�ons Begin June 1st

ItTakesATeacher.ca

A message from the Sea to Sky Teachers’ Association

SEA TO SKY

Contractors 2019 Directory

We are pleased to present the 3rd annual Contractors Directory, publishing July 2019. This special guide will be loaded with valuable information for residents looking for trades in all areas of home repairs and new construction, for both residential and commercial applications. This booklet is the perfect platform to showcase your business to our readers. The glossy magazine will be kept in homes year round as a valuable resource for all trades in the Sea to Sky Corridor. This special publication will also be available online at www.squamishchief.com Due to unseasonably warm temperatures and predicted dry weather in the coming weeks, the Village has ini�ated Level 2 Watering Restric�ons as of June 1st. For more informa�on, review the Outdoor Water Use Regulation Bylaw No. 792, 2015 at www.pemberton.ca. Have you installed new landscaping/sod? Avoid a fine by contac�ng the Village Office at 604.894.6135 or admin@pemberton.ca to obtain an Outdoor Water Use Permit for $30.

Boulevard Maintenance Bylaw Boul Reminder

Are you planning on repaving or paving your driveway? Installing a culvert to extend or build a new entrance to your property? Landscaping the ditch in front of your home? Don't forget to apply for a Boulevard Improvement Permit! A link to the permit can be found here: http://www.pemberton.ca/public/download/documents/37450

VillageOfPemberton 30 JUNE 6, 2019

www.pemberton.ca

10,000 COPIES

DISTRIBUTES IN SQUAMISH, WHISTLER AND PEMBERTON

PUBLISHING JULY 2019 MATERIAL & AD BOOKING DEADLINE: Thursday, June 28, 2019

CALL YOUR SALES REPRESENTATIVE TODAY! 604.938.0202


LIVE SUN PEAKS

SUNPEAKSCOLLECTION.COM

COMMERCIAL LIST ING

SUN PEAKS MOUNTAIN RESORT MUNICIPALITY FAST FACTS •

Canada’s second largest ski area with 4,270 acres of skiable terrain, reliable Interior BC snow, abundant sunshine and minimal lift lines New Orient Ridge chairlift 2018

37 km of Nordic trails with daily machine grooming starting in late November

Charming Tyrolean style, ski-through Village (Village Elevation 4,116’) nestled between three mountains

Vibrant year round resort municipality with it’s own K-12 school, new Medical Centre and Arena with Conference Facilities & Fitness Centre currently in construction

Year round activities include 18 hole golf course, lift accessed hiking, downhill and cross country biking, summer concerts, farmer’s markets, nearby lakes

40 minutes to Kamloops; 4 hours to Vancouver; 5.5 hours to Seattle, 4.5 hours to Whistler via Pemberton

For more information visit

sunpeaksresort.com

Your best life begins with a home that inspires you.

$1,500,000 115 - 3170 Creekside Way, Sun Peaks, BC

$899,000 2508 Mountain View Drive, Sun Peaks, BC

1,889 SQ. FT. MLS# 149597

BEDS: 4 BATHS: 3.5 2,683 SQ. FT. MLS# 150440

Prime commercial space 1,889 sq. ft. plus use of sunny patio with mountain and valley views, in the heart of Sun Peaks Village currently leased until November 30, 2023 with option for another five years with 6% cap rate, triple net. Successful long term restaurant/bar has exceptional visibility off central roadway, next to main chairlifts.

Exceptional view property overlooking the 4th teebox of the golf course and expansive, sunset views of the mountains and valley. Spacious two car garage, and a walkout, daylight, lower level with family room and legal revenue suite. Dramatic vaulted ceiling and large windows in the living area, with direct access to a spacious sundeck.

Liz Forster

Liz Forster

250.682.2289

250.682.2289 QUART E R OWN E RS HI P

$349,999 204 Fireside Lodge, Sun Peaks, BC

$69,900 GST APPLICABLE 1301 A The Residences, Sun Peaks, BC

BEDS: 1 BATHS: 1 606 SQ.FT. MLS# 151254

BEDS: 1 BATHS: 1 787 SQ.FT. MLS# 148354

Prime ski-in/out access extra large end unit that comfortably sleeps 6. Only one adjacent neighbour & an abundance of natural light. Located in the heart of Sun Peak’s Village, enjoy restaurants, shopping & entertainment. Zoning allowing for short term rentals for revenue opportunities or full-time living, fully furnished.

Quarter Ownership. Luxury suite in The Residences at Sun Peaks Grand Hotel & Conference Centre, fully furnished and equipped with six appliances, offering true ski-in/ski-out convenience. Features include a full kitchen in an open living area with fireplace, a private deck. Use of the hotel’s amenities such as pool, hot tubs & gym.

Quinn Rischmueller

Liz Forster

778.257.4494

250.682.2289

For more information contact:

NOW SELLING S K I - I N / S K I - O U T CO N DO S B E S I D E THE NEW ORIENT CHAIRLIFT

ELEVATIONSUNPEAKS.COM

E XC E P T I O N A L V I E W S P R I C E S S TA R T AT $3 8 9 ,9 00

Elevation at Sun Peaks is a development of A&T Project Developments Inc. The developer reserves the right to modify or change plans, specifications, features and prices without notice. Materials may be substituted with equivalent or better at the developer’s sole discretion. All dimensions and sizes are approximate and are based on architectural measurements. This is not an offering for sale and such offer can only be made by Disclosure Statement E.&O.E.

LOCAL EXPERTISE, GLOBAL CONNECTIONS.

Sotheby’s International Realty Canada, Sun Peaks

t. 250.578.7773 tf. 1.877.578.5774

sunpeaks@sothebysrealty.ca #9 - 3250 Village Way, Sun Peaks, BC

SOTHEBYSREALTY.CA

Sotheby’s International Realty Canada, Independently Owned and Operated. E.&O.E.: This information is from sources which we deem reliable, but must be verified by prospective purchasers and may be subject to change or withdrawal.


NEWS PEMBERTON & THE VALLEY

Maverick wildlife biologist talks East Kootenay grizzly bear recovery MICHAEL PROCTOR ADDRESSES FULL HOUSE AT THE TS’ZIL LEARNING CENTRE

BY JOEL BARDE GIVEN THE SLOW and somewhat uneven recovery of the Sea to Sky region’s grizzly bear population, it was no surprise that a classroom in the Lil’wat Nation’s new Ts’zil Learning Centre was packed for Michael Proctor’s May 27 talk. As head of the Trans-Border Grizzly Bear Project, Proctor has worked extensively with a team of international wildlife biologists and conservationists to recover fragmented grizzly bear populations in the south Selkirk and south Purcell mountain ranges. In a lively presentation, he discussed his journey from “a hippie living out in the middle of nowhere” to a highly regarded expert celebrated for his enterprising nature. After obtaining his undergraduate degree in his 40s, Proctor went on to study the movement patterns of grizzlies in the East Kootenays as part of his PhD studies. Using DNA sampling, he was able to map out boundaries for discreet grizzly bear populations. Some of the units were fragmented due in large part to human habitation and roads. “We are left with what I call a ‘cracked windshield,’” said Proctor. “It’s not broken, but it’s got all these cracks in it.”

MAKING CHANGE Michael Proctor discussed

his efforts to connect East Kootenay grizzly bear populations during his May 27 talk. PHOTO BY JOEL BARDE

32 JUNE 6, 2019

After finishing his PhD studies in 2003, Proctor decided to focus his efforts on repairing that “cracked windshield,” creating linkages between fragmented populations. “I thought, instead of just being a scientist that moves on to the next problem, I’m going to actually try to solve (the issue),” said Proctor. “I just kind of dug in and created a job in my backyard.” With the support of various conservation groups, Proctor has worked closely with the

interested in conservation and techniques that get us out of the revolving door of conflict,” said Proctor. To help address the issue of bear attractants, Procter has worked with farmers on a successful electric-fencing initiative. “We started out and we could barely get the program going, and now we can hardly raise enough money to keep up with it,” said Proctor. “People love it.” Because it’s critical for farmers to

“I just kind of dug in and created a job in my backyard.” - MICHAEL PROCTOR

region’s conservation officers to promote grizzly bear relocation. “I had to get their bosses and the policy makers to decide to let them do it,” explained Proctor. “We had a couple meetings and they said ‘yes, we are willing to do that.’” With the help of the conservation officers, Proctor has placed radio collars on many grizzlies, allowing him to further follow their movements and learn more about where the best linkage areas are. “It’s not (conservation’s) mandate to radio collar the bears, but (they) are very

have some “skin in the game,” farmers are required to pay some of the cost of the fencing, added Proctor. Working with his American counterparts and various conservation groups, Proctor has also helped steer major land acquisition in the U.S. and Canada. In total, they’ve acquired some 210 square kilometres of land, largely between Invermere, B.C. and Libby, Mont. In total, about $58 million worth of land has been acquired, said Proctor. “In Canada, I think we (have) spent around $6 million,” said Proctor, adding that much of

it is around Creston, an area that can serve as a linkage point for the southern Purcell and southern Selkirk mountain ranges. Following the presentation, Johnny Mikes—field director for the Coast to Cascades Grizzly Bear Initiative—said Proctor raised some “useful tools” that could be employed in the Sea to Sky region, including the acquisition of private land to facilitate linkage. “At Coast to Cascades, (it’s) not our area of expertise,” said Mikes. “We can point an organization in that direction, like the Nature Trust and the Nature Conservancy— groups that are specialists in that ... We’re already talking to them about partnering with them in certain areas.” Coast to Cascades, he added, is already busy at work on initiatives aimed at reducing human-grizzly conflict and would look at an electric-fencing initiative with the right support. “We did some work last summer on bear-hazard assessments in the D’Arcy, Seton, Portage Road areas, and this year we are planning on doing some more in the Pemberton Meadows,” said Mikes. “We have Dr. Lana Ciarniello ... she’s going to be working with us some more this summer.” But when it comes to working with conservation officers to promote relocation, Mikes said that there is little need for that. “Our conservation officers are awesome,” said Mikes. “They know that these grizzly bears are at risk, and they really go out of their way to go the extra mile to haze bears and make sure they are not having to put a bear down.” n


Public No�ce Ques�ons? We’re Listening

(604) 894.6135

admin@ pemberton.ca

www. pemberton.ca

Alternate Approval Process Opportunity

WE KNOW PEMBERTON INSIDE & OUT

Downtown Enhancement Project Con�ngency and Downtown Barn Parking Lot Paving Loan Authoriza�on Bylaw No. 863, 2019

1406 POPLAR STREET

Location, location, location! This spectacularly located corner lot features vaulted ceilings, lots of light and views of Mount Currie. A minute’s walk to both schools, you won’t find a better location!

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT the Village of Pemberton Council proposes to adopt the following bylaw: Downtown Enhancement Project Con�ngency and Downtown Barn Parking Lot Paving Loan Authoriza�on Bylaw No. 863, 2019

Bedrooms:

This Bylaw will authorize the Village of Pemberton to borrow up to $980,000 to be repaid over a maximum of twenty (20) years. The funds borrowed will be to cover the Downtown Enhancement Project con�ngency ($880,000) and the paving of the Downtown Barn Parking Lot ($100,000). It is es�mated e that the average residen�al taxpayer’s annual charges would increase by approximately $47.27. TAKE FURTHER NOTICE THAT “Downtown Enhancement Project Con�ngency and Downtown Barn Parking Lot Paving Loan Authoriza�on Bylaw No. 863, 2019” may be inspected at the offices of the Village of Pemberton at 7400 Prospect Street, Pemberton, BC during normal office business hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday to Friday, excluding public holidays, from the 6th day of June to the 8th day of July, 2019.

Gene General Enquiries regarding the proposed “Downtown Enhancement Project Con�ngency and Downtown Barn Parking Lot Paving Loan Authoriza�on Bylaw No. 863, 2019” may be directed to Sheena Fraser, Manager of Corporate and Legisla�ve Services at 604-894-6135 or at sfraser@pemberton.ca.

Bathrooms:

3

2

LISA HILTON* lisah@wrec.com 604 902 4589

9201 PORTAGE ROAD

$679,000

D’ARCY

Time to enjoy the lake! This chalet sits on 6.45 acres and is set up to house your horses, gardens and recreational toys. with lake and mountain views, you are only a moments stroll to Gates lake. Bedrooms:

4.5

Bathrooms:

3

DAN SCARRATT*

Sec�on 86 of the Community Charter provides that: • If the number of electors on the Elector Response Forms represents fewer than 10% of the electors in the Village, the Council of the Village may proceed to adopt Bylaw No. 863, 2019. •• Elector Response Forms against the above Bylaw must be in the form established by the Village. Persons wishing to receive an Elector Response Form may download it from the website at www.pemberton.ca, request a Form by emailing admin@pemberton.ca, phone the Village Office at 604-894-6135 or write to the Village at P.O. Box 100, Pemberton, BC V0N 2L0. •• The only persons en�tled to sign Elector Response Forms are eligible electors within the Village of Pemberton. The deadline for submi�ng signed Elector Response Forms against the proposed Bylaw to the Village of Pemberton is Monday, July 8, 2019 at 4:00 p.m. •• The Village has es�mated that the total number of eligible electors within the Village to be 1995 and 10% of that number, or 195 eligible electors must submit Elector Response Forms against Bylaw No. 863, 2019 to prevent the Village from adop�ng Bylaw No. 863, 2019. •• A qualified eligible elector is a person who is: A Canadian Ci�zen; at least 18 years of age; has resided in Bri�sh Columbia for at least six (6) months; has resided in the Village of Pemberton for at least thirty (30) days; or meets the qualifica�ons of a non-resident property elector as set out in sec�on 51.1 of the Local Government Act.

$775,000

PEMBERTON

dan@wrec.com 604 938 4444

7463 ASPEN BOULEVARD

$1,069,000

PEMBERTON

Fabulous Family home situated on a beautiful tree lined street in the heart of Pemberton.Offering gorgeous views, flexible living options, storage and large lot.This home is a must-see! Bedrooms:

5

Bathrooms:

4

DANIELLE MENZEL* danielle@wrec.com 604 698 5128

#42 CREEKSIDE VILLAGE

$599,000

1400 PARK STREET, PEMBERTON

This bright and tastefully renovated townhome has seen many upgrades: engineered hardwood, new appliances and more! Enjoy living across from One Mile Lake. Bedrooms:

3

Bathrooms:

2.5

ERIN MCCARDLE STIEL erin@wrec.com 604 902 0520

Sheena Fraser, Corporate Officer This is the second of two no�ces. * Denotes Personal Real Estate Corporation

VillageOfPemberton

www.pemberton.ca

604 894 5166 | WHISTLERREALESTATE.CA JUNE 6, 2019

33


DISPATCHES OUT OF RANGE

Should we be thinking about last ascents, instead of first ones? MOUNTAINEERS CONFRONT DISAPPEARING GLACIERS

BY HEATHER HANSMAN THE MOST COMMON ROUTE UP Gannett Peak, the highest mountain in Wyoming, follows a gooseneck couloir up a skinny snowfield to a gaping crevasse. Darran Wells, a professor of Outdoor Education and Leadership at Central Wyoming College who studies glaciers in the Wind River Range, says that historically, it’s been fairly straightforward to cross, a scramble across a snow bridge. Over the past few years, however, temperatures have been so warm that the crevasse—technically a bergschrund, where the glacier separates from the mountain— opens up, making it nearly impassable. People who have traversed it before without ropes and found the route fairly easy now find it completely different. “One of the things I couldn’t have imagined, as I started going in to the

DISAPPEARING GLACIERS Central Wyoming

College students traverse the treacherous Sourdough Glacier in 2016, where rocky rubble had fallen onto a sheet of ice and a misstep could send you sliding into the frigid meltwater below. PHOTO COURTESY OF DARRAN WELLS/ CENTRAL WYOMING COLLEGE

34 JUNE 6, 2019

Wind (River Range in western Wyoming) as a NOLS (National Outdoor Leadership School) instructor in the late ’90s, was how the routes would have changed,” Wells said recently. “And the emotional impact of seeing the glaciers move and melt.” Wells has seen the toe of the Sourdough Glacier retreat 14 metres in 15 years, making

Safe mountain travel requires stable conditions and fair weather, but as the globe warms, that’s becoming harder to find. Glaciers are breaking up, permafrost is melting and mush season is creeping into winter, rendering old approaches inaccessible and new places harder to explore.

“All the glaciers basically are receding.” - ANDREW FOUNTAIN

it inaccessible. “There used to be ice and snow that bound up the talus, and that’s all gone now,” he said, making it harder to climb. It also impacts the time of day and year climbers can attempt the peak. “The window throughout the year is getting narrower, and then through the 24-hour cycle, you have to worry about rockfall during the day. You’re getting up at 1 or 2 a.m., climbing in the dark, getting down before a rockfall. There’s a lot more rockfall; it’s just a bowling alley.”

As a culture, we’ve glorified first ascents—and the climbers who attempt them—in the Western U.S. since 1820, when geologist Edwin James first climbed Pikes Peak. The 2018 documentary Free Solo’s Oscar win is the most recent sign of our obsession with untouched summits, even as we approach the downslope of accessibility. A 2017 study from Portland State University (PSU) found that Western glaciers and snowfields—perhaps “the clearest expression of climate change”—

may have decreased by as much as 39 per cent since the mid-20th century. This forces a question: As high mountains melt and change, do we need to stop thinking of first ascents, and start thinking about final ones instead? When do we need to give up on these places? Glaciologist and climber Alison Criscitiello is now prioritizing what she calls “ice memories,” recording ice cores from mountains that might soon become inaccessible. She cites endless examples, like Mount Logan, Canada’s highest peak, where the climbing season is shortening and icefall conditions are changing. This is an urgent issue for both the climbing and glaciology worlds. “Many of these places that hold soon-tobe-lost climate archives are the same places that have drawn climbers for centuries and may too become unclimbable, or at least unrecognizable, in our lifetime or within a few generations,” she said. Said Andrew Fountain, the PSU study’s lead author: “All the glaciers basically are receding.” His group is mapping glacier change in the Rockies, Sierra Nevada and Cascades to try to quantify just how much climate change is impacting glaciers and where they’re most sensitive.


2018

DISPATCHES OUT OF RANGE

SLOW DECLINE The steady recession of the Wedgemount Glacier has been well documented for over 40 years. PHOTO BY DAVE LYON

The U.S. Department of Agriculture flies over the whole nation every five years, taking aerial photos. Digitized mountain photographs can then be used to compare the outlines of glaciers to historical records. The agency has photo records from some glaciers, including Washington’s Sahalie, going back to 1900, after the end of the

frequently climbed routes are changing quickly. By last August, Disappointment Cleaver on Mount Rainier, the most popular route up to the top of the volcano, was a tricky cheese grater of bridged crevasses and loose rock. Lowell Skoog, who pioneered skiing and climbing routes in the North Cascades,

“The question isn’t whether or not they’re changing, it’s where they’re changing less.”

BAR OSO’S ANNIVERSARY

$

20 .15

2-COURSE DINNER Available Sundays - THURSDAYS FROM 5 PM

DAILY LUNCH BOCADILLO $8 include A craft BEER OR house SANGRIA $12 MONDAyS - THURSDAYS UNTIL 3 PM

- ANDREW FOUNTAIN

Little Ice Age. Fountain and his researchers looked at the records and learned that almost every glacier is receding, except for a few that are topographically protected. “The question isn’t whether or not they’re changing, it’s where they’re changing less,” Fountain said. For mountaineers, that means they’re losing access to climbs like the visually stunning Black Ice Couloir on the Grand Teton, dealing with dangerous rockfall as permafrost melts, and trying to push summit attempts in narrow weather windows. Even the more accessible,

said the period the mountains are climbable is shrinking, the swing between seasons has become more dramatic, and thinning glaciers now reduce access to many popular routes. Skoog doesn’t think we’ll lose our drive to explore, but at some point the access gap will be so narrow that we won’t be able to slide through. Heather Hansman lives in Seattle, where she writes about water and the West. Her first book, Downriver, came out in 2019.  This article first appeared in High Country News, www.hcn.org, on May 13, 2019. n

4242 VILLAGE STROLL

604 962 4540

BAROSO.CA JUNE 6, 2019

35


DISPATCHES OUT OF RANGE

Mountain News: Skier makes no bones about it: he screwed up BY ALLEN BEST allen.best@comcast.net JACKSON, WYO. —In May, a 24-yearold Jackson man ignored advice to retain a defense attorney and instead fessed up to his guilt for skiing out of bounds. For this, he must pay US$6,000. In late February, after a metre of snow had fallen, Andrew Richards had dipped out of bounds at Jackson Hole Mountain Resort. The U.S. Forest Service and the resort operator had instituted an extraordinary closure to the backcountry, the first ever. In skiing out of bounds, Richards didn’t intend to stay outside the ropes for long. But two of his companion followed his tracks out of bounds, but not following his tracks back inside the ropes. Instead, getting confused, they skied into Granite Canyon, in Teton National Park. Once he had discovered what had happened, Richards did everything right. He got vital information from one of his lost companions via cellphone, told her to stay put, and went to ski patrol headquarters and spilled everything. National Park Service rangers reached the skiers just before midnight after using ropes and belays. They

hiked back up to the ski area boundary, arriving at 3 a.m. The thing is that somebody easily could have been killed, because of the dangerous conditions. “To me, that’s one of the most frustrating things I have experienced in society—people not owning up to things they have done wrong,” Richards told the Jackson Hole

waiting their turn to tag the summit, was certainly arresting. There was a similar arrest of hearts among some for the climbers exposed for too long in this zone where, without oxygen, oxygen blood saturation levels drop to below 25 per cent. Even in mountain towns, most healthy people have saturation levels well above 90 per cent. Eleven people died on Everest in May, if for various reasons.

But what is the solution? The draw of the world’s highest is immense.

metres, as witnessed by the fears around the fate of a party of eight climbers that may have been caught by an avalanche on Nanda Devi, the world’s 23rd highest peak. It’s located in India. In Colorado, only occasionally does anybody die while climbing a 4,627-metre peak, but the trails can indeed be busy. With this, there has been some effort to steer attention to lesser-climbed peaks. Some people have made it a quest to climb all 3,962-metre peaks. Some of them do pose much greater challenges than even the most difficult of the 4,267-metre peaks.

SOME HAVE SKIED EVERY SINGLE MONTH FOR YEARS

News&Guide. “I can’t reiterate enough how thankful I am that everyone is OK and how sorry I am.” No word on whether the other skiers who hopped out of bounds will similarly get their hands smacked.

EVEREST SPECTACLE PROVOKES DISCUSSION

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, Colo.—The image of the climbers on Everest last week,

But what is the solution? The draw of the world’s highest is immense, as reflected by the admission of three veterans of Everest in Steamboat that they would also love to go back if given the chance. But they also pointed to other peaks with great allure in the Himalaya. Certainly, there is the challenge Pakistan’s K2—the world’s second highest— and the other 8,000-metre peaks offer to the most experienced mountaineers. But there is great danger even in those less than 8,000

TRUCKEE , Calif.—It turns out that quite a few people have made it a point to put on skis every single month of the year—and for years on end. Writing in the Sierra Sun Jenny Goldsmith turned up several skiers in the Tahoe-Truckee area who are every-month skiers. But perhaps most notable was the story of Brennan Lagasse and Jillian Raymond, who have been married nearly two decades. They started tracking their months of consecutive skiing in November 2003, their intent being to ski

2018

the beach whistler We Are LOVING Our New Active Wear Brands

YOGA . R UN NI NG . GYM FI TNESS . BEACH

Located near the Olympic Rings on the Village Stroll. Follow us on Instagram @thebeachwhistler 36 JUNE 6, 2019

604-932-7505


DISPATCHES OUT OF RANGE every month for a year. Now, 16 years later, they still haven’t missed a month.

EVIDENCE MOUNTS THAT BISON IN BANFF STAYED IN MOUNTAINS

BANFF , Alta.—There were bison in Banff before the modern era. But were they tourists, who wandered into the mountains occasionally, or mountain dwellers? The Rocky Mountain Outlook reported that tests conducted on 15 bison bones discovered recently delivered further evidence of bison as mountain dwellers, not tourists. In fact, they may not have left the mountains. A scientist was careful not to deliver conclusions too sweeping, though. “It’s suggesting that these particular individual bison could have gone out of the mountains a little bit, but not very much,” said Karsten Heuer, manager of Banff’s bison reintroduction project. Isotope analysis of the bones sheds light on the diets of the bison, including their habitat, while radio-carbon dating indicated a date of 600 years ago. However, other bison bones discovered in the park put bison there as long as 10,370 years ago. A bison shot near Lake Louise in 1858 was believed to be the last wild bison in what is now Banff National Park. In 2016, Parks Canada transplanted 16 bison imported from east of Edmonton into the park. So far, reported the Outlook, the effort appears to be paying off. The original herd was enclosed within a fenced pasture, and it has more than doubled, with more calves on the way.

TOWN FRETS ABOUT POTENTIAL OF FLOODS

LAKE CITY , Colo.—Flooding in Lake City during this year’s runoff of the phenomenal snowpack has become such a concern that materials from the local historical museum have been transferred to higher ground, as have some documents normally kept in the Hinsdale County Courthouse. Some 15,000 sandbags have been imported to Lake City as attention has been focused on the watershed upstream in the San Juan Mountains. Lake City, which got its name in 1873, during the first flash of the mining boom in the San Juans, has a population of 400 people. Its population swells during summer, when it’s a popular destination for Texans but also mountain climbers. Several 4,267-metre peaks, including Uncompahgre and Wetterhorn, are located nearby, above Henson Creek. Henson Creek is what concerns Hinsdale County as well as state and other authorities. There were many avalanches during snow season. One left snow and ice 60- to 90-metres deep and 800 metres wide across the creek. The trees, boulders, and other debris in the snow create the makings of a dam. Should the dam back up melted snow and then burst, Lake City could be flooded. “It is a totally different animal if we’re talking about a debris field of logs and trees as opposed to clear water,” explained Michael Davis, public information

officer with the Hinsdale Unified Coordination Group. A masonry dam, called Hidden Treasure, compounds the problem. Created in 1890 to produce electricity, it lost that function long ago. It has a gaping hole in its face, the result of a breach in 1973. But a half-dozen experts who gathered to study it this past week, concluded that trees and other materials could build up behind the dam. They said complete failure of the dam is likely, which could result in a “catastrophic flood surge,” according to the Hinsdale County website. To avert that possibility, the dam is being pre-emptively destroyed. High runoff normally occurs by June 10, Davis told the Crested Butte News, but because of the cool spring, that high runoff as of late May was expected to occur on or around June 18. The snow-water equivalent in the snowpack of the Gunnison River Basin, where Lake City is located, was 727 per cent of normal as of June 2, according to the SNOTEL measuring sites. Farther south, in the Telluride-Durango area, the same measuring matrix reported 1,174 per cent of average. The primary message Lake City wants to communicate is that it’s still very much open for business, despite the potential flooding.

FILM FROM URBAN SLUM THE TOP PICK AT MOUNTAINFILM

$49 - FOUR COURSE

PRIX FIXE MENU CELEBRATE SPRING FLAVOURS WITH CHEF WALT’S ITALIAN-INSPIRED SEASONAL CREATIONS.

OFFERED SUNDAYS THROUGH THURSDAYS Dinner from 5:30pm. Reservations recommended. 4242 VILLAGE STROLL

604 932 4442

ILCAMINETTO.CA

TELLURIDE ,

Colo.—The name of Telluride Mountainfilm has been slightly misleading for a very long time. The festival has been around since 1978, but even by the late 1980s it had strayed far from its mountaineering roots. That was again the case this year as the most acclaimed film at the festival was about urban life, reported the Telluride Daily Planet. The film, 17 Blocks, tells the astonishing, truth-is-stranger-than-fiction story of a family that lives a mere 17 blocks from the nation’s Capitol in Washington D.C. But the family might as well be a world away, said the Planet. “The masterpiece of verité filmmaking follows four generations of the family as hope keeps them raised up through struggles of addiction, gang violence and devastating tragedy,” said Mountainfilm in its promotional material. The film was named audience favourite at the festival and also the best feature film by the expert panel. As for verité, it’s a genre that emphasizes realism and naturalism. As usual, there was much more than just cinematography at the festival. For example, there were also musical brothers who gave impromptu rap/tub performances, but also Winfred Rembert, a self-taught visual artist who is old enough to have worked for pennies in the cotton fields of his native Georgia, and who worked on a prison chain gang and survived a lynching attempt. Then there was Oprah Winfrey, a parttime resident of the Telluride area, in an on-stage conversation with Cheryl Strayed, who wrote a book about hiking the Pacific Trail that got some attention. Maybe you’ve heard of Wild? n

THE INSIDERS’ GUIDE TO WHISTLER FAQ INSIDERS’ GUIDE TO WHISTLER WINTER BOOKING DEADLINE SEPTEMBER 16, 2019

Call today Catherine Power-Chartrand 604-932-1672 cpower@whistlermagazine.com

Fit it in your pocket. Take it everywhere. Free. JUNE 6, 2019

37


WHISTLER’S PREMIER VISITOR MAGAZINE SINCE 1980 Fine Italian Cuisine

SPRING VER ELD O H SPECIAL

3 COURSE MENU

ON NOW

$35 $45

SUNTHURS FRISAT

Choose your favorite item from each course and create your own 3 COURSE EXPERIENCE! (A la Carte also Available) Selected Signature and

whistlermagazine.com /whistlermagazine

We’ve got you covered.

specialty items are also

CELEBRATING

Reservations Recommended menus are available for viewing/ download on our website.

38 JUNE 6, 2019

Climate Change released a special report in October warning of how quickly we’re advancing toward irreversible climate chaos, it led the news—for a day. A massive study in May by the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services about rapid wildlife extinction met a similar fate. In Canada, issues like legalization of recreational cannabis pushed aside the climate report, and news about the birth of Meghan Markle and Prince Harry’s baby buried the biodiversity report everywhere.

BY DAVID SUZUKI In early April, I read front-page stories in the Vancouver Sun about Brexit and the SNCLavalin scandal. Page 3 had a single column headlined, “Grim climate report released,” about an Environment and Climate Change Canada review by 43 scientists showing Canada is warming at twice the global average rate, even faster in the North.  The  Globe and Mail  headlined the news on page 4 with “Canada warming at rapid rate, study finds.” It shared the page with stories about provincial and national efforts to undermine the federal government’s less-than-adequate but necessary climate initiatives, such as carbon pricing. No one likes bad news, but we can’t turn away from reality if we want to avoid catastrophe. Elizabeth Bush, lead author of  Canada’s Changing Climate Report,

by the three major networks and Fox fell from just 260 minutes in 2017 to a mere 142 minutes in 2018,” and “about 1,300 communities across the United States have totally lost news coverage, many from newspaper mergers and closures.” Moyers, who says he learned about the consequences of rapid fossil fuel burning in early 1965, added, “many of the news outlets that are still around have ignored or misreported the climate story and failed to counter the tsunami of deceptive propaganda unleashed by fossil-fuel companies and the mercenaries, ideologues, and politicians who do their bidding.” We’re facing a similar fate in Canada. One company, Postmedia, owns much of our print media (with added online presence). In Alberta, where many people seem to lack basic information about climate disruption, the company owns all major dailies in Calgary and Edmonton, and many smaller community newspapers. Despite some good coverage of climate issues, the media giant often runs opinion columns by climate science deniers. In 2013, Postmedia—mostly owned by a U.S. hedge fund— entered into an agreement with the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers to “bring energy to the forefront of our national conversation.” It recently hired Alberta Premier Jason Kenney’s former campaign director Nick Koolsbergen to “discuss ways Postmedia could be involved in the government’s energy war room”—a $20 million program to “fight fake news and share the truth about Alberta’s resource sector and energy issues.” Many new and some mainstream media outlets in Canada and elsewhere are stepping

- BILL MOYERS

OVER 20 YEARS IN WHISTLER

quattrorestaurants.com

WHEN THE Intergovernmental Panel on

“Reporting the truth about climate disruption, and its solutions, could be contagious.”

(Prices will vary)

Quattro at Whistler

Climate change and biodiversity should be top headline news

Get your new winter edition in hotel rooms and select locations around Whistler.

available for an extra charge.

4319 Main Street 604.905.4844

SCIENCE MATTERS

Pick up the latest issue of your favourite read in Whistler.

echoed what experts have said in light of the IPCC report: “It’s clear, the science supports the fact that adapting to climate change is an imperative. Urgent action is needed to reduce emissions.” Why aren’t these reports dominating front pages, financial sections and newscasts, highlighting the enormous societal and economic implications? British Columbians know well that climate change is real. We’ve seen glaciers that supply much of our water retreating, mountain pine beetle outbreaks destroying billions of dollars’ worth of trees, smoke from massive wildfires darkening skies for weeks, acidified oceans killing shellfish and rising seas threatening coastlines. In an April speech to the Columbia Journalism Review  and  The Nation’s Covering Climate Now conference in New York, respected U.S. broadcaster Bill Moyers pointed to research showing, “The combined coverage of climate change

up to fill the void in reporting on issues critical to our well-being and survival, but they often lack resources. There is no shortage of solutions to the related climate and biodiversity crises. We’ve written about them in Just Cool It! and elsewhere, as have many others. But people need good, evidence-based news coverage on which to base their actions and voting decisions. Where and how climate change and other environmental stories are covered in news outlets and broadcasts indicates how seriously society takes them.  We need and deserve better from our news media. As Moyers said, “Reporting the truth about climate disruption, and its solutions, could be contagious.” David Suzuki is a scientist, broadcaster, author and co-founder of the David Suzuki Foundation. Written with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor and Writer Ian Hanington. ■


RANGE ROVER

In the land of Oz FROM AN AUSTRALIAN natural history volume on the Snowy Mountains: “You can see in the snow gum an expression of the different moods of these mountains: desperately clinging to an exposed slope in the face of blizzards, umbrageous and welcoming in a sun-filled valley; ghostly and

BY LESLIE ANTHONY insubstantial in rain and mist. The curving, variegated trunk and gesturing branches place it among the most graceful of the eucalypts... few would complain at the near monopoly of such a beautiful tree.” Except, of course, ignorant Canadians trying to ride from Mt. Kosciusko, Australia’s highest point, to the ocean. Whistler’s trails may be flocked to by our Aussie cousins, but one of my earliest mountain bike expeditions was to the Land of Oz, where the gums had almost gotten to me. After hours grinding around above 1,500 metres in Kosciusko National Park in the southeast corner of New South Wales, with nothing in the viewfinder but the emaciated sprigs of broccoli known as snow gums, and an equally forlorn understory of grasses flattened by the previous winter’s snows, I’d unconsciously blurted More gums! to no one in particular after cresting another ridge. Only later would I come to appreciate the eucalypt hegemony—an

UNIQUE and breathtakingly beautiful Kosciusko National Park in Australia.

SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

indoctrination that involved up-close viewing of thousands of snow gums. Plus mountain gums, white gums, red gums, blue gums, river gums, monkey gums, gum gums, and gums in disguise—code-named things like white ash, silvertop, black sally, stringybark, messmate, and brownbarrel. Variations cribbed by time from the same DNA, now leading upright lives of their own to the continental exclusion of any other major tree group. You could get downright evangelical about such impressive ecological dominance, painting mountain biking here as akin to a Rolling Church of the Holy Gum. The previous day, we’d hiked to the

trees covered uplands and lower slopes remained bare. On Blanket Plain, frogs called in icy air from puddled bogs while a cold wind sent previously hidden wallabies swarming through the glades ahead like stuffed toys on pogo-sticks. The final kilometres tumbled downhill through towering mountain ash, the frequent berms creating high-speed jumps. Our ride over the massive escarpment girdling Australia’s east coast began in remote Wadbilliga National Park at the edge of the Monaro high plain. As we neared the windswept crest of the Kybean Range, forest faded to heath as sun played over rust-colored dwarf casuarinas. Wedge-

You could get downright evangelical about such impressive ecological dominance.

summit of 2,225-metre Kosciusko. Though early “mountain bikers” rode and pushed cycles 100 kilometres through snow to the peak in the 1890s, current national park policy prohibited riding anywhere near it, and the deep snows of spring made a carry impractical. So, we’d skied off Kosciusko, following the steep slope below its southern spur and skirting Lake Cootapatamba in Rawson Pass, supposed route of those historic cyclists. Now, finally, we were on our bikes, contouring a ridge above the Nungar Frost Plain, a barren basin that, by trapping cold air, created topsy-turvy hills where

tail eagles hovered in updrafts while lyre birds called from the swaying edge of a dark coastal forest. Views to the Brogo Cliffs and peaks of the Razorback hovered across a deep chasm to our right. As we made a final turn toward the coast, the vegetation changed quickly, segueing to a tropical cloud forest of towering tree-ferns and gift-wrapping vines. Lizards were legion: enormous goanas charged across the trail, skinks clamoured over river logjams, and water dragons plied the rock faces of a small gorge. At Wonboyn Lake, the scene was almost tropical, with the shrill calls of rainbow

lorakeets, king parrots, wattles, and sulphurcrested cockatoos. Indeed, Australia’s bird fauna is among its most stunning attributes; in the high country, kookaburras had dotted balconies at ski-area condos while rosellas— red, blue and green mountain parrots—were everywhere, swooping down from gums, vibrant against the snow. In Nadgee Nature Reserve, we cycled up Tumbledown Mountain to overlook Newton’s Beach—a spectacular strand bookended by sea cliffs and sweeping headlands. Captain James Cook first viewed Australia here as he sailed past in 1770, commenting in his log that the land “… had a very agreeable and promising aspect.” But brief observations by a passing mariner didn’t do justice to the righteous singletrack cutting through aromatic brush above towering bluffs, bisected by deep-ravine downhills through lush vegetation. On the beach, ghost crabs flashed across dingo tracks that led over red sandstone to dens packed with howling pups. Shadows wavered through shoreline fog from a forest of phantasmagorical trees with seed cones imbedded in the middle of branches—giant lizards, giant kangaroos, giant snags, and giant views of lush offshore islands. The Tasman Sea swept away to the horizon, melding with the Pacific somewhere out of sight. We’d started hundreds of kilometres away on the cold-hearted summits of the Snowy Mountains and, like all life, returned to the sea—if only for the weekend. Surf pounded below as we rode the scrub of the Nadgee headlands, a lone tree looming from the mist as the smoke of a fisherman’s campfire wafted a final trace of eucalypt seaward. Incense in the Rolling Church of the Holy Gum. ■

JUNE 6, 2019

39


FEATURE STORY

Here comes the sun …And bacteriapowered solar cells perfect for cloudy days By Glenda Bartosh

I

t provides 10,000 times the amount of energy we use on Earth every day. It’s free, it’s plentiful, it’s super-clean and safe—and it’s everywhere. The sun may well be our best friend in the face of our fossil-fuelled climate emergency, if only we harnessed it more. Right now, dozens of countries around the world—China, Japan, Germany, France, the U.S. and U.K., Italy, India, even tiny Latvia, and more—depend on solar power to some extent. Here in Canada, Alberta and Ontario are our solar leaders— Alberta with 25 per cent more sunlight than the heartland of Canada’s solar capacity, Ontario, where solar power has proven to be a welcome addition to a power grid that often fails and where people have tired of throwing out the food in their freezers over and over. Now, that picture could change with more—and more unexpected—places jumping on the solar express thanks to an exciting new innovation developed by researchers at Vancouver’s University of British Columbia (UBC), ranked the No. 1 campus in the world for taking urgent action on the climate crisis. They’ve come up with a low-cost, sustainable biogenic solar cell made with dye-producing bacteria. It works as well in dim light, like cloudy or overcast skies, as in bright light, like full sun. Even in early stages, the cell generated an electrical current twice as strong as any from similar devices, its capacity is constantly being increased. Biogenic solar cells using dye have been produced before, but they entail costly, complex processes that use toxic solvents to extract the dye, plus the dye can be lost making the

40 JUNE 6, 2019

cells less effective. (“Biogenic” simply means something made of or produced by living organisms, in this case E. coli bacteria that have been engineered to produce lycopene, a natural dye that gives tomatoes and other red fruits and vegetables their colour. Lycopene is also very good at “harvesting” light and turning it into electrical energy. E. coli are used because they’re one of the most productive and versatile bacteria in the lab—and, no, this isn’t the type that makes you sick.) The new UBC approach leaves the dye in place, which makes it higher yielding and about 10 times cheaper. It also uses a nano-coating of titania (or titanium dioxide) to enhance electrical production. The same titanium dioxide used to tint white the acrylic paints in your art studio, it’s an excellent conductor. The result? Bacteria-powered solar cells that are more economical and efficient than comparable biogenic systems, and certainly more organic and sustainable than conventional solar cells made with things like silicone, hydrochloric acid and unrenewable metals, such as platinum. “It was a shot in the dark, and serendipity helped us a bit,” says Vikramaditya Yadav, a professor in UBC’s chemical and biological engineering department and the project lead. Drawing on his own research in bioactive materials and dyes at Harvard and MIT was critical, but Yadav credits most of the serendipity to the creativity and complementary backgrounds of the talented five-person team of graduate students and scientists who comprise his BioFoundry research group, which specializes in collaborating with local start-ups, industry and other researchers on creative, bioengineered solutions using bacteria.


FEATURE STORY

JUNE 6, 2019

41


FEATURE STORY

Whistlerites weigh in on UBC’s new biogenic solar cells Better tech is good for the climate crisis and global heating as long as it isn’t a distraction [from] what is easily possible today. When this type of solar is commercialized, it will have greater importance in places where electricity is more fossil-fuel based and expensive compared to B.C. and Whistler.”  DAN WILSON, PLANNING AND ENGAGEMENT, WHISTLER CENTRE FOR SUSTAINABILITY

SHOT IN THE DARK Vikramaditya Yadav (centre), professor in UBC’s chemical and biological engineering department and project lead on the biogenic solar cells, recognizes there was a lot of serendipity involved in the research Photo submitted

THE PURE JOY OF PURE RESEARCH

“When Sarvesh [Srivastava, a researcher from the Technical University of Denmark,] joined the lab, he was a material scientist. He had never touched biology,” recalls Yadav. “But this guy, he was full of energy, and one day he came by my office the start of 2017 and said, ‘I have some very interesting ways to synthesize organic materials—metals and metal oxides. I want to spend some time in your group.’” At that time, the BioFoundry had been looking at lycopene to make nutraceuticals— those hybrid pharmaceutical/food supplements you might buy at Nesters Market or Whole Foods. But Yadav directed the young researcher to work with some fermenters making lycopene, and the moon shot took off from there. It started off like the Toronto Raptors’ story: At first things looked dismal, but that quickly turned around. “Sarvesh would come into the office, shoulders slumped,” says Yadav. “He’d made a lot of lycopene, but ‘unfortunately’ everything was degrading.” Initially, the team wanted to stop the degradation. Then they started asking questions, like, why was it happening in the first place? It was these informal conversations, literally around a water cooler, where one thing led to another. The team landed on the idea of experimenting with light—bingo! They proved the degradation was occurring because each molecule of lycopene released an electron when light, even low light, hit it. And electrons mean electrical current. As well, Srivastava knew they could take the bacteria and coat them with something metallic (like the titania nanoparticles) to make it more conductive, and they had a winner. “It takes only a day or so to grow the bacteria and make the dye and coat it, so making this was very, very easy,” says Yadav. In my books, that’s exactly the kind of reward that pure, undirected scientific research can give the world.

FULL OF ENERGY Sarvesh Srivastava, a researcher from the Technical University of Denmark, was key in developing UBC’s biogenic solar cells. Photo submitted

RBC Dominion Securities Inc.

LET ’S CREATE YOUR WINNING FINANCIAL GAME PLAN

Integrated wealth management for individuals, families and business owners

■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■

Create strong financial plans Align business and personal strategies Build investment portfolios to achieve goals Establish peace of mind through risk management solutions Plan for the long term through Will and estate consulting Make sound tax planning decisions

DON BRETT, MBA, CIM, CFP, CLU Wealth Advisor 1-888-612-9566 | don.brett@rbc.com www.donbrett.com

Let’s start a conversation about your future. Contact Don today.

RBC Dominion Securities Inc.* and Royal Bank of Canada are separate corporate entities which are affiliated. *Member-Canadian Investor Protection Fund. RBC Dominion Securities Inc. is a member company of RBC Wealth Management, a business segment of Royal Bank of Canada. ®Registered trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada. Used under licence. © RBC Dominion Securities Inc. 2015. All rights reserved. 15_90805_VDW_001

42 JUNE 6, 2019


FEATURE STORY

OFF TO THE RACES

Once they’re developed at a commercial level—and several companies have already approached UBC—these unique biogenic solar cells would work effectively in low-light settings such as mines or deep-sea exploration. But most of the excitement is around their use in places like Vancouver—and Whistler—as well as much of Canada and the northern U.S., northern Europe, the U.K., and parts of New Zealand where cloudy skies are common. “This is perfect for a place like Whistler … When you use these materials in overcast conditions where you don’t have a lot of energy descending on solar cells, they’re able to function as well as they do in direct sunlight,” says Yadav, who reminds us he’s referring to biogenic cells once they’re manufactured as solar panels, which may be only three to five years away. “It’s not like you spent a lot of money and installed a lot of solar panels, and you find out that for most of the year these things are not able to generate enough electricity because it’s too overcast,” he says. Conventional solar panels do generate electricity under cloudy, foggy or overcast skies, but they average around only 10 to 25 per cent of their rated capacity, depending on the panel and conditions. “The big advantage here is you get a return on the investment you make on the infrastructure, which is critical for regions that are thinking about solar,” Yadav adds. “Climate change is one argument. But another important argument that often gets buried is you have to still achieve sustainability. There are no ifs and buts—economic sustainability is also equally important. “There is no unlimited sum you can pay for technology in order for it to be sustainable.”

Any locations where you’re depending on solar, it’s a game-changer because the hours you can generate power and the amount of power you can generate in non-ideal conditions is so much better.”

Hard at work Lycopene-producing E. coli that have been coated with titania, as seen by a scanning electron microscope, magnified 5,000 times. Photo submitted

 ROD NADEAU, MANAGING PARTNER, INNOVATION BUILDING GROUP

Proudly supporting local designers.

10% TUESDAYS mention this ad and receive 10% off of all products on Tuesdays L o c a t e d i n t h e To w n P l a z a a c r o s s f r o m T h e G a p 6 0 4 . 9 0 5 . 6 2 9 0

JUNE 6, 2019

43


FEATURE STORY

If this new technology can obtain energy comparable to current synthetic [conventional] solar under cloudy skies, as we see in the corridor, that is a game changer. And it’s not just clouds, it’s mountain slopes. We put a bunch of solar up on a cabin we have at Anderson Lake and it’s interesting, because we’re on a really steep slope and it has its challenges. It doesn’t start picking up until 11 in the morning, when the sun goes over the ridge.”  ARTHUR DE JONG, MUNICIPAL COUNCILLOR, AND WHISTLER BLACKCOMB SENIOR MANAGER OF MOUNTAIN PLANNING AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

$18-HYDRO BILLS [right] Jen and Richard Wyne are very comfortable in their solar-powered house. Built by Bob Deeks of RDC Fine Homes, it was the first of its kind at Whistler. Photo by Richard Wyne

44 JUNE 6, 2019

WHISTLER: THE ETERNAL EARLY ADOPTER Since its early days of hippie-jock blissdom, Whistler’s always been a town of early adopters—people quick on the uptake of good, new ideas and ready to push the boundaries. It was no different when I called around to see what people thought of UBC’s latest innovation. From innovative builders like Bob Deeks and Rod Nadeau to solar-power advisors like Shannon Klassen, and even the mayor, people were pretty excited (see the collection of more Whistlerites’ comments). In fact, Richard Wyne, who, with his wife, Jen, owns one of the handful of houses at Whistler with conventional solar panels, is seriously interested in offering up their house to the BioFoundry team if they want to experiment with their new biogenic solar cells. “Game changer” was the term that came up time and again regarding the new solar cells. “It’s encouraging to me that the flexibility in the [new building] code will allow for adoption of new technology like this one,” says Whistler’s mayor Jack Crompton, who loves new technology. “As a ski town, we’re eminently aware of our need to find ways to reduce our emissions. Whistler is working on ways to reduce our impact and adapt to the climate, and ideas like this are important for us to consider.” Municipal councillor Arthur De Jong, who has worked on Whistler Blackcomb for four-plus decades, currently as senior manager of mountain planning and environmental resource management, has been

researching renewable energy for years. He’s also enthusiastic, and, like Yadav, acknowledges that the investment must be viable. “I will encourage any form of renewable energy that we can make the economics work. Absolutely!” he says. Another economic angle: He and the professor also recognize how these solar cells could be useful in lifting people out of poverty. “[Solar power] is right there as one of the most impactful solutions to climate change, and what I really like—this is an important one for me—is how it can help people in poverty. Over 1 billion people don’t have access to power grids,” adds De Jong. “Sunlight is the most accessible energy there is, and it costs so little to put up a small solar system.” The economics and small eco-footprint (a term coined by another innovative UBC team, Bill Rees and Mathis Wackernagel), along with the accessibility of sunlight are all behind Whistler Blackcomb’s use of solar panels in about a dozen applications. Conventional solar panels power some gates where skiers are loaded onto lifts; control systems in WB’s lift terminals; and weather stations that provide the daily weather data everyone using the mountains relies on.


Wellness Talks GOOD REASONS TO GO SOLAR Shannon Klassen, independent solar power advisor at Whistler, has three good reasons to go solar—her kids. These photovoltaic solar panels on parking kiosks at the day skier parking lot will help. Photo by Shannon Klassen

Nesters Market and Pharmacy offers wellness talks at its Whistler location. Join RHN and Certified Plant Based Chef Sarah Uy, Carissa Beu, RHN and Post Partum Doula Dana Lemmon and Jasmin Wong each week for inspirational whole health ideas.

SO WHY DON’T WE SEE MORE SOLAR AT WHISTLER? Besides the ones used on Whistler Blackcomb, case didn’t add up,” says Richard Wyne, who which are largely invisible to most of us, loves that their B.C. Hydro bill for February people think there are a lot of solar panels and March was only $18. “We knew we were used in Whistler, and there are. Sort of. But going to spend a bunch of extra money to do first an explanation. this, but Jen and I are both very happy with There are two types of solar panels with our decision to power our house with solar very different technologies: Solar thermal panels, and we’d absolutely do it again.” and solar photovoltaic, or PV for short. Solar Through net metering, such as the thermal technology collects sunlight and Wynes have, people with solar systems only transforms it into heat that’s stored; it can be pay for the electricity they use, getting a transformed into electricity, but it’s usually rebate for any power they add to the grid. used for heating water, like the 15 panels on “Net metering allows our residential Meadow Park Sports Centre in Whistler. and commercial customers to connect It’s these thermal solar panels for a small electricity-generating unit (up to heating hot water that people see the most 100 kilowatts) that uses clean or renewable on Whistler homes, largely in Rainbow resources to our distribution system,” subdivision where about 10 to 15 homes explained B.C. Hydro’s Tanya Fish via email. are using it. It’s also a technology Bob “When customers generate more electricity Deeks, head of RDC Fine Homes and one than they need, they can sell the excess of Whistler’s most sustainable builders, power back to us and get a bill credit towards describes as being “past its best-before date.” their future electricity use. If they don’t Photovoltaic solar panels use technology generate enough to meet their power needs, to capture sunlight and convert it into they buy power from us.” electricity. That’s the type of application B.C. Hydro currently has about 1,850 netwe’re mostly concerned with in this article, metered customers, the majority of them on not thermal; it’s also the type of panel barely solar photovoltaic. Previously, more robust used in the Sea to Sky corridor. buy-back programs were available through Besides the dozen or so solar PV panels net metering, but these were cancelled when on WB and powering municipal parking it became apparent some private operators kiosks, there are only three or four homes were acting like unlicensed commercial using them in Whistler along with one on power plants, selling up to $30,000 worth of Judd Road in Squamish. (Whistler doesn’t power annually back to the grid. track solar panel usage.) Whistler’s Official Community Plan, An average residential solar PV power Community Energy and Climate Action Plan system is around 14 to 24 solar panels or and net-zero ready building standard all about 4 to 6kW. The UBC team anticipates encourage renewable energy like solar. But that their biogenic cells could be easily other than net metering, the only financial linked into such conventional solar panel incentive in Whistler (and the rest of B.C.) systems to supplement them, not necessarily for homeowners is a $250 rebate on an replace them. energy evaluation for your home. When it comes to solar panels (the PV So why don’t we see more solar panels in type), the iconic example most Whistlerites use at Whistler? cite is the Wyne home in Rainbow Cost, says Rod Nadeau, managing partner subdivision mentioned earlier. Built by RDC of Innovation Building Group (IBG), which in time to be a showcase of sustainability has 40-plus years at Whistler. Cost, the lack during the 2010 Winter Olympics, the of incentives, financial or otherwise, and the owners couldn’t be more pleased with the fact that B.C. is 98 per cent powered by cheap, results, even though the panels are only clean hydroelectricity all play a role. about 12 per cent efficient. (Today’s panels “We have cheap hydro, and so the are about double that.) [return on investment] isn’t there yet,” “For us, the convenience is there but when says Nadeau. He explains that in a place we first engaged in this project, the business like Germany or California, where you’re

Kick the Sugar Habit THURSDAY JUNE 13, 10:30 A.M. WITH MELISSA DEALLY, HEALTH COACH Do you wonder why you crave sugar at certain times? Are you done reinventing the wheel and do you want someone to tell you what really works and what doesn’t when it comes to kicking the sugar habit? Learn the 3 main challenges to kicking the sugar habit and then 7 tips you can implement that will curb your sugar cravings, helping you not only kick the sugar habit, but reduce inflammation in your body, thereby reducing the risk of future chronic illness in your brain and gut.

Melissa Deally is a registered Health Coach and the owner of Better Brain Health, which focuses on concussion recovery support, optimizing brain performance, as well as mastering your mindset to have positive impact on your life, in addition to focusing on your 2nd brain - your gut. Melissa coaches on all aspects of gut and brain health to give you the education and tools you need, to live a long and healthy life. Prevention is the best remedy, as you can’t enjoy your wealth if you don’t have your health!

Wellness Desk 604-932-3545 Ext 322

7019 Nesters Rd. Whistler, B.C.

JUNE 6, 2019

45


FEATURE STORY

SOLAR IN B.C. AND BEYOND Depending on the source and context, the global solar picture varies. But safe to say China tops the charts, with about onethird of world capacity, followed by the E.U., U.S. and Japan, not necessarily in that order. However, when it comes to photovoltaic solar watts generated per capita, Germany leads the pack followed by Japan and Italy. As for Canada, even though our solar capacity exploded from 16.7 megawatts in 2005 to 2,911 megawatts in 2017, we trail the rankings with only one per cent of world solar capacity. Here in B.C., it’s not that solar power is missing from the energy scene. More, it’s not exactly big, largely because of cost (an average installation is usually cited in the $30,000 range) and the province’s huge clean supply of hydroelectric power. Meanwhile, other jurisdictions shine. In the U.S., the average cost of installing solar panels runs around $US17,000 but tax breaks and other incentives can drop that down around $US5,000 in some states. Alberta, under its previous NDP government, invested $36 million to encourage solar and community energy projects under the federal government’s Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change. This includes an impressive rebate incentive of $10,000 or up to 35 per cent of the initial cost of installation. The goal: to have solar on 10,000 rooftops by 2020. While no one knows what’s going to happen under Alberta’s new Conservative government, the investment is paying off. Right now, Ontario remains the heartland of solar capacity in Canada. For instance, the 100-MW Kingston and equally big Grand Renewable solar project near Hamilton— where Six Nations are the “landlord” and half a million solar panels gather the sun’s energy—are the largest in Canada and among the largest in North America. But Alberta is Canada’s new leading light in the solar department. Energyhub.org ranks Alberta as tops in the nation in terms of the feasibility of installing solar power at home. According to CBC, about 250 solar companies are now operating in Alberta, with investments in solar projects totalling about $134 million. About 1,500 residential and commercial solar projects have been installed with another 900 on the way. The bulk, about 2,200, are residential projects, including my cousins’ home on Pigeon Lake where they’ve just installed a full photovoltaic array. As well, Alberta recently invested in three new solar facilities to supply the provincial government with 55 per cent of its annual electrical needs, effectively doubling the province’s solar capacity. Ontario’s solar industry was thriving until premier Doug Ford nuked the solar rebate program. In 2016, the most recent year that figures are available, solar accounted for five per cent of the average residential electrical bill. But now many of Ontario’s solar companies are looking to move to Alberta—at least they were, until Jason Kenney was elected. With 25 per cent more sun than Ontario, our next-doorneighbour province is a likely solar hotbed—providing Albertans keep their eye on the renewable energy ball.

46 JUNE 6, 2019

If you can have fewer solar panels to generate the same amount of electricity, it gives you more flexibility around design. Absolutely. Or on the flip side, it will allow you to generate more power from the same roof area if you want to be more self-sufficient. Anything that’s more efficient is going to have a lot greater value and more interest.”  BOB DEEKS, HEAD OF RDC FINE HOMES

POWER HOUSE: Bob Deeks, head of RDC Fine Homes, is the rightfully proud builder of two Whistler solar-powered homes, this one in Bayshores, constructed in 2012, and one in Rainbow. The solar panels are just peeking over the roof edge, as the zoning required a flatter pitch. Photo by Jennie Small paying 15 to 40 cents a kilowatt hour, solar panels make “tons of economic sense.” In B.C., we pay eight to 12 cents a kilowatt hour and because of that, solar is not as economically viable. To top it off, the municipality offers few incentives for builders. “For all their talk, there is absolutely nothing,” Nadeau adds. “There’re no incentives, no expedited approval process, no bonus density, absolutely nothing, and there’s not even recognition that you’re doing it. But the reality is if you want something to be adopted, it needs to be cheaper, faster, better, easier, and if you don’t hit all those buttons, why do it?” Still, Nadeau and his partner are “doing it” because they believe in sustainability. IBG has built lots of energy-efficient properties, including a 45-unit rental building in Pemberton that’s solar-ready for photovoltaic, which they intend to install next year, as well as a similar project in Golden, B.C. Bob Deeks has a similar take. Whistler has the province-wide solar-ready requirement to encourage builders, and that’s about it. “The solar-ready requirement was initially a commitment through the Union of B.C. Municipalities that a number of municipalities signed on to around 2012. Its intent was originally for solar thermal and, installed correctly, could also be used in the future for solar PV,” explains Deeks, who also focuses on low-

impact, energy-efficient homes. “Currently, with the cost of installing PV and what the comparative cost of electricity is, there is no payback model in B.C. Additionally, with most of the power consumed coming from hydro, you can argue that our power is green power.” But there is hope for more solar use wherever we live. Cost is dropping while efficiency is climbing— and that’s without any new biogenic solar cells. Wyne points out they could install a solar system on their house today that would produce twice the power at half the cost. Shannon Klassen has three more reasons. She’s an independent solar-power advisor at Whistler and licensee with California-based Powur, a tech company trying to get as many homes as possible hooked into solar power. “I have three kids and we watch the glaciers melt,” she says. “It’s really becoming more and more apparent that everybody needs to do as much as possible—it’s an environmental crisis, right?” To that end, Klassen will happily provide anyone with an accurate, non-invasive proposal for solar panels for your home or commercial building at no cost. With a little luck, and more development, that could include a biogenic solar system not too far in the future. ■


ADMISSION IS FREE ALL WEEKEND LONG

• Welcome and meet AAM Director & Chief Curator Dr. Curtis Collins • Live music with Stephen Vogler • Cash bar

COMMUNITY MEMBERSHIP

PROMOTION

(3:30 PM Friday to 5 PM Sunday)

AND SUNDAY

COMMUNITY WEEKEND OPENING NIGHT

FRIDAY JUNE 14 SUNDAY JUNE 16

June 15 - 16: 10 AM – 5 PM

SATURDAY

FRIDAY

June 14: 6 PM - 9 PM

Credit: Darby Magill

COMMUNITY OPEN HOUSE WEEKEND

LEARN ABOUT THE MUSEUM & ART

with “docent hotspot talks” 12 PM – 4 PM

VAULT TOURS

with Director & Chief Curator Dr. Curtis Collins 11 AM – 3 PM SATURDAY ONLY. In-person day-of registration required. First come first served.

FAMILY STUDIO PROGRAMMING

12 PM – 4 PM

Sign up or renew your membership in person over the community weekend to receive the discounted membership rate. *discount cannot be applied to previous purchases.

INDIVIDUAL: $50

+ GST

FAMILY: $65

+ GST

Photo: Darby Magill

Photo: Scott Brammer

Photo: Darby Magill

Photo: Tod Easterbrook

PRESENTED BY


TRAVEL & ADVENTURE

getting naked in 1

Wiesbaden Bathe naked, sip sparkling wine and eat schnitzel in the historic German city of Wiesbaden. BY STEVE MACNAULL

48 JUNE 6, 2019

ertainly, you can make eye contact and even nod in greeting. But, for heaven’s sake, don’t stare, in neither admiration nor aversion, at anyone’s privates or bare backside. Those are my do-and-don’t tips for taking the waters naked at Kaiser Friedrich Therme, a Romanstyle bath in the German spa-town of Wiesbaden. Not that I’m a nude-in-public etiquette expert, but you tend to learn quickly when you and everyone around you is buck naked. You can negotiate much of the elaborately pillared, tiled, muralled and vaulted circa 1913 bathhouse wrapped in a towel or wearing a robe. But, if you’re going to use the main pool, one of the saunas or steam rooms, hot tubs, plunge pools, ice or warm

showers, you have to shed it all. Thank goodness it wasn’t overly busy when I visited Kaiser’s therme at lunch time on a Monday. Fellow bathers ran the gamut from Germans aged millennial through senior citizen to curious foreigners and young couples who seemed to be having a laugh they could be naked together in public. I felt it was my tourist-and-historical duty to check out Kaiser’s therme while in Wiesbaden, which is a 30-minute train ride west of Frankfurt. After all, Wiesbaden was founded by the Romans as a spa town and it gained fame as such over the next 1,500 years. The Romans discovered exhausted horses recovered faster rolling around in fields soaked in thermal waters and injured soldiers healed miraculously after bathing in the naturally heated baths. In fact, Wiesbaden loosely translated


1

2

is fields of bath water. Thanks to 26 underground thermal springs abundantly spouting this mineralrich, 66-degree Celsius elixir, today there are fountains in public squares, drinking stations, two public thermal baths and numerous hotel spas utilizing the waters. The other public bath is Thermalbad Aukammtal, which I find out later allows swimsuits. In its spa-time heyday through the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries, Wiesbaden attracted the wealthy from around the world to soak up its cure-all waters. Today, the benefits are proven to be purely therapeutic. Thus, after an hour at Kaiser therme, I feel relaxed and rejuvenated and my skin is baby-soft. There’s more to Wiesbaden than getting naked. In fact, since 1856, the area has been home to sparking wine, a luxury drink

3

that went hand-in-hand with well-heeled international spa goers. That little sparkling wine maker is now Henkell and Wiesbaden has become the world capital of sparkling wine for the 90 million bottles of bubbly it pumps out annually. While Henkell is essentially a massive factory, it has a neo-classical palace facade with grand, marble reception hall where I sipped Henkell Troken, the bestselling sparkling in the world, before touring its seven levels of underground production, bottling, labelling, storage and shipping facilities. While Wiesbaden is called a spa town, it’s really a cosmopolitan city of 300,000 that also happens to be steeped in history and heritage buildings. Wander the pedestrianized downtown, the cobblestoned district of shops and restaurants on higgledy-piggledy narrow lanes and wide boulevards.

4

Check out the stately City Palace built in 1842 for the Duke of Nassau and the Gothic Revival Market Church, which is built of 6.5 million bricks. You’ll be temped to drop into traditional restaurants like Uhrturm and Koyler for German favourites such as schnitzel paired with Riesling or lager. Outside of downtown, you can visit the Riesling vineyard on Neroberg hill of Kloster Eberabach Winery and then go a little farther to the actual Kloster (historic monastery) where we meet the Rheingau wine queen, Katharina Bausch, and two of her princesses. Speaking of royalty, outside of town you can also pop into Biebrich Palace, the summer home of the Duke of Nassau, which earned the nickname Versailles on the River Rhine for its grandeur. n

Facing page: No swimsuits allowed at Kaiser Friedrich Therme, a historic Roman-style bathhouse in Wiesbaden, German. SUPPLIED BY KAISER FRIEDRICH 1. Henkell in Wiesbaden has a

neo-classical palace facade with the largest sparkling wine production facility in the world behind it. BY STEVE MACNAULL 2. Rheingau wine queen Katharine Bausch, centre, with princesses Isabella Albrecht, left, and Annika Walther greet guests at Kloster Eberbach monastery. BY STEVE MACNAULL 3. Erika Buntschuh leads tastings

at the Neroberg vineyard of Kloster Eberbach Winery. BY STEVE MACNAULL 4. Guide Andrea Oswald leads a tour past the bust of company founder Otto Henkell. BY STEVE MACNAULL

Check out Wiesbaden.de and www.Germany.Travel

JUNE 6, 2019

49


SPORTS THE SCORE

Whistler Half Marathon hits its stride in ninth year RETURN RUNNERS DOMINATE THE PODIUM OF JUNE 1 RACES

BY ALYSSA NOEL EVERYTHING WAS A LITTLE bit easier this year for organizers of the Whistler Half Marathon. The gloomy skies that loomed over the last few editions of the race gave way to sun on Saturday, June 1, volunteers turned up in abundance, and the number of runners remained steady at about 1,770, said race director Dave Clark. “I think it was probably the smoothest edition we’ve had so far from an operational perspective,” he said. “We’ve always had that mentality of, ‘Things are great and work well, but how can we fine tune and improve our process?’ It really feels those nine years of attention to details has paid off. That was definitely a big win. The second big win was the number of volunteers—it was phenomenal.” The podium, meanwhile, was dominated by return runners this year. Victoria’s Care Nelson, held on to top spot in the women’s half marathon with a time of 1 hour, 28 minutes and 24 seconds (1:28:24) after her win in 2018. (She’s also placed in the top three since 2011—the only exception being 2014 when she didn’t run.)

ON YOUR MARK Runners take off from the start line at the Whistler Half Marathon on Saturday, June 1. PHOTO BY ROB SHAER/ COURTESY OF THE WHISTLER HALF MARATHON

50 JUNE 6, 2019

“I thought of this one a lot while I was running because she’s super fast,” she said while holding her daughter, Stella, in her arms after crossing the finish line. “She’s doing the kids’ race, so every time I got tired, I thought, ‘Oh, I have to get back to Stella.’” Coming in behind Nelson with 1:31:40 was Renee Lane in second spot, followed by Annika Austin at 1:32:44. Meanwhile, on the men’s side,

Just 15 seconds behind him was Victoria’s Nick Walker. “I’ve been out to help with the event in the first three years it started,” Walker said. “It’s amazing. It’s definitely a very challenging course, but rewarding as well.” Taking the top spot in the 30K was renowned ultra marathoner Rob Krar with a time of 1:56:28. Krar, who has won both the Western States 100 and Leadville 100, was invited

“I think it was probably the smoothest edition we’ve had so far from an operational perspective.” - DAVE CLARK

Alexandre Ricard crossed the finish line first in 1:14:07. Having moved from Quebec to Squamish a year ago, Ricard had mostly run five and 10-kilometre races before toeing the line in Whistler. “It’s my second half marathon,” he said. “I’m starting longer distances. It’s nice.” Behind him with a time of 1:16:25 was Seattle’s Uli Steidl, who set a course record for the 30-km distance of the race last year. “I thought, ‘I did the 30 K last year and got the course record; I’ll try something new,’” he said.

to the race this year to lead two guided trail runs on Friday, May 31 as part of the pre-race events. “I come from an ultrarunning and trail-running background, so this was very smooth, very flat,” Krar said. “Definitely the pace was much faster than I’m used to, but I enjoyed it.” The second-place runner, Lukas Fuesselberger, came in less than a minute behind him at 1:57:09, which added up to some fun competition, he said. “The guy in front of me put a good gap on me halfway through the course. And I

caught up to him with just over a kilometre to go and put in a hard surge. It was fun. It brought me back to my road running days, putting on the face and going by quickly,” he said. Michael Stobart rounded out third place in the 30K men’s division. Trisha Steidl took first place in the women’s division with 2:12:52 while Christina Bauer and Chloe Eaton finished the top three. That distance marked its third year as part of the race’s offerings. It has become a solid challenge for those who are looking for something a little less daunting than a full marathon, Clark said. “The feedback we get from people is they like it because it challenges them more than they expected it to,” he added. In the 10K, David Jackson was the fastest man at 35:08, followed by Luke Armstrong, and Jan Kundoerfer. Catrin Jones topped the women at 39:01, with Lydia Tay in second, and Megan Morrissey in third. The 5K, meanwhile, saw Mark Klassen cross the line first in 18:30, with Anando Naqui, and Hector Aro behind him. For the women, Marilyn Arsenault finished in 24:37, followed by Emma Elsner, and Willa Kriebel in third. To see the full results, visit whistlerhalfmarathon.com/results.html. Meanwhile, an early tally estimated the event raised at least $18,000 for Crohn’s and Colitis Canada. “It really solidifies why we did this in the first place and continue to do it,” Clark said. n


SPORTS THE SCORE

PEMBERTON FARMERS MARKET Fridays 3-6:30pm, June 7 – Oct 25 Pemberton Downtown Community Barn

A great way to start the weekend! Email: info@pembertonfarmersmarket.com

OPENING MARKET, FRIDAY JUNE 7TH! FINE FORM Finn Iles cruised to a fourth-place finish at the UCI Downhill World Cup race in Fort William, Scotland

WWW.WORCA.COM

TOONIE SCHEDULE

on June 2.

PHOTO BY BARTOSZ WOLINSKI/RED BULL CONTENT POOL

Iles earns career-best fourth at Fort William DOWNHILLER BATTLED THROUGH AFTER HARROWING CRASH

BY DAN FALLOON LINING UP IN THE START gate for the second Mercedes-Benz UCI Downhill World Cup of the season in Fort William, Scotland on June 2, Finn Iles wasn’t expecting to do much. After all, he was only a day removed from one of the worst crashes he’d ever suffered, going down in the rock garden during qualifying and needing extensive attention from the physiotherapist just to get in a position to compete in the race. However, on race day, the 19-yearold blazed down the course to a career-best fourth-place showing, finishing in four minutes, 35.781 seconds (4:35.781), 7.2 seconds back of winner Amaury Pierron of France, and 3.5 seconds off the podium. “I had a big crash on Saturday that took a lot out of me. I went over the bars in the rock garden and then I had to do a lot of physio on Saturday night just to be able to race on Sunday. I didn’t really think I was going to be able to do anything special on Sunday just because my hand was in so much pain, but everything seemed to work out in the end,” he said. “I was pretty much held together by tape and a few painkillers that allowed me to push through that pain barrier. “I was pretty lucky not to have broken anything just because of the speed—and the landing spot was a pile of rocks.” Fort William can be difficult to handle in wet conditions, as the course stays grippy on top, but the bottom has a slippery wood section that could wreak havoc on riders, Iles said. “This weekend was really hard, just because weather was constantly changing. It was really cold, (with) a lot of rain and a lot of wind. It was hard to figure out what I was going to do on race day,” he said. “We

got pretty lucky with conditions, so we could gauge what to do with the bike.” Iles said he entered the 2019 campaign, his sophomore season on the elite circuit, feeling confident, but felt a bit of a blow after crashing in the first event in Maribor, Slovenia, in April. “I knew I had the speed to do a podium or even get a win, (so) that was quite frustrating to say the least,” he said. “After the last result, I’m confident in myself. I’m slowing down a little bit more in terms of my raceday process and my race-weekend process. “Last year, I was focused too much on trying to win instead of just riding my bike.”

“Last year, I was focused too much in trying to win instead of just riding my bike.”

%

TONIGHT'S TOONIE - JUNE 6

SPONSORS: Coastal Culture, Creekside Market, X-treme Organics, Sabre Rentals, Arts Whistler, Whistler Museum COURSE: XC point to point with an optional extra lap SIGN-IN: Interpretive Forest Car Park, 5:30pm APRÈS: Creekside Parking lot with a Retro Bike Show & Shine

NEXT WEEK'S TOONIE - JUNE 13

SPONSORS: Cascade Environmental Resource Group, Whistler Village Sports, Diamond Head Sports COURSE: XC point to point SIGN-IN: Cascade Environmental, Function Junction, 5:30pm APRÈS: Cascade Environmental, Function Junction

Avoid line-ups and buy your membership and toonie season pass online BEFORE sign-in.

Y For Toonie patrol & first Aid on-course Phone: 604.902.2104 Y

WALSH

RESTORATION USE A WALSH CUBE TRUCK FOR FREE TO MOVE YOUR POSSESSIONS TO WALSH STORAGE

- FINN ILES

Iles also recently got a head start on his post-secondary education, attending the University of Victoria for its fall semester. Though he took a buffet of courses to start, Iles is leaning towards pursuing economics in the future. Iles also stayed on Vancouver Island to train during the winter with fellow Canadian rider Magnus Manson. Also in Fort William, several Canadians hit the top 10 in the junior men’s event. Patrick Laffey took third, 2.2 seconds back of winner Thibaut Daprela of France, while Pemberton’s Lucas Cruz was fifth, Elliot Jamison was eighth and Squamish’s Seth Sherlock took 10th. Whistler summer resident Ethan Shandro, meanwhile, took 16th. n

%

We Added More Containers!

WALSH STORAGE Pemberton Industrial Park - 1944 Stone Cutter Place Owner Residence On-Site

8 X 10 CONTAINERS

100

$

+TAX PER MONTH

2 HOURS FREE TRUCK TIME

8 X 20 CONTAINERS

160

$

+TAX PER MONTH

4 HOURS FREE TRUCK TIME

Call Mike Walsh

604 698 0054

mike.walsh@walshrestoration.ca JUNE 6, 2019

51


SPORTS THE SCORE

Bowen excellent at Oliver TRIATHLETE WINS WINE CAPITAL OF CANADA SPRINT, TAKES SECOND AT HALF IRON

BY DAN FALLOON CHRIS BOWEN VERY nearly doubled up in Oliver on the weekend. The Whistler Triathlon Club member started off the weekend by capturing the sprint distance event at the Wine Capital of Canada (WCOC) Triathlon on Saturday, then in the longer Oliver Half Iron, he placed second overall while winning the 30-to-34 age category. “It was a hot weekend to race, for sure,” he said. “It was my first time doing that, racing two races in two days.” For Bowen, the weekend was a stepping stone on the path back to Whistler, as he hopes to star at the Subaru Ironman Canada race on July 28. “Normally, with a longer race, you want to do something a bit before, but usually quite a relaxed session. It was certainly different to put in a short, harder workout the day before,” he said. “I wanted to see how I’d react to that, being a little bit more tired the next day.” Coming off his win in the roughly 23-kilometre race in which he topped runner-up Jesse Van Oene by 71 seconds, Bowen was keen to ramp it up the

WILD WEEKEND Chris Bowen (centre) won the Wine Capital of Canada Triathlon’s sprint distance on June 1. PHOTO BY PRESERVED LIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY

following day in the Half Iron. There, he finished 14 minutes and 11 seconds behind Martin Caron for the overall crown in the 91-km contest. “I definitely felt the effort of the previous day when I got on my bike. It was super hot out there on the run, so I dialled the effort back a little bit at the start,” he said. “I was able to come through in the second half of the run and get into second spot, which is better than I expected.” In addition to the heat, Bowen identified strong winds as challenges that he hadn’t

WHISTLER INTERIORS INTERIOR DESIGN & HOME STAGING Loremipsum

Making a house a home whistlerinteriors.com (778) - 266 - 0181

Coastal Design Contracting Ltd.

had to deal with to the same degree in Oliver during prior trips. Bowen is excited to do this weekend’s inaugural Whistler X Triathlon on Sunday, June 9 as part of a relay team. He said he will welcome the change of pace, embracing off-road elements that are near and dear to Whistler’s heart. “That’s a really exciting event that’s going to be a local thing put on and presented by the tri club, which is really cool,” he said. “It’s just nice to mix it up and have some different events out there

for people who have done a few triathlons before, and it’s easier for people who are just getting into things as well.” Also in the Half Iron, Marla Zucht won her 45-to-49 age category and was the third woman to finish, while Karen Norton took third in the 30-to-34 age division. Whitney Reynolds and Jodi Carter took fifth and 11th, respectively, in the 45-to-49 event. Norton also won her age category while placing third overall among women in the WCOC sprint triathlon. Silvie Votrubova, meanwhile, was fifth in the 30-to-34 women’s sprint while Frances Dickinson and Shannon Didier were fourth and eighth, respectively, in the women’s 45-to-49 contest. Maridee Fitch took sixth in the women’s 55-to-59 category in the standard distance. Meanwhile, at the Ironman 70.3 Victoria on June 2, local finishers were: Andrew Narkewicz (134th in the men’s 30-to-34 event); Bob Deeks (17th in the men’s 55-to59 event); Christian Stulz (19th in the men’s 50-to-54 event); Gideon Baldridge (127th in the men’s 30-to-34 event); Kyle Kennedy (33rd in the men’s 30-to-34 event); Matthew Robinson (17th in the men’s 25-to-29 event); Scott Brammer (69th in the men’s 50-to-54 event); Steve Wheeler (44th in the men’s 50-to-54 event); and Maude Cyr (30th in the women’s 35-to-39 event). n

Reduce your Carbon Footprint Housing contributes 30% of all greenhouse gases

GENERAL CONTRACTING CUSTOM HOMES RENOVATIONS

A PASSIVE HOUSE uses up to 90% less energy than a normal house

coastaldesigncontracting.com (604) - 345 - 9101

To learn more go to: SUMMERHILLCONSTRUCTION.COM

Award winning Design and Maintenance

WILL & ESTATES BUSINESS LAW

www.heikedesigns.com

Did you know ?

REAL ESTATE

Plants are ALIVE! Allow for growth, Proud member of space and food as per their unique needs. Plants actually increase in value as they grow. Soil plays an important role. Keep it healthy, too! Plants, soil, air, water are our environment! See full series and more information at www.heikedesigns.com

52 JUNE 6, 2019

FREE CONSULTATION In person or by phone

S H O LT O S H AW

604.932.3211 332-4370 lorimer road s.shaw@raceandco.com

R A C E A N D C O M PA N Y. C O M


SPORTS THE SCORE

Welsh leads Spruce Kings to national final PRINCE GEORGE ENJOYED INCREDIBLE CAMPAIGN

BY DAN FALLOON ANY HOCKEY PLAYER worth his or her salt wants to be out on the ice with a national championship on the line. And when out there, finding a way to score is even better. That’s what Whistler’s Nolan Welsh was able to do for his Prince George Spruce Kings in the championship game of the National Jr. ‘A’ Championship on May 19. Down 4-2 to the host Brooks Bandits late in the third, Welsh was tabbed to help the Spruce Kings find some quick offence. He converted with 45 seconds to go to make it 4-3, and even though Prince George wasn’t able to find the equalizer, Welsh was glad to have made good with his opportunity. “That was really special. We weren’t giving up at all. We gave it all we had and it was nice to be able to score and make the game at least a one-goal difference,” he said. “We proved to ourselves that we should be here, we deserve to be in this thing. To be able to battle back like that was huge for our team.” It was the continuation of a strong postseason for Welsh, who is able to raise his game when the contests matter more.

STRONG SEASON Nolan Welsh (left) helped the Prince George Spruce Kings to the second-best season in Canadian Jr. ‘A’ hockey, as they fell in the national championship final to the host Brooks Bandits in May.

PHOTO BY MATTHEW MURNAGHAN/HOCKEY CANADA

Welsh, who turns 20 on June 23, has eight goals in 163 career British Columbia Hockey League (BCHL) regular-season games, but, counting this year’s national championship, has 11 goals in 69 career playoff games. Just this season, he had 21 points in 29 playoff games, whereas he posted 20 in an injuryshorted 43-game regular season. “It was awesome to be able to produce the way I did in the playoffs. It helps with the team doing so well. It’s just a lot easier,” Welsh said. “For me, I was able to find the net and have success all through playoffs.

“Nothing felt different and I wasn’t doing anything different. Everything was working out. I was just clicking with my linemates and I was able to put the puck in the net.” Though the season came to a disappointing end, especially considering the Spruce Kings bested the Bandits 4-2 in the best-of-seven Doyle Cup series between the B.C. and Alberta champions, Welsh is looking back at the many positives from the season. “It was tough to lose, coming one

game short of what you wanted to do all season, but looking back, it was a really good season,” Welsh said. “We won the whole league and ended up beating the team that won (the national title) in a sevengame series. We definitely had success this season.” Welsh was also quick to credit the Bandits, who rose to the pressure of hosting a national tournament at home. “They definitely played really well. We knew they were going to play well going into it and it’s what we expected. It just didn’t go our way. They’re a really good team and for them to be on their own ice, too, was definitely a big advantage for them, but in the end, we fell short,” Welsh said. The Spruce Kings built off a strong regular season in which they led the league in goal differential and placed only one point behind the league leaders and defending national champions Chilliwack Chiefs. But in the playoffs, Prince George rolled, downing Coquitlam 4-1 before plowing through Chilliwack, Victoria and Vernon undefeated. “It was such a big thing to do, playing against those teams all year. All through the year, it was really close with all the teams,” Welsh said. “Beating all those teams the way we did was something special.” n

JUNE 6, 2019

53


SPORTS THE SCORE

Krasny captures CNES victory LOCAL ENDURO RIDER SPLITTING TIME BETWEEN NATIONAL, WORLD STAGES

BY DAN FALLOON CARTER KRASNY ISN’T spending his 2019 season focusing on the Canadian National Enduro Series (CNES) under-21 crown, but that doesn’t mean he’s averse to reminding everyone he’s still the defending champion until the campaign wraps. Krasny dropped into the CNES event in Kamloops on June 2, edging Jacob Tooke by 6.5 seconds and Emmett Hancock by 8.9 seconds. He also ended up with the fourthbest overall time of the day. “I was just riding clean and smooth and things went well,” Krasny said. Krasny trailed for the first half of the race, but his favourite stage, the fourth of six, is where he pulled into the lead and didn’t look back, winning all three remaining sections. Taking more than 11 minutes to complete, Krasny knew No. 4 was make-orbreak going in. “(The fourth stage) was steep technical at the top and then it went into some new

trail and had a big pedally section in it. The rest of it was just brakeless, going really fast. That was the one I knew that the racing was tight, but that was the stage that was going to decide who was going to win the race,” he said. “Because of how long it is, you can put more time into people on that one.” All in all, Krasny said the course was similar to 2018 apart from a couple of small, new sections popped in. Though dry and dusty conditions meant high speeds were on order, the deteriorating condition in the new sections gave Krasny pause. “The new trails were a little difficult to race because we weren’t allowed to practice them before because they wanted to keep them fresh so they wouldn’t get blown out and destroyed. You had to have your eyes up and be looking far ahead to be going fast on a trail you don’t know,” he said. “All the pro riders went through before. When we walked the new sections, you’d see a corner and you’d (think), ‘That looks like it will hold, you can hit it fast.’ “But the reality is you came into some of the corners and it was just blown out. You’d

STRONG START Carter Krasny (centre) shown here celebrating his overall Canadian National Enduro Series win in Bromont, Que. last summer, won his first race of 2019 in Kamloops.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

hit it and it would be rotor-deep dust. You’d get pretty loose on your bike.” Also in Kamloops, Marcus Goguen edged Wei Tien Ho to win the 15-and-under event. Krasny began his season at the Enduro World Series (EWS) event in Madeira, Portugal in May, taking a 14th-place finish in the U21 division. “That was the coolest trip I’ve ever been on. It was unreal riding there. The island’s amazing,” he said. “Even though I’ve done the Enduro World Series in Whistler, it’s my home trails, so it doesn’t really feel like it’s a huge deal. When you travel so far to this remote island to go racing against the best

in the world, it’s really cool.” The biggest adjustment has been that riders, only get one lap of each stage to practice, whereas Canadian races are unlimited (provided those trails aren’t closed). “Wearing a GoPro helps, and rewatching your runs, but also, I feel like my memorization of trails is getting better as I’m racing more and more,” he said. Krasny now heads to next two EWS events in Italy and France, and he will race the CNES Panorama event and before wrapping his campaign with EWS races in Whistler, Northstar California Resort and Zermatt, Switzerland. n

R E L T S I WH

B U L C BMX Racing Every Tuesday

Registration at 5:30pm

All Bikes All Ages All Levels

FREE RACING on June 11 to

celebrate Olympic Day

Come try the awesome sport of BMX! Volunteers always needed

No experience required!

5 DAYS Last Day

THURSDAY 27TH JUNE.

Choice of one plate

Grilled Chicken Caesar Salad

Marinated chicken thigh, low fat yogurt dressing, capered focaccia croutons, Grana Padano crisp

2 Baja fish Taco

House slaw, avocado salsa verde+cilantro sour cream served in a flour tortilla

Johnny Mac Pizza

Capicolla, mushrooms, mozzarella, provolone

Beef Burger

Ground chuck, fried onions, lettuce, tomato

Mac and Cheese

Macaroni, 4 cheese sauce, light panko crust +garlic toast

Plus one craft beer Grizzly Brown Ale • Lifty Lager •Alta Lake Ale • 5 Rings IPA

ONLY

WhistlerBmx info@whistlerbmx.com 54 JUNE 6, 2019

14.99

$

EACH

SUNDAY TO THURSDAY EXCEPT HOLIDAYS


SPORTS THE SCORE

Celebration of Life CHERYL MORNINGSTAR

COME ON DOWN Whistler Sailing is hosting open houses ion June 10 and July 13. PHOTO BY JILL WYNOTT

Whistler Sailing hosting open houses SPORTS BRIEFS: FORGED TEAMING UP WITH ZERO CEILING

BY DAN FALLOON WHISTLER SAILING IS inviting the public to its boats. The club is set to host two free open houses, one on Monday, June 10 between 4:30 and 7:30 p.m., and one on Saturday, July 13 from 1 to 4 p.m. Head coach and general manager Francois Hebert is excited to see some new

“The ultimate goal is to create new sailors and grow interest and share our sport with the community.” - FRANCOIS HEBERT

faces at the club. “The goal of these open houses is for people to meet the coaches and the members of Whistler Sailing, and secondly, to learn about the Whistler Sailing programs and options,” he said. “People are going to get the chance to go sailing with an experienced coach or member. “The ultimate goal is to create new sailors and grow interest and share our sport with the community.” The open houses are a continuation of the club’s increase in outreach in recent years. Hebert said those efforts are paying off in padding Whistler Sailing’s membership numbers. “We’re still growing. We’ve been in existence now just about 10 years this year,”

he said. “We’ve had a lot of impact with kids in our community with our school programs and the summer camps that are our most popular activity.” Hebert added that he also feels that Whistler is “ahead of the curve” when it comes to making sailing inclusive, noting that some other communities face perceptions that it’s an unattainably elitist pursuit. “Sailing has a bit of a problem that it’s perceived as a bit exclusive with all the yacht clubs. We’re more of a sailing club where we sail smaller boats and it’s all about the sport of sailing and keeping it affordable,” he said. Those interested in coming to the open house are asked to RSVP to info@ whistlersailing.com.

Sunday, June 16, 2019 3:00 pm Fairmont Chateau Whistler

FORGED TEAMING UP WITH ZERO CEILING Forged Axe Throwing is holding an open house in support of Zero Ceiling on Thursday, June 13. The Function Junction-based business will mark International Axe Throwing Day with the chance to try the sport by donation to Zero Ceiling, which helps at-risk and homeless youth. As well, a representative from the Whistler Community Services Society will be on hand to provide information about the organization’s mental-health supports as part of an effort to eliminate stigma about proper mental health. “Mental health has never been more topical than it is right now,” Forged co-owner James Anderson said in a release. “It’s important to encourage more people to talk about mental health, and here at Forged, we are always keen to bring different communities together and promote inclusivity.” The event starts at noon. For more information, visit www. forgedaxe.ca. n

• •

JUNE 6, 2019

55


SPORTS THE SCORE

Riding the Silk Road ROSSLAND’S DR. BRENDA TRENHOLME TO SPEAK ABOUT FIVEMONTH RIDE AT WHISTLER PUBLIC LIBRARY

BY DAN FALLOON CYCLING ALONG the Silk Road was, contrary to its name, not a smooth ride for Dr. Brenda Trenholme. The now-65-year-old Rossland resident completed the 13,000-kilometre journey from Beijing to Istanbul over the course of five months last year, traversing through the Gobi Desert, western Siberia and across the Pamir Mountains. She’ll be in town to speak all about it at the Whistler Public Library on June 6 at 2:30 p.m. Admission is by donation to the Kenya Education Empowerment Fund (KEEF). As a lifelong cyclist, Trenholme had done mostly solo trips before doing a 12,000-km transcontinental African tour from Cairo to Cape Town, travelling with the TDA Global Cycling group for safety and security reasons.

“I’d wanted to see the interior of Asia. I’d explored some of its fringes but had never been to the middle of it,” she said. Even going with a group, there’s plenty of advance work, such as organizing 10 visas and making travel arrangements. Trenholme said that once she’s on her bike, all she’s responsible for is riding. “It’s just such a relief to get on that bicycle and leave it all behind, considering that it’s a hedonistic experience to have your meals made for you and your luggage carried,” she said. The trip was a grind, with only a handful of days off every month. When riding, the group would average 135 km per day, though it would be less than 100 when riding rocky, technical terrain and push 200 on flatter roads in good condition. “We travelled through 10 countries and we went from capital city to capital city, usually. Otherwise, we were in very remote places,” Trenholme said. “We’d ride for,

ROCKY ROAD Dr. Brenda Trenholme completed the Silk Road by bike last year, and will present about her experience at the Whistler Public Library on June 6. PHOTO SUBMITTED

usually, five to seven days and then have a day off. During the days of riding, we were camping in very remote camp spots … On our rest days, we would usually be in a hotel if there was one around and there would usually be water and electricity so we could get cleaned up and charge our electronics.” Roughly 40 per cent of the journey was done off-road, as conditions varied greatly.

Some of the toughest features, Trenholme explained, were deep sand and gravel. “It’s really high, remote and jagged and very steep (in Tajikistan, where it’s poorly maintained),” she said. “In Kazakhstan, we had road, but they were in such bad condition that it was better to have not been on the road. They were so full of potholes that it was just like riding a jackhammer,

Douglas James Dixon

SEA TO SKY › POLYUREA & EPOXY GARAGE FLOORS › CONCRETE PORCHES & POOL DECKS › ZG STORAGE SOLUTIONS › GARAGE CABINETS › SEAMLESS PATIOS › 20 YEAR WARRANTY 604-698-6869 seatosky@zonegarage.ca zonegaragebc.ca

NEW

RESIDENTAL / COMMERCIAL 56 JUNE 6, 2019

January 10, 1929 to June 1, 2019

Doug died very peacefully in his sleep at Hilltop House in Squamish. The care he received there was exemplary in every respect and was underscored by love, respect and compassion. He is predeceased by his mother Mildred Dixon (nee Smith), his father Dr. Harold Dixon and his brother Bill Dixon. He is survived by his loving wife of 66 years Sheila Dixon (nee Charters), his daughters Tracy Dixon, Cathy Dixon (Paul Flanagan), Kim Dixon (Fraser Ray), and his beloved grandchildren Robbie Dixon (Carleigh Hofman) and Eamon Flanagan. Doug had two long and successful careers, the first as a sales manager with a leading paper manufacturer and the second as a ski instructor at Blackcomb Whistler. Doug loved the skiing life and retired from teaching skiing at 80 years old and 30 years of service. Earning a Blackcomb Whistler Lifetime Pass was an important goal for Doug and he was very proud of that achievement. Doug began his working life as a roughneck in the oil fields of Texas. He was then rescued by his parents as he was on the verge of being drafted for the Korean War. Upon return to Canada he earned an Institutional Management diploma at Ryerson University in Toronto. After graduation, he went to work at the Chateau Lake Louise where he met the love of his life, Sheila. At the end of their summer employment Doug followed Sheila to Vancouver and there followed marriage, and children in short order. First and foremost, Doug was a family man. He was a devoted father and husband to his “bevy of girls” as he liked to call them. But more than anything he was devoted to Sheila. They had a wonderful life of travel and adventure including hiking, biking and of course skiing. Doug’s devotion to Sheila was only matched by Sheila’s devotion to Doug. Doug was diagnosed with dementia in 2012. His decline was precipitous in the beginning but with Sheila at his side, every day, providing unbounded love and advocacy he made a recovery of sorts that saw joy and contentedness for over 7 years including weekends at home with Sheila watching the activities on Howe Sound. Doug has been cremated and a celebration of life will follow at a later date. Doug’s memory can be honoured by doing what you love with your family and friends and sending a thought his way. As a founding director of the Whistler Blackcomb Foundation donations in his honour would also be gratefully accepted. To write a condolence to the family, please visit www.squamishfuneralchapel.com


SPORTS THE SCORE

NOTICE

Strategic Planning Committee Membership The Resort Municipality of Whistler is seeking interested applicants to serve in a voluntary capacity on the Strategic Planning Committee. Applications are sought for five (5) representatives for the community-at-large member positions. This committee will act in an advisory capacity to support Council in its decision making relating to comprehensively addressing community and land use planning and growth management within the Resort Municipality of Whistler. Download the terms of reference for this committee at whistler.ca/committees. Apply by submitting a resume and brief statement that reflects your interest in participating on this committee to Toni Metcalf, Manager, Economic Development by email (tmetcalf@whistler.ca) or fax (604-935-8109). Submission deadline: Friday, June 21st, at 4.30pm

ROCKY ROAD Dr. Brenda Trenholme, shown here in Mongolia, rode from Beijing to Istanbul last year. PHOTO SUBMITTED

bouncing and jumping all over the place.” As for the weather, there was only one day of rain in the 150-plus-day trip, though when it rained, it poured. Temperatures ranged from 0 to 47 C, with the ride through Turkmenistan never having conditions cooler than 40 C. “You drink a lot of water, 12 or 13 litres a day,” Trenholme said. Along the way, Trenholme said Siberia was a pleasant surprise, considering the image just saying the region’s name can conjure up. Russia, like many of the countries she passed through on the journey, has a bad rap because of its government, but is home to beauty in both its people and landscape. “It was lush alpine, much like B.C. It’s like B.C. on steroids, with beautiful infrastructure, great roads,” she said. “I felt as safe there as I did in North America,” she added, citing the residents’ “openness and friendliness.” The group was a mix of 14 international riders in their 30s through 60s from France, Germany, Switzerland, the Netherlands, U.S., Canada and Australia that signed up, though only 11 finished. Some riders, primarily younger ones, joined for different sections along the way, Trenholme said. Trenholme is currently completing a bike tour of B.C. in support of KEEF, which provides scholarships to gifted but underprivileged students to help pay for high school education. Trenholme stressed that KEEF volunteers cover their own costs when doing work for the organization to allow for as much of the non-profit’s income to go directly to the cause as possible. Her journey began in the Nelson area on May 21 and will wrap on June 13 on Salt

Resort Municipality of Whistler whistler.ca/committees

Spring Island. “After I rode in Africa, it was just such an amazingly rich experience that I thought I should give back in some way,” she said. Trenholme already stopped in Pemberton, but is eager to return to the Sea to Sky.

“It’s just such a relief to get on that bicycle and leave it all behind, considering that it’s a hedonistic experience to have your meals made for you and your luggage carried.” - DR. BRENDA TRENHOLME

“It’s not very challenging compared to the Silk Road ride. People were saying ‘Wow, you cycled that road from Lillooet to Pemberton?’” she recalled. “I said ‘Yeah, that was a fantastic ride. It’s the best ride I’ve had in North America. It was a dream compared to the winds and the roads and elevation that we were up against in other places.’” Visit www.kenyaeducation.org for more information. n

The Whistler Housing Authority is seeking a qualified individual to join the

WHA Board of Directors Participation as a WHA Director is an opportunity to make an important contribution to Whistler’s resident restricted housing program and to the overall community. Members of the Board of Directors are responsible for providing direction to the Whistler Housing Authority, including review and approval of the organization’s strategic goals, priorities and policies. Relevant qualifications include: knowledge and enthusiasm about the Whistler Housing Authority inventory and initiatives; housing and development experience; competence reviewing budgets and financial statements; and the ability to commit to a 3 year term including attending monthly Board meetings in Whistler. Please read the detailed Call for Expression of Interest for Candidates to WHA Board of Directors and the WHA Board Candidate Application Form found at www.whistlerhousing.ca. Interested candidates are asked to email a completed Application Form to: mail@whistlerhousing.ca Deadline for applications is June 11th, 2019.

JUNE 6, 2019

57


FORK IN THE ROAD

Clean eating vs. chlorinewashed chicken DIFFERENT NATIONAL STANDARDS MEAN STICK TO YOUR GUNS I’M SO HAPPY to see that clean eating— or eating clean, as it’s also called—is a hot trend lately for “foodie” bloggers and other influencers, like the menu designers of leading-edge restos. And I don’t mean the talented graphic designers who create printed menus; I mean the informed chefs and culinary experts who think about what

BY GLENDA BARTOSH kind of customer they want to attract, and then create the unique dining experience listed in the print menu that’s ultimately delivered to your table. Oh, yes, that’s all very planned. I’m even happier to see that clean eating is on the rise just as the heat is being turned up on a full-blown food fight on the other side of The Pond. If you haven’t paid a lot of attention to the concept of “clean eating,” Mayo Clinic— the wonderful, nonprofit academic medical centre in Minnesota that provides some of the most reliable health care information in the world—has a nice, compact description of it. Really, clean eating is nothing new. It’s based on the keystones of any healthy diet: Eat more real foods, like all those fruits, veggies and other whole foods on the outside aisles of your grocery store.

KEEPING IT CLEAN Clean eating is a hot trend

these days.

WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

58 JUNE 6, 2019

Eat for nourishment, not for convenience or because you’re in a hurry. Eat at home more often. Eat more plant-based foods like experts have been telling us for years. And, in what might be the only new twist here, clean up your act in general by adopting a “cleaner” lifestyle. That means getting lots of physical activity during the day, enough sleep at night and managing any stress in a healthy way, as in not over-drinking like Cathy Goddard’s excellent article (“Being sober curious”) described in Pique last week. As clean eating is catching fire, or maybe even because of it, influencers of a different type in the U.K are raising red flags about their food supply as Brexit efforts wind up, fall apart, and wind up again. According to reports in The Guardian, it all stems from the U.K. contemplating whether post-Brexit food standards should be lowered to allow in U.S. products, such as chlorine-washed chicken. The food fight came to a head amid protests and heated comments over trade issues during the Trumps’ royal visit this week, a possible “re-set” moment for trade with Theresa May on the way out and Brexit still dangling. National health, Huawei and, yes, chlorinated chicken were all on the table, so to speak, after U.S. ambassador Woody Johnson earlier this year “suggested” the U.K. would need to allow U.S. agricultural products into the U.K. market as part of any post-Brexit trade deal (along with private U.S. companies gaining access to Britain’s proud national health system). Never mind the health care gambit, it was the chlorine-washed chicken that grabbed my attention. Fears about U.S. farming practices in general resurfaced

after Mr. Johnson insisted that practices such as washing chicken in chlorine to kill pathogens like salmonella were safe. These echoed comments made several years ago by U.K. trade secretary, Liam Fox, who insisted there were no health reasons “why you couldn’t eat chickens that have been washed in chlorinated water,” reported The Guardian. “Most of the salads in our supermarkets are rinsed in chlorinated water.” Before you go “euugh,” or, “that’s OK by me,” know that it’s not exactly chlorinated water that’s used in meat processing. I have no idea about U.K. standards for salad washing, but our own federal government has no objections to some sort of chlorineish washing of raw chicken and other meats processed in plants here in Canada, not just the cutting boards, knives and other paraphernalia used to process the meat. In what are known as Letters of No Objection, or LONOs for short, the Bureau of Chemical Safety at Health Canada lists in detail the chemical treatments that, while it doesn’t exactly approve them, at least it has no objections to in terms of “antimicrobial processing aids.” Among these are sodium hypochlorite and calcium hypochlorite, both chemical compounds commonly used in water purification, bleaching and the like. Both can be used in solutions of up to 20 to 50 ppm, or parts per million, to “wash” raw meat. (Maybe a bit more encouragement to eat more plants!) By comparison, most chlorinated drinking water in B.C. will be no more than 2.0 ppm. Drinking water in Whistler is well below this level. Emerald Estates drinking

water, for instance, was only chlorinated to 0.4 ppm, according to the 2017 Annual Drinking Water Report. B.C. swimming pools might hit 5.0 ppm of chlorine, or about 1/10th the chicken-washing concentration, and you know how strong that pool water can smell. The E.U. has long banned using strong chlorine solutions for washing meat. The thinking is it encourages poor hygiene standards—standards that would be illegal in the E.U.—along with industrial animal farming. I guess I’m with U.K. pundit George Monbiot on this one. It’s not the chlorine that gets me, per se. It’s the other standards, or lack of them, in America’s farming practices. The use of antihistamines to make chicken meat more tender. The use of growth hormones, steroids, antibiotics and more in raising chickens and other animals—many of these substances banned in Canada, too. Think about that next time you drive across the border for “cheap” milk or meat. It all comes down to how you think about your food. Experts in the U.K. are horrified by the idea of letting in U.S. agricultural products because Britain has long valued the “farm to fork” principle. Raise it on the farm and get it to your fork with as few interventions as possible. Here in B.C., especially on the West Coast, we value that, too, much like we’ve valued “clean eating” long before it got named and tagged in social media. Here’s to more cleanliness with less chlorine. Glenda Bartosh is an award-winning journalist who avoids bleach. n


MEADOW PARK SPORTS CENTRE SWIM • SKATE • SWEAT • SQUASH

Meadow Park Sports Centre is located 4 km north of Whistler Village. OPEN DAILY: 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Last entry by 9:30 p.m.

GROUP FITNESS SCHEDULE THU 6

Cardio Core Workout 9-10a.m.

FRI 7

SAT 8

Low Impact Circuit 7:30-8:30a.m.

Total Body Conditioning 7:30-8:30a.m.

Circuit 9-10a.m.

Low Impact Circuit 9-10a.m.

SUN 9

MON 10

Low Impact Circuit 7:30-8:30a.m. Circuit 9-10a.m.

TUE 11

Low Impact Circuit 9-10a.m.

Total Body Conditioning 9-10a.m.

*Gentle Fit Aqua Fit WORKSHOP Shallow 9:30-10:30a.m. 10-11:00a.m.

Aqua Fit Deep 9:30-10:30a.m. *Parent & Zumba Baby Fit 10:30-11:30a.m. 10:30-11:30a.m.

*Barre 11:45-12:45p.m.

*Stroller Parent & Baby Fit 10:30-11:30a.m.

Zumba 12:15-1p.m.

Zumba 12:15-1 p.m. *Gentle Fit for Seniors 1-2p.m.

*Gentle Fit for Seniors 1-2p.m. *PWR! Moves 1:15-2:15p.m.

*PWR! Moves 1:15-2:15p.m.

*Gentle Fit for Seniors 1-2p.m.

20/20/20 5:30-6:30p.m.

Movement is Medicine: CanActive CanActive is a group based physical activity program for people affected by cancer at any stage of treatment. Contact the fitness centre for more information.

604.935.8363 Whistler.ca/fitness

*PWR Moves 1:15-2:15p.m Classes with * are registered or flexible registration (flex reg) programs and require registration of at least 5 people to start.

Box Fit 6:45-7:45p.m.

WED 12

Low Impact Circuit 7:30-8:30a.m

All other classes are included in the price of admission.

See exact schedule of classess at the sports centre or online at:

Bootcamp 5:10-6:10p.m Zumba *Prenatal 6:20-7:20p.m. Yoga 6:45-7:45p.m.

Zumba 6:20-7:20p.m.

Stretch & Restore Yoga 8-9 p.m.

whistler.ca/recreation

ARENA SCHEDULE THU 6

W&OT Drop-In Hockey

8:15-9:45a.m. Drop-In Hockey 10-11:30a.m. Public Skate 12-3p.m.

FRI 7

Drop-In Hockey 8:15-9:45a.m.

SAT 8

SUN 9

MON 10

55+ Drop-In Hockey 8:15-9:45a.m.

TUE 11

WED 12

Drop-In Hockey 8:15-9:45a.m.

Drop-In Hockey 10-11:30a.m. Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 6:30-8p.m.

Public Skate 6:30-8p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 6:30-8p.m.

As supervised exercise and wellness program for those living with or who are at risk for heart disease. Contact the fitness centre for more information.

POOL SCHEDULE THU 6

FRI 7

SAT 8

SUN 9

MON 10

TUE 11

WED 12

LEISURE POOL 9a.m. - 9p.m. LAP POOL, HOT TUB, SAUNA, STEAM ROOM 6a.m. - 10p.m.

whistler.ca/recreation | whistler.ca/notices | 604-935-7529  @RMWhistler |  @rmwhistler |  @rmowhistler

Movement is Medicine: Strong Hearts

604.935.8363 Whistler.ca/fitness


EPICURIOUS

Do-nut hate, pollinate! CELEBRATE NATIONAL POLLINATOR MONTH THIS JUNE WITH THE FAIRMONT CHATEAU WHISTLER AND HONEY FROM THE HOTEL’S ROOFTOP HIVES

BY MEGAN LALONDE CALLING ALL HONEY LOVERS: June is National Pollinator Month, and the Fairmont Chateau Whistler is buzzing with all sorts of exciting offerings in celebration of the bees. As Fairmont Chateau Whistler executive chef Isabel Chung points out, these hard working honeybees deserve the attention. “Bees are responsible for one in three bites of food we consume, and the majority of our fresh produce,” she said. While bees might have their moment in the spotlight throughout the month of June, the hotel’s commitment to protecting and encouraging our local pollinator population lasts all year long. In the spirit of sustainability, many of the honey-tinged creations highlighted as part of the monthlong celebration come courtesy of the honey harvested from the hotel’s rooftop hives in 2017 and 2018. This honey isn’t just delicious, but also serves as an educational message to the Fairmont’s guests, explained Chung. “Honey is a great vehicle and a great byproduct of what’s really a sustainability story,” she said. Back on the menu at the Portobello deli is the Honey Bee Donut, flavoured with honey and lemon, topped with bright yellow icing, adorned with a small decorative bee and revived specifically for National Pollinator Month. The celebrations also extend to the hotel’s Mallard Lounge, where guests can enjoy a modern twist on a long beeloved cocktail. In fact, the chef’s favourite cocktail, “just happens to be the Bee’s Knees—who would have thought?” said Chung, who shares her employer’s passion for pollinators, with a laugh. (Despite finding out she’s “highly allergic” to the tiny creatures a few years ago, you can catch Chung—who proudly sports a prominent honey bee tattoo on her forearm—tending to her own bees on her Pemberton property in her free time.)

FOR THE LOVE OF HONEY Celebrate National Pollinator Month this month with some honey-infused favourites. WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

This version of the prohibition-era cocktail, dubbed the Bees Knees #2, comes as the result of a recent collaboration between Chung and the Fairmont Chateau Whistler’s bar manager for the 100-year anniversary of prohibition. It uses a unique, house-made beeswax gin—created by combining rooftop beeswax sous vide with Canadian Ungava gin, explained Chung—mixed with simple syrup, vanilla syrup and fresh squeezed lemon, and served in a glass rimmed with dehydrated honey from the Fairmont’s rooftop honeybees, of course. Best of all, a portion from each cocktail sold goes towards the Pollinator Partnership—“the world’s largest nonprofit devoted solely to the health of all pollinators,” according to a Fairmont release. Guests can also find rooftop honey in more than a few longstanding Fairmont menu items, including Chung’s tasty honey granola parfait in The Wildflower, the Grill Room’s B.C. cedar plank salmon with rooftop honey glaze, a cheeseburger

Planning your perfect Whistler wedding?

NEW ISSUE OUT NOW!

60 JUNE 6, 2019

with honey bacon at the Clubhouse, or the Summer Salad on the Mallard Lounge’s menu that features mixed greens, pickled cherries, roasted almonds, and a honey and citrus vinaigrette. The Wildflower’s Yarrow Meadows Duck, a spruce-infused, honey-glazed duck breast, is also served with pollen collected from the rooftop hives. For dessert, those with a sweet tooth can indulge in the hotel’s handcrafted Honey Bear chocolate bar, made with rooftop honey, caramelized white chocolate, B.C. blueberries, almonds and bee pollen—a tasty treat that exists almost entirely thanks to bees. “We wouldn’t have almonds without bees,” explained Chung, adding that bees are also responsible for pollinating the vast majority of blueberries grown in the region. Not only is it “incredibly romantic to talk about honey from the rooftop,” but in the past five to 10 years, “I think people are more open to learning about their food,” Chung added. “As they’re enjoying it, they want to know where it comes from.” In honey’s case, much like wine, the

taste profile represents the region—and the plants—it comes from, Chung explained. For example, “If fireweed is having a good season on Whistler Mountain, the honey will have spicy notes, while blueberries result in more aromatic, floral profiles,” she said. As part of National Pollinator Month, the Fairmont is also putting its money where its mouth is while allowing guests to do their part to help nature’s best pollinators with a “Bee Sustainable Offer.” In addition to receiving 10 per cent off the daily rate, guests will have a $50 hotel dining credit to take advantage of all the aforementioned tasty treats and delectable dishes. Each stay will also yield a $10 donation to the Pollinator Partnership. But what can guests—and Whistler residents, for that matter—do to help the bees once they return home? It’s simple: add a bee-friendly plant, or plants, to your garden, said Chung. While any flowering herb, like oregano, mint or thyme will do, “lavender is probably the easiest to find,” she suggested. n


SUSHI VILLAGE ...COOLER THAN EVER REOPENING FRIDAY, JUNE 7 FOR DINNER @ 5:30PM WE HAVE INSTALLED AN AWESOME NEW A/C UNIT TO KEEP OUR GUESTS, STAFF & FISHES COOL FOR THE SUMMER

SUSHIVILLAGE.COM 604-932-3330

available may 14-june 26 PLUS OPTIONAL

SOMMELIERS’ PAIRING $49 SIDECUTWHISTLER.COM Reservations Required: 604-935-3400

ws

Last modified by:

SPRING SPECIAL

$21

3 COURSE MENU

AVAILABLE SUNDAY TO THURSDAY - NOT AVAILABLE ON HOLIDAYS

FIESTA HOUR 5pm to 6:30pm EVERYDAY

Double Margaritas $8.50 Sunday to Thursday 5pm – 9:30pm Friday & Saturday 5pm – 10pm At the Base of Whistler Mountain in the Sundial Hotel 12-4340 Sundial Crescent / 604.962.4450

www.themexicancorner.ca

Coronas $5

FOLLOW US ON Insta

4591 BLACKCOMB WAY • 604-935-3400 Fourseasons.com/whistler

@FSWhistler /Fourseasonsresortwhistler JUNE 6, 2019

61


ARTS SCENE

Mountain Bike Heritage Week returns for fourth year INDIGENOUS MOUNTAIN BIKING TALK SET FOR JUNE 7 AT WHISTLER MUSEUM

BY DAN FALLOON WITH MOUNTAIN BIKE HERITAGE WEEK running from June 6 to 12 at Whistler Museum, there’s one thing Patrick Lucas wants riders to keep in mind every time they go out. “Every time you step out on a trail, you get on a bike, you’re taking on an explicit political act in terms of being out on the land and it having an impact on people other than you,” the Aboriginal Youth Mountain Bike Program executive director says. “When we take responsibility for that and we own it, that’s when we’re creating the sport that we’ve come to know and love.” With that mindset in place and the context of a national conversation around reconciliation with First Nations, Lucas is set to present alongside Bicycles for Humanity founder Pat Montani as part of a speaker series event about Indigenous Mountain Biking on June 7 at 7 p.m. As non-Indigenous people, the duo will be talking about their respective experiences bringing the sport to Indigenous communities—Lucas here in B.C. and Montani in Uganda. “(Montani’s efforts are) really focused on tourism and creating employment for the locals—there isn’t a mountain-bike tourism

MUSEUM MOMENT Aboriginal Youth Mountain

Bike Program executive director Patrick Lucas, shown here presenting at the Mountain Bike Tourism Symposium in Williams Lake in 2015, is coming to the Whistler Museum to speak about indigenous mountain biking on Friday, June 7. FILE PHOTO BY DAN FALLOON

62 JUNE 6, 2019

industry there at all. For me, I come at it from a different perspective. B.C. has a very well established mountain-bike industry built on Indigenous territory and what I’ve been working to do with First Nations is get them into a place where they’re in a leadership role and are benefitting from that industry,” Lucas says. “It’s more about getting your kids out first than creating a huge destination.” Lucas got his start in development in southeast Asia, and says it’s important to bring an approach of only working with communities who invited him, and once there, listening as much as possible before undertaking any projects.

was also key, as Montani sought permission from elders and locals to ride on their land, though they at first didn’t understand why he wanted to ride on, not around, the mountain. “Over there, nobody even knew what a mountain bike was, so we had to start to bring mountain bikers in and then use funds from the trips to teach people trail building,” he says. From there, Montani and the late Paul Sherwen established the Tour of Karamoja, which has run twice and drawn riders from across the globe. Though the mountain biking economy is still small, it’s starting to grow, even in places

“Trying to convince people to ride through the bike park with no suspension is a bit of a hard sell.” - ALLYN PRINGLE

“Doing the work I do, I’m very aware of being, basically, the white guy talking to First Nations communities on mountain biking and really trying to be cognizant of not imposing my idea of what that should look like for them,” he says. Montani, who was Whistler’s 2019 Citizen of the Year alongside Keith Reynolds, explained that where Lucas’ work is from the “ground forward,” his is from the ground up. When he first brought mountain bikes to postwar Uganda, it was because there were no cars, roads or electricity, and bikes were a vital progression in transportation. Consultation

hours from the nearest town. “If you have a good product, it doesn’t matter how isolated you are,” he says. Lucas and Montani’s presentation are part of Thinkbike, a demo event run by local guide Grant Lamont from June 7 to 9. Passes for any or all of the three days are available at www. thinkbike.com. Whistler Museum’s events and community manager Allyn Pringle says Lamont brought the Indigenous conversation to the table, and they’re glad to collaborate on that. Other events include: Lamont and others speaking about the Cheakamus Challenge

bike race on June 8 at 7 p.m.; a screening of classic mountain bike movie Ride to the Hills from 2001 on June 9 at 7 p.m. at Whistler Public Library; a bike maintenance workshop at the library on June 11 from 2 to 4 p.m.; and, of particular intrigue for Pringle, a talk from North Shore Billet’s Chris Allen and Vorsprung’s Steve Mathews about operating their mountain bike parts businesses in a small mountain town. “It’s always interesting to look at how things are made in Whistler because it’s not really thought of as a manufacturing town,” she says. The week will kick off with a Whistler OffRoad Cycling Association Toonie Ride on June 6. Pringle says there are some changes to this year’s event, with the retro ride on old bikes morphing into a show and shine. “Trying to convince people to ride through the bike park with no suspension is a bit of a hard sell,” she says. Whether one attends Lucas and Montani’s talk, any other events throughout the week, or just keeps on riding, Lucas stresses how important it is to keep mountain biking respectful and sustainable. “I really hope that people take away how powerful trails and mountain biking can be in terms of impacting communities in a positive way. If it’s not done properly, it can be negative,” he said. “Creating the community that we have in B.C. happened because hundreds of people really dedicated themselves towards doing things in a good way and making sure that mountain biking served the community so we could do what we loved to do. “We take responsibility for our sport. We think about the impact it’s having.” n


ARTS SCENE

INKED UP A new exhibit at The Gallery showcases the work of tattoo artists from across the Sea to Sky corridor. PHOTO BY ALYSSA NOEL

Whistler INKorporated displays tattoo talent NEW SHOW AT THE GALLERY FEATURING SEA TO SKY TATTOO ARTISTS UP UNTIL JULY

BY ALYSSA NOEL IF YOU’RE IN THE MARKET for some new ink, there couldn’t be a better time to visit The Gallery at the Maury Young Arts Centre. Twelve tattoo artists from across the Sea to Sky corridor have 100 pieces of wildly diverse work on display through June as part of an exhibit called Whistler INKorporated. “The idea has been floating around Arts Whistler for a while,” says Charmaine Carpenter, programs and events coordinator with Arts Whistler, who organized the show. “There are obviously a number of talented artists in Whistler (and there’s) a lot of crossover.” Carpenter started by reaching out to long-time tattooist Dave “Pepe” Petko, who owns Black Ohm Tattoos, for a little advice. “I had only lived in Whistler for a year, so I reached out to Dave and said, ‘Who do I reach out to?’” He offered an array of studios—from Method Tattoo in Pemberton to TNT Whistler, Whistler Tattoo Company, and Electric Uprising in Squamish. “I got some really positive feedback,” Carpenter says of connecting with the artists. “I had some people pop in to see what the space is like. It (made it) easier to explain the vision. We had the idea, but we didn’t know how to display it.” In the end, she settled on the concept of a dark room. The tattoo artists sent in their images of clients’ inked arms and she

printed them all out on paper and hung it on the wall to mimic photos drying in a dark room. “When you see (tattoos) on people, it’s so different,” she says. “Some of them gave sketches and it gives you a chance to see the process.” Petko, for example, included a photo depicting three sides of brightly coloured mountain landscape tattoo, as well as a sketch planning out how to colour each piece. Another artist, Barbara Rebel, included sketches next to the finished product, like one particularly captivating one of a girl with her arms wrapped sweetly around a cat in a windowsill. “It’s cool because some artists have just started. They’ve been artists for a long time, but developed into tattoo artists, which is a totally different realm,” Carpenter says. The styles vary from true-to-life portraits to traditional-style tattoos, and bright, dreamy creations. “I think the thing that surprised all the staff is the things people want tattooed on their body,” Carpenter adds. “Most people have at least one, even if they’re tiny.” Meanwhile, as spring rolls on to summer and locals shed layers, more tattoos are on display, making it the perfect time to host the show, she explains. “It’s such a personal thing, a reflection of who you think you want to be,” she says. “Sometimes, it’s a momentous thing you’re trying to commemorate.” Catch Whistler INKorporated at The Gallery until July 8. n

JUNE 6, 2019

63


ARTS SCENE

Whistler Kids Cabaret puts young talent centre stage PERFORMANCES AT THE MAURY YOUNG ARTS CENTRE ON JUNE 14 AND 15

BY ALYSSA NOEL LAST YEAR, Ira Pettle had an ambitious idea. While the long-time Whistler arts educator and children’s entertainer has run everything from improv to acting to music classes for local kids, he wanted to tackle something more in depth. So, he put some feelers out to see which young, local performers might be willing to commit to a five-month program and, ultimately, produce a variety show. “It’s been a crazy, beautiful adventure,” Pettle says, just two weeks away from the three-show run at the Maury Young Arts Centre. “We started in January and broke it down into four different stages.” The group of 18 kids, ranging in age from eight to 12, spent four weeks learning improv and ensemble team building followed by five weeks of focusing on various performing arts—from singing to dancing and acting. (Only 15 will be performing as two kids moved away and one other isn’t able to attend the

performance and, instead, took on an assistant director role.) Then, Pettle and Sarah-Dawn Robichaud, his co-director and the show’s choreographer, cast each student in three different roles. “We have monologues, we have scenes, we have musical theatre, we have dance, we have a live band, which is awesome,” Pettle says. “The kids were then cast in roles that would support them in areas they were strong. Then we were also casting in other roles that may be a little more challenging to help them develop those other areas. It was a balance. In addition to that, there was balancing out everybody in a way that they all had a chance to shine.” Most of the kids had some kind of artistic background, but part of the cabaret format means there’s no stars. “A couple kids had some dance backgrounds, a couple had done some acting with me last summer. They were inspired to keep going,” he says. “Vocally, we had a bunch of kids that can sing. They have great voices. This production is supporting them in further developing,

SHOW TIME Ira Pettle launched the Whistler Kids Cabaret with shows set for June 14 and 15 at the Maury Young Arts Centre. FILE PHOTO

not just their talent, but their passion.” As a project spanning nearly half a year, the group bonded during the weekly

NOW MAKE THE DISHES YOU ENJOYED WHILE IN WHISTLER Pick up a copy for yourself or the foodie in your life

PUBLISHED BY

AVAILABLE AT:

ARMCHAIR BOOKS, NESTERS MARKET + FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT

chefschoicecookbook.com 64 JUNE 6, 2019

WHISTLER KITCHEN WORKS

meetings. “We call ourselves a family now. Going into this production, there’s so much involved emotionally not just for the kids, but for the parents who are supporting these kids, for the team involved,” he adds. Two shows will be open to friends, family and the public on June 14 and 15 at 6:30 p.m. However, a private donor purchased all 200 tickets for the matinee on June 15 at 1 p.m. That one will be open to kids only (ages eight and up). They can be claimed by emailing KidsCabaret2019@ gmail.com. The other shows are $7.50. “We wanted to keep it on the very, very low end, so that money wasn’t a barrier to have community come support these kids,” Pettle says. “I want to rewrite what’s possible for performing arts and theatre in this town. But that’s going to take the community stepping up and saying, ‘We’re going to support this arts and cultural growth opportunity.’” Tickets are available at showpass. com/o/arts-whistler/. n


SPRING SPECIAL

Whistler Conference Centre | June 12, 2019 | 2-6PM

Come Learn about Summer in Whistler

$30 FOUR COURSE MENU Whistlers favourite deal on now! Available 7 days a week Limited to parties up to 6 people (one bill) Drink specials available 604.962.0404 | nagomisushi.com @nagomisushiwhistler

#whistlermtbweek 4th Annual

Thanks to those who helped us for the Roland's Creekside Pub Golf Tournament. We raised $1760 for the Whistler Food Bank with an outstanding group of golfers! We couldn't have done it without the local community's support.

In no order we would like to offer our sincere thanks to these places and individuals: Blacks's Pub, R.D., Dubh Linn Gate, 21 Steps, G.L.C., Gibbons Group, Brew House, Mongolie Grill, Independent Grocers and Tim Maguire, Alpine Café, Sushi Village, Armchair Books, Blenz, O&R Entertainment, Wildwood, Elements, Caramba, Brickworks, Quattro, The Keg, Okanagan Springs, Southside Diner, Creekbread, Nita Lake Lodge (our neighbours), Arterra Wines, The Raven Room, Earls, Creekside Market, Cinnamon Bear Bar, Foto Source, Whistler Bungee, Audain Art Museum, Merlins, Russell Beer, Rob, Phil, Slinky, and Steve's Group, John McGregor, Labatts, Whistler Brewery, Whistler Golf Course, Tracy Fawcett, Whistler Wine Merchants, Stinky of Stinky's on the Stroll, Carly C., Gail S., Moby’s on Salt Spring Island, and all the staff of Roland's Creekside Pub.

For more information visit:

www.whistlermuseum.org/mtbweek

Thurs June 6th

Fri June 7th

Hosted by

Coastal Culture Post Ride - Retro Bike Show & Shine Creekside Market X-Treme Organics Bring out your old retro bikes!! Sabre Rentals Prizes for best retro Arts Whistler bike & outfit

Think Bike Conversations

Indigenous MTB With Patrick Lucas + Pat Montani

Ride starts @ 6:30pm

7pm @ Whistler Museum Admission $5.

“Ride To The Hills” A JORLI RICKER FILM (2001)

The Story of

Cheakamus Challenge Whistler’s Classic MTB Endurance Race (1989 - 2011) With Grant Lamont + More

7pm @ Whistler Museum

www.worca.com/toonie-ride-schedule/

Sun June 9th

Sat June 8th

Tues June 11th With Whistler

Bike Co.

Admission by donation. All proceeds go to WORCA trail maintenance

Wed June 12th Manufacturing in the Mountains

followed by With Chris Allen (North Shore Billet) Filmmaker Q&A 2-4pm @ Whister Public Library + Steve Mathews (Vorsprung) 7:00pm @ Whistler Public Library Registration is required. 7pm @ Whistler Museum Free Admission. Call the Whistler Public Library 604 935 8435 to reserve a spot

Admission by donation.

JUNE 6, 2019

65


NOTES FROM THE BACK ROW

Woah ... Is Keanu Reeves our biggest star? KEANU REEVES IS HAVING a moment. While John Wick 3 continues slaying the box office as one of the best action flicks of the decade, Reeves also shows off his lesser-known comedic chops in Always Be My Maybe, an Ali Wong-driven romantic comedy that dropped on Netflix last week. Reeves’ bit is hilarious—he delivers a sense

BY FEET BANKS of comedic timing and physicality we haven’t seen since Bill & Ted—and while the flick doesn’t quite hold the momentum of its first half it definitely holds up (for a romantic comedy). Keanu is burning up the internet as well; a clip of him flooring talk show vet Stephen Colbert with his insight on what happens when we die has gone viral, and the tactical training videos for Wick 3 are highly impressive as well. Who knew watching 53-year-old Keanu and co-star Halle Berry tearing up a shooting

X-MEN Sophie Turner and Jessica Chastain in Twentieth Century Fox’s Dark Phoenix. PHOTO DOANE GRAGORY

range could be so satisfying? (It’s all about the double tap). All this has spurned a flood of think pieces as the entertainment world re-evaluates Reeve’s career—were all those surf-bro “whoa” criticisms of his acting valid? Or were

an uncommon instance where the sequels outshine the original, and popular culture embraces a character who kills a few hundred people every flick, usually with a more-thannecessary number of bullets to the face. Does that count as charisma?

Beyond his body of work, Reeves is also the rare celebrity that has avoided scandal. we missing what some are now calling a “restrained intensity of character?” It’s hard to stand behind everything Keanu has made (he can’t really hang with Pacino in The Devil’s Advocate) but take another look at Francis Ford Coppola’s Dracula from 1992 and you might be impressed. While the latest New Yorker headline might be a bit much (“The World Doesn’t Deserve Keanu Reeves”) there’s no denying that Reeves has pulled off something no other action star ever has. He’s hit action film critical mass on three separate occasions, starting with Point Break/Speed in the early ‘90s, again with The Matrix franchise at the turn of the millennium, and then again with the John Wick franchise, which is also

Beyond his body of work, Reeves is also the rare celebrity that has avoided scandal. The stories and videos of his private life that do pop up are generally about how awesome and charitable he is (Reeves rents van and entertains everyone after a flight to L.A. is grounded in Bakersfield! Reeves donates millions to children’s hospitals! Etc.). And with Bill & Ted Face the Music slated for a 2020 release, Reeves will revive another cult classic franchise built around his talents. He’s getting into a position in popular culture similar to where Bill Murray is, almost universally loved not only for the work, but also for who he is and how he lives his life. John Wick 3 is still playing at the Whistler Village 8.

Also playing, new this week, Dark Phoenix is an X-Men movie retelling one of that comic’s most popular stories—that time Jean Grey got hit with a solar storm and became so powerful her teammates had to decide if it was OK to kill a friend in order to maybe save the world. The X-Men have long floundered in the shadow of Marvel’s ridiculous Avengers movies (that Sony owned the rights to the X-Men and pumped out a bunch of crappy flicks at the start of the millennium didn’t help). What little momentum they have built since the Days of Future Past reboot in 2014, is supposed to climax here and Dark Phoenix boasts a stacked cast led by Sansa Stark Sophie Turner (who does her best with little support), but in the end the story is rushed, the characters are jangled and the whole thing is just not very good. Dark Phoenix tries to rise from the flames, but the franchise as a whole is going down in them. Also opening, The Secret Life of Pets 2 doesn’t bring anything new to the table, but if you like talking animals enough to watch a sequel, that probably won’t matter to you will it? (Bonus info: Harrison Ford, anchor of two great adventure franchises himself, voices a rooster. Watch out Keanu! It can fall to shit pretty fast.) n

LIVE MUSIC!

e launch of Come celebrate th our new patio &

IN ENTER TO W E! BIK

TUESDAY

BLACKS’N’BLUES WEDNESDAY

5 NIGHTS LIVE @ $5 LIVE MUSIC WITH HAPPY HOUR PRICES TUESDAY TO SATURDAY

HAPPY HOUR 9am-12pm & 9pm-1am

66 JUNE 6, 2019

A

with Sean Rose

JAM NIGHT THURSDAY

with Kostaman

BAND CAMP FRIDAY

with Michael Belanger

KARAOKE SATURDAY

with Juan

LOCAL ARTIST GRAHAM STRANG

NEW PATIO OPEN!

CONTEST RUNS May 1st - June 7th

DRAW DATE Fri. June 7th • 8pm Must be here to win!

AT THE

1045 Millar Creek Rd

in Function Junction

whistlerbeer.com

LIVE MUSIC from Whiskey Dicks

6-9 pm

No purchase necessary. Ask server for more details. Prize may not be exactly as shown.


ARTS NEWS

VILLAGE 8 SHOW SCHEDULE

FRIDAY, JUNE 7TH – THURSDAY, JUNE 14TH ADVANCED SCREENING OF MEN IN BLACK: INTERNATIONAL THURSDAY, JUNE 14TH @ 4:05 & 7:05PM

WHISTLER’S NEWEST RESTAURANT & COCKTAIL BAR located in The Pan Pacific Whistler Village Centre

FEST FUN A calligraphy workshop (pictured here in 2018) is just one of the events at the Whistler Multicultural

Festival on Friday, June 7.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Celebrating Whistler’s diversity WHISTLER MULTICULTURAL FESTIVAL RETURNS ON FRIDAY, JUNE 7 AT WHISTLER PUBLIC LIBRARY

BY ALYSSA NOEL THE ORGANIZERS of the Whistler Multicultural Festival have learned a few things over the last seven years. For one, it’s wise to let Mother Nature do her thing and host a few activities indoors. “We’re going to be inside the library again just because of the rain,” says Carole Stretch, one of those organizers. “The performances and activities (will be) inside the library then the food and a couple other activities will take place on the plaza from 4 to 8 p.m.” The annual event celebrating Whistler’s diverse community is set to take place on Friday, June 7. More than a dozen cultures will be represented through food, crafts, performances, and volunteers onsite. “Lots more people know about it (than in the past), but I think there are lots of people who don’t,” Stretch adds. “Awareness grows over years and time, but we’re still working it out.” This year, they’re hoping to spread the word to attract as many people as possible to the one-day event. The goal is to spark conversations and promote understanding. “This town has a great amount of diversity,” Stretch says. “We really want people to understand how diverse we are and what these people bring to the community and integrate them into the community—get people to meet, get people to talk so we can really be inclusive.” And then, of course, there’s also the food. This year, a group of volunteer immigrants are getting together the day before the festival to make popular items from their cultures for festival-goers to try. “Food is so, so integral to culture,” Stretch says. “We organized a group and facilitated immigrants who want to showcase their

food, so they can talk about it.” To that end, there will be empanadas, zaalouk, phad thai, crepes, cotton candy (with a Japanese spin), sari sari, and bread and cakes from various cultures. “We tried to keep the costs low so that everyone can try it,” Stretch adds. Throughout the event, there will also be performances, including YangGe, a traditional folk dance from Northeast China; singing and drumming from Xet’olacw Community School’s Grades 4 and 5 classes; Haka lessons from New Zealand; and several different dancers and singers of Filipino background. “This year we asked questions (like), ‘What does this mean in your culture?’ ‘Why do you want to perform this?’” Stretch says. “We’re trying to tie into the culture and learn about what people’s cultures are.” On top of that, there will be plenty of craft sessions as well. Lessons on Japanese calligraphy, decorating a Mexican piñata, Mexican and Japanese mask painting are just a few that will be on offer. “We have a Japanese lady doing three, 30-min. calligraphy workshops teaching people about characters, how to hold a brush, how to make their brush strokes and create calligraphy brush strokes,” Stretch says. While crafts might seem geared towards family, plenty of adult community members also attend the festival. “We’ve seen more community members,” Stretch says. “Last year we had somebody I know who has lived here for a long time. He came and went, ‘Wow, do all these people live in Whistler?’ … I think it’s really important for people to live the diversity themselves.” The Whistler Multicultural Festival takes place on Friday, June 7 from 4 to 8 p.m. at the Whistler Public Library. For more information, visit welcomewhistler.com/ programs-services/whistler-multiculturalfestival/ n

SERVING FOOD & DRINKS 3-MIDNIGHT DAILY

SPRING SPECIALS AVAILABLE 7 DAYS A WEEK

$33

3 COURSE DINNER 5:30-10PM

THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 2 (G) DAILY 4:10, 4:15, 7:15 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:20 MATINEES SATURDAY & SUNDAY 1:10, 1:15 DARK PHOENIX (PG) DAILY 3:50, 6:50 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:30 MATINEES SATURDAY & SUNDAY 12:50 ROCKETMAN (PG)

DAILY 3:45, 6:45 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:25 MATINEES SATURDAY & SUNDAY 12:45

GODZILLA: KING OF MONSTERS (PG)

DAILY 3:40, 6:40 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:35 MATINEES SATURDAY & SUNDAY 12:40

ALADDIN (PG)

DAILY 3:55, 6:55 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:40 MATINEES SATURDAY & SUNDAY 12:35

AVENGERS: END GAME (PG)

DAILY 3:25, 6:35 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:25 MATINEES SATURDAY & SUNDAY 12:30

JOHN WICK CHAPTER 3 - PARABELLUM (18A) DAILY 6:30 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 10:00

& ALL DAY HAPPY HOUR

POKEMON DETECTIVE PIKACHU (PG)

menu & group booking details WWW.THERAVENROOM.CA

DAILY 4:00 MATINEES SATURDAY & SUNDAY 1:00

www.imaginecinemas.com

DAILY D

R K SPECIIN ALS

MONDAY TO FRIDAY

JUNE 3-13 MONG

OLIEG

RILL .

CO M

JUNE 6, 2019

67


MUSEUM MUSINGS

J

NER N I W 9 1 0 2 UNE 6TH,

Spike

PET of the

week

bring your bike to.

Name: Spike

WHISTLER QUESTION COLLECTION, 1980

Meet Spike! He’s a bearded dragon who loves sprawling in the sun, eating grapes and worms, and snuggling with his humans.

Visit a Whistler Happy Pets store to pick up your prize. Function Junction: #101-1085 Millar Creek Rd. Bring a copy of this ad to redeem your prize.

YOUR PET COULD BE NEXT!

Email your pet photo with name & details to tsweeney@wplpmedia.com

SEE YOU NEXT YEAR!

THANK YOU TO OUR PARTICIPANTS

Spectators,Volunteers & Partners We raised $22,000 this year for Crohn’s and Colitis Canada whistlerhalfmarathon.com

68 JUNE 6, 2019

FINE TUNE Bike maintenance is an important skill in Whistler, especially when there were no convenient shops to

Talking shop: Whistler’s early mountain- bike Shops BY ALYSSA BRUIJNS NOT ONLY do we have a trail-rich valley to call home in Whistler, but we are also spoiled with choice when it comes to bike shops. This wasn’t always the case. When mountain bikes first hit the logging roads in the valley in the early 1980s, most riders had to head to Vancouver for any mountain-bike-specific parts and maintenance, according to one of our oral history interviews with local mountain bike pioneer Steve Anderson. A couple of shops were starting to pop up around that time. In the newly constructed village Jim McConkey’s shop sold bikes in summer months and Doris Burma operated a small bike shop out of a trailer right above the commercial loading zone at the Delta Mountain Inn (today known as the Hilton). Doris was passionate about mountain bikes and famed for her Cheakamus Challenge precursor race called “See Colours & Puke,” a wild mountain-bike race reportedly meant to be completed on mushrooms. In the autumn of 1985, Backroads Whistler owner Eric Wight opened a bike shop in the basement of Creekside’s Southside Diner. A short time later, the shop moved to the first floor of a house in Mons. The new location was in the centre of the local mountain bike scene at the time, not far from new trails in Emerald and Lost Lake. The shop sold, fixed, and rented mountain bikes, even building a small trials track outside their door. Eric admits the shops didn’t make much money in the early days, as most of the clientele were locals who could only afford parts using “local deals.” Big things were to come, however. In 1989, Eric’s shop moved to Whistler Village, finding a spot in the base of the

Delta. The location was off the radar for visitors, however, and the clientele was still all locals. The shop finally surfaced on the Village Stroll in the spot where Jim McConkey had sold bikes (currently Showcase Snowboards) around the time Backroads began working with Whistler Mountain to begin mountain bike tours down the mountain. According to Eric, the new shop had a Santa Fe theme, a mechanic shop in the back, rentals and tours, and plenty of snazzy lycra on sale out front. As mountain biking continued gaining traction, the 1990s saw bikes shops that are still kicking it today start up shop. In 1994, John Inglis and Peter Colapinto opened the Whistler Bike Co., also in the underground portion of the Delta, for the summer months. In 1995, they brought onboard Giant Bicycles and they eventually expanded to Pemberton, the Village Gate location, and most recently, their Marketplace location to accommodate a growing population of bikers in town. Bike Co. is currently the oldest independent bike shop in town, followed closely by Evolution, which was opened by Jenine Bourbonnais in 1995. Many more mountain bike shops have opened up as Whistler had become the mountain bike mecca it is today: Summit Sports, Fanatyk Co., Garbanzo Bike & Bean, Coastal Culture Sports, Arbutus Routes, Whistler Village Sports, The Fix, Comor Sports, Fineline, Gateway Bikes—the list grows. Needless to say, Whistler’s mountain bikers (and their bikes) are now very well serviced. This week, we’ll be celebrating Whistler’s mountain biking history with the museum’s fourth-annual Mountain Bike Heritage Week. You can find a full list of events at whistlermuseum.org/mtbweek or join us in Creekside post-Toonie this evening for a Retro Bike Show and Shine (you can even bring out your old bikes)! n


PARTIAL RECALL

2

1

3

4

5

6

1 SUMMER SKIING Squeezing out the last set of spring turns in the backcountry off of the Duffey Lake Highway. PHOTO BY STEVE JONES. 2 WHISTLER HALF WINNING Local runner, Jim Budge won his division in the Whistler Half Marathon on Saturday, June 1. PHOTO BY MEL WHITLEY. 3 MUSIC ‘N MOUNTAINS Joanne Heppner and her piano students celebrated another year of Music ’n Mountains at a recital on Sunday, June 2. PHOTO SUBMITTED. 4 IT’S NOT WEAK TO SPEAK Mental health advocate and Camp My Way founder Terrence Kosikar enlisted the help of Whistler Fire Rescue Service members at the Whistler Fire Hall on Friday, May 31 to raise awareness and erase the stigma for those suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. PHOTO BY JOERN ROHDE, COURTESY OF CAMP MY WAY. 5 100 WOMEN WHISTLER 100 Women of Whistler founder Ashlie Girvan, right, and Chris Wrightson, co-executive Director Zero Ceiling Society of Canada, left, are pictured at 100 Women in Whistler’s inaugural event, on Wednesday May 29. $11,300 was presented to Zero Ceiling of Canada for their Work2Live Program. Each member voted, out of three non-profit presentations, and then donated $100 to the majority member vote. PHOTO BY JEFF GIRVAN. 6 A DOG’S LIFE Bennie, the best friend a guy could ask for, bid farewell to his Whistler family last week when he went to sleep for the last time. PHOTO SUBMITTED.

NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING NOTICE is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of the Members of HOWE SOUND WOMEN’S CENTRE SOCIETY is called for and will be held at the Squamish Adventure Centre: 38551 Logger’s Lane, Squamish, BC on the 26th day of June, 2019 at 6:00 pm (registration begins at 5:30 pm at the Squamish Adventure Centre). Refreshments and snacks will be served. For more information, please see www.hswc.ca/annual-general-meeting/ or contact us by phone at 604.892.5748.

JUNE 6, 2019

69


MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

Aude Ray celebrates release of Dreamcatcher WHISTLER MUSICIAN’S THIRD ALBUM KICKS OFF BUSY SUMMER

BY ALYSSA NOEL IN 2016, Whistler musician Aude Ray did the scariest thing she’s ever done and quit her job. She had been teaching music at a local school for a few years, but she longed to focus on her own projects. “It really felt like I was a sailor in the really rough sea and the only way I could see my path was through the stars,” she says. “I felt like an explorer being guided by the light.” It wasn’t until she faced the deaths of two friends in close proximity that she found the courage to chase her dreams. “I really felt like life is so fragile. I have to do this. I was inspired by them, their lives, to leave my day job,” she says. After taking the plunge, she quickly set to work writing By My Home, her second full-length record, and began to tour it extensively—from California to her home province of Quebec and even on a train tour of Canada. “That tour from that album brought me to reconnect with an old friend

CHASING A DREAM Whistler’s Aude Ray released her third album, Dreamcatcher, last month. PHOTO SUBMITTED

70 JUNE 6, 2019

of mine,” she says. “We were touring together before I moved out West in 2003 and we always had an amazing connection, so we decided to write an album together.” That friend was Montreal-based musician and producer Jean-Frédéric Lizotte. Together, they worked on the

in Montreal, meaning she’s been spending time with a foot in two worlds lately. “I feel so lucky to have chosen to live out West, but I’m finding the importance of reconnecting with my roots in Quebec,” she adds. “I’m loving spending time with my family and the Quebecois culture. For me, right now, it’s nice to have a foot in

“I’m really excited to play with these guys. They make me so happy. I’m so glad to make music with my Whistler band.” - AUDE RAY

album’s nine tracks (this time, they’re all in English) with Aude Ray putting words to their musical collaborations. “To work with someone else this time made the music take so many different colours, but each song has a little taste,” she says. “They’re all so unique. You go from country to pop to more soul, R&B, but they’re all folk, so they work together. That’s why it’s called Dreamcatcher.” The album—her third—was recorded

Montreal and a foot in Whistler.” With the album officially out on May 29, however, she’s preparing for a busy summer of performing in B.C. with her band of Sea to Sky musicians, including Marcus Ramsay on guitar, Radim Kopitz on violin, Rajan Das on bass and Andrew Crome as drummer. “I’m really excited to play with these guys. They make me so happy. I’m so glad to make music with my Whistler band. It

really feels like I’m back home,” she says. “We’re having a lot of fun and we can’t wait to share all these songs and good times with Whistler.” Next up, she’s playing a show in Squamish on Canada Day. That’s followed by a gig at the Pemberton Farmers’ Market on July 9 and then a show as part of the Flag Stop Theatre Festival on July 11. The big album launch party, however, will take place at The Point Artist-Run Centre on Aug. 28. “That’s the official Dreamcatcher show in Whistler,” she adds. “Then I’ll go back to Montreal for the fall and play more shows there. Then we’ll see.” While leaving the comfort of a steady job might have been nerve-wracking, Aude Ray says each opportunity has fortuitously led to the next. “I was really lost, but I did this and followed my heart,” she says. “I’m really proud of myself and my achievements. It’s a really beautiful time to be alive right now. We have to take care of each other, take care of our friends, listen to good music, and go to live concerts.” Dreamcatcher is available now on iTunes, Spotify, Bandcamp, Amazon and YouTube. You can also connect with Aude Ray at her shows for a CD. To see all of her summer dates, visit auderay. com. n


WIN A PEMBERTON EXPERIENCE PACKAGE!

10 ROUNDS OF GOLF AT BIG SKY DINNER FOR TWO AT BARN NORK

VOTE ONLINE

www.piquenewsmagazine.com/vote WIN WEEKLY PRIZES! A PAIR OF MOVIE PASSES TO VILLAGE 8! Results will be published in our July 18th issue. Deadline for submissions is 11:59pm on Sunday, June 16th 2019. Only online submissions will be accepted. No photocopies, faxes or mailed entries. Only one entry per email address will be used. Please note we track user registration from individual IP addresses. We reserve the right to eliminate contest entrants if fraud is suspected. Pique makes every effort to create a concise list of Whistler businesses in the multiple choice drop downs. If you are a business owner in Pemberton we encourage you to check the details and email us with corrections and omission suggestions. Email traffic@wplpmedia.com.


PIQUECAL

YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL EVENTS & NIGHTLIFE For a complete guide to events in Whistler, visit piquenewsmagazine.com/events

THU

6.6

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

SFU WRITER’S STUDIO WRITING CONSULTS

Need an expert opinion on your writing? The SFU Writer’s Studio offers free one-on-one, 45-minute consultations. Register at least one week prior to the consultation time required. Seven pages of poetry or a prose manuscript must be submitted one week prior to your scheduled appointment. Doublespaced with title and your name on each page with the page number on the bottom. For more information and to register, call the library at 604-935-8435. > 2, 3 & 4 pm > Whistler Public Library

WALK AND TALK SERIES

Docents will provide visitors with an introduction to the Audain Art Museum and its permanent collection. Visitors will be encouraged to explore the galleries afterwards. These drop-in tours are free with the purchase of admission or museum membership. 604-962-0413. > 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

COMMUNITY

BNI MOUNTAIN HIGH

BNI provides a positive and structured environment for the development and exchange of quality business referrals. It does so by helping you build personal relationships with dozens of other qualified business professionals. Register by emailing David Livesey at david_livesey@cooperators.ca. $20. > 6:45-8:30 am > The Venue

ROTARY CLUB OF WHISTLER MILLENNIUM

Join the Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium to learn about what the club is doing to support your local community and international projects. Lunch is available for $20. Everyone welcome. > 12:15 pm > Pan Pacific Mountain Side

DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB

The club meets every week and visitors are welcome. For a partner, please call Gill at 604-932-5791. > 1-5 pm > Whistler Racquet Club

ACTIVATE AND CONNECT FOR SENIORS 50+

Connect with friends, new and old, through weekly activities. Meet at Whistler Community Services Society. In partnership with the Mature Action Community. > 9:30-11 am > Whistler Community Services

See and hear about Brenda Trenholme’s 2018 fivemonth, 13,000 km ride across Asia, Beijing to Istanbul. Admission by donation to KEEF, a BC charity www. kenyaeducation.org. Info: 604-415-9397 shelaghag@ shaw.ca. By donation. > 2:30-4 pm > Whistler Public Library

INTERACT CLUB OF WHISTLER DINNER AND A MOVIE FUNDRAISER

Don’t miss the Rotary-sponsored dinner and a movie fundraiser for Girls Matter and Children of the Street Society. Entry by donation: kids minimum $5, adults minimum $10. Silent auction and dessert auction. > 5:30-8 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

WHISTLER YOUTH BAND

Let the trumpets sing! The Whistler Youth Band is a beginner band for youth ages 10 and up. Grab an instrument and make music with friends. > 6-7:30 pm > Myrtle Philip Community School

MUSIC

Venture on out to Function Junction for the most sophisticated après of the week! Funk, soul, jazz, blues, rare groove, disco and other rare beats curated by Stache, paired with some of the best beer and service in Whistler! Free. > 3:30-7:30 pm > Coast Mountain Brewing

COCKTAIL DANCE PARTY

Start your weekend early with a handcrafted cocktail. Then hit the dancefloor or rock our legendary dancing cage with help from DJ Peacefrog. > 7 pm > Buffalo Bills

72 JUNE 6, 2019

Stache has been on a nomadic musical adventure for almost a decade, travelling to more than 50 countries and sharing his passion for music with others. Drawing influences from all four corners of the globe, his appetite, understanding and energetic delivery will guarantee a funky smorgasbord of beats. Free. > 9 pm-1 am > Three Below

6.7

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

PRESCHOOL STORY TIME

Books, songs and rhymes for preschool-aged children, accompanied by a caregiver. Registration is not required. > 10:30 am > Whistler Public Library

WALK AND TALK SERIES See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 3, 5:30 & 7 pm > Audain Art Museum

BAND CAMP

Band Camp is a local talent development night at Black’s Pub. This is where new talent to Whistler debuts and artists who have been honing their skills at Jam Night’s make their debut. This week it is Nicole ans Alex a.k.a. Hot Licks on guitar and vocals from 9 pm. Free. 604-932-6408. > 9 pm-midnight > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

SHUT UP AND PARTY

Start your weekend off one night early and come get wild with Whistler’s loosest bar staff. With music from Fidel Cashflow and DJ Shearer. Email info@maxxfish. com for VIP and other special perks. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

SOUNDSCAPE WITH BRIAN EH - ROHIT - TZEN

Tommys Whistler is now home to Soundscape! A series of nights blending the musical boundaries of house, techno and trance with Brian Eh - Rohit - TZEN. For Guest List, VIP reservations and table inquiries, please visit www.tommyswhistler.com. > 9 pm-2 am > Tommys Whistler

LOZEN

Lozen’s collage of lyrical flow and smooth vocal melodies over criss-crossing genres keep people engaged. Live shows are high energy, raw, and authentic. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

THURSDAY NIGHT FUNK FEATURING DJ DAKOTA

He spins old school and new school, ya need to learn though, he burns baby BURNS … like a hip-hop inferno! No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

LOCALS’ NIGHT

Party at Whistler’s longest-running locals’ night. Specials all night long. For VIP table bookings or guest list, email info@garfinkels.ca. > 7:30 pm > Garfinkel’s

EVAN KENNEDY For more information on featured events find us online at WWW.PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM

#TBT WITH THE SOUNDS OF STACHE

FRI

ART AFTER DARK

Art After Dark is every Friday, with artmaking for youth (18 and under) 3:30 to 5:30pm, and adult artmaking 6:30 to 8:30pm. > 3:30-5:30 & 6:30-8:30 pm > Audain Art Museum

SPORTS

WHISTLER TRI CLUB SWIM SQUAD

Triathlon-focused swim squads. Full details at whistlertriclub.com/training-sessions. Free to members for fall, non-members $8 drop-in (includes entry into Meadow Park). > 6-7:15 am > Meadow Park Sports Centre

INDOOR PICKLEBALL

Have fun with others playing the fastest-growing sport in North America! All levels welcome. Free paddle rental. $10. 604-932-1991. > 4-6 pm > Whistler Racquet Club

COMMUNITY

COAST MOUNTAIN THURSDAYS!

PARENT INFANT DROP-IN

An opportunity to develop a supportive social network with other parents of young babies. Speakers and a public health nurse are often in attendance. Free. > 11 am-12:30 pm > Whistler Public Library

Put it on the rocks and call it a show! Hosted by Jack-Qui No. > 8-11 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

CYCLING THE SILK ROAD

WOMEN’S KARMA YOGA

Drop-in for weekly yoga classes led by an all-female team of certified, 200-hour yoga instructors. Includes mat use and childminding. All women, all ability levels welcome. This program is made possible by yoga instructors and childminders donating their time. Contact us to join the team. Free. 604-962-8711. > 9:30-10:30 am > Whistler Women’s Centre

KARAOKE WITH JACK-QUI NO

Evan creates a unique live performance mixing in lesser-known album songs with the songs of today. > 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

SEA TO SKY

WORKBC EMPLOYMENT SERVICES DROP IN

Drop in to the Pemberton Public Library every Thursday afternoon and learn how WorkBC can assist you in your job search and career planning. All services are free. For details, call 1-877-932-1611. > 1-5 pm > Pemberton Library (Pemberton)

WELCOME CENTRE MULTICULTURAL MEET UP

Come and say “hi” if you are new to Canada and Whistler! Everyone and every age is welcome. Casual meet up, workshops, information about living in Canada. Check calendar at welcomewhistler.com for full details. Contact info@welcomewhistler.com or 604-698-5960. > 9:30 am-noon > Whistler Public Library

WHISTLER YOUTH CENTRE DROP-IN

For ages 13 to 18. We offer ping pong, a skateboard mini-ramp (skateboards and helmets to borrow), free Wi-Fi, Xbox One, PS3 & PS4, guitars, board games, a projector and widescreen TVs. Free. 604-935-8187. > 3:30-11 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

WHISTLER MULTICULTURAL FESTIVAL

The Whistler Multicultural Festival is back for the seventh year at Whistler Public Library. Organized by locals, for locals, this free event is open to anyone and everyone. Experience the different cultures of Whistler through food, music, dance, cultural activities and more. Lots of cultural activities for children,


PIQUECAL

SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

ONGOING & DAILY

and shake your hips to. > 6-9 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

MAC MAYER AT ALPINE CAFE

This guitar duo will be sure to impress you ... playing all-time favourite songs and working the crowd, they are not to be missed! Free. > 7-9 pm > Alpine Cafe

LADIES’ NIGHT

We have a gift for all ladies. Enjoy a glass of champagne then hit the dance floor and dance the night away with DJ Peacefrog. Info@buffalobills.ca for guestlist or table bookings. > 7 pm > Buffalo Bills

WHISTLER MUSEUM

Learn more about Whistler’s culture and history. Now open by donation. > Daily 11am-5pm, Thu until 9pm > Whistler Museum

THE CULTURAL CONNECTOR: A JOURNEY OF ADVENTURE AND DISCOVERY

Grab a Cultural Connector guide and explore Whistler’s world of culture. As you follow the Cultural Connector route, you’ll discover the stories that enrich Whistler’s culture, the venues that celebrate it and the milestones that we’ve achieved along the way. The pathway will lead you through beautiful surroundings and six cultural institutions: Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre, Whistler Museum, Whistler Public Library, Maury Young Arts Centre, Lost Lake PassivHaus, and Audain Art Museum. Free. > Ongoing > Maury Young Arts Centre

CHAMPAGNE FRIDAY

Kick off your weekend at Garf’s. Get on the guest list and join the party: info@garfinkels.ca. > 7:30 pm > Garfinkel’s

BC’S BIG & OLD TREES JUNE 7 LEGENDS WHISTLER

and special kids’ corner. For more details, go to welcomewhistler.com. > 4-8 pm > Whistler Public Library*

and get the funds. For more visit artswhistler.com. > 6-9 pm > Maury Young Arts Centre

Hosted by Delta Hotels by Marriott Whistler Village Suites, the 11th annual Raise the Roof event is a fundraiser for both Whistler Adaptive Sports Program and BC Children’s Hospital Foundation. The event includes a raffle and silent auction featuring numerous hotel stays, restaurants, activities and more. No charge. 604-905-3987. > 5-8 pm > Delta Whistler Village Suites

Free BioBlitz event. BC’s Big & Old Trees by Andy MacKinnon and Bob Brett. > 7:30 pm > Legends Whistler

MUSIC

EVAN KENNEDY

Evan creates a unique live performance mixing in lesser-known album songs with the songs of today. > 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

YOGA @ THE AUDAIN

Yoga @ the Audain every Friday evening from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. > first Friday of every month, 6:30-8 pm > Audain Art Museum

ARTS-U: SHOW ME THE MONEY

Join funky and fearless artist Hjeron O’Sidhe this Friday for the latest installment of Arts-U, where rock star experts share their secrets for how to build a kick-ass creative career. Hjeron has funded several of his own creative projects by applying for artist grants and is here to help you do the same. He’ll share his tips and tricks for writing grants that stand out from the crowd

Grab a flock of friends and come in an try one of our huge famous flamingo cocktails. Music by DJ Dre Morel all night. > 9 pm-2 am > Tommys Whistler

COMMUNITY

GAMES CAFE

Come in and enjoy a massive selection of popular games. Sunday to Thursday. > 4-8 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

STEPHEN VOGLER BC’S BIG & OLD TREES

11TH ANNUAL RAISE THE ROOF EVENT AND SILENT AUCTION

FLAMINGO FIRDAYS AT TOMMYS

LIVE MUSIC

Solo artists perform every week, except on the first Friday of every month when they swap out for a full band. No cover, no lineups. > 6-9 pm > Whistler Brewing Company

MONTY BIGGINS

Stephen Vogler plays ska, reggae, blues and rock with a healthy mix of originals and covers. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

LIVE @ BLACK’S

Every Friday and Saturday, party with local and touring musicians at Black’s Pub. > first Friday of every month, 9 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

FEEL GOOD FRIDAYS

Start the weekend off right with music by B.C.’s finest party DJs mixing the best in hip hop, rap, R&B and party anthems. Whistler’s most energetic dancefloor. > 9:30 pm > Moe Joe’s

FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE

Live music by Whistler favourites Red Chair. > 9:30 pm > Tapley’s Pub

Friday Night weekend kick off party with Monty Biggins. Biggins is a musical force. As a soloist, his style is rooted in vocal driven themes of the ages. He has a bluesy essence with traditional jazz roots. The music he chooses to share is happy music, easy to tap your toe

FRIDAY NIGHT ALL LOVE NO CLUB FEATURING TYMETAL

Shake off your work week by grooving to deep cuts featuring classics and future gems ... you can’t help but move to the beats! No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

SEA TO SKY

COMICON

Howe Sound Dance Academy year-end show, COMICON themed music and choreography, ballet, jazz, lyrical, modern, acrobatic arts, hip hop dances. June 7 to 10, 7:30 pm, with 2pm matinees on Saturday and Sunday. Tickets at Kaos Kids. General Admission - Adult $22, Youth (18yrs, and under) $18. 604-892-5500. > 10, 7:30-9:30 pm > Eagle Eye Theatre (Brackendale/ Squamish)

WHISTLER COMMUNIT Y SERVICES SOCIE T Y

Notice of

ur pics o y e r a h S with us

Annual General Meeting You are invited to join us on

Wednesday, June 26th, 2019 4pm-6pm

e #mypiqu

F O L LO W

US @

Meet, Mingle & Munch - 4pm-5pm AGM - 5pm-6pm

E MYPIQU

Whistler Community Services Society Building 8000 Nesters Road

Save the date

RSVP: grace@mywcss.org

JUNE 6, 2019

73


PIQUECAL

SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

GIANT PLANT SALE JUNE 8 WHISTLER PUBLIC LIBRARY

SQUAMISH DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB

Play stratified duplicate bridge. For more information visit https://squamishbridgeclub.com/. > first Friday of every month, 10:30 am > Squamish Royal Canadian Legion

PEMBERTON FARMERS’ MARKET

Pemberton Farmers’ Market brings together Pemberton area producers and consumers creating a marketplace for vibrant collections of fresh produce, delicious food, unique art and more. Come meet and support local “makers, bakers and growers”, enjoy live music every Friday from June to October. Free. 604-966-4422. > 3-6:30 pm > Pemberton Downtown Community Barn

COMMUNITY

WHISTLER FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY ANNUAL GIANT PLANT SALE

We will be selling perennials, annuals, salad pots, herb pots, bulbs, house plants. Garden gurus on site, local author Jane Reid with her Freshly Picked book signing and sales, Sea to Sky Invasive Species. Donations of plants will be accepted on day of sale. > 10 am-1 pm > Whistler Public Library

SINGING WITH THE BABIES

Learn songs and rhymes to soothe and entertain baby while encouraging early language development. For kids up to walking age. Free. > 11-11:30 am > Whistler Public Library

NIGHT CRITTERS

Free BioBlitz event. Watch as scientists catalogue everything that comes out at night, including bats! (Cancelled if raining.) > 9:30 pm > Alpha Lake Park

MUSIC

WHISTLER SINGS, A MULTIGENERATIONAL CHOIR

This is a choir for everyone, regardless of age or musical experience. If you sing in a choir, in the car or shower or not at all but would like to, this is your choir. All ages and abilities are welcome, under 13s need an adult with them. For more information email whistlerharp@gmail.com. > 9:30-11 am > Whistler Museum

SAT

6.8

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

A parent-directed hour with board games, crafts and a story corner with felt puppets. A drop-in program for families of all ages. Free. > 3:30-4:30 pm > Whistler Public Library

WALK AND TALK SERIES See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 1 & 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

HORRORFEST PITCH-TO-SCREEN WITH JASON BOURQUE

Over a three hour lunch, the Pitch-to-Screen is your chance to pick the brain of a master, pitch ideas, learn tricks and glean the wisdom and inspiration to get out and make your own HorrorFest masterpiece. It all goes down June 8, 2019. Tix are $50 (including lunch). > 1-4 pm > Sushi Village

WHISTLER YOUTH CENTRE DROP-IN

See Friday’s listing for more info. > 6-10 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

> 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

Free BioBlitz event. Finds of the Day and Updates from the Field. > 7:30 pm > Legends Whistler

JOEL & RAD

Saturday Night Live music with Joel & Rad. Joel and Rad bring crowd-pleasing covers from old classics to modern favourites mixed in with their catchy originals. This combination of warm acoustic guitar, captivating vocals and bluesy fiddle won’t leave you disappointed! > 6-9 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

Bluesparks are back with a new line up that will get you up and moving. Ripping harp and guitar leads and soulful voice over a powerful rhythm section... R&B at it’s best, don’t miss it! Free. > 7-9 pm > Alpine Cafe

With music from Fidel Cashflow and DJ C Stylez, two of Whistler’s hardest-working and most-loved DJs spinning the best in Top 40, mash-ups, electro, hip hop and party anthems that will keep your booty shakin’ all night long. Email info@maxxfish.com for VIP and other special perks. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

> 9 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

It’s Whistler’s No. 1 stop for stag and stagette parties. DJ Turtle and friends mix up everything from hip hop, R&B, new rap, dance hall and Top 40 bangers. Email guestlist@moejoes.com for VIP and group perks. > 9:30 pm > Moe Joe’s

SATURDAY NIGHT ALL LOVE NO CLUB FEATURING TYMETAL

He got your blood pumping last night, now satiate your thirst for amazing cocktails and unique beats with tyMetal’s eclectic DJ feats. No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

SUPREME SATURDAY BROTHER TWANG

Come wind down your ski day or ramp up your Saturday night festivities with the boys from Brother Twang. > 9 pm-midnight > FireRock Lounge

74 JUNE 6, 2019

SATURDAY NIGHT SHAKER

LADIES’ NIGHT

BLUESPARKS AT ALPINE CAFE FINDS OF THE DAY AND UPDATES FROM THE FIELD

Colour Tonges is a four-piece progressive indie rock band based out of Vancouver, giving audiences waves of head-bobbing, body-moving energy you can’t help but dance too, with lyrics that are both heart-warming and heart breaking. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

LIVE @ BLACK’S EVAN KENNEDY

FAMILY TOGETHER TIME

COLOUR TONGUES

DJ Nikky from Vancouver brings the Whistler’s biggest weekend party and best vibe. VIP champagne parades along with the hottest hip hop and remixes! For VIP and guest list, email info@garfinkels.ca. > 10 pm > Garfinkel’s


Now ng! Hiri

GRAB YOUR COPY TODAY! BUY IT TODAY AT:

ARMCHAIR BOOKS, NESTERS MARKET + WHISTLER KITCHEN WORKS

PUBLISHED BY

OPEN 10-8

WE CUT & COLOUR • NOW HIRING OPEN UNTIL 8PM • SINCE 1994

� Vista Place LIVE, WORK, PLAY

Residential, Office Commercial Space and Commercial Available Now! Rental Spaces info@vistaplacebc.com

NOW ACCEPTING Lease Applications

www.VistaPlacePemberton.com

Pemberton Valley Transit

Service Changes Effective June 3, 2019

One additonal round trip in the evenings on the route 99 Pemberton Commuter. For more information, visit bctransit.com or pick up a Rider’s Guide on board.

SPRING SPECIALS AVAILABLE 7 DAYS A WEEK

3 40

Course Dinner

for

$

THREE COURSE DINNER WITH CHOICES FROM OUR ENTIRE MENU

3 29 Small Plates

for

$

ONLY IN ...

The Attic ABOVE 21 STEPS

9004

Village of Pemberton

Transit Info 604·932·4020 • www.bctransit.com

FOR RESERVATIONS CALL

604-966-2121 w w w. 2 1 s t e p s . c a

JUNE 6, 2019

75


PIQUECAL TOURISM WHISTLER / MIKE CRANE

SEA TO SKY

COMICON

See Friday’s listing for more info. > Eagle Eye Theatre (Brackendale/ Squamish)

SUN

6.9

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 1 & 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

MOUNTAIN BIKE HERITAGE WEEK: RIDE TO THE HILLS FILM SCREENING

Join us for a screening of Ride to the Hills, presented with Whistler Museum. > 7-9 pm > Whistler Public Library

WHISTLER SAILING’S COMMUNITY OPEN HOUSE JUNE 10

MUSIC

WHISTLER SAILING ASSOCIATION

GAMES NIGHT AT PANGEA

Challenge your crew: Cards Against Humanity, Jenga, Settlers of Catan, HedBanz, and many more. Drinks and food specials all night long. > 4 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

ELLIE & CHARLIE

“Sunday Session” with Ellie & Charlie. If you haven’t had a chance to catch this Whistler duo you’re are missing out. They’re killer vocals paired with guitar are unforgettable and draw crowds. > 4:30-7:30 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

MIX WITH THE LOCALS

Mix with the locals featuring DJ Nat Morel on our late sun patio. Deep house and tropical beats. > 6-9 pm > Cinnamon Bear Bar

SUNDAY NIGHT THEORY WITH TYMETAL

tyMetal’s diversified taste translates to deep cuts featuring classics and future gems, guaranteed to tweak your brain stem! No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

One man band on the run, songwriter, world traveller, original van lifer. > 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

SEND IT SUNDAYS

With music from T-Zen and DJ Shearer. Keep your weekend alive, and join us on Sunday nights for one of Whistler’s wildest industry nights. Email info@ maxxfish.com for VIP plus special perks. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

SOULFUL SUNDAYS

Soul Club Whistler spinning that funky soul soundtrack. > 9 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

An open stage invitation for all who can sing, perform or even just wanna jam out with our house band. Whistler’s longest-running jam night every Sunday at Crystal Lounge. All instruments are provided. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

The best locals’ party in Whistler. > 9 pm > Tapley’s Pub

SEA TO SKY

WWF-CANADA’S KIDS’ RUN FOR NATURE

Join WWF Canada’s Kids’ Fun Run in Pemberton! This is a race for kids to raise awareness about World Wildlife Fund — Canada’s efforts to protect Canada’s wildlife. Runners receive a WWF-branded headband, runner bib, participant ribbon and a complimentary vegetable seed package. 1k, 3k and 5k course options $15 to register. 604-935-7602. > 8-11 am > One Mile Lake Park (Pemberton)

Moe Joe’s is transformed into a psychedelic UV-infused rave cathedral, as Fidel Cashflow, Zapps and La Dooda cook up an aural feast of house and electro beats. Arrive early to beat the line. > 9 pm > Moe Joe’s

76 JUNE 6, 2019

Come join in with this afternoon of music. Bring your instruments and come early to sign up. > 12-2 pm > Grimms Deli (Pemberton)

WHISTLER SAILING’S COMMUNITY OPEN HOUSE

Come out and meet the Whistler Sailing team, learn about sailing programs/memberships, and even try sailing first hand! Event is free to attend. Please RSVP to confirm your place. RSVP to info@whistlersailing.com. > 4:30-7:30 pm > Whistler Sailing Association

MUSIC

MON

6.10

COMMUNITY

MONDAYS IN MUSE LAB

OPEN MIC THE SUNDAY GLOW PARTY

See Friday’s listing for more info. > Eagle Eye Theatre (Brackendale/ Squamish)

OPEN MIC JAM NIGHT

SUNDAY SESSIONS MARC CHARRON

COMICON

Stop by and repair ripped seams, sew on the loose buttons, patch the jeans! With love for community Whistler Sewing Services is opening the Muse Lab, a new creative space in Function. Six sewing machines and all the supplies are ready to fix, mend and create. Visit your creative universe! $10 per hour. 604-967-2422. > 12-9 pm > Muse Lab

WORKBC EMPLOYMENT SERVICES DROP IN

Get your resume reviewed, learn about the local labour market, job search tips, and more. All services are free. For details, call 1-877-932-1611 or go to WhistlerESC.com. > 3-6 pm > Whistler Public Library

OPEN MIC & PATIO JAM

Open Mic night at Cranked Espresso Bar with host Kostaman. This is a super fun night for music lovers and artists of all levels. Cranked is the perfect place for new artists to try performing in front of a small supportive audience. This night always bring a solid mix of seasoned and budding artists together, and opportunities to collaborate. They’re always looking for new musicians to joins them. > 6-9 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

MONDAY NIGHT LIVE WITH WHAT A RACKET!

Local legend Monty Biggins offers hits of the eras in an Americana Swing sound. His soulful voice has been described as a journey of the heart. An entire rat pack in one man, he’ll tip his glass to you with that jazzy swagger. > 7-10 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

SPORTS

MARTINI MONDAY WHISTLER TRI CLUB SWIM SQUAD

See Friday’s listing for more info. > 6-7:15 am > Meadow Park Sports Centre

> 7:30 pm > Buffalo Bills

PATRICK GAVIGAN

Vancouver-based singer-songwriter, formerly of the 99.3 FM CFOX Seeds-winning band the TURN. > 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge


PIQUECAL MEATY MONDAY

Sport and beer what more do you need? How about a chance to win our famous Meat Raffle? Proceeds donated to charity. > 9 pm > Tapley’s Pub

TRIVIA NIGHT

The Crystal Lounge hosts trivia every Monday night! Bring your friends and test your knowledge for a night of fun, laughs, prizes and the chance to “burn your bill.” Conditions apply. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

The Whistler Naturalists present

The Whistler Naturalists present

MOUNTAIN

WHISTLER SEARCH & RESCUE SOCIETY BACKCOUNTRY SAFETY TALK & FUNDRAISER - JUNE 11.

The Whistler Naturalists present

Whistler Search & Rescue Society and Gibbons Whistler are having Backcountry Safety Talk & Fundraiser on June 11. Info and tickets at http://bit.ly/WSARJune11. There is over $5,000 in backcountry gear and raffle prizes to be won! > 7:30-10:30 pm > Longhorn Saloon

SPORTS

FVCK MONDAYS

The wildest party in Whistler on a Monday night continues with music from Fidel Cashflow, Dan Darley, The Rogue Killers and DJ Shearer. Throwing down all the hottest tunes you know and love. Deep, tech, bass, house, trap, hip hop and more. Email info@maxxfish. com for VIP plus special perks. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

MONDAY MADNESS

Fidel Cashflow, Dan Darley and Billy The Kid throw down all the hottest deep and dirty beats you know and love. Deep tech, bass, house, trap, plus more. > 9:30 pm > Maxx Fish

SEA TO SKY

COMICON

See Friday’s listing for more info. > Eagle Eye Theatre (Brackendale/ Squamish)

ACOUSTIC COFFEE HOUSE

The Acoustic Coffee House is back! Come join in with this afternoon of music. > 4-6 pm > Grimms Deli (Pemberton)

TUE

6.11

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

RHYME & SONG

This program gives toddlers, parents and caregivers the opportunity to learn songs, rhymes and finger plays together. Movement is encouraged and your preschooler’s early language and literacy development is supported. For more information, please come to the library, call 604-935-8436 or email youthservice@ whistlerlibary.ca. Free. > 10:30 am > Whistler Public Library

COMMUNITY

MOUNTAIN BIKE HERITAGE WEEK: BIKE MAINTENANCE WORKSHOP The Whistler Public Library is excited to offer one more Beginner Bike Maintenance Workshop, in partnership with their pals at Giant Whistler and the Whistler Museum. Email publicservices@whistlerlibrary.ca to sign up! > 2-4 pm > Whistler Public Library

WHISTLER CYCLING CLUB TUESDAY RIDES

Whistler Cycling Club rides for A, B and C level road riders. See www.whistlercyclingclub.ca for details. Free with club membership > 5:15-8 pm > Whistler Village Sports

WE RUN WHISTLER: SALOMON DEMO NIGHT

Saturday July 9, 2016 June 6 to 9, 2019

School Presentations:

scientistsat present to 20 classes Thursday and Friday. NatureBioBlitz Festival Alpha LakeonPark

Whistler Naturalists present Join us to for a special nightThe in collaboration with Salomon Whistler. Demo their latest running shoes12-5pm: Free Nature Festival Public Events:

Saturday July 9, 2016 Live critters, touching tables, working

and packs while we run some of Whistler best trails. Please arrive early if you wish to demo shoes and come run-ready in case you are unable to demo on the night, due to availability. Post-run refreshments thanks to Salomon. Visit werunwhistler.com for more details. #werunwhistler rain or shine! Free. > 5:55 pm 1-2pm: > Salomon Store Whistler

Fri. 7:30pm

BC’s Big and Old Trees

scientists, interactive displays, BC’s forests contain remarkable trees. Learn nature crafts and more! about BC’s biggest trees and why they’re important from Andy MacKinnon, Shaun

Nature Festival atAnimal Alpha Lake Park Tracks T-Shirt Painting Muc, and tree climber Matthew Beatty. Next

up, find out where to find Whistler’s biggest Bring a plain shirt. Leave looking wild! Nature Festival and oldest trees with Bob (Some kids’ shirts available for sale.)Brett. MUSIC Live critters, touching tables, working Legends Hotel. BINGO scientists, interactive displays, 2:30pm: Wild Things Scavenger Hunt Channel your inner granny and dominate bingo at the Sat. and 7:30pm Species conservation and Scientists’ nature crafts more! locals’ living room. Not your everyday hunt!

12-5pm:

Finds of the day.

> 8 pm > Tapley’s Pub

Saturday 2016Painting 1-2pm: AnimalJuly Tracks9,T-Shirt Legends Hotel. Bring a plain shirt. Leave looking wild! PATRICK GAVIGAN NatureSat. Night Legends Hotel 8:30ish at to late Night Critters at Alpha Lake Park > 8-11 pm (Some kids’ shirts availableWatch for sale.) as scientists catalogue everything > Mallard Lounge 7:30pm: Fabulous Finds of the Day Nature Festival at Alpha Lake Park that comes out at night. Scientists reveal their coolest finds. (Cancelled if raining.) 2:30pm: WildFestival Things Scavenger Hunt BLACK ‘N’ BLUES 12-5pm: Nature Blues night with Sean Rose. Live critters, tables,hunt! working Not yourtouching everyday Updated details at: www.whistlerbioblitz.ca > 8 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

scientists, interactive displays,at: Updated details nature crafts and more!

Scientist Blitz Days

Animal Tracks T-Shirt Painting Bringing a wide variety of sounds to your Tuesday June 6/7 looking wild!School Presentations Bring a plain shirt. Leave evening, ED:WIN will be playing “AllSorts” of music to June 8 (Some kids’ shirts available for sale.) Pemberton get you dancing down at Three Below every Tuesday 7:30pm: FabulousJune Finds night. Listen to hip hop, R&B, house, garage and disco! 9 of the Day Whistler Free. Scientists reveal their 2:30pm: Wild Things Scavenger Hunt coolest finds. > 9 pm-1:30 am Not your everyday hunt!

ALLSORTS

1-2pm:

www.whistlerbioblitz.ca

Nature Night at Legends Hotel

> Three Below

Updated details at: www.whistlerbioblitz.ca TOMMY TUESDAYS Nature Night at Legends Hotel SUMMER EDITION Music by DJ Dre Morel7:30pm: and guests all summer long! Fabulous Finds of the Day For guest list and VIP packages/ reservations, please Scientists reveal their coolest finds. contact us at info@tommyswhistler.com. Prize Giveaways every week. > 9 pm-2 am Updated details at: www.whistlerbioblitz.ca > Tommys Whistler

CELLAR SESSIONS

With live music from Neverland Nights and guests, playing all your rock, alternative and party jams all night long. Plus DJ sets from Fidel Cashflow. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

JUNE 6, 2019

77


PIQUECAL KARAOKE NIGHT

“I Will Survive” won’t sing itself, so come over to Whistler’s longest-running karaoke night and belt out all your favourite hits. Arrive early to avoid disappointment. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

SEA TO SKY

ANNUAL STRAWBERRY TEA HOSTED BY THE PEMBERTON WOMEN’S INSTITUTE

The Annual Strawberry Tea hosted by the Pemberton Women’s Institute, come for a piece of homemade shortcake with fresh strawberries covered in whip cream along with a cup of tea and coffee. $6. 604-698-8199. > 2-4 pm > Pemberton Museum grounds (Pemberton)

WEDNESDAY NIGHT RACING, SAILING

Join the Whistler Sailing Association for our weekly Wednesday Night Race Night and social. Members will participate in a fun and competitive sailing race, followed by a social evening (barbecue or après at a local restaurant). Please visit http://whistlersailing. com/races-family-club-sail/ for prices, prerequisites & registration. Rig at 5:30 p.m., first horn at 6:15 p.m. > 5:30 pm > Whistler Sailing Club

TENNIS LOCALS’ NIGHT

All levels are welcome to join in the Locals Night. Clinic for beginners and casual play for intermediate and advanced. Free racket rental, snacks and beverage included! $20. 604-932-1991. > 6:30-8:30 pm > Whistler Racquet Club

MUSIC

CONOR FITZPATRICK

f pair o Win a McGregor r o Conn gloves!

40% dur off Foo Spri ing our d ng D Mo Buck nster E eal ets a nergy nd m ore!

in the Upper Village

WED

6.12

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

QUEER WEDNESDAYS WALK AND TALK SERIES See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

INDUSTRY NIGHT Are you smarter than the average fifth grader? Let’s hope so as Stache brings you trivia with a Whistler twist. All the regular rounds plus our weekly degenerate round full of public and celebrity scandals. Great banter and awesome prizes! Free. > 9-10:30 pm > Three Below

INTERACT CLUB OF WHISTLER

WE DON’T WANT YOUR NAME...

just your information!

1-800-222-8477 (TIPS) Visit us on facebook Sea to Sky Crime Stoppers

Recycle? Yes or no?

Get the BC RECYCLEPEDIA App

We reserve the prime family-style table by the Ola Volo mural for our LGBTQ2+ family. Get your game (or gay’m) on. > 5-8 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

COMMUNITY

LET’S GET QUIZZICAL

Sea to Sky

Once the word gets out, everyone is going to want to see this guy play. He is already one of Cranked’s favourites. On warmer days, he will be playing outside on their sunny patio. > 4:30-7:30 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

Interact is a club for young people ages 12 to 18 who want to make a difference in their community, mentored by the Rotary Club of Whistler and Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium. The club includes students from Whistler Secondary School, Waldorf, Spring Creek and Myrtle Philip who want to join together to tackle the issues in their community they care most about. > 4-5 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

MOUNTAIN SPIRIT WHISTLER TOASTMASTERS

Build communication, public speaking, and leadership skills with Mountain Spirit Whistler Toastmasters. Everyone welcome. > 5:30-7 pm > Pan Pacific Mountain Side

SPORTS

Live music from Neverland Nights. > 6 pm > Buffalo Bills

FOXY GET FUNKY

Whether you know her as DJ Foxy Moron or just Ace, you know she kills it on the vinyl. Join us as this homegirl legend spins you silly. > 8-11 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

DINO DINICOLO

The electric bass becomes an extension of his hands and his voice has developed a rhythmic centre of its own, Dino DiNicolo is a master musician with a groove so deep that it moves the mind, the body and the soul. > 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

GEORGE

Georgina is acoustic/folk singer songwriter from Australia who pours her heart and soul into her songs. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

JAM NIGHT

Jam Night with Kostaman and Friends every Wednesday night from 9 pm. > 9 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

INDOOR PICKLEBALL DROP-IN > 9:30-11:30 am > Whistler Racquet Club

WHISTLER CYCLING CLUB WEDNESDAY RIDES

www.rcbc.ca RECYCLING COUNCIL OF B.C. MEMBER

78 JUNE 6, 2019

Whistler Cycling Club rides for emerging road riders. See www.whistlercyclingclub.ca for details. Free for club members > 5:15-7 pm > Whistler Village Sports

WILDIN’ OUT WEDNESDAYS FEATURING DJ GAINZ

He’s hot, he’s sicker than your average, Gainz comin’ through mixin’ tracks like a savage. No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg


ASTROLOGY

Free Will Astrology WEEK OF JUNE 6 BY ROB BREZSNY

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “I don’t think we were ever

meant to hear the same song sung exactly the same way more than once in a lifetime,” says poet Linh Dinh. That’s an extreme statement that I can’t agree with. But I understand what he’s driving at. Repeating yourself can be debilitating, even deadening. That includes trying to draw inspiration from the same old sources that have worked for you in the past. In accordance with current astrological omens, I suggest you try to minimize exact repetition in the next two weeks: both in what you express and what you absorb. For further motivation, here’s William S. Burroughs: “Truth may appear only once; it may not be repeatable.” TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Peter Benchley wrote the bestselling book Jaws, which was later turned into a popular movie. It’s the story of a great white shark that stalks and kills people in a small beach town. Later in his life, the Taurus author was sorry for its influence, which helped legitimize human predation on sharks and led to steep drops in shark populations. To atone, Benchley became an aggressive advocate for shark conservation. If there’s any behaviour in your own past that you regret, Taurus, the coming weeks will be a good time to follow Benchley’s lead: correct for your mistakes; make up for your ignorance; do good deeds to balance a time when you acted unconsciously. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Some birds can fly for days without coming down to earth. Alpine swifts are the current record-holders, staying aloft for 200 consecutive days as they chase and feed on insects over West Africa. I propose we make the swift your soul ally for the next three weeks. May it help inspire you to take maximum advantage of the opportunities life will be offering you. You will have extraordinary power to soar over the maddening crowd, gaze at the big picture of your life, and enjoy exceptional amounts of freedom. CANCER (June 21-July 22): “I think gentleness is one of the most disarmingly and captivatingly attractive qualities there are,” writes poet Nayyirah Waheed. That will be emphatically true about you in the coming weeks, Cancerian. Your poised, deeply felt gentleness will accord you as much power as other people might draw from ferocity and grandeur. Your gentleness will enable you to crumble obstacles and slip past barriers. It will energize you to capitalize on and dissipate chaos. It will win you leverage that you’ll be able to use for months. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Is the Loch Ness monster real? Is there a giant sea serpent that inhabits the waters of Loch Ness in Scotland? Tantalizing hints arise now and then, but no definitive evidence has ever emerged. In 1975, enterprising investigators got the idea to build a realistic-looking papier-mâché companion for Nessie and place it in Loch Ness. They hoped that this “honey trap” would draw the reclusive monster into more public view. Alas, the scheme went awry. (Lady Nessie got damaged when she ran into a jetty.) But it did have some merit. Is there an equivalent approach you might employ to generate more evidence and insight about one of your big mysteries, Leo? What strategies might you experiment with? The time is right to hatch a plan. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Earlier in your life, you sometimes wrestled with dilemmas that didn’t deserve so much of your time and energy. They weren’t sufficiently essential to invoke the best use of your intelligence. But over the years, you have ripened in your ability to attract more useful and interesting problems. Almost imperceptibly, you have been growing smarter about recognizing which riddles are worth exploring and which are better left alone. Here’s the really good news: The questions and challenges you face now are among the finest you’ve ever had. You are being afforded prime opportunities to grow in wisdom and effectiveness. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): How many languages are you

fluent it? One? Two? More? I’m sure you already know that gaining the ability to speak more than one tongue makes you smarter and more empathetic. It expands your capacity to express yourself vividly and gives you access to many interesting people who think differently from you. I mention this, Libra, because you’re in a phase of your cycle when learning a new language might be easier than usual, as is improving your mastery of a second or third language. If none of that’s feasible for you, I urge you to at least formulate an intention to speak your main language with greater candour and precision—and find other ways to expand your ability to express yourself. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Here’s Uruguayan writer Eduardo Galeano from The Book of Embraces: “In the River Plate basin we call the heart a ‘bobo,’ a fool. And not because it falls in love. We call it a fool because it works so hard.” I bring this to your attention, Scorpio, because I hope that in the coming weeks, your heart will indeed be a hard-working, wisely foolish bobo. The astrological omens suggest that you will learn what you need to learn and attract the experiences you need to attract if you do just that. Life is giving you a mandate to express daring and diligent actions on behalf of love. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): When he was 20 years old, a German student named Max Planck decided he wanted to study physics. His professor at the University of Munich dissuaded him, telling Planck, “In this field, almost everything is already discovered, and all that remains is to fill a few unimportant holes.” Planck ignored the bad advice and ultimately went on to win a Nobel Prize in Physics for his role in formulating quantum theory. Most of us have had a similar experience: people who’ve tried to convince us to reject our highest calling and strongest dreams. In my view, the coming weeks will be a potent time for you to recover and heal from those deterrents and discouragements in your own past. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Not all, but many horoscope columns address your ego rather than your soul. They provide useful information for your surface self, but little help for your deep self. If you’ve read my oracles for a while, you know that I aspire to be in the latter category. In that light, you won’t be surprised when I say that the most important thing you can do in the coming weeks is to seek closer communion with your soul; to explore your core truths; to focus on delight, fulfillment, and spiritual meaning far more than on status, power, and wealth. As you attend to your playful work, meditate on this counsel from Capricorn author John O’Donohue: “The geography of your destiny is always clearer to the eye of your soul than to the intentions and needs of your surface mind.” AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Aquarian biochemist Gertrude Belle Elion shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1988. She was instrumental in devising new drugs to treat AIDS and herpes, as well as a medication to facilitate organ transplants. And yet she accomplished all this without ever earning a PhD or MD, a highly unusual feat. I suspect you may pull off a similar, if slightly less spectacular, feat in the coming weeks: getting a reward or blessing despite a lack of formal credentials or official credibility. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Today, Mumbai is a megacity with 12.5 million people on 603 square kilometres. But as late as the 18th century, it consisted of seven sparsely populated islands. Over many decades, reclamation projects turned them into a single land mass. I foresee you undertaking a metaphorically comparable project during the coming months. You could knit fragments together into a whole. You have the power to transform separate and dispersed influences into a single, coordinated influence. You could inspire unconnected things to unite in common cause.

WHAT’S ON @ THE AUDAIN New Special Exhibition Now Open! Artistry Revealed: Peter Whyte, Catharine Robb Whyte and Their Contemporaries | On display until August 26

FREE ADMISSION FOR AGES 18 & UNDER Including regular events & programs Art After Dark Fridays | Watercolour Painting | Jun 7 3:30 – 5:30pm (youth-specific art making) Family Studio | Snow Textures | June 9 12 – 4pm presented by

WEEKLY EVENTS Art After Dark Fridays | Watercolour Painting | Jun 7 6:30 – 8:30pm (adult-specific art making) Yoga @ the Audain | Fridays 6:30 – 8:00pm | Instructor Laura Davies Public Walk & Talk Tours Wednesday through Sunday | Scheduled Times Visit audainartmuseum.com/events for details Open Daily 10am – 5pm Open Friday 10am – 9pm (Closed Tuesday)

4350 Blackcomb Way, Whistler audainartmuseum.com

?

PIQUE HOUSE ADS - BOOKING 2.00x6.1500 R0021106933 PQ22 - SPACE SAVER ROP

DO YOU HAVE A DIGITAL ROADMAP

CONFUSED BY DIGITAL ADVERTISING AND NEED HELP?

Glacier Digital Services in partnership with Pique Newsmagazine offers solutions in website design, SEM, SEO, social media and so much more. Call your sales representative today.

604-938-0202

Homework: To connect with me on social media, go here: https://freewillastrology.com/social

In addition to this column, Rob Brezsny creates

EXPANDED AUDIO HOROSCOPES

In-depth weekly forecasts designed to inspire and uplift you. To buy access, phone 1-888-499-4425. Once you’ve chosen the Block of Time you like, call 1-888-682-8777 to hear Rob’s forecasts. www.freewillastrology.com

JUNE 6, 2019

79


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

RENT SELL HIRE

ADULT SERVICES

LONG-TERM RENTALS

LONG-TERM RENTALS

Accommodation

MARKETPLACE

ADULTS ONLY

WHISTLER

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS

FOR SALE - MISC

Long Term Rentals

Monthly rental accommodation that is available to local renters for a minimum of 12 months.

CALL OR PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED WITH OUR ONLINE SERVICE FOR EITHER PRINT OR ONLINE...OR BOTH!

Short Term Rentals

Monthly or seasonal rental accommodation that is available to local renters for less than 12 months, or where the rental price varies throughout the year.

D E A D L I N E

FOR PRINT ADS

PRINT & ONLINE SELF-SERVE CLASSIFIEDS.PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM

DISPLAY ADS

     

Secure & scamless Fully searchable Targeted online community Categorised listings No reposting Trusted by locals Make your listing stand out with featured locations

THEBACHELORPLAN.COM Your gentleman’s concierge for… • • • • •

Adrenaline-fueled adventures Customized nightlife itineraries Luxury transportation Awesome chalet parties Unique female entertainment

List your accommodation持持持持持持持持持持 rental in print & online * a week from only

$5

Vacation Rentals

Nightly and/or weekly rental accommodation, available to visitors over a short period of time.

online print only & online

4 Bedroom & 3 Bath Home - Close to Alta Lake Available August 1 Beautiful four-level cozy home. Optional bachelor suite. One year minimum lease. Contact 604-218-1843 or email r.wong@telus.net.

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS

Property Owners seeking Annual or Seasonal Rental Income from screened Tenants, please contact one of our 6 Rental Agents to discuss revenue, services & fees.

Advertising Options 

 

Packages start with 4 lines of text. Additional text .....$1/line Add one image in print and up to three online as per package level. Bolding .............50¢/word Border .......................... $2

* Rates are based on using Pique’s self-serve online application at classifieds. piquenewsmagazine.com

Get the added punch to make your business ad standout with a classified display ad. Free ad design, colour options, incentives for ad frequency. Contact a sales rep today.

604-938-0202 piquenewsmagazine.com

80 JUNE 6, 2019

licenseD rental agents: simon Westwood 604-967-1195 simon@WhistlerProperty.com ALWAYS HIRING ALWAYS HIRING

STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! DEALERS AND BIKINI CLAD CADDIES. ESCORTS MAKE ANY PARTY AMAZING!! STRIPPERS TOPLESS BLACKJACK DEALERS 6 0SEXY 4 -SKI9 INSTRUCTORS! 38-6456 For the Time of Your Life! MAKE ANY PARTY AMAZING! www.roxysinwhistler.com

604 -938 - 6 4 56 For the Time of Your Life!

roxysinwhistler.com roxys_in_whistler

SHORT-TERM RENTALS BENCHLANDS Fabulous executive, 2bdrm view townhome available for July and August. Beautifully furnished and fully equipped, featuring huge wrap around patio and garden for all those hot sum-mer evenings. Minutes to Lost Lake, golf course and biking trails, a perfect place to spend the summer ! No smok-ing, no pets, no parties , secure under-ground parking. call 604-318-5348

Accommodation

SEEKING

Re-Build-It Centre Furniture, appliances, kitchen cabinets, doors, plumbing, tools, flooring, hardware, lumber, lighting and more!

Open 10am-5pm, 7 days a week 1003 Lynham Road, Function Junction 604-932-1125 Recycle, Re-build and Re-invest in your community. All proceeds support 28 programs and services such as the food bank, outreach services, and counseling assistance offered by Whistler Community Services. www.mywcss.org Like us on Facebook @ Whistler Community Service Society

ACCOMMODATION WANTED

long term rental management services

* $11 per week

Accommodation

Shopping and Donation hours: 11am - 6pm, 7 days a week 8000 Nesters Road 604-932-1121

ALTA LAKE (WESTSIDE)

Sell your stuff * Free for 30 days

Come and visit Whistler’s funkiest thrift store and get (almost) everything you need for your EPIC season! Winter clothes, skis, boards, boots, bindings, goggles, toques and more! As well as all the usual stuff to make that rented closet feel like a palace. You may even find some hidden treasure you never knew needed.

A C C O M M O D AT I O N LISTINGS, DEFINED:

Where locals look

Accommodation

Beautiful Hot Blonde - Cherry Double D Delicious. Tight & pristine, extremely blessed, gorgeous girl. She loves to be watched, loves attention & wants to entertain you with her lust crusade. Duos & Stags. 24Hrs. 1-604-902-1112. Clean, classy & discreet.

Classifi eds

Tuesday 4pm

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

Forrest chittick 604-902-7178 forrest@WhistlerProperty.com rosie Blaser 604-932-8864 rosie@WhistlerProperty.com

Long Term Locals Seeking Pet Friendly Home

HOME SERVICES BUILDING AND RENOVATIONS

We’ve lived in Whistler for 10 years and are looking for a long-term place to call home for July 1st. We are mature professionals with excellent community and landlord refrences. We have a small, older dog named Della and we do require space for mountain bikes. Looking forward to hearing from you! 778-229-5296 olliejonesphoto@hotmail.com

MARKETPLACE FURNITURE

WHISTLER FURNITURE CO

BEDS IN STOCK!

Wiebe Construction Services Serving Whistler for over 25 years

• Kitchen and Bath • Renovations & Repairs • Drywall • Painting • Finishing • Minor Electrical & Plumbing

Ray Wiebe 604.935.2432 Pat Wiebe 604.902.9300 raymondo99.69@gmail.com

SAME DAY DELIVERY! MATTRESSES-BUNK BEDSSOFA BEDS-CUSTOM SOFAS

Helene Huang 604-902-0608 helene@WhistlerProperty.com Duane Kercher 604-932-7849 duane@WhistlerProperty.com

VIEW AVAILABLE RENTAL LISTINGS AT:

WhistlerProperty.com

Queen mattresses from $289.99 Bunk Beds from $699.99 Sofa beds from $1099.99

NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

PICK UP YOUR

whistlerfurniture.ca 2-1020 Millar Creek Road

604.938.4285

COPY TODAY


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

BUY

RENT

WORK

Services

FIX

DRIVE

SELL

Services

HOME SERVICES

HOME SERVICES

HOME SERVICES

HEALTH & WELLBEING

HEALTH & WELLBEING

BUILDING AND RENOVATIONS

MOVING AND STORAGE

MOVING AND STORAGE

SALON & SPA

COUNSELLING

HIGH AND DRY

NORTHLANDS

BLUE HIGHWAYS MASSAGE & SPA

STORAGE Come visit our showroom for all your renovation and supply needs For Free consults and Quotes call 604-935-8825 Located in function junction mariomarble@shawbiz.ca Showroom #103-1010 Alpha Lake Rd.

STORAGE STORAGE SPACE

LOWEST PRICES IN THE CORRIDOR GAURANTEED UNITS STARTING AT

65

$

AVAILABLE

BEST PRICES IN WHISTLER FURNITURE, CARS, BOATS & MOTORCYCLES ETC STORAGE AVAILABLE

per month

24 HR ACCESS,

BEST

electronic monitoring

PRICES

8080 NESTERS SHAW STORAGE

Deep Tissue Massage, Relaxation, Thai & Shiatsu, Therapeutic Massage, Reflexology, Aromatherapy & Hot Stone Massage

604.932.1968 WALSH

FLOORING

CARPET & FLOOR CENTRE

Family owned & operated

8080 Nesters Road Whistler, BC

Open Monday through Friday 8:30 - 4:30 Saturday 10:00 -4:00 Sundays and Evenings by appointment only.

SPACE NOW AVAILABLE!

3-1365 Alpha Lake Road Whistler, B.C, V0N1B1 Phone 604-938-1126 email shawcarpet@shaw.ca

USE A WALSH CUBE TRUCK FOR FREE TO MOVE YOUR POSSESSiOnS TO WALSH STORAgE

We Added More Containers!

WALSH StoRAge Pemberton Industrial Park 1944 Stone Cutter Place Owner Residence On-Site

5 Minutes North of Whistler Village Shipping Containers

8 x 10 COntAIneRS

100 +

$

+ Insulated With 1.5” Foam Ceiling, Walls and Doors + Pre-wired 20-Amp

CLEANING

ReStoRAtion

+ Central Location,

+ 20’ (one-trip)

Service With Overhead Light, Duplex Plug and Heater on Shelf

tax per month

2 hRS fRee tRuCk tIMe

8 x 20 COntAIneRS

160 +

$

tax per month

4 hRS fRee tRuCk tIMe

Call Mike Walsh

604 698 0054

Housekeeping - daily, weekly monthly Move in/out & Construction Cleaning IICRC Professional carpet cleaning Caretaker Services

CALL SARA

FRIEND US ON:

604.848.8987 sara@goldmedalcleaning.ca goldmedalcleaning.ca

MOVING AND STORAGE

WHISTLER’S

RMT specials on request

Two new classes with Jess!

604-938-0777

Outdoor Strength and Conditioning

#206 - 4368 MAIN ST. 2ND FLOOR, MARKET PAVILION

Tuesdays 11-12 Starts June 18 $66 for 6 weeks

PHYSICAL THERAPY

Metabolic Conditioning

Sally John Physiotherapy

Fridays 5:30-6:30 pm Starts June 21 $66 for 6 weeks

ONE-ON-ONE PHYSICAL-THERAPY

IN HOME PHYSIOTHERAPY AVAILABLE

CUSTOM-MADE ORTHOTICS at competitive prices for ski boots & shoes, including training shoes. 17 years of making orthotics

‘Sally John Physiotherapy’

No Heat now available

COUNSELLING + Paved, 24/7 fenced & gated access.

CONTACT

ROTARY CLUBS OF WHISTLER & PEMBERTON

Tuesdays at 7:15 a.m. BG Urban Grill: 604-905-5090 & Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. at the Pan Pacific, Mountainside. www.whistler-rotary.org

U.S.

Exchange Rate

free

* PREPAY 3 MONTHS GET 4TH FREE

fit it in your pocket. take it everywhere.

604.932.1948

www.a1ulock.com

NOTICES

Pemberton Rotary Club at the Pemberton Community Centre, Wednesdays at 7:15am www.pembertonrotary.ca

604.966.8080 8080Nesters@telus.net www.nestersstorage.ca

BEST STORAGE

1209 Alpha Lake Rd., Function Junction

Community

GENERAL NOTICES

www.sallyjohnphysiotherapy.com

Overhead Doors, Light,

www.whistler.ca/recreation 604-935-PLAY (7529)

REGISTERED PHYSIOTHERAPIST

(604) 698-6661

one month * OPEN / 7 DAYS WEEK

available on request

Registered Massage, Registered Counselling & Registered Chiropractic

2997 Alpine Cresent (Alta Vista)

10’x8’ Containers,

SPORTS & ACTIVITIES

Registered Therapists

mike.walsh@walshrestoration.ca

+ Limited Number -

VACATION RENTAL CLEANING & PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE Serving Whistler for 25 years in:

IN WHISTLER

Outdoor storage for RV’s, Boats, Campers, Vehicles etc $2 per LFT. Call 604.935.9370 or email gphare@shaw.ca

massage clinic & spa

piquenewsmagazine.com/events

free.

Emotional distress can be difficult to manage on your own. The goal of Ashlin Tipper Counselling is to promote health and happiness by providing welcoming, kind, supportive, non-judgmental, goal-oriented, practical, clinically-based emotional support.

29% as recommended by:

Website: ashlintippercounselling.com Email: ashlintippercounselling@gmail.com Phone: (604) 916 8979

JUNE 6, 2019

81


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

Community

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

NOTICES

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Donate to BC's First SeaBin! Sumi Saves Wildlife is a non-profit environmental organization based in Whistler. Our current goal is to install a SeaBin in the Sea-Sky corridor. A SeaBin is a floating garbage bin that is said to collect 680 kgs of rubbish in the ocean a year. Learn more about the SeaBin on our Website! sumisaveswildlife@gmail.com sumisaveswildlife.ca

JOB POSTING #OPS221 POSITION: LEAD HYDRO STATION MANAGER UPPER LILLOOET HYDRO PROJECT PEMBERTON, BC ROLE AND RESPONSIBILITIES • Reporting to the Manager – Operations and Maintenance, the Lead Hydro Station Manager will work together with the Operations and Maintenance Team and will be responsible for the following primary duties: • Lead a team of approximately 3 people (Plant Managers and Operators): • Manage employees scheduling, time management and timecard approval; • Manage employees and put the resources in place to accomplish the necessary tasks for the proper functioning of the site; • Evaluate employees according to existing policies; • Give clear and measurable objectives to employees based on the existing policies. • Manage, run and supervise the operations of the hydroelectric power plant by way of scheduling, conducting, and documenting all regular monitoring and maintenance; • Supervise the optimization of the hydroelectric power plant output and production; • Manage, lead and participate in the Preventive Maintenance program for plant and facilities’ equipment including the electrical and mechanical testing, repair of equipment and procurement of parts and supplies; • Manage, lead and participate in the troubleshooting and resolution of alarms generated by the hydroelectric power plants to minimize downtime (availability 24 hours a day when on duty); • Assist the Operations and Maintenance Manager in planning major maintenance activities; • Coordinate with the BC Hydro – Fraser Valley Office for outages and line switching; • Manage any specialized contractors needed to perform maintenance and repairs for the power plants; • Manage overflow camp facilities for contractors and visitors; • Adhere to and implement the Environmental, Occupational Health and Safety standards of Innergex; • Innergex provides formal and in-house training, as required.

PERSONAL MESSAGES

We are actively looking for individuals who are passionate An about extraordinary company, an extraordinary career. providing a memorable guest experience! Are you ready to begin your extraordinary experience? CURRENT CAREER OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE Current Career Opportunities:

Whistler Experience Coordinator Purchasing Manager Whistler Experience Coordinator Health Club Attendant Guest Experience Manager Purchasing Manager Royal Service Agent Banquet Server Banquet Server Guest Service Agent Overnight In-Room-Dining Server Junior Server Reservations Housekeeping Agent Room Attendant Engineering Opportunities Engineering Opportunities Steward /Dishwashers Culinary Opportunities Culinary Opportunities

EMPLOYEEWe BENEFITS INCLUDE: offer: Health Benefits Extended Health BenefitsWages | Competitive Wages Competitive Colleague Accommodation | Leisure Package Colleague Accommodation Hotel Leisure Stay and F&B Discounts Package Opportunity forStay Growth and Development Hotel Discounts Greatcolleague colleagueevents events&&recognition! recognition! Great To review TO job descriptions apply, please www.fairmontcareers.com APPLY ANDand REVIEW FULLvisit JOB DESCRIPTION,

PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE:

www.fairmontcareers.com

LOST 01/06/2019 Lost Columbia jacket with car keys in the pocket Pemberton st area 604-476 -0744 anchirila@gmail.com

MEETING PLACE Welcome Centre at Whistler Public Library - Information, support, community connections and ESL practice groups for newcomers and immigrants. Meet people, make connections, volunteer, build your communication skills in English. Multicultural Meet Up every Friday 9.3012pm.604-698-5960 info@welcomewhistler. com FB: WhistlerWelcomeCentre

WHISTLER COMMUNITY LISTINGS The Friends of the Whistler Public Library are looking for healthy plant donations for their annual 'Giant Plant Sale' (June 8. 10 am to 1 pm Library square) Please bring donations on day of sale or contact christyauer@gmail. com

SITE AND WORK DETAILS • The site is located approximately 90 minutes out of Pemberton (the marshalling point); • Employees work schedule is 8 days on and 6 days off at 10 hours per day for a total of 80 working hours per two (2) week period; • Travel time between the marshalling point and the site is included in these hours. • Employees are provided with a pickup for travel between the marshalling point and site and for use on site; • Employees are provided with furnished accommodation while working on site: cable TV, telephones and internet access are available; • Employees are provided with a Living out Allowance for each day they are on site

Whistler Friends of the Library Annual Giant Plant Sale Saturday June 8. 10 am to 1 pm. Whistler Public Library We will be selling Perennials, Annuals, Salad Pots, Herb Pots, Bulbs, House Plants. Garden Gurus on site, Local Author Jane Reid with her 'Freshly Picked' book signing and sales, Sea to Sky In-vasive Species. Donations of plants will be accepted on day of sale.

PROFILE • Advanced leadership skills: provides guidance on individual development, leads the modification of existing processes and proposes new solutions for improved efficiency; • Practical work methods: takes part in small projects and repairs with the goal of fully understanding general plant processes and operations; • Adaptable: able to work effectively within a multidisciplinary team environment consisting of Engineering, Project Management, Operations and Maintenance employees at all levels; • Supportive of the development of new technologies and methods; • Highly independent and self-directed: anticipates requirements, seeks opportunities, develops and implements solutions to complex plant processes and operations; • Safety: good understanding and application of electrical, mechanical and general safety.

Pemberton and District Museum and Archives Society. Located at 7455 Prospect St. Open: May to Nov annually from 10am-5pm. Guided tours and activities for all ages. Join us for "Tea & Tales" every Tuesday at 2pm in July and August. Some seasonal closures. Closed on holidays. www.pembertonmuseum.org

PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS • Experience as a Journeyman Millwright • Experience at managing maintenance and operation crews at industrial facilities; • Experience with hydro plant operations, Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), communications infrastructure, high-voltage transmission lines (a definite asset); • Experience reading and interpreting Engineering drawings; • Ability to read electrical schematics, wiring diagrams, pneumatic and hydraulic drawings; • Possess a BC driver’s licence in good standing; experience with 4-wheel drives and snowmobiles is required (Class 1 driver’s licence, an asset);

PEMBERTON COMMUNITY LISTINGS

Avis Rent a Car Whistler is looking for counter sales reps to join our busy and fun Avis team. We are hoping to find a full-time and part-time employee, willing to be flexible for the right long term candidate. We offer paid training, medical & dental, sales bonuses and more! Drivers licence and good attitude required. Please forward resume to sheri.warm@abglocalmarket.ca

The chosen candidate will be based at out Upper Lillooet Hydro Project in Pemberton, BC.

HR@INNERGEX.COM

Volunteer To Help Injured Wildlife Injured birds, small mammals, raccoons, and many others rely upon volunteers to help them get to the designated wildlife rehabilitation centres. Join the volunteer network to support the community’s response to injured wildlife. www.snoopandlove.org

EDITION

Please note that only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

82 JUNE 6, 2019

Big Brothers, Big Sisters Sea to Sky Volunteer to Mentor- just 1hr/week - and make a difference in a child's life. Call 604892-3125.

SUMMER

WWW.INNERGEX.COM

The masculine is used in this publication without prejudice for the sake of conciseness.

VOLUNTEERS

PICK UP YOUR COPY TODAY

OUt NOW FAQw histl e r


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

BUY

Community

RENT

WORK

FIX

DRIVE

SELL

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

NOTICES VOLUNTEERS

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

PIZZA BASEBALL & SOFTBALL FREE BATTING PRACTICES AFTER SCHOOL FRIDAYS, 2:30-6:00 pm at MYRTLE PHILIP DIAMOND

EXCITING CAREER OPPORTUNITIES APPLY TODAY!

FREE After-School Drop-In Youth (K12) Baseball & Softball Batting & Fielding Practices 2:30 to 6:00 pm ALL 4 June FRIDAYS, JUNE 7 to JUNE 28 at Myrtle Philip (Balsam Park) Diamond in lower field. FREE PIZZA for practicing youth. Bring your own gloves and any favorite bats or helmets if you have them. Loaner equipment avail. Parents encouraged to help & play also. Phone or email Duane at 604-932-7849 or duane@whistlerproperty.com for more info. Volunteer Adult/Parent COACHES are encouraged to contact us. EXTRA SESSION PLANNED: "FATHERS DAY" Sunday, JUNE 16th, 11 am to 5 pm

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

Is hiring (FULL TIME / PART TIME) LINE/ PREP COOKS DOOR HOST/SECURITY DISHWASHERS SOUS CHEF (FULL TIME) HOST BAR PORTER Wages are very competitive (based on experience), great perks and benefits. Come join the best team in Whistler! Interested applicants please email your resume to skeenan-naf@Crystal-Lodge.com

Diamond Resorts Canada Ltd., Whistler, BC

Contracts Specialist (entry level) Eligible successful candidates may receive*: • Extensive benefits package which may include; ski pass or wellness allowance, disability coverage, travel insurance and extended health and dental. • Discounted employee rates at any Diamond Resort International resort. • Full-time work year round and a FUN work environment. *eligibility and conditions based on DRCL policies and practices set out in general terms and conditions of employment.

Email your resume with the position you wish to apply for to: embarc_hr@diamondresorts.com

ARTS & CULTURE Arts Whistler - Full arts & culture listings. Comprehensive artist directory & programs, events & performances year-round. For info 604-935-8410 or visit www.artswhistler.com Pemberton Arts Council - Connect with other artists, writers, artisans, musicians & help make Pemberton a vibrant arts community. Call 604-452-0123 or visit www. pembertonartscouncil.com Pemberton Writers - Meet with other writers to review and critique monthly. Opportunities for writing in a comfortable and creative setting. Email crowley7@telus. net Sea to Sky Singers - Invites new & former members to join us for an exciting new term, the spring & fall terms culminate with a concert. Choir meets Tues, 7-9pm at Squamish Academy of Music, 2nd Ave. Veronica seatoskysingers@gmail.com or 604-892-7819 www.seatoskysingers.net Whistler Community Band - Rehearsals on Tuesdays 7 - 8:15 pm CONTACT whistlerchorus@gmail.com FOR LOCATION Whistler Singers Rehearsals are Tuesdays from 7 to 9pm at Myrtle Philip School in the Toad Hall room. Everyone is welcome! Inquiries can be sent to whistlersingers@gmail.com For more info, visit: https://www.facebook.com/ whistlersingers/ Whistler Sings - Multi-generational choir Our new multi-generational choir begins this Saturday, May 25th. What's it all about? This is a choir for everyone - regardless of age or musical experience. If you sing in a choir, in the car or shower or not at all but would like to, this is your choir. All ages and abilities are welcome - under 13s need an adult with them. We'll be meeting at the Whistler Museum from 9:30 - 11 am for 5 Saturday mornings. We've got some fun music to sing as well as some percussion. If you have an instrument you feel would work with the choir, please do bring it along. Any questions email whistlerharp@gmail.com

Now Hiring for the Following Positions: BREAKFAST / BISTRO ASSOCIATE (Seasonal Bonus) GUEST SERVICE AGENT (Commission Incentives) • Competitive Wages • Associate Housing • Wellness Allowance • Discounted Food • Extended Medical Benefits • Spa Discounts Discover new opportunities and embark on a career in Hospitality with Pan Pacific Whistler To apply, please submit your cover letter and resume to careers.ppwhi@panpacific.com

JOIN THE MONGOLIE CREW! We are hiring full time & part time:

GRILL CHEFS HOSTS

Hourly wage + tips, flexible schedule, fun & fast-paced work environment, staff meals. Learn how to cook with flair!

Send your resume to careers@mongoliegrill.com Or drop off your resume in person before 5pm!

WE ARE LOOKING TO HIRE:

EXPERIENCED LINE COOKS (ACCOMMODATION AVAILABLE) BUSSERS HOSTS SERVERS Full-time and year round. We feature evening work only, staff meals, competitive wages and a great work environment. So if you’re looking for a change or some extra hours, come by and see us. Flexible schedules are available. REPLY IN PERSON WITH RESUME BETWEEN 3-5 AT QUATTRO 4319 Main St. in the Pinnacle Hotel

SEEKING A LEAD HAND/SUPERVISOR IF YOU

Want to grow your existing leadership skills Enjoy solving problems and being creative Prefer working outside and keeping active Hold a valid BC Drivers Licence

WE WANT TO MEET YOU! • STARTING WAGE OF $22.00/HOUR • END OF SEASON BONUS • SEASON RUNS UNTIL MID-NOVEMBER 2019

APPLY NOW: Send your resume and availability to carolyn@mountainberrylandscaping.ca JUNE 6, 2019

83


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

LOCALLY OWNED AND INDEPENDENT SINCE 1980 • $241.50 Bi Weekly Staff Housing (incl bills) • 15% Grocery Discount • Competitive Wages • Parties, Perks and Positive Vibes

Red Door Bistro & Roland’s Pub are looking for full time line cooks. Wage based on experience. Extended Medical & Dental Benefits, tips, staff meal, and staff discounts.

CHARACTERS WANTED “Work with all your pals, have a good laugh and meet heaps of people” - Chief Morale Officer ROB STANNARD POP INTO THE STORE AND SPEAK TO A MANAGER 4211 VILLAGE SQUARE WHISTLER

Apply in person or email resume to info@rolandswhistler.com

EXCITING CAREER OPPORTUNITIES APPLY TODAY! Diamond Resorts Canada Ltd., Whistler, BC

Now Hiring for the Following Positions:

Off Property Contacts

HOUSEKEEPERS – CASUAL • Competitive Wages - $25/HR • Associate Housing • Discounted Food • Flexible Schedule • Spa Discounts Discover new opportunities and embark on a career in Hospitality with Pan Pacific Whistler To apply, please submit your cover letter and resume to careers.ppwhi@panpacific.com

Eligible successful candidates may receive*: • Extensive benefits package which may include; ski pass or wellness allowance, disability coverage, travel insurance and extended health and dental. • Discounted employee rates at any Diamond Resort International resort. • Full-time work year round and a FUN work environment. *eligibility and conditions based on DRCL policies and practices set out in general terms and conditions of employment.

Email your resume with the position you wish to apply for to: embarc_hr@diamondresorts.com

GUEST SERVICES AGENT

WE ARE HIRING: Foremen, Carpenters, Labourers, Apprentices Please contact Marc@balmoralconstruction.com

84 JUNE 6, 2019

Pinnacle Hotel Whistler has an opening for a full time or part time guest services agent. We are looking for a customer service professional who will help our guest enjoy their experience at our hotel. Duties include check in and checkout of guests, concierge and reservations. Experience preferred but we will train the right person. Please contact Roger Dix   rdix@pinnaclehotels.ca or ph: 604-938-3218

COMMUNITY LISTINGS CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS Donate Used Clothing & Household Goods- To be distributed to local charities by Sharon 604-894-6656 for pick up. Playground Builders: Creating Play Building Hope - Playground Builders is a registered charity that builds playgrounds for children in war-torn areas. Learn more, volunteer or donate at www. playgroundbuilders.org Sea to Sky Community Services - running dozens of programs in Whistler to help people through times of crisis and with everyday challenges. www.sscs.ca 1-877892-2022 admin@sscs.ca Stewardship Pemberton Society and the One Mile Lake Nature Centre- Connecting community, nature and people through education, cooperation, and community involvement. www.stewardshippemberton. com Whistler Health Care Foundation raises funds for improving health care resources and services. New board members welcomed. Contact us at info@ whistlerhealthcarefoundation.org or call Karen at 604-906-1435.

SPORTS & RECREATION Alpine Club of Canada Whistler Section - Outdoor club focused on ski/split board touring, hiking, mountaineering and skills training. More info: accwhistler.ca Trip Schedule: accwhistler.ca/trips/ Griffin Squadron Squamish Air CadetsOpen to youth 12-18yrs at Don Ross Secondary School on Tues at 6:30pm. Pemberton Valley Trails AssociationMeets the second Wed of each month. 7pm at the Pemberton Recreation Centre. Call 604-698-6158 Sea to Sky RC Flyers - Model Aeronautics Association of Canada Club active in the Sea to Sky Region flying model airplanes, helicopters and multi-rotors. Contact S2SRCFLY@telus.net Whistler Adaptive Sports Program Provides sports & recreation experiences for people with disabilities. Chelsey Walker at 604-905-4493 or info@whistleradaptive. com

SPORTS & RECREATION Whistler Martial Arts offers - Kishindo Karate for kids age 4 and up, Capoeira and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu for kids and adults. Also Kickboxing, Judo, Yoga and Bellyfit for adults. Call Cole 932-2226 Women's Karma Yoga - Thursdays, 9:30-10:30, ongoing by donation and childminding provided. Whistler Women's Centre: 1519 Spring Creek Drive. Drop-in for weekly yoga classes led by an all female team of certified yoga instructors. All women, all ability levels welcome. hswc.ca | 604-962-8711

YOUTH ACTIVITIES 1st Whistler Scout Group - outdoor & adventure program for girls and boys aged 5-17. Times and locations vary. More info: http://1stwhistlerscoutgroup. webs.com. Contact scoutsatwhistler @gmail.com or 604-966-4050. Whistler Children's Chorus Rehearsal Tuesdays at MILLENNIUM PLACE (4 - 5:30 pm) contact whistlerchorus@gmail.com Whistler/Pemberton Girl Guides Adventures for Girls age 5 & up. Sparks & Brownies (Gr K,1,2,3) Guides (Gr 4,5,6) Volunteers always welcome. coastmountaingirlguides@gmail.com Whistler Youth Centre - Drop - in: Fridays 3:30 - 11 PM & Saturdays 6 - 10 PM for ages 13 - 18. Located downstairs in the Maury Young Arts Centre (formerly Millenium Place). We offer: a Ping pong table, Pool table, Skateboard mini ramp w. skateboards and helmets to borrow, Free Wi-Fi, Xbox One, PS3 & PS4, Guitars, Board games, Projector and widescreen TV's. Facebook THEYC Crew, www.whistleryouthcentre. com or call 604-935-8187.


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

BUY

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

RENT

WORK

FIX

DRIVE

SELL

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

LEISURE GROUPS

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Duplicate Bridge Club- Whistler Racquet Club reconvenes in late fall. The club meets every week and visitors are welcome. For partner, please call Gill at 640-932-5791. Knitty Gritty Knit Night- Held every Tues 6-8pm. Free evening open to everyone with a love for knitting/crocheting. Beginners welcome. For location and further details email knittygrittywhistler@gmail.com or find us on facebook. Mountain Spirit Toastmasters- Builds communication, public speaking, and leadership skills . Wednesdays at the Pan Pacific Mountainside - Singing Pass Room, 5:30-7pm. Email contact - 8376@ toastmastersclubs.org www.whistler. toastmastersclubs.org Pemberton Women's Institute - Meets the third Mon of each month in the activity room at St. David's United Church at 7:30pm. New members welcome. Linda Ronayne at 604-894-6580 Rotary Club of Whistler - Meets Tuesdays AM & PM www.whistler-rotary.org

Mountain Biking Instructor Plan, lead, and supervise mountain bike programs, camps, and other recreation activities. A passion for mountain biking, and leading and mentoring others is essential! Other requirements include a PMBI certification, and two years' experience working with and leading recreation programs.

Share your passion!

Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium Meets every Thurs at 12:15pm at Pan Pacific Mountainside. 604-932-7782 Shades of Grey Painters Meets twice a week - Tuesdays, Watercolour, 11.00am-2.30pm @ The Rec, Pemberton. Thursdays, Acrylic, 1.00pm-3.30pm @ The Amenities Building, Pioneer Village, Pemberton. We are like-minded people that get together & paint. Gretchen is the painting coach. $5 to attend. Whistler Reads - Meets to discuss a new book every eight weeks. Go to bookbuffet. com & click on Whistler Reads for the latest book/event. Paula at 604-907-2804 or wr@ bookbuffet.com

COMMUNITY CENTRES Maury Young Arts Centre - Whistler's community centre for arts, culture & inspiration. Performance theatre, art gallery, daycare, youth centre, meditation room, meeting facilities. www.artswhistler.com or 604-935-8410 Pemberton & District Community Centre - Located at 7390 Cottonwood St. Fitness Centre, facility rentals, spray park, playground, children, youth, adult & seniors programs. For more info 604-894-2340 or pemrecinfo@slrd.bc.ca

Please email your resume and cover letter to jobs@squamish.ca

LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 2004 • $241.50 Bi Weekly Staff Housing (Incl bills) • Staff Meals & FREE COFFEE • 15% Grocery Discount At “The Grocery Store” • Local Customer Base • Competitive Wages • Parties, Perks & Positive Vibes

“Great Team & Awesome Staff Housing” - Irelands Finest Export PADDY BRANGAN POP INTO SEE IAN AT DELISH CAFE OR EMAIL ian@whistlergrocery.com

EXCITING CAREER OPPORTUNITIES APPLY TODAY! Diamond Resorts Canada Ltd., Whistler, BC

In-House Marketing Concierge Full Time & Part Time Eligible successful candidates may receive*: • Extensive benefits package which may include; ski pass or wellness allowance, disability coverage, travel insurance and extended health and dental. • Discounted employee rates at any Diamond Resort International resort.

MUSEUMS Squamish Lil'wat Cultural Centre Explore First Nations Art Galleries, and Interactive Exhibits. Gift Shop & Cafe are in our admission free area. Open Tuesday'sSunday's per week. 10am-5p.m.. Whistler Museum & Archives Society Explore interactive exhibits, listen to local stories & discover Whistler's journey. Open daily 11am-5pm, 4333 Main St. www. whistlermuseum.org or 604-932-2019

PROFESSIONAL NETWORKING BNI Mountain High - BNI Mountain High - Meets at 6:45-8:30am every Thursday at Whistler Chamber Boardroom. BNI provides a positive and structured environment for development and exchange of quality business referrals. It does so by helping you build personal relationships with dozens of other qualified business professionals. Register by emailing melissa@betterbrainhealth. info Whistler Chamber of Commerce - Is the leading business association in Whistler that works to create a vibrant & successful economy. Learn more about the programs & services at www.whistlerchamber.com Women of Whistler - Group that provides opportunities for Whistler businesswomen to network, gain knowledge & share ideas in a friendly, relaxed environment. Learn more at www.womenofwhistler.com

• Full-time work year round and a FUN work environment. *eligibility and conditions based on DRCL policies and practices set out in general terms and conditions of employment.

Email your resume with the position you wish to apply for to: embarc_hr@diamondresorts.com

Sundial Boutique Hotel at 4340 Sundial Crescent, Whistler BC V0N 1B4 is currently hiring for a

Housekeeping Supervisor This position is FT year around. Wage is $21.75/hr + benefits. Job duties include: Supervising dept duties, inspection of work, administration, assist with recruiting, perform training and cleaning duties. Skill requirements: 1 year’s prior experience as a housekeeping supervisor”, tourism, administration and customer service. Please fax or email your resume with attention to “Human Resources Department” to:

604-932-7152 hr@sundialhotel.com

DOUG BUSH SURVEY SERVICES LTD. is looking for a

SURVEY FIELD TECHNICIAN With a two or three year college or technical school program in geomatics. Three years experience and proficient in the use of robotic survey instruments and GPS equipment for engineering and building construction layout, topographic site surveys, site improvement surveys and precise monitoring. Experience with AutoCAD Civil 3D also an asset to assist in office with computations and drawing preparation. Please call Ian @ 604-932-3314 or email @ ian@dbss.ca #18-1370 Alpha Lake Rd. Whistler BC V0N 1B1 Serving Squamish, Whistler and Pemberton

JUNE 6, 2019

85


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

COMMUNITY LISTINGS FOR SENIORS Activate & Connect - Come join us Thursday mornings 9:30am to 11:00am at Whistler Community Services for a weekly drop in program for seniors 50+. Everyone welcome, in partnership with Mature Action Community. www.mywcss.org

EXCITING CAREER OPPORTUNITIES APPLY TODAY! Diamond Resorts Canada Ltd., Whistler, BC

Full & Part Time Housekeepers Eligible successful candidates may receive*:

• Retention Bonus Program of up to $1,200 for eligible candidates. • Extensive benefits package which may include; ski pass or wellness allowance, disability coverage, travel insurance and extended health and dental. • Travel Allowance and discounted employee rates at any Diamond Resort International resort. • Full-time work year round and a FUN work environment. *eligibility and conditions based on DRCL policies and practices set out in general terms and conditions of employment.

Email your resume with the position you wish to apply for to: Madiha.Hassan@diamondresorts.com

is now hiring for the following position:

Guest Service Agent Room Attendant* Maintenance Person $300 signing bonus Full-time and Part-time Seasonal incentives available *Short-term accommodation available Please email resume to hr@listelhotel.com Thank you for your interest. Only those applicants being considered for an interview will be contacted.

Mature Action Community (MAC) - Represents seniors in Whistler and welcomes new members. MAC meets for fun and interaction with local seniors and those just visiting on Thursday mornings from 9:30 to 11:00 a.m. at the Whistler Community Services Community Room for Activate and Connect. Come join us for coffee and socializing while engaging in fun activities. Check us out at www.whistlermac. org or view our schedule on Facebook Whistler Mature Action Community Group page. Outreach Services - Free confidential support for adults dealing with the challenges of social wellness. Please call our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. Pemberton Men's Shed - Weekly social meetings WED. 11-2 in the Seniors/youth Rec. bldg. beside library. Social meeting with BYO Bag lunch, card games and pool/ snooker. Help out in YOUR community, operating the Pemberton Tool Library. Senior Citizen Organizations - Is an advocacy group devoted to improving the quality of life for all seniors. Ernie Bayer 604576-9734 or ecbayer2@gmail.com

Financial Systems Analyst - Regular Full Time

Roland’s Pub & Red Door Bistro are looking for experienced line cooks and dishwashers. Full time and part time available, mostly night shifts. Competitive wages, tips, staff meal, staff discounts, and many other perks. Full time staff eligible for Extended Medical & Dental benefits after 3 months. Come join the coolest group of locals at the coolest local establishment. Apply in person to 2129 Lake Placid Road, or email resume to info@rolandswhistler.com

The Pinnacle Hotel Whistler has the following positions available:

HOUSEMAN HOUSEKEEPING SUPERVISOR ROOM ATTENDANTS Please reply by email: parmstrong@pinnaclehotels.ca

86 JUNE 6, 2019

Under the supervision of the Chief Financial Officer, the Financial Systems Analyst will act as Project Lead for the successful implementation of the District's new enterprise-wide software systems. The ideal candidate is a CPA, and has extensive experience with financial and ERP based software. Please visit our website to find out more information about this exciting opportunity.

squamish.ca/careers

SEEKING STRONG, ACTIVE, RELIABLE AND NATURE-LOVING F/T & P/T LANDSCAPERS FOR OUR 21st SEASON! WORK OUTSIDE THIS SUMMER: • STARTING WAGE OF $18.00/HOUR • PERFORMANCE & END OF SEASON BONUSES • POSITIVE, ENCOURAGING TEAM & LEADERS • ALL TRAINING PROVIDED • SEASON RUNS UNTIL MID-NOVEMBER 2019

APPLY NOW: Send your resume and availability to carolyn@mountainberrylandscaping.ca

ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY Earthsave Whistler - Providing info & support to people who are interested in making healthier, greener, more peaceful food choices. earthsavewhistler.com Healthy Home, Healthy Planet - Expert in green cleaning offers tricks, info & advice on the best way to green clean your home or work space! Call France 604-698-7479. Free private presentation on request. www. healthylivingwhistler.com Re-Build-It Centre - Daily 10:00am to 5:00pm. Accepting donations of furniture, quality used building supplies & new items. Deliveries and pickups available for $35. Call 604.932.1125, www.mywcss.org, rebuildit@ mywss.org Regional Recycling - Recycle beverage containers (full deposit paid) electronics, appliances, batteries, Lightbulbs, drop-off times are 9am-5pm on Nesters Rd. Pick up service 604-932-3733 Re-Use-It - Daily 11:00am to 6:00pm, Donate all household goods in good shape. Accepting bottles & cans, old electronics, anything with a cord, and light fixtures for recycling. All proceeds to WCSS. Call 604.932.1121, www.mywcss.org, reuseit@ mywcss.org. The Association of Whistler Area Residents for the Environment (AWARE) Whistler's Natural Voice since 1989. Regular events, project and volunteer opportunities. www.awarewhistler.org info@awarewhistler.org The Mountain Village Social Gathering Join us at one of our regular social gatherings on the last Wednesday of every month. There is a group of us at The Mountain Village who are forming a sustainable, multi generational neighbourhood based on the co housing model. WHAT IF... Housing wasn't just a place to live, but rather, a way of life? To find out more, visit our Facebook page @themountainvillage or go to our website www.themountainvillage.ca


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

BUY

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

WORK

FIX

DRIVE

SELL

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

FAMILY RESOURCES

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

Baby/Child Health Clinics - Free routine immunizations & newly licensed vaccines for purchase, growth & development assessments & plenty of age appropriate resources avail. By appointment 604-9323202

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Become part of a dynamic team and experience the art of British Columbia.

Camp Fund - Provides financial assis-tance to enable children of financially restricted families to attend camp. Call WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. www.mywcss.org

SHARE WHAT MOVES YOU.

The Audain Art Museum is currently seeking:

Families Fighting Cancer In The Sea To Sky - We are a non profit partner with Sea to Sky Community Services. We provide financial and practical support to children and parents with dependants diagnosed with cancer. Please contact us on our confidential email: ffcseatosky@gmail.com, visit our Facebook Page or website www. familiesfightingcancer.ca

Sales & Marketing Coordinator Full time position available

KidsArt - Provides financial assistance to enable children of financially restricted families to participate in arts and culture education. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. www. mywcss.org.

Guard Full time & part time positions available

Kids on the Move - Provides financial assistance to enable children of financially restricted families to participate in sport programs. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. www. mywcss.org. Outreach Services - Free confidential support for adults and families experiencing challenges with mental health, food insecurity, housing insecurity, substance use, misuse or addiction, employment, eating disorders, violence in relationships, roommate conflict or homesickness. Contact our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker or visit www. mywcss.org.

RENT

SUPERVISOR, VISITOR CENTRE Full Time, Year Round

The Visitor Centre Supervisor oversees the daily operations of the Visitor Centre. With a strong customer focus, the main goal of the Supervisor is to ensure the Visitor Centre team is effective in providing information services to resort visitors, as well as the local community. The supervisor also cultivates strong relationships with Tourism Whistler members. This position requires an individual who has an extensive knowledge of Whistler and previous leadership experience in a similar role. The ideal candidate is a great communicator, has the ability to build long term relationships with diverse stakeholders and has a passion and focus on achieving results.

TOURISM WHISTLER IS ALSO RECRUITING FOR:

For a full job description please visit audainartmuseum.com/ employment-opportunities

• • • •

Executive Assistant Maintenance Technician / Cleaner Travel Consultant Visitor Centre Agent

For a complete job description and to apply, visit us online at whistler.com/careers.

credit: Joern Rohde

Pemberton Parent Infant Drop-In Facilitated by Capri Mohammed, Public Health Nurse. Every Mon 11am-12:30pm at Pemberton Public Library. Pemberton Strong Start Family Drop-InA play group for you and your under-5 child. Signal Hill Elementary, Mon, Tues, Wed & Fri, 9am-12pm. Thurs only 12pm-3pm. Call 604894-6101 / 604-966- 8857 Whistler Public Library - Open Mon-Thurs 10am-7pm, Fri 10am-6pm, Sat & Sun 11am5pm. Music & Words, Mon 10am. Rhyme & Song, Tues 10:30am. Parent & Infant dropin, Thurs 11am. Preschool Story Time, Fri 10:30am. Singing with the babies, Sat 11am. Call 604-935-8433

SOCIAL SERVICES Access to Justice - Need legal advice but are financially restricted? Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to find out more or visit www. mywcss.org. Counselling Assistance Available - WCSS subsidizes access to a private counselor for $35-$50/hr depending on financial need. Contact an outreach team member at 604932-0113 www.mywcss.org Counselling Assistance - WCSS subsidizes access to a private counsellor depending on financial need. Contact an outreach worker at 604.932.0113 or visit www.mywcss.org. ESL Volunteer Tutor Program - Volunteer one-to-one tutoring for new immigrants & Canadian citizens. For more information or to register, contact the Whistler Welcome Centre info@welcomewhistler.com or call 604.698.5960 Food Bank, Pemberton - Run by Sea to Sky Community Service. Open every second Monday. 604 894 6101 Food Bank Whistler - Located at 8000 Nesters Road, every Monday from 10am to noon. For emergency food bags, please call 604.935.7717 for as-sistance. www.mywcss. org, food-bank@mywcss.org Healthy Pregnancy Outreach ProgramLearn how to prepare healthy affordable meals at this outreach program. Sea to Sky Community Services 604-894-6101

We are looking for full & part-time sales people

What we want:

NOW HIRING!

Opportunity for Full-Time and Part-Time employment in All DEPARTMENTS. Our Team enjoys: ü Air conditioning ü Awesome colleagues ü Flexible schedules ü Training and experience ü Employee perks and benefits ü Prime location in Pemberton ü Short commute = less time, more $$$

Apply within, visit our website or email us today! www.pembertonsupermarket.com jobs@pembertonsupermarket.com

www.whistlerwag.com

Looking for a dog to adopt? Look for WAG’s bright orange bandanas on dogs being walked by volunteers! These dogs are looking for their forever home. 604.935.8364 | www.whistlerwag.com

Outgoing, self-motivated, mature and responsible individuals who love to sell and help to create a positive store environment.

What you get: $15/hour & team-orientated sales bonus as well as a winter 2019/20 ski pass for full-time employees. *possible management advancement* Apply in person at Ruby Tuesday located in the Town Plaza

604-905-6290

THE

RAVEN ROOM Whistler's newest restaurant and cocktail bar Join our kitchen team lead by the talented Chef Erin Stone. Open Part Time Posi�ons:

Experienced Line Cooks Breakfast and Evening Dishwashers Please email erin@theravenroom.ca to apply JUNE 6, 2019

87


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

SOCIAL SERVICES Meadow Park Rec Credit - If you are financially restricted, you may be eligible for a $131.20 municipal recreation credit. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak with an outreach worker. www.mywcss.org. North Shore Schizophrenia Society Services for family, friends & community. Mental illness info, support & advocacy. Call Chris Dickenson at 604-966-7334

Banquet Captain PM Server Assistant In Room Dining Server Steward Front Desk Agent Spa Supervisor Seeking Room Attendants and Dishwashers

***$500 Signing Bonus Offered***

The Four Seasons team is looking for these roles to start immediately. $500 signing bonus available for all hires

Our Benefits Include: Health Benefits | Colleague Housing | Leisure Package

APPLY TODAY AT FAIRMONTCAREERS.COM

Pearl's Safe Home - Temporary shelter for women & children experiencing abuse in relationships. Locations in Whistler & Pemberton avail 24/7. All services are free. 1-877-890-5711 or 604-892-5711 RMOW Rec Credit - If you are financially restricted, you may be eligible for a $127.60 municipal recreation credit. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 www.mywcss.org Support Counselling - For women regarding abuse & relationship issues. No charge. Call 604-894-6101

Staff Meals | Hotel Stay Discounts Great Events & Recognition | Opportunity for growth

Outreach Services - Free, confidential support for youth experiencing challenges with mental health, food insecurity, housing insecurity, substance use, misuse or addiction, employment, eating disorders, violence in relationships, roommate conflict or homesickness. Contact our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker or visit www.mywcss.org.

Details: Please apply online via jobs.fourseasons.com For possible same day offers, please come to our drop-in hours every Tuesday between 1pm-4pm. Please bring your resume and two references in order to be considered!

WORK. LIFE. BALANCE.

Victim Services - Assists victims, witnesses, family members or friends directly affected by any criminal act or traumatic event. Call 604-905-1969 Whistler Community Services Society Outreach Services Now Available Monday to Saturday at our new location - 8000 Nesters Road (next to WAG) 604.932.0113 www. mywcss.org Whistler for the Disabled - Provides info for people with disabilities on what to do & where to go. Visit www. whistlerforthedisabled.com Whistler Housing Authority - Long term rental & ownership housing for Whistler residents. Visit www.whistlerhousing.ca

MAINTENANCE TECH / CLEANER FULL TIME, YEAR ROUND

Benefits Package . Wellness Bonus . Great Team . Flexible Hours Working within the Building Operations team, the Maintenance Technician / Cleaner is responsible for the daily cleaning, beautification, security and minor repair of the Whistler Conference Centre, Tourism Whistler offices, and the Whistler Golf Club buildings. The ideal candidate is a professional, mature, self-motivated individual who thrives in a customer oriented, hands-on, team environment. To view our current career opportunities and to apply, please visit: whistler.com/careers TOURISM WHISTLER IS ALSO RECRUITING FOR: • • • •

Executive Assistant Travel Consultant Visitor Centre Supervisor Visitor Centre Agent

For a complete job description and to apply, visit us online at whistler.com/careers.

SUMMER EDITION OUt NOW! 88 JUNE 6, 2019

We’re Hiring! JOIN #TEAMNITA

• Banquet Sous Chef • Chef de Partie • Breakfast Cooks • Stewards • Engineering Associate • Bell Attendant • R.M.T. • Guest Service Agent We offer a fun and professional environment with competitive wages, great perks, benefits & seasonal bonus. To apply email: careers@nitalakelodge.com

contact us today

careers@nitalakelodge.com www.nitalakelodge.com I @nitalakelodge

Whistler Mental Health & Addiction Services - If you or someone you know needs help with a mental health issue or substance misuse or addiction problem, we can assist. Mon-Fri 830am-430pm. 604-6986455 Whistler Multicultural Network Settlement information, social support and programs for newcomers and immigrants living/working in Whistler. 604-388-5511 www.whistlermulticulturalnetwork.com Whistler Opt Healthy Sexuality Clinic - Professional sexual health services at a reduced cost. Free HIV testing. Clinics at Whistler Health Care Ctr, 2nd floor on Tues 4:30-7:30pm. Winter hours Thurs. 5:00pm7:00pm. Confidentiality assured. Whistler Women's Centre - Provides confidential support, resources, referrals and advocacy for women living in the Sea to Sky corridor. All services are free of charge and include access to emergency safe housing, child/youth counselling, play space and computer access. Drop-In Centre open Mon 12-230, Tue-Thu 12-5. 1519 Spring Creek Drive. You can also access our services at the Whistler Public Library on Mondays from 3-6 p.m. www.hswc.ca or call (604)962-8711. 24 HR Crisis Line: 1-877-890-5711 Whistler WorkBC Employment Services Centre - Provides free one-stop employment services to job seekers and employers. Drop in services at the Pemberton Library Thursdays 1-5 PM, and at the Whistler Public Library on Mondays from 3-6 PM. For more information visit www.WhistlerESC.com or call us at 604-932-1600


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

BUY

COMMUNITY LISTINGS SUPPORT GROUPS

RENT

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

Immigrant Peer Educators - Immigrants providing support and information for those who may be experiencing challenges adjusting to a new culture. 604-388-5511 info@whistlermulticulturalnetwork.com Pregnancy and Infant Loss - Facilitated by a registered counsellor, this program is designed for couples and individuals who have experienced loss of a child, either before or after birth. Please call WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak to an outreach worker for more information or visit www. mywcss.org. SMART Recovery Whistler (SelfManagement and Recovery Training) A Cognitive-Behavioural group for individuals with substance abuse con-cerns. Drop-in: Registration is not necessary. Wednesdays 5:30-7:00pm Whistler Health Centre (2nd floor-group room)

DRIVE

SELL

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Come Grow Sport with us at our Whistler Olympic Legacy Venues

We are the Spa for you If you are looking for a new place to call home: • We manifest positive energy • We have a long term and loyal team • We treat you fairly and look out for your wellness • You are listened to • We give you proper breaks and time to set up between services • We offer extended medical benefits • We have potential staff housing at affordable rates • You can enjoy $5.00 cafeteria meals • You have the opportunity to work for other Vida locations in slow season We are here for you. Vida Spa at the Fairmont Chateau Whistler is currently recruiting: REGISTERED MASSAGE THERAPIST ESTHETICIAN GUEST SERVICE AGENT

We offer competitive wages, a unique environment, seasonal bonuses, staff discounts and benefits. Ask about accommodation.

Epilepsy Support Group- For individuals & families seeking guidance or support. Contact eswhistler@gmail.com

FIX

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Birth, Baby and Beyond - Join a registered counsellor and meet other moms with the opportunity to ask questions and share experiences in a safe, welcoming and nonjudgmental setting. Call 604.932.0113 for more information or visit www.mywcss.org. Concussion Support Group - WCSS is offering a recurring 8 week program to support people living with persistent postconcussion symptoms. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak with an outreach worker about upcoming sessions or visit www.mywcss.org.

WORK

Whistler Athletes’ Centre (High Performance Training and Accommodation) Lead, Lodge Attendant Kitchen Porter / Lodge Attendant Lodge Attendant Guest Service Agent

Whistler Sliding Centre (Bobsleigh, Luge & Skeleton) Summer Operations Trainee (Canada Summer Jobs) Track Medical Responder/Guest Service Host, Summer Control & Timing Operator/Guest Service Host, Summer Pilot/Guest Service Host, Summer Guest Service Host, Summer

Whistler Olympic Park (Nordic Skiing, Snowshoeing and Outdoor Activities) Summer Operations Trainee (Canada Summer Jobs) Biathlon Tour Guide, Summer Guest Activity Rep, Summer

To join our unique Vida family, email Bonnie@vidaspas.com Vida Spas - Vancouver & Whistler Live well. Live long. vidaspas.com Thank You for applying Only those considered will be contacted.

Visit our website to view current postings and to apply: www.whistlersportlegacies.com/careers

RELIGION Jesus Rock Of Ages Ministry- A bible based church that holds services at Millennium Place's main floor theatre at 4:30pm. www. jesusrockofages.com Roman Catholic Church- Come celebrate mass at Our Lady of the Mountains, Whistler on Saturday 5pm, Sunday 9am, Tuesday 5:45pm, Wednesday 7pm, Thursday/Friday 5:45pm. St. Francis of Assisi, Pemberton on Sunday 12:30pm and Friday 9am. St. Christopher's, Mt. Currie on Sunday 11am. 604-905-4781

Sea to Sky Healing Room - For Blessing/Prayer/Encouragement In the Community Church building, 7422 Dogwood Street, Pemberton. Every 1st and 3rd Wednesday: 4-6 PM Whistler Church- Join us for worship and fellowship around Jesus. Sunday 10 am at Myrtle Philip Community School, 6195 Lorimer Rd. Nursery, Sunday School to gr. 6, Youth gr. 7 and up. Call Pastor Jon 604-7983861 / Kelvin 204-249-0700 or www.whistlerchurch.ca

Diverse construction company with

residential/commercial projects

INSTALLER/SERVICE TECHNICIAN

we are currently hiring

Great opportunity for a super motivated/organized person to excel in the field of hardware installation and lock technician services.

across the sea to sky corriDor

Site Supervisors Carpenters Labourers We offer; employee benefits and full time employment year round. To apply: call 604.935.2683 or email dcoTe@coasTconsTrucTion.ca

The successful individual will have experience in carpentry and/or building maintenance. Any experience in low voltage electrical and/or hotel card access systems will prove very beneficial. Good communication and customer service skills as well as a strong work ethic are essential to this position. Please reply to alpinelock@telus.net with a resume and cover letter outlining your suitability and qualifications for the position. No drop-ins or phone calls please, apply only by email.

FUR & FEATHERS Get Bear Smart Society - Learn more about coexisting with bears. To report a conflict, garbage or attractant issue call 604-905BEAR (2327) www.bearsmart.com Pemberton Wildlife Association Advocates for the conservation of fish, wildlife & wilderness recreation. Also offering target shooting & archery facilities. www.pembertonwildlifeassociation.com WAG - Whistler Animals Galore - A shelter for lost, unwanted, and homeless cats and dogs. Let us help you find your purrfect match...adopt a shelter animal! For more info 604-935-8364 www.whistlerwag.com

We are currently hiring an Assistant Manager Full Time and Part Time Sales Representatives We have staff accommodation available for full time, starting in May Please stop by our Whistler Village location with your resume to fill out an application and say Hi to Michelle or Tina. (4154 Village Green)

WEST ELECTRIC IS HIRING:

Service Electrician and Apprentices email resumes to: office@westelectric.ca JUNE 6, 2019

89


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

Let us take care of you! • • • •

Staff housing available Competitive wages Full time hours year around Free staff parking in Whistler Village

6 REASONS L: TO WORK AT SUNDIA Place to sleep + $ for activities es + more $ for activiti + convenience + security + Free Ski Pass

Come be our: • • • • •

G Guestt S Services i R Representative t ti Night Audit Representative Maintenance Representative Room Attendant Houseperson

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Whistler in e f li d o o g A =

Please fax or email your resume with attention to “Human Resources Department” to:

604-932-7152 hr@sundialhotel.com We thank you for your interest. Only candidates chosen for further consideration will be contacted.

We are seeking flexible, hardworking and hard playing

FRONT DESK AGENT FULL-TIME BELLMEN HOUSEKEEPERS/HOUSEMAN

Basalt Wine + Salumeria are currently looking to fill the roles of:

PART-TIME AND FULL-TIME HOURS AVAILABLE

PART-TIME NIGHT AUDIT Please apply if you can bring your smile and positive energy to our team and our guests!

Your next big adventure starts here.

BARTENDER Please send your cover letter and resume to skeenan-naf@crystal-lodge.com

Thank you for your interest. Only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted

DO YOU LIVE IN PEMBERTON? THEN WHY COMMUTE TO WHISTLER?

DISHWASHERS HOSTS/ EXPEDITORS

Please email your resume to: roberto@aavawhistlerhotel.com

Employment Opportunities:

LINE COOKS

Guest Services Agents Room Attendants Maintenance Helper

Wages are very competitive (based on experience), great perks and benefits. Full and Part Time positions available. Come join the best team in Whistler!

The Adara Hotel, Whistler We now have the following positions available:

Apply to: jobs@pembertonvalleylodge.com

Competitive wages, health benefits, casual environment

RESERVATION SUPERVISOR FRONT DESK SUPERVISOR HOUSEKEEPERS We offer better than competitive wages, benefits, spirit or epic ski pass and more. The Adara Hotel is a small boutique hotel nestled in the heart of Whistler close to all amenities and services. We take care of our staff and experience is an asset not a requirement.

90 JUNE 6, 2019


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

BUY

RENT

WORK

FIX

DRIVE

SELL

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

WHISTLER BLACKCOMB Crepe Montagne, French restaurant in Whistler since 1997, is looking for:

We’re currently hiring a

Crepes Maker (Cook)

BRAND CONTENT SPECIALIST

Prep Cook / Dishwasher

This role will be part of building the resort’s brand and be involved in the content strategy and creative aspects of making it come to life, while ensuring the brand’s voice, guidelines and all aspects of the brand ladder back up to clearly defined guidelines. We’re looking for someone with the following skills/experience:

Competitive wage based on experience + great tips + flexible schedule to enjoy Whistler! Visit us from 10am to 2pm or email us your resume at alicia@crepemontagne.com.

for our Marketing division:

Experience leading a multi-channel content strategy Familiarity with social medial platforms and channels Ability to ski/snowboard Please visit whistlerblackcomb.com/jobs to find out more and apply!

/

/

/

/

Are you an Entrepreneur? Do you think like one? If so, we want to talk to you. Start Date: June 15, 2019 - Full time $16/hour + marketing/sales incentives Walk to work - housing available in Creekside for 2019/2020 winter season 50% Winter Spirit Pass Looking for a person to launch Confetti & take our concept to the next level. Confetti is all about the ultimate toppings. Think over the top gelato, milkshakes, smoothie bowls & chia puddings. Participate in the development of our menu, experiment in creating new and exciting products, prepare the store for opening, further develop our social media presence & engage with our community.

IS SEEKING A LEADER TO JOIN OUR TEAM:

Banquet Manager For a complete job description please visit SLCC.ca/Careers. We thank you for your interest; however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

• Deliver excellent service in store and ensure high levels of customer satisfaction • Develop & meet daily sales targets • Maintain outstanding store cleanliness and visual merchandising standards • Update and develop social media strategy (Instagram & Website) • Develop new menu items (rotating based on season) & liaise with suppliers • Monitor inventory & place re-orders with suppliers • Train & manage part time staff • Plan & execute events in Creekside (following local events & holidays • Work with other businesses in Creekside to cross promote and increase foot traffic in Franz’s Trail. Please email your CV to info@confettigelato.com Instagram: @confettigelato

JUNE 6, 2019

91


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS Whistler Summer Job for July Grade 10 girl looking for work; Has housing; Responsible, friendly and hardworking. 604-722-4023 nlhunter@shaw.ca

Our outstanding team is looking to add individuals with a variety of skill sets and experience. Friendly, hard working candidates are invited to apply.

Housekeepers Needed

-Signing Bonus & Great Benefits!-

CURRENT OPPORTUNITIES

The Four Seasons Housekeeping team is looking for Guestroom

FRONT-OF-HOUSE

Attendants for contracts starting immediately or for summer hire!

Experienced Server (Araxi) Cocktail Bartender (Bar Oso) Server Assistant Expeditor

Candidates will receive a $500 signing bonus. Benefits include Guaranteed housing, one meal per working shift, health & medical after 90 days, a winter leisure package, and more!

BACK-OF-HOUSE Pastry Cooks Line Cooks (1-2 years experience) Dishwashers

Staff Housing Available! Competitive Wage + Benefits Package We’re Hiring

DISHWASHERS On-the-job training offered APPLY TODAY!

Assistant Restaurant Manager Seeking a full-time Assistant Manager to help oversee day-to-day operations and uphold Araxi Restaurant’s exceptional levels of hospitality. • Previous restaurant leadership experience is required • WSET Level 2 or equivalent is an asset

Lazy Bear Lodge Ltd. Front Desk, Server and Housekeeping Staff Required "Lazy Bear Lodge Ltd. in Churchill, Manitoba requires front desk, server and housekeeping staff. Email resume to louise@lazybearexpeditions.com or fax 1-204-353-2944. www.lazybearexpeditions.com

Details: Please apply online via jobs.fourseasons.com For possible same day offers, please come to our drop-in hours every Tuesday between 1pm-4pm. Please bring your resume and two references in order to be considered!

Whistler Integrative Wellness Centre is

HIRING!!

Admin / Clinic Assistant (PT) MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES

All Positions The Pony restaurant is currently seeking applicants for the following positions: Line cook: day and night shifts available. Must have 3+ years experience, competitive wages and bi-weekly tip out. Dishwasher: Evening shifts, entry level position.Wages + bi-weekly tip out. Bartender: Experience necessary, part time position. Server: must have experience in similar fast paced role. Please email or drop off your resume to The Pony events@thepony.ca

Duties include: Front desk operations i.e. patient coordinator, patient booking, patient billing. accounts receivable, daily cash reconciliation, equipment set up, treatment room prep, third party insurance, submission

Pemberton Museum Currently Seeking Summer Students Collections Coordinator (10 weeks) starting June 17th ($15/hr/FT) Museum Guide (9 weeks) starting June 24th ($15/hr/FT) For full job descriptions see the website. This is a Young Canada Works position and applicants must be Canadian citizens, 16-30 years of age, and returning to school in the fall. 604-894-5504 info@pembertonmuseum.org www.pembertonmuseum.org

Whistler Personnel Solutions CAREERS and TEMP WORK 604-905-4194 whistler-jobs.com

Qualifications/Experience preferred in the following: Clinic reception, Customer service, Medical terminology, Proficient Computer skills, EMR training, Experience with Jane Booking & Billing system, Microsoft Word, Excel, Knowledge of nutritional supplements, vitamins etc.

Excellent training and growth opportunities available within an award-winning restaurant group.

Successful candidate will: Have an engaging personality, Work independently, Be kind, courteous and respectful, Willing to learn new tasks, Reliable

Please email your resume & cover letter to careers@araxi.com or present in person at Araxi between 3-5 pm daily.

Please email your Resume with Cover Letter to:

info@whistlerintegrative.com

We offer year-round full and part-time hours, gratuities, potential for future growth within the company, and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants.

Resort Municipality of Whistler

SOLID CONTRACTING

Employment Opportunities

is currently looking for

LABOURERS, CARPENTERS, FINISH CARPENTERS

· Utilities Labourer I · Leadhand Parking Enforcement Officer · Labourer I – Irrigation · Skate Host · Human Resources Coordinator - Benefits

We offer full-time/flex-time positons in a positive, safe work environment. Salary based on experience. Send us your resume or call Solidcontracting@gmail.com 604-966-7062

92 JUNE 6, 2019

solid-homes.com

Resort Municipality of Whistler whistler.ca/careers

OUT NOW!

Whistler’s only dedicated wedding magazine. WHISTLERWEDDINGMAGAZINE.COM


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

RENT

WORK

FIX

DRIVE

SELL

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

2

6 9 1 9

7

BUY

7 5 3

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

3 & MOUNTAIN SIDE 9 HOTEL 8POSITIONS 1 AVAILABLE: 7 2 FULL TIME/ PART TIME 1 8 HOUSEKEEPING 5ASSOCIATE PART TIME FRONT 3DESK/ NIGHT AUDIT 4 7 $17.50 an hour* 2 ts** Benefi 1!Housing Available! 8

Do you want to share in something special? If challenge & fun at work is what you desire, come see us today!

Servers Cooks Hosts Expeditors Barbacks Setters Shift Managers

# 26

Submit resumes to: gm.whistler@executivehotels.net *$18 upon completion of probationary period ** upon completion of probationary period

Visit us anytime or email us at apply.whistler@earls.ca

5 1 4 2 8 3 8 5 6 7 9 4 2 9 1 5 1 3 4 7 3 Pick up our 4 9 2

Summer 2019 # 28 issue now

Find it on select stands and in Whistler hotel rooms

Nagomi Sushi in Whistler is hiring experienced:

Kitchen Helpers Servers Hosts in Whistler

# 28

7 5 1 4 9 6 8 2 3

Answers 2 6 9 5 3 8 7 4 1

8 3 4 2 1 7 9 5 6

6 7 3 1 5 9 2 8 4

5 4 8 3 6 2 1 7 9

1 9 2 7 8 4 3 6 5

3 2 5 8 4 1 6 9 7

9 1 7 6 2 5 4 3 8

4 8 6 9 7 3 5 1 2

4/11/2005

Full time and Part time available Available to start immediately Benefits: 2 weeks vacation per year, potential staff accommodation and Spirit Pass Program. Address: 108-4557 Blackcomb Way, Whistler, BC, V0N 1B4 Apply by email at nagomisushi@outlook.com

Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub is hiring:

LINE COOK DISHWASHER Work at Whistler’s best location! Refine or jump-start your culinary career in our fast-paced and busy kitchen. We offer competitive wages, tips and a season ski pass. Please stop by the pub between 10am and 5pm with a copy of your resume. You can also submit your resume via email to careers@dubhlinngate.com

JUNE 6, 2019

93


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

NOW HIRING:

MECHANIC NOW HIRING:

Here’s to the Journey At Westin, we recruit the brightest, most energetic people in pursuit of developing an exciting and rewarding career. Marriott International has 30 renowned hotel brands in over 122 countries around the world, and we’re still growing. Opportunities abound! STEWARD BUSSER BANQUET SERVER IN ROOM DINING SERVER ROOM ATTENDANT BELL ATTENDANT

MAINTENANCE ENGINEER OVERNIGHT SECURITY AGENT FOOD RECEIVER/ COORDINATOR ROOMS CONTROLLER HOUSEKEEPING COORDINATOR IT TECHNICIAN

PERKS AND BENEFITS • MSP COVERAGE • DISCOUNTED MEALS • FLEXIBLE SCHEDULES

• STAFF ACCOMMODATION • MARRIOTT “EXPLORE” PROGRAM ASSOCIATE HOTEL DISCOUNTS

Email your resume to work@westinwhistler.com or visit Monday to Friday, 9am - 5pm

ATV & BUGGY GUIDES CANOE GUIDES • Proven record of quality and efficient workmanship JEEP GUIDES • Ability to work as part of a high performance team GUIDES • Positive attitudeE-BIKE with a drive to succeed • Extensive automotive /or power sports experience (ticket an asset) SHUTTLE DRIVERS SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATES WILL POSSESS

•We Strong of technical/mechanical repairs offeraptitude a fun, outdoor work environment with a great team of like-minded individuals. An always changing, always challenging •work Validday driver’s license with the opportunity to connect with people from all over the world. Flexible schedules and amazing staff parties are definite perks of the job. PERKS INCLUDE: FLEXIBLE SCHEDULE – FRIENDS & FAMILY DISCOUNTS – EPIC STAFF PARTIES - FREE ACTIVITIES FOR STAFF Full job descriptions at: www.canadianwilderness.com/employment/

If you are interested in joining our team, please submit your resume to employment@canadian01.com

Be a part of our dynamic team at one of Whistler’s busiest spots!

Delta by Marriott Whistler Village Suites Is currently recruiting for the following positions:

- Front Desk Manager

- Housekeeping Room Attendant - Strata External Maintenance - Bellperson 3 days/week - Houseperson / Public Area Attendant - Guest Service Agent

STAFF HOUSING IS AVAILABLE! Start your journey today with: competitive wages, growth opportunities, a positive team environment, medical benefits, play money (ski pass, etc), 100% provincial health care coverage. To Apply: either submit an application online at Marriott.com/careers or send your resume to barbara.fraser@deltahotels.com

SUMMER EDITION OUt NOW! 94 JUNE 6, 2019

At The High Mountain Brewing Company, Whistler Brewhouse, we take pride in our product and service - From the busy patio to the cozy two-sided fireplace, from our exceptional pizzas to our hand-crafted beer. We are currently looking for

Front of House Manager Dishwasher Line Cook We offer comprehensive benefits packages after a probationary period, as well as competitive wages. Please come by with your resume or apply via email to adam@mjg.ca

4355 BLACKCOMB WAY WHISTLER, BC, V0N 1B4


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

BUY

RENT

WORK

FIX

DRIVE

SELL

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

The Blackcomb Lodge join our team

Now Hiring for the Following Positions: HOUSEKEEPERS **$500 Signing Bonus** plus: • Competitive Wages • Wellness Allowance • Associate Housing • Discounted Food • Extended Medical Benefits • Complimentary Associate Stays • Flexible Schedule • Spa Discounts

Discover new opportunities and embark on a career in Hospitality with Pan Pacific Whistler To apply, please submit your cover letter and resume to careers.ppwhi@panpacific.com

Starting wage at $17/hour, and a variety of benefits, including employee discounts, training and development, career advancement opportunities and more!

questions? let’s chat 604.932.4155 hr@coasthotels.com

Front Office Manager

Front Desk Agent

apply online now coastcareers.ca

Room Attendant

Maintenance Ambassador

Night Auditor

Full-time, part-time, flexible work schedules

SQUAMISH NATION is looking for a

Concurrent Wellness Specialist Permanent Full-Time position *This position will work 4 days/ week in Squamish Valley and 1 day/week in North Vancouver* Location: Squamish, BC View Full Posting on our website: http://www.squamish.net/jobs/

All applications must be completed using online application. JUNE 6, 2019

95


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Teppan Village is hiring

JAPANESE TEPPANYAKI CHEFS in Whistler. JOB DUTIES • Prepare and cook Teppanyaki and other Japanese food including Sushi. • Ensure food meets quality standards. • Estimate food requirements and cooking time. • Instruct Kitchen Helpers and Cooks in preparation, cooking, and presentation of food.

is currently looking for

We offer world-class benefits

Culinary Talent

• Life & Leisure Program

Our kitchen team are culinary wizards! Delighting our guests’ senses is a joy this team lives for. Come develop in our kitchen as a part of our team.

your wages

• Assist Head Chef and supervise cooks and kitchen helpers. • Inspecting ingredients for quality and freshness and supervising all food preparation. • Create new menu, recipes and specials. • Ensure to provide excellent live cooking presentation and customer services at the Teppanyaki bar.

• Health Benefits

• Work as a team and ensure orders are completed in timely manner.

• Gym and Pool Access

• Ensure Teppan cooking presentations are performed in most safe environment.

• Parking • Free Meals • Free Yoga

QUALIFICATIONS • Completion of secondary school and 3 years or more experience as a cook/chef. • Experience as a Teppanyaki Cook/Chef an asset. • Good understanding of Japanese food and Teppanyaki food.

• • Year• AMAZING Team Member Travel Program including Friends & Family Benefits

And More!

All season, Permanent Full-time, 30 hours per week $24 per hour Benefits: 2 weeks vacation (10 working days) Start Date: As soon as possible. Language of work is English Address: 301-4293 Mountain Square, Whistler, BC, V0N 1B4 Apply by email at teppanvillage@shaw.ca

VILLAGE OF LIONS BAY

CAREER OPPORTUNITY - EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT

The Village of Lions Bay is a small, compact community located on the scenic coast of Howe Sound, ten minutes north of West Vancouver and twenty minutes south of Squamish. We are looking for someone with drive and determination to help grow and contribute to our dedicated team. This is an exciting, full-time administrative opportunity for a person with solid municipal experience who wishes to advance his or her career in municipal government. Reporting to the Chief Administrative Officer, the Executive Assistant will manage the Village Office in all aspects of work flow, scheduling, deadline control, records management, handling and preparation of reports and correspondence, agenda control, policy development and analysis, and act as the recorder for Council meetings. This position functions as a senior assistant to the CAO and as a resource to the Management Team and Council. For a detailed job description, please see: https://www.lionsbay.ca/government/employment-contract-opportunities by June 14, 2019. 96 JUNE 6, 2019

Whistler Brewing Company is hiring…

Cook Full-time & part-time positions available $15/hr + Beer perks

Part-time delivery driver Minimum 2 days a week, possibly more Must be over 25 years of age with a clean drivers abstract Must be able to lift 150lbs $16/hr + beer perks Come see us with your resume!


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

BUY

RENT

WORK

FIX

DRIVE

SELL

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

STPS POLICE CONSTABLE We provide our people with a caring and fun work environment and cater to lifestyles of adventure seekers. We are centrally located in the heart of Whistler Village and provide our employees with the opportunity to work flexible hours based on their adventure or family requirements.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY The Stl’atl’imx Tribal Police Service is seeking an individual who will be respectful of the St’at’imc Heritage, culture and traditions and who will be dedicated to work in partnership with the communities to ensure safety and security for all people according to the Stl’atl’imx Tribal Police Service Agreement. **If the successful candidate has not previously attended or completed an accredited Police Training, training to the successful applicant will be provided by attending the Justice Institute of British Columbia, upon completion of the hiring process** Basic Requirements for Applicants: • 19 Years of age or older • Canadian Citizen, Permanent Resident or First Nation by birth or naturalization • Grade 12 or equivalent • Post-Secondary Education Preferred but not required • Valid Standard First Aid Certificate with CPR Level C & AED for BC. • Current Class 5 BC Drivers License • Physically Fit and able to pass the POP AT (Police Officers Physical Abilities Test) & a medical examination • Eye exam conducted within past 6 months/ Normal Color vision. Visual Standards as recommended by the Canadian Ophthalmological Society for police officers. • Excellent Character • Hearing loss in one ear not greater than 50 dB & other ear not greater than 30dB in the 500-3000 Hz range. • Must not have a Criminal Record, or Charges under another federal statue, or Criminal Charges Pending. • Basic Computer, Keyboarding skills • Cultural Awareness of the St’at’imc People and and First Nation Communities. • Work/Volunteer work experience with a recognized Police Agency Applicants must complete the STPS application package with a Cover Letter, download at stlatlimxpolice.ca. Mail resume with copies of all certificates to Stl’atl’imx Tribal Police Service P.O Box 488 Lillooet, B.C, V0K 1V0 Applicants who fail to submit the required documentation will be automatically disqualified. ** Pursuant to section 41 of the BC Human Rights Code, preference may also be given to applicants of Aboriginal ancestry **

Join our Adventure Service Team at the Whistler Village Inn and Suites! WE OFFER • A great work environment with opportunities for development and career advancement • Free coffee and tea service • Training for advancement • Use of facilities based on occupancy (Gym, Sauna, Hydro Spa and Pool) • Highly competitive compensation in Whistler • Employee accommodation discounts with Atlific Hotels and Resorts • Medical and Dental for full time employees • Some staff discounts on local activities • Staff housing based on availability • Increments to pay scale based for longevity • Flexible hours and work schedules based on your requirements • Bike Storage based on availability

CURRENTLY HIRING • Front Desk Agents (Commission based incentives) • FT Night Auditor - Premium Wage (Commission based incentives) • FT or PT Room Attendants (Commission based incentives) • FT Maintenance (Commission based incentives) Resumes can be submitted to karen@wvis.ca

CREATIVE AND COLLABORATIVE? WORK WITH US! We are currently recruiting amazing people to be part of our team.

ResortQuest Whistler is currently hiring:

Houseman Guest Service Supervisor Group Sales Coordinator Maintenance Benefits include - activity allowance, extended medical, RRSP match, opportunities for growth and more. To apply for this opportunity, please specify the position and email your resume and cover letter to: beth.fraser@resortquestwhistler.com We thank all applicants for their interest but only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

Communica�ons Specialist

Full-�me posi�on | Applica�ons considered as received

Bartender

Casual | Applica�ons considered as received

Cra� Facilitator

Whistler Street Entertainment & Arts Whistler Casual | Applica�ons considered as received

APPLY TODAY!

artswhistler.com/careers

Apply to: getinvolved@artswhistler.com | attn: Susan Holden Maury Young Arts Centre | 604.935.8410

SUMMER EDITION OUt NOW! JUNE 6, 2019

97


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

WE ARE HIRING WE ARE HIRING WE ARE HIRING

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

SURFACE WEATHER OBSERVERS SURFACE WEATHER OBSERVERS WE ARE HIRING WE ARE HIRING WE ARE HIRING SURFACE WEATHER OBSERVERS PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

SURFACE SURFACEWEATHER WEATHEROBSERVERS OBSERVERS SURFACE WEATHER OBSERVERS Whistler CWO

Whistler CWO A permanent position  as a Surface Weather Observer Whistler CWO A permanent position  Surface Weather Observer with ATS Services Ltd. as a at the Whistler Contract Weather Whistler WhistlerCWO CWO Whistler CWO

with ATS Services Ltd. as a at the Whistler Contract Weather Office.  A permanent position  Surface Weather Observer A permanent position  as a Surface Weather Observer Office.  A permanent position  Weather Observer Weather with ATS Services Ltd.as a at Surface the Whistler Contract with Ltd. atatthe Whistler Contract Weather A permanent position  Surface Weather Observer withATS ATSServices Services Ltd.as a the Whistler Contract Weather Office.  Office. 

Office. No experience required No experience required Training provided @ NAV Centre, Cornwall, ON No experience required Noexperience experience required No required Training provided @ NAV Centre, Cornwall, ON June to July 12th 2019 No3rd experience required

with ATS Services Ltd. at the Whistler Contract Weather Office. 

Training provided @ NAV Centre, Cornwall, ON September 2019 June 3rd to July 12th 2019 Training provided @ NAV Centre, Cornwall, ON ON Travel, accommodations and meals provided. Training provided @ NAV Centre, Cornwall, June 3rd to July 12th 2019 Training provided @ NAV Centre, Cornwall, ON June 3rd to July 12th 2019 and meals provided. Travel, accommodations June 3rd to July 12th 2019 Travel, accommodations and June 3rd to July 12th 2019 Travel, accommodations andmeals mealsprovided. provided.

Travel, meals provided. Travel, accommodations accommodations andand meals provided.

$14.00 starting wage $14.00 $14.00 starting wage $14.00starting startingwage wage $14.00 starting wage $14.00 starting $300            signing bonus upon wage graduation and successful $300                   signing graduation and    signingbonus bonusupon upon graduation andsuccessful successful $300     $300     certification      signing bonus upon graduation and successful site site certification $300              signing bonus upon graduation and successful  site certification    site certification $300      certification    signing bonus upon graduation and successful      site site certification

ATS ATSSERVICES SERVICESLTD LTD- -1-888-845-4913   1-888-845-4913  

ATS LTD- 1-888-845-4913   - 1-888-845-4913   ATSSERVICES SERVICES LTD FAX FAX1-613-221-9815 1-613-221-9815 ATS SERVICES LTD - 1-888-845-4913   FAX 1-613-221-9815 1-613-221-9815 FAX CAREERS@ATSSERVICES.CA   CAREERS@ATSSERVICES.CA   ATSCAREERS@ATSSERVICES.CA   SERVICES LTD - 1-888-845-4913   FAX 1-613-221-9815 PLEASE ABOUT CAREERS@ATSSERVICES.CA   PLEASEINQUIRE INQUIRE ABOUTOTHER OTHERSITE SITEVACANCIES VACANCIESAND ANDTRAINING TRAININGDATES DATES FAX 1-613-221-9815 PLEASE INQUIRE ABOUT OTHER SITE VACANCIES AND TRAINING CAREERS@ATSSERVICES.CA   DATES

PLEASE INQUIRE ABOUT OTHER SITE VACANCIES AND TRAINING DATES CAREERS@ATSSERVICES.CA   PLEASE INQUIRE ABOUT OTHER SITE VACANCIES AND TRAINING DATES PLEASE INQUIRE ABOUT OTHER SITE VACANCIES AND TRAINING DATES

We are currently interviewing:

Project Coordinator Carpenters Carpenters Helpers Labourers Level 2 First Aid Attendant Please submit resume to: info@evrfinehomes

Whistler’s Premier Estate Builder

98 JUNE 6, 2019


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

BUY

RENT

WORK

FIX

DRIVE

SELL

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

WHISTLER’S RE-IMAGINED ITALIAN RESTAURANT

The storied restaurant offers a modern taste of Italy to bring a fresh, contemporary style of dining to the mountain.

CURRENT OPPORTUNITIES FRONT-OF-HOUSE

Team!

Experienced Server Server Assistant Host / Hostess

BACK-OF-HOUSE Line Cooks (1-2 years experience) Dishwashers

is currently looking for

Staff Housing Available! Competitive Wage + Benefits Package

Room Attendants

WE’RE HIRING

Our room attendants play a vital role in the success and reputation of the brand and our hotel. Join this truly amazing team!

DISHWASHERS On-the-job training offered. Apply today!

We offer world-class benefits

• Life & Leisure Program your wages

• Health Benefits • Gym and Pool Access • Parking • Free Meals

RESERVATIONS MANAGER

• Free Yoga

The ideal candidate is well spoken, organized, confident, outgoing, and well-presented. • Previous experience in a fine dining environment is required • Post Secondary education is an asset • Familiarity with a reservations management platform is an asset We offer year-round full and part-time hours, gratuities, potential for future growth within the company, and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants. Please email your resume & cover letter to careers@ilcaminetto.ca

• • Year• AMAZING Team Member Travel Program including Friends & Family Benefits

And More!

VILLAGE OF LIONS BAY

DEPUTY EMERGENCY PROGRAM COORDINATOR The Sea to Sky corridor’s top civil construction company. We are currently recruiting professionally minded people to join our team. Required are:

Labourers Equipment Operators Class 1 or Class 3 Truck Drivers Please send resume to: Email: info@whistlerexcavations.com Fax: 604-932-8748 Mail: Box 1145, Whistler, BC V0N 1B0. Drop off @ Suite 202, 1400 Alpha Lake Road, Whistler (Function Junction)

www.whistlerexcavations.com Last modified by:

KP

The Village of Lions Bay is a small, compact community located on the scenic coast of Howe Sound, ten minutes north of West Vancouver and twenty minutes south of Squamish. We are looking for someone with drive and determination to contribute their knowledge and experience to our dedicated team. This is an interesting, part-time opportunity for a person with solid emergency management experience who wishes to advance his or her career experience in municipal government. Reporting to the Chief Administrative Officer (acting Emergency Program Coordinator), the Deputy Emergency Program Coordinator will be a member of the Emergency Program Committee and will analyze the Lions Bay Emergency Plan and all related documents for updating, and will help provide strategic direction and oversight to the Lions Bay Emergency Plan. For a detailed job description, please see: https://www.lionsbay.ca/government/employment-contract-opportunities by June 17, 2019. JUNE 6, 2019

99


CALL THE EXPERTS

Want to advertise your service on this page? AUTOMOTIVE

Call Pique at (604) 938-0202, or email sales@piquenewsmagazine.com

BLINDS ETC.

BLINDS ETC.

FIX AUTO PEMBERTON • Certified Insurance Collision Repair Facility • Insurance & Private Auto Body Repair • Courtesy Vehicles on Site

Visit fixautopemberton.com to schedule an appointment or call 604-894-6767

SUNCREST WINDOW COVERINGS Custom Blinds • Shades • Draperies

Tel: 604-935-2101 Email: windowcov@shaw.ca www.whistlerwindowcoverings.ca

CARPET CLEANING

WINDOW COVERINGS

BLACK BEAR CARPET CLEANING LTD.

David Weldon david@summersnow.ca 604-938-3521

• Wood blinds • Sunscreens • Shades • Motorization

www.summersnow.ca

Summer Snow Finishings Limited

• SHUTTERS • DRAPERY

Connie Griffiths

BLINDS ETC. Whistler’s Source for Blinds since 1989

• BLINDS • SHADES

• CARPETS • UPHOLSTERY

Custom Window Treatments Contact us today for a free quote or consultation info@suncrestwindowcoverings.com

604.698.8406

CARPET CLEANING

• TILES • CAR INTERIORS

100% ECO FRIENDLY CERTIFIED www.blackbearcarpetcleaning.ca • 604 698 6610

PROUDLY SERVING WHISTLER FOR OVER 25 YEARS

CHIMNEY

GLASS

BLACKCOMB CHIMNEY PATROL LTD.

TIRED OF THOSE OLD CONDENSATED, MOLDY WINDOWS AND DOORS?

Serving Whistler since 1986

Specialized in cleaning

Wood Energy Technology Transfer Inc.

Chimneys, Furnace & Airducts, Dryer vents.

604.932.5775 / 1.877.932.5775 blackcombchimney@yahoo.ca

GLASS

WINDOW REPLACEMENT

WANT TO ADVERTISE

your service here?

Take advantage of the benefits and savings you will receive from new windows and doors.

Call Pique at (604) 938-0202, or email sales@piquenewsmagazine.com

Call Whistler Glass for your onsite consultation

MORTGAGES

PAINT

604.932.1132 whistlerglass.com

MORTGAGE BROKER SERVICES Residential & Commercial • First-time Home Buyers Non-residents • Pre-Approvals • Reverse Mortgages

AUTO GLASS SPECIALISTS · Frameless Shower Enclosures · Complete Window/Door Packages · Custom Railing Glass Systems · Fogged/Failed Window Replacements

mountainglass.ca | info@mountainglass.ca

604-932-7288

Annie de la Chevrotiere | Mortgage Broker www.peaktopeaktmortgage.com annie@peaktopeakmc.com 1328 Main Street, Squamish, BC, V8B 0R2

604.905.8483

THE COMPLETE GLASS CENTRE

SURVEYING

SURVEYING

BUNBURY & ASSOCIA

Surveys Surveys

▪ ▪ ▪

Surveys Plans

Surveys

www.bunbury-surveys.com

Phone: 604-932-3770

100 JUNE 6, 2019

SQUAMISH OFFICE #207 - 38026 Second Avenue Phone: 604-892-3090 email: squamish@bunbury-surveys.com

604-894-6240 7426 Prospect St, Pemberton

SURVEYING DOUGLAS J BUSH AScT, RSIS

Serving the Sea to Sky Corridor Since 1963 ▪ ▪ ▪

Book your in-home leen Consultation with Col today!

DOUG BUSH SURVEY SERVICES LTD

BC LAND SURVEYORS North Vancouver to Lillooet

Our paint team has over 25 years combined paint sales experience, and we can help you get things right the first time. Now offering In Home Paint Consultations! Pemberton Valley Rona. Let us help you love where you live.

THE RIGHT TOOLS. THE RIGHT PEOPLE. Surveying | Mapping | Engineering | Environmental | Landscape Architecture | Planning To learn more visit: www.mcelhanney.com

p: 604-932-3314 c: 604-935-9515 Engineering & construction layout Topographic & site improvement surveys Municipal, volumetric & hydrographic surveys GPS - global positioning systems www.dbss.ca // dougb@dbss.ca


PUZZLES ACROSS 1 6 10 15 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 31 33 35 36 38 39 40 41 42 44 46 48 51 53 58 59 61 62 63 65 67 69 71 72

Vow venue Order around Injury results Attired like Batman “Twelfth Night” heroine Fiji neighbor Night sky streaker Martini garnish Make ashamed Put on ice Hazard a guess Get mellow Form 1040 sender Brisling Game for (2 wds.) Face card Printer’s measures After midnight Smokehouse hangers Dance wear Eddie Cantor’s wife Dept. store inventory Burro alternative Elk Record, as mileage London’s river Meager Felt cold Staff Crumpet companion Whichever Witty Polish Assert North Sea tributary Wine servers Fizzy beverage Excellence

4

2

5 3 4

2 1 6 8 3 6 7 5

74 Raised railways 75 Rears 76 Lunar effects 77 Before giving birth 79 John, Robert or Ted 80 Force 81 Slip sideways 82 Summits 83 Congeal 84 Banded stones 87 Scatters 88 Tom Sawyer state 92 Pie flavor 93 Oil in paints 94 LII twice 95 Put on the radio 96 Prolific auth. 97 Design 98 Stacks 100 Ponytail site 101 Lightning byproduct 102 “True Lies” co-star 103 Sweetie-pie 104 Female rabbit 106 Hawaii’s Mauna - 107 Mutually approved (2 wds.) 109 Stiff 112 Palms off 114 Move up and down 115 Ogres 117 State Farm rival 119 Sari wearer 122 DJ’s albums 125 Made a sketch 126 Microwave button 127 Bottle top 131 Miners dig it 132 Mare’s offspring

6 9 1 9

3

133 Actress -- Kudrow 134 In plain sight 136 Taro dish 137 Zest 139 Check endorser 141 Radio knob 143 Not abridged 145 “Crocodile Rock” composer -- John 146 Says decidedly 147 Poet -- Dickinson 148 Fumble 149 Turn back the clock 150 Fewest 151 Spicy 152 Cloys

DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 21 30

9

8 1 7 2 1 8 5 7 3 5 4 7 3 2 7 1 8

V. EASY

Benefit Virgo’s neighbor Crunchy bread Gore and Capone Fan noise Nassau’s country Drops Mr. Hurok Healthful Wire-haired dog Lame excuse (hyph.) Fifi’s boyfriend Movie mutt Lieu Fishing float MacGraw of the movies Uttered shrilly Levels off Tightly packed Get lost! “Star Trek” weapon

32 34 37 41 43 44 45 47 48 49 50 52 54 55 56 57 60 62 64 66 68 69 70 71 73 75 76 78 79 80 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90

Pet shop cuties Knee neighbors “Nightmare” street Exec Hire out Diminish Boulevard dividers Above, to Tennyson Vagabond Linger Put on a pedestal Stovetop items Substantial Famous lithographer Wash away Guys Out in front Goes furtively Male voice Mr. Churchill Feverish Hiker’s tote Maria’s husband Steakhouse order Carried off Sneeze inducer Oklahoma city Poet’s contraction Hugs’ companions Some, to Yvette Coloring Fast-talked Range in Asia Italian seaport In the thick of “Same here!” Wire measure Where Asia begins Place in a larger urn

91 93 94 97 98 99 102 103 105 108 109 110 111 113 116 118

Suggestions Pie crust ingredient Film Spanish town Okra morsels Not as loud Corp. honcho Big trouble (2 wds.) Untold centuries Sports figure Most cautious Wallet stuffers Too trustingly John, in Glasgow Loafing sorts Grinding material

119 Walkie-talkie OK 120 As -- -- (usually) 121 Robin domiciles 123 Of the bishop of Rome 124 Toil away 126 Bar mixer 128 Disney site 129 Two-door car 130 Windy day fliers 132 Type style 135 Yanks 138 “Little piggie” 140 Team cheer 142 Ms. Thurman of “Kill Bill” 144 Firearms org.

LAST WEEKS’ ANSWERS

# 26

Enter a digit from 1 through 9 in each cell, in such a way that: • Each horizontal row contains each digit exactly once • Each vertical column contains each digit exactly once • Each 3x3 box contains each digit exactly once Solving a sudoku puzzle does not require any mathematics; simple logic suffices.

LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY: VERY EASY

7

6 8 2

6 9 5 2 3 1 9 5

5 1 4 2 3 8 5 7 4 9 1 1 3 7 4 9

2 5 4 3

8 6 9

2

V. ESolution, ASY tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com# 28

ANSWERS ON PAGE 93

JUNE 6, 2019

101


MAXED OUT

It begins with acknowledging prejudices IT’S HARD TO BELIEVE—I hardly believe it myself—that I’ve been writing this column for almost 24 years. More than 1,200 times I’ve sat down and stared at a blank computer screen and had it stare back at me, expectantly. I never thought Pique founder Bob Barnett’s insane offer would last more than a couple of weeks, ironically about as long as it took for the first pissedoff person to threaten to sue Pique over something I’d written. Recently, more times than I’d like to admit, I’ve stared at the blank screen and wondered whether I should still be doing

BY G.D. MAXWELL this. This is one of those weeks. This is one of those weeks where I’d like nothing more than to comb through past columns and pull one out, spruce it up with some topical references and put it out there to simply entertain. After all, it’s summer— in all ways other than astronomical—and the livin’ should be easy. It’s not a good time to be beating people over the head with warnings of imminent demise, shining a light on political shenanigans or even grousing about the pathetic human being ruining the country to the south of us and taking the rest of world down the toilet with him. And chances are that’s what I’d have done if I hadn’t found myself waking up in a country accused this week of committing genocide against its Indigenous population. It made me feel sick the first time I heard the accusation. It still makes me feel sick. Like so many Canadians, both native born and immigrants, I’ve never imagined friendly ol’ Canada would join the ranks of ... of whom? As it turns out, just about every country, every tribe, every group of humans who’ve ever lived and were powerful enough to wage war against their neighbours or their “own” people. Just within the two continents sharing the name America, Canada has joined the U.S., Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Guatemala, Paraguay and others following in the bootsteps of Spanish conquistadors and Portuguese soldiers who have commited genocide against native populations. And, not surprisingly, we’re in good Commonwealth company. British colonists and soldiers practiced genocide across the Joyce Carpenter holds a photo of her daughter Trish, who was found suffocated in 1992 , during the Annual Strawberry Ceremony on the National Day of Action Honouring Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women. PHOTO BY ARINDAMBANERJEE / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

102 JUNE 6, 2019

empire. Aussies, too, have been so charged. Internationally, the list goes on and on. And while the word itself was only coined in the mid-20th century to describe events in Armenia and Nazi Germany, one need not look too closely at the historical record of inter-tribal warfare of Canada’s own Indiginous peoples to see many of them were guilty of genocide against other Indiginous nations. Somehow though, being in a crowd of supposedly civilized people who have committed genocide doesn’t make me feel any less sick. And, I suppose, it doesn’t move the needle very much in overcoming this all too human failing. So, assuming it’s even possible, what is the way forward? I’ll assume there is but I’m not completely comfortable in that assumption. The reason I’m not comfortable is both historical and a sign of the times in which we live. Historically, you don’t have to look very far to understand there are plenty of examples of ancient tribal, ethnic, cultural and national warfare being carried out today over wrongs done, in some cases, centuries ago. Old animosities apparently never die; they just lie dormant until some leader or group get their knickers sufficiently in a knot to resort to armed conflict. We are all, it seems, the Hatfields and McCoys, the Yorks and Lancasters, the Stewarts and the Douglases, Tairas and Minamotos, the Pazzis and Medicis. Hell, it’s amazing enough of us were able to get along with each other long enough to invent refrigeration! History aside, we now live in the

Age of Victimhood. We wallow in what one observer, writing about what passes for news on the CBC, called victim porn. Everyone, it seems, is a victim while everyone and no one is actually to blame. Hence, responsibility, if such a concept still exists, keeps floating uphill until it bumps up against the top of the power pyramid. And so, Canada’s to blame. It’s Canada’s fault. Canada committed genocide; Canada must atone. I’m not going to get drawn into arguing whether genocide is the correct word or not. I’m not invested enough and I’m tired of every crackpot with email accusing me of one form of intolerance or another for something I’ve written. And, like something in excess of 90 per cent of the country’s population, I’m not going to wade through 1,200 pages of the report issued by the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. I guess I’m like a lot of other Canadians. I’m powerless to move the needles of either the federal, provincial, municipal or tribal governments to any substantial degree. I can’t make successive B.C. governments get serious about settling land claims, I can’t remove the paternalism inherent in the Indian Act. I can’t end poverty, improve living conditions or relieve cycles of self-destruction that exist on far too many reserves. I can’t comment on the corruption practiced by some tribal governments that exacerbate already intolerable living conditions. All I can do is live my life without acting on my prejudices. Like many roads

to recovery, it begins with acknowledging those prejudices even though it’s nearly impossible to comprehend where some of them come from. Prejudice is, largely, though by no means exclusively, a learned behaviour. Given its genesis, the only hope is to, in turn, learn to recognize it and learn to not act on it. I’m the first to admit I don’t understand people who hate other people because of their ethnicity. Maybe that’s a result of growing up in the southwest and failing to understand Chicano kids and Pueblo kids I grew up with, went to school with, played sports with and hung around with were somehow different enough from me to be discriminated against. Some were smarter and some were less smart, most were better athletes, some poorer and others not, but somehow, we all managed to have fun together and find far more in common with each other than the things that differentiated us. Whether the 200-plus justice recommendations contained in the committee’s report will be acted upon—not likely until after October’s election—and whether they’ll prove to be a path toward solving any of the problems that exist between genocide Canada and Aboriginal Canada or not, will be an experiment in living history. I’m not optimistic. Perhaps there has simply been too much backsliding lately on the evolutionary march of homo sapiens for me to be convinced we can even solve small problems let alone such monumentally large ones as our relationship with Canada’s Indigenous people. But hope springs eternal. n


Welcome to the best place on earth Engel & Völkers Portfolio of Fine Homes

EMERALD

EMERALD ESTATES

EVA LAKE VILLAGE, NORDIC ESTATES

VILLAGE – NEW PRICE!

Solid house built in 1993 and renovated 2001. It provides 3200 sqft of living area, plus a 1000sqft basement. 4 Bedrooms and 3.5 Bathroom. Expansive windows oriented towards Green Lake and Mountains. $3,300,000

Enjoy the private hot tub and beautiful landscape set on a view lot. A solid log post and beam Artisan quality chalet with four bedrooms and 4.5 bathrooms. $2,695,000

Eva Lake Village is a conveniently located complex within the Nordic Estates neighbourhood that is occupied by employees or retirees of Whistler and as a result offers a wonderful feeling of community. $499,000

Luxury townhome within 1 block of the Village Stroll! 4 generous bedrooms, 3 full bathrooms, vaulted ceilings, private hot tub! www.4877casabella.info Nightly rentals permitted. $2,349,000

Ruby Jiang *prec

Laura Wetaski

Maggi Thornhill *prec

David Wiebe *prec

9328 Autumn Place

9483 Emerald Drive

778-834-2002

31-2230 Eva Lake Road

604 938 3798

604-905-8199

4877 Casabella Cresent

604-966-8874

NICKLAUS NORTH / GREEN LAKE ESTATES

ALTA VISTA

VILLAGE

WHISTLER CAY HEIGHTS

This 3.5 bed townhome in the popular Englewood Green development is a blank canvas awaiting your person touches. The Nicklaus North Golf course and Valley trail are all a short walk from your front door. $1,939,000

Rarely available! Corner top floor 2bed/1bath townhouse in Alta Vista II. Large private covered deck surrounded by lush forest. One of the best yearround locations in Whistler; on the Valley Trail & short walk to Lakeside Park. $599,900

The Hideout is a newly renovated, cozy & spacious 1 bed apartment conveniently located within the heart of Whistler Village, yet it enjoys a peaceful, private setting within a wooded area. Don’t miss this great prperty. $799,000

Beautifully renovated 5 bed/3.5 bath chalet in prestigious Linkside in Whistler Cay Heights. Extremely private with SW exposure & views of Whistler Mountain, just steps from Whistler Village. $3,999,000

Nick Swinburne *prec

Ron Mitchell *prec

Peter Lalor

Janet Brown

9-8030 Nicklaus North Blvd

604-932-8899

210 – 3070 Hillcrest Drive

53-4335 Northlands Boulevard

604-938-3815

604-902-3309

6412 Linkside Road

604-935-0700

BENCHLANDS

BRACKENDALE, SQUAMISH

GARIBALDI ESTATES

SQUAMISH

Snowberry Villas 2BR/2BA townhouse with private ground floor patio facing the centre greenspace. New kitchen appliances and HW tank. Furnished to enjoy as your weekend getaway with the family or to rent nightly. $1,210,000

On apx. 1/4 acre on Dryden Creek you’ll find this 3,150 sf ‘Timber Kings’ home. Outside: lush gardens, basalt columns, sauna cabin, whirlpool spa & workshop. Inside: 3 beds + family games room/4th bed + office, 3 baths + 2-car garage. $1,798,000

Beautiful modern home in Amblepath. Open concept 3 bed & 2.5 bathroom. Features bamboo flooring, gas fireplace, stainless steel appliances, Silestone countertops & new washer/dryer. Storage & patios w/views. $849,000

Incredibly spacious 3.5 bed / 2,350 sq ft Townhouse. Big outdoor patio with gated access to park & playground. Updated hardwood floors, double garage, balcony, hot tub, workshop & ample storage space. $799,900

Rob Boyd

Katherine Currall

Angie Vazquez *prec

Rachel Edwards

15 – 4637 Blacomb Way

41496 Meadow Ave

604-935-9172

41-40137 Government Road

604-966-1364

48-40632 Government Road

778-318-5900

Whistler Village Shop

Whistler Creekside Shop

Squamish Station Shop

36-4314 Main Street · Whistler BC V0N 1B4 · Phone +1 604-932-1875

325-2063 Lake Placid Road · Whistler BC V0N 1B2 · Phone +1 604-932-1875

150-1200 Hunter Place · Squamish BC V8B 0G8 · Phone +1 778-733-0611

whistler.evrealestate.com

whistler.evrealestate.com

whistler.evrealestate.com

Engel & Völkers Whistler *PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION ©2018 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage is independently owned and operated. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified.

604-966-4200


Open House Sat/Sun 2 to 4 pm

6471 Balsam Way

$2,599,000

This lovely home has 4 bedrooms, large family room and office in addition to the main living/ dining room. The yard offers privacy with lots of room to play and garden, is fully irrigated & backs on to green space and a gently flowing creek. Heated floors in the bathrooms, entrance and Kitchen adds another layer of comfort. Matterport 3D Showcase: rem.ax\6471balsam

Sherry Baker

5

604.932.1315

9096 Corduroy Run Court

$2,999,950

1 Garibaldi Drive

$1,179,000

Wonderfully secluded 4 bdrm/ 3 bthrm. home or getaway only minutes to Whistler creekside. This well built, well kept home is located in Black Tusk Village, a gated community with lakes and trails. Enjoy the expansive, sunny deck with carport below for all the toys. A large entry level room is a perfect family/ games area.

Ted Morden

604.938-3606

#114D - 2020 London Lane

4

$119,500

9120 Emerald Drive

$1,595,000

Beautifully renovated 4 bedroom chalet, located on a large lot in the peaceful Emerald Estates. Bright, open concept living space, leading out onto 1, of 2 spacious patios that invite the afternoon sunshine. The recent renovation includes new windows and doors, heated flooring, as well as new plumbing and electrical. Matterport 3D Showcase: rem.ax\9120

Ursula Morel*

4

604.932.8629

2578 Snowridge Crescent

$6,200,000

Stunning new contemporary home by Heritage West Homes offering 4600 square feet of living space with a stunning main floor of 3500 square feet and 1100 sq ft finished lower level to accommodate guests and family gatherings. 5 bedrooms and 4.5 bathrooms, a delightful chef’s kitchen with ample sunshine. Easy to show.

Enjoy all of the benefits of luxury condo ownership at the base of Whistler Mountain at a fraction of the cost. This 1 bed/1 bath quarter ownership property in Evolution offers custom finishings, contemporary design & comes fully equipped. Building amenities include: outdoor pool, hot tub, sauna, steam room, games room, exercise room & media room.

Enjoy the views of Whistler Peak and the Dave Murray Downhill from your patio Hot Tub. Picture your family skiing or riding home for lunch. Walking down to Dusty’s or shopping without having to get into your car. In the summer the bike park is right there as well. Fine dining is a short walk, as are the two lakes in the Creekside Area.

Ann Chiasson

Bob Cameron*

Bruce Watt

4

604.932.7651

#318 - 2222 Castle Drive

$998,000

2 bedroom, 2 bathroom townhouse with 1 car garage and 3 decks! This updated home has a lovely wood burning fireplace, hardwood and tile flooring throughout, vaulted ceilings, custom wood countertops, stainless steel appliances, lots of natural light, and an accessible back yard because of its unique location in the complex.

Dana Friesen Smith

2

604.902.3878

#6 - 4636 Blackcomb Way

$197,000

604.935.2214

#10 - 2400 Cavendish Way

1

$744,900

This clean and tidy 2 bedroom townhouse in Whiski Jack is ready to move in. The suite has new carpet and fresh paint with plenty of upgrades including granite counter tops, kitchen cabinets, heated floors, new by-fold doors and ceiling fan. With a large secured crawl space under the building, this property is suitable for full time living or a weekend getaway.

604.905.8855

2

#40 - 4388 Northlands Blvd.

$765,000

Dave Beattie*

5

604.905.0737

Anderson Lake

$399,000

Featuring 100 feet of lakefront, on .68 of an acre, this property is situated on the east shore of pristine Anderson Lake, so it catches all the afternoon sun. Accessible by boat, the cabin was completely renovated in 2015, with about 936 sq ft of total living space. It boasts spectacular views up and down the lake and of the Bendor Mountain Range to the west.

Dave Halliwell*

604.932.7727

8556 Drifter Way

3

$2,599,000

Adjacent to the Fairmont Chateau golf course, this rarely available, 1/5th interest in an immaculate 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom townhome boasts a spacious open layout, heated slate floors in bathroom. A cozy wood burning fireplace, large master bedroom with sitting area, and plenty of secure parking are among the many amenities.

40 Glacier Reach is a 556 sf 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom townhome with 2 patios in the Marketplace area of Whistler Village. This home is a mix of mountain and city with it’s new gorgeous design elements and fresh, new furniture. Light and bright on the quiet side of the complex. Matterport 3D Showcase: bit.ly/40GRB

INVESTORS ALERT! INVESTORS ALERT! NET INCOME of $126,300 and growing on full rental of home. Have your realtor call for questions or answers regarding this opportunity. Also available and qualifies through municipal zoning for infill housing! Currently renting entire home for $11,000 monthly.

Dave Sharpe

Denise Brown*

Doug Treleaven

604.902.2779

2

WHISTLER OFFICE 106 - 7015 Nesters Road, Whistler, BC V8E 0X1 604.932.2300 or Toll Free 1.888.689.0070 *PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

remax-whistler.com awarded best website 2018 by Luxuryrealestate.com

Property Management remaxseatoskypm.com

604.935.2013

1

604.905.8626

5

PEMBERTON OFFICE 1411 Portage Road, Pemberton, BC V0N 2L1 604.894.6616 or Toll Free 1.888.689.0070

Profile for Whistler Publishing

Pique Newsmagazine 2623  

Pique Newsmagazine for June 6, 2019

Pique Newsmagazine 2623  

Pique Newsmagazine for June 6, 2019

Advertisement