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MAY 30, 2019 ISSUE 26.22

WWW.PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM ALCOHOL

FREE -ISH

16

CONNECTING TO CULTURE The federal government unveils its new tourism strategy

17

GRIZZLY INFORMATION Close trails to preserve our grizzly bears

68

MAKING WAVES nights at the GLC

Ocean Alley plays two


WHERE NATURE MEETS LUXURY JOHN RYAN

8372 MOUNTAIN VIEW DRIVE

3550 FALCON CRESCENT

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Bedrooms:

Bedrooms:

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JOHN RYAN*

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Square Feet:

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0.5

Bathrooms:

JON CHAUDHARI*

1

jc@wrec.com 604 902 7875

Square Feet:

327

$399,000

4050 WHISTLER WAY, VILLAGE

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#1 ELEVATE AT SUNSTONE

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Lot #23 is a gorgeous lot with “spectacular” Mount Currie Views. Build your dream home here.

PEMBERTON

Bedrooms:

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KEITH MCIVOR keith@wrec.com 604 935 2650

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1

KRIS

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1

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$419,900 604 932 5538

WHISTLERREALESTATE.CA *Personal Real Estate Corporation


JOHN & LIZZIE WEISNER CLAUDIA LAMONTAGUE MICHELLE KIRKEGAARD

DEREK LEWIS MATT DELAN

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THIS WEEK IN PIQUE

52 68

40 Being sober-curious People are re-visiting their relationship with alcohol in a trend that sees lifestyle choices reimagined. - By Cathy Goddard

16

CONNECTING TO CULTURE

The

52

SLIDING TO WHISTLER?

Luge Canada

federal government’s new Tourism Growth Strategy aims to enhance cultural

seeks to move 2021 FIL World Championships from Calgary to the Whistler

tourism offerings and grow tourism-sector revenue by 25 per cent by 2025.

Sliding Centre.

32

62 TIME OF TRANSITION

TACKLING TOPICS

Village of Pemberton

Arts Whistler

council discussed public civility, food affordability, and water restrictions

looks back on a year of transition, growth and change during its

during its Tuesday, May 28 regular council meeting.

annual general meeting.

34

TRAUMA TRANSPORT

Dr. Ross Brown has

68 OCEAN SPRAY

We can’t help you out with

worked in what he believes is the best trauma system in the world—the

Ocean Alley tickets, but we can offer you a peek into the psych-rock

Canadian military—and learned that transport is key to patients’ recovery.

band’s crazy year.

COVER I’m basically the weeknight warrior of sober curiosity. - By Jon Parris 4 MAY 30, 2019


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WE ARE NOW HIRING for ALL POSITIONS

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*not valid when purchasing gift cards. *excluding tobacco products. EXPIRES June 5, 2019. Not valid with any other coupons. One coupon per customer, per day. Valid only at MarketPlace IGA Whistler at time of purchase only.

*not valid when purchasing gift cards. *excluding tobacco products. EXPIRES June 5, 2019. Not valid with any other coupons. One coupon per customer, per day. Valid only at MarketPlace IGA Whistler at time of purchase only.

All Prices Effective THURS. MAY 30 - JUNE 5, 2019

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THIS WEEK IN PIQUE

Opinion & Columns #103 -1390 ALPHA LAKE RD., FUNCTION JUNCTION, WHISTLER, B.C. V8E 0H9. PH: (604) 938-0202 FAX: (604) 938-0201 www.piquenewsmagazine.com

Founding Publishers KATHY & BOB BARNETT Publisher SARAH STROTHER - sstrother@wplpmedia.com Editor CLARE OGILVIE - edit@piquenewsmagazine.com Assistant Editor ALYSSA NOEL - arts@piquenewsmagazine.com Sales Manager SUSAN HUTCHINSON - shutchinson@wplpmedia.com Production Manager KARL PARTINGTON - kpartington@wplpmedia.com Art Director JON PARRIS - jparris@wplpmedia.com

08 OPENING REMARKS Are B.C. schools heading for a strike in the fall of 2019? Teachers and their employer are back at the bargaining table and class size and composition remain thorny issues in the negotiations.

10 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Our letter writers speak out about e-bikes on our trails, tackling mental health and changes to the French Immersion teaching model in Whistler.

13 PIQUE’N YER INTEREST Writer Megan Lalonde looks back on the snow season that was. From the no-snow scare of early winter to the sun-drenched Gaper Day on May 27, it’s worth celebrating.

98 MAXED OUT Max weighs in on the decision by former Liberal MPs Jody Wilson-Raybould and Jane

Advertising Representatives AMY ALLEN - aallen@wplpmedia.com TESSA SWEENEY - tsweeney@wplpmedia.com ANTHONY JOYCE - ajoyce@wplpmedia.com

Philpott to run in the next federal election as independents. What does this say about the state of our government?

Sales Coordinator EMMA WILKINS - traffic@wplpmedia.com Digital Sales Manager FIONA YU - fiona@glaciermedia.ca

Environment & Adventure

Production production@piquenewsmagazine.com CLAIRE RYAN - cryan@wplpmedia.com LOU O’BRIEN - lstevens@wplpmedia.com WHITNEY SOBOOL - wsobool@wplpmedia.com

38 ECOLOGIC Columnist Leslie Anthony urges readers to change their way when it comes to TP, as 28

Arts & Entertainment Editor ALYSSA NOEL arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

39 THE OUTSIDER Columnist Vince Shuley recalls a trip to the fabled Fedchenko Glacier where he found

million acres of Canada’s boreal forest was mowed down to make toilet paper from 1996 to 2015.

Sports Editor DAN FALLOON - sports@piquenewsmagazine.com Features Editor BRANDON BARRETT - bbarrett@piquenewsmagazine.com Reporters BRADEN DUPUIS - bdupuis@piquenewsmagazine.com BRANDON BARRETT - bbarrett@piquenewsmagazine.com JOEL BARDE - jbarde@piquenewsmagazine.com MEGAN LALONDE - mlalonde@wplpmedia.com

the Gorbunov Meteorological station at 4,169 metres, a legacy of Soviet climate science in Tajikistan’s Pamir Mountains.

48 TRAVEL Two teens from Pemberton travel to Italy and find it is all they imagined and more. From exploring Venice to hiking in Capri, biking along the Appian Way and eating gelato every day, it was a trip worth the planning.

Classifieds and Reception mail@piquenewsmagazine.com Circulation and Accounts LAURA PRIOR - lprior@wplpmedia.com Office and Accounts Manager HEIDI RODE - hrode@wplpmedia.com I.T. and Webmaster KARL PARTINGTON Contributors G.D. MAXWELL, GLENDA BARTOSH, MICHAEL ALLEN, FEET BANKS, LESLIE ANTHONY, ALLEN BEST, ALISON TAYLOR, VINCE SHULEY, LISA RICHARDSON President, Whistler Publishing LP SARAH STROTHER - sstrother@wplpmedia.com Pique Newsmagazine (a publication of Whistler Publishing Limited Partnership, a division of Glacier Media) distributed to over 130 locations in Whistler and to over 200 locations from Vancouver to D’arcy. The entire contents of Pique Newsmagazine are copyright 2019 by Pique Newsmagazine (a publication of WPLP, a division of Glacier Media). No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the express written permission of the Publisher. In no event shall unsolicited material subject this publication to any claim or fees. Copyright in letters and other (unsolicited) materials submitted and accepted for publication remains with the author but the publisher and its licensees may freely reproduce them in print, electronic or other forms. Letters to the Editor must contain the author’s name, address and daytime telephone number. Maximum length is 250 words. We reserve the right to edit, condense or reject any contribution. Letters reflect the opinion of the writer and not that of Pique Newsmagazine. Pique Newsmagazine is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please contact (edit@ piquenewsmagazine.com). If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the web site at mediacouncil. ca or call toll-free 1-844-877-1163 for additional information. This organization replaces the BC Press council (and any mention of it).

ISSN #1206-2022 Subscriptions: $76.70/yr. within Canada, $136.60/yr. courier within Canada. $605.80/ yr. courier to USA. GST included. GST Reg. #R139517908. Canadian Publications Mail Product Sales Agreement #40016549.

Lifestyle & Arts

58 VELOCITY PROJECT Writer Lisa Richardson urges us to release our inner curiosity so that we don’t miss experiences and challenges along the way.

60 EPICURIOUS Rice Straws Technology is bringing 100 per cent natural, biodegradable and edible rice straws to Canada—including here in Whistler.

64 NOTES FROM THE BACK ROW This week, Feet Banks offers his take on monsters versus musicals. Godzilla: King of the Monsters and Rocketman both hit theatres.

66 MUSEUM MUSINGS How valley residents made Whistler their home is explored in a new exhibit, which opens Friday, May 31.

70 PIQUECAL Have you seen the Oscar-winning Green Book yet? Head down to the library for a chance to screen the flick on Tuesday at 7 p.m.

L I L L

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9 bed/7 bath Sep. Suite $2.599M PANO VIEWS The Ridge

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F R A N K I N G H A M . C O M 6 MAY 30, 2019

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OPENING REMARKS

The teacher tango IT FEELS LIKE SUMMER is just around the corner. Our kids are dreaming of days at the lake, afternoons on the cross-country trails and that feeling of freedom that one only gets when school’s out for summer. But while students might be relaxing the school system that supports them will be hard at work: The teachers’ union and their employer will be at the bargaining table trying to hammer out a new contract. Historically this has never been

BY CLARE OGILVIE edit@piquenewsmagazine.com

a smooth process. It’s been 32 years since teachers were granted the right to strike. There were 48 strikes and three lockouts under “local bargaining” from 1987 to 1994, three strikes disrupting 14

well as a $400-million education fund to hire specialist teachers. It also provided an additional $105 million for dispatching of retroactive grievances. The settlement was the lengthiest ever reached, but it will expire on June 20. Part way through this contract, in 2016, the nation’s highest court restored deleted provisions in the contract around class size and composition and the landscape of the education system and the classroom faced significant change as a result. This was the result of a 14-year court battle waged by the teacher’s union, the B.C. Teachers’ Federation (BCTF). Since the decision, B.C. has hired 3,700 new teachers to meet the requirement of the ruling and boosted its education budget from $580 million to $6.6 billion. There are 43,000 teachers in B.C.—and we need another 1,000 according to the union. As we get into the thick of bargaining, dealing with the language around class size

But neither can the government concede to a contract that might have cost implications with other unions and a bottom line that might have taxpayers seeing red.

days of school since 1995, three legislated contracts, one legislated “cooling off period” and two negotiated deals under “provincial bargaining” since 1994. In 2014 there was a six-week strike. At the end of it a six-year deal was struck, which included a 7.25-per-cent salary increase, improvements in extended health benefits and the teaching-on-call rates, as

and composition restored to the contract is going to be key. Some of the challenge will flow from the lack of uniformity in the system. There are 60 school districts in B.C. Of those, 40 have some sort of class composition rules, while the other 20 have none at all. What the government would like to see in this round of negotiations is for the system to be more

equitable with districts that have strong language about class size and composition concede some of this thereby reducing costs so that other districts can share the wealth and get more teacher resources for the students. The BCTF would like all districts to have strong class composition rules. Then there is the age-old bargaining around pay. The government is looking for the same deal it has secured with other public sector unions in recent months, two per cent in each of the next three years. (There is pressure to achieve this on the government side as the unions negotiated a “me-too” clause guaranteeing matching funds if another union scores a richer deal.) The BCTF is considering this but it is also looking for the teacher-wage grid to be condensed so that educators get to the higher wage brackets faster, along with other concessions. There is a certain irony in the fact the NDP government, long the champion of the BCTF is now fighting with it over the class size and composition language, which it says is out of date and unwieldy— the very same thing the previous Liberal government claimed. That there is uncertainty as both sides move forward in bargaining goes without saying. It is unlikely that the BCTF will concede on the restored language after such a lengthy court battle, nor will it budge much on pay increases. After all, two per cent is nothing more than a cost of living adjustment—it is not a salary increase. But neither can the government concede to a contract that might have cost implications with other unions and a bottom line that might have taxpayers seeing red. Let us hope that this is not a summer of discontent for the two sides in this historically fraught relationship, and that school is back in session come September. n

1 BEDROOM WHISTLER VILLAGE TOWNHOUSE

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44-4388 Northlands Blvd Upgraded 1 bedroom townhome in the popular Glaciers Reach complex in Whistler Village. Walk to ski lifts, restaurants and shops. This two level home features open concept kitchen and living room area, gas fireplace and 2 private decks to relax on after a day on the slopes. The complex features pool, hot tub, exercise room and underground parking. Unlimited owner use permitted with nightly rental option.

A contemporary mountain home in Cheakamus Crossing. In-floor radiant heating throughout, gas range & fireplace, private hot tub and double car garage. Stunning views and unparalleled access to all of Whistler’s outdoor recreational activities. Under construction, completion 2019.

ASKING PRICE $750,000

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8 MAY 30, 2019

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Mountain biking has positive future In his opinion piece last week (“How now, brown pow,” Pique, May 23), Andrew Mitchell outlines his concerns for the current state of mountain biking in this community. I would like to take this opportunity to provide an outlook that is significantly more positive and yet rooted in the same passion, culture and commitment of days gone by that Andrew alludes to. It’s important to put on record that in 2017-18, Whistler Off-Road Cycling Association (WORCA) members completed Cut Above, Lord Of Squirrels, Industrial Waste, Scotia Creek climb and rebuilt the Lower Sproatt Dessert Platter. These are all blue-grade trails. In 2019, WORCA members plan to build a blue-grade exit from the wildly popular Lord Of The Squirrels trail, realign HiHi and lower Cat Scratch Fever (both blue grade) after forest thinning impacted them, and we hope to start work on the Far Out/Flashback route, which will connect two existing blue-grade trail networks (Farside and Cheakamus Lake Trail) to create an epic blue-grade loop that could lower potential road user conflict, encourage people to pedal rather than drive to the lake and serve the expanding population of Cheakamus Crossing. These are just the WORCA projects, not counting the considerable and extremely

on exciting, sustainable projects, such as the list of projects above or our very well attended weekly Trail Nights, in the hope we’ll satiate their need to build something. Times are changing, but it’s actually changing for the better. Trails are more sustainable, the number of kids and diversity of riders is increasing every day, community stakeholders are working in an effective and coordinated effort to address many of the concerns (mentioned in Andrew’s column) and passion for riding bikes continues to grow. Perhaps to ease the old man in us all, the Pique could champion a few column inches towards a comprehensive weekly trail update from the WORCA and RMOW trail crews so this hard work is presented to the community. Seb Kemp // Trails Director, WORCA

E-bikes a good alternative for recreation professional work that the Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) crews continually add to the Lost Lake, Emerald Interpretative Forest and Cheakamus River trails. The sport of mountain biking has exploded and there are more riders able to take on the trickiest of trails today than there’s ever been before, so we’re going to have to contend with offering trails that satisfy their needs while doing so sustainably and responsibly. The original trails weren’t built to handle the transition from mountain biking being a niche, hardcore sport to serving the populist

I am not “an average nobody” because I ride an e-bike as stated by Andrew Mitchell in his “How now, brown pow” opinion column (Pique, May 23). Rather, I have ridden a mountain bike since first invented, but my almost 70-year-old legs can no longer get up steep trails. I used to be a WORCA Monday night bike guide who just happens to be getting older. Please stop promoting age discrimination. Secondly, where is the research and evidence that e-bikes do any more damage to trails than regular mountain bikes? Properly designed trails at Whistler can handle all bikes. I observe that aggressive bikers on non e-bikes that hit the brakes and skid around

and tourism machine that it now feeds. We need to build trails that use the gradient wisely and can handle much larger numbers of riders. If we don’t do this, we’ll only increase the desire for people to go out into the forest and build trails without proper authorizations. This is why any move to halt or slow the construction of new, sanctioned trails is going to create more problems than it’ll solve. WORCA is committed to the promotion and construction of sustainable, formally sanctioned trails. To discourage rogue building, we create opportunities for community members to work

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tf: 1-866-978-8866


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR COMING SOON! corners do more damage to the trails than conservative e-bikers. I would never suggest restricting trails. Let everyone be encouraged to recreate! Michael Blaxland // Whistler

Connecting communities to tackle mental health Mountain living can be spectacular—both the beauty of being surrounded by the great outdoors and the camaraderie of a tight-knit community. But the same characteristics that make it unique have also created barriers to addressing a critical issue facing mountain and remote communities around the world: mental health. Despite the prevalence of mental illness—one in five adults will experience mental illness in a given year—the majority of those affected do not receive the services they need. In mountain communities, the issue is intensified. Suicide rates are higher than average, emergency room visits for anxiety and depression are up by triple digits, and we continue to see a rise in substance abuse. Why? Unfortunately, there is a devastating shortage of mental-health-care service providers in smaller and more remote communities. And, even when services are available, those affected are less likely to seek help because of the social stigma already associated with treatment, which is often exacerbated in more intimate communities. The good news is there is brave and inspiring work being done to address the issue in our mountain communities—from the Hope Center’s crisis response work in Eagle County, Colo. to Building Hope’s stigmareduction marketing campaign and provider network in Summit County, Colo. to Park City’s collaborative efforts through the Mental Wellness Alliance to Whistler Community Services Society’s outreach programs to Truckee’s high-school wellness program—just to name a few. At Vail Resorts, we have also made our Epic Wellness program—which provides free, confidential counselling and other mental health care services—available to all of our employees. Last fall, my wife Elana and I launched the Katz Amsterdam Foundation with a clear mission: to be a catalyst for eliminating the stigma of mental illness, increasing access to behavioural and mental healthcare, and improving the quality of care for all in the communities in which Vail Resorts operates. Since then, the foundation has been able to meet with dozens of non-profits and organizations committed to creating truly healthy communities. As we listened to their concerns, perspectives and ideas, we have been inspired by their passion for making a difference. Our goal now is to help amplify the work they are doing by connecting them to critical resources—and to each other. Our communities can be far more powerful if we work collectively. Our foundation is seeking to help make those connections: Connection between communities to share experiences, learnings and programs; connection to

knowledge, research and innovation happening across the world; and connection with financial resources—both through grants from the Katz Amsterdam Charitable Trust and by helping to attract others to give as well. May is Mental Health Awareness Month. In the spirit of connections, we’re hosting the first Katz Amsterdam Foundation Convening, where 60 non-profit, local government and health care leaders from 10 mountain communities (including Whistler) are coming together May 29 to 31 in Boulder, Colo., to establish a foundation for shared learning. While we’re incredibly excited by what this group of passionate and experienced minds will discover, we encourage everyone to get involved by taking even one small action: Ask someone how they are. Share a challenge that you have had. Show others it is OK to ask for help. By connecting, we can help break the stigma and create stronger, more-resilient and more-connected communities. We’re all in this together. Rob Katz, CEO of Vail Resorts // Broomfield, Colo.

Parents oppose three-grade French Immersion classes At Spring Creek Community School, there is a possibility that all French Immersion classes may be comprised of a three-way split of grades 5/6/7 for potentially all four of its late French Immersion classes. There was a meeting held at the school (recently) about different scenarios of class composition for next year, which included this idea. Many parents opposed voiced their opinions; however, school administrators seem fixated on implementing this concept. This year, there was a 5/6/7 split late French Immersion class, which my child was in and it was a challenging experience on an educational and social level. As a Grade 7 in that class, my avid learner switched off for the first four months, while the class went back to basic French so the Grade 5s could understand what was going on. One of my biggest concerns is burnout of the amazing teachers who are given these classes. How can an educator effectively teach three grades to 28 students with the Grade 5s having no previous French and the Grade 6s and 7s at a good level of French language comprehension? Imagine putting a group of never-before, green-run skiers in with blue- and some blackrun skiers all in the same ski lesson. I’m thinking someone would want their money back and the instructor would be quite challenged. The social aspect is another concern for many parents. If they want to build empathy and inclusion for kids of all ages, continue with little buddy groups, reading buddies etc. Our children will learn to get along with people of all ages all their lives; surely this lesson does not need to be taught at the detriment of their education. I would like the school board to take into consideration the opinions of parents, teachers and students on this matter, as I feel we are all not being heard and an agenda is being

Write to us! Letters to the editor must contain the writer’s name, address and a daytime telephone number. Maximum length is 450 words. Pique Newsmagazine reserves the right to edit, condense or refrain from publishing any contribution. Letters reflect the opinion of the writer and not that of Pique Newsmagazine.

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pushed forward. The school district has widely implemented the practice of two-grade split classes, which is now the norm in Whistler and I am personally OK with this. However, why is there a need to push it to three-grade split classes and what is next, four grades in one classroom? Allie Gilchrist // Whistler

School Board needs to listen to parents

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

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I attended a meeting at Spring Creek Elementary (recently), discussing having three grades in one class for the Late French Immersion program. Three grades in one class have not been confirmed at this point, but the meeting was to let us know it’s a possibility. This idea was met by opposition from the parents, myself included, and so I wondered who does this actually benefit? (Currently at Spring Creek, there is one class of Grades 5/6/7 and a straight Grade 5, 6 and 7 in French Immersion.) Social implications: I have seen firsthand the detrimental effects on young impressionable boys with having older boys

Get a rain barrel Most people in Whistler don’t have rain barrels—we’re not accustomed to saving water in this province. But that’s not the way it is anymore. We have two rain barrels but could easily use 10 more when it rains. That’s water flowing away unused. With all the water runoff and spring flooding, we could create another Great Lakes if we saved it, but politicians talk oil pipelines. We can’t drink oil. We can’t grow food in oil. As a tiny beginning, I’d like to see the Resort Municipality of Whistler offer a “rain-barrel incentive.” Sell them at reasonable prices to encourage usage, work with federal and provincial politicians to promote them, not just offer rebates if we happen to buy one. We’ve got more plastic garbage than we know what to do with—that could be turned into rain barrels. I’m not saying plastics don’t have essential uses, but they need to be drastically reduced. What we don’t need is China, or anyone, sending us cheap plastic products that end up in the ocean. We don’t need plastic milk

“We are the voices and advocates for our children...” - CHRISTY CRAIG

influence them in the classroom. It robs children of their innocence. If my nineyear old going into Grade 5 was placed with 12-year-olds in Grade 7, the social implications could/would be devastating. Socially, I want my son to belong with other students of his age. Educational implications: I have asked Grade 7s if they would like to be in a class with Grade 5s. “No way” was the answer. How fair is it to a Grade 7 student that they can’t be in a class with their peers learning at a gradeappropriate level? Grade 7s, who are fluent in French, have very different educational needs than Grade 5s who are just starting to learn a new language. When there is such a large age and educational gap, there is a fear of loss of engagement from the older students and intimidation from the younger. Teacher resources: Teaching is a profession that I would not consider for myself. I admire anyone who has chosen this as their career. With large class sizes and the overall behaviour of students these days, I am surprised that anyone wants to be a teacher. Why make it harder on teachers by having them have to prepare for three grades in one class, especially with students who are also trying to learn a new language? Shouldn’t teachers have the ultimate say in this, as they are the ones who have to deal daily with students? As a parent, I am very opposed to a threegrade split and can’t see any clear benefit. I hope the school district takes into consideration the opposition from the parents. We are the voices and advocates for our children and only have their best interest in mind. Christy Craig // Whistler

12 MAY 30, 2019

containers, margarine only came wrapped in paper at one time but now it has to be soft in a plastic tub for our convenience—conveniences that are killing our planet. Pulp and paper mills are disgusting and plastics were considered an alternative. Hemp is a better alternative. Some people think we shouldn’t have gardens at all, but they want the bees and butterflies that go with them. If wildflowers don’t bloom or die off because of lack of water, the bees won’t have much of a food source. Some people think wildflowers bloom regardless of the weather; that’s not true. I have lupine in areas I never water and they don’t do well if it doesn’t rain regularly— if they don’t bloom, they don’t reseed and eventually die out completely. With rain barrels we can limit watering in our yard to treed areas that, at one time, didn’t need it because of B.C.’s rainfall amount— that’s not the case anymore. I know I’m not the only one who’s noticed all the dead and dying trees. Cedar trees are being hit hard by repeated summers of hot dry weather. Beetles are attacking pine and spruce trees. Dead trees make fire hazards worse, and if wildfires continue like they have and trees keep dying, we won’t be beautiful B.C. much longer. Our forests are dying in front of our eyes and some politicians want more oil pipelines, heating the planet even more, adding to the problem rather than working to find ways to reduce it. There’s more than one way to earn a living. How about a cross-country pipeline for water, create a river and lakes, save water—a lot of it could be along the border, stock them with fish, make it a swimming event … tourism makes money too. If the Chinese could create two rivers out of one, we can create one river with lakes. Erna Gray // Whistler n


PIQUE N’ YER INTEREST

The season that was THE CHAIRS have stopped spinning, the last Hawaiian-shirted, bucket-hat-wearing snowboarder has downloaded, and another ski season has come and gone. Whistler is officially in summer mode. If I remember correctly, I think I said the same thing last fall. Thinking back to November, I recall how opening weekend rapidly approached,

BY MEGAN LALONDE but the snow, on the other hand, took its sweet, sweet time. Take this observation with a grain of salt, considering the only other opening days I experienced were the previous two— both of which were ushered in by Mother Nature with a massive snowstorm—but I was seriously questioning whether Whistler Blackcomb (WB) would even be able to open on time. How do you expect people to ski without any snow? To the surprise of not a single local but me, WB opened right on schedule. Conditions might not have been ideal, terrain might have been limited, and many of the precious white flakes might have been the result of the resort’s

extensive snowmaking system, but the mountain was open. From then on, it was a season full of highs and lows. December was a dream, mostly thanks to record-shattering snowfall—384 centimetres, to be exact. It was good enough to erase any lingering fears of a subpar season after its less-than-exciting kick-off. The last month of 2018 also marked the opening of the new Blackcomb Gondola— but unlike the mountain itself, it couldn’t get up and running on time. Despite Whistler Blackcomb’s insistence that the shiny new lift would be ready to go on opening day, it instead opened to the public on Dec. 15. Since there aren’t too many reasons someone who lives near Creekside would need to upload from the Upper Village, I don’t have a lot of firsthand experience with Blackcomb’s newest lift. I had no complaints the handful of times I used it, but the word on the stroll was that between slow speeds, constant stopping, delayed openings and difficulty loading to capacity, it wasn’t exactly living up to expectations. Only time will tell whether these issues can be resolved by next winter. An even bigger low? The temperatures in February—literally. It was so. Friggin. Cold.

Back in Ontario, those temperatures wouldn’t have made me think twice about tossing my board in the car, throwing on an extra layer or three and heading to the hill, but it seems I’ve finally acclimatized to southwestern B.C. weather. This season, those temperatures—coupled with a lack of new snow and a few seriously icy runs— were enough to make me wuss out and pick a couple more hours of sleep over a morning up the mountain. Needless to say, I was looking forward to some heavy March snowstorms. But then, aside from a somewhat decent day or two, they never came. All of a sudden, it seemed like winter was gone and hot, sunny, spring weather had taken its place. I wasn’t wrong: Temperatures in March in Whistler this year reached a low of -13.9 C and a high of 17.9 C. I couldn’t help but feel like I spent most of the season waiting for snow that never showed up. This season’s snowfall reached approximately 950 cm—more than a third of which took place in December alone. A far cry from 2017-18’s total of 1,239 cm and 2016-17’s 1,307 cm, according to Tourism Whistler’s website. Besides new chairlifts and fewer powder days, one other difference I noticed was the number of people on the hill. It was still busy on weekends, but choked-up runs and lines so long they make me want to throw

in the towel and head for the Umbrella Bar were fewer and farther between, compared to other winters. Was this the result of less-than-ideal early season conditions prompting skiers to book their vacations elsewhere, or sky-high day-pass rates prompting Lower Mainland daytrippers to ski closer to home? Who knows, but it seems like a twoper-cent drop in room night bookings, according to Tourism Whistler, is definitely noticeable, according to me. But at the end of the day—or should I say, Gaper Day—the highs beat out the lows by a long shot this winter. I’ll remember this sunnier-than-usual season as the first I ventured into the backcountry, the first I lined up at 5:30 a.m. for Fresh Tracks and the first I clipped into skinny skis and hit the cross-country trails—all some of the most fun experiences I’ve had since moving here a few years ago. There will always be something to complain about, whether that’s your favourite side hits being groomed out or a lift that’s stopped for a few too many minutes. That said, I think we can all agree the benefits of getting to live and ski in Whistler will always outweigh the cons. Hey, even if you get stuck on a chairlift, at least you get to take in one of the best views in the world. n

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OUR ONLINE CONVERSATION What caught Pique readers’ attention online? This week, it was Andrew Mitchell’s opinion column, “How now, brown pow,” which discussed—you guessed it—mountain biking. Or, more specifically, some of the problems associated with the sport in 2019. While some appreciated the “good points” and the “interesting read” it provided, one commenter added:

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An important issue is that we need more investment in trails development and management. The marketing of trails has been going (too) well.

The number of species documented for the first time in the 12 years the BioBlitz event has been running.

DID YOU KNOW?

Others took issue with Mitchell’s stance that e-bikes, “take that glorious suffering away—health is no longer a prerequisite or side effect of the sport,” and “also increase erosion on trails.” Read one post:

“ ” “

The author has never ridden an E-Mtb.

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The percentage of all calls from Whistler to B.C. Emergency Health Services that are treated as urgent or higher in response.

Another Whistler Off-Road Cycling Association bike guide chimed in, adding

Stop discriminating against us old people. Where is the evidence E-bikes do more damage to trails? I observe laying on the brakes on downhill trails by aggressive non e-bikers does the most damage.

” ”

Properly designed trails at Whistler can handle all mountain bikes.

OF INTEREST

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On May 31, the museum will open a new exhibit featuring the various ways people have found a place to call home in the valley. Featured in the display is McKeever’s General Store the original name of the Alpine Meadows Market. It was named for Harry and Linda McKeever who opened the store in 1986.

THROWBACK THURSDAY

In this issue writer tobias c. van Veen explored the lives of “working-class kids” in the resort. There is no doubt that we rely on young people to serve, build, clean and more to keep Whistler running as the No.1 ski resort in North America. Van Veen tells the story through photos and interviews offering readers a unique glimpse into the everyday workers of the resort. More pay parking P.12

Pemby fest bankrupt P.24

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The amount visitation to the Maury Young Arts Centre spiked from 2017 to 2018.

3,535 The number of calls in 2018 to B.C. Emergency Health Services for medical emergencies in the corridor: Whistler with 1,902, Squamish with 1,392 and Pemberton with 241.

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WHISTLER’S WEEKLY NEWSMAGAZINE

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NEWS WHISTLER

Federal Tourism Growth Strategy receives high praise INCREASED FUNDING, INVESTMENT STRATEGIES AND COLLABORATION AT HEART OF STRATEGY

BY BRADEN DUPUIS THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT’S new Tourism Growth Strategy—released on May 21—is getting high praise from industry stakeholders. “It’s a very exciting strategy,” said provincial tourism minister Lisa Beare. “I’ve had a number of meetings with (federal tourism) minister (Melanie) Jolie … and have reiterated B.C.’s tourism priorities, and we shared our new strategic framework on tourism with the minister, and I’m really happy to see that reflected in the federal strategy.” The plan aims to grow tourism sector revenue by 25 per cent by 2025. To do so, it proposes three “pillars:” $58.5 million in funding through the Canadian Experiences Fund to enhance Canada’s tourism products and experiences; the formation of “tourism investment groups” where all levels of government will collaborate to invest more efficiently while meeting local priorities and ways to raise private investment; and the creation of a new Tourism Industry Economic Strategy The federal government’s new Tourism Growth Strategy aims to (among other things) enhance cultural tourism offerings like those found at Whistler’s Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre.

CONNECTING TO CULTURE

PHOTO BY LOGAN SWAYZE/COURTESY OF THE SQUAMISH LIL’WAT CULTURAL CENTRE

16 MAY 30, 2019

Table to provide a platform for government and industry leaders to work together on addressing challenges. Overall, the strategy is “very positive,” said Tourism Whistler president Barrett Fisher. “I think they’ve got a really solid foundation and a really solid basis, (and) they have attributed some specific funds against some of the items,” she said, pointing to $78.6 million in the budget over two years to help with things like visa and border processing. “So there’s some specific

that would be consistent with the size of the resort.” Today, the Conference Centre can host groups of 800 to 1,200—a second ballroom with some additional breakout space could potentially double that, Fisher said. While talk of the expansion is still very preliminary, mention in the federal tourism strategy of the need for greater investment in infrastructure could prove beneficial to the project. The plan is exciting for Indigenous

“It’s a very exciting strategy.” - LISA BEARE

items in there that are very tangible … as far as a high-level strategy it’s definitely going in the right direction.” In Whistler, the goal is to develop a more “moderate level of tourism” on a yearround basis, Fisher said. “So from our perspective, investing into shoulder season experiences or investing into some of the winter months that are not as buoyant due to holiday peak periods would certainly be advantageous to us,” she said, adding that on the infrastructure side, the long-term goal is a major expansion for the Whistler Conference Centre. “In order to be competitive, the Whistler Conference Centre ideally would have a second ballroom, in order to meet and feed guests, and to bring in the size of groups

tourism operators as well, said Brady Smith, executive director of the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre (SLCC). “There’s a focus on enhancing Canadian tourism through an Indigenous lens,” Smith said, noting that the SLCC can now request funding up to $500,000 to help pay for new programs, product development and employee retention. “Getting capital for products and programming and core funding has always been the most difficult component of our jobs. Finding the resources, finding the grants, and then having to report back on it,” he said. “Now the tourism strategy from the federal government allows us to apply regionally and individually as organizations for this Canadian

Experiences Fund, at a large level.” Locally, from 2014 to 2017, Indigenous tourism increased from between 17.5 to 22.5 per cent, in line with the growth in Indigenous tourism on the national level (23 per cent) and outpacing growth in the sector overall (14.5 per cent), Smith said. “I do see that we are enticing a different type of travellers from the U.K., Germany and China, seeing that we actually have a bigger opportunity to leverage those big, huge nations and demographic pools to showcase our Indigenous values here,” he said. “So I hope that growth continues, maybe not that same trend of 23 per cent for next year, but we’re hoping between 15 and 20 (per cent).” From the perspective of BC Chamber of Commerce president and CEO Val Litwin, the strategy is breaking new ground on the federal level. “I don’t know that we’ve ever seen a federal government step up to the plate in this way from a strategy standpoint … it’s absolutely a step in the right direction, and I love the tone of this federal government giving tourism a better shake,” Litwin said. The plan is especially exciting for tourism operators in rural B.C., he added. “The more we’re talking about this on bigger platforms and we’re talking about a more strategic approach to product investment and development, the more we’ll be having meaningful conversations at a federal level on this particular economic driver,” he said. “So as we continue to elevate the profile, I think that’s a good thing.” n


NEWS WHISTLER

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Grizzly plan review reveals unanswered, and unasked, questions RMOW’S ALPINE TRAIL PLANNING STUDIES MISS THE MARK ON GRIZZLY CONSERVATION, EXPERT SAYS

BY BRADEN DUPUIS WHILE THE EXPANSION of Whistler’s Alpine Trail Network into the Sproatt and Rainbow Mountain area was preceded by a grizzly bear risk assessment and conflict management strategy, an independent review of both documents by a renowned grizzly expert found some big, unanswered questions. “Neither of the documents that I read question the effects of the expansion of recreation on grizzly bear habitat or discuss the implication of this increased network on grizzly bears and the conservation of grizzly bears,” said Dr. Lana Ciarniello, in a presentation to Whistler’s Committee of the Whole on May 28. “They don’t ask that question.” The Squamish-Lillooet Grizzly Bear Population Unit (within which the Sproatt/ Rainbow trails are located) is still considered “threatened,” with about 12 bears per 1,000 square kilometres (about half its carrying capacity). Grizzly sightings on the alpine trails (opened in 2017) started to become more common late in the summer last year, and the Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) closed the trails to the public in September. Since opening, the trails have seen about 2,500 users a month from summer to fall, for a total of about 14,000 users every year. “That is extremely high. That is very, very high in bear habitat,” said Ciarniello, one of Canada’s leading bear experts with the International Union for Conservation of Nature. But the impact on grizzly habitat is not the only thing missing from the studies, Ciarniello said, adding that, though grizzly bears in southwestern B.C. are some of the most-researched bears in the province, the reports don’t make use of the data. “We know a lot about these bears. We have DNA on every bear in the SteinNahatlatch … but there’s not a mention of it. There’s not even a report in here,” she said. “You have so much information on this population, yet, one of the only things that was in here was that the bears are feeding on salmon, and so they’ll come down low.” And even that detail isn’t accurate, Ciarniello said, noting that, in the case of females (which are crucial to sustaining the population), they typically stay high, feeding on blueberries and the “extremely fatty” seeds of the whitebark pine, which are linked to reproduction. And if the reports are based on the assumption that the grizzlies are staying low in the valley, how does that affect risk assessment?

After conducting her review, Ciarniello was left wondering what the goal for the Squamish-Lillooet grizzly population is in the RMOW’s bear risk assessment. “What is it? Is it the conservation of grizzly bear habitat, or is it further expanding human recreation into Crown lands? I don’t know,“ she said. “Can a balance be achieved? These are the kinds of things that I think would be valuable talking about if grizzly bear conservation is a goal.” The Bear Risk Assessment and Human-Grizzly Bear Conflict Management Strategy were conducted by the Wind River Bear Institute Canada and Grey Owl Consulting, respectively. Both were “highly recommended by the province,” said RMOW chief administrative officer Mike Furey. “We’d like to go back and circle back to them and share your analysis with them and sort of compare and contrast those two,” he said after the presentation. “I guess overall, we really appreciate your feedback, because we do have 3.5 million visitors coming here a year who want to go up that way, so that whole model is going to continue into the future … it is a coexistence model we’re trying to figure out, (to) try and avoid that conflict.” The Coast to Cascades Grizzly Bear Initiative (which asked Ciarniello to review the RMOW’s plans) has been critical of the municipality’s trail planning—or lack thereof—in the past. “To me, the lesson is I think we could have done the existing trail network development with pre-planning, and not got ourselves as much into the situation where we had the closures last year,” said Coast to Cascades’ Johnny Mikes at the meeting. “If we don’t change things in terms of how we manage up there, or routing trails or whatever the suite of solutions is going to be, we will end up having situations where we’re closing trails that the muni spent a million dollars, or the better part of, building, so something needs to be done there to deal with those issues.” The RMOW budgeted $350,000 in 2019 (followed by a further $300,000 in both 2020 and 2021) for work on Whistler’s Alpine Trail Network, including completion of the Beverley trail, a focus on developing access from the southwest peak to the south flank trail and more. Asked for his thoughts on the presentation after the meeting, Mayor Jack Crompton said he was impressed with Ciarniello’s work. “I’m enthusiastic about science-based contributions to our planning processes,” he said. “I think it informs the decisions that we’ll make, and we’ll consider that input seriously.” n

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NEWS WHISTLER

Cheakamus Phase 2 gets funds for planning COUNCIL BRIEFS: STRATEGIC PLANNING COMMITTEE TERMS OF REFERENCE ENDORSED; COMPOST CONTRACT AWARDED

BY BRADEN DUPUIS PHASE 2 of Cheakamus Crossing is one step closer to breaking ground. At its May 28 meeting, council gave first three readings for an amendment to the five-year financial plan bylaw that will direct money towards developing 100 units of employee housing in Cheakamus Crossing. The amendment will transfer $200,000 from the housing reserves (representing the bulk of the current housing reserves balance) to the Whistler 2020 Development Corp (WDC) to develop the units on Parcel A in Cheakamus. The money will be used for planning and site preparation with an eye to breaking ground this fall, director of finance Carlee Price said in a presentation to council. “The reason that this transfer is happening immediately is because WDC does need immediate cash in order to continue to move this project forward,” Price said. “They are working on site preparation for Parcel A and do expect to begin construction sometime after the fall.” Currently, Whistler’s Employee Housing Service Charge bylaw—which

COUNCIL BRIEFS Whistler’s mayor and council watch a presentation at the May 28 council meeting. PHOTO BY BRADEN DUPUIS

collects money from developers’ projects to be used for housing—provides about $40,000 to the reserves every year. But with the provincial government now collecting Municipal and Regional District Tax (MRDT) on properties listed

with online accommodation sites like Airbnb (and those funds being remitted to the municipality quarterly, potentially to be used for employee housing), the reserves are set to grow. The Resort Municipality of Whistler

(RMOW) budgeted $750,000 in revenue from online accommodation providers for 2019, though “we don’t have a tremendous amount of visibility” into if that number will stay the same in future years, Price said. Tourism Whistler (TW) has also “substantially agreed” to contribute its portion of the MRDT revenue collected from online accommodation providers to employee housing for one year (the total amount of that contribution also won’t be known until the end of year). “I’d like to thank the board members of TW. This helps a lot in keeping the project planning for the housing moving along— costs are being incurred today and every day so this really is helpful,” said Councillor John Grills. WDC will be bringing an update to council “in the near future,” said Coun. Duane Jackson, who also serves as chair of the WDC. “We hired Murdoch and Co. as an architect earlier in the year, who has prepared plans and submitted them to the RMOW at the planning department,” Jackson said, adding that the plans have ben reviewed by the municipal Advisory Design Panel (ADP).

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NEWS WHISTLER << FROM PAGE 18 “WDC will review the input from the ADP and from staff … before we revise the plan and then present it to council,” he said. “We will continue progress as fast as we can.” The RMOW unveiled its preliminary plans for Cheakamus Crossing Phase 2 (with a target of at least 550 rental units and a move-in date as early as spring 2021) at an open house in October (see Pique, Oct. 4, 2018).

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STRATEGIC PLANNING TERMS OF REFERENCE ENDORSED; MEMBERS-ATLARGE NEEDED Calling all qualified Whistlerites: Your expertise is needed at municipal hall. With council’s endorsement of the terms of reference for a new Strategic Planning Committee (SPC) on May 28—which have been revised to include five members-atlarge from the community rather than the three that were originally proposed on

manager of resort experience and director of planning. Following the motion to endorse the terms of reference, council expressed excitement over the new committee. “Change is either constant or frequent or inevitable—geopolitically, economically, environmentally,” said Coun. Arthur De Jong. “We’ve just gone through the only time in our operating history where we’ve had four good winters in a row, so I really have my eyes on scenario planning so we can be resilient in whatever’s thrown at us stepping into the future.”

COMMITTEE SHUFFLING; CLIMATE CHANGE COORDINATOR HIRED Some municipal councillors are taking on new committee roles. At the May 28 meeting, council voted to shift Coun. Ralph Forsyth to the Audit and Finance Committee, Coun. Cathy Jewett to the Human Resources Standing Committee and Mayor Jack Crompton to the Whistler

“Change is either constant or frequent or inevitable— geopolitically, economically, environmentally.” - ARTHUR DE JONG

April 16, and remove representatives from Tourism Whistler, Whistler Blackcomb and the Whistler Chamber of Commerce—the search begins for qualified candidates. The successful community members will have skills and experience in community planning and development and extensive community involvement, and the positions will be advertised in the coming weeks, said economic development manager Toni Metcalf in a presentation to council. “It will be comprised of members who bring a unique and strategic perspective, both generally in terms of strategic thinking about the bigger picture and to the challenges that we face as a community,” she said. The committee will act in an advisory capacity to support council in its decision making, with three primary goals: providing input on long-term development, providing strategic input for potential amendments to the Official Community Plan, and to establish guiding metrics and targets “that will effectively help support, manage and balance Whistler’s resort and community capacity, while still protecting our unique sense of place and meeting the community’s longer-term needs,” Metcalf said. Along with the five members-at-large, the SPC will be comprised of Mayor Jack Crompton (who will serve as chair), two members of council and the RMOW’s Chief Administrative Officer, general

Animals Galore board of directors. As well, the RMOW has finally settled on its Climate Change Coordinator. Max Kniewasser, a Whistler resident of three years, will step into the role on June 10, announced De Jong at the May 28 meeting. “He was previously with the Pembina Institute as the director of the B.C. clean energy economy program, so we’ve got a real bright mind there,” De Jong said.

COMPOST CONTRACT AWARDED Also at the May 28 meeting, council awarded a contract for compost operations at the Whistler Compost Facility in the Callaghan Valley to GFL Environmental Inc., which has successfully operated the compost facility for the last 10 years. GFL won out over two other bidders, and will now enter into a five-year contract with the RMOW that the company says will result in savings for the municipality (from the current $131.60/metric tonne of organic material processed to $125/metric tonne). The total amount of the contract will depend on the amount of compostable material each year. Last year, the 6,423 metric tonnes of organics received at $131.60 per tonne cost the RMOW $845,266.80. Under the new agreement, that would cost $802,875 (saving the RMOW $42,391). n


NEWS WHISTLER

RMOW bylaws ‘reasonable,’ Supreme Court judge rules TOURIST ACCOMMODATION BYLAWS NOT OUTSIDE LOCAL AUTHORITY, JUDGMENT SAYS

BY BRADEN DUPUIS THE RESORT Municipality of Whistler (RMOW)’s decision to adopt bylaws concerning tourist accommodations was “reasonable” and within its authority, according to a Supreme Court of BC judge’s ruling. The judgment from Justice Diane MacDonald was filed in the Supreme Court of B.C. on May 14. “The RMOW is pleased that the judge upheld our bylaws and covenants,” said Mayor Jack Crompton. “The ruling recognizes Whistler’s planning and land use was thoughtfully laid out from the beginning, and recognizes the need to have zoning that provides both residential and tourist accommodation, as well as bylaws that are responsive to changes in tourist accommodation marketing to help ensure that overnight visitors have positive experiences in Whistler.” The bylaws in question were introduced in relation to the RMOW’s Tourist Accommodation Review conducted in 2016 and 2017.

According to the RMOW, they were meant to address the new trend of online nightly rentals, and reinforce the requirement that all nightly rentals in stratas operate under a single, front-desk booking system (which caused a small uproar from owners in the

“Two of these strata rental units were purchased prior to the enactment of the bylaws. The petitioners intended to use the strata units for the purpose of tourist rentals through self-management,” states the judgment, adding that the petitioners

“Whistler’s decision to adopt the bylaws was reasonable.” - JUSTICE DIANE MACDONALD

Alpenglow Lodge, in particular. See Pique, June 1, 2017). But in a petition to the Supreme Court, two owners argued the RMOW doesn’t have the authority to compel individual strata lot owners to participate in a rental pool arrangement. Through their companies, the petitioners, Brent Lokash and Marla Coleman, began to purchase strata units in Whistler’s Cascade Lodge in May 2017, according to the judgment.

owned 19 units in the lodge as of May 2019. ResortQuest, listed as a respondent on the petition along with the RMOW, was managing the units prior to their purchase. But when the petitioners acquired their new units, they were denied access by ResortQuest, which told them they had to sign a rental-management agreement. The petitioners declined, and a notice of civil claim was filed against ResortQuest on June 23, 2017, claiming the company was unlawfully occupying the unit and denying

access, and seeking relief. With that matter still before the courts— and an appeal of Justice Macdonald’s ruling not out of the question—Lokash and Coleman declined to comment. The petitioners received approval from the Cascade Lodge Strata Council to change the locks on their units on July 11, 2017, and began advertising and renting their units outside of the rental pool, prompting the RMOW to issue them a cease and desist letter on August 8, 2017. In her conclusion, MacDonald stated that Whistler had the authority to adopt the bylaws. “Whistler’s decision to adopt the bylaws was reasonable,” she wrote. “They are not vague or uncertain and they do not impermissibly regulate land, or users rather than use.” Further, the RMOW’s “decision to allow strata unit owners, through a 3/4 vote, to appoint or replace the rental pool manager is reasonable,” MacDonald wrote, and its 2018 renewal of ResortQuest’s business licence at Cascade Lodge “was a reasonable interpretation of the Tourist Accommodation Bylaw." n

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NEWS WHISTLER

Alcohol suspected to be factor in accident POLICE BRIEFS: STOLEN ITEMS RECOVERED, ‘PROLIFIC PROPERTY OFFENDERS’ BUSTED IN SQUAMISH; BRITANNIA CHECKPOINT NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR LONG WEEKEND TRAFFIC, SAYS RCMP

BY MEGAN LALONDE A 58-YEAR-OLD Vancouver man was arrested in Whistler following a motor vehicle accident in which alcohol was suspected to be a factor, local police confirmed. At approximately 10:45 p.m. on Monday, May 27, Whistler RCMP received a report of a vehicle in a ditch at the intersection of Aspen Road and Whistler Drive, according to a release. Once at the scene, police discovered a grey, 2018 Ford F150 occupied by one person who officers believed to be in care and control of the vehicle. “Police began an investigation into the crash and through that investigation suspected alcohol was a contributing factor,” read the release. The driver was brought to the Whistler RCMP Detachment to provide breath samples, in order to determine the concentration of alcohol in his system. Following those tests the Vancouver man was arrested and subsequently released from police custody with a promise to appear in North Vancouver Court on August 28. Police continue to investigate this file and

are asking anyone who witnessed this event but has not spoken to police, or perhaps saw the vehicle driving in the area on Monday, to contact the Whistler RCMP at 604 932-3044 or Crimestoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS.

RCMP BRITANNIA ROAD STOP NOT TO BLAME FOR MAY LONG WEEKEND TRAFFIC BACKUPS Were you stuck in backed-up traffic near Britannia Beach last Saturday, May 18? If you were blaming your traffic woes on RCMP road monitoring, you need to look somewhere else say officials. Police “can confirm that last weekend’s highway backup was entirely due to normal long weekend traffic volume and was not at all a result (of) the RCMP’s road stop,” said a spokesperson with the RCMP’s BC Traffic Division in an email. Pique originally reached out to the RCMP’s Sea to Sky Traffic Services looking for more information after word of the road monitoring and highway backups flooded social media over the May long weekend. Despite dozens of photos and comments posted in online forums like the Sea to Sky

Road Conditions Facebook page referencing the check point, police say they “were not interfering with the flow of traffic” during the approximately three hours they spent conducting enforcement in Britannia Beach last Saturday. “Every Saturday the northbound traffic is very heavy, however, on the May long weekend the northbound traffic is notoriously extremely heavy and is always slow going from the Furry Creek two lane area to the one northbound lane through Britannia Beach,” explained Cpl. Elizabeth Lynn in an email.  “Knowing the traffic would be very slow going through Britannia Beach area and not wanting to interfere with the already heavy traffic, the police set up in Britannia Beach monitoring the northbound traffic. Any vehicle safety issues or motor vehicle act infractions the police would flag the vehicle and pull it  into the Galileo parking lot to conduct enforcement. The parking lot was used to ensure the police, the motor vehicle being stopped and the motoring public’s safety.   “The slow moving traffic on Saturday May 18th was merely from the sheer volume of the holiday long weekend,” she added.

RCMP ARREST ‘PROLIFIC PROPERTY OFFENDERS’ Squamish police recovered not only “several vehicles which they believed to be stolen” on Sunday afternoon, May 26, but also two men they believe to be responsible for a widerange of recent thefts in the region as well, confirmed RCMP. Alongside the Sea to Sky General Investigations Unit, Squamish RCMP located the vehicles at a gas station in Brackendale. After further investigation, police located two men nearby. The pair, aged 25 and 36 and both from Penticton, was subsequently arrested on scene. RCMP was also able to recover four mountain bikes that had been reported stolen during two separate residential break-and-enters a week prior in the Ravenswood neighbourhood, as well as other items allegedly stolen from vehicles in Whistler earlier this month. According to the release, the 36-yearold man was held in custody due to an outstanding warrant for a stolen vehicle and flight from police out of Penticton. The 25-year-old man was released from custody and due to appear in North Vancouver Court in July 2019.  n

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NEWS WHISTLER

Whistler’s TFWP policy adopted at BC Chamber AGM DELEGATES ADOPT 66 POLICIES, WITH AN INCREASING ENVIRONMENTAL FOCUS

BY BRADEN DUPUIS A RESOLUTION from the Whistler Chamber of Commerce concerning “minor modifications” to the Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP) was well received at the BC Chamber’s annual general meeting in Burnaby last week, and will now head to the national level. “The (TFWP) needs to be modernized, and this piece is only one piece of many in an effort to support and increase the labour pool that we have,” said Whistler Chamber CEO Melissa Pace. “The modifications will serve to meet the employers’ needs while ensuring that Canadians remain first in line for available jobs and that foreign workers are protected.” The policy calls for reduced minimum advertising periods of two weeks for roles and regions where there is a demonstrated lack of domestic labour supply and regional unemployment rates are lower than five per cent; an expansion of applications eligible for 10-day expedited processing to include applications with employment durations for

six months or less, and; a review of screening processes to ensure that decisions with respect to the completeness of applications are made by the staff responsible for application review. “The intent here in the future is to modernize it (and) streamline it,” Pace said.

delegates in Burnaby from May 23 to 25, and a total of 66 policies were approved for 2019. “I think there was definitely a very balanced focus, or let’s say dual-pronged focus, on the environment and climate change as much as there was the economy,” said BC

“The housing is continuing to be a challenge.” - MELISSA PACE

Staffing remains one of the biggest challenges Whistler businesses are facing, Pace said, along with higher labour costs and a higher cost of doing business in general. “The housing is continuing to be a challenge. If there’s no housing the labour tends to not come … it’s not getting better yet,” Pace said. “We do have some housing coming up through the (Whistler Housing Authority). It’s not going to be enough to put a big dent into the labour market, but it’s the start of something.” The BC Chamber AGM hosted 230

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Chamber president and CEO Val Litwin. “Policies like the phase-out of single-use plastics was a big conversation, enhancing our investments provincially in emergency preparedness … (there’s) definitely an acknowledgement that climate change is now a part of our future. “This is not a sort of passing consideration of how we need to brace ourselves for the future, this is now being baked into business consideration wherever you are in the province.” The shift towards a greater focus on

environmental policies has been happening for awhile, Litwin said (the BC Chamber was the first in Canada to support a carbon tax, he pointed out). “There’s always been an awareness and I think the B.C. business community has always led the pack, but now year over year we’re seeing more policy come forward in that vein,” he said. “And I also think the network self identifies as one that thinks they can help government find that balance moving forward, where we’re applying good science to some of the conversations around species-at-risk, and we’re also being thoughtful in how some of these management measures with particular species are rolled out, or in what combination and where, such that local communities aren’t left in the dust, local economies.” The BC Chamber’s policy manual will now be “edited and polished,” to be published by the end of June. “The first stakeholder to get that beyond of course our membership at the grassroots level will be government,” Litwin said. “So this will now become essential reading for every civil servant and every cabinet minister here in B.C.” n

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Naturespeak: Whistler to Pemberton BioBlitz with iNaturalist public are also a big part of the BioBlitz! To encourage you and your friends to upload sightings to the Whistler to Pemberton BioBlitz “project” (and to get to know the website since it’s super handy outside of BioBlitz as well), we have draw prizes of a $100 gift certificate to Nesters Market, a $100 gift certificate to the Bike Co. and a Ziptrek Ecotours zipline tour for two. For every sighting you submit to the “project” you will get your name in the draw. The “project” will be running the week of BioBlitz, June 3 to 9. Happy BioBlitzing!

BY KRISTINA SWERHUN HAVE YOU EVER WISHED there was an easy way to help identify interesting things you see in nature? Well there is and it’s called iNaturalist. How it works is you first take photos of whatever you find interesting, anything from plants to birds to bugs. Then you submit them to a fun, interactive website, which automatically suggests identifications, which could be verified by experts and amateurs worldwide. Photos can be uploaded instantly from either a cell phone or at home after you have downloaded them to your computer. If your cell phone or camera has GPS tracking enabled, then iNaturalist will automatically map and record the location of the sighting for you. Experts and amateurs alike use the app and website since it’s such an easy way to keep track of sightings on maps and lists and see what others are finding. This free tool was created by the California Academy of Sciences in partnership with the National Geographic Society and so far, more than 200,000 species from around the world have been recorded. Another useful feature on iNaturalist is

BIOBLITZ PUBLIC EVENTS: HELPFUL SITE iNaturalist will lend a hand to those attending BioBlitz. PHOTO SUBMITTED

that you can create “projects” for specific purposes and special events. The Whistler to Pemberton BioBlitz is coming up June 6 to 9, so we’ve created a “project” for it that you can search for by that name and join. This is our 13th annual BioBlitz, which is a fun event to count as many species as possible—mammals, birds, plants, frogs,

fish, bugs—you name it. A BioBlitz introduces people to real (and fun) science and the amazing diversity surrounding us. After the past 12 years, more than 1,300 Whistler species have been documented for the first time by BioBlitz. We’ve invited some of BC’s best scientists here to take part, but sightings from the

FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 7:30 P.M. at Legends Hotel: BC’s Big & Old Trees  by Andy MacKinnon and Bob Brett. SATURDAY, JUNE 8, 7:30 P.M. at Legends Hotel: Multiple presentations—Finds of the Day and Updates from the Field. SATURDAY, JUNE 8, 9:30 P.M. at Alpha Lake Park:  Night Critters—Watch as scientists catalogue everything that comes out at night, including bats! (Cancelled if raining.) Naturespeak is prepared by the Whistler Naturalists. To learn more about Whistler’s natural world, go to whistlernaturalists.ca. n

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NEWS WHISTLER

PTSD memorial slated for Saturday, June 1 EVENT TO DOUBLE AS FUNDRAISER FOR CAMP MY WAY

BY DAN FALLOON WHEN

PRESENTED WITH the chance to attend a camp to help him work through some mental-health issues, Capt. Dale Lundy of Salt Spring Island Fire Rescue thought of a handful of his colleagues who were better choices. But when he ultimately took the opportunity to attend Camp My Way, located near D’Arcy, it was a worthwhile experience. “I could think of four other people off the top of my head who could utilize the experience more than I, not that I didn’t need it,” Lundy said. “(Salt Spring’s chief) said, I think it would be good for you because you would embrace whatever it is that was being offered and be able bring something back to our community and our department.” Though not officially diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Lundy had experienced a tough decade as his older brother committed suicide in 2010 at age 49, then in 2013, a colleague at the fire department died of brain cancer at age 35. The following year, his father passed and shortly after, he went through a divorce. He started speaking with a professional around this time, but his time at the camp last June

WORLDWIDE AWARENESS Terrance Kosikar (second from left) with members of the Bonn/Cologne Airport Fire Department.

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helped Lundy take another step forward. “It was totally out of my comfort zone. I wasn’t ready to go spend a week in the woods figuring my shit out, if you will,” he said. “It was really a life-changing time up there for me, not only for what I experienced, but for the other campers and what they were going through.” Lundy, a 28-year veteran of the force, learned new breathing exercises and how to

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meditate over the course of one week at the camp. Also included in the visit was plenty of exercise in the form of running, pushups, canoeing, and archery. The camp was founded by executive director Terrance Kosikar, one of the first responders when Georgian luger Nodar Kumaritashvili died in an accident at the Whistler Sliding Centre in the leadup to the 2010 Winter Olympic Games.

When dealing with the fallout, Kosikar experienced addiction, homelessness and suicidal thoughts as a result of PTSD. He has started to turn his life around, becoming an advocate for first responders and raising awareness through events in which he flips a 400-pound (181-kilogram) tractor tire. Camp My Way’s latest endeavour, the First Responder Family Fundraiser, is set for this Saturday, June 1 in Vancouver. The event will begin at the Olympic Cauldron at Jack Poole Plaza at 11 a.m. before making its way to Stanley Park for tire flipping along the Seawall. It will be a worldwide affair, as satellite events as far away as North Carolina and Germany are planned. In an email, Capt. Michael Wehle of the Bonn/Cologne Airport Fire Department noted Germany has much better PTSD care and far fewer suicides by first responders. He said it’s important to support their colleagues overseas. “This is the reason why we help our brothers in Canada and we do this event also. All our brothers in the world should do this,” he wrote. At the local event, in addition to several first responders and search-and-rescue volunteers coming from across the province to attend, members of Vancouver’s Georgian community are also expected to

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lend their support. Kosikar had a meeting with Ambassador Konstantin Kavtaradze and several other Georgians in which he was embraced and felt relief after bearing guilt from Kumaritashvili’s death. Kosikar is looking to raise $10,000, which would allow for two first responders and their partners to come to camp for

can’t afford it.” In addition to wanting to bring in more people who need the services, Kosikar also wants to host them for longer. “Our ultimate goal is to be up and running year-round (with) 100 acres of land (with) 30-, 60-, 90-day programs allowing the campers a lot more time to settle into

“That’s why it’s so important ... By the time you need help, you can’t afford it.” - TERRANCE KOSIKAR

a week, as well as to buy a canoe and other outdoor equipment. With the next camp slated for late June, Kosikar is glad to fill some more demand after the camp welcomed 57 people over the course of six week-long sessions, but added that he receives several messages a week from people looking for help. “I get anywhere from eight to 12 messages a week from people wanting and needing to come up to the camp,” he said. “The fire department’s not going to pay for it. WCB (Work Safe BC) is not going to pay for it. “They’ve exhausted all their money. They’ve lost their family. They’ve lost their jobs. They have nothing. That’s why it’s so important … By the time you need help, you

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their environment, use the tools that we’re sharing them,” he said. Lundy will be in attendance this Saturday alongside his girlfriend. He has collected $1,000 and should be well on his way to his goal of $1,500 when he catches the ferry to the mainland. That morning, as with every other, Lundy will apply his major takeaways from Camp My Way: meditation, gratitude and forgiveness as necessary. “I don’t have to forgive every day, but there are certain things that I’m definitely hanging onto that I have to let go of,” he said. “The bigger part of my morning routine is just thinking about the things I’m grateful for in my life.” n

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31


NEWS PEMBERTON & THE VALLEY

VOP Mayor urges public civility after verbal harassment of enhancement plan workers COUNCIL BRIEFS: PAVING AND CONTINGENCY LOAN; WATER RESTRICTIONS; FOOD AFFORDABILITY

BY JOEL BARDE THE VILLAGE of Pemberton (VOP) council is urging the public to respect downtown enhancement project workers after hearing reports of disrespectful behaviour towards flaggers. Speaking to council at the May 28 VOP regular council meeting, mayor Mike Richman said that one flagger has quit after being verbally abused. “We had one of our flaggers … quit because of abusive language and behaviour,” said Richman. “We’ve had staff verbally abused (as well). There has been a lot of online social media personal attacks ... and it’s wearing staff down.” Flaggers—who are responsible for safely directing the public—are facing verbal abuse on a daily basis, added Nikki Gilmore, chief administrative officer for the VOP. “We’re going to work with RCMP to see if they can start doing a few patrols, and see what Hazelwood (Construction Services Inc., the firm carrying out the project) has for their bullying and harassment policies to make sure that we try to limit this as much as we can,” she said. With construction to continue throughout the summer, VOP Mayor Mike Richman is encouraging more civility in general. “We understand that this is disruptive and it has an impact on everybody,

BUSY BUSY Flaggers working on the VOP downtown enhancement plan are facing issues with verbal harassment. PHOTO BY JOEL BARDE

32 MAY 30, 2019

especially businesses and people coming into the downtown area,” said Richman, following the meeting. “These are people that are just doing their job. What we are asking for most is civility. The end product is going to be wonderful.”

PAVING AND CONTINGENCY LOAN With the project well underway, council also gave staff the OK to move forward with a loan authorization initiative at the meeting on May 28. The VOP will be going to the public to ask for permission to borrow up to $980,000 for cost overruns, as well as the cost of paving the parking lot behind the community barn. Sheena Fraser, manager of corporate and legislative services for the VOP, explained that public approval will be sought through an Alternate Approval Process, meaning that the VOP will advertise the details of the loan and the public will need to register opposition to veto it. A total of 10 per cent of Pemberton residents are needed to stop the loan. “We (would be) looking at 195 eligible electors to fill out a form and bring it in for the bylaw not to move forward,” said Fraser, adding that details of the loan will be advertised in Pique and the deadline for registering opposition is set at July 8. “It doesn’t happen very often that there’s that many people who come in.” In her comments, Councillor Amica Antonelli asked if staff foresees cost overruns at this time. Gilmore said that so far the project is coming in within budget and there is no

indication that the VOP will need to access the bulk of the proposed loan.

WATER RESTRICTIONS With another hot summer just around the corner, staff will likely be clarifying the rules and regulations around when and what you can water or clean outside. Staff gave readings one through three of a bylaw that would amend the VOP’s outdoor water regulations on May 28. (The changes still require fourth and final readings to take force.) Adopted in 2015, the regulations set out four water restriction levels and are in effect from June 1 to Sept. 30. They include clarifying that “sprinkling” does not apply to hand watering by a hose, drip irrigation, micro irrigation systems, or the application of water to flower beds and vegetable gardens. Moreover, the bylaw will be amended to include boats and other recreational vehicles to a list of things that can’t be washed when Level 3 and 4 restrictions come into force. Fraser said that this was important as some members of the community were effectively exploiting a loophole in how the current bylaw is formulated with respect to Level 3 and 4 restriction levels They preclude washing motor vehicles, but not specifically recreational ones. “We added to (those) definitions boats, other recreation vehicles and trailers, because we have been met with, ‘ohh it’s not a car, so I can wash my 22-foot motorhome, because it’s not a vehicle,’” said Fraser. A full list of the regulations can be found at www.pemberton.ca/ municipal-services/utilities/sprinking-and-

watering-restrictions. Level 2 Water restrictions will be in effect on June 1, according to staff.

FOOD AFFORDABILITY During the meeting, council also received a briefing about the cost of food and the implications for people’s health. Gerry Kasten, a public health dietician with Vancouver Coastal Health, discussed the expense of healthy eating in B.C. and encouraged council to advocate to senior levels of government for better wages and more generous social welfare payments, saying that augmenting income is the best way to address food affordability. Kasten said that the cost of food for a family of four in the Sea to Sky corridor stands at around $1,073 per month. “It significantly exceeds the cost in Vancouver once you take out those high-end food stores,” said Kasten, who pegs the figure for a family in Vancouver to be around $1,000. According to a fact-sheet provided by VCH, approximately one in 10 households in B.C. experience food insecurity, and one in six children live in homes that struggle to feed them. Things like community gardens and kitchens are positive because they promote healthy eating, said Kasten. But in the end, they don’t truly address the food-security issues many experience. “For people living in poverty the cost of food constitutes 44 per cent of their income,” said Kasten. “For people living on a median income, it’s 14 per cent of their income. “The issue isn’t cost of food, but how much income is coming in.” n


NEWS PEMBERTON & THE VALLEY

NEW RUN The 99 Pemberton Commuter—which connects Whistler and Pemberton—is getting a new nighttime run. PHOTO BY JOEL BARDE

Pemberton commuters get some relief NEW 99 PEMBERTON COMMUTER RUN OFFERS NEEDED PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION OPTION, SAYS VOP MAYOR

BY JOEL BARDE TRANSIT USERS looking to get to and from Pemberton at night can breath a sigh of relief, as an additional nighttime run will be added to the 99 Pemberton Commuter, which connects Whistler and Pemberton. “The evening run was identified as the biggest gap or the biggest hole in our system right now, so that’s what (we) went with,” said Village of Pemberton (VOP) Mayor Mike Richman. The new run will depart the Gondola Transit Exchange in Whistler at 9:15 p.m. for Pemberton and depart the Pemberton Hotel at 9:50 p.m. to return to Whistler and will start June 3. It will serve Pemberton residents who work late in Whistler, and could help alleviate issues related to drinking and driving, said Richman. The additional changes come after a public survey administered by BC Transit in February. According to Levi Megenbir—a senior transit planner with BC Transit—the survey received nearly 200 responses, with the majority of people calling for a nighttime transit option between Whistler and Pemberton. The need for the change is especially urgent given the loss of Greyhound bus service, he said. “There used to be some supplemental service along this corridor provided by Greyhound, and since they have pulled out that has reduced options for residents using any mode other than a single-occupancy vehicle,” said Megenbir. Yet despite the change, there is still thought to be a hole in transit service between Whistler and Pemberton. Buses currently leave Whistler at 6:20 and 7:40 a.m. and 4:45 and 6:05 p.m., and some are calling for a mid-afternoon run. “I thought when they were adding busses that they would be adding more than just a night bus,” said Lindsay McAllister, in a

Facebook message to Pique. “There is still no way into Whistler mid-day ... If I go in at 8:20 (a.m.), I still don’t have a way back till 4:45 p.m.” Megenbir said the transit authority recognizes there is strong demand for such a run. “If we were looking to get future expansion that is where we would be looking to fill in the gaps,” he said. “There’s nothing on the books currently, but through this process, we definitely identified that (a) midday trip would likely be the next priority for improving regional and interregional service between Pemberton and Whistler.” Richman said that the long-awaited regional transportation system would help

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alleviate the issue. It would put eight buses into operation and offer a total of six round trips between Mount Currie and Whistler a day. “I’m certain that there will be (a bus) in mid afternoon because that’s definitely a big hole,” said Richman. “And obviously our goal is to build (the system) and continue adding buses as the needs grow.” Yet just when Sea to Sky residents will see the system in place remains unclear, as the province has yet to respond to a proposal and funding model put forward by the stakeholders at the end of 2018. Richman said that the stakeholder communities will be meeting with the province regarding their proposal. “We’re going to be meeting with the Ministry of Transportation very shortly and hopefully there will be some news out of that,” he said. n

Spalding Foundation who through their generous gift of $13,000 US to the American Friends of Whistler are title sponsors for two of our family programs Birth, Baby and Beyond and Pregnancy and Infant Loss. We are thankful to the Spalding Foundation and the entire Harmon family for your encouragement in supporting a healthy community!

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33


DISPATCHES OUT OF RANGE

Transport key to Sea to Sky trauma patients VCH TRAUMA DOC GIVES OVERVIEW OF CORRIDOR SERVICE IN TALK TO ROTARY CLUB

BY ALISON TAYLOR VANCOUVER TRAUMA surgeon Dr. Ross Brown has worked in what he believes is the best trauma system in the world. It was while he was stationed in Afghanistan on two different tours—one in Kabul, the other in Kandahar. “I didn’t have the best facilities—our initial facility was a canvas tent … but I was totally surrounded by an unbelievable evacuation system that would bring the victims to us in a very short time … We would do our work and very quickly … they (the patients) were on a plane going home or they were seen at a higher level of care,” says Brown at a luncheon hosted by the Rotary Club of Squamish on Thursday, May 23. This military system, he adds, is the lens through which he looks at the delivery of trauma services in the Sea to Sky corridor as the regional medical director of trauma in Vancouver Coastal Health. “That’s an unbelievable system,” he said of the military trauma system. “If we could do it with multiple militaries and multiple facilities working in Afghanistan, we can probably do better in British Columbia.” Brown offered Rotarians a snapshot of the state of trauma services in the region, highlighting the many factors at play in the Sea to Sky corridor: the growth of tourism, the single highway in and out of the region,

AMBULANCE ACTIVATION Getting patients to trauma centres in a timely manner is key to saving lives. PHOTO BY BONNY MAKAREWICZ/FILE PHOTO

34 MAY 30, 2019

the weather which can hinder air transport, among many other things. “This is a very living system,” he said of the dynamic and ever-changing service. He highlighted two recent cases over the winter in which the patients survived despite the odds stacked against them—a snowboarder with a ruptured aorta on the top of Whistler Mountain, the other with a significant stab wound in the village. (See Pique, May 16, “Whistler pushes for trauma room expansion” for more on these stories.) “There’s some fantastic advanced state of the art stuff that’s occurring,” he said of the trauma care in Sea to Sky. But there are challenges. Like working in a war zone, the corridor is far from major trauma centres. It too relies on an intricate network of interconnected yet separate agencies working closely together: communications, first responders, initial care facilities and the urban trauma centres. The transportation system, he added, is critical to the delivery of trauma care in this region. “The transportation system is fundamental when you’ve got a (health care) system like this,” said Brown.

TRAUMA TRANSPORT IN S2S In the Sea to Sky corridor, trauma is a busy business. According to the most recent statistics from the British Columbia Emergency Health Services (BCEHS) there were 3,535 calls in 2018 to BCEHS for medical emergencies in the corridor: Whistler with 1,902, Squamish with 1,392 and Pemberton

with 241. It’s a call volume that has remained fairly steady over the last three years, albeit with a slight decrease in calls in 2018. More tellingly, however, is the nature of the calls. In Whistler in 2018, 13 per cent of calls were immediately life-threatening or time-critical with 12 calls a code “purple” requiring the highest level of response. A further 21 per cent of all calls were potentially serious, or urgent. That’s fully one-third of all calls urgent or higher. “Whistler has a large number of BCEHS transfer calls: Patients requiring transfer from the local medical facility to a hospital with a higher level of care,” said Shannon Miller in an email, communications officer with BCEHS. Whistler and Squamish are both designated “urban” stations. The BCEHS target is to arrive within nine minutes, 70 per cent of the time for those lifethreatening “lights and sirens” calls. The median response time in Whistler last year was 9:46, in Squamish 10:16 and in Pemberton 15:34. Not all responses are made within those averages. Another factor complicating healthcare services in the corridor is that often doctors or nurses from the Whistler Health Care Centre are needed en route, supporting paramedics and caring for the patient as the ambulance races down the highway. There are no advanced care paramedics stationed in the corridor (paramedics specialized in advanced life support including advanced cardiac care). “They’re too busy to get in the back of an ambulance,” said Brown of the doctors and nurses who have to leave the corridor for hours at a time.

WHISTLER’S TRAUMA ROOM Brown also highlighted some of the infrastructure challenges in the corridor pointing to the aging Squamish Hospital and the 25-year-old Whistler Health Care Centre. “We have infrastructure challenges,” he admitted. Those challenges must be considered within the bigger picture. Vancouver General Hospital, B.C.’s largest teaching hospital and a Level 1 Trauma Centre, which sees many of Whistler’s trauma patients for example, is in the midst of a $102 million renovation to make way for more operating rooms. When asked about the request from local health providers for a bigger trauma room in Whistler (currently the WHCC has one small trauma room with a second nearby room which can be used for overflow), Brown said: “I think the users who are there have very valid concerns around the size and makeup of the facility, not just the trauma room. Our staff have gone to listen to their stories to review what’s possible. So we’re at that stage where we’re gathering the data to look at it.” Among the ideas on the table is the possibility of taking down a wall to make the trauma room bigger and more efficient. “Those are legitimate questions to ask: Can we do it better?” It’s the same question posed about the system overall. There is a continued push for injury prevention; there is registry to collect and analyze the data in an effort to understand changing patterns. “Are we perfect? Have we got it yet?” said Brown. “No, but we’re getting there.” n


DISPATCHES OUT OF RANGE

BY ALLEN BEST allen.best@comcast.net EAGLE, COLO. —Eagle continues its transformation from a ranching centre to that of an amenity-laden mountain town, this time with the addition of a river park. Residents of the town of 7,000 people, which is a half-hour down-valley from Vail, approved a half-cent sales tax for four years, long enough to raise US$5.8 million. The money was used to reconfigure the Eagle River with concrete blocks, the better to raise water levels and continue the boating season for kayakers and other rivers users. Originally, points out Mayor Anne McKibbin, an archaeologist by profession, the river had meandered more leisurely. When Interstate 70 was constructed in the late 1970s, the river was pushed about 90 metres away from bluffs and toward the town, causing it to flow straighter and hence more rapidly. Water parks have become the rage in Colorado in the 21st century. Vail was among the first, creating a kayak course through the middle of the town. Breckenridge, Glenwood Springs, and perhaps two-dozen others have followed. In some instances, the new river parks reflect a new recognition of the value of the rivers, assets that were long ignored or at least relegated to industrial necessities, much like the water treatment and sewage treatment plants. In Eagle, the park takes the space that was long dedicated to parking by long-haul 18-wheel trucks. In Steamboat Springs, an eponymously

said McKibbin, a river rafter herself, cannot dictate what the owner of the largely undeveloped property along the south bank of the river do. But if they chose to develop, the town sees multi-family housing overlooking the river. Celebrating Eagle’s achievement was Jon Stavney, director of the Northwest Colorado Council of Governments. Earlier in his career, he was a town trustee, mayor, and then town manager in Eagle during a time when Eagle was reimagining itself. “A river is a placemaking and economic development opportunity,” he observed in an op-ed published in the Vail Daily. In 2014, as Eagle began imagining the river park, he and other town leaders travelled to Salida, a high-desert town located in the shadow of 4,267-metre peaks, which has had a river festival called FibArk since 1969. Some businesses have completely flipped their front doors away from F Street, the town’s main corridor, to the river and a new pedestrian corridor. In Golden, where Clear Creek emerges from the foothills into metropolitan Denver, improvements “changed an overgrown stormwater chute into a vital pedestrian corridor that enhanced and activated adjacent properties and connected disparate parts of the city,” he wrote.

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Colorado’s San Juan Mountains were the very definition of parched last year. But the snowpack as of May 23 stood at 374 per cent of average. In Silverton, organizers of the Hardrock 100, an endurance race at an average elevation of 3,353 metres, were hedging their bets whether the event, which is scheduled for July 19 to 21, will be possible. Dale Garland, run director, told the Durango Herald that he and others are “cautiously optimistic.” The race was cancelled in 1995, because of too much snow, and in 2002, because of too much smoke from the Missionary Ridge fire near Durango, about 48 kilometres south. This year, the road to Animas Forks, a

SEE PAGE 36

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DISPATCHES OUT OF RANGE

Public No�ce Ques�ons? We’re Listening

Alternate Approval Process Opportunity

(604) 894.6135

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT the Village of Pemberton Council proposes to adopt the following bylaw:

admin@ pemberton.ca

www. pemberton.ca

Downtown Enhancement Project Con�ngency and Downtown Barn Parking Lot Paving Loan Authoriza�on Bylaw No. 863, 2019

Downtown Enhancement Project Con�ngency and Downtown Barn Parking Lot Paving Loan Authoriza�on Bylaw No. 863, 2019 This Bylaw will authorize the Village of Pemberton to borrow up to $980,000 to be repaid over a maximum of twenty (20) years. The funds borrowed will be to cover the Downtown Enhancement Project con�ngency ($880,000) and the paving of the Downtown Barn Parking Lot ($100,000). It is es�mated that the average residen�al taxpayer’s annual e charges would increase by approximately $47.27. TAKE FURTHER NOTICE THAT “Downtown Enhancement Project Con�ngency and Downtown Barn Parking Lot Paving Loan Authoriza�on Bylaw No. 863, 2019” may be inspected at the offices of the Village of Pemberton at 7400 Prospect Street, Pemberton, BC during normal office business hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday to Friday, excluding public holidays, from the 6th day of June to the 8th day of July, 2019. Sec�on 86 of the Community Charter provides that: • If the number of electors on the Elector Response Forms represents fewer than 10% of the electors in the Village, the Council of the Village may proceed to adopt Bylaw No. 863, 2019. •• Elector Response Forms against the above Bylaw must be in the form established by the Village. Persons wishing to receive an Elector Response Form may download it from the website at www.pemberton.ca, request a Form by emailing admin@pemberton.ca, phone the Village Office at 604-894-6135 or write to the Village at P.O. Box 100, Pemberton, BC V0N 2L0. •• The only persons en�tled to sign Elector Response Forms are eligible electors within the Village of Pemberton. The deadline for submi�ng signed Elector Response Forms against the proposed Bylaw to the Village of Pemberton is Monday, July 8, 2019 at 4:00 p.m. •• The Village has es�mated that the total number of eligible electors within the Village to be 1995 and 10% of that number, or 195 eligible electors must submit Elector Response Forms against Bylaw No. 863, 2019 to prevent the Village from adop�ng Bylaw No. 863, 2019. •• A qualified eligible elector is a person who is: A Canadian Ci�zen; at least 18 years of age; has resided in Bri�sh Columbia for at least six (6) months; has resided in the Village of Pemberton for at least thirty (30) days; or meets the qualifica�ons of a non-resident property elector as set out in sec�on 51.1 of the Local Government Act. Gene General Enquiries regarding the proposed “Downtown Enhancement Project Con�ngency and Downtown Barn Parking Lot Paving Loan Authoriza�on Bylaw No. 863, 2019” may be directed to Sheena Fraser, Manager of Corporate and Legisla�ve Services at 604-894-6135 or at sfraser@pemberton.ca. Sheena Fraser, Corporate Officer

36 MAY 30, 2019

one-time mining hamlet at the treeline, was covered as of last week with 30 metres of snow. Avalanches may have torn out other sections of backcountry trail. Downstream on the Animas in New Mexico, organizers of a river festival told the Farmington Times that there might actually be too much water in the Animas River. The Gunnison River drainage also had a huge amount of snow for late May, 334 per

www.pemberton.ca

disposable bags. The ban that takes effect Oct. 1 will be applicable to four large stores in Steamboat, those of more than 10,000 square feet in size. The stores can provide paper bags at 20 cents a bag. Council members, reported Steamboat Today, agreed that that’s just enough to get people to start taking reusable bags. The fees collected will be used to support a new waste-diversion outreach program, but some money will also be used

“We have a saying in the ski industry: ‘It’s the snow, stupid,’ when we all sit around and think we’re the most brilliant marketers and have got it all figured out ... ” - NATHAN RAFFERTY

cent of average for May 23. At Crested Butte, this meant no driving across Kebler Pass to Paonia or Aspen. “Typically we get it open by Memorial Day weekend,” Gunnison County commissioner Jonathan Houck told the Crested Butte News. “This was not a typical winter.” Across the Elk Range at Aspen, economic records tumbled during the winter. December started slow, a hangover from last year’s drought, but then retail sales from January through March rose US$15 million, a 5.9 per cent increase from the previous year. March was a bonanza, with a total take of US$95.8 million, a record, reported the Aspen Daily News, citing city tax auditor Anthony Lewin. This was all about the skiing economy, of course. Occupancy for the ski season was 61.7 per cent, according to Destrimetrics, the resort reservations tracking firm. Jeff Hanle, spokesman for the Aspen Skiing Co., said snow was the major story, although inauguration of Alterra Mountain Co.’s Ikon Pass did help push numbers higher, he said. In Utah, the Ikon Pass may have had something to do with a record number of skiers, but Nathan Rafferty, who heads the state trade organization, pointed to a more certain suspect: snow. “We have a saying in the ski industry: ‘It’s the snow, stupid,’ when we all sit around and think we’re the most brilliant marketers and have got it all figured out,” Rafferty said at a press conference covered by The Park Record. Utah, through last week, had topped 5.1 million skier days, a record, and also a 24-per-cent increase over the prior, snowshort winter. It 2000-01, just as the state was gearing up for the Olympics, it was below 3.3 million skier days.

PLASTIC BAN IN RESPONSE TO STUDENT PRODS

This is the first of two no�ces.

VillageOfPemberton

<< FROM PAGE 35

STEAMBOAT SPRRINGS, Colo.—Steamboat Springs has joined eight other towns and cities in Colorado, in banning single-use

to give out reusable bags for free. Some property management companies already do provide the bags in units. Stores can retain five cents of each bag fee for their own use. The council’s action was pushed by high-school students during the last year.

VAIL STUDENTS UP TO TASK OF CREATING TEENFRIENDLY PLACES VAIL, Colo.—A virtual reality tour of summer in Vail for winter visitors has a prototype. As demonstrated to the town council members recently, users could mount a bicycle and, with aid of a laptop, get a virtual reality peek of riding on Vail Mountain’s trails in summer. The Vail Daily explained that the idea was among many hatched by seventh- and eighth-grade students at Vail Mountain School. They were given the challenge in a class called Design Thinking to imagine more teen-friendly spaces in Vail. Other ideas include Chess & Chill, a place where young people could do homework, buy soft drinks and snacks, but yes, practice their chess moves. Two other students concluded that many teens visiting Vail wanted to do more than shop and eat. Ergo, the idea of a padded maze in which kids could bounce off each other. Most of the ideas required space in a place where space comes at a premium. But the idea of the virtual reality preview seemed to have some wind at its back.

STILL WORKING ON HOW TO CUT ENERGY USE ASPEN, Colo.—Pitkin County continues to wonder how it can reduce the energy consumed by its luxury homes. Last year, there were proposals to cap the size of new homes in the unincorporated areas around Aspen at 10,750 square feet, down from 15,000 square feet now.


DISPATCHES OUT OF RANGE Instead, reported the Aspen Daily News, an advisory group composed primarily of individuals associated with the real estate and development sector have proposed a “whole project budget.” The idea involves setting a threshold for energy consumption by both interior and exterior amenities such as ovens, snowmelt driveways, heated pools, and the like. Builders, explained the Aspen Daily News, would be required to integrate renewable energy or energy savings systems into their projects. The goal would be a netzero impact. Is it possible? The Daily News cites the comments of County Commissioner George Newman, who cited studies that show that in homes over 7,500 square feet, energy use goes up exponentially. Pitkin County downzoned in the 1970s, and it might be time now to downsize houses. The commissioners, though, have made no decisions. Aspen is not part of the same debate, nor is Snowmass Village.

WILL JAIL TIME FOR PAIR WHO STARTED WILDFIRE HELP BUILD A NEW HOUSE? BASALT, Colo.—Last week, two individuals pleaded guilty to misdemeanor charges stemming from the wildfire they started last year when firing tracer rounds—in violation of regulations—at a shooting range.

The fire they started in a year of drought raced across 12,600 acres, destroyed three houses, and forced thousands of other residents to flee. The fire also very nearly caused portions of Aspen, 32 kilometres upvalley, as well as Snowmass, to lose power. The plea agreement calls for the two individuals, a 24-year-old man and a 23-year-old woman, to be jailed for 45 days and to perform 1,500 hours of community service. Each was ordered to pay $100,000 in restitution. Formal sentencing is scheduled for July 1. The Aspen Times asked Cleve Williams, a firefighter who lost his home in the blaze, what he might tell the judge at the sentencing. “I know they did wrong, but I don’t know what 45 days in jail will do,” Williams answered. Taxpayers, he added, will just be footing the bill. And assuming they can come up with the restitution, it will have to be shared and under the best of circumstances will not compensate him for his losses. “It was two years of my life that they’ve taken,” he said, explaining that he is now reconstructing a home. Total firefighting costs exceeded $20 million.

IDA GOT LEGISLATIVE TRACTION, BUT WILL IT HELP I-70 TRAFFIC? SILVER PLUME, Colo.—Colorado has a new law that boosts the requirements of all cars and other vehicles driving on

Interstate 70 during winter across the mountain barriers. The old law said 1/8th-inch tread depth was sufficient. The new law, which was signed by Colorado Gov. Jared Polis in the ceremonial bill-signing held at the Eisenhower-Johnson Memorial Tunnel recently, requires a minimum of 3/16th will be needed, along with all-wheel drive. Legislators who proposed the law say it will improve safety and reduce traffic jams. Traffic on I-70 has steadily increased, somewhat proportionate to the population of Colorado. This compounds the problems during winter storms, when cars lose traction and block traffic. The Summit Daily News reported that some with a direct interest in Interstate 70 mobility question just how valuable the new law will be. “Enforcement could be an interesting issue,” said Colin Remillard, a spokesperson for the Colorado State Patrol. In other words, how do you tell somebody driving from, say, Florida of the law until they get into trouble? An owner of a rental car firm in Summit County blames car-rental companies in Denver. “I think it’s just an ongoing issue of people not knowing the area,” said Peter Griff, of Breckenridge Rental Car. “They don’t know the laws or how they work. They think they’re all set with that four-wheel drive car, even if they don’t have the right tires. I think the intention is in the right place, but it’s a matter of how enforceable that is.”

ANOTHER COLORADO TOWN GOES TO 100% RENEWABLES GLENWOOD SPRINGS, Colo.—Glenwood Springs this week joined an elite group. A new contact with the city’s utility provider, the Municipal Energy of Nebraska, will allow the resort town of 10,000 people along the Colorado River to declare itself powered 100 per cent by renewable sources, mostly wind generated on farms in Nebraska. By the calculations of Glenwood Springs, there are now seven towns and cities in the United States that can make this claim of being 100 per cent renewably powered. Aspen Electric joined that elite club in 2015, when there were just three, and it established the pathway that Glenwood Springs is now using. Aspen has a lot of hydro and a lot of wind, plus a little bit of solar and landfill gas. The Glenwood Springs Post Independent reported that the cost with renewables would actually drop, saving the city $500,000 per year. It had previously been powered 35 per cent by renewables. Does this mean that Glenwood Springs will get no electricity produced by coal-fired power plants? No, and neither can Aspen or other towns and city. The electrical grid does have separate pathways for renewable and fossil electrons. There has been, for several years, considerable discussion about what it will take to create broad, regional power systems that do not depend upon the certainty of fossil-fuel generation as backup. n

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37


The Whistler Naturalists present

The Whistler Naturalists present

e Whistler Naturalists present

Saturday July 9, 2016 June 6 to 9, 2019

School Presentations:

scientistsat present to 20 classes Thursday and Friday. NatureBioBlitz Festival Alpha LakeonPark

Whistler Naturalists present 12-5pm: Free Nature Festival Public Events:

aturday July 9, 2016 Live critters, touching tables, working Fri. 7:30pm

BC’s Big and Old Trees

scientists, interactive displays,gives a fascinating Andy Mackinnon nature crafts and more! glimpse into BC’s biggest trees from his

experience with the BC Big Tree Registry.

e Festival Alpha Lake Park 1-2pm: atAnimal Tracks T-Shirt Painting Then Bob Brett introduces some of

:

Whistler’s oldest treeswild! that are accessible Bring a plain shirt. Leave looking Nature Festival by walking, biking, or an (Some kids’ shirts available for sale.)easy drive. Live critters, touching tables, working Legends Hotel. scientists, interactive displays, 2:30pm: Wild Things Scavenger Hunt Sat. and 7:30pm Species conservation and Scientists’ nature crafts more! Not your everyday hunt! Finds of the day.

aturday 2016Painting AnimalJuly Tracks9,T-Shirt Legends Hotel.

Bring a plain shirt. Leave looking wild! NatureSat. Night Legends Hotel 9:30pmat to late Night Critters at Alpha Lake Park (Some kids’ shirts availableWatch for sale.) as scientists catalogue everything 7:30pm: Fabulous Finds of the Day Festival at Alpha Lake Park that comes out at night. Scientists reveal their coolest finds. (Cancelled if raining.) : Nature WildFestival Things Scavenger Hunt Live critters, tables,hunt! working Not yourtouching everyday Updated details at: www.whistlerbioblitz.ca scientists, interactive displays,at: Updated details nature crafts and more!

www.whistlerbioblitz.ca

Scientist Blitz Days

Animal Tracks T-Shirt Painting June 6/7 looking wild!School Presentations Bring a plain shirt. Leave June 8 (Some kids’ shirts available for sale.) Pemberton FabulousJune Finds 9 of the Day Whistler Scientists reveal their Wild Things Scavenger Hunt coolest finds. Not your everyday hunt!

e Night at Legends Hotel

:

ed details at: www.whistlerbioblitz.ca Night at Legends Hotel

Fabulous Finds of the Day Scientists reveal their coolest finds.

d details at: www.whistlerbioblitz.ca

38 MAY 30, 2019

ECOLOGIC

Wiping out a forest IF YOU’VE SPENT any time in Costco you won’t be surprised to hear that its biggest selling item is … toilet paper. Given the retail giant’s outsized influence on both downstream consumer behaviour (because bargain!) and upstream supply chains (because volume!), this particular piece of trivia is worrisome given that most TP that Costco sells contains no recycled content, and is made from 100 per cent virgin pulp fibre, itself derived from Canada’s boreal forest. Thus, it’s no exaggeration to state—as a recent petition on SumofUs.org does—that “toilet paper is destroying Canada’s vast and majestic old-growth Boreal forests.”

BY LESLIE ANTHONY First, a word about the boreal. In Canada it covers over a billion acres—60 per cent of the country—from Newfoundland to the Yukon. It’s also home to over 600 Indigenous communities whose cultural identities are tied to this ecosystem and its dwindling population of species like caribou and moose. Canada’s boreal is also essential nesting ground for billions of migratory birds. The circumpolar boreal of Canada, Scandinavia, Russia and Alaska serves another key function: carbon storage— sequestering more per hectare than any forest type, and more than all currently accessible oil, gas, and coal reserves combined. Canada’s share alone represents 12 per cent of world carbon stores, and each year the region annually draws down an amount of atmospheric CO2 equivalent to the yearly emissions of 24 million cars. Despite its crucial litany of cultural, ecological and carbon-cycle climate function, over 28 million acres of Canada’s boreal—an area roughly the size of Pennsylvania—were mowed down to make toilet paper from 1996 to 2015; 90 per cent of it was clearcut, which will require over a century to regenerate. According to a February report from the Natural Resources Defense Council and Stand.earth—“The Issue with Tissue: How Americans are Flushing Forests Down the Toilet.”— Canada holds a shocking third place in intact forest loss, trailing only Russia and Brazil to account for 15 per cent of global loss from 2000 to 2013. This eye-popping trend is little publicized. Worse, most of it is happening to supply America’s voracious appetite for toilet paper. Due to decades of hard-sell marketing around toilet paper softness, Americans are now unwittingly to blame for our disappearing boreal forest. Although the country claims just over four per cent of world population, it wipes up more than 20 per cent of global tissue output. The average four-person American household uses north of 220 kg of TP each year. Major toilet paper brands have refused to use more sustainable materials, the report suggests, because Americans

are more concerned than the rest of us about ideal toilet paper texture. But manufacturers needn’t use solely virgin pulp fibre—pulp can also be made from non-wood alternative fibres like fastgrowing bamboo, and agricultural residues like wheat straw and sugar cane. While all tissue producers should aim to maximize use of postconsumer recycled content, properly sourced alternative fibres are a viable, sustainable substitute for virgin wood pulp. The report notably offers a report card for brands viz environmental impact. Those that use recycled paper and alternative fibres—like Seventh Generation and Natural Value—received an “A.” But the popular quilted paper brands score badly, with Charmin Ultra Soft, Kirkland Signature (Costco’s big brand) and Angel Soft all receiving “F.” The companies with the largest market shares—Procter & Gamble, Kimberly-Clark, Georgia-Pacific—rely almost exclusively on virgin pulp for their household tissue brands. But, as the report notes, they also “… have the power to make a significant difference for the future of our world’s forest ... Recycled content and alternative fibers are readily available solutions, and these large companies need to dedicate their substantial R&D budgets to tackling the problems their products cause for the planet. In the meantime, consumers can push for change with their pocketbooks, buying only those tissue products that minimize their impact on forests. Forests are too vital to flush away.” With consumers seeking more sustainable products but manufacturers not acting, retailers might step in. Given the volume it sells, a switch by Costco to a benchmark 50 per cent post-consumer recycled materials (or alternative fibres) would make a world of difference to the boreal forest. As the petition urges, like so many other companies it’s high time Costco helped end wasteful and destructive practices to put the planet ahead of profits.

... it’s high time Costco helped end wasteful and destructive practices to put the planet ahead of profits. The petition to Costco can be found at actions.Sumofus.org. You can also check out the Issue with Tissue report and its scorecard for toilet paper, paper towels and facial tissue at https://www.nrdc.org/sites/ default/files/issue-tissue-how-americansare-flushing-forests-down-toilet-report.pdf. Leslie Anthony is a science/environment writer and author who holds a doctorate in connecting the dots. n


OUTSIDER

Stepping into a high-altitude time warp “Comrade Stalin. Glad to be able to inform you that the highest point of the USSR, first discovered by us last year, and named after you, the beloved leader of the world proletariat, was reached on the 3rd September by our storming party. ... Our party sends you heartiest greetings. Gorbunov.” — Telegram sent from Osh, Kyrgyzstan by Nikolai Petrovich Gorbunov, Chief of the Executive of the Soviet of People’s Commissars, 1933.

BY VINCE SHULEY I DUCK MY HEAD as I step through the first bulkhead door and follow a short passage before clambering through an even smaller hatch. The entrance to the 80-year-old Gorbunov Meteorological Station was designed to keep out the harsh elements, not accommodate tall travelling ski mountaineers. Inside to my left, a sad guitar lays on a stool, the rotting wood separating in several places. Posters of forgotten ‘80s action movies and classic bodybuilders adorn the walls, accompanied by Madonna in her prime. A pair of dried chicken feet is wedged

MEMORIES OF FEDCHENKO It’s been five years ince Vince completed his traverse of the glacier.

PHOTO BY VINCE SHULEY

above the entrance doorway, warding off thieves and other malevolent spirits. What I assume was once the common area features a wall map alongside pencilled portraits of ancient rulers from the Samanid dynasty. Mouldy mattresses and blankets are all that occupy the quarters. Yet for all the strange relics, the eeriest thing in this domed steel structure is the silence. I try to imagine what sort of bustling scientific activity went on here in decades past, inside what is perhaps the most remote backcountry shelter in the world. The Gorbunov Meteorological station sits on a rocky outcropping on the Fedchenko Glacier at 4,169 metres, a legacy of Soviet climate science in Tajikistan’s Pamir Mountains. One of 80 meteorological stations (past and present) in the mountainous country, Gorbunov operated from its construction in 1935 all the way up to the early 1990s when the country plunged into a five-year civil war. The location is extremely hard to access by foot (impossible by land vehicle) and even helicopters struggle to lift in passengers and payloads at such high altitude. Now a husk of its operational heyday, Gorbunov served as one of the most equipped meteorological stations in Central Asia during the 20th Century. It was a research and analysis centre that would receive daily data transmissions from dozens of portable self-recording weather stations, as evidenced by

the rooms stacked to the rafters with disorganized logbooks. The station’s namesake also has rich, if not tragic, history. Nikolai Petrovich Gorbunov, Chief of the Executive of the Soviet of People’s Commissars (at one time personal secretary and scientific adviser to Vladimir Lenin himself), lead multiple expeditions in the Western Pamirs between 1928 and 1932, including the first ascent of Pik Lenin. Alongside Soviet explorer and Bolshevik revolutionary Nikolai Krylenko, Gorbunov helped map much of the Pamir region and identify the highest peak in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), Pik Stalin (7,495m, later renamed Pik Communism in 1962 then Ismoil Somoni Peak in 1998). Gorbunov mounted a large expedition in 1933 to climb Pik Stalin and install two portable weather stations as high on the slopes as possible, claiming the trip “was not just a climb, [or] a matter of sport, but a scientific expedition.” Two party members died on that ascent, another narrowly escaping death in a fall, but losing a hand, which was crushed in a rockfall. Determined to fulfill his mission for his Motherland, Gorbunov ignored his party’s objections and made the push for the summit despite being the oldest member at 41 years old. It was Soviet alpinist Yevgeniy Abalakov who first stood on the summit of Pik Stalin, with records unclear if the older Gorbunov actually made it to the summit at all. Regardless, Gorbunov returned with

the story that he did, and later went on to assume several prestigious positions within Soviet Academy of Science, only to be later arrested, incarcerated and executed for espionage as part of Stalin’s Great Purge in the late 1930s. The Gorbunov Meteorological station has now been abandoned for over 20 years, but evidence of visiting mountaineers can be found peppered among the volumes of scientific journals, cannibalized instruments and battered kitchen utensils. Among the tomes of Cyrillic text, the only pieces of English literature we could read were aged travel brochures offering guided mountaineering trips to the nearby peaks. An emergency food cache—tins of meat long-expired—hang from the roof should any forsaken travellers stumble in from the cold. After a half hour of strolling through this remote and dusty museum, I exit and join my party to make camp at the edge of the Fedchenko. Overlooking the station and the largest non-polar glacier in the world, I give a silent salute to Gorbunov. He risked his life many times in these mountains, putting science and the prosperity of his country above his own ambitions. Few mountaineers would do so today. Vince Shuley’ is celebrating five years since he returned from the fabled Fedchenko Glacier. For questions, comments or suggestions for The Outsider email vince@vinceshuley.com or Instagram @whis_vince. n

MAY 30, 2019

39


FEATURE STORY

People are re-visiting their relationship with alcohol in a trend that sees lifestyle choices reimagined

J

By

Cathy Goddard

ules Taggart started questioning how much she was drinking after she had two children and starting to work from her San Diego home-office. Because it was more difficult to get out, the 38-year-old digital marketing expert fell into a pattern of having wine at the end of her workday. “Every morning I would wake up with a foggy head and say to myself that I wasn’t going to drink that day,” Jules says. “And then five in the afternoon would roll around and I’d pour a glass of wine and keep going until it wasn’t unusual to drink an entire bottle of wine in an evening.” She shared her concern with friends but alarmingly, her network of moms admitted they drank the same amount while half-joking that they needed alcohol to get through the stress of parenting. The bottom line was she couldn’t ignore the negative impact drinking was having on her well being and, last November, she embarked on a brief journey with sobriety that lasted only nine days. Deciding to have a glass of wine while watching election results for the U.S. mid-terms, she reverted to her old patterns of drinking for the next three days. That was the breaking point. Jules acknowledged she had to take a leadership role in her life and that drinking was either all or nothing. She hasn’t had a drink since. The start of her sobriety came with intense withdrawal symptoms in the form of anxiety and nausea, and a general obsession with the thoughts of drinking.

40 MAY 30, 2019

After getting through that phase though, sobriety has made her feel more in control, eliminated her anxiety issues and provided great sleep and a clear brain with improved decision-making abilities.

The rise of ‘sober curious’ It’s likely you have heard or read a similar story to Jules’. We have made it culturally acceptable to drink. Our social activities often revolve around alcohol: cocktails at the end of a workday; samples of alcohol to sip at the liquor store; “mommy juice” wine to take the edge off parenting pressure. Even our obsession with self-care has been tainted with boozy themes— Prosecco and pedicures; vinyasa and vino; biking and beer tents. However, this culture of acceptance around alcohol consumption is evolving a new paradigm and people are questioning how much they drink and the impact it has on their well-being. Whereas being sober has historically been reserved for alcoholics working through the whole 12-step program with zero tolerance to having a drink, there’s now a trend of people exploring what it means to venture out socially sans cocktails. Whether wanting to embrace an alcohol-free life as a commitment to their wellness or just being tired of events revolving around booze, people are abstaining in greater and greater numbers. Granted, people jumping on the abstinence bandwagon isn’t new. Teetotalling


FEATURE STORY

MAY 30, 2019

41


FEATURE STORY

is a common strategy to lose weight, train for an athletic challenge or as a New Year’s resolution, but sobriety is being rebranded in a trend that is gaining traction—being “sober curious.” The term “sober curious” was coined by Ruby Warrington, author of the popular new book titled, Sober Curious: The Blissful Sleep, Greater Focus, Limitless Presence, and Deep Connection Awaiting Us All on the Other Side of Alcohol (more on this later). It seems that Jules is onto something when touting the health benefits of living without alcohol. In the British Medical Journal, 2018 research conducted by the Royal Free Hospital shows that quitting alcohol for a month: lowers blood pressure and cholesterol levels; leads to weight loss; improves sleep; lowers risk of disease; and, decreases blood protein levels thereby acting as cancer protection. Wellness portal Healthy Food House backs these findings with a 2019 study documenting the effects on a group of volunteers who gave up drinking for 28 days. Initially, participants experienced challenges with increased appetite, spiked sugar cravings, poor sleep and headaches. However, things got progressively better and by the end, some volunteers lost three to four kilograms. Most had noticeable changes such as improved sleep, better sense of smell and taste, more confidence and their brains worked more efficiently. Remarkably, some reduced their risk of cardiovascular disease and lowered high blood pressure. The reality is that alcohol is a poison that damages body organs and while enjoying a glass of wine once in a while is acceptable, excessive consumption can seriously harm health. Too much alcohol can cause problems with the digestive and immune systems, increase the risk of osteoporosis, bone fractures and weak muscles. The liver is seriously damaged by alcohol use and can lead to fatty liver disease, cirrhosis or cancer. Considering the obvious negative impact, it’s unsettling how we have let alcohol weave into our society, culture and psyche. Alcohol is heavily marketed to us from an early age. According to the Federal Trade Commission, alcohol producers spend two to three times their measured media expenditures in unmeasured promotions such as sponsorships, internet  advertising, point-ofsale materials, product placement and items with brand logos, and other means. Pernod Ricard, a leader in the wine and spirits industry, claims to be “creators of conviviality” and boasts that it “create(s) moments that make life worth living.” In 2017, Pernod Ricard invested $421 million in advertising alcohol in the

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United States. Jules found that once she quit drinking, she was shocked to discover how booze seeps into our psyche. Business events, television, highway billboards and chalkboards offering up happy hour deals dole out temptations to relax with a drink. Even birthday party invitations for her two-year-old come with the promise of “adult drinks” for parents.

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42 MAY 30, 2019


FEATURE STORY

A balancing act Building a façade of fun is amplified in a tourist town like Whistler and frequently, that involves the party scene. Julia Montague lived a familiar story of heading to Whistler to party with her weekend-warrior friends. During university, her drinking appeared to be the same as everyone else’s, but in her 20s she started to see a divide. While her friends were progressing with relationships and careers, Julia’s drinking spiralled to the point of experiencing black outs. “In spite of putting myself in unsafe situations and recognizing that blackouts were becoming more frequent and lasting longer, I still thought drinking was fun,” Julia says. “Then it shifted from being fun, to being fun with consequences and then it was just consequences. I was testing relationships and making decisions that weren’t in alignment with who I was when I was sober.” Julia shared the same struggles as Jules, in that every day she would commit to not drinking and consequently break down and do it again. In May 2010, Julia hit an emotional rock bottom, let go of denial and reached out to close friends for help. Today, she has been sober for nine years. In 2016, that life of sobriety gave her the strength to fulfil her dream of moving to Whistler. “I travel in sobriety, date in sobriety, have a job in an industry where alcohol is prevalent but I feel free to go anywhere,” Julia says. “Although drinking was a big part of Whistler for me in the past, I can go to the bar with friends and not drink. Drinkers and non-drinkers can co-exist.” In spite of her freefall with alcohol, she doesn’t judge those that choose to drink and accepts that while others can opt for a sober-curious lifestyle, it is not an option for her because she is an alcoholic. “I’ve been sober for nine years. It doesn’t ensure that I’ll never drink again but I hope I’ll never drink again,” Julia admits.

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January 14, 1965 – February 20, 2019 A Celebration of Life for Jose will take place on Sunday June 9th from 3:00 PM to 7:00 PM at The Point on Alta Lake Road. Friends are invited to come and remember Jose, share stories, and toast to a life well lived.

MAY 30, 2019

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FEATURE STORY

Perhaps you consider yourself a moderate drinker. After all, compared to some of your friends, it seems average. Maybe you’d like to cut down a bit, but you certainly wouldn’t describe yourself as a high-risk drinker. According to Health Canada, an estimated four to five million Canadians regularly engage in high-risk drinking of four or more alcoholic beverages per day. Even more alarming is that the number of 25 to 35 year olds dying from alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver spiked an average of 10.5 per cent annually between 2009 and 2016. Comparatively, moderate or low-risk drinking is defined as no more than three drinks in a single day or seven per week for women, and no more than four drinks per day or 14 per week for men. Sixty-four per cent of people keep their drinking to that level, according to recent results From the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry (2017). While moderate drinking may not seem to present problems, the statistics don’t reflect the whole story. Unhealthy, habitual drinking patterns are being discovered within the “moderate-drinking” group. Dr. Timothy Naimi, a professor at Boston University School of Medicine and Public Health, studies the health impact of alcohol and reports in the same JAMA Psychiatry study that, “20 per cent of Americans report at least one episode of binge drinking within the last month.” Binge drinking is defined as four or more drinks for women and five or more for men, in a two-hour period.

It’s a lifestyle change Warrington contextualizes the new trend of sober curiosity as a lifestyle whereby people consider the amount they consume, question the reasons behind why they are drinking and consider how it makes them feel. From there, drinking is reframed as a mindful choice that leads to greater clarity, presence, and connection. Her personal motivation in exploring what it meant to socialize without having a drink resulted from a lifestyle that involved drinking several nights a week and the resulting brain fog and anxiety the next day. In 2010, Warrington started to banish alcohol on occasional social nights and not surprisingly, woke up the following morning with more energy and clarity. It wasn’t an all-or-nothing mandate but eventually, she quit drinking almost entirely. She starts the book off with persistent questions that kept popping up: Would life be better without alcohol? Would I be more productive, thinner or look younger if I didn’t drink? How can I socialize without booze? Probing into answers for these questions means you are getting sober curious. Warrington sums up this culture brilliantly as “our own innate desire to transcend the daily trials and traumas of being human. The way we learn to see it, alcohol is pretty much the elixir of a life worth living. A life that involves laughter, connection, relaxation, and inspiration, that is.” Being sober curious actually removes the allure of alcohol and empowers people to make decisions based on their feelings. Psychotherapist Alison Stone tells publisher Bustle Digital Group that identifying as sober curious can “help us better understand our relationship with alcohol—when do we drink more than we intended to? Are we drinking because we want to, or because we feel we need to? Having curiosity opens up the possibilities to better understand ourselves and our motives for doing things.”

It’s not black and white For Elizabeth (not her real name), being sober curious meant delving into habits. She was never concerned that her drinking was an addiction, but felt that she and her husband occasionally imbibed too much and too often. Letting alcohol creep into her life to that extent resulted in brain fog and feeling unhealthy, which was

44 MAY 30, 2019

a clear conflict with what she wanted for her well-being. “I go to the gym five days a week and have goals for my physical health,” Elizabeth says. “And as a grad student, I didn’t feel as intellectually sharp as I wanted to be. I didn’t want to give up drinking entirely but needed to regain control.” That meant reflecting on the consequences of drinking and identifying triggers and changing behaviour. “I recognized that pouring a drink, listening to a podcast and preparing a lovely dinner was a trigger on some evenings,” Elizabeth reveals. “But my husband would arrive home from work and join me for a cocktail and it would go from there. The upside was that this came with stimulating conversations and kitchen dance parties but it was time to be more mindful of the aftermath.” They started going for a walk or playing board games without the alcohol in the evenings and those changes haven’t altered the fun they have in their relationship, but instead have eliminated the factors that were derailing a healthy and productive lifestyle. According to Warrington, it’s common that what starts with asking questions can ignite a radical reevaluation of one’s relationship with booze.

In recovery Fred (not his real name) is a recovered alcoholic who accepts that he can’t live a sober-curious lifestyle. Last year, he landed in an addiction treatment facility launching a quest to understand how he ended up with a drinking problem at 65 years of age. A part of his recovery has been to recognize that although disguised as just being a partier for most of his adult life, there were warning signs of excess along

the way. However, it’s easier to ignore when your behaviour doesn’t necessarily have a clear negative outcome. After all, Fred had a successful career, happy marriage and was a competent athlete that could snap into a rigid training regimen. Things changed when he retired and had free time on his hands. He started to drink alone with a glass of wine at four in the afternoon then earlier with beers at lunch. Fred couldn’t deny a serious problem loomed when he started drinking in the morning to “settle his nerves.” What was originally social drinking had become a drinking problem. When that happens, situations in life get progressively worse: your health, your psychological behaviour and your physical condition deteriorate. During his fourweek stint at a treatment facility, he worked with psychologists to understand the


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CN is required to clear its rights-of-way from any vegetation that may pose a safety hazard. Vegetation on railway rights-of-way, if left uncontrolled, can contribute to trackside fires and impair proper inspection of track infrastructure. As such, for safe railway operations, the annual vegetation control program will be carried out on CN rail lines in the province of British Columbia. A certified applicator will be applying herbicides on and around the railway tracks (mainly the graveled area/ballast). All product requirements for setbacks in the vicinity of dwellings, aquatic environments and municipal water supplies will be met. Having received confirmation of CN’s PMP, we expect that the program will take place from June 1, 2019 to September 15, 2019. Visit www.cn.ca/vegetation to see the list of cities as well as the updated schedule. For more information, you may contact the CN Public Inquiry Line at 1-888-888-5909.

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FEATURE STORY origin of alcoholism, also called alcohol use disorder, and to build a new life based on sobriety. One of Fred’s discoveries was that alcoholism originates from complex biological processes and there is a strong genetic disposition to addiction. A 2008 study by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism concluded that genetics are 50 per cent of the underlying reason for alcoholism. Understanding addictive behaviour guided Fred on a path of self-examination and ultimately, to choose living his life in a more healthy and present way. “When I considered that I probably have 20 years of optimal health left before old age causes a potential decline, I had to ask myself: Do I really want to compromise those few good years?” Fred says. “The long-term effects of alcohol are serious but beyond that, I’ve embraced the fact that not drinking gives me incredible improvement in my mental and physical ability.” The choice was easy but the journey was hard. Fred needed to probe into what keeps someone from drinking because as a full-time Whistler resident, it’s easy to fill the social calendar on most nights of the week. One of his first tasks as a sober individual was to share his new reality as a recovered alcoholic with friends. He asked that they not change their behaviour but to understand that he had to change his. It also meant getting support that came in the form of attending Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings. While AA conjures up visions of a bunch of old guys with bulbous noses meeting over a cup of coffee to lament their ruined lives, Whistler’s chapter is as unique as our community. A core group of locals is often joined by weekend warriors and those visiting on vacation—normal people living normal lives committed to staying sober.

Moving forward Whether choosing to be sober curious or fully abstaining as a recovered alcoholic, the challenge and reward is in adapting behaviour to support living without alcohol—whether for an evening or a lifetime. Elizabeth broke away from activities that triggered drinking by substituting board games with her husband. Jules armed herself with a response for clients asking her to meet over happy hour by offering up a walk as an alternative. Julia fully embraces “daytime Whistler” with a lifestyle revolving around outdoor adventure. Fred orders seltzer and lime in a wine glass to take the edge off at social events, at least psychologically. And all of them have responses ready when asked, “Why aren’t you having a drink? C’mon!” If people are struggling to find solutions on their own, sobriety gurus have

46 MAY 30, 2019

arrived to help. There are books, webinars and online courses to guide people on living a life with little or no alcohol at all. Mindful drinking groups and online sobriety coaches offer programs to help their followers go alcohol-free. “Hello Sunday Morning,” self-described as the world’s “largest online movement for alcohol behaviour change,” now boasts 110,000 members. And interest in informal sobriety experiments — Dry January, Sober October, One Year No Beer — has reached a new peak. Google Trends reported that the number of searches for “Dry January” in 2019 was nearly double what it was two years ago. In spite of a reputation of partying hard, that global trend of seeking solutions for sober living exists in Whistler and there are options. Jackie Dickinson, Executive Director of Whistler Community Services Society (WCSS) believes that building a sense of belonging and community goes a long way to promote healthier decision making when it relates to sleep, exercise, nutrition, alcohol and drugs. WCSS, along with other local organizations have worked hard to provide alternatives that promote that lifestyle. The choices are varied with game nights at local cafes, free weekly running groups and events at the Whistler Public Library offering up boozeless options. Late & Unique Nighttime Alternatives (LUNA) is a Whistler success story that provides alcohol-free activities for young adults aged 18 to 35 years old. Since its inception in 2003, LUNA programming has contributed to a 20-per-cent reduction in alcohol-related calls to the RCMP and engaged more than 13,000 people in alcohol-free nightlife. And yet, there is a wave of stigma when it comes to accepting choices around drinking. Alcohol is often a defacto part of daily life and stepping back from it can feel controversial. Everyone except Jules and Julia asked to be anonymous for this story. It’s indicative of the deep desire to not to be judged for making a choice of abstinence and the struggles to justify that decision. It all starts with cultural shifts. We now know that cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable disease and death in Canada but remember 40 years ago when it was suave? Change happened with public awareness of the dire health risks and when marketers were forced to use warning labels. Fights with powerful tobacco industries were ongoing for years. Similarly, taxes and limits on where and when alcohol is sold are often rejected because the liquor industry has considerable clout with policymakers. If we can shift our mindsets, remove alcohol as a foregone conclusion and accept peoples’ right to choose abstinence for whatever reason, we might just push that trend of sober curiosity into overdrive. Cathy Goddard is a sober curious Whistlerite and owner of Lighthouse Visionary Strategies and Lighthouse Mentor Network. n


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www.piquenewsmagazine.com/vote WIN WEEKLY PRIZES! A PAIR OF MOVIE PASSES TO VILLAGE 8! Results will be published in our July 18th issue. Deadline for submissions is 11:59pm on Sunday, June 16th 2019. Only online submissions will be accepted. No photocopies, faxes or mailed entries. Only one entry per email address will be used. Please note we track user registration from individual IP addresses. We reserve the right to eliminate contest entrants if fraud is suspected. Pique makes every effort to create a concise list of Whistler businesses in the multiple choice drop downs. If you are a business owner in Pemberton we encourage you to check the details and email us with corrections and omission suggestions. Email traffic@wplpmedia.com.


TRAVEL & ADVENTURE

18

Italy at

Exploring Venice, hiking in Capri, biking along the Appian Way and gelato every day

48 MAY 30, 2019


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W

hile standing on Venice’s Scalzi Bridge eating gelato and overlooking the gondolas that ply Grand Canal at sunset, it’s hard to imagine that just an hour ago we were navigating our way through a busy airport. Everything in Italy is just how I imagined it—better even! But my friend and I didn’t arrive in Venice on a whim. As two 18-year-olds going on their first independent European vacation, we planned our trip to Italy for months. It’s impossible to experience all of what Italy has to offer in one trip; that’s why we decided to pick four places we really wanted to see over a span of three weeks: Venice, Florence, Naples and Rome. We booked all of our flights, accommodation, trains (from city to city) and access to the main attractions online before we left home—a must if you want to avoid hours-long lineups and stress. While planning the trip, safety was an obvious concern as we were travelling alone; however, while staying vigilant on any trip at any age, we found everyone was friendly and helpful. This also helped us navigate the amazing public transportation systems, something teens from Pemberton have little experience using. In Venice, we stayed at the newly built and affordable Anda Hostel in Mestre, a perfect choice for young travellers. If you are staying in Venice for three days or more, purchasing the Rolling Venice Pass is a good idea. The pass provides unlimited travel on Venice’s vaporettos (water buses) and ACTV buses for three consecutive days. When in Venice, travelling by water is the fastest way to get around—and definitely the most fun. Venice is truly a jaw-dropping, architectural feat, with a magical feel—indescribable even. We spent hours contently wandering the narrow streets and passing over some of the more than 400 bridges spanning the city’s rios. We found Florence expensive, but worth visiting—especially if you are an art lover.

Many of the top attractions are clustered so walking between them is easy. Tourists flock from all over the world to see Florence’s sites such as Michelangelo’s David, Brunelleschi’s Dome, the Ponte Vecchio and the Uffizi Gallery. To the southern end of the city, you can climb up to Piazzale Michelangelo (a place many tourists don’t know about) that has a fantastic panoramic view of the city with the Duomo front and centre. In Naples, we stayed at the Hostel of the Sun, a funky hostel close to the city’s Centro Storico. This city was our ultimate destination for food—inexpensive, huge portions and pizza galore! It’s also a perfect place to stay if you want to go on a day trip to Capri. Exploring the green, rocky cliffs of this Mediterranean island, hiking Monte Solaro, and taking a dip in its crystal clear waters is unforgettable. As well, it’s a quick train ride to Pompeii from Naples. One would expect Pompeii, the victim of Vesuvius’ eruption in 79 A.D., to be overrun with tourists on a Sunday in the middle of spring break. But there were still sections of the city where we found ourselves completely alone. We spent more than seven hours wandering Pompeii’s expansive network of cobblestoned streets. If you’re planning a trip to Italy, Rome is a must-see destination. Booking ahead is crucial when seeing sites like the Vatican Museum and the Colosseum. Buying tickets for the Colosseum’s Underground and Panoramic Tour was like purchasing concert tickets; it sells out so quickly that we pulled two all-nighters just to secure them online. In the end, however, the tour was worth losing sleep for! At the Vatican, we were lucky enough to attend spring mass with Pope Francis— something we didn’t have to book ahead for, shockingly enough. It was in Rome that we found our favourite gelateria of the trip. Giolitti’s, tucked away between Piazza Navona and the Pantheon, has great flavours and gives you the option of whipped cream on top. Having gelato every day is a must when travelling in Italy! Ella interned at Pique during her second semester of Grade 12 at Pemberton Secondary School. She will be attending journalism school at University of Kings College in Halifax, Nova Scotia—the oldest chartered university in Canada. n

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WHISTLER OLYMPIC PLAZA MAY 31-JUNE 2, 2019

COURSE MAP

TRAFFIC INFORMATION The WHISTLER HALF MARATHON would like to advise residents and travellers along Highway 99 and Municipal Streets in Whistler of temporary road closures and traffic control measures to accommodate the event on Saturday June 1, 2019. EXPECTED HOURS OF IMPACT ARE: • Highway 99 closure at Lorimer Road: 7:25am to 7:40am (15 min. closure) and 7:50am – 8:05am (15 min. closure) • Lorimer Road CLOSED to westbound traffic West of Highway 99 7:30am to 8:15am • Neighbourhood and Village streets West of Highway 99 expect minor delays 7:30am to 11:00am • Neighbourhood and Village streets East of Highway 99 expect minor delays 8:00am – 11:30am Traffic control personnel will be stationed at major intersections and access points along the race route, shown here, to safely manage traffic. Motorists are asked to avoid travel during impacted hours and consider alternative times for corridor trips or alternative routes for local trips. Motorists that need to travel during these times are advised to plan ahead for potential delays and short duration stoppages on the affected route. In addtion to street traffic and transit delays, please also note that much of Lost Lake Park will play host to the event. Expect heavy trail usage between the hours of 7:00am - noon on Saturday June 1, and 8:00am to 10:00am on Sunday, June 2. The Whistler Half Marathon organisers and participants thank you for your patience and cooperation and remind you to drive safely.

NEIGHBOURHOOD ROADWAYS AFFECTED IN: • Whistler Cay • Blueberry Hill • Alta Vista • Whistler Village

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TRANSIT ROUTES AFFECTED BY POSSIBLE MINOR DELAYS: • Route 30 connector north to Emerald Estates • Route 30 connector south from Emerald Estates • Blueberry/Tapley’s connector


WEEKEND SCHEDULE OF EVENTS FRIDAY MAY 31 1:00pm - 10:00pm

Package Pick-Up

Athlete HQ @ Whistler Olympic Plaza

1:00pm - 9:00pm 3:00pm

Partner Showcase Presented by Scandinave Spa Course Orientation with Dave Clark, Race Director

Athlete HQ @ Whistler Olympic Plaza Athlete HQ @ Whistler Olympic Plaza - Course Map

3:30pm

CYA - Guided Trail Run #1, presented by CLIF, featuring Rob Krar

Athlete HQ @ Whistler Olympic Plaza - Smartwool Tent

5:00pm 8:00pm

CYA - Guided Trail Run #2, presented by CLIF, featuring Rob Krar Course Orientation with Dave Clark, Race Director

Athlete HQ @ Whistler Olympic Plaza - Smartwool Tent Athlete HQ @ Whistler Olympic Plaza - Course Map

All-day

Save 10% OFF admission at Audain Art Museum (show bib for discount)

Audain Art Museum

6:30am

Pre-Run Stretch with Coach Christine

The North Face Store, Whistler Village - FREE

7:00am

WALKER’S START - Whistler Half Marathon

Whistler Olympic Plaza

7:15am

Athlete Warm Up

Whistler Olympic Plaza

7:30am

START - Whistler 10km (runners and walkers)

Whistler Olympic Plaza

7:40am

START - Whistler 5km (runners and walkers)

Whistler Olympic Plaza

7:50am

RUNNER’S START - Whistler Half Marathon and 30km

Whistler Olympic Plaza

8:15am

Finish line Live Entertainment/ Athlete Celebration and Post Run Food begins

Main Stage/ Athlete Food Area @ Whistler Olympic Plaza

9:15am

5k and 10k Awards Ceremony, presented by BlueShore Financial

Main Stage/ Athlete Food Area @ Whistler Olympic Plaza

10:30am

START - Whistler Kids Run, presented by CLIF Kids Z-BAR

Main Stage/ Race Results Table @ Whistler Olympic Plaza

10:45am

21.1k and 30k Awards Ceremony, presented by BlueShore Financial

Main Stage/ Race Results Table @ Whistler Olympic Plaza

11:00am - 12:30pm

Shirt exchange and late pick up

Athlete HQ @ Whistler Olympic Plaza

1:00pm

Yoga Jam, presented by CLIF Bar & Yogacara Whistler

Athlete HQ @ Whistler Olympic Plaza, By Donation

7:30pm

Trails in Motion 7 Film Screening, opening presentation by Rob Krar (ticketed event)

The North Face Store, Whistler Village

All-day

Save 10% OFF admission at Audain Art Museum (show bib for discount)

Audain Art Museum

9:00am

Dog Jog, proudly supporting Whistler Animals Galore (WAG)

Passive Haus - Entrance to Lost Lake Park

9:00am

Recoverun, coached 5 km recovery run and information session

The North Face Store, Whistler Village

12:00pm - 4:00pm

Family Studio Sunday, Family friendly mountain inspired art projects. (Free with admission or membership.) Audain Art Museum

All-day

Save 10% OFF admission at Audain Art Museum (show bib for discount)

SATURDAY JUNE 1

SUNDAY JUNE 2

SUPPORTERS & SUPPLIERS

WALSH RESTORATIONS

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SPORTS THE SCORE

Luge Canada looks to bring World Champs to Whistler EVENT WOULD MOVE FROM CALGARY, WHOSE TRACK IS FACING UNCERTAINTY

BY DAN FALLOON CALGARY’S LOSS could be Whistler’s gain. Luge Canada is preparing to pitch the International Luge Federation (FIL) on moving the 2021 World Championships to the Whistler Sliding Centre at the FIL’s congress on Ljubjana, Slovenia on June 14 and 15. Calgary was initially awarded the championships in 2017, but the future of its track is currently up in the air. The WinSport track closed for renovations at the conclusion of the 2018-19 season, but the project currently faces a financial shortfall and it is unclear when the track will reopen. “We had to get confirmation from WinSport that the track will be open in 2021 and they aren’t willing to do that at this point,” Luge Canada executive director Tim Farstad told CTV Calgary. “We had to make the decision to move it to Whistler because we still want to have the luge championships in 2021 in Canada.” Farstad told CTV that the change-ofvenue request opens the door for other

BACK TO THE TRACK Luge Canada will ask the International Luge Federation to move the 2021 FIL World Championships from Calgary to Whistler. FILE PHOTO BY DAN FALLOON

52 MAY 30, 2019

tracks to bid on the championships, but Luge Canada will be aware of any challengers by June 1. Whistler Sport Legacies president and CEO Roger Soane said he and his crew kept an eye on what was happening in Calgary and are ready to fill in if the FIL approves the switch.

arrival, Soane said a compressed timeline wouldn’t be a major challenge for Whistler Sliding Centre to overcome. The track just went through a World Championships cycle this spring when the International Bobsleigh and Skeleton Federation brought its best to the track, so the memories are still fresh.

“Part of our mandate is to keep hosting these events so we jumped at the opportunity to get into this possibility.” - ROGER SOANE

“With the World Championships being held in January 2021, I think Luge Canada was looking for a guarantee that the track would be open so that they could proceed. I don’t think the track operators were able to give them that guarantee,” he said. “Part of our mandate is to keep on hosting these events so we jumped at the opportunity to get into this possibility.” While tracks typically have four years to prepare for the World Championships’

“You start doing the preliminary work two years out, but really, you’re going (to get started) a year out. We would miss a little bit, but if we get confirmation in July, it still gives us a good 18 months to get things in place,” he said, adding that much of the sponsorship is international and would travel without issue from Calgary to Whistler. While WinSport was disappointed to lose such a major event, it understands the

need to make the switch at this time. “We are still continuing to look for funding sources for the track project and it is still on pause, not stopped,” WinSport spokesman Dale Oviatt said in a statement to The Canadian Press. “Given the construction time line and the fact that we don’t have funding in hand, we have informed the sport groups that the track won’t be operational next season. “We are hopeful that we’ll find a funding solution to complete the construction to open for the 2020-21 season. “Even when that is complete, it wouldn’t be feasible to host the worlds in 2021, due to the lead-up time required for such an important event.” With Calgary’s track not expected to operate at all in the coming season, Whistler is likely to see some additional traffic, with or without the championships. Canada’s national teams would split time between the two in seasons past, but now, Whistler will take on the “full load” in addition to hosting international teams. “The 2018-19 season was our busiest year ever. Even (with) the Olympic season, we put more people down the track in the last season. We’re expecting this to be another very busy season in 19-20,” Soane said, adding that Whistler will host an FIL World Cup in December, while an IBSF North American Cup event is in the works. n


SPORTS THE SCORE

High school MTB teams wrap season WHISTLER SECONDARY, PEMBERTON SECONDARY EACH TAKE HOME AGE-GROUP TITLE FROM PROVINCIALS

BY DAN FALLOON WHISTLER IS A MECCA for mountain biking, and that’s obvious even at the highschool level. Whistler Secondary School (WSS) boasted the largest team at the BC High School Mountain Bike Championships in Squamish on May 24, bringing 42 riders in all despite missing some team members. There was quality with that quantity, as WSS took 17 top-10 finishes, led by Wei Tien Ho’s win in the Grade 9 boys’ enduro and sixth-place finish in the cross-country (XC) race. Other strong results included: Sophie Lawrence (fourth in the Grade 8 girls’ enduro and fifth in the cross-country); Nic Mikkelsen (fourth in the Grade 8 boys’ cross-country and sixth in the enduro); Aiden Bayliffe (fifth in the Grade 8 boys’ enduro and ninth in the cross-country); Taylor Boehm (seven in both the Grade 8 boys’ enduro and cross-country); Zach Eaton (eighth in the Grade 8 boys’ enduro); Marlie Molinaro (fourth in the Grade 10 girls’ cross-country and fifth in the enduro); Kenzo Okazaki (fourth in the Grade 9 boys’ enduro and eighth in the cross-country); Tristan Curran (fifth in the Grade 9 boys’ enduro); and Brady Fogolin (10th in the Grade 11/12 boys’ enduro). As a team, WSS won the Grade 8 boys’ title. Head coach Lesley Clements was impressed with how the athletes handled the less-than-ideal conditions on race day. “It poured rain on us before the XC … but all the kids were tough,” she said. “They held in there and then the enduro went. “Everybody rode strong and did their absolute best,” she added. In the North Shore Mountain Bike League regular season, WSS brought home the overall banners in Grade 8 and Grade 10. “Winning two of those banners in one year is really, really awesome,” Clements said. “We had a bunch of really great Grade 8 riders come in to the school last year, so that was really great for the overall team.” The team continued to work with the Whistler Off-Road Cycling Association (WORCA) for its Monday and Thursday training, while Bike Co. and Coastal Culture helped the team with jerseys this year. Up the highway, Pemberton Secondary School (PSS) also enjoyed an impressive provincials with 10 top-10 results. Tegan Cruz was a particular bright spot, winning the Grade 8 boys’ enduro, while Chris Beaton also podiumed with a third in the Grade 10 boys’ enduro to go along with a seventh-place finish in the cross-country. As for the girls, Ella MacDonald was second in the Grade 11/12 girls’ cross-country and

Wellness Wellness Talks

Nesters Market and Pharmacy offers wellness talks at and Certified Plant Based Chef Sarah Uy, Carissa Beu Nesters Market and Pharmacy offers wellness na Lemmon and Jasmine Wong each talks at its Whistler location. Join RHN andweek for inspira

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third in the enduro, helping PSS claim the Grade 11/12 girls’ banner. Other strong results came from: Tea Cousineau (sixth in both the Grade 8 girls’ cross-country and enduro); Zachary Nesters Market and Pharmacy offers wellness talks at its Whistler location. Join R Stratton (fourth in the GradeNesters 8 boys’Market Nestersand Market Pharmacy and Pharmacy offers wellness offers wellness talks at itstalks Whistler at its Whistler location. location. Join RHNJoin RHN enduro); Arriya Kuiper (fourth in the Gradeand Certified Plant Based Chef Sarah Uy, Carissa Beu, RHN and Post Partum Do and Certified and Certified Plant Based Plant Chef Based Sarah Chef Uy,Sarah Carissa Uy,Beu, Carissa RHNBeu, andRHN Post and Partum PostDoula Partum Da-Doula Da11/12 girls’ enduro and sixth in the crossna Lemmon and Jasmine Wong each week for inspirational whole health ideas. na Lemmon and Jasmine and Wong Jasmine each Wong week each for week inspirational for inspirational whole health whole ideas. health ideas. country); and Sean Turrin (fourth in the na Lemmon Grade 11/12 boys’ enduro). Head coach Nicole Jean was happy with how the Red Devils handled the day’s weather. “Despite being cold and muddy and miserable after the cross-country event, they kept their spirits up,” she said. The spirits were high in part, she said, because many riders preferred the enduro and, no coincidence, performed better in it.

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with Carissa CarissaCarissa welcomes welcomes all moms all and moms dads, and people dads, people whoBeu like who to festival like to festival with Carissa Beu WITH CARISSA BEU - LESLEY CLEMENTS or camp orand camp those andwho those just who likejust to use like baby to usewipes baby on wipes a regular on a regular Carissa welcomes alltop moms and dads, people who like to fes basis. She basis. willShe share willthe share topthe 11welcomes harmful 11 harmful ingredients ingredients found in found com-in comCarissa all moms and dads, or camp and those likecleaner tooruse baby wipes onaa regu baby wipes baby and wipes look and atwho look some atto cleaner some alternatives alternatives with a with “That’s just probably because wemercial live in mercial people who likejust festival camp and Pemberton,” she said with a laugh. basis. Sheon will share the top 11 harmful ingredients found in demo demo how on to how make toyour make atown home. atwipes home. those who just like own toyour use baby on PSS could have placed higher, Jean felt, but three senior riders opted to race the next day’s Nimby Fifty instead. Enduro champion Cruz said he enjoyed the first stage where he could let it rip en route to the win. “(It) was a little technical than the other, and had less uphill, so it was faster,” he said. Beaton, meanwhile, recorded top-10 finishes throughout the season and kept that going at provincials. Feeling gassed after the cross-country, Beaton wasn’t expecting to do as well as he did in the enduro, but managed to put his head down and earn a bronze. “It was crazy slick, so I tried to keep on pedalling and not stop,” he said. “It was pretty funny. I didn’t think I’d gotten there. I was pretty tired and didn’t think I was actually going all that fast. I didn’t think I would actually podium.” Both athletes felt they’d improved their strength and stamina over the course of the season, as did Grade 8 rider Sami Teitzel, who was in second midway through the enduro before a flat tire ended his medal hopes. Despite that disappointment, he was pleased with how he improved this season. “I was definitely pacing myself a lot more,” he said. “I started to find a good speed to take the whole race at.” Full results are online at www. spruceracetiming.com/bc-high-schoolmtb-championship/results. n

Carissa welcomes all moms and dads, p or camp and those who just like to use a regular She will share the top 11alternatives wi mercial baby wipesbasis. and look at some cleaner ingredients foundthe in com-mercial basis.harmful She on will top harmful demo howshare to make your own 11 at home. baby wipes and look at some cleaner Carissa Beu studied Naturopathy and Aromatherapy at one of the top mercial baby wipes and look at some cl alternatives with a demo on how to make Medicine colleges in Australia. Her passion is natural skin care and ha Wellness Wellness Desk 604.932.3545 Desk 604.932.3545 Ext Ext your own at home. ful creative side322 as she crafts like a demon, dances and plays several in 322demo on how to make your Wellness Wellness Desk 604-932Desk 604-932ments. She also LOVES cats. You can find her most days in the Nester` Carissa Beu Carissa studied Beu Naturopathy studied Naturopathy and Aromatherapy and Aromatherapy at one of the at one top of Natural the top Natural Medicine colleges Medicineincolleges Australia. in Her Australia. passion Her is natural passion skin is natural care and skin has carea colourand has a colourful creativefulside creative as sheside crafts as like she crafts a demon, like dances a demon, anddances plays several and plays instruseveral instruments. Shements. also LOVES She also cats. LOVES You can cats. find Youher can most finddays her most in thedays Nester`s in thewellness Nester`s wellness department department ready to help ready youtoheal helpyourself. you heal yourself.

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MAY 30, 2019

53


SPORTS THE SCORE

Quick comeback LOCAL RUNNER ELIZABETH BOYLAN RACING WHISTLER HALF MARATHON MONTHS AFTER HEART SURGERY

BY DAN FALLOON RUNNING COULD VERY WELL have been the last thing Elizabeth Boylan ever did. But with a stroke of luck, the 43-yearold is now using her passion to celebrate the fact that she’s still here. The Whistler runner will line up with more than 800 other runners to run 21.1 kilometres as part of the Whistler Half Marathon this Saturday, June 1. Last summer, however, Boylan collapsed while jogging on the Valley Trail on the northeast corner of Nita Lake. She rolled down the slope but luckily, came to rest on a log instead of ending up, perilously, in the water. Bikes and runners continued on their way just a few metres up the bank, but Boylan wasn’t visible from the trail. She eventually came to and made her way home. Boylan was born with a heart murmur and doctors discovered that she was born with a bicuspid aortic valve that from an early age, she expected she would need to replace. Boylan developed severe aortic stenosis (the narrowing of the aortic valve opening), and with a life expectancy of

two to five years after that diagnosis, open-heart surgery seemed like a very real possibility for Boylan at some point in her life. With surgery as an admittedly scary option, Boylan tried her best to persevere through the symptoms, including shortness of breath (with one doctor describing it

Boylan’s condition worsened around Christmas, and the surgery was quickly becoming vital. Another complication came from Boylan’s choice to have the Ross Procedure, which replaces a diseased aortic valve with the pulmonary valve, which itself

“I want to run it the whole way. I don’t want to walk ... I know I can run 15 kms without walking, and then it’s 21 kms.” - ELIZABETH BOYLAN

as “a horrible way to die,” she recalled), for as long as possible while finding other explanations for occurrences even as serious as her collapse—in that case, the poor air quality from nearby wildfires. “I didn’t want to have to have surgery. I wanted to be healthy,” she said over coffee at Nita Lake Lodge earlier this month. “I didn’t want to be sawed open.”

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is replaced with one from a cadaver. The procedure can be difficult to procure in British Columbia, so Boylan had to travel to her hometown of Montreal to have the surgery on Feb. 28. Locally, replacing the valve with a mechanical valve is more common, but for an active runner and snowboarder like Boylan, having to take medications daily, listen to the valve’s

clicking, and risk serious injury on a fall were not side effects she wanted to deal with. She would also likely require another operation in the future. The surgery, performed by Dr. Ismail El-Hamamsy at the Institut de cardiologie de Montreal, was a success. As luck would have it, Dr. El-Hamamsy is also a runner and was a strong resource for Boylan. “Going into surgery, I asked my surgeon ‘When can I start training for the New York City Marathon in 2020?’ I thought I would need so much recovery time, so I was being conservative. But he said ‘Right away,’” she recalled. “They want you moving right away. “Even in the hospital, I was moving up and down the hall.” Boylan’s first run after her operation was a quick 3.5-km effort just 11 days afterward, though it was a painful effort as her sternum was still healing. She was soon able to complete her first 15-km run in nearly two decades, running along the Stanley Park Seawall. It was an emotional experience for Boylan, who lived in downtown Vancouver when she moved to B.C. and would run along there often, generally completing 90 kms in a week. “I hadn’t been able to run 15 kms for 17 years and so it felt really good,” she said,

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SPORTS THE SCORE

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COMEBACK PATH Runner Elizabeth Boylan is shown on the stretch of the Valley Trail near Nita Lake where she collapsed because of a heart condition. After open-heart surgery this winter, she’s running the Whistler Half Marathon on June 1. PHOTO BY DAN FALLOON

noting she had to get her joints to catch up. Her husband, John, is able to track her runs using the Find My Friends app, and Boylan is also in the process of training a cardiac response dog. When Boylan told people she would be running again so soon, it took her some time to convince friends and family it was a safe activity. However, she feels like she has more energy than she’s had in years. “At first, they look at you and they’re a little bit sorry for you, (saying) ‘Be careful,’” she said. When she lines up on Saturday, Boylan has some basic goals she’d like to achieve: cross the line in under two hours, and keep running. “I want to run it the whole way. I don’t want to walk,” she said. “I know I can run 15 kms without walking, and then it’s 21 kms.” Boylan is also looking to run the New York City Marathon in 2020 for charity.

MARATHON WEEKEND IN GOOD SHAPE Race weekend is shaping up well according to organizer Dave Clark, who said there will be a good-sized field, even if registration is pacing slightly behind recent years, which were high watermarks for the race. “We can’t expect to grow year over year, but the numbers are still solid,” he said. “We’ve got a lot of people coming in from out of town, so it should be a good,

busy weekend for all the businesses in town as well.” Race weekend officially starts with guided trail runs on Friday, May 31. The runs, with an easier one at 3:30 p.m. and a more difficult option at 5 p.m., will feature Canadian endurance athlete Rob Krar and local coach John Blok. After runners complete any of the half marathon of the 30-km, 10-km or five-km distances, there will be a yoga jam through Yogacara on Saturday afternoon at 1 p.m. by donation to Crohn’s and Colitis Canada. In the evening at 7:30 p.m. is the Trails in Motion 7 film screening at The North Face store with Krar, a Western States 100 and Leadville 100 winner set to present. Tickets are $15, includes a beer or glass of wine, and are available at www. whistlerhalfmarathon.com. On Sunday morning, the Recover Run with Christine Suter is on at 9 a.m. for those looking to keep their legs moving with a quick five-km run starting at The North Face. If something a little furrier and more low-key is in order, the Dog Jog in support of Whistler Animals Galore is on tap at the PassivHaus, also at 9 a.m. “We expect to have 40 to 50 dogs and their people out at the PassivHaus,” Clark said. “It’s a really fun event where the dogs come out. They have to be on a leash, but they can run with their owners in a group environment. “We mix our passion of animals and running together.” n

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MAY 30, 2019

55


SPORTS THE SCORE

Mountain Bike Tourism Symposium coming ORGANIZER THRILLED TO BRING EVENT TO SPORT’S ‘FLAGSHIP’

BY DAN FALLOON THE 2019 Mountain Bike Tourism

     

Symposium is coming to Whistler from Oct. 2 to 4. Western Canada Mountain Bike Tourism Association executive director Martin Littlejohn is excited to bring the biennial conference to the sport’s heart in British Columbia. Littlejohn said the organization put out a request for proposals in the Vancouver-Coastal Mountains region and a local contingent jumped at the chance, while Mission and Powell River were also strongly considered. “What we’ve done for the previous symposiums is we’ve wanted to spread it around. We choose a region that we’ve yet to have a symposium in, of the six tourism regions in the province. We hadn’t had it here in this part of the province yet,” he said. “Whistler was the first one to respond and they ended up winning the bid for this year.” Recent hosts include Williams Lake and Revelstoke, and while the organization was pondering a return to a smaller centre, Littlejohn said Whistler’s allure was too strong to overcome. “Typically in the past, we’ve always

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chosen locations that were always a little bit off the beaten trail, perhaps a little less known,” he said. “At this juncture, I suppose, and with the development of mountain-bike tourism, it made sense to go right with the flagship and use Whistler as the backdrop for this year’s symposium.” Though the Whistler Conference Centre would be the first location to come to mind to host, Littlejohn said it was too late in the game to consider the high-demand Whistler Village location. Instead, the symposium will run in Creekside and Dusty’s will serve as the main venue. “It’s a bit of an unusual venue for us, but I think it’s going to work as a rustic, adventurous Whistler feel,” he said. “It’ll be an interesting chance to showcase a little different side of Whistler, the Creekside of Whistler. It’s nice because it’s more intimate. We’ll hopefully be able to have everybody staying close by and people can rely on a bike to get around and not worry about having to drive anywhere.” While speakers and content haven’t been totally set in stone, Littlejohn said the broad focus will be on creating a sustainable approach to trails that also ticks the boxes of the demands placed on them. “(Mountain biking is) still growing and it’s still relatively new to some areas of

COVERGING IN WHISTLER The 2019 Mountain Bike Tourism Symposium is coming to Whistler in October.

PHOTO BY JUSTA JESKOVA

the province. Certainly, Whistler is ahead of a lot of the other mountain-biking destinations in B.C. There’s a lot to learn from their experience and certainly, some of the challenges that we’re all facing, it’s somewhat amplified a bit for Whistler, is keeping up with the demand and supporting

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SPORTS THE SCORE

Looney tops women’s event at final Nimby Fifty

Whistler Conference Centre | June 12, 2019 | 2-6PM

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SPORTS BRIEFS: SEA WOLVES HOLD HOME MEET; AXEMEN WIN

BY DAN FALLOON IN HER PRIOR THREE TRIES at the Nimby Fifty, Sonya Looney had come close but never quite topped the podium. In her final try on May 25, the Kelownabased Looney pulled off the elite women’s win, besting a pair of Squamish residents, Zoe Dawson by 17 seconds and Elissa Lok by two minutes and 45 seconds (2:45). Looney, the World Solo 24-Hour Mountain Bike Championships winner in 2015, looked back on her previous results and made some changes to try to win. “Last year, I was second. I’ve been thirdand fourth-place at this race. I changed my strategy a little bit,” she said. “I knew that there was a lot of climbing in this race and normally, I ride my 120-millimetre bike. “I used a 100-mm bike with lighterweight tires and a lighter-weight set-up to optimize for the climb.” There was a trade-off, Looney said, as she gave up speed on the descents. “I hoped my fitness and my climbing would be enough,” she said. “Normally, descending is a strength of mine and it was humbling to see how much of a difference equipment makes on the descent of that race.” The day’s weather threw a wrench into Looney’s plans, as she was prepared for the forecasted hot, dry conditions, and not for the rain that showed up just late enough that she didn’t have time to make adjustments. “I haven’t done much riding in wet conditions on the coast at all this year. It takes time to re-adjust to getting your confidence back, knowing which things you’re going to be fine riding and which things are going to be slippery,” she said. “The Nimby Fifty descents are so steep and there are lots of steep rock faces where you have to commit 100 per cent whenever you start down them.” Looney added that the win was bittersweet—she was glad to win the last one, but sorry to see the Nimby Fifty go, especially given its status in the crosscountry community. “I’ve raced all over the world and it’s the most technical cross-country race there is,” she said. In the men’s elite division, Chilliwack’s Ricky Federau won for the second time, edging Abbotsford’s Michael van den Ham by seven seconds and Bellingham’s Spencer Paxson by 10 seconds. In the age-group events, the men’s winners were: Cam McCallum (under-19); Joel De Schiffart (19-to-29); Brian O’Rourke (30-to-34); Barry Wicks (35-to-39); Chris Clark (40-to-44); Andreas Hestler (45-to-

49); Scott Simpson (50-to-54); Ted Russo (55-to-59); and Lawrence Hindle (60-andover). As for the women, winners were: Geza Rodgers (under-19); Sarah Moore (19to-29); Jenny Lehmann (30-to-34); Carrie Meltzer (35-to-39); Catherine Fleming (40to-44); Tobi Henderson (45-to-49); Lisa Le Poole (50-to-54); and Cathy Zeglinski (55-to-59). Full results are online at www. webscorer.com.

SEA WOLVES HOLD HOME MEET The Whistler Sea Wolves had 42 athletes take part in their home meet at Meadow Park Sports Centre on the weekend, taking home some excellent results. Individual winners included: Maggy Smith (first in girls’ 10-and-under 50-metre freestyle among six total medals); Zachary Currie (first in boys’ 13-14 200-metre butterfly, among seven total medals); Robyn Minton (first in 13-14 girls’ 50-metre butterfly, 200-metre individual medley, 100-metre freestyle, 50-metre freestyle, and 50-metre breaststroke with one other medal); Macy Kercher (first in 15-and-over girls’ 50-metre butterfly, 200-metre individual medley, 100-metre freestyle, 50-metre freestyle, and 100-metre butterfly with one other medal); Kieran Higgins (first in boys’ 13-14 200-metre freestyle, among six total medals); and Archie Baldwin (first in boys’ 10-and-under 50-metre backstroke, among five total medals). Other individual medallists included: James Tait (one medal); Nicole Bolleman (three medals); Kierstin Higgins (two medals); Mason Foose (three medals); Billie Horn (two medals); Kye McKiernan (one medal); Connor Haig (one medal); Emma Horn (one medal); Daniel Ford (four medals); Annabel Gilman (one medal); Olivia Persson (two medals); Eli Grier (one medal); Mio Grier (one medal); Anna Grier (one medal); Lucy Smith (one medal); and Isla Inglis (one medal).

AXEMEN HELP VANCOUVER RUGBY UNION TO TITLE Four members of the Axemen Rugby Club continued their winning ways. Weeks after winning the BC Rugby Union’s Division 3 title, Blake Mahovic, Lewis Stockton, Neil Irwin and Oli Watts joined up with the Vancouver Rugby Union (VRU) side in the McKechnie Cup tournament. VRU beat North Island 48-23 on May 18 and South Island 46-18 to claim the crown. Mahovic served as captain. n

Mark Jonathan Hurtubise Mark Jonathan Hurtubise (lovingly known as Jack), age 49, passed away peacefully on May 23, 2019, at North Shore Hospice in Vancouver. He was born August 5, 1969, in Montreal to Jean and Nicole (Dube) Hurtubise. He was a 1986 graduate of Polyvalente des source and went on to Dawson College in 1987, then John Abbott in 1988. After attending Concordia University from 1989 to 1992, he packed up and headed west to pursue his life in the mountains. He married Erica (Cuthbert) Hurtubise on September 26, 2015, in Whistler, BC. He worked as a pro ski patrol for Whistler Blackcomb for over 15 years and beyond his passion for spending time out in nature he was an amazing friend and had a wonderful knack for making you feel at home when spending time with him. Mark (Jack) truly lived life to the fullest through simple pleasures; chatting with friends and family, sipping on a great cup of coffee, and spending precious time with his son Noah Hurtubise and step son Samuel Murray. Mark had an uncanny ability to reach people in a deep and positive way. He is survived by his wife, Erica (Cuthbert) Hurtubise; son Noah Hurtubise; step son Samuel Murray mother Nicole (Dube) Hurtubise, two brothers, Kevin and Charles Hurtubise; aunts, uncles, and cousins. Family, friends, and others whose lives Mark (Jack) touched are encouraged to donate to the BC Cancer Foundation or North Shore Hospice in his memory. At his request there will not be a formal memorial service but a celebration in his honour at a date to be determined.

MAY 30, 2019

57


VELOCITY PROJECT

Don’t Die Curious ON MAY 22, 2019, the Class of 2033 had their kindergarten orientation. I drove past Signal Hill and saw the swell of improbably small and cute four and five year olds spilling out of the school, peeking in their welcome packets—60 families on the cusp of a big transition. I distinctly remember sitting in that tiny-chaired room this time last year, knees under my chin, heart in my

BY LISA RICHARDSON throat, with more questions than certainty, wondering what to expect, what I needed to know, how this chapter was going to unfold. I didn’t know how to prepare my fiveyear-old for kindergarten. I had memories of my own first days of school—anxious memories. And I felt anxiety now about releasing my Small Person into the world. I did not want him to contract this worry from me, so in the handful of days leading up to the start of kindergarten, we would have dance parties. We jumped around to a song called “Watermelon” as the singer, Tom Rosenthal, donned a human watermelon suit and grooved absurdly across the north Welsh countryside. For an encore, we’d cue up Rosenthal’s “Don’t Die Curious.” And then we’d get on with our day. I was turning all my anxious energy into a dance, and it began to feel OK. The first day of school was just a two-hour session of kids being observed and assigned to their classes. Cue up the worry-monsters: Would he get put in the right class? Would

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58 MAY 30, 2019

he get the best teacher? What did he need to do to get in the right class? Would he make friends? Should I have engineered a social circle for him already? What did these questions even mean? Watermelon, watermelon, watermelon. We danced it out to our songs, then got in the car, and held tight hands down the corridor where I delivered him to his unknown adventure. The kids were sorted into their classes, and we, and all the other anxious parents, scattered away, drifting off to coffee shops, bakeries, trails, to worry and wonder what we should be wishing for, how noisily should we be advocating for our children, whether it’s OK to just let it all unfold. Watermelon, watermelon, watermelon, watermelon. The next morning, we danced. The morning before his first bus ride, we danced. Then we moved on. A more prosaic, watermelon-free, morning routine took over. But I still feel exuberant delight when I hear those songs. We dared to go out into a brave scary place, with a little spring in our step. Watermelon was the word I used to shut up my worry-mind, and in that juicy space I substituted a motto, with a killer beat, the Don’t Die Curious song: “You can’t count every single grain of sand. You can’t save a heart by holding a hand. You can’t make everyone understand. But don’t die curious.” On March 11, 2011, an earthquake took place off the coast of Japan. It triggered a massive tsunami that decimated the north-eastern coastline, the region known as Tohoku, destroying 250,000 homes and taking 16,000 lives. Two photographers living in Tokyo—Yuko Yoshikawa and her American-born business partner Brian Scott Peterson were motivated to do something to help. So, they boarded a train and headed north, into the heart of the devastation, with the intent of offering to

take family portraits with instant Polaroidtype film, for the survivors—the people living in temporary housing camps, who had lost everything, including their personal histories and photographs, when the giant black wave rolled in and swamped everything in its path. “We went six months after the tsunami, to the day,” recalls Peterson. It was somber. People were coping, but the loss was still visceral, confronting, and Peterson suddenly felt unsure of himself. “We realized in that moment how ill-equipped we were, how much we didn’t know.” Peterson is an exuberant character, a camera-wielding minstrel, whose friendliness transcends language barriers and disarms people quickly. But he began to second-guess himself. “What was I about to say? ‘Hey, we’re here from Tokyo to do a photo project for you. Were you in the tsunami? Did you lose anybody?’” It was highly probable the person might respond: Yes, I lost my entire family. And then what? Peterson was not a counsellor. The whole mission could be derailed by one ignorant question. They’d travelled through the night, and now his team was standing on top of an overlook, where many of the survivors had fled to escape the tsunami, watching the sunrise, waiting for the day to begin. The light was beautiful, he set up his camera and someone wandered up, curious. “What’s going on over here?” the man asked them. “Do you live here?” probed Peterson, trying to ascertain if he was meeting a volunteer contributing to the ongoing clean-up and recovery efforts, or a local. The man was a local who taught English in the school. “Were you in the tsunami?” asked Peterson.

“Yeah, I was in the tsunami.” A confession exploded out of Peterson. “I’m about to ask you if your life was totally destroyed by the tsunami. But I’m scared to ask you that question, because I’m scared of what that answer might be and maybe I’m not prepared to hear it, so before I ask you that question, I’m thinking I’d be better to ask: What should I ask you, if I’m coming here?” And the stranger offered: “You could ask me where I lived before I came to live in the temporary housing here.” Peterson and his team had their point of entry. Not “Are you OK? Is your family OK?” But, “What was life like before it was like this?” Outfitted with their intention to help, a camera, some instant film, and that question, they headed into the village. By the end of the day, they had given away 100 family portraits, and a handful of photo albums—symbols of hope, of life ongoing and worth holding onto. Their project, Photohoku, (a hybrid word combing Photo and Tohoku for the tsunamiaffected region) is now seven years strong, and has provided more than 10,000 instant portraits to local families, celebrating them as they rebuild, grow, even welcome new babies. They’ve expanded their offering into other countries after devastating events, including the Moore tornado in Oklahoma and Typhoon Haiyan in the Phillippines. And it all was powered by this heartfelt and curious approach: what question should I be asking? “We started out not knowing anything,” says Peterson. Don’t we all. Which makes curiosity the perfect place to start. The Velocity Project: how to slow the f*&k down and still achieve optimum productivity and life happiness. n


MEADOW PARK SPORTS CENTRE SWIM • SKATE • SWEAT • SQUASH

Meadow Park Sports Centre is located 4 km north of Whistler Village. OPEN DAILY: 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Last entry by 9:30 p.m.

GROUP FITNESS SCHEDULE THU 30

FRI 31

SAT 1

Circuit 7:30-8:30a.m.

Low Impact Circuit 7:30-8:30a.m.

Total Body Conditioning 7:30-8:30a.m.

Cardio Core Workout 9-10a.m.

Circuit 9-10a.m.

Low Impact Circuit 9-10a.m.

SUN 2

MON 3

Low Impact Circuit 7:30-8:30a.m. Circuit 9-10a.m.

TUE 4

Low Impact Circuit 9-10a.m.

WED 5

Low Impact Circuit 7:30-8:30a.m Total Body Conditioning 9-10a.m.

*Gentle Fit Aqua Fit WORKSHOP Shallow 9:30-10:30a.m. 10-11:00a.m.

Aqua Fit Deep 9:30-10:30a.m.

*Barre 11:45-12:45p.m.

*Stroller Parent & Baby Fit 10:30-11:30a.m.

Low Impact *Parent & Zumba Baby Fit Aerobics 10:30-11:30a.m. 10:30-11:30a.m. 10:30-11:30a.m. Zumba 12:15-1p.m.

Zumba 12:15-1 p.m. *Gentle Fit for Seniors 1-2p.m.

*Gentle Fit for Seniors 1-2p.m.

*Gentle Fit for Seniors 1-2p.m.

*PWR! Moves 1:15-2:15p.m.

*PWR! Moves 1:15-2:15p.m.

*PWR! Moves 1:15-2:15p.m.

20/20/20 5:30-6:30p.m.

Bootcamp 5:10-6:10p.m Classes with * are registered or flexible registration (flex reg) programs and require registration of at least 5 people to start.

Box Fit 6:45-7:45p.m.

All other classes are included in the price of admission.

See exact schedule of classess at the sports centre or online at:

Mind Body Stretch 8-9 p.m.

Zumba *Prenatal 6:20-7:20p.m. Yoga 6:45-7:45p.m.

Zumba 6:20-7:20p.m.

Stretch & Restore Yoga 8-9 p.m.

whistler.ca/recreation

ARENA SCHEDULE THU 30

W&OT Drop-In Hockey

8:15-9:45a.m. Drop-In Hockey 10-11:30a.m. Public Skate 12-3p.m.

FRI 31

Drop-In Hockey 8:15-9:45a.m.

SAT 1

SUN 2

MON 3

55+ Drop-In Hockey 8:15-9:45a.m.

TUE 4

WED 5

Drop-In Hockey 8:15-9:45a.m.

Drop-In Hockey 10-11:30a.m. Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 6:30-8p.m.

Public Skate 6:30-8p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 6:30-8p.m.

Get strong again with an exercise program tailored to your injuries. Kinesiology services available at Meadow Park Sports Centre. Contact the fitness centre to find out more.

POOL SCHEDULE THU 30

FRI 31

SAT 1

SUN 2

MON 3

TUE 4

WED 5

LEISURE POOL 9a.m. - 9p.m. LAP POOL, HOT TUB, SAUNA, STEAM ROOM 6a.m. - 10p.m.

whistler.ca/recreation | whistler.ca/notices | 604-935-7529  @RMWhistler |  @rmwhistler |  @rmowhistler

Movement is Medicine 604.935.8363 Whistler.ca/fitness


EPICURIOUS

Could rice straws kick single-use plastic products to the curb for good? WHISTLER’S NITA LAKE LODGE, JUICE NATION OFFERING RICE STRAW TECHNOLOGIES’ NEW, ECO-FRIENDLY SIPPING SOLUTION

BY MEGAN LALONDE THE WAR ON PLASTIC is officially underway. As the world quickly begins to realize that this synthetic material is clogging up our rivers, oceans, landfills and even seeping into our soil, at this point it’s clear that plastic, in general, kind of sucks. It sucks so much that some municipalities—including the City of Vancouver—are implementing distribution bans on products like singleuse plastic straws. But unfortunately, sipping an icy beverage without a straw can kind of suck, too—particularly if you’re part of the population living with a physical disability or other health concern that makes drinking without a straw nearly impossible. Although this war on plastic has yielded several innovative alternatives to singleuse straws—ranging from paper to metal to compostable plastic—one Vancouver-based start-up has launched a new eco-friendly product that they say is safe for our environment without any of the drawbacks: the rice straw. Comprised of 50-per-cent finely-ground rice powder and 50-per-cent Tapioca, proponents of the rice straw say this 100-percent natural, biodegradable creation has all the necessary ingredients to replace the approximately 57 million plastic straws that are currently used in Canada each day and win the Straw Wars, once and for all. To begin with, the straws don’t sacrifice user-satisfaction, explained Kristi Wells, Regional Sales Director for Rice Straw Technologies. “It’s incredibly sturdy, it actually feels like a strong plastic because it has that very smooth texture to it,” said Wells. The compostable straws can be manufactured in a variety of sizes, and have no taste. They last four to six hours in cold drinks and two to three in hot beverages,

RICE, RICE BABY Rice Straw Technology is bringing 100-per-cent natural, biodegradable and edible rice straws to Canada—including here in Whistler. Head to Nita Lake Lodge or visit Juice Nation Organic Café at the Whistler Farmers’ Market to try one out. PHOTO SUBMITTED

according to Rice Straw Technologies, and take a maximum of 100 days to break down—all while remaining entirely edible. Even when the straws reach their life span, they don’t disintegrate the way, say, a flimsy paper straw would. “It gets a bit of a bow in it, as it slowly starts absorbing the liquid, but it’s still functional. The hole doesn’t close up or anything, it just gets a little bent,” Wells explained. Considering that millions of tonnes of rice are wasted globally each year, rice straws also offer a cost-effective alternative to many of the eco-friendly options that are on the market today, while simultaneously taking aim at curbing food waste, Wells added. “Rice grows very quickly and it’s a very sustainable farmed product, but a lot of the rice, when it’s harvested, actually ends up wasted,” she explained, referring to misshapen grains that typically wouldn’t make it to grocery store shelves. “We’re able to collect and use all of that wasted rice, so it fits into that sustainable program as well.” The rice straws are currently more expensive than paper straws but lower than

the plant-based plastic straws that can only be composted at commercial facilities. The idea for rice straws was first conceived by Yeonjigonji, a South Koreabased company, and first hit the market last August. Vancouver’s Rice Straw Technologies, founded in January 2019, is the first to distribute these rice straws in Canada since the rice straw received approval from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. Now, they’re available in Whistler. On May 15, Nita Lake Lodge announced it has partnered with Rice Straw Technologies to become Whistler’s first business to offer the eco-friendly alternative. The straws are currently available for customers to use at Aura Restaurant, Cure Lounge & Patio and Fix Café. “We are delighted to welcome a sustainable alternative for guests enjoying cocktails, smoothies or soft drinks in our dining establishments,” said Theresa Ginter, general manager at Nita Lake Lodge in a release. “As we are surrounded by such an abundance of natural beauty, we are inspired to help do our part in keeping our mountains,

lakes and forests in pristine condition.” Juice Nation Organic Café, a local food truck that can be found at the Whistler Farmers’ Market and several Whistler Parks this summer, has also since hopped aboard the rice-straw train. “Our company really feels like Whistler is the perfect community to sort of showcase and embrace this initiative and set an example,” Wells said, adding that customer feedback at their first Farmers’ Market appearance with Juice Nation, “was really positive.” “I think people are really looking for alternatives. We’re blessed to be in a community where our awareness is so high … to protect what we’ve been blessed with,” she added. Next up, Rice Straw Technologies is hoping to use the same materials and formula to bring biodegradable, single-use cutlery to the market. Rice straws are not currently available for retail purchase, but are available for distribution to restaurants and bars. For more information, head to ricestraw.ca or contact Kristi Wells at Kristi@ricestraw.ca. n

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ARTS SCENE

Arts Whistler fares well in year with ‘unique challenge’ ORGANIZATION REVIEWS ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF 2018 AT AGM

BY ALYSSA NOEL LAST YEAR was a time of transition for Arts Whistler. Most notably, the organization had to adjust after a two-year injection of $489,500 from a Canadian Heritage grant wrapped up at the end of 2017, said Michelle Ratcliffe, the new chair of Arts Whistler’s board of directors at the organization’s annual general meeting last Wednesday, May 22. “We had the unique challenge of a year where the focus shifted to maintaining momentum,” she said. “With the support of grants and fundraising, the momentum enabled Arts Whistler continue to produce Arts Scene three times a year, we found new reach with digital advertising, social channel marketing and … managed to maintain Arts Whistler operations at an impressive height.” The annual report for 2018 showed plenty of areas of growth from 2017—one of the biggest being increased visitors to the Maury Young Arts Centre. The facility saw a spike of 80 per cent, welcoming 93,522 people in

BUSY BUILDING Arts Whistler saw an 80 per cent spike in the number of visitors to the Maury Young Arts Centre in 2018. Part of that was thanks to performances like the one by Fred Penner. PHOTO BY JEREMY ALLEN/THE FULL TIME HOBBY

62 MAY 30, 2019

2017 and 169,172 in 2018. That included 1,395 venue bookings with 589 of the bookings for arts, culture or heritage events. “Arts Whistler continued to focus on local, cultural connections and collaborations, so in the spirit of collaboration, (it) transformed the arts centre into a central hub,” Ratcliffe said. “The centre is now home to a variety of

The Holiday Market grew by 32 per cent to finally reach 10,000 visitors over the weekend, while the Whistler Children’s Festival welcomed over 7,000 attendees, up slightly from 6,237 people in 2017. “We had record-setting numbers at a few key events that have been around for a long time, so that was exciting for us,” Douglas added. “We surpassed the

“I sit alongside a diverse group of creative leaders, all passionate about arts in our community ... ” - MICHELLE RATCLIFFE

creative communities that are expansive.” The Gift Shop, meanwhile, saw a 27 per cent increase in the number of people selling their products. A total of 76 artists and artisans sold $22,000 worth of items, up nine per cent from 2017. “We positioned ourselves through the Canadian Heritage grant … to promote all arts and culture, not just Arts Whistler, to get more people walking through that door,” Mo Douglas, executive director of Arts Whistler, said during the meeting. Two of the organization’s major events of the year also saw growth in attendance.

10,000-person mark at the Holiday Market last year. Our last years have been 7,000 to 7,500 … The resort is realizing we protect the resort on American Thanksgiving. If there’s not great snow, that show is the best thing in town.” The organization also “continues to be in good financial shape,” said David Wilcox, treasurer with the board of directors. Revenue was down for 2018, which was anticipated due to the end of the Canadian Heritage grant. That added up to $1,597,406 in 2018 compared to $1,936,411 in 2017. Expenses, meanwhile, also dropped

from $754,479 in 2017 to $575,001 in 2018. “Looking ahead to 2019, we’ve approved a balanced budget for the year,” Wilcox said. “So far, we’re tracking in line with that.” Before the end of the meeting, board member Shelagh Thiessen introduced the new faces on the board. Earning spots by acclimation were Jeff Murl (who ran for a council seat in the last municipal election), Jessie Morden, and Claire Ruddy (who you might recognize as executive director of AWARE). They join existing board members Wilcox (moving into year three of six), Suzanne Johnston (heading into her fifth year), and Brianna Beacom (in year three). Ratcliffe took over the board chair position from Heather Paul in April. Outgoing directors include former mayor Nancy Wilhelm-Morden and Elizabeth Tracy. The appointed members are Councillor Cathy Jewett, who oversees the municipality’s Arts, Natural History, Traditions and Heritage portfolio; Kim Stanger from the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre; and the Resort Municipality of Whistler’s Manager of Cultural Planning and Development, John Rae. “I sit alongside a diverse group of creative leaders, all passionate about arts in our community,” Ratcliffe said, “especially because of the opportunities to really engage everyone, whether they’re here for a day or whether they’re rooted for life.” n


ARTS SCENE

WHAT’S ON @ THE AUDAIN New Special Exhibition Now Open! Artistry Revealed: Peter Whyte, Catharine Robb Whyte and Their Contemporaries | On display until August 26

FREE ADMISSION FOR AGES 18 & UNDER Including regular events & programs Art After Dark Fridays | Block Printing | May 31 3:30 – 5:30pm (youth-specific art making) Family Studio | Tree Weavings | June 2 12 – 4pm presented by

WEEKLY EVENTS BIG BAND (From left) Chris Beaton, Pheobe Telfer, and Isaac Tetreault are co-stars in Pemberton Secondary School’s production of Airheads. PHOTO SUBMITTED

Art After Dark Fridays | Block Printing | May 31 6:30 – 8:30pm (adult-specific art making)

PSS tackles ‘90s comedy Airheads

Yoga @ the Audain | Fridays 6:30 – 8:00pm | Instructor Laura Davies

THEATRE PRODUCTION RUNNING FROM MAY 30 TO JUNE 2 AT THE PEMBERTON HIGH SCHOOL

Visit audainartmuseum.com/events for details

BY ALYSSA NOEL RENATA ZABLOTNEY LIKES to think outside the box when it comes to Pemberton Secondary School’s theatre productions. “I think it speaks more to (students’) interests,” says the drama teacher and director. “If I keep (producing) plays and movies they’ve never experienced, but they have these fun scenes, then I’m going to keep their attention and they’re going to give me more energy for it.” To that end, this year’s season-ending play—the school’s 15th in the last three years—is a production based on the ‘90s comedy Airheads. “It has fun, dynamic characters and it’s really campy,” Zablotney adds. “I wanted to do a really attainable kind of ‘90s or ‘80s classic—some nostalgia for myself in there.” For the uninitiated, the story is about a band that hijacks a radio station in an attempt to get them to play their demo. (You might remember the movie version starring much younger versions of Adam Sandler, Steve Buscemi, and Brendan Fraser.) The PSS version will feature two alternating cast, around 30 students in total. However, at least 10 characters are on stage at all times—and the action takes place in one room, which adds up to a high-energy show. “It’s been really fun doing this one,” says Chris Beaton who plays the “slow-thinking” drummer, Pip. “You get to play around with the character a lot. My character is pretty goofy and has a lot of weird reactions. It’s fun just messing around with how this character would act.” Rehearsals have been marked by nonstop laughter, the actors add. “In general, the play is just hilarious,” says Marley Losee,

who’s playing Ian the Shark, a radio host. “At every rehearsal, I’m laughing my head off.” It’s been much the same for Isaac Tetreault, who plays Rex, the “mean, aggressive” band member. “We’ve rehearsed this play so many times and we’re still finding new things that are funny about it and still making each other laugh,” he says. The production also marks Tetreault’s first. As a Grade 12 student heading into his last semester, he realized he only had one more chance to give theatre a try. “I didn’t really know what to expect, but I had a lot of fun with it and really enjoyed my time,” he says. While the show might be based on music, it’s not a musical, Zablotney adds. However, “you’ll see some amazing lip syncing,” she says. The show is running for four nights at the high school, but, like all their productions, it’s open to the entire community. “I’ve been asked in supermarkets, by random people, ‘When is your next play coming up?’ and I don’t know who they are. They’re just community members,” she says. Airheads, in particular, seems to be drawing community interest. “A few of the millwrights I know in Whistler that my husband works with are coming to the play,” she says. “It’s this ‘90s comedy and they want to come see it.” PSS’s production of Airheads runs at the school from May 30 to June 2. (It should also be noted that it’s rated PG-13.) Doors are at 7 p.m. and the show starts at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $10 each, available at the PSS office or reserve one by texting Zablotney at 778-848-1055. “We highly recommend people purchase tickets in advance,” she says. “There’s limited seating.” n

Public Walk & Talk Tours Wednesday through Sunday | Scheduled Times

Open Daily 10am – 5pm Open Friday 10am – 9pm (Closed Tuesday)

4350 Blackcomb Way, Whistler audainartmuseum.com

DAILY D

R K SPECIIN ALS

MONDAY TO FRIDAY

JUNE 3-13 MONG

OLIEG

RILL .

CO M

MAY 30, 2019

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NOTES FROM THE BACK ROW

Kicking ass and singing songs YOU KNOW WHAT never gets old? Watching something, anything, kick the living shit out of something else. Red ants versus black ants? Definitely. Bees versus giant wasp? Yes please. Zombie versus shark? Hold my diaper. From the

BY FEET BANKS Ultimate Warrior versus King Kong Bundy to the gladiator rings of ancient Rome to the Whistler taxi loop on a summer long weekend, civilization seems at its most entertained when watching carnage. (That’s even the early emotional climax of Ridley Scott’s Gladiator, when Russell Crowe butchers four or five dudes then throws his sword into the audience in disgust, “Are you not entertained?”) Well, chances are we will be entertained this Friday when Godzilla: King of the

ROCKETMAN The Elton John biopic Rocketman made a splash at Cannes last week.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Monsters opens at the Whistler Village 8. Promoted as a sequel to the 2014 Godzilla reboot (and part of Legendary/Warner’s “Monsterverse” mass reboot movement), this looks to be as advertised: monsters beating the tar out of each other while a (very talented) human cast stands by and watches. There’s not much more to say about the 35th Godzilla film (most of the previous ones came from Toho, the Japanese film studio that came up with the Godzilla character back in 1954). The good news is that there’s no shortage of giant monsters here: Mothra, Rhodan, and the hydra-like King Ghidorah also star. The bad news is, a lack of press screenings probably means the studio knows what we all suspect—beyond monster battles, this movie will not change your life. But really, who needs it to? (The Godzilla vs Kong sequel is already slated for 2020). Also opening this week, Rocketman is the Elton John biopic that made such a big splash at Cannes last week. Taron Egerton (Kingsman: The Secret Service) stars as the titular piano man in a by-the-playbook humble-origins-to-stardom-to-self-

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64 MAY 30, 2019

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with Cat Madden with Juan

RAD AND JOEL STYLIN’ ON THE VIOLIN

destruction-to-salvation rock ‘n’ roll story we’ve seen many times before. That’s OK though, because director Dexter Fletcher (Eddie the Eagle, Wild Bill) strays far enough from the formula that he is able to inject some of the real magic of Elton John’s persona and music into the film. Be warned, there is a lot of music in this film, and the musical montages are very musical (like the genre) but they work to elevate Rocketman beyond the cookiecutter rock biopic narrative template. Also a plus, Fletcher doesn’t shy away from the sexuality and addiction aspects of the story. Where Bohemian Rhapsody was criticized for tiptoeing around certain elements of Freddy Mercury’s proclivities, Rocketman is a much more candid look at John’s homosexuality, inner conflicts with his past, and ultimate escape. (Interestingly, Fletcher was the director called in to save Bohemian Rhapsody after Bryan Singer went AWOL amidst scandal. Fletcher stuck to Singer’s more closeted vision there, with Rocketman we get a glimpse of what could have been.) Even though the narrative ends in the early ‘80s, it’s never easy to summarize a rock career in one flick and certain

narrative arcs in Rocketman are left un-ventured down. For the most part, however, this is a solid flick, especially when Egerton (who does his own singing and really nails it) is in the spotlight. Rocketman (crocodile) rocks. On the small screen, iTunes has a bunch of killer docs on sale right now ($0.99 rentals) and one worth checking out is Mission to Lars, an ultra-low-budget road trip doc about Tom Spicer, a UK man living with Fragile X syndrome, an autism-like genetic disorder that comes with developmental problems and learning disabilities. Tom keeps his spirits high, lives in a care home, and works in a factory shredding paper to make pet cage lining, and he’s obsessed with the idea of meeting Metallica drummer Lars Ulrich. After listening to Tom say, “Gotta see Lars” on repeat for more than a decade, his sister and brother decide to make it happen. What follows is a touching family road trip story about chasing a dream and what happens when you find them. “Everyone should have one big adventure in their lives,” says sister/ producer Kate Spicer. Tom’s is pretty sweet to watch. n

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ARTS NEWS

VILLAGE 8 SHOW SCHEDULE

FRIDAY, MAY 31ST – THURSDAY, JUNE 6TH ROCKETMAN (PG) DAILY 3:55, 6:55 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:45 MATINEES SATURDAY & SUNDAY 12:55 GODZILLA: KING OF MONSTERS (PG)

WHISTLER’S NEWEST RESTAURANT & COCKTAIL BAR

CELEBRATE CULTURE The Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre will host a celebration for National Indigenous

Peoples Day on June 21.

PHOTO BY LOGAN SWAYZE/ COURTESY OF THE SLCC

Celebrate National Indigenous Peoples Day at the SLCC ALSO IN ARTS NEWS: APPLY FOR THE HOLIDAY MARKET; CHECK OUT NEW SHOW AT THE GALLERY FEATURING TATTOO ARTISTS

BY ALYSSA NOEL THE SQUAMISH LIL’WAT Cultural Centre (SLCC) has announced its plans for celebrating National Indigenous Peoples Day on June 21. Starting at noon, visitors will be led on “an immersive cultural journey” by cultural ambassadors in full regalia with songs, dance, and storytelling. “Cultural Ambassadors will share how the animals, people and the land are tied to one another,” according to a press release. Throughout the day, Indigenous Youth Ambassadors will host complimentary

“Cultural Ambassadors will share how the animals, people and the land are tied to one another ... ”

crafts in the Longhouse, including paddle necklaces, headbands, hide bracelets, and temporary tattoos. There will also be smudging, an Indigenous-inspired barbecue lunch, and 15 per cent off in the gift shop. The SLCC is also partnering with the Whistler Film Festival for a screening of The Grizzlies, a Canadian film based on the true story of Inuit youth who start playing lacrosse. The film will be followed by a panel discussion about the role sports play in the Squamish and Lil’wat Nations. “We are very excited to augment our annual celebration of Indigenous Peoples

Day with an evening event in partnership with Whistler Film Festival,” says Brady Smith, executive director of the SLCC in a release. “By engaging with another Whistler-based arts, culture, and heritage organization, we are bridging Indigenous Tourism into Whistler’s thriving cultural tourism scene.” Tickets will be $10 online or $15 at the door. For more, visit slcc.ca.

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DAILY 3:40, 6:30 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:30 MATINEES SATURDAY & SUNDAY 12:20

JOHN WICK CHAPTER 3 - PARABELLUM (18A) DAILY 3:35, 6:35 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:50 MATINEES SATURDAY & SUNDAY 12:30

POKEMON DETECTIVE PIKACHU (PG) DAILY 4:00, 7:15 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 10:00 MATINEES SATURDAY & SUNDAY 1:00 www.imaginecinemas.com

APPLICATIONS FOR HOLIDAY MARKET OPEN Mention “the holidays” right now and people will probably assume you’re talking about your summer adventures. But not Arts Whistler. They’re planning ahead for their massive November Holiday Market. The organization is currently accepting early bird applications from vendors who want to have a booth in the market this year. If selected, they’ll save $100 on fees. To be considered, the vendor’s work must be created by the artist or artisan applying and they must be Arts Whistler members. The deadline is June 3. For more information visit artswhistler. com/holiday-market.

CELEBRATE INK AT THE GALLERY

Planning your perfect Whistler wedding? P I C K U P Y O U R C O P Y T O D AY !

Arts Whistler is showcasing Whistler’s tattoo artists with a new exhibit at The Gallery in the Maury Young Arts Centre from May 29 to July 8. Whistler INKorporated will celebrate the resort’s local tattoo scene—and the art they ink on to people’s bodies. An Art Party will kick off the show on May 31 in which you can learn about different styles and techniques artists use as well as “the journey of their work, from sketch to skin,” according to Arts Whistler’s website. The party is free and runs from 7 to 10 p.m. n

MAY 30, 2019

65


MUSEUM MUSINGS

How McKeevers got its name BY ALLYN PRINGLE

SPRING SPECIAL

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ER N N I W 9 1 0 AY 30TH, 2

TOMORROW EVENING (Friday, May 31) we’ll be opening a new temporary exhibit at the Whistler Museum featuring the various ways people have found a place to call home in the valley (doors open at 6:30 p.m. and admission is free so be sure to drop by!). While putting together the exhibit, we’ve spent quite a bit of time thinking about housing and development and what has and hasn’t changed. I recently came across an article in the Squamish Citizen that featured the beginning of a building that has changed while, in some ways, remaining the same: McKeever’s General Store. On July 22, 1986 Sue Cote, a reporter for the Squamish Citizen, was invited to a groundbreaking ceremony in Alpine Meadows by Chuck Johnstone, the owner of the property at the corner of Alpine Way and Highway 99. Attended by MLA John Reynolds, Alderman Paul Burrows, Michael and Mark Sadler of Sadler Brothers Building Ltd. and Harry McKeever, the actual breaking of the ground was done by Art Den Duyf and his grader (no spades were needed). With approval from the neighbourhood and the RMOW, Johnstone planned to develop a convenience store and laundromat on the property. The store would be owned and operated by McKeever and his sister Linda, who committed to leasing the space. After early reports of opposition to the store were published in the Whistler Question in October 1985, Alpine Meadows residents Sonya McCarthy and Margaret Kogler conducted a petition that showed overwhelming support for the idea. By the end of 1986, the idea had become reality and residents now had access to McKeever’s General Store and Dirty Harry’s Laundromat.

CORNERSTORE MAGNATE Harry McKeever, Alpine Meadows resident, Vending Machine Operator. WHISTLER QUESTION COLLECTION, 1982.

machine business between 1970 and 1990, supplying the valley’s game, pop and cigarette machines, and became known to some as Whistler’s “slot machine mogul.” During his time in Whistler, McKeever was also an early member of the Chamber of Commerce, on the Board of Directors of the Whistler TV Society, a member of the Whistler Rotary Club and the sponsor of Dirty Harry’s hockey team. When McKeever’s General Store opened in 1986, it carried groceries, hardware, auto supplies and video rentals while the laundromat provided a welcome service to residents. Shortly before they opened, Linda McKeever stated, “We want to make the store a focal point for the neighbourhood,” a goal they certainly achieved. McKeever’s provided a convenient location to pick up eggs or butter (especially if you already happened to

“McKeever could give seminars to today’s lifties on courtesy and friendliness, although he might have a hard time imparting his sincerity.” - BOB COLEBROOK

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McKeever’s was a well-known name in the valley well before the opening of this store. Harry McKeever first came to Alta Lake on holiday in 1957. In 1960, his family bought property and built a cabin in Alta Vista. Not too long after that, he moved up permanently and when Garibaldi Lifts began operating in 1965-66, McKeever became one of the company’s first lifties. Working mainly in the gondola barn in the valley, McKeever became valley supervisor and stayed with Garibaldi Lifts until 1975. According to a 1993 article by Bob Colebrook in the Whistler Answer, “McKeever could give seminars to today’s lifties on courtesy and friendliness, although he might have a hard time imparting his sincerity.” Lifts were not McKeever’s only occupation; he ran a successful vending

checking your mailbox) and for the children of the neighbourhood, it was the closest place to buy Popsicles in the summer. When discussing the store with Colebrook in the early 1990s, Harry McKeever told him: “It’s excellent, it’s the first easy job I’ve had. As the staff learns more and more, my work gets less and less. It’s a great way to keep in touch with the people. Also, by having my name on the store I get a lot of people from twenty-five or thirty years ago coming in because they saw my name.” The store has evolved since McKeever left the valley. The laundromat (and the linoleum flooring) is gone, replaced by Alpine Cafe and the store is now named Alpine Meadows Market. The McKeever name, however, will always be associated with the address: 8104 McKeevers Place. n


PARTIAL RECALL

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1

3

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1 FRIDAYS FOR FUTURE Whistler climate warriors stepped out on Friday, May 24 for a Fridays for Future march, to protest a worldwide lack of action in the face of ongoing climate change. PHOTO BY CLARE OGILVIE. 2 AFTER THE RAIN As the sun popped out after a rainy day in Whistler, so did this rainbow. PHOTO BY ANDREA RODGERS. 3 SURVIVORS Whistler runners at the Survival of the Fittest 35k trail race in Squamish on Saturday, May 25. PHOTO SUBMITTED. 4 GAPER GETUPS Seattle “locals” donned their brightest apparel and got into the Gaper Day spirit on Whistler Mountain on Monday, May 27. PHOTO SUBMITTED. 5 FESTIVE FIESTA Dave Beattie and Meg Maclean of Dave Beattie Personal Real Estate Group REMAX Sea to Sky take a crack at a piñata during their annual Client and Vendor Fiesta at GLC on Saturday, May 25. PHOTO BY TESSA SWEENEY. 6 DREAMING OF VINTAGE The crowds turned up to the Dream Big Vintage Collective’s pop-up shop, held at the Alpine Café on Saturday night, May 25, to cruise through racks of secondhand apparel, tables full of handmade goods, and, of course, listen to some tunes. PHOTO BY WHITNEY SOBOOL.

SEND US YOUR PHOTOS! Send your recent snaps to arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

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67


MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

Ocean Alley gets busy AUSTRALIAN PSYCH-ROCK BAND SELLS OUT TWO-NIGHT RUN AT THE GLC JUNE 1 AND 2

BY ALYSSA NOEL MITCH GALBRAITH needs a shower. It’s fair to assume so do all of the members of Ocean Alley and their crew, but Galbraith is the one stuck fielding a phone interview on the band’s day off in California. “I’m sitting outside. We’re up the road from our giant tour bus that sleeps 12 people,” he says. “It’s a nice bit of luxury on the road, but there’s no shower on the bus … I haven’t had a shower for three days, so when I get off this phone call, I’m going to go have a shower in the hotel.” A lot has changed since the band was touring North America last year at this time. Until recently, for example, they packed into a tiny van. But now they’ve sold out shows around the world, played massive festivals, and even landed on Triple J’s Hottest 100 Poll in their native Australia for their single “Confidence” in January. (They earned 2,758,584 votes, which was an all-time high for the fan-

MAKING WAVES Ocean Alley plays the GLC on June 1 and 2.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

68 MAY 30, 2019

voted music poll.) To get a sense of their meteoric rise, consider that there was so much demand for their May 30 show in Vancouver at the Imperial that it got moved to the Commodore Ballroom. “One surprise was probably that Vancouver room,” Galbraith adds. “The

so their popularity in Whistler might not be all that surprising. But still, Galbraith has a warning for the audience at their shows. “Expect a fuckload of Aussies,” he says. “And watch out for the Australians because you can’t trust them. The people of Whistler know they can’t trust Aussies.” They can also expect to hear both older

“ ... watch out for the Australians because you can’t trust them. The people of Whistler know they can’t trust Aussies.” - MITCH GALBRAITH

Commodore is the biggest venue on the tour and it’s on its way to selling out.” In other words, it might be wise to find a way to get in to their two sold-out shows at the GLC on June 1 and 2. “I don’t know if we could do four nights at the GLC,” Galbraith says. The psych-rock band is from Sydney,

songs and their latest single, “Stained Glass.” It’s the first single since their second full-length album, Chiaroscuro. “It’ll set the vibe up for the next record,” Galbraith says. “We just can’t sit still and we want people to hear this music. It feels (wrong) to have it recorded and not give it to people to listen to.

We want people to listen to our art and critique our art. Then, of course, that helps to keep momentum going.” While they’re still enjoying their jampacked tour schedule, not having time to write new music might be one downfall of being so busy. Typically, all six members sit down to write “spit balling ideas and tinkering around with instruments” then head into the recording studio to polish the tracks before recording them. “Maybe three months of this year will be at home,” Galbraith says. “We all have really fun hobbies back home. When we’re back there, even for a short time, it’s easy for us to recharge.” Although, perhaps detracting from that rest and relaxation, they’re also recognized more often at home. “We’re more popular in Australia than in other parts of the world,” he says. “In New Zealand we get yelled at on the streets. It’s fun. We love it … All that stuff—people stopping to get photos—is part of the job. It makes people happy and we’re not going to take that away from them.” Ocean Alley plays the GLC on June 1 and 2, but both shows are sold out. On their website, the venue says they may release more tickets closer to the date. Keep an eye on www.facebook.com/GLC.Whistler. n


MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

NEW VIDEO Cat Madden’s new video for the song “Thank God,” produced by Prime Vision, is out on Thursday, May 30.

STILL IMAGE COURTESY OF PRIME VISION

Cat Madden releases stark video for sprawling single ‘Thank God’ PEMBERTON-BASED PRIME VISION HELPED CRAFT IN-DEPTH CLIP

BY ALYSSA NOEL LAST YEAR, Jasmine Jade and her partner Radek Drozdowicz were at the Squamish Wind Festival taking in some musical acts when once voice in particular caught their attention. “It was a beautiful summer day and Cat was playing and we were amazed by her voice, the soul of it,” Jade recalls. “Cat” was Squamish singer and songwriter Cat Madden. Fast forward a few months and the couple—the Pemberton residents behind Prime Vision, a videography and photography company—are set to release a complex, storydriven video for Madden’s single “Thank God.” “I’ve grown so much in this time,” Madden says. “Originally, I was just like, ‘I need to make a music video.’ I knew I wanted to do something powerful and strong, but ideally I wanted to ‘grow’ my career.” Instead, with Jade and Drozdowicz’s help, she selected the deep, slow-burning track— rather than a more upbeat, accessible song—to commit to video. “The theme of the song is intergenerational trauma and anger,” Madden adds. “As we started working on it and started collaborating with loads of different people, my band, volunteer actors, everyone had their own story. It was amazing.” While she doesn’t want to delve too deeply into the personal roots of the song, Madden says she penned it during a five-week period she moved from Whistler to live with her parents in France. “I have to say, the reason that came to mind was because I was living with my parents’ intergenerational trauma,” she says. To that end, the group built a story rife with characters struggling from various challenges—including verbal abuse, a “more

subtle” sexual assault, and featuring an Indigenous drug dealer. (Madden is married to a man from the Squamish Nation and they consulted with members of the nation when attempting to depict the effects of colonization.) “I came to Canada four years ago from Poland,” Drozdowicz says. “In Europe, no one is mentioning colonial times. No one knew what it’s about, but here you feel it everywhere.” Prime Vision and Madden recruited a group of first-time actors to play various characters over the two-day shoot. It primarily took place at The Chieftain in Squamish. For Madden, it was the perfect spot. “It’s the longest-existing bar in Squamish,” she says. “It’s where everyone has been. They have the same wooden flooring—and even the sign—everything about it was perfect.” (Editor’s note: since this interview, The Chieftan has been renamed Crash Hotel Squamish and the sign has been removed to restore its neon lights and add the new name). “They were holding off their renovations for the shoot,” Jade adds. In the end, all three of them held the same goal: to produce a genuine and meaningful piece of art. “You want to orient yourself as an artist who has something to say,” Drozdowicz says. “That comes as a priority. For me and Jasmine, it’s very important to have something to say. It’s not just another song that’s going to be a pop hit. It doesn’t matter if people like it or not. That’s not the purpose. Of course, we want to do it super good. But that isn’t the priority. When you prioritize like that, the quality comes.” The video for “Thank God” will be released on Thursday, May 30 on Madden’s Facebook (facebook.com/CATMMadden) and Instagram (@catmmadden).n

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MAY 30, 2019

69


PIQUECAL

YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL EVENTS & NIGHTLIFE For a complete guide to events in Whistler, visit piquenewsmagazine.com/events

THU

ACTIVATE AND CONNECT FOR SENIORS 50+

5.30

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES

Docents will provide visitors with an introduction to the Audain Art Museum and its permanent collection. Visitors will be encouraged to explore the galleries afterwards. These drop-in tours are free with the purchase of admission or museum membership. 604-962-0413. > 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

ALPHABET SOUP PRESENTS: THE MISEDUCATION OF CAMERON POST

Alphabet Soup is excited to present a screening of The Miseducation of Cameron Post, an award-winning coming-of-age story based on the book of the same name by Emily M. Danforth. This event is free to attend, and everyone is welcome. > 5:30-8 pm > Whistler Public Library

Connect with friends, new and old, through weekly activities. Meet at Whistler Community Services Society. In partnership with the Mature Action Community. > 9:30-11 am > Whistler Community Services

PARENT INFANT DROP-IN

An opportunity to develop a supportive social network with other parents of young babies. Speakers and a public health nurse are often in attendance. Free. > 11 am-12:30 pm > Whistler Public Library

ROTARY CLUB OF WHISTLER MILLENNIUM

Join the Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium to learn about what the club is doing to support your local community and international projects. Lunch is available for $20. Everyone welcome. > 12:15 pm > Pan Pacific Mountain Side

DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB

The club meets every week and visitors are welcome. For a partner, please call Gill at 604-932-5791. > 1-5 pm > Whistler Racquet Club

COMMUNITY

BNI MOUNTAIN HIGH

BNI provides a positive and structured environment for the development and exchange of quality business referrals. It does so by helping you build personal relationships with dozens of other qualified business professionals. Register by emailing David Livesey at david_livesey@cooperators.ca. $20. > 6:45-8:30 am > The Venue

WOMEN’S KARMA YOGA

WHISTLER YOUTH BAND

Let the trumpets sing! The Whistler Youth Band is a beginner band for youth ages 10 and up. Grab an instrument and make music with friends. > 6-7:30 pm > Myrtle Philip Community School

MUSIC

Drop-in for weekly yoga classes led by an all-female team of certified, 200-hour yoga instructors. Includes mat use and childminding. All women, all ability levels welcome. This program is made possible by yoga instructors and childminders donating their time. Contact us to join the team. Free. 604-962-8711. > 9:30-10:30 am > Whistler Women’s Centre

COAST MOUNTAIN THURSDAYS!

Venture on out to Function Junction for the most sophisticated après of the week! Funk, soul, jazz, blues, rare groove, disco and other rare beats curated by Stache, paired with the best beer and service in Whistler! Free. > 3:30-7:30 pm > Coast Mountain Brewing

� Vista Place LIVE, WORK, PLAY

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Commercial Space and Commercial Available Now! Rental Spaces info@vistaplacebc.com 70 MAY 30, 2019

COCKTAIL DANCE PARTY

Start your weekend early with a handcrafted cocktail. Then hit the dancefloor or rock our legendary dancing cage with help from DJ Peacefrog. > 7 pm > Buffalo Bills

LOCALS’ NIGHT

Party at Whistler’s longest-running locals’ night. Specials all night long. For VIP table bookings or guest list, email info@garfinkels.ca. > 7:30 pm > Garfinkel’s

ADAM THOMAS

Adam Robert Thomas is a Juno-nominated performer based in Vancouver. > 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

KARAOKE WITH JACK-QUI NO

Put it on the rocks and call it a show! Hosted by Jack-Qui No. > 8-11 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

CHAD STORM

Sexy blues tones and warm electric vibes; batten down the hatches, you’re in for a storm. All your favourite tunes stripped raw and served with soul. > 8:30 pm > Brickworks Public House

#TBT WITH THE SOUNDS OF STACHE

Stache has been on a nomadic musical adventure for almost a decade, travelling to more than 50 countries and sharing his passion for music with others. Drawing influences from all four corners of the globe, his appetite, understanding and energetic delivery will guarantee a funky smorgasbord of beats. Free. > 9 pm-1 am > Three Below

JOEL AND RAD

> Crystal Lounge

SHUT UP AND PARTY

Start your weekend off one night early and come get wild with Whistler’s loosest bar staff. With music from Fidel Cashflow and DJ Shearer. Email info@maxxfish. com for VIP and other special perks. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

BAND CAMP

Band Camp is a local talent development night at Black’s Pub. This is where new talent to Whistler debuts and artists who have been honing their skills at Jam Nights make their debut. This week it is Nicole and Alex a.k.a. Hot Licks on guitar and vocals from 9 p.m. Free. 604-932-6408. > 9 pm-midnight > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

THE PLANET SMASHERS + K-MAN AND THE 45’S

Pure unadulterated party ska awesomeness served up hot with a large order of radical sauce on the side. No cover. > 9:30 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

THURSDAY NIGHT FUNK FEATURING DJ DAKOTA

He spins old school and new school, ya need to learn though, he burns baby BURNS…like a hip-hop inferno! No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

SEA T0 SKY

WORKBC EMPLOYMENT SERVICES DROP IN

Drop in to the Pemberton Public Library every Thursday afternoon and learn how WorkBC can assist you in your job search and career planning. All services are free. For details, call 1-877-932-1611. > 1-5 pm > Pemberton Library (Pemberton)

Joel and Rad bring crowd-pleasing covers from old classics to modern favourites mixed in with their catchy originals. This combination of warm acoustic guitar, captivating vocals and bluesy fiddle won’t leave you disappointed! > 9 pm

NOW ACCEPTING Lease Applications

www.VistaPlacePemberton.com

We’ve got you covered. Pick up the latest issue of your favourite read in Whistler.


PIQUECAL ONGOING & DAILY

> Whistler Public Library SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

WHISTLER YOUTH CENTRE DROP-IN

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

For ages 13 to 18. We offer ping pong, a skateboard mini-ramp (skateboards and helmets to borrow), free Wi-Fi, Xbox One, PS3 & PS4, guitars, board games, a projector and widescreen TVs. Free. 604-935-8187. > 3:30-11 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

WHISTLER TRI CLUB SWIM SQUAD

Triathlon-focused swim squads. Full details at whistlertriclub.com/training-sessions. Free to members for fall (includes entry into Meadow Park). Nonmembers $8 drop-in (includes entry into Meadow Park). > 6-7:15 am > Meadow Park Sports Centre

INDOOR PICKLEBALL

Have fun with others playing the fastest-growing sport in North America! All levels welcome. Free paddle rental. $10. 604-932-1991. > 4-6 pm > Whistler Racquet Club

FRI

MAY 27-JUNE 2 WHISTLER

WALK AND TALK SERIES See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 3, 5:30 & 7 pm > Audain Art Museum

5.31

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

PRESCHOOL STORY TIME

COMMUNITY

WELCOME CENTRE MULTICULTURAL MEET UP

Books, songs and rhymes for preschool-aged children, accompanied by a caregiver. Registration is not required. > 10:30 am > Whistler Public Library

Come and say “hi” if you are new to Canada and Whistler! Everyone and every age is welcome. Casual meet up, workshops, information about living in Canada. Check calendar at welcomewhistler.com for full details. Contact info@welcomewhistler.com or 604-698-5960. > 9:30 am-noon

MULTI-DAY EVENT

COMMUNITY

BIKE TO WORK WEEK AND THE COMMUTER CHALLENGE

MAY. 27- JUN.2

Bike to Work Week and the Commuter Challenge start Monday, May 27th! These are friendly, weeklong competitions where you are challenged to leave the car at home and bike, walk or take transit to get to work. Register your trips online at biketowork.ca and commuterchallengebc.ca to win prizes. >Whistler

e launch of Come celebrate th our new patio &

IN ENTER TO W E! BIK

A

NEW PATIO OPEN! 1045 Millar Creek Rd

in Function Junction

whistlerbeer.com

COMMUNITY

ADAM THOMAS

Adam Robert Thomas is a Juno-nominated performer based in Vancouver. > 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

LIVE MUSIC

Solo artists perform every week, except on the first Friday of every month when they swap out for a full band. No cover, no lineups. > 6-9 pm > Whistler Brewing Company

FRIDAY NIGHT PATIO PARTY WITH CAT MADDEN

Local musician, Cat Madden, has blended styles to bring a refreshingly unique mix of folk, jazz, soul and rock. Cat has been mastering the writing of original music for 12 years and is now putting it out on the scene. Cat says all she wants to do is “... be genuine and blow people away...” You will be seeing and hearing much more from this woman, keep an eye out. > 6-9 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

We have a gift for all ladies. Enjoy a glass of champagne then hit the dancefloor and dance the

Come in and enjoy a massive selection of popular games. Sunday to Thursday. > 4-8 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

night away with DJ Peacefrog. Info@buffalobills.ca for guestlist or table bookings. > 7 pm > Buffalo Bills

MONTY BIGGINS @ ALPINE CAFE A lively fun-filled Friday night performance by the one and only talented Monty Biggins! Free. > 7-9 pm > Alpine Cafe

CHAMPAGNE FRIDAY

Kick off your weekend at Garf’s. Get on the guest list and join the party: info@garfinkels.ca. > 7:30 pm > Garfinkel’s

EVAN KINSELLA

With a high-energy performance, heart felt songwriting, and a dynamic collective of musicians behind him. Evan Kinsella is capturing audiences everywhere he goes. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

Recycle? Yes or no?

Get the BC RECYCLEPEDIA App

CONTEST RUNS May 1st - June 7th

DRAW DATE Fri. June 7th • 8pm Must be here to win!

AT THE

Grab a Cultural Connector guide and explore Whistler’s world of culture. As you follow the Cultural Connector route, you’ll discover the stories that enrich Whistler’s culture, the venues that celebrate it and the milestones that we’ve achieved along the way. The pathway will lead you through beautiful surroundings and six cultural institutions: Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre, Whistler Museum, Whistler Public Library, Maury Young Arts Centre, Lost Lake PassivHaus, and Audain Art Museum. Free. > Ongoing > Maury Young Arts Centre

GAMES CAFE

MUSIC

LADIES’ NIGHT

Learn more about Whistler’s culture and history. Now open by donation. > Daily 11am-5pm, Thu until 9pm > Whistler Museum

THE CULTURAL CONNECTOR: A JOURNEY OF ADVENTURE AND DISCOVERY

SPORTS

BIKE TO WORK WEEK

WHISTLER MUSEUM

LIVE MUSIC from Whiskey Dicks

6-9 pm

No purchase necessary. Ask server for more details. Prize may not be exactly as shown.

www.rcbc.ca RECYCLING COUNCIL OF B.C. MEMBER MAY 30, 2019

71


PIQUECAL SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

KARAOKE NIGHT AT ALPINE CAFE JUNE 1 ALPINE CAFE

FLAMINGO FIRDAYS AT TOMMYS

Grab a flock of friends and come in an try one of our huge famous flamingo cocktails. Music by DJ Dre Morel all night. > 9 pm-2 am > Tommys Whistler

THE WHISKEYRICHARDS

The Whiskeydicks are a group of Celtic Gypsy punk rockers who have spent the better part of a decade carving a reputation for themselves as “one hell of a good time.” > 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

FEEL GOOD FRIDAYS

Start the weekend off right with music by B.C.’s finest party DJs mixing the best in hip hop, rap, R&B and party anthems. Whistler’s most-energetic dancefloor. > 9:30 pm > Moe Joe’s

FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE

Live music by Whistler favourites Red Chair. > 9:30 pm > Tapley’s Pub

FRIDAY NIGHT ALL LOVE NO CLUB FEATURING TYMETAL

Shake off your work week by grooving to deep cuts featuring classics and future gems...you can’t help but move to the beats! No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

72 MAY 30, 2019

SAT

6.1

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 1 & 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

ART TALKS

Every month, the Whistler Contemporary Gallery will be featuring an artist from their diverse collection of contemporary artists. The gallery invites the public to come and explore the artistic process offering a fascinating insight from conception to completion. > first Saturday of every month, 4 pm > Whistler Contemporary Gallery

COMMUNITY

WHISTLER SINGS, A MULTIGENERATIONAL CHOIR

This is a choir for everyone, regardless of age or musical experience. If you sing in a choir, in the car or shower or not at all but would like to, this is your choir. All ages and abilities are welcome. For more information email whistlerharp@gmail.com. > 9:30-11 am > Whistler Museum

SINGING WITH THE BABIES

Learn songs and rhymes to soothe and entertain baby while encouraging early language development. Free. > 11-11:30 am > Whistler Public Library

FAMILY TOGETHER TIME

WEEKEND GETAWAYS AT TOMMYS

WHISTLER YOUTH CENTRE DROP-IN

MARCUS RAMSAY

A parent-directed hour with board games, crafts and a story corner with felt puppets. A drop-in program for families of all ages. Free. > 3:30-4:30 pm > Whistler Public Library

> 6-10 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

MUSIC

CRANKED’S ONE-YEAR ANNIVERSARY PARTY

Cranked’s one-year anniversary party will feature a mini-music festival, including George (8-9:45 am), Austin Ross (10-11:45 am), Micheal Belanger (12-1:45 pm), Matthew Holland (2-3:45 pm), Conor Fitzpatrick (4-5:45 pm), Jennifer Bisset (5:45-6:15 pm), Kostas, Joel, Rad and friends (6:15 to 10 pm). They will also have a complimentary Rise & Shine 45-min. stretch class with personal trainer Danica Hurbert on our patio at 8 am. Anyone participating gets a free coffee. Face painting for kids will take place from 11 am to 1 pm > 8 am-10 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

KARAOKE NIGHT AT ALPINE CAFE Get ready to bust out your favourite tunes and join us for a night of fun and laughter! Hosted by Monty Biggins. Free. > 7-9 pm > Alpine Cafe

Let’s send it on and off the mountain this weekend! DJ Dre Morel spinning rock, pop and hip hop all night! For VIP reservations and guest list inquiries, please visit tommyswhistler.com. > 9 pm-2 am > Tommys Whistler

Marcus Ramsay bring the noise with this footstomping, booty-shaking blues-rock style that everyone can enjoy! Playing catchy originals and tasty covers that you know and love. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

THE WHISKEYRICHARDS > 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

BROTHER TWANG

Come wind down your ski day or ramp up your Saturday night festivities with the boys from Brother Twang. > 9 pm-midnight > FireRock Lounge

SATURDAY NIGHT SHAKER

With music from Fidel Cashflow and DJ C Stylez, two of Whistler’s hardest-working and most-loved DJs spinning the best in Top 40, mash-ups, electro, hip hop and party anthems that will keep your booty shakin’ all night long. Email info@maxxfish.com for VIP and other special perks. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish


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| 6pm – close |

(excluding holidays)

Whistlers favourite deal on now! Available 7 days a week Limited to parties up to 6 people (one bill) Drink specials available

reservations recommended

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WHISTLER’S PREMIER VISITOR MAGAZINE SINCE 1980

Pemberton Valley Transit

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One additonal round trip in the evenings on the route 99 Pemberton Commuter. For more information, visit bctransit.com or pick up a Rider’s Guide on board. Get your new winter edition in hotel rooms and select locations around Whistler. whistlermagazine.com

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PIQUECAL SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

LIVE @ BLACK’S

Every Friday and Saturday, party with local and touring musicians at Black’s Pub. > 9 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

LADIES’ NIGHT

It’s Whistler’s No. 1 stop for stag and stagette parties. DJ Turtle and friends mix up everything from hip hop, R&B, new rap, dance hall and Top 40 bangers. Email guestlist@moejoes.com for VIP and group perks. > 9:30 pm > Moe Joe’s

SATURDAY NIGHT ALL LOVE NO CLUB FEATURING TYMETAL

He got your blood pumping last night, now satiate your thirst for amazing cocktails and unique beats with tyMetal’s eclectic DJ feats. No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

SUPREME SATURDAY

DJ Nikky from Vancouver brings the Whistler’s biggest weekend party and best vibe. VIP champagne parades along with the hottest hip hop and remixes! For VIP and guest list, email info@garfinkels.ca. > 10 pm > Garfinkel’s

SEA TO SKY

BOOM! OPENING WEEKEND

Join us for the opening weekend of BOOM! a live-action experience inside the historic mill on June 1 and 2. Discover the captivating story of the mill with an imaginative storytelling experience unlike anything else in North America. BOOM! will take visitors on thrilling visual journey! 604-896-2233. > 9:30 am-5 pm > Britannia Mine Museum

SUN

MONDAYS IN MUSE LAB

SUNDAY SESSION WITH ELLIE & CHARLIE

If you haven’t had a chance to catch this Whistler duo, you’re are missing out. Ellie & Charlie are a newly formed acoustic duo. Both from the U.K., they are debuting their Canadian musical adventure. Come check out their singer songwriter vibe and chill out to some mellow tunes. > 4-7 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

JERRY’S DISCO

Dust off your Gaper Day getup, from backwards helmets to gorby gaps, ‘cos the best Jerry outfit gets a free bottle of prosecco! > 7-10 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

6.2

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 1 & 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

COMMUNITY

FAMILY STUDIO SUNDAY

Family Studio Sunday is every Sunday from 12 to 4pm. > first Sunday of every month, 12-4 pm > Audain Art Museum

MUSIC

GAMES NIGHT AT PANGEA

Challenge your crew: Cards Against Humanity, Jenga, Settlers of Catan, HedBanz, and many more. Drinks and food specials all night long. > 4 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

PATRICK GAVIGAN

Vancouver-based singer-songwriter, formerly of the 99.3 FM CFOX Seeds-winning band theTURN. > 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

SEND IT SUNDAYS

With music from T-Zen and DJ Shearer. Keep your weekend alive, and join us on Sunday nights for one of Whistler’s wildest industry nights. Email info@ maxxfish.com for VIP plus special perks. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

OPEN MIC JAM NIGHT

An open stage invitation for all who can sing, perform or even just wanna jam out with our house band. Whistler’s longest-running jam night every Sunday at Crystal Lounge. All instruments are provided. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

SUNDAY SESSIONS

The best locals’ party in Whistler. > 9 pm > Tapley’s Pub

THE SUNDAY GLOW PARTY

Moe Joe’s is transformed into a psychedelic UV-infused rave cathedral, as Fidel Cashflow, Zapps and La Dooda cook up an aural feast of house and electro beats. Arrive early to beat the line. > 9 pm > Moe Joe’s

DEADLY LETHAL NINJA ASSASSINS DLNA return to Tapley’s. Come support your local alt rock band! Free! > 9 pm-midnight > Tapley’s Neighbourhood Pub

RUCKUS DELUXE

Ruckus Deluxe features former Cirque Du Soleil lead singer Chad Oliver and Grammy-nominated violinist Ian Cameron playing Celtic and classics on mandolin, fiddle and electric guitar. > 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

SUNDAY NIGHT THEORY WITH TYMETAL

tyMetal’s diversified taste translates to deep cuts featuring classics and future gems, guaranteed to tweak your brain stem! No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

SEA TO SKY

BOOM! OPENING WEEKEND See Saturday’s listing for more info. > 9:30 am-5 pm > Britannia Mine Museum

OPEN MIC

Come join in with this afternoon of music. Bring your instruments and come early to sign up. > 12-2 pm > Grimms Deli (Pemberton)

MON

JUNE 3 MUSE LAB

6.3

COMMUNITY

MONDAYS IN MUSE LAB

Stop by and repair ripped seams, sew on the loose buttons, patch the jeans! With love for community Whistler Sewing Services is opening the Muse Lab, a new creative space in Function. Six sewing machines and all the supplies are ready to fix, mend and create. Visit your creative universe! $10 per hour. 604-967-2422. > 12-9 pm > Muse Lab

WORKBC EMPLOYMENT SERVICES DROP IN

Get your resume reviewed, learn about the local labour market, job search tips, and more. All services are free. For details, call 1-877-932-1611 or go to WhistlerESC.com. > 3-6 pm > Whistler Public Library

SPORTS

WHISTLER TRI CLUB SWIM SQUAD

See Friday’s listing for more info. > 6-7:15 am > Meadow Park Sports Centre

MUSIC

OPEN MIC

Open mic with host Jenna Mae. This is a super fun night for music lovers and artists of all levels. Cranked is the perfect place for new artists to try performing in front of a small supportive audience. This night always bring a solid mix of seasoned and budding artists together, and opportunities to collaborate. Everyone is welcome and they’re always looking for new musicians to join them. > 6-9 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

SOULFUL SUNDAYS

Soul Club Whistler spinning that funky soul soundtrack. > 9 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

For more information on featured events find us online at

WWW.PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM 74 MAY 30, 2019


PIQUECAL MONDAY NIGHT LIVE WITH WHAT A RACKET!

Local legend Monty Biggins offers hits of the eras in an Americana Swing sound. His soulful voice has been described as a journey of the heart. An entire rat pack in one man, he’ll tip his glass to you with that jazzy swagger. > 7-10 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

MARTINI MONDAY > 7:30 pm > Buffalo Bills

PATRICK GAVIGAN > 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

MEATY MONDAY

Sport and beer what more do you need? How about a chance to win our famous Meat Raffle? Proceeds donated to charity. > 9 pm > Tapley’s Pub

TRIVIA NIGHT

The Crystal Lounge hosts trivia every Monday night! Bring your friends and test your knowledge for a night of fun, laughs, prizes and the chance to “burn your bill.” Conditions apply. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

FVCK MONDAYS

The wildest party in Whistler on a Monday night continues with music from Fidel Cashflow, Dan Darley, The Rogue Killers and DJ Shearer. Throwing down all the hottest tunes you know and love. Deep, tech, bass, house, trap, hip hop and more. Email info@maxxfish. com for VIP plus special perks. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

MONDAY MADNESS

Fidel Cashflow, Dan Darley and Billy The Kid throw down all the hottest deep and dirty beats you know and love. Deep tech, bass, house, trap, plus more. > 9:30 pm > Maxx Fish

SEA TO SKY

ACOUSTIC COFFEE HOUSE

The Acoustic Coffee House is back! Come join in with this afternoon of music. > 4-6 pm > Grimms Deli (Pemberton)

TUE

BEST PICTURE SERIES: GREEN BOOK

The Whistler Public Library’s Best Picture Series is back! Join them on the first and second Tuesday of the month for a screening of the Best Picture nominees from the 2019 Academy Awards. > 7-9 pm > Whistler Public Library

COMMUNITY

WE RUN WHISTLER TURNS 2!

Join We Run Whistler, together with lululemon Whistler for a birthday celebration like no other! Come ready to run and expect some team activities and challenges followed by apres at Handlebar. Follow us on Facebook for updates on all our events: facebook.com/groups/ werunwhistler #werunwhistler rain or shine! Free. > 5:55 pm > Lululemon

SPORTS

WHISTLER CYCLING CLUB TUESDAY RIDES

Whistler Cycling Club rides for A, B and C level road riders. See whistlercyclingclub.ca for details. Free with club membership > 5:15-8 pm > Whistler Village Sports

MUSIC

BINGO

Channel your inner granny and dominate bingo at the locals’ living room. > 8 pm > Tapley’s Pub

BLACK ‘N’ BLUES

Blues night with Sean Rose. > 8 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

MARC CHARRON

One-man band on the run, songwriter, world traveller original van lifer. > 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

EVAN KINSELLA

Evan Kinsella is soul-drenched folk, hip hop artist based out of Squamish, performing solo, and collaborating with musicians and producers coast to coast. Inspired by social justice, the healing power of music, travel, and love, his music is written from the heart aims to invoke positive minds. > 8:30 pm > Brickworks Public House

NEW SUMMER DI S HE S

ALLSORTS

6.4

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

RHYME & SONG

This program gives toddlers, parents and caregivers the opportunity to learn songs, rhymes and finger plays together. Movement is encouraged and your preschooler’s early language and literacy development is supported. For more information, please come to the library, call 604-935-8436 or email youthservice@ whistlerlibary.ca. Free. > 10:30 am > Whistler Public Library

Bringing a wide variety of sounds to your Tuesday evening, ED:WIN will be playing “AllSorts” of music to get you dancing down at Three Below every Tuesday night. Listen to hip hop, R&B, house, garage and disco! Free. > 9 pm-1:30 am > Three Below

TOMMY TUESDAYS SUMMER EDITION

Tommys Tuesday with resident DJ Dre Morel and guests bringing you all the best of the best every Tuesday evening! Doors at 8 pm. For guest list and VIP packages, please visit tommyswhistler.com. > 9 pm-2 am > Tommys Whistler

CELLAR SESSIONS

With live music from Neverland Nights and guests, playing all your rock, alternative and party jams all

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MAY 30, 2019

75


PIQUECAL night long. Plus DJ sets from Fidel Cashflow. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

CHAD OLIVER

Ruckus Deluxe frontman and former Cirque Du Soleil lead singer Chad Oliver sings Celtic, rock, pop and originals. > 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

Fine Italian Cuisine

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CELEBRATING

OVER 20 YEARS IN WHISTLER

Reservations Recommended menus are available for viewing/ download on our website.

4319 Main Street 604.905.4844 Quattro at Whistler

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KARAOKE NIGHT

“I Will Survive” won’t sing itself, so come over to Whistler’s longest-running karaoke night and belt out all your favourite hits. Arrive early to avoid disappointment. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

WED

6.5

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

LET’S GET QUIZZICAL

Are you smarter than the average fifth grader? Let’s hope so as Stache brings you trivia with a Whistler twist. All the regular rounds plus our weekly degenerate round full of public and celebrity scandals. Great banter and awesome prizes! Free. > 9-10:30 pm > Three Below

COMMUNITY

GREEN DRINKS

Green Drinks is a global movement in over 70 countries and 537 cities worldwide. Locally it is hosted by AWARE, Whistler’s environmental charity. The group comes together on every first Wednesday of the month to discuss local or global environmental issues and concern, brainstorming ideas and promoting sustainable living. A great way to meet new likeminded people in town and have stimulating conversation. By donation. > first Wednesday of every month, 7-9 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

INTERACT CLUB OF WHISTLER

Interact is a club for young people ages 12 to 18 who want to make a difference in their community, mentored by the Rotary Club of Whistler and Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium. > 4-5 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

MOUNTAIN SPIRIT WHISTLER TOASTMASTERS

Build communication, public speaking, and leadership skills with Mountain Spirit Whistler Toastmasters. Everyone welcome. > 5:30-7 pm > Pan Pacific Mountain Side

SPORTS

INDOOR PICKLEBALL DROP-IN > 10-11:30 am > Whistler Racquet Club

STATE OF ORIGIN GAME I REPLAYS

Replaying all the action from Game I of the series Queensland vs. New South Wales, with sound on! > 1 & 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

WHISTLER CYCLING CLUB WEDNESDAY RIDES

Whistler Cycling Club rides for emerging road riders. See whistlercyclingclub.ca for details. Free for club members > 5:15-7 pm > Whistler Village Sports

WEDNESDAY NIGHT RACING, SAILING

Join the Whistler Sailing Association for our weekly Wednesday Night Race Night and social. Members will participate in a fun and competitive sailing race, followed by a social evening. Please visit whistlersailing. com/races-family-club-sail/ for prices, prerequisites and registration. Rig at 5:30 pm, first horn at 6:15 pm. > 5:30 pm > Whistler Sailing Club

TENNIS LOCALS’ NIGHT

All levels are welcome to join in the Locals’ Night. Clinic for beginners and casual play for intermediate and advanced. Free racket rental, snacks and beverage included! $20. 604-932-1991. > 6:30-8:30 pm > Whistler Racquet Club

MUSIC

CONOR FITZPATRICK

Once the word gets out, everyone is going to want to see this guy play. He is already one of Cranked’s favourites. On warmer days, he will be playing outside on their sunny patio. > 4:30-7:30 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

QUEER WEDNESDAYS

We reserve the prime family-style table by the Ola Volo mural for our LGBTQ2+ family. Get your game (or gay’m) on. > 5-8 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

INDUSTRY NIGHT

Live music from Neverland Nights. > 6 pm > Buffalo Bills

FOXY GET FUNKY

Whether you know her as DJ Foxy Moron or just Ace, you know she kills it on the vinyl. Join us as this homegirl legend spins you silly. > 8-11 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

MARC CHARRON > 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

JAM NIGHT

Jam Night with Kostaman and Friends, every Wednesday night from 9 pm. > 9 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

WILDIN’ OUT WEDNESDAYS FEATURING DJ GAINZ

He’s hot, he’s sicker than your average, Gainz comin’ through mixin’ tracks like a savage. No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg


ASTROLOGY

Free Will Astrology WEEK OF MAY 30 BY ROB BREZSNY

ARIES (March 21-April 19): In the coming weeks, it will

make good sense for you to travel down winding paths replete with interesting twists and provocative turns. The zigzags you’ll be inspired to pursue won’t be inconvenient or inefficient, but rather will be instrumental in obtaining the healing you need. To honour and celebrate this oddly lucky phase, I’ll quote parts of “Flying Crooked,” a poem by Robert Graves. “The butterfly will never master the art of flying straight, yet has a just sense of how not to fly: He lurches here and here by guess and God and hope and hopelessness. Even the acrobatic swift has not his flying-crooked gift.” TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Has a part of you become too timid, docile, or prosaic? Is there an aspect of your beautiful soul that is partially muzzled, submissive, or housebroken? If so, now is a favourable time to seek an antidote. But listen closely: the cure isn’t to become chaotic, turbulent, and out of control. It would be counterproductive to resort to berserk mayhem. Here’s a better way: be primal, lush, and exciting. Be wildly playful and unpredictably humourous and alluringly intriguing. Try experiments that rouse your rowdy sweetness, your unkempt elegance, your brazen joy, and your sensual intelligence. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I prefer live theatre over movies. The glossy flawlessness of films, accomplished by machines that assemble and polish, is less emotionally rich than the direct impact of live performers’ unmediated voices and bodies and emotions. Their evocative imperfections move me in ways that glossy flawlessness can’t. Even if you’re not like me, Gemini, I invite you to experiment with my approach for a while—not just in the entertainment you choose, but in all areas of your life. As much as possible, get your experience raw and unfiltered. CANCER (June 21-July 22): I’ve got a message for you from Cancerian poet Tyler Knott Gregson. Please read it every day for the next 15 days, including when you first wake up and right before sleep. Here it is: “Promise me you will not spend so much time treading water and trying to keep your head above the waves that you forget, truly forget, how much you have always loved to swim.” LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In 2003, a group of thieves in Antwerp, Belgium pulled off the biggest jewelry heist in history. To steal the diamonds, gold, and other gems, together worth more than $100 million, they had to outsmart security guards, a seismic sensor, a protective magnetic field, Doppler radar, infrared detectors, and a lock. I mention this, Leo, because I suspect that in the coming weeks you will have a comparable ability to insinuate yourself into the presence of previously inaccessible treasures and secrets and codes. You’ll be able to penetrate barriers that have kept you shut off from valuable things. (P.S. But I hope that unlike the Antwerp thieves, you’ll use your superpowers in an ethical manner.) VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In the northeast corner of Spain, bordering France, is an area known as Catalonia. With its own culture and language, it has a long history of seeking complete autonomy. On four occasions it has declared itself to be independent from Spain. The most recent time was in 2017, when 92 per cent of the Catalans who voted expressed the desire to be free of Spain’s rule. Alas, none of the rebellions have succeeded. In the latest instance, no other nation on Earth recognized Catalonia’s claim to be an independent republic. In contrast to its frustrated attempts, your own personal quest to seek greater independence could make real progress in the coming months. For best results, formulate a clear intention and define the precise nature of the sovereignty you seek. Write it down! LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A Libran blogger named OceanAlgorithms wrote, “I’m simultaneously wishing I were a naturalist whose specialty is finding undiscovered species in well-explored places; and a skateboarding mathematician

meditating on an almost-impossible-to-solve equation as I practice my skateboard tricks; and a fierce forest witch who casts spells on nature-despoilers; and a gothic heroine with 12 suitors; and the sexiest cat that ever lived.” I love how freewheeling and wide-ranging OceanAlgorithms is with her imaginative fantasies. In light of current astrological omens, I encourage you to do the same. Give yourself permission to dream and scheme extravagantly. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Geologists aren’t exactly sure why, but almost six million years ago, the Strait of Gibraltar closed up. As a result, the Mediterranean Sea was cut off from the Atlantic Ocean, and within a thousand years, it had mostly disappeared. Fast forward 600,000 years. Again, geologists don’t understand how it happened, but a flood broke through the barrier, allowing the ocean to flow back into the Mediterranean basin and restore it to its previous status as a sea. I propose that we invoke that replenishment as a holy symbol for the process you’re engaged in: a replenishment of your dried-out waters. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I invite you to meditate on this proposal from freelance writer Radha Marcum: “The spiritual definition of love is that when you look at the person you love, it makes you love yourself more.” I hope there’s a lot of that kind of action going on for you in the next four weeks. According to my assessment of life’s secret currents, all of creation will be conspiring to intensify and deepen your love for yourself by intensifying and deepening your love for other people. Cooperate with that conspiracy, please! CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Is there a creature on Earth that’s more annoying than the mosquito? I’ve never heard anyone gaze upon one of the pesky monsters sucking blood out of her arm and say, “Aw, what a cute little bug.” And yet every year there is a town in Russia that holds a jokey three-day celebration in honour of the mosquito. The people who live in Berezniki even stage a “most delicious” competition, in which people allow themselves to be pricked by mosquitoes for 20 minutes, with an award going to whomever accumulates the most bites. I highly approve of the spirit of this approach for your own use in the coming weeks, Capricorn. If you have fun with the things that bother you, I bet they won’t bother you as much. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): It’s the Forever Season, Aquarius. You have a poetic licence to act as if your body will live for a hundred years and your soul will live for all eternity. You are authorized to believe that in the coming decades you will grow steadily wiser, kinder, happier, and wilder. During the Forever Season, you may have dreams like flying over a waterfall at sunset, or finding the lost magic you were promised before you were born, or discovering the key to a healing you feared would always elude you. As you careen through this unpredictable grace period, your understanding of reality may expand dramatically. I bet you’ll get practical epiphanies about how to express yourself with greater effectiveness. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): A musical historian from Cambridge University decided it would be amusing to perform forgotten songs that were written in the Rhineland a thousand years ago. His research wasn’t easy, because musical notation was different back then. But he ultimately reconstructed the tunes in ways that he felt were 80-per-cent faithful to the originals. He and other musicians subsequently performed and recorded them. I propose a somewhat comparable assignment for you in the coming weeks, Pisces. You will benefit, I believe, from trying to recover the truth about events that occurred a long time ago and/or by trying to revivify old beauty that has new relevance. Homework. Finish this sentence: “The one thing that really keeps me from being myself is _______.” Testify at Truthrooster@gmail.com.

In addition to this column, Rob Brezsny creates

EXPANDED AUDIO HOROSCOPES

In-depth weekly forecasts designed to inspire and uplift you. To buy access, phone 1-888-499-4425. Once you’ve chosen the Block of Time you like, call 1-888-682-8777 to hear Rob’s forecasts. www.freewillastrology.com

JULY 5-7, 2019

FRIDAY, JULY 5: 4-7PM SATURDAY, JULY 6: 10AM-4PM SUNDAY, JULY 7: 10AM-4PM

THE MAKE-IT TENT IS BACK! Make a rains�ck, build a birdhouse, design your own backpack or decorate a paddleball for hours of unplugged fun!

GET READY TO GET CRAFTY!

$10/day: Kids 3-10 years-old | Free: Ages 11+ and toddlers

whistlerchildrensfes�val.com

5 DAYS Last Day

THURSDAY 27TH JUNE.

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House slaw, avocado salsa verde+cilantro sour cream served in a flour tortilla

Johnny Mac Pizza

Capicolla, mushrooms, mozzarella, provolone

Beef Burger

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Mac and Cheese

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ALTA LAKE (WESTSIDE) 4 Bedroom & 3 Bath Home - Close to Alta Lake Available August 1 Beautiful four-level cozy home. Optional bachelor suite. One year minimum lease. Contact 604-218-1843 or email r.wong@telus.net.

CREEKSIDE Whistler's Creekside ski in ski out 5 bdr. family house for rent $4,000 per month. July-Dec. 604-388-8018

long term rental management services

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Property Owners seeking Annual or Seasonal Rental Income from screened Tenants, please contact one of our 6 Rental Agents to discuss revenue, services & fees.

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78 MAY 30, 2019

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GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES Meighan Creek Giant Garage Sale A residential complex of 46 home owners many of whom will be partaking in the annual garage sale on Saturday, June 1st, 9:00 am -2:00 pm. Parking on Tantalus Rd. only.

NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

whistlerfurniture.ca 2-1020 Millar Creek Road

604.938.4285

HOME SERVICES BUILDING AND RENOVATIONS

Wiebe Construction Services

Forrest chittick 604-902-7178 forrest@WhistlerProperty.com

Serving Whistler for over 25 years

rosie Blaser 604-932-8864 rosie@WhistlerProperty.com

• Kitchen and Bath • Renovations & Repairs • Drywall • Painting • Finishing • Minor Electrical & Plumbing

Helene Huang 604-902-0608 helene@WhistlerProperty.com Duane Kercher 604-932-7849 duane@WhistlerProperty.com

VIEW AVAILABLE RENTAL LISTINGS AT:

WhistlerProperty.com

Recycle, Re-build and Re-invest in your community. All proceeds support 28 programs and services such as the food bank, outreach services, and counseling assistance offered by Whistler Community Services. www.mywcss.org

WHISTLER FURNITURE CO

simon Westwood 604-967-1195 simon@WhistlerProperty.com

STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! DEALERS AND BIKINI CLAD CADDIES. ESCORTS MAKE ANY PARTY AMAZING!! STRIPPERS TOPLESS BLACKJACK DEALERS 6 0SEXY 4 -SKI9 INSTRUCTORS! 38-6456 For the Time of Your Life! MAKE ANY PARTY AMAZING!

Open 10am-5pm, 7 days a week 1003 Lynham Road, Function Junction 604-932-1125

Like us on Facebook @ Whistler Community Service Society

licenseD rental agents:

ALWAYS HIRING ALWAYS HIRING

Re-Build-It Centre Furniture, appliances, kitchen cabinets, doors, plumbing, tools, flooring, hardware, lumber, lighting and more!

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Queen mattresses from $289.99 Bunk Beds from $699.99 Sofa beds from $1099.99

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Shared Accommodation - Benchlands A large, charming private room available for the summer. Beautifully furnished with queen bed, large bureau and closet, TV, en-suited bath and washer dryer available. Gorgeous gardens, mountain views, minutes to Lost Lake, golf course and biking trails. Perfect for single mature gal, no smoking, no parties, no pets. Has underground parking. Available June 1st call 604 318 5348.

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Ray Wiebe 604.935.2432 Pat Wiebe 604.902.9300 raymondo99.69@gmail.com


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Two new classes with Jess! Outdoor Strength and Conditioning

Tuesdays 11-12 Starts June 18 $66 for 6 weeks Metabolic Conditioning

Fridays 5:30-6:30 pm Starts June 21 $66 for 6 weeks

NOTICES

Whistler Friends of the Library Annual Giant Plant Sale Saturday June 8. 10 am to 1 pm. Whistler Public Library We will be selling Perennials, Annuals, Salad Pots, Herb Pots, Bulbs, House Plants. Garden Gurus on site, Local Author Jane Reid with her 'Freshly Picked' book signing and sales, Sea to Sky In-vasive Species. Donations of plants will be accepted on day of sale.

PEMBERTON COMMUNITY LISTINGS Pemberton and District Museum and Archives Society. Located at 7455 Prospect St. Open: May to Nov annually from 10am-5pm. Guided tours and activities for all ages. Join us for "Tea & Tales" every Tuesday at 2pm in July and August. Some seasonal closures. Closed on holidays. www.pembertonmuseum.org

www.whistler.ca/recreation 604-935-PLAY (7529)

SUMMER

EDITION OUT NOW FAQwh istl e r

VOLUNTEERS Big Brothers, Big Sisters Sea to Sky Volunteer to Mentor- just 1hr/week - and make a difference in a child's life. Call 604892-3125.

Community

NOTICES

GENERAL NOTICES

No Heat now available

Dont forget to scoop the poop! It’s not fun to step in, or to see around town. Help keep Whistler clean and pick up after your dog.

www.whistlerwag.com Services

HEALTH & WELLBEING

ROTARY CLUBS OF WHISTLER & PEMBERTON

Tuesdays at 7:15 a.m. BG Urban Grill: 604-905-5090 & Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. at the Pan Pacific, Mountainside. www.whistler-rotary.org Pemberton Rotary Club at the Pemberton Community Centre, Wednesdays at 7:15am www.pembertonrotary.ca

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MEETING PLACE

Registered Therapists

Welcome Centre at Whistler Public Library - Information, support, community connections and ESL practice groups for newcomers and immigrants. Meet people, make connections, volunteer, build your communication skills in English. Multicultural Meet Up every Friday 9.3012pm.604-698-5960 info@welcomewhistler. com FB: WhistlerWelcomeCentre

Registered Massage, Registered Counselling & Registered Chiropractic

WHISTLER COMMUNITY LISTINGS

Serving Whistler for 25 years in: Deep Tissue Massage, Relaxation, Thai & Shiatsu, Therapeutic Massage, Reflexology, Aromatherapy & Hot Stone Massage available on request

RMT specials on request

604-938-0777 #206 - 4368 MAIN ST. 2ND FLOOR, MARKET PAVILION

The Friends of the Whistler Public Library are looking for healthy plant donations for their annual 'Giant Plant Sale' (June 8. 10 am to 1 pm Library square) Please bring donations on day of sale or contact christyauer@gmail. com

 Email marketing  Analytics and measurement On completion students will receive a WAS Course Certification and Hootsuite Certification.

NEXT CLASS:

STARTS JUNE 4TH! Contact Whistler Adventure School to reserve your space. info@WhistlerAdventureSchool.com

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604.962.2220 MAY 30, 2019

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COMMUNITY LISTINGS ARTS & CULTURE Arts Whistler - Full arts & culture listings. Comprehensive artist directory & programs, events & performances year-round. For info 604-935-8410 or visit www.artswhistler.com

Pemberton Arts Council - Connect with other artists, writers, artisans, musicians & help make Pemberton a vibrant arts community. Call 604-452-0123 or visit www. pembertonartscouncil.com

LOCALLY OWNED AND INDEPENDENT SINCE 1980 • $241.50 Bi Weekly Staff Housing (incl bills) • 15% Grocery Discount • Competitive Wages • Parties, Perks and Positive Vibes

PLAY HERE

CHARACTERS WANTED “Work with all your pals, have a good laugh and meet heaps of people” - Chief Morale Officer ROB STANNARD POP INTO THE STORE AND SPEAK TO A MANAGER 4211 VILLAGE SQUARE WHISTLER

Pemberton Writers - Meet with other writers to review and critique monthly. Opportunities for writing in a comfortable and creative setting. Email crowley7@telus. net

Sea to Sky Singers - Invites new & former members to join us for an exciting new term, the spring & fall terms culminate with a concert. Choir meets Tues, 7-9pm at Squamish Academy of Music, 2nd Ave. Veronica seatoskysingers@gmail.com or 604-892-7819 www.seatoskysingers.net

Whistler Community Band - Rehearsals on Tuesdays 7 - 8:15 pm CONTACT whistlerchorus@gmail.com FOR LOCATION

Whistler Singers Rehearsals are Tuesdays from 7 to 9pm at Myrtle Philip School in the Toad Hall room. Everyone is welcome! Inquiries can be sent to whistlersingers@gmail.com For more info, visit: https://www.facebook.com/ whistlersingers/

Now Hiring for the Following Positions:

HOUSEKEEPERS – CASUAL • Competitive Wages - $25/HR • Associate Housing • Discounted Food • Flexible Schedule • Spa Discounts Discover new opportunities and embark on a career in Hospitality with Pan Pacific Whistler To apply, please submit your cover letter and resume to careers.ppwhi@panpacific.com

Whistler Sings - Multi-generational choir Our new multi-generational choir begins this Saturday, May 25th. What's it all about? This is a choir for everyone - regardless of age or musical experience. If you sing in a choir, in the car or shower or not at all but would like to, this is your choir. All ages and abilities are welcome - under 13s need an adult with them. We'll be meeting at the Whistler Museum from 9:30 - 11 am for 5 Saturday mornings. We've got some fun music to sing as well as some percussion. If you have an instrument you feel would work with the choir, please do bring it along. Any questions email whistlerharp@gmail.com

CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS Donate Used Clothing & Household Goods- To be distributed to local charities by Sharon 604-894-6656 for pick up.

WE ARE LOOKING TO HIRE:

EXPERIENCED LINE COOKS (ACCOMMODATION AVAILABLE) BUSSERS HOSTS SERVERS

» piquenewsmagazine.com/jobs

Full-time and year round. We feature evening work only, staff meals, competitive wages and a great work environment. So if you’re looking for a change or some extra hours, come by and see us. Flexible schedules are available. REPLY IN PERSON WITH RESUME BETWEEN 3-5 AT QUATTRO 4319 Main St. in the Pinnacle Hotel

80 MAY 30, 2019

Playground Builders: Creating Play Building Hope - Playground Builders is a registered charity that builds playgrounds for children in war-torn areas. Learn more, volunteer or donate at www. playgroundbuilders.org

Sea to Sky Community Services - running dozens of programs in Whistler to help people through times of crisis and with everyday challenges. www.sscs.ca 1-877892-2022 admin@sscs.ca

Stewardship Pemberton Society and the One Mile Lake Nature Centre- Connecting community, nature and people through education, cooperation, and community involvement. www.stewardshippemberton. com


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Whistler Health Care Foundation raises funds for improving health care resources and services. New board members welcomed. Contact us at info@ whistlerhealthcarefoundation.org or call Karen at 604-906-1435.

SPORTS & RECREATION Alpine Club of Canada Whistler Section - Outdoor club focused on ski/split board touring, hiking, mountaineering and skills training. More info: accwhistler.ca Trip Schedule: accwhistler.ca/trips/

Snowflake, a leading Canadian retailer in outerwear and accessories, is looking for a Sales Associate for their Fairmont Chateau Whistler location.

Griffin Squadron Squamish Air CadetsOpen to youth 12-18yrs at Don Ross Secondary School on Tues at 6:30pm.

Above-average wage. Outstanding commissions. Employee discount. Health Club membership at Fairmont. Opportunity for advancement.

IS SEEKING TWO LEADERS TO JOIN OUR TEAM: Pemberton Valley Trails AssociationMeets the second Wed of each month. 7pm at the Pemberton Recreation Centre. Call 604-698-6158 Sea to Sky RC Flyers - Model Aeronautics Association of Canada Club active in the Sea to Sky Region flying model airplanes, helicopters and multi-rotors. Contact S2SRCFLY@telus.net Whistler Adaptive Sports Program Provides sports & recreation experiences for people with disabilities. Chelsey Walker at 604-905-4493 or info@whistleradaptive. com

Banquet Manager & Team Driver For a complete job description please visit SLCC.ca/Careers. We thank you for your interest; however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

Previous sales experience an asset, but not required. Excellent overall communication skills, both verbal and written. Enthusiastic and goal-oriented. Please email resume to kathleen@snowflakecanada.com

Whistler Martial Arts offers - Kishindo Karate for kids age 4 and up, Capoeira and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu for kids and adults. Also Kickboxing, Judo, Yoga and Bellyfit for adults. Call Cole 932-2226

snowflakecanada.com

Women's Karma Yoga - Thursdays, 9:30-10:30, ongoing by donation and childminding provided. Whistler Women's Centre: 1519 Spring Creek Drive. Drop-in for weekly yoga classes led by an all female team of certified yoga instructors. All women, all ability levels welcome. hswc.ca | 604-962-8711

YOUTH ACTIVITIES 1st Whistler Scout Group - outdoor & adventure program for girls and boys aged 5-17. Times and locations vary. More info: http://1stwhistlerscoutgroup. webs.com. Contact scoutsatwhistler @gmail.com or 604-966-4050. Whistler Children's Chorus Rehearsal Tuesdays at MILLENNIUM PLACE (4 - 5:30 pm) contact whistlerchorus@gmail.com Whistler/Pemberton Girl Guides Adventures for Girls age 5 & up. Sparks & Brownies (Gr K,1,2,3) Guides (Gr 4,5,6) Volunteers always welcome. coastmountaingirlguides@gmail.com Whistler Youth Centre - Drop - in: Fridays 3:30 - 11 PM & Saturdays 6 - 10 PM for ages 13 - 18. Located downstairs in the Maury Young Arts Centre (formerly Millenium Place). We offer: a Ping pong table, Pool table, Skateboard mini ramp w. skateboards and helmets to borrow, Free Wi-Fi, Xbox One, PS3 & PS4, Guitars, Board games, Projector and widescreen TV's. Facebook THEYC Crew, www.whistleryouthcentre. com or call 604-935-8187.

ResortQuest Whistler is currently hiring:

Maintenance Group Sales Coordinator Benefits include - activity allowance, extended medical, RRSP match, opportunities for growth and more. To apply for this opportunity, please specify the position and email your resume and cover letter to: beth.fraser@resortquestwhistler.com We thank all applicants for their interest

Seeking Room Attendants and Dishwashers

***$500 Signing Bonus Offered*** Our Benefits Include: Health Benefits | Colleague Housing | Leisure Package Staff Meals | Hotel Stay Discounts Great Events & Recognition | Opportunity for growth

but only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

APPLY TODAY AT FAIRMONTCAREERS.COM MAY 30, 2019

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LEISURE GROUPS Duplicate Bridge Club- Whistler Racquet Club reconvenes in late fall. The club meets every week and visitors are welcome. For partner, please call Gill at 640-932-5791.

Nagomi Sushi is hiring experienced Japanese Chefs in Whistler.

PAINTERS

Full Time & Part Time If you.... *have a minimum of one season of experience *like working with fun and chill co-workers *are a hard worker with a relaxed attitude *like flexible bosses & schedules *want steady work from now till the snow flies (or year round)

• Preparing Sushi and cooking other Japanese traditional food. • Plan menu and ensure food meets quality standards. • Estimate food requirements and estimate food and labour costs. • Instruct Kitchen Helpers and Cooks in preparation, cooking, and presentation of food. • Assist Head Chef and supervise cooks and kitchen helpers. • Inspecting ingredients for quality and freshness and supervising all food preparation. • Create new menu, recipes and specials. • Ensure excellent customer services at the Sushi bar. • Work as a team and ensure orders are completed in a timely manner. Qualifications: • Completion of secondary school and 2 years of cook/chef experience

Full-time, Permanent

All season, 30-35 hours per week $24 per hour Language of work is English

Starting pay $16-25 depending on experience. Benefit packages available for year round/long term employees

Benefits: 2 weeks vacation, extended health plan.

PLEASE EMAIL YOUR RESUME AND DETAILS TO:

Start date: As soon as possible. Address: 108-4557 Blackcomb Way, Whistler, BC, V0N 1B4

JOBS@PERFORMANCEPAINTING.CA

Apply by email at whistlernagomisushi@hotmail.co.jp

Knitty Gritty Knit Night- Held every Tues 6-8pm. Free evening open to everyone with a love for knitting/crocheting. Beginners welcome. For location and further details email knittygrittywhistler@gmail.com or find us on facebook.

Mountain Spirit Toastmasters- Builds communication, public speaking, and leadership skills . Wednesdays at the Pan Pacific Mountainside - Singing Pass Room, 5:30-7pm. Email contact - 8376@ toastmastersclubs.org www.whistler. toastmastersclubs.org

Pemberton Women's Institute - Meets the third Mon of each month in the activity room at St. David's United Church at 7:30pm. New members welcome. Linda Ronayne at 604-894-6580

Rotary Club of Whistler - Meets Tuesdays AM & PM www.whistler-rotary.org

Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium Meets every Thurs at 12:15pm at Pan Pacific Mountainside. 604-932-7782

Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub is hiring:

Roland’s Pub & Red Door Bistro are looking for experienced line cooks and dishwashers. Full time and part time available, mostly night shifts. Competitive wages, tips, staff meal, staff discounts, and many other perks. Full time staff eligible for Extended Medical & Dental benefits after 3 months. Come join the coolest group of locals at the coolest local establishment. Apply in person to 2129 Lake Placid Road, or email resume to info@rolandswhistler.com

LINE COOK DISHWASHER Work at Whistler’s best location! Refine or jump-start your culinary career in our fast-paced and busy kitchen. We offer competitive wages, tips and a season ski pass. Please stop by the pub between 10am and 5pm with a copy of your resume. You can also submit your resume via email to careers@dubhlinngate.com

Shades of Grey Painters Meets twice a week - Tuesdays, Watercolour, 11.00am-2.30pm @ The Rec, Pemberton. Thursdays, Acrylic, 1.00pm-3.30pm @ The Amenities Building, Pioneer Village, Pemberton. We are like-minded people that get together & paint. Gretchen is the painting coach. $5 to attend.

Whistler Reads - Meets to discuss a new book every eight weeks. Go to bookbuffet. com & click on Whistler Reads for the latest book/event. Paula at 604-907-2804 or wr@ bookbuffet.com

COMMUNITY CENTRES Maury Young Arts Centre - Whistler's community centre for arts, culture & inspiration. Performance theatre, art gallery, daycare, youth centre, meditation room, meeting facilities. www.artswhistler.com or 604-935-8410

Pemberton & District Community Centre - Located at 7390 Cottonwood St. Fitness Centre, facility rentals, spray park, playground, children, youth, adult & seniors programs. For more info 604-894-2340 or pemrecinfo@slrd.bc.ca

MUSEUMS The Pinnacle Hotel Whistler has the following positions available:

HOUSEMAN ROOM ATTENDANTS Please reply by email: parmstrong@pinnaclehotels.ca

82 MAY 30, 2019

WE ARE HIRING:

Squamish Lil'wat Cultural Centre Explore First Nations Art Galleries, and Interactive Exhibits. Gift Shop & Cafe are in our admission free area. Open Tuesday'sSunday's per week. 10am-5p.m..

Foremen, Carpenters, Labourers, Apprentices Please contact Marc@balmoralconstruction.com

Whistler Museum & Archives Society Explore interactive exhibits, listen to local stories & discover Whistler's journey. Open daily 11am-5pm, 4333 Main St. www. whistlermuseum.org or 604-932-2019


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BNI Mountain High - Meets at 6:45-8:30am every Thursday at Whistler Chamber Boardroom. BNI provides a positive and structured environment for development and exchange of quality business referrals. It does so by helping you build personal relationships with dozens of other qualified business professionals. Register by emailing melissa@betterbrainhealth.info Whistler Chamber of Commerce - Is the leading business association in Whistler that works to create a vibrant & successful economy. Learn more about the programs & services at www.whistlerchamber.com Women of Whistler - Group that provides opportunities for Whistler businesswomen to network, gain knowledge & share ideas in a friendly, relaxed environment. Learn more at www.womenofwhistler.com

Be a part of our dynamic team at one of Whistlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s busiest spots! At The High Mountain Brewing Company, Whistler Brewhouse, we take pride in our product and service - From the busy patio to the cozy two-sided fireplace, from our exceptional pizzas to our hand-crafted beer. We are currently looking for

Front of House Manager Dishwasher Line Cook

FOR SENIORS Activate & Connect - Come join us Thursday mornings 9:30am to 11:00am at Whistler Community Services for a weekly drop in program for seniors 50+. Everyone welcome, in partnership with Mature Action Community. www.mywcss.org Mature Action Community (MAC) - Represents seniors in Whistler and welcomes new members. MAC meets for fun and interaction with local seniors and those just visiting on Thursday mornings from 9:30 to 11:00 a.m. at the Whistler Community Services Community Room for Activate and Connect. Come join us for coffee and socializing while engaging in fun activities. Check us out at www.whistlermac. org or view our schedule on Facebook Whistler Mature Action Community Group page. Outreach Services - Free confidential support for adults dealing with the challenges of social wellness. Please call our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. Pemberton Men's Shed - Weekly social meetings WED. 11-2 in the Seniors/youth Rec. bldg. beside library. Social meeting with BYO Bag lunch, card games and pool/ snooker. Help out in YOUR community, operating the Pemberton Tool Library. Senior Citizen Organizations - Is an advocacy group devoted to improving the quality of life for all seniors. Ernie Bayer 604576-9734 or ecbayer2@gmail.com

We offer comprehensive benefits packages after a probationary period, as well as competitive wages. Please come by with your resume or apply via email to adam@mjg.ca

4355 BLACKCOMB WAY WHISTLER, BC, V0N 1B4

JOIN THE MONGOLIE CREW! We are hiring full time & part time:

GRILL CHEFS HOSTS

Hourly wage + tips, flexible schedule, fun & fast-paced work environment, staff meals. Learn how to cook with flair!

Send your resume to careers@mongoliegrill.com Or drop off your resume in person before 5pm!

is now hiring for the following position:

Guest Service Agent Room Attendant* Maintenance Person $300 signing bonus Full-time and Part-time Seasonal incentives available *Short-term accommodation available Please email resume to hr@listelhotel.com Thank you for your interest. Only those applicants being considered for an interview will be contacted.

ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY Earthsave Whistler - Providing info & support to people who are interested in making healthier, greener, more peaceful food choices. earthsavewhistler.com Healthy Home, Healthy Planet - Expert in green cleaning offers tricks, info & advice on the best way to green clean your home or work space! Call France 604-698-7479. Free private presentation on request. www. healthylivingwhistler.com Regional Recycling - Recycle beverage containers (full deposit paid) electronics, appliances, batteries, Lightbulbs, drop-off times are 9am-5pm on Nesters Rd. Pick up service 604-932-3733

NOW HIRING:

FT Bakery PT & FT Cashier PT Grocery COMPETITIVE WAGES, BENEFITS AND FLEXIBILITY email jobs@pembertonsupermarket.com online application at pembertonsupermarket.com fax (604) 894-1107 or apply within!

is currently hiring for the following positions:

EXCAVATOR OPERATOR CLASS 1 TRUCK DRIVER Please send resume to

admin@tktcontracting.ca NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

MAY 30, 2019

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ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY Re-Build-It Centre - Daily 10:00am to 5:00pm. Accepting donations of furniture, quality used building supplies & new items. Deliveries and pickups available for $35. Call 604.932.1125, www.mywcss.org, rebuildit@ mywss.org

Nagomi Sushi in Whistler is hiring experienced:

Kitchen Helpers Servers Hosts in Whistler

Full time and Part time available Available to start immediately Benefits: 2 weeks vacation per year, potential staff accommodation and Spirit Pass Program. Address: 108-4557 Blackcomb Way, Whistler, BC, V0N 1B4 Apply by email at nagomisushi@outlook.com

OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS The Bearfoot Bistro, Whistlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premier fine dining restaurant is growing its team.

Be part of the action to deliver exceptinal fine dining experience to guests in an award-winning and high volume dining room. We are hiring for the following position:

Dishwashers We offer year-round or seasonal employment, industry leading wages, medical services plan, staff meals, staff discounts and more... Please send your resume to info@bearfootbistro.com or apply in person between 3-5pm. 4121 Village Green | Adjacent to Listel Hotel 604 932 3433 | bearfootbistro.com

Diverse construction company with

residential/commercial projects across the sea to sky corriDor

we are currently hiring

Site Supervisors Carpenters Labourers We offer; employee benefits and full time employment year round. To apply: call 604.935.2683 or email dcoTe@coasTconsTrucTion.ca

RAVEN ROOM What we want: Outgoing, self-motivated, mature and responsible individuals who love to sell and help to create a positive store environment.

Whistler's newest restaurant and cocktail bar Join our kitchen team lead by the talented Chef Erin Stone Looking for:

located in the Town Plaza

Experienced Line Cooks Breakfast and Evening Dishwashers

604-905-6290

Please email erin@theravenroom.ca to apply

What you get: $15/hour & team-orientated sales bonus as well as a winter 2019/20 ski pass for full-time employees. Apply in person at Ruby Tuesday

84 MAY 30, 2019

The Association of Whistler Area Residents for the Environment (AWARE) Whistler's Natural Voice since 1989. Regular events, project and volunteer opportunities. www.awarewhistler.org info@awarewhistler.org

The Mountain Village Social Gathering Join us at one of our regular social gatherings on the last Wednesday of every month. There is a group of us at The Mountain Village who are forming a sustainable, multi generational neighbourhood based on the co housing model. WHAT IF... Housing wasn't just a place to live, but rather, a way of life? To find out more, visit our Facebook page @themountainvillage or go to our website www.themountainvillage.ca

FAMILY RESOURCES

THE

We are looking for full & part-time sales people

Re-Use-It - Daily 11:00am to 6:00pm, Donate all household goods in good shape. Accepting bottles & cans, old electronics, anything with a cord, and light fixtures for recycling. All proceeds to WCSS. Call 604.932.1121, www.mywcss.org, reuseit@ mywcss.org.

Baby/Child Health Clinics - Free routine immunizations & newly licensed vaccines for purchase, growth & development assessments & plenty of age appropriate resources avail. By appointment 604-9323202

Camp Fund - Provides financial assis-tance to enable children of financially restricted families to attend camp. Call WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. www.mywcss.org

Families Fighting Cancer In The Sea To Sky - We are a non profit partner with Sea to Sky Community Services. We provide financial and practical support to children and parents with dependants diagnosed with cancer. Please contact us on our confidential email: ffcseatosky@gmail.com, visit our Facebook Page or website www. familiesfightingcancer.ca

KidsArt - Provides financial assistance to enable children of financially restricted families to participate in arts and culture education. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. www. mywcss.org.

Kids on the Move - Provides financial assistance to enable children of financially restricted families to participate in sport programs. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. www. mywcss.org.

Outreach Services - Free confidential support for adults and families experiencing challenges with mental health, food insecurity, housing insecurity, substance use, misuse or addiction, employment, eating disorders, violence in relationships, roommate conflict or homesickness. Contact our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker or visit www. mywcss.org.


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Counselling Assistance Available - WCSS subsidizes access to a private counselor for $35-$50/hr depending on financial need. Contact an outreach team member at 604932-0113 www.mywcss.org

SELL

Full & Part-Time Class 2 Drivers Excellent hourly wage

Required Skills and Experience: - Customer service skills - Class 2 (w/ Air Brake) preferred - Class 4 Unrestricted License - Will train for Class 2 License upgrade for excellent candidates

We offer competitive wages, a unique environment, seasonal bonuses, staff discounts and benefits. Ask about accommodation.

Come Grow Sport with us at our Whistler Olympic Legacy Venues

Pemberton Strong Start Family Drop-InA play group for you and your under-5 child. Signal Hill Elementary, Mon, Tues, Wed & Fri, 9am-12pm. Thurs only 12pm-3pm. Call 604894-6101 / 604-966- 8857

Access to Justice - Need legal advice but are financially restricted? Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to find out more or visit www. mywcss.org.

DRIVE

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Pemberton Parent Infant Drop-In Facilitated by Capri Mohammed, Public Health Nurse. Every Mon 11am-12:30pm at Pemberton Public Library.

SOCIAL SERVICES

FIX

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

FAMILY RESOURCES

Whistler Public Library - Open Mon-Thurs 10am-7pm, Fri 10am-6pm, Sat & Sun 11am5pm. Music & Words, Mon 10am. Rhyme & Song, Tues 10:30am. Parent & Infant dropin, Thurs 11am. Preschool Story Time, Fri 10:30am. Singing with the babies, Sat 11am. Call 604-935-8433

WORK

Whistler Athletes’ Centre

(High Performance Training and Accommodation) Lead, Lodge Attendant Kitchen Porter / Lodge Attendant Lodge Attendant Guest Service Agent

Whistler Sliding Centre

(Bobsleigh, Luge & Skeleton) Summer Operations Trainee (Canada Summer Jobs) Track Medical Responder/Guest Service Host, Summer Control & Timing Operator/Guest Service Host, Summer Pilot/Guest Service Host, Summer Guest Service Host, Summer

Whistler Olympic Park

(Nordic Skiing, Snowshoeing and Outdoor Activities) Summer Operations Trainee (Canada Summer Jobs) Biathlon Tour Guide, Summer Guest Activity Rep, Summer E-Bike Guide

Great team atmosphere with a well-established local company. Visit our website to view current postings and to apply:

Please send resume to info@vipwhistler.com

www.whistlersportlegacies.com/careers

Counselling Assistance - WCSS subsidizes access to a private counsellor depending on financial need. Contact an outreach worker at 604.932.0113 or visit www.mywcss.org.

ESL Volunteer Tutor Program - Volunteer one-to-one tutoring for new immigrants & Canadian citizens. For more information or to register, contact the Whistler Welcome Centre info@welcomewhistler.com or call 604.698.5960

Whistler Brewing Company is hiring…

Cook Full-time & part-time positions available $15/hr + Beer perks

Food Bank, Pemberton - Run by Sea to Sky Community Service. Open every second Monday. 604 894 6101

Food Bank Whistler - Located at 8000 Nesters Road, every Monday from 10am to noon. For emergency food bags, please call 604.935.7717 for as-sistance. www.mywcss. org, food-bank@mywcss.org

Healthy Pregnancy Outreach ProgramLearn how to prepare healthy affordable meals at this outreach program. Sea to Sky Community Services 604-894-6101

Meadow Park Rec Credit - If you are financially restricted, you may be eligible for a $131.20 municipal recreation credit. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak with an outreach worker. www.mywcss.org.

North Shore Schizophrenia Society Services for family, friends & community. Mental illness info, support & advocacy. Call Chris Dickenson at 604-966-7334

Outreach Services - Free, confidential support for youth experiencing challenges with mental health, food insecurity, housing insecurity, substance use, misuse or addiction, employment, eating disorders, violence in relationships, roommate conflict or homesickness. Contact our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker or visit www.mywcss.org.

Red Door Bistro & Roland’s Pub are looking for full time line cooks. Wage based on experience. Extended Medical & Dental Benefits, tips, staff meal, and staff discounts. Apply in person or email resume to

Part-time delivery driver Minimum 2 days a week, possibly more Must be over 25 years of age with a clean drivers abstract Must be able to lift 150lbs $16/hr + beer perks Come see us with your resume!

info@rolandswhistler.com

DOUG BUSH SURVEY SERVICES LTD. is looking for a

SURVEY FIELD TECHNICIAN With a two or three year college or technical school program in geomatics. Three years experience and proficient in the use of robotic survey instruments and GPS equipment for engineering and building construction layout, topographic site surveys, site improvement surveys and precise monitoring. Experience with AutoCAD Civil 3D also an asset to assist in office with computations and drawing preparation. Please call Ian @ 604-932-3314 or email @ ian@dbss.ca #18-1370 Alpha Lake Rd. Whistler BC V0N 1B1 Serving Squamish, Whistler and Pemberton

Sundial Boutique Hotel at 4340 Sundial Crescent, Whistler BC V0N 1B4 is currently hiring for a

Housekeeping Supervisor This position is FT year around. Wage is $21.75/hr + benefits. Job duties include: Supervising dept duties, inspection of work, administration, assist with recruiting, perform training and cleaning duties. Skill requirements: 1 year’s prior experience as a housekeeping supervisor”, tourism, administration and customer service. Please fax or email your resume with attention to “Human Resources Department” to:

604-932-7152 hr@sundialhotel.com MAY 30, 2019

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COMMUNITY LISTINGS SOCIAL SERVICES Pearl's Safe Home - Temporary shelter for women & children experiencing abuse in relationships. Locations in Whistler & Pemberton avail 24/7. All services are free. 1-877-890-5711 or 604-892-5711 RMOW Rec Credit - If you are financially restricted, you may be eligible for a $127.60 municipal recreation credit. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 www.mywcss.org Support Counselling - For women regarding abuse & relationship issues. No charge. Call 604-894-6101

An extraordinary company, an extraordinary career. Are you ready to begin your extraordinary experience? Current Career Opportunities: Whistler Experience Coordinator Purchasing Manager Banquet Server Junior Server Reservations Agent Engineering Opportunities Culinary Opportunities We offer: Health Benefits Competitive Wages Colleague Accommodation Leisure Package Hotel Stay Discounts Great colleague events & recognition! To review job descriptions and apply, please visit www.fairmontcareers.com

We are currently interviewing:

Project Coordinator Carpenters Carpenters Helpers Labourers Level 2 First Aid Attendant Please submit resume to: info@evrfinehomes

Whistlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Premier Estate Builder

Victim Services - Assists victims, witnesses, family members or friends directly affected by any criminal act or traumatic event. Call 604-905-1969 Whistler Community Services Society Outreach Services Now Available Monday to Saturday at our new location - 8000 Nesters Road (next to WAG) 604.932.0113 www. mywcss.org Whistler for the Disabled - Provides info for people with disabilities on what to do & where to go. Visit www. whistlerforthedisabled.com Whistler Housing Authority - Long term rental & ownership housing for Whistler residents. Visit www.whistlerhousing.ca Whistler Mental Health & Addiction Services - If you or someone you know needs help with a mental health issue or substance misuse or addiction problem, we can assist. Mon-Fri 830am-430pm. 604-6986455 Whistler Multicultural Network Settlement information, social support and programs for newcomers and immigrants living/working in Whistler. 604-388-5511 www.whistlermulticulturalnetwork.com

INSTALLER/SERVICE TECHNICIAN Great opportunity for a super motivated/organized person to excel in the field of hardware installation and lock technician services. The successful individual will have experience in carpentry and/or building maintenance. Any experience in low voltage electrical and/or hotel card access systems will prove very beneficial. Good communication and customer service skills as well as a strong work ethic are essential to this position. Please reply to alpinelock@telus.net with a resume and cover letter outlining your suitability and qualifications for the position. No drop-ins or phone calls please, apply only by email.

We are currently hiring an Assistant Manager Full Time and Part Time Sales Representatives We have staff accommodation available for full time, starting in May Please stop by our Whistler Village location with your resume to fill out an application and say Hi to Michelle or Tina. (4154 Village Green)

86 MAY 30, 2019

The Beacon Pub and Eatery is currently looking for: LINE/ PREP COOKS (FULL-TIME & PART-TIME) DISHWASHERS SOUS CHEF DOOR HOST Wages are very competitive (based on experience), great perks and benefits. Come join the best team in Whistler! Interested applicants please email your resume to skeenan-naf@Crystal-Lodge.com

Whistler Opt Healthy Sexuality Clinic - Professional sexual health services at a reduced cost. Free HIV testing. Clinics at Whistler Health Care Ctr, 2nd floor on Tues 4:30-7:30pm. Winter hours Thurs. 5:00pm7:00pm. Confidentiality assured. Whistler Women's Centre - Provides confidential support, resources, referrals and advocacy for women living in the Sea to Sky corridor. All services are free of charge and include access to emergency safe housing, child/youth counselling, play space and computer access. Drop-In Centre open Mon 12-230, Tue-Thu 12-5. 1519 Spring Creek Drive. You can also access our services at the Whistler Public Library on Mondays from 3-6 p.m. www.hswc.ca or call (604)962-8711. 24 HR Crisis Line: 1-877-890-5711 Whistler WorkBC Employment Services Centre - Provides free one-stop employment services to job seekers and employers. Drop in services at the Pemberton Library Thursdays 1-5 PM, and at the Whistler Public Library on Mondays from 3-6 PM. For more information visit www.WhistlerESC.com or call us at 604-932-1600

SUPPORT GROUPS

WEST ELECTRIC IS HIRING:

Service Electrician and Apprentices email resumes to: office@westelectric.ca

Birth, Baby and Beyond - Join a registered counsellor and meet other moms with the opportunity to ask questions and share experiences in a safe, welcoming and nonjudgmental setting. Call 604.932.0113 for more information or visit www.mywcss.org.


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Concussion Support Group - WCSS is offering a recurring 8 week program to support people living with persistent postconcussion symptoms. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak with an outreach worker about upcoming sessions or visit www.mywcss.org. Epilepsy Support Group- For individuals & families seeking guidance or support. Contact eswhistler@gmail.com Immigrant Peer Educators - Immigrants providing support and information for those who may be experiencing challenges adjusting to a new culture. 604-388-5511 info@whistlermulticulturalnetwork.com Pregnancy and Infant Loss - Facilitated by a registered counsellor, this program is designed for couples and individuals who have experienced loss of a child, either before or after birth. Please call WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak to an outreach worker for more information or visit www. mywcss.org. SMART Recovery Pemberton - (SelfManagement and Recovery Training) A Cognitive-Behavioural group for individuals with substance abuse con-cerns. Pemberton Health Centre (Board Room) January 17th, 24th, 31st, and February 7th 2019 4:30-6:00pm **drop in welcome.

RELIGION Jesus Rock Of Ages Ministry- A bible based church that holds services at Millennium Place's main floor theatre at 4:30pm. www. jesusrockofages.com Roman Catholic Church- Come celebrate mass at Our Lady of the Mountains, Whistler on Saturday 5pm, Sunday 9am, Tuesday 5:45pm, Wednesday 7pm, Thursday/Friday 5:45pm. St. Francis of Assisi, Pemberton on Sunday 12:30pm and Friday 9am. St. Christopher's, Mt. Currie on Sunday 11am. 604-905-4781

Sea to Sky Healing Room - For Blessing/Prayer/Encouragement In the Community Church building, 7422 Dogwood Street, Pemberton. Every 1st and 3rd Wednesday: 4-6 PM Whistler Church- Join us for worship and fellowship around Jesus. Sunday 10 am at Myrtle Philip Community School, 6195 Lorimer Rd. Nursery, Sunday School to gr. 6, Youth gr. 7 and up. Call Pastor Jon 604-7983861 / Kelvin 204-249-0700 or www.whistlerchurch.ca

FUR & FEATHERS Get Bear Smart Society - Learn more about coexisting with bears. To report a conflict, garbage or attractant issue call 604-905BEAR (2327) www.bearsmart.com Pemberton Wildlife Association Advocates for the conservation of fish, wildlife & wilderness recreation. Also offering target shooting & archery f a c i l i t i e s . www.pembertonwildlifeassociation.com WAG - Whistler Animals Galore - A shelter for lost, unwanted, and homeless cats and dogs. Let us help you find your purrfect match...adopt a shelter animal! For more info 604-9358364 www.whistlerwag.com

Our outstanding team is looking to add individuals with a variety of skill sets and experience. Friendly, hard working candidates are invited to apply.

Overnight Steward Steward

CURRENT OPPORTUNITIES

Front Desk Agent

FRONT-OF-HOUSE

Spa Supervisor Employee Experience Manager The Four Seasons team is looking for these roles to start immediately. $500 signing bonus available for all hires

Experienced Server (Araxi) Cocktail Bartender (Bar Oso) Server Assistant Expeditor BACK-OF-HOUSE Pastry Cooks Line Cooks (1-2 years experience) Dishwashers

Details: Please apply online via jobs.fourseasons.com For possible same day offers, please come to our drop-in hours every Tuesday between 1pm-4pm. Please bring your resume and two references in order to be considered!

Staff Housing Available! Competitive Wage + Benefits Package We’re Hiring

DISHWASHERS On-the-job training offered APPLY TODAY!

MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES The Sea to Sky corridor’s top civil construction company.

Assistant Restaurant Manager

We are currently recruiting professionally minded people to join our team.

Seeking a full-time Assistant Manager to help oversee day-to-day operations and uphold Araxi Restaurant’s exceptional levels of hospitality.

Required are:

• Previous restaurant leadership experience is required • WSET Level 2 or equivalent is an asset

Labourers Equipment Operators Class 1 or Class 3 Truck Drivers Please send resume to: Email: info@whistlerexcavations.com Fax: 604-932-8748 Mail: Box 1145, Whistler, BC V0N 1B0. Drop off @ Suite 202, 1400 Alpha Lake Road, Whistler (Function Junction)

Excellent training and growth opportunities available within an award-winning restaurant group. Please email your resume & cover letter to careers@araxi.com or present in person at Araxi between 3-5 pm daily. We offer year-round full and part-time hours, gratuities, potential for future growth within the company, and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants.

www.whistlerexcavations.com Last modified by:

KP

Resort Municipality of Whistler

Employment Opportunities For full details on current openings and to apply, please visit our website. Resort Municipality of Whistler whistler.ca/careers

Edin Boutique in the Village is hiring:

Full-time Sales Person (30+hr/week)

• $18 per hour • Subsidized Staff housing available • Staff discount and ski pass after 3-month probationary period provided • We offer flexible hours in our relaxed boutique where ladies come to shop for beautiful and unique clothing We are located on the Village Stroll next to the “Anne of Green Gables” Chocolate store.

Please drop by with a resume and introduce yourself (604)938-9922

MAY 30, 2019

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WHISTLER’S RE-IMAGINED ITALIAN RESTAURANT

Blackcomb Peaks Accommodations

The storied restaurant offers a modern taste of Italy to bring a fresh, contemporary style of dining to the mountain.

CURRENT OPPORTUNITIES FRONT-OF-HOUSE

seeks a

FULL TIME MAINTENANCE PERSON Starting wage min $20p/h based on experience.

Experienced Server Server Assistant Host / Hostess

The successful candidate will need to be able to shift

BACK-OF-HOUSE

lift 25+ lbs. Tools are provided. Good time

Line Cooks (1-2 years experience) Dishwashers

management skills are very important, and after

Staff Housing Available! Competitive Wage + Benefits Package

starting wage provided to the successful candidate.

between duties rapidly, be very organized, and

3 months; benefits will be offered. Competitive Please contact admin@blackcombpeaks.com with your resume to apply.

WE’RE HIRING

DISHWASHERS On-the-job training offered. Apply today! RESERVATIONS MANAGER The ideal candidate is well spoken, organized, confident, outgoing, and well-presented. • Previous experience in a fine dining environment is required • Post Secondary education is an asset • Familiarity with a reservations management platform is an asset We offer year-round full and part-time hours, gratuities, potential for future growth within the company, and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants. Please email your resume & cover letter to careers@ilcaminetto.ca

GUEST SERVICES AGENT

Pinnacle Hotel Whistler has an opening for a full time or part time guest services agent. We are looking for a customer service professional who will help our guest enjoy their experience at our hotel. Duties include check in and checkout of guests, concierge and reservations. Experience preferred but we will train the right person. Please contact Roger Dix   rdix@pinnaclehotels.ca or ph: 604-938-3218

All Positions The Pony restaurant is currently seeking applicants for the following positions: Line cook: day and night shifts available. Must have 3+ years experience, competitive wages and bi-weekly tip out. Dishwasher: Evening shifts, entry level position.Wages + bi-weekly tip out. Bartender: Experienced bartender, mainly day shifts, full time preferred. Please email or drop off your resume to The Pony events@thepony.ca Full Time Our client, a small group of medical specialist offices in Whistler and Squamish, requires an extraordinary senior office administrator. Your attention to detail is legendary! When combined with your precision in managing the logistics, people are in awe. You really know how to strike a balance between competing priorities. With at least 5yrs experience in a medical office environment, you are best known for your excellent care of people. Your direct experience overseeing professional admin staff has taught you how to truly support others in bringing their best. 604-263-5670 deborah @walshbusinessgrowth.com

LODGE MANAGER Eagle Pass Heliski is now hiring. The Lodge Manager is responsible for the general overview and day to day operations of the lodge to ensure an unparalleled experience for our guests. For full job description and how to apply visit our website. www.eaglepassheliskiing.com/ jobs/

Lazy Bear Lodge Ltd. Front Desk, Server and Housekeeping Staff Required "Lazy Bear Lodge Ltd. in Churchill, Manitoba requires front desk, server and housekeeping staff. Email resume to louise@lazybearexpeditions.com or fax 1-204-353-2944. www.lazybearexpeditions.com

Now Hiring for the Following Positions: HOUSEKEEPERS **$500 Signing Bonus** plus: • Competitive Wages • Wellness Allowance • Associate Housing • Discounted Food • Extended Medical Benefits • Complimentary Associate Stays • Flexible Schedule • Spa Discounts

Discover new opportunities and embark on a career in Hospitality with Pan Pacific Whistler To apply, please submit your cover letter and resume to careers.ppwhi@panpacific.com

88 MAY 30, 2019

Avis Rent a Car Whistler is looking for counter sales reps to join our busy and fun Avis team. We are hoping to find a full-time and part-time employee, willing to be flexible for the right long term candidate. We offer paid training, medical & dental, sales bonuses and more! Drivers licence and good attitude required. Please forward resume to sheri.warm@abglocalmarket.ca

Pick up our Summer 2019 issue now Find it on select stands and in Whistler hotel rooms


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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS Pemberton Museum Currently Seeking Summer Students Collections Coordinator (10 weeks) starting June 17th ($15/hr/FT) Museum Guide (9 weeks) starting June 24th ($15/hr/FT)

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For full job descriptions see the website. This is a Young Canada Works position and applicants must be Canadian citizens, 16-30 years of age, and returning to school in the fall. 604-894-5504 info@pembertonmuseum.org www.pembertonmuseum.org

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The Body Shop Assistant Manager Do you want to learn from a company that does business as a force for good? Are you a leader looking for your next opportunity? Then we want to connect with you! Apply to The Body Shop Whistler! We are looking for amazing leaders to join our brand and help us promote our cruelty-free products, and fair trade initiatives. We can’t wait to connect! * Great Perks. *Full-time flexible schedule. HARD *Competitive Wage. + Bonus. *Excellent Medical Benefits & MSP. robyn.camley@thebodyshop.com https://thebodyshop.avature.net/T BScareers/JobDetailRetail?jobId=51977

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8 Hut1Operations Manager 6 9 3

The Spearhead Huts Society (SHS) is seeking a part-time/contract Hut Operations Manager to manage the operations and maintenance of up to three alpine backcountry huts in the Spearhead Range of Garibaldi Provincial Park near Whistler, British Columbia. The first of these huts will be completed and open for operations starting 2019. The SHS is seeking a candidate to join our team in summer 2019 to prepare for initial opening and operation.

WHISTLERWEDDINGMAGAZINE.COM

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HARD only dedicated Whistler’s wedding magazine.

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Responsibilities The successful candidate will be responsible for managing the overall operations and maintenance of the huts in a # 28 cost effective manner, including the following: • Coordinate operations such as replenishment of propane supplies and waste disposal • Work with the SHS’s Operations Committee to develop policy and procedures to govern hut bookings, operations, maintenance, as well as Hut rules and signage. • Coordinate trades people and volunteers to complete all maintenance and repairs • Managing accounts and finances • Ensuring that all operations and maintenance are compliant with the terms of the Huts’ BC Provincial Park Use Permit (PUP) and Annual Operating Plan The Operations Manager will work with volunteers from member clubs and organizations, the Operations Committee, and will report to the SHS Board of Directors Qualifications The applicant should have a background in building operations and maintenance, backcountry recreation, and office productivity such as Microsoft Office.

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Job Type

This is a contract someone # 28 9 1part-time 3 2position 7 suitable 6 4for 8 5 located in the Squamish-Whistler-Pemberton area. The

candidate should be reasonably fit and able to make regularly scheduled visits to the hut sites, either by helicopter or by 2 means 8 (backcountry 6 4 1 skiing 5 &9hiking). 3 Salary 7 is $25/hr with benefits negotiable. self-propelled

7 SHS 4 5 9 3 8 2 6 1 About the The Spearhead 3 Huts 5 Society 1 8(SHS) 9 is2a non-profi 6 7t society 4 comprised of several interest groups and clubs all sharing a common goal – to create a world-class backcountry hut-to-hut system in Garibaldi Provincial Park. The organizations 4 6 2 3 5 7 8 1 include Kees and Claire Memorial Hut Society, Brett9Carlson Memorial Foundation, Alpine Club of Canada – Whistler Section, Alpine 8 Club 9 of7Canada 6 -4Vancouver 1 5 Section 2 3and the British Columbia Mountaineering Club. Please forward 6 you 7 application 9 5 to8 info@spearheadhuts.org 3 1 4 2

We thank all1applicants, 2 4 however, 7 6 only9those 3 selected 5 8 for an interview will be contacted. www.spearheadhuts.org 5 3 8 1

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4/11/2005

LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 2004 • $241.50 Bi Weekly Staff Housing (Incl bills) • Staff Meals & FREE COFFEE • 15% Grocery Discount At “The Grocery Store” • Local Customer Base • Competitive Wages • Parties, Perks & Positive Vibes

“Great Team & Awesome Staff Housing” - Irelands Finest Export PADDY BRANGAN POP INTO SEE IAN AT DELISH CAFE OR EMAIL ian@whistlergrocery.com

MAY 30, 2019

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Now Hiring for the Following Positions: RESERVATIONS & REVENUE SUPERVISOR RESERVATIONS & REVENUE COORDINATOR MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN HOUSEPERSON – OVERNIGHT ACCOUNTANT VALET BANQUET SERVERS - CASUAL • Competitive Wages • Associate Housing • Wellness Allowance • Flexible Schedule • Discounted Food • Extended Medical Benefits • Spa Discounts Discover new opportunities and embark on a career in Hospitality with Pan Pacific Whistler To apply, please submit your cover letter and resume to careers.ppwhi@panpacific.com

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

NOW HIRING:

MECHANIC NOW HIRING:

ATV & BUGGY GUIDES CANOE GUIDES • Proven record of quality and efficient workmanship JEEP GUIDES • Ability to work as part of a high performance team GUIDES • Positive attitudeE-BIKE with a drive to succeed • Extensive automotive /or power sports experience (ticket an asset) SHUTTLE DRIVERS SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATES WILL POSSESS

•We Strong of technical/mechanical repairs offeraptitude a fun, outdoor work environment with a great team of like-minded individuals. An always changing, always challenging •work Validday driver’s with license the opportunity to connect with people from all over the world. Flexible schedules and amazing staff parties are definite perks of the job. PERKS INCLUDE: FLEXIBLE SCHEDULE – FRIENDS & FAMILY DISCOUNTS – EPIC STAFF PARTIES - FREE ACTIVITIES FOR STAFF Full job descriptions at: www.canadianwilderness.com/employment/

If you are interested in joining our team, please submit your resume to employment@canadian01.com

Housekeepers Needed

We’re Hiring! JOIN #TEAMNITA

We are looking to expand our team for peak summer season and hiring the following positions:

-Signing Bonus & Great Benefits!The Four Seasons Housekeeping team is looking for Guestroom Attendants for contracts starting immediately or for summer hire! Candidates will receive a $500 signing bonus. Benefits include Guaranteed housing, one meal per working shift, health & medical after 90 days, a winter leisure package, and more!

• Banquet Sous Chef • Chef de Partie • Breakfast Cooks • Stewards

PICK UP YOUR

• Engineering Associate • Bell Attendant • Reservations Coordinator • R.M.T. We offer a fun and professional environment with competitive wages, great perks, benefits & seasonal bonus. To apply email: careers@nitalakelodge.com

contact us today

90 MAY 30, 2019

careers@nitalakelodge.com www.nitalakelodge.com I @nitalakelodge

Details: Please apply online via jobs.fourseasons.com For possible same day offers, please come to our drop-in hours every Tuesday between 1pm-4pm. Please bring your resume and two references in order to be considered!

COPY TODAY


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We provide our people with a caring and fun work environment and cater to lifestyles of adventure seekers. We are centrally located in the heart of Whistler Village and provide our employees with the opportunity to work flexible hours based on their adventure or family requirements.

Crepe Montagne, French restaurant in Whistler since 1997, is looking for:

Server Server Assistant Crepes Maker (Cook) Prep Cook / Dishwasher Competitive wage based on experience + great tips + flexible schedule to enjoy Whistler! Visit us from 10am to 2pm or email us your resume at alicia@crepemontagne.com.

Become part of a dynamic team and experience the art of British Columbia.

Join our Adventure Service Team at the Whistler Village Inn and Suites! WE OFFER • A great work environment with opportunities for development and career advancement • Free coffee and tea service • Training for advancement • Use of facilities based on occupancy (Gym, Sauna, Hydro Spa and Pool) • Highly competitive compensation in Whistler • Employee accommodation discounts with Atlific Hotels and Resorts • Medical and Dental for full time employees • Some staff discounts on local activities • Staff housing based on availability • Increments to pay scale based for longevity • Flexible hours and work schedules based on your requirements • Bike Storage based on availability

CURRENTLY HIRING • Front Desk Agents (Commission based incentives) • FT Night Auditor - Premium Wage (Commission based incentives) • FT or PT Room Attendants (Commission based incentives) • FT Maintenance (Commission based incentives) Resumes can be submitted to karen@wvis.ca

The Audain Art Museum is currently seeking:

Sales & Marketing Coordinator Full time position available

Guard Full time & part time positions available

For a full job description please visit audainartmuseum.com/ employment-opportunities

credit: Joern Rohde

Delta by Marriott Whistler Village Suites Is currently recruiting for the following positions:

- Front Desk Manager - Housekeeping Room Attendant - Executive Housekeeper - Bellperson - Houseperson / Public Area Attendant - Strata External Maintenance 3 days/week

STAFF HOUSING IS AVAILABLE! Start your journey today with: competitive wages, growth opportunities, a positive team environment, medical benefits, play money (ski pass, etc), 100% provincial health care coverage. To Apply: either submit an application online at Marriott.com/careers or send your resume to barbara.fraser@deltahotels.com

SUBSCRIPTIONS - 52 $76.70/YEAR

CANADA - REGULAR MAIL

ISSUES

$136.60/YEAR

CANADA - COURIER

$605.80/YEAR USA - COURIER

PAY BY MASTERCARD, VISA OR AMEX. TEL. 604-938-0202 | FAX. 604-938-0201

MAY 30, 2019

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

Let us take care of you! • • • •

Staff housing available Competitive wages Full time hours year around Free staff parking in Whistler Village

6 REASONS L: TO WORK AT SUNDIA Place to sleep + $ for activities es + more $ for activiti + convenience + security + Free Ski Pass

Come be our: • • • • •

G Guestt S Services i R Representative t ti Night Audit Representative Maintenance Representative Room Attendant Houseperson

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Whistler in e f li d o o g A =

Please fax or email your resume with attention to “Human Resources Department” to:

604-932-7152 hr@sundialhotel.com

Basalt Wine + Salumeria are currently looking to fill the roles of:

ASSISTANT MANAGER LINE COOKS DISHWASHERS BARTENDER HOSTS/ EXPEDITORS Please send your cover letter and resume to skeenan-naf@crystal-lodge.com

We thank you for your interest. Only candidates chosen for further consideration will be contacted.

Wages are very competitive (based on experience), great perks and benefits. Full and Part Time positions available. Come join the best team in Whistler!

We are seeking flexible, hardworking and hard playing

FRONT DESK AGENT FULL-TIME BELLMEN HOUSEKEEPERS/HOUSEMAN PART-TIME AND FULL-TIME HOURS AVAILABLE

PART-TIME NIGHT AUDIT Please apply if you can bring your smile and positive energy to our team and our guests!

Your next big adventure starts here.

Please email your resume to: roberto@aavawhistlerhotel.com Thank you for your interest. Only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted

Employment Opportunities:

DO YOU LIVE IN PEMBERTON? THEN WHY COMMUTE TO WHISTLER?

Guest Services Agents Room Attendants Maintenance Helper

The Adara Hotel, Whistler We now have the following positions available:

Apply to: jobs@pembertonvalleylodge.com

Competitive wages, health benefits, casual environment

RESERVATION SUPERVISOR FRONT DESK SUPERVISOR HOUSEKEEPERS We offer better than competitive wages, benefits, spirit or epic ski pass and more. The Adara Hotel is a small boutique hotel nestled in the heart of Whistler close to all amenities and services. We take care of our staff and experience is an asset not a requirement.

92 MAY 30, 2019


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Now Hiring for the Following Positions: BREAKFAST / BISTRO ASSOCIATE (Seasonal Bonus) GUEST SERVICE AGENT (Commission Incentives) ASSISTANT FRONT OFFICE MANAGER GUEST EXPERIENCE MANAGER RELIEF GUEST EXPERIENCE MANAGER

• Competitive Wages • Associate Housing • Wellness Allowance • Discounted Food • Extended Medical Benefits • Spa Discounts Discover new opportunities and embark on a career in Hospitality with Pan Pacific Whistler To apply, please submit your cover letter and resume to careers.ppwhi@panpacific.com

We are looking for a Service Plumber (Apprentice or Journeyman) to start immediately. REQUIRED SKILLS: • Plumbing apprenticeship ,or certification • Gas fitting or experience • Residential & Commercial Plumbing ( Trouble Shooting and repair) • *Drivers license with clean abstract Wages are based on experience Please email your resume to turbo45@telus.net

www.whistlerwag.com

Here’s to the Journey At Westin, we recruit the brightest, most energetic people in pursuit of developing an exciting and rewarding career. Marriott International has 30 renowned hotel brands in over 122 countries around the world, and we’re still growing. Opportunities abound!

STEWARD ROOM ATTENDANT CASUAL BANQUET SERVER MAINTENANCE ENGINEER OVERNIGHT SECURITY AGENT

HOUSEKEEPING COORDINATOR ROOMS CONTROLLER FOOD RECEIVER/ COORDINATOR IT TECHNICIAN

PERKS AND BENEFITS • MSP COVERAGE • DISCOUNTED MEALS • FLEXIBLE SCHEDULES

• STAFF ACCOMMODATION • MARRIOTT “EXPLORE” PROGRAM ASSOCIATE HOTEL DISCOUNTS

Email your resume to work@westinwhistler.com or visit Monday to Friday, 9am - 5pm

SQUAMISH NATION is looking for a

Concurrent Wellness Specialist Permanent Full-Time position *This position will work 4 days/ week in Squamish Valley and 1 day/week in North Vancouver* Location: Squamish, BC View Full Posting on our website: http://www.squamish.net/jobs/

All applications must be completed using online application.

Looking for a dog to adopt? Look for WAG’s bright orange bandanas on dogs being walked by volunteers! These dogs are looking for their forever home. 604.935.8364 | www.whistlerwag.com

SUMMER EDITION OUt NOW! MAY 30, 2019

93


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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

SURFACE WEATHER OBSERVERS SURFACE WEATHER OBSERVERS WE ARE HIRING WE ARE HIRING WE ARE HIRING SURFACE WEATHER OBSERVERS PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

SURFACE SURFACEWEATHER WEATHEROBSERVERS OBSERVERS SURFACE WEATHER OBSERVERS Whistler CWO

Whistler CWO A permanent position  as a Surface Weather Observer Whistler CWO A permanent position  Surface Weather Observer with ATS Services Ltd. as a at the Whistler Contract Weather Whistler WhistlerCWO CWO Whistler CWO

with ATS Services Ltd. as a at the Whistler Contract Weather Office.  A permanent position  Surface Weather Observer A permanent position  as a Surface Weather Observer Office.  A permanent position  Weather Observer Weather with ATS Services Ltd.as a at Surface the Whistler Contract with Ltd. atatthe Whistler Contract Weather A permanent position  Surface Weather Observer withATS ATSServices Services Ltd.as a the Whistler Contract Weather Office.  Office. 

Office. No experience required No experience required Training provided @ NAV Centre, Cornwall, ON No experience required Noexperience experience required No required Training provided @ NAV Centre, Cornwall, ON June to July 12th 2019 No3rd experience required

with ATS Services Ltd. at the Whistler Contract Weather Office. 

Training provided @ NAV Centre, Cornwall, ON June 3rd to July 12th 2019 Training provided @ NAV Centre, Cornwall, ON ON Travel, accommodations and meals provided. Training provided @ NAV Centre, Cornwall, June 3rd to July 12th 2019 Training provided @ NAV Centre, Cornwall, ON June 3rd to July 12th 2019 and meals provided. Travel, accommodations June 3rd to July 12th 2019 Travel, accommodations and June 3rd to July 12th 2019 Travel, accommodations andmeals mealsprovided. provided.

Travel, meals provided. Travel, accommodations accommodations andand meals provided.

$14.00 starting wage $14.00 $14.00 starting wage $14.00starting startingwage wage $14.00 starting wage $14.00 starting $300            signing bonus upon wage graduation and successful $300                   signing graduation and    signingbonus bonusupon upon graduation andsuccessful successful $300     $300     certification      signing bonus upon graduation and successful site site certification $300              signing bonus upon graduation and successful  site certification    site certification $300      certification    signing bonus upon graduation and successful      site site certification

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ATS LTD- 1-888-845-4913   - 1-888-845-4913   ATSSERVICES SERVICES LTD FAX FAX1-613-221-9815 1-613-221-9815 ATS SERVICES LTD - 1-888-845-4913   FAX 1-613-221-9815 1-613-221-9815 FAX CAREERS@ATSSERVICES.CA   CAREERS@ATSSERVICES.CA   ATSCAREERS@ATSSERVICES.CA   SERVICES LTD - 1-888-845-4913   FAX 1-613-221-9815 PLEASE ABOUT CAREERS@ATSSERVICES.CA   PLEASEINQUIRE INQUIRE ABOUTOTHER OTHERSITE SITEVACANCIES VACANCIESAND ANDTRAINING TRAININGDATES DATES FAX 1-613-221-9815 PLEASE INQUIRE ABOUT OTHER SITE VACANCIES AND TRAINING CAREERS@ATSSERVICES.CA   DATES

PLEASE INQUIRE ABOUT OTHER SITE VACANCIES AND TRAINING DATES CAREERS@ATSSERVICES.CA   PLEASE INQUIRE ABOUT OTHER SITE VACANCIES AND TRAINING DATES PLEASE INQUIRE ABOUT OTHER SITE VACANCIES AND TRAINING DATES

We are the Spa for you

F/T CASHIER F/T SALES ASSOCIATES Whistler Home Hardware has the immediate openings for the above mentioned positions. Previous retail experience in a similar role or working environment will be an asset. You need to have good communication skills, be willing to work in a team environment and be professional and courteous by nature. We offer a positive work environment, competitive wages and a benefits program. Please apply in person with your resume and references to: #1-1005 Alpha Lake Rd. in Function Junction Location: Function Junction

94 MAY 30, 2019

If you are looking for a new place to call home: • We manifest positive energy • We have a long term and loyal team • We treat you fairly and look out for your wellness • You are listened to • We give you proper breaks and time to set up between services • We offer extended medical benefits • We have potential staff housing at affordable rates • You can enjoy $5.00 cafeteria meals • You have the opportunity to work for other Vida locations in slow season We are here for you. Vida Spa at the Fairmont Chateau Whistler is currently recruiting: REGISTERED MASSAGE THERAPIST ESTHETICIAN GUEST SERVICE AGENT To join our unique Vida family, email Bonnie@vidaspas.com Vida Spas - Vancouver & Whistler Live well. Live long. vidaspas.com Thank You for applying Only those considered will be contacted.


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Do you want to share in something special? If challenge & fun at work is what you desire, come see us today!

Servers Cooks Hosts Expeditors Barbacks Setters Shift Managers Visit us anytime or email us at apply.whistler@earls.ca

The Blackcomb Lodge join our team Starting wage at $17/hour, and a variety of benefits, including employee discounts, training and development, career advancement opportunities and more!

questions? let’s chat 604.932.4155 hr@coasthotels.com

Front Office Manager

Room Attendant

apply online now coastcareers.ca

Maintenance Ambassador

Night Auditor

Full-time, part-time, flexible work schedules

Whistler Integrative Wellness Centre is

hIrIng!!

Admin / Clinic Assistant (PT) Duties include: Front desk operations i.e. patient coordinator, patient booking, patient billing. accounts receivable, daily cash reconciliation, equipment set up, treatment room prep, third party insurance, submission

CREATIVE AND COLLABORATIVE? WORK WITH US!

Qualifications/Experience preferred in the following: Clinic reception, Customer service, Medical terminology, Proficient Computer skills, EMR training, Experience with Jane Booking & Billing system, Microsoft Word, Excel, Knowledge of nutritional supplements, vitamins etc.

Casual | Applica�ons considered as received

Successful candidate will: Have an engaging personality, Work independently, Be kind, courteous and respectful, Willing to learn new tasks, Reliable Please email your Resume with Cover Letter to:

info@whistlerintegrative.com Please note: Only resumes with cover letter will be considered.

We are currently recruiting amazing people to be part of our team.

Bartender

Cra� Facilitator

Whistler Street Entertainment & Arts Whistler Casual | Applica�ons considered as received

APPLY TODAY!

artswhistler.com/careers

Apply to: getinvolved@artswhistler.com | attn: Susan Holden Maury Young Arts Centre | 604.935.8410

MAY 30, 2019

95


CALL THE EXPERTS

Want to advertise your service on this page? AUTOMOTIVE

Call Pique at (604) 938-0202, or email sales@piquenewsmagazine.com

BLINDS ETC.

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FIX AUTO PEMBERTON • Certified Insurance Collision Repair Facility • Insurance & Private Auto Body Repair • Courtesy Vehicles on Site

Visit fixautopemberton.com to schedule an appointment or call 604-894-6767

SUNCREST WINDOW COVERINGS Custom Blinds • Shades • Draperies

Tel: 604-935-2101 Email: windowcov@shaw.ca www.whistlerwindowcoverings.ca

CARPET CLEANING

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David Weldon david@summersnow.ca 604-938-3521

• Wood blinds • Sunscreens • Shades • Motorization

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Summer Snow Finishings Limited

• SHUTTERS • DRAPERY

Connie Griffiths

BLINDS ETC. Whistler’s Source for Blinds since 1989

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Custom Window Treatments Contact us today for a free quote or consultation info@suncrestwindowcoverings.com

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Wood Energy Technology Transfer Inc.

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your service here?

Take advantage of the benefits and savings you will receive from new windows and doors.

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Call Whistler Glass for your onsite consultation

MORTGAGES

PAINT

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MORTGAGE BROKER SERVICES Residential & Commercial • First-time Home Buyers Non-residents • Pre-Approvals • Reverse Mortgages

AUTO GLASS SPECIALISTS · Frameless Shower Enclosures · Complete Window/Door Packages · Custom Railing Glass Systems · Fogged/Failed Window Replacements

mountainglass.ca | info@mountainglass.ca

604-932-7288

Annie de la Chevrotiere | Mortgage Broker www.peaktopeaktmortgage.com annie@peaktopeakmc.com 1328 Main Street, Squamish, BC, V8B 0R2

604.905.8483

THE COMPLETE GLASS CENTRE

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Phone: 604-932-3770

96 MAY 30, 2019

SQUAMISH OFFICE #207 - 38026 Second Avenue Phone: 604-892-3090 email: squamish@bunbury-surveys.com

604-894-6240 7426 Prospect St, Pemberton

SURVEYING DOUGLAS J BUSH AScT, RSIS

Serving the Sea to Sky Corridor Since 1963 ▪ ▪ ▪

Book your in-home leen Consultation with Col today!

DOUG BUSH SURVEY SERVICES LTD

BC LAND SURVEYORS North Vancouver to Lillooet

Our paint team has over 25 years combined paint sales experience, and we can help you get things right the first time. Now offering In Home Paint Consultations! Pemberton Valley Rona. Let us help you love where you live.

THE RIGHT TOOLS. THE RIGHT PEOPLE. Surveying | Mapping | Engineering | Environmental | Landscape Architecture | Planning To learn more visit: www.mcelhanney.com

p: 604-932-3314 c: 604-935-9515 Engineering & construction layout Topographic & site improvement surveys Municipal, volumetric & hydrographic surveys GPS - global positioning systems www.dbss.ca // dougb@dbss.ca


PUZZLES ACROSS

1 More sensible 6 Lackey 11 Expedite 16 Is giddy 21 Greek market 22 Aluminum company 23 Chopin’s instrument 24 Nudge 25 Poker hand 26 Soda-bottle size 27 Computer chip maker 28 Suffuse 29 Selene’s sister 30 Round of applause 32 Wolfgang’s thanks 34 Half a score 36 MPG monitor 37 Jungle warning 39 Steel plow inventor 41 Existing 43 More embarrassed 45 Throw for -- - 47 Glue down 49 Summa cum - 51 Maxim 54 Goes it alone 55 Daisy Mae’s creator 56 Robin’s snack 60 Mournful poem 61 More polite 62 Explodes 64 Skiing champ Tommy - 65 In -- -- (briefly) 66 Kind of helmet 67 Crocheted item 69 Make void 71 Mesh 72 Popular cat

3 4 2

9

7

5 6

9 7

6 8

75 Like good cheddar 76 Cook in liquid 77 Uno, dos, - 79 Walked heavily 80 Prankster 82 Person of power 83 In poor taste 85 Afresh 86 Alarm signal 87 Horses pull them 90 Dishwasher phase 91 Horseback game 92 “Watch -- step!” 96 Lustrous 97 Suddenly break away 98 December 31 101 Sweater letter 102 Cowboy’s rope 103 Overthrow 105 Brenda and Bruce 106 Assumed name 108 “-- been robbed!” 109 Stiff 111 Some eclipses 113 City map line 114 Reveal 116 Colorado tribe 117 Varnish ingredient 118 Turns on a pivot 119 Montezuma, for one 121 “The Pink Panther” player 122 Play hockey 123 Recorded, as mileage 126 Rogue 128 Tom Mix movie 130 Film spectacular 134 Physician’s grp. 135 Thumbs-down votes

6

4

8

1

3

137 139 141 142 144 146 148 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157

DOWN

1 Thin cookie 2 Snow shelter 3 Marching band composer 4 Speaker’s pauses 5 Grandstand yells 6 Everest adjective 7 Bartender’s stock 8 Cast member 9 Fawn parent 10 Textile measure 11 Small electric organs 12 Little finger 13 Gnawed away 14 Capt.’s heading 15 Simpleton 16 Stopped the horse 17 Horror-film street 18 Flowed back 19 Jeweler’s lens 20 Vow

6 2 8 4

3

2

7 1 9

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(var.) Mimicking Cringe Mexican Mrs. Ms. LaBelle As long as Romance, in Rome Yellow pigment Take a picture More up to it Less cooked Alan Ladd film Astronaut’s base -- nova Ties up Put in stitches

# 25

7

31 33 35 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 51 52 53 54 55 57 58 59 61 62 63 66 68 70 73 74 76 78 81 82 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 93

9

4 1 8

Pass a bill Soak up Flow forth Indy driver Noteworthy periods Stared angrily Drops on the grass Allows to borrow Pub order Domed recess Power source More blustery Act like a ham Positioned Shrewder “-- vincit amor” Waken rudely Free-for-all Trekkie idol One over par Bilko’s nickname City groves Cody co-star Kid watcher Scratchy Bails out Nobleman Moves a little It gives a hoot Road map data Radiant Synthetic fabric More achy Champagne bottle Go away Art-store buy Deals with Song of joy Reckon

8

94 Orange-and-white rental (hyph.) 95 Stands up 97 Adorn 99 Weather modifier (2 wds.) 100 Boat crane 103 Indulge, plus 104 Late-news hour 107 Flood barrier 110 Surpass 112 Consume 113 Cognizant 115 Be overdue 117 Jet-set locale 118 Barbecue tools 120 Nadir opposite

121 122 123 124 125 127 129 131 132 133 136 138 140 143 145 147 149

Port near Pompeii Laid in Slip back Nebraska city Gainesville fan Toe coverers Squirrel snack Baloney! Papas or Dunne Felt for Ear cleaner Wearing apparel “ER” medic Preschooler Cinemax rival Avril follower Ernesto Guevara

LAST WEEKS’ ANSWERS

6 3 7

1 3 2 1 7 6 5

9 1 3

5 9 3

2

8

4

HARD

# 26

Enter a digit from 1 through 9 in each cell, in such a way that: • Each horizontal row contains each digit exactly once • Each vertical column contains each digit exactly once • Each 3x3 box contains each digit exactly once Solving a sudoku puzzle does not require any mathematics; simple logic suffices.

LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY: HARD

5 7

4 7

8

3

9

4 1 2 8 6

8

3 2 1 7 7 9

6 1

6

2

3 8

HARD Solution, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com# 27

5

6 4 1 5 3 8 8 9 7 2 4 5 HARD

9 3 6 7 4 1

8 1 6 9 3 # 28

ANSWERS ON PAGE 89

MAY 30, 2019

97


MAXED OUT

Independent, but at what cost? “We’re on a road to nowhere Come on inside Takin’ that ride to nowhere We’ll take that ride” — David Byrne, Talking Heads

COMPARED TO THE

train wreck that started this whole business, the announcement this week that the JWR-JP Righteous Railway was going to run on an independent track garnered little interest and even less press. The prevailing mood among commentators seemed to be good riddance; now please just shut up and go away. Too pure, too delicate for politics as they have existed for as long as anyone with a firm grasp of history can remember, Jody

BY G.D. MAXWELL Wilson-Raybould (JWR) and Jane Philpott (JP) have formed a partnership—of sorts— and headed down the rabbit hole into a world of unicorns, rainbows and cotton candy clouds. It’s a world where politics is done a different way: Their way! Both former Liberal ministers have decided to run as independents in this fall’s election. Both were spouting the kind of nonsense that has fuelled populist movements from Brexit to Trump to strongman dictators around the globe. They want to be beholden to no one but their constituents and their consciences. This, of course is shorthand for they want to do things the way they want to do them. Ms. Philpott’s comment that the “ ... only people that are the boss of me right now are you,” is the kind of pabulum hyperbole that appeals to voters with half a brain and unshakable belief in what they believe in as being the one true path. Sadly, for both those voters and Ms. Philpott, the people to whom she refers fall along the political continuum from right to left. Her riding in Ontario swings between Liberal and Conservative with the regularity of a well-lubricated pendulum. They speak with many voices while Ms. Philpott only wants to hear her own. Not those of lobbyists, party leaders, staffers or bureaucrats. Mama knows best. The reality of her departure from cabinet and expulsion from caucus is almost certain to be retirement from politics and the freedom to pursue whatever else for which she may be suited. It is also almost a certainty that pendulum will swing toward the Conservatives and her riding will be represented by someone who believes in even fewer unicorns than herself. But a double loss is totally acceptable if it means she can remain pure as the driven snow. She, and others for whom she has become a philosophical rallying point, have either forgotten or, more likely, failed to learn the lesson so graphically played out three years ago south of the border.

98 MAY 30, 2019

PHOTO BY ART BABYCH / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Those who wanted politics done differently threw their heart and soul behind Bernie Sanders. Avuncular Bernie believes in the kinds of things they believed in—universal health care, free university tuition, punishing taxes on the rich and other socialist pipe dreams in a country where socialist is a dirty word. When politics the old way threw its weight behind Hillary Clinton and threw Bernie under the bus, they cried foul. Then they had a tantrum and just cried. Then they dropped out, stayed home, didn’t vote and watched Donald Trump get elected, notwithstanding receiving fewer actual votes than his opponent. Let’s be generous. Let’s imagine none of them wanted Trump to be elected. It’s hard to believe anyone who supported Bernie would support Trump. But their guy didn’t get in. Their way was refuted by the

naivety, their rigidity has given voice to people who will fail to see any good in what the Liberal government has accomplished in its current term. Their spotlight will only show the dark corners and their complaints about being bullied by “unelected staffers” will resonate among so many who have spent their whole lives being told what to do by someone who they believe just doesn’t understand them and how right they and their ideas are. Ms. Wilson-Raybould is a walking paradox. Hers is the mindset of a dictator. Her mind is like a steel trap, once closed it’s never to be reopened and, frankly, she doesn’t even want to hear from anyone who might have a different point of view. While she claims to want to “... transform our political culture ... “ the only transformation she wants to accomplish is to reshape it to suit her own beliefs.

... frankly, she doesn’t even want to hear from anyone who might have a different point of view.

party machine. Their voices weren’t heard or if they were heard they weren’t listened to, which is shorthand for they didn’t get their own way and they were going to show them. It was the petulant minority, not his core supporters, who gave the reins of power to the madman. And in a much milder way, that is quite likely what the JWR-JP juggernaut may do for Smilin’ Andy Scheer. Their pique, their

When she says political parties might wither away in the face of a new group of independent candidates that will build a parliament of consensus builders, it sounds like a good idea. But then you have to remember this is coming from someone who only wants to build a consensus of people who believe she’s right and everyone else is wrong. Elizabeth May dodged a bullet when

the JWR-JP train twins decided not to join the Green Party. While Ms. May’s Greenies are pretty philosophically pure, they are so in a vacuum of powerlessness. By contrast, the BC Green Party, the only Green Party holding the balance of power in this country, have been more than willing to abandon their beliefs and support any number of the orange initiatives of John Horgan such as Site C and LNG. (Ironically, orange is one of the colours opposite to green on the colour wheel, both being secondary colours.) JWR and JP could never tolerate such compromise. The very fact the twins have chosen the independent path is a clear sign they can’t work with any party and want things to be the way they want them. Politics is a team sport. Wishing it weren’t ain’t going to make it so. The party structure is, arguably, the only reason anything gets accomplished. Canadians waver between the two major parties federally and sometimes dally with one or another of the minor parties provincially depending on their coefficient of dissatisfaction. A parliament of independents would be a cacophony of angry voices, each wanting what they want and being unwilling to compromise—a recipe sure to accomplish nothing. While we’d all like to see party leaders take their foot off the partisan pedal occasionally and join each other to get more accomplished, the fact anything gets done is a result of parties bringing their own members to bear on a piece of legislation, notwithstanding the fact some of them would prefer to not support it. The politics of JWR-JP are the politics of small minds and even smaller accomplishments. Let us hope they both enjoy life after politics. n


Welcome to the best place on earth Engel & Völkers Portfolio of Fine Homes

NORDIC – THE LOOKOUT

ALTA VISTA

BLACKCOMB BENCHLANDS

BLUEBERRY HILL

Ski or bike in/out from Creekside trails. Beautifully upgraded 3br, 2.5ba, 2027sq‘ townhome. Enjoy views of Whistler Peak from SW facing decks. Fully furnished and turnkey ready to move in or zoned for nightly rentals. $2,999,000

Lakecrest – luxury residential Lot in Whistler. One of the largest lots with lake / mountain vistas. Build your future dream Resort residence close to Alta Lake parks & bike + walking trails. $2,680,000 (GST exempt)

Four Seasons Resort is about to get even better! Resort renovation under way. Deluxe King Studio sleeps 4 (2 adults/2 kids or 3 adults). King bed, sofa bed, fireplace, oversized bath, private balcony, 5-star amenities & revenues! $410,000

This stunning property offers the opportunity to build your dream home on a large 20,904 sqft. (.48 acres) lot. Amazing views of Whistler/Blackcomb and surrounding mountains with sun all day long. $2,950,000

Rob Boyd

Kathy White

Katherine Currall

Brigitta Fuess

6-2500 Taluswood Place

3108 Lakecrest Lane

604-935-9172

301-4591 Blackcomb Way

604-616-6933

3430 Blueberry Drive

604-966-1364

604-932-0751

BENCHLANDS

ALTA VISTA

WHISTLER CREEK

EMERALD ESTATES

Enjoy Christmas 2019 in Whistler in your own 2 bedroom, 2 en-suite bathrooms condo on Blackcomb. Offering all the conveniences of home with the added benifits of a heated pool, hot tub, owner ski locker and bike storage. $252,900

Rarely available! Corner top floor 2bed/1bath townhouse in Alta Vista II. Large private covered deck surrounded by lush forest. One of the best yearround locations in Whistler; on the Valley Trail & short walk to Lakeside Park. $599,900

Enjoy this beautiful, fully renovated, turn-key unit and relish in the highest cap rate of any nightly rental property currently available on the market. Amenitites include pool, hot tub, sauna, garden space. $1,050,000

Enjoy the private hot tub and beautiful landscape set on a view lot. A solid log post and beam Artisan quality chalet with four bedrooms and 4.5 bathrooms. $2,695,000

Nick Swinburne *prec

Ron Mitchell *prec

Jeremy Fairley

Laura Wetaski

306G4-4653 Blackcomb Way

210 – 3070 Hillcrest Drive

604-932-8899

302 A/B – 2129 Lake Placid Road

604-938-3815

604-935-9150

9483 Emerald Drive

604 938 3798

WHITE GOLD

WHISTLER CREEKSIDE

BRACKENDALE

SQUAMISH

RARE Fitz Creek waterfront property! Almost 10,000 sq ft lot. $2,299,000

Bright 2 bed/2 bath end unit right at the base of Creekside gondola, just steps from shops & restaurants. Open living plan, private master suite, vaulted ceilings, SW exposure overlooking poolside. Nightly rentals allowed. $975,000

Recently updated rancher on a large duplex zoned 13,200 sq. ft. corner lot. 5 bed & 2 bath. Updated kitchen/bathroom, finished basement, new roof, back deck & fenced yard. Close to elementary school & shopping. $1,135,000

The perfect family home awaits! ‘Rivers Walk’ Townhouse in Brackendale. Modern 3.5 Bed/ 3 Bath/ 2,350sf. Open concept living featuring 2 living areas. Dbl garage, patio, hot tub & outdoor dining. Greenspace & Mountain views. $799,900

David Wiebe *prec

Janet Brown

Angie Vazquez *prec

Rachel Edwards

7211 Fitzsimmons Road N

230-2050 Lake Placid Rd

604-966-8874

1630 Depot Road

604-935-0700

48-40632 Government Road

778-318-5900

Whistler Village Shop

Whistler Creekside Shop

Squamish Station Shop

36-4314 Main Street · Whistler BC V0N 1B4 · Phone +1 604-932-1875

325-2063 Lake Placid Road · Whistler BC V0N 1B2 · Phone +1 604-932-1875

150-1200 Hunter Place · Squamish BC V8B 0G8 · Phone +1 778-733-0611

whistler.evrealestate.com

whistler.evrealestate.com

whistler.evrealestate.com

Engel & Völkers Whistler *PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION ©2018 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage is independently owned and operated. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified.

604-966-4200


Anderson Lake

$399,000

Featuring 100 feet of lakefront, on .68 of an acre, this property is situated on the east shore of pristine Anderson Lake, so it catches all the afternoon sun. Accessible by boat, the cabin was completely renovated in 2015, with about 936 sq ft of total living space. It boasts spectacular views up and down the lake and of the Bendor Mountain Range to the west.

Dave Halliwell*

3

604.932.7727

#6 - 4636 Blackcomb Way

$197,000

Adjacent to the Fairmont Chateau golf course, this rarely available, 1/5th interest in an immaculate 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom townhome boasts a spacious open layout , heated slate floors in bathroom. A cozy wood burning fireplace, large master bedroom with sitting area, and plenty of secure parking are among the many amenities.

Dave Sharpe

604.902.2779

9175 Emerald Drive

$1,400,000

Smart Investor Alert: 7.5 bedroom, 3 bathroom, 2970 sf Emerald home just listed for sale. Spread over 3 floors this home is separated into a 5 bedroom house & 2.5 bedroom suite. Steady staff housing for years, with proven income. Upgrade to increase rental or totally renovate the home to make it family ready. 3D Matterport Showcase: http://bit.ly/9175EMB

2

Denise Brown*

604.935.2013

7.5

Open House Sat/Sun 1 to 4 pm

#212 - 4910 Spearhead Drive

$1,249,000

#201G4 - 4653 Blackcomb Way

$121,900

6642 Cedar Grove Lane

$2,499,000

Property sleeps 6!!! Ground floor access from your balcony to life outdoors in the mountains. Winter or summer, your own private access directly to the slopes for mountain biking, snowboarding or hiking. Location, location, location! Your home in Whistler is also 25 feet around the corner from the pool and hot tub too.

Benchlands!! Spacious and private west facing ¼ share unit right on the ski out trail. Owners have use 1 week every month or can rent it out through the front desk. Enjoy a fully equipped kitchen, king bed and en-suite bath in the master, a pull-out couch in the living room, washer/dryer, large deck, underground parking.

Best location in Whistler Cay Estates! This proven revenue producer is currently operating as a staff house and has great building potential due to its unique position. Another option would be to use the 2 bedroom suite for your yourself and enjoy the revenue from the 5 bedroom main house.

Doug Treleaven

James Collingridge

Josh Crane

1.5

604.905.8626

2 Garibaldi Drive

$699,000

Just in time for building season - this 7535 flat vacant lot in Black Tusk is ready for your client. 15 minutes south from Whistler Creekside you arrive at the gated community of Black Tusk Village. This private community offers single family housing at an attractive price point.

Laura Barkman

604.905.8777

#312 - 7445 Frontier Street

#312A - 2020 London Lane

1

$249,000

Quarter Ownership in a modern well appointed condo at the base of Whistler Mountain. The building has a pool with sauna and steam room, this unit has a great kitchen, open floor plan, and is pet friendly. Use your unit 1 week every month, or allow it to be rented out for revenue. Comes with a ski locker in the building. and lockable owner closet in the unit.

Matt Chiasson

$589,000

604.902.0132

604.935.9171

#3 - 2134 Sarajevo Drive

2

$545,000

7

604.902.6106

#15 - 7408 Cottonwood Court

$579,000

If you are looking for a family friendly and very affordable townhouse, look no further! 3 bedroom 2.5 bathroom in the Cottonwood Court complex. Perfectly located, less than a 5 minute walk to the elementary school, 2 minutes to the community center and youth center, BMX club skatepark and kids pump track!

Matt Kusiak

604.935.0762

#3 - 4628 Blackcomb Way

3

$1,315,000

Top floor corner unit. This 1302 sq ft condo is located in the “tower” corner looking south east offering superior views of sunrises and Mount Currie. Essentially having two master bedrooms, each with 4 piece ensuite bathrooms, you will love the generous floor spaces, high ceilings, ample storage and in-suite laundry.

Renovated Gondola Village unit with vaulted ceilings backing onto the forest, and mountain views from the bedroom. Move-in ready, with newer windows and tasteful upgrades to the kitchen, bathroom and bedroom, the new owner can enjoy the unit as a full time residence, weekend getaway, or chic little airbnb cabin.

Livethedreamwiththisfullyfurnishedtownhomeofferingawood-burningfireplace,2full bathrooms,beautifulrenovatedkitchen,2spaciousbedroomsandaprivatepatiooffthelivingarea foreveningbarbequesorcocktails.Withover1,000squarefeetofcrawlspacestorage,youwill havelotsofroomforallofyourgear.3DMatterportShowcase:http://bit.ly/3AlpineGreens

Patrick Saintsbury

Richard Grenfell

Sally Warner*

604.935.9114

2.5

WHISTLER OFFICE 106 - 7015 Nesters Road, Whistler, BC V8E 0X1 604.932.2300 or Toll Free 1.888.689.0070 *PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

remax-whistler.com awarded best website 2018 by Luxuryrealestate.com

Property Management remaxseatoskypm.com

604.902.4260

1

604.905.6326

2

PEMBERTON OFFICE 1411 Portage Road, Pemberton, BC V0N 2L1 604.894.6616 or Toll Free 1.888.689.0070

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Pique Newsmagazine for May 30, 2019

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