Page 1

MAY 23, 2019 ISSUE 26.21

WWW.PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM

FREE TO REMAIN SILENT

16

QUIET LONG WEEKEND

Resort-wide

changes seem to be paying off

18

LANDSLIDE

Joffre Peak fractures with

second landslide in as many weeks

66

SKA VETERANS

The Planet Smashers

make a tour stop in Whistler


LOVE WHERE YOU LIVE

HANNAH GARCIA

9008 SKIERS REST LANE

#41 SNOWRIDGE

#42 CREEKSIDE VILLAGE

9008 SKIERS REST LANE

Located in a quiet development 100 m from a ski in ski out, features a large deck and tons of storage.

This bright tastefully renovated townhome in Pemberton Creekside has seen many upgrades.

Surrounded by nature and beauty, views and a river this home is set in the midst of paradise.

Bedrooms:

Bedrooms:

2544 SNOWRIDGE CI., WHISTLER CREEK

Bedrooms:

2.5

Bathrooms:

2

ELIZABETH CHAPLIN elizabeth@wrec.com 604 932 1311

Square Feet:

1,215

$1,199,000

1400 PARK STREET, PEMBERTON

3

Bathrooms:

2.5

ERIN MCCARDLE STIEL erin@wrec.com 604 902 0520

Square Feet:

1,424

$599,000

WEDGEWOOD

Bathrooms:

5.5

5.5

HANNAH GARCIA* hannah@wrec.com 604 966 8943

Square Feet:

4,456

$3,788,000

#412C LEGENDS

#312 ASPENS

#322 MARQUISE

This ski-in ski-out quarter-ownership condo with vaulted ceilings is truly a unique Legends listing.

Slopeside on Blackcomb, this exceptional ski-in-skiout condo is one of the best locations in Whistler.

Third floor condo located just 150 meters from the ski-slope is offered fully furnished and equipped.

Bedrooms:

Bedrooms:

2036 LONDON LANE, WHISTLER CREEK

Bedrooms:

1

JANE HEIM

jane@wrec.com 604 935 0802

Bathrooms:

1

Square Feet:

589

$125,000

4800 SPEARHEAD DRIVE, BENCHLANDS

2

JEFF HUME* jeff@wrec.com 604 966 4058

Bathrooms:

2

Square Feet:

786

$1,199,900

4809 SPEAHEAD DRIVE, BENCHLANDS

Bathrooms:

1

1

JIMMY SIMPSON jimmy@wrec.com 604 902 4002

Square Feet:

619

$739,000

604 932 5538 WHISTLERREALESTATE.CA *Personal Real Estate Corporation


TINA PFEIFER BEN BRAVINGTON LOUISE CLARK

STEVEN LEE MARK MATHIAS

Whistler Half Marathon SATURDAY, JUNE 1ST

Get your running shoes on and join the Whistler Half Marathon happening Sat, June 1st. Still time to enter at whistlerhalfmarathon.com, several distances available. KIJU

Organic Lemonade or Raspberry Lemonade

2 $6

1L

SUZIE’S ORGANIC CONDIMENTS

Ketchup 499ml Mayonnaise 499ml Mustard Spicy Brown,

Yellow, or Dijon, 355ml

FOR

Pharmacy & Wellness PRESCRIPTIONS WHILE YOU SHOP

2018

9am to 7pm. 7 days a week.

LOOK IN-STORE FOR EVERYDAY VALUE CARD SAVINGS!

4 $2.99 $ .99 EACH

EACH

Divine Essence Essential Oils Divine Essence essential oils are virtually all certified organic by Ecocert. Prized for their many health benefits, our premium quality essential oils are guaranteed to be 100% pure and natural. Divine Essence essential oils are also chemotypes, which means that all of their active ingredients are listed and shown to be safe and effective.

604.932.3545 604.905.0429

Nesters Market Pharmacy

nestersmarket.com

7019 Nesters Road (Just 1 km north of Whistler Village)

Prices Effective At Whistler Nesters From: Thursday, May 23rd to Wednesday, May 29th, 2019. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Sale limited to stock on hand. Some items subject to Tax, plus deposit, recycling fee where applicable.


THIS WEEK IN PIQUE

46

36

66

Training day A hands-on look at the RCMP’s use-of-force model. - By Braden Dupuis, Megan Lalonde, Brandon Barrett and Keili Bartlett

16

MAY LONG SUCCESS

As GO Fest marks six

46

FINAL FIFTY

Nimby Fifty organizers prepare for

years, Whistler cautiously hopes it has turned the corner on a weekend

the 10th and final running of the famed mountain bike race, welcoming a

traditionally marred with drunkenness, vandalism and violence.

record 650 riders.

28

58

PEMBY REC

The Squamish-Lillooet Regional District

PICTURE PERFECT

Meet the surgeon-

and the Village of Pemberton have finalized the transfer of management

turned-photographer who just earned a spot in the Professional

of the Pemberton and District Recreation Service.

Photographers of Canada’s 2019 annual competition.

30

OUTDOOR PARTNERSHIPS

In early

66 SKA RULES

With a fresh album in hand,

February, the new Outdoor Business Climate Partnership faced its first

Canadian ska veterans The Planet Smashers make a tour stop in

test, and its response made some people cranky.

Whistler on May 30.

COVER These characters created for my colleagues are not to be taken too seriously, but reading this feature story made me really think about the myriad serious considerations that RCMP officers have to run through on every decision while trying to keep us safe. - By Claire Ryan 4 MAY 23, 2019


4330 NORTHLANDS BLVD, WHISTLER

achieve a

AG PLASTIC B

FFURTEUREE

LER help WHIST

7 DAYS 8AM - 9PM

Freshness Selection Location CLIF

Bars 68g

1

MEAT

$ 49 each

AAA Certified Angus Beef T- Bone Steak Family Pack

$28.64kg

Fresh Pork Loin Rib Chop

$8.80/kg

Fresh Family Pack Boneless Skinless Chicken Thighs

$11.00/kg

1299/lb $ 49/lb 4 $

4

$ 99/lb

DELI SANTA CRUZ

2

$ 49

Organic Lemonades

2 $ 99/100g 1 $ 49/100g 1 $ 19/100g

Classic Ham Cajun Chicken Breast Tuna Salad

each

BAKERY

946ml

Cheese Rolls Baked Fresh in Store

5

6-pack, 340g

$ 99

340g

$ 99

Rustic Cheese & Asiago Loaf Baked Fresh in Store

4

PRODUCE DANONE

Activia Yogurts 8-pack or 12-pack

RESTAURANTE

Tortilla Chips 250g-320g

4 $ 99 5 $ 59

Red Grapes Chile

$6.59/kg

$ 99 each

Strawberries California

to

2 3 $ 99/lb 3 $ 99/lb

Asparagus Washington

$8.80/kg

GROCERY TROPICANA

2 for

Orange Juices

6

3

$ 99 each

4

$ 98

PERRIER Sparkling Waters Lemon, Lime, Orange, Pink Grapefruit, Strawberry, Original

1l

GENERAL MILLS Cheerios Honey Nut, Multigrain & Regular

342-430g

$ 99 each

90g-199g

$ 39 each

QUAKER Rice

$ 00

1.65-1.75l

Chips & Cakes

SUN RYPE Juice

Blends

PRINGLES Potato CRAVE Frozen CHAPMAN’S

1.36l

Chips

148-156g

Dinners

283-320g

Frozen Yogurt

Your Neighbourhood Food Store

2l

3 FOR

2 2 $ 99 each 2 $ 49 each 2 $ 99 each 4 $ 99 each 3

WE ARE NOW HIRING for ALL POSITIONS

Available to start immediately. Apply in person.

*not valid when purchasing gift cards. *excluding tobacco products. EXPIRES May 29, 2019. Not valid with any other coupons. One coupon per customer, per day. Valid only at MarketPlace IGA Whistler at time of purchase only.

*not valid when purchasing gift cards. *excluding tobacco products. EXPIRES May 29, 2019. Not valid with any other coupons. One coupon per customer, per day. Valid only at MarketPlace IGA Whistler at time of purchase only.

All Prices Effective THURS. MAY 23 - MAY 29, 2019

We reserve the right to limit quantities.

Full-service deli, In-store bakery & Floral Department Not valid if combined with PLU 91911

91910

604-938-2850

www.marketplaceiga.com

Not valid if combined with PLU 91910

91911


THIS WEEK IN PIQUE

Opinion & Columns 08 OPENING REMARKS Four years after a tragic May long weekend in Whistler, the resort seems to

#103 -1390 ALPHA LAKE RD., FUNCTION JUNCTION, WHISTLER, B.C. V8E 0H9. PH: (604) 938-0202 FAX: (604) 938-0201 www.piquenewsmagazine.com

have turned a corner.

10 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Our letter writers have a lot to be thankful for this week, from the

Founding Publishers KATHY & BOB BARNETT Publisher SARAH STROTHER - sstrother@wplpmedia.com

used-book sale to supporting a local family dealing with cancer to the amazing success of Buck Cancer.

Editor CLARE OGILVIE - edit@piquenewsmagazine.com Assistant Editor ALYSSA NOEL - arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

13 PIQUE’N YER INTEREST Andrew Mitchell suggests that mountain biking has problems that

Sales Manager SUSAN HUTCHINSON - shutchinson@wplpmedia.com Production Manager KARL PARTINGTON - kpartington@wplpmedia.com

stem from recent trends that could upset the delicate balance the sport’s pioneers worked so hard to create.

Art Director JON PARRIS - jparris@wplpmedia.com

102

Advertising Representatives AMY ALLEN - aallen@wplpmedia.com TESSA SWEENEY - tsweeney@wplpmedia.com ANTHONY JOYCE - ajoyce@wplpmedia.com

MAXED OUT Max offers up Whistler as a salve to the horrors unfolding around us in the world of

politics here at home, and south of the border.

Environment & Adventure

Sales Coordinator EMMA WILKINS - traffic@wplpmedia.com Digital Sales Manager FIONA YU - fiona@glaciermedia.ca Production production@piquenewsmagazine.com CLAIRE RYAN - cryan@wplpmedia.com LOU O’BRIEN - lstevens@wplpmedia.com WHITNEY SOBOOL - wsobool@wplpmedia.com

34 SCIENCE MATTERS Decision-makers who care about the people they represent and understand

Arts & Entertainment Editor ALYSSA NOEL arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

35 RANGE ROVER Leslie Anthony recalls his first “Range Rover” five years ago, which discussed

science, social trends and technological potential know that a low-carbon future offers a better life.

Sports Editor DAN FALLOON - sports@piquenewsmagazine.com Features Editor BRANDON BARRETT - bbarrett@piquenewsmagazine.com

spring skiing in the far north of Norway. Since then Vårvinter, or spring-winter, has become a favourite season.

Reporters BRADEN DUPUIS - bdupuis@piquenewsmagazine.com BRANDON BARRETT - bbarrett@piquenewsmagazine.com JOEL BARDE - jbarde@piquenewsmagazine.com MEGAN LALONDE - mlalonde@wplpmedia.com

44 TRAVEL Every place has its creation myth, and in Texas, it’s all about the Alamo in downtown San Antonio, writes Allen Best.

Classifieds and Reception mail@piquenewsmagazine.com

Lifestyle & Arts

Circulation and Accounts LAURA PRIOR - lprior@wplpmedia.com Office and Accounts Manager HEIDI RODE - hrode@wplpmedia.com I.T. and Webmaster KARL PARTINGTON Contributors G.D. MAXWELL, GLENDA BARTOSH, MICHAEL ALLEN, FEET BANKS, LESLIE ANTHONY, ALLEN BEST, ALISON TAYLOR, VINCE SHULEY, LISA RICHARDSON President, Whistler Publishing LP SARAH STROTHER - sstrother@wplpmedia.com Pique Newsmagazine (a publication of Whistler Publishing Limited Partnership, a division of Glacier Media) distributed to over 130 locations in Whistler and to over 200 locations from Vancouver to D’arcy. The entire contents of Pique Newsmagazine are copyright 2019 by Pique Newsmagazine (a publication of WPLP, a division of Glacier Media). No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the express written permission of the Publisher. In no event shall unsolicited material subject this publication to any claim or fees. Copyright in letters and other (unsolicited) materials submitted and accepted for publication remains with the author but the publisher and its licensees may freely reproduce them in print, electronic or other forms. Letters to the Editor must contain the author’s name, address and daytime telephone number. Maximum length is 250 words. We reserve the right to edit, condense or reject any contribution. Letters reflect the opinion of the writer and not that of Pique Newsmagazine. Pique Newsmagazine is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please contact (edit@ piquenewsmagazine.com). If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the web site at mediacouncil. ca or call toll-free 1-844-877-1163 for additional information. This organization replaces the BC Press council (and any mention of it).

ISSN #1206-2022 Subscriptions: $76.70/yr. within Canada, $136.60/yr. courier within Canada. $605.80/ yr. courier to USA. GST included. GST Reg. #R139517908. Canadian Publications Mail Product Sales Agreement #40016549.

54 FORK IN THE ROAD Columnist Glenda Bartosh encourages you to read food labels as you shop, and choose wisely.

56 EPICURIOUS Grab your sombrero and get ready for Whistler’s first Taco Fest on June 3. There will be multiple vendors, margaritas and more at this fun-filled event at the Whistler Golf Club.

60 NOTES FROM THE BACK ROW Speculation abounds on Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. The verdict on the new Aladdin remake, however, is a little more clear.

64 MUSEUM MUSINGS Whistler has been the setting for many adventure-based film projects, including documentaries, commercials and instructional video series over the years.

68 PIQUECAL If your bike could use a little tune up after the long winter, head down to the Whistler Public Library on Sunday for a bike maintenance workshop from 2 to 4 p.m.

6207 Eagle Drive

8140 Muirfield

• A perfect family home located in desirable Whistler Cay Heights

Overlooking the 2nd hole of Nicklaus North Golf Course, features a 4 bedroom, 5 bath luxury post and beam home. Stunning views of Whistler and Blackcomb mountains with ample privacy for the owners. This home features vaulted ceilings, private hot tub, built-in BBQ, 2 car garage, and floor to ceiling river rock fireplace. Zoned for nightly rental or use for full time living.

• Walking distance to Village, elementary school, golf course, valley trail • Flexible layout can provide different suite size options

• Top quality appliances and Control Four System throughout

$3,299,000

$2,899,000

De live ring the Dream – Whistler

CAROLYN HILL

Caronne Marino

PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION/ MASTERS AWARDS

604-905-8324 caronne.marino@evcanada.com

6 MAY 23, 2019

CARONNE MARINO Engel & Völkers Whistler

PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

WHISTLER, BC

604-907-0770

chill@whistlerbuyer.com ~ whistlerbuyer.com


EN OP

LY DAI

LOCAL OWNE LY DA OPERA ND TED

T0 M A 7 PM 10

OUR WEEKLY SPECIALS MAY 23-29, 2019

604.938.9301

Feeding the Spirit of Whistler Since 1988

WASHINTON GROWN

ROYAL GALA APPLES

1

$ .49/lb

3.28/KG

SUMMER FRESH All Flavours - Great Grab and Go to take to the Lake or on a Bike Ride

3

TRI-COLOUR TORTILLA CHIPS Made in Kamloops BC

4

.99

325G

LUCIA GELATO

GELATO

Made in Whistler - All Flavours

5

.99

MEXICAN

HADEN MANGOES

2 FOR $4

CALIFORNIA GROWN

BUNCH CARROTS

1.69

CALIFORNIA GROWN

ORGANIC GREEN KALE

2.69

FREYBE'S

PASTRAMI

1.99

100G

GREEK STYLE FETA

6.99

200G

WRAPS

3.99

500G

CRACKERS

6.99

108G

KRAFT

PEANUT BUTTERS

5.99

750ML-1L

COMPLIMENTS

SKIPJACK TUNA

2 FOR $4

CLASSICO

PASTA, ALFREDO OR PESTO SAUCES

3.99

218-650ML

COMPLIMENTS

PURE LIQUID HONEY

5.99

500ML

ICED TEA MIXES

6.99

715G

GENERAL MILLS

CEREALS Lucky Charms, Cheerios, Golden Grahams,

3.99

300-430G

CHRISTIE'S

CRACKERS

2 FOR $7

COMPLIMENTS

FROZEN FRUITS 9 Varieties Available

4.99

CHICKEN & APPLE SAUSAGE Made Fresh Instore Daily from Rossdown Farms Free Run Chicken & BC Grown Apples

1.69

PARADISE VALLEY

FREE RANGE PORK SIRLOIN CHOPS

5.99/LB

CREEKSIDE'S OWN

HAWAIIAN AHI TUNA POKE

3.99

/100G

GRIMM'S

BAVARIAN SMOKIES

5.99

450G

Great for any Sandwich

Cow, Goat or Sheep

INDIAN LIFE

Spinach, Sundried Tomato, Coriander or Chapati Savoury Sunflower, Chili Pepper, Pumpkin Seed or Black Sesame - Vegan & Keto Friendly

227G

FRESH IS BEST

$

2.99

EVE'S

.99

$

LARGE POMEGRANATES

SHEPHERD GOURMET

DIPS

$

PERUVIAN

500ML

Smooth, Crunchy, or All Natural Smooth or Crunchy

19 Flavours to Choose From

GOOD HOST

Original or Lemon

Made Fresh Instore from Certified Angus AAA Canadian Beef & Paradise Valley Free Range Pork

1

$ .69

Puffs, Nesquik or Cinnamon Toast Crunch

Ritz, Triscuits, Wheat Thins or Vegetable Thins

CREEKSIDE'S OWN

CREEKSIDE'S OWN

KOREAN BBQ BURGERS

Flaked or Chunk

Boneless Thick Cut Perfect for BBQ 5 Flavours Available

Made Fresh Instore Daily

Original, Cheddar, Jalapeno or Bacon

EACH BUNCH

170G

175-200G 500-600G

NEW FLAVOUR

/100G 13.21/KG

/100G

COME JOIN THE CREEKSIDE MARKET FAMILY! FRONT END • GROCERY DELI/ BAKERY • MEAT/ SEAFOOD PRODUCE

PLANT-BASED PROTEINS TRY ME!

I'M NEW!

Please apply in-store (look for Kent, Don or Joanna), or online at www.creeksidemarket.com

LOCATED IN CREEKSIDE

EACH

VILLAGE

OPEN DAILY

Quinoa Mushroom Burgers Black Bean Bites or Garden Vegetable Bites

9.99 375G

$

7AM–10PM

604.938.9301


OPENING REMARKS

Turning a corner IN 2015, as newspapers across the country carried stories of the stabbing death of a teenager in Whistler during the May long weekend, it was hard to imagine that the resort would ever leave behind its reputation for violence, vandalism and drunkenness over the Victoria Day holiday. But if this weekend was anything to go by, it just might be that Whistler has turned a corner.

BY CLARE OGILVIE edit@piquenewsmagazine.com

With GO Fest finishing off its sixth iteration, the weekend has morphed into a part family, part adventure-activity-fuelled destination to mark the start of summer.

Perhaps we did have an air of desperation about us a decade ago when it came to the May long weekend. As a Province newspaper reporter back then, I’ll admit to my fair share of front-page stories about the mayhem in the resort. Just Google how the resort was portrayed. So we can embrace the change with a quiet satisfaction. That’s not to say that we can sit back and believe our raucous May long weekend problems are behind us. Getting here has taken a great deal of effort from our local RCMP, from local government, from the accommodation sector, from the pubs, clubs and bars and also from local residents. In 2015, Pique ran a lengthy news story about the troubles of the weekend. Said one local when asked if he and his family were going to enjoy the festivities,

Believe me, I understand that the crazy, wild, irreverent partier is also a quintessential part of Whistler, but it’s not the vision we want young kids to see. Indeed, I would say it is no longer the image we want to portray at all. When GO Fest was first announced, it wasn’t that warmly received by the community. Many felt it was a wishywashy idea that would go nowhere and that only policing, roadblocks and absolute vigilance by the accommodation sector not to accept underage vacationers and to push up the price of rooms would create change.

“Oh, god no. None of our friends are. Everyone’s leaving. This is the honest truth. I don’t know any of our friends who are sticking around for the weekend.” The party atmosphere of any long weekend in the resort has oft been the root of angst locally. We are in many ways the architects of our own misfortune as we spend so much time, effort and money attracting

people to come and enjoy Whistler. Entertaining people and offering adventure, fun and escape is our raison d’être after all. Finding that balance between having fun and feeling safe, and having fun then watching it turn bad and never wanting to come back is actually a fine one. When my kids were small, I stayed out of the village at night on the weekends in the summer. There were too many drunks, people smoking weed, spouting profanity and making poor choices played out publicly in front of family outings. (Did you see the letter in the last council package from a visitor shocked by the inebriated state of some of our young female miniskirt-clad partiers who while repeatedly falling down left nothing to the imagination of onlookers, while their male counterparts injured themselves falling into planters and stairs? Really, go and read this letter. “This is not healthy tourism. It is an unethical and immoral way of cashing in on youth who are in a sad, vulnerable and dangerous state of intoxication,” said the letter writer.) Believe me, I understand that the crazy, wild, irreverent partier is also a quintessential part of Whistler, but it’s not the vision we want young kids to see. Indeed, I would say it is no longer the image we want to portray at all. Yes, we are a destination resort, but we are growing up, maturing into a place where adventurers come to fulfill dreams, where travellers come to embrace nature, where epicureans come to indulge. Can clubbing, letting go and giving life a giant bear hug be a part of it? Absolutely. But here’s hoping that we have left behind the days of substance-fuelled violence and vandalism. n

1 BEDROOM TOWNHOUSE – WALK TO ALTA LAKE Centrally located between the Village and Creekside ski lifts. Just a short walk from Lakeside Park and steps to the Valley Trail, recreation is at your doorstep whether you want to bike, kayak, paddleboard, or just relax! This upgraded property has an open floor plan with updated flooring, new refrigerator, stove and fresh paint. An outdoor deck with forested view is perfect for relaxing. Additional features include in suite laundry, gas fireplace and additional secured storage. Perfect for a full time resident, long term rental or weekend retreat.

E! RIC P W NE

ASKING PRICE $520,000

Dave Brown

Personal Real Estate Corporation

davebrown@wrec.com www.davesellswhistler.com Cell: 604 905 8438 / Toll Free: 1 800 667 2993 ext. 805

8 MAY 23, 2019

1074660 BLACKCOMB WAY  $709K

LOST LAKE LODGE

Situated on the Chateau Golf Course, this beautifully updated one bedroom suite enjoys a sunny western exposure overlooking the pool and is the perfect year-round holiday home! Gas fireplace, oversized balcony, hardwood floors, granite counter tops and in-suite laundry. On the Valley Trail with easy access to the Village, lifts, and Lost Lake. Flexible zoning allows for nightly or long term rental, as well as full time owner use! Call to arrange a viewing today!


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Reflecting on D-Day 75th anniversary On June 6, 1944, I arrived by boat on Juno Beach in Normandy, France, with the Canadian Scottish Regiment. My role was in the mortar platoon. On June 17, I was based in a barn, anticipating an attack that never came. I went into a nearby shed to disarm the grenades when one exploded, resulting in the loss of my right arm. When I returned to Canada, I became a member of The War Amps, which was started by amputee veterans returning from the First World War to help each other adapt to their new reality as amputees. Through the years, we have made it a goal to remember and commemorate our fallen comrades, and to educate youth about the horrors of war. In Normandy, many Canadians died or suffered wounds that they had to carry for the rest of their lives. As we mark the 75th anniversary of D-Day, it’s important that we never forget. Allan Bacon, 99 Toronto

Sport fishers not the problem I don’t like how (Bruce Kay, “Letters to the Editor,” Pique, May 16) can trivialize the impact of (the government’s Chinook regulation plan) on people’s lives, especially when Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s own science says sport

fishermen take well under one per cent of the species at risk. There are businesses hurting badly, and people’s lives affected negatively for less than one per cent and you seem to take glee in it? I look at catch and release like getting in your car, driving 100 kilometres to go to a restaurant just to take a picture of your meal and drive back. It would be different if we were shut out of fishing because we were really making a difference to the (fish) population, because all the fishermen I know are really conservationists who get involved in protecting fishing for future

generations. You talk with your mouth too full of farmed salmon. Dean Terry // Squamish

Raising a glass for Julie On behalf of our volunteer fundraising team for the Cassettari family at the “Raise a Glass for Julie” event on May 6, 2019 at Alta Bistro, we would like to thank our community for its generous support and kindness to Nick, Julie and Cicely Cassettari.

First, we must thank all of the staff at Alta Bistro who donated their skills, hours and gratuities, with an extra special thank you to Eric Griffith who started the massive roaster at 7 a.m. and was there until the very end. Another special thank you is extended to the Gibbons Whistler team for providing additional staffing, and “tossing in” two kegs of Après Lager with the keg from Good Company Lager. Local DJ Olly Watt provided his services free of charge with more than four hours of classic and modern jams, as the room (and Main Street) filled with mouthwatering smells from the donated meats of Two Rivers Meats and Albion Fisheries. The Mexican-themed dinner filled the room full of colour and flavour, as many more local wineries, breweries and distillers donated their premium products. Throughout the evening, more than 150 people dropped in to bid on silent auction prizes, buy 50/50 tickets, connect with old and new friends and raise a glass to Julie. A quick look around the room showcased the diverse industries and individuals that contributed to this event. With much appreciation and admiration, we would like to thank the 60-plus donors who contributed to the event, and the long-form of this thank you letter can be found in the Facebook event “Raise a Glass for Julie.” In four whirlwind hours, our community raised more than $18,000. These funds have been awarded directly to the Cassetari family to support Julie’s ongoing fight against cancer and support their day-to-day needs as they care for their two-year-old Cicely. No cup, nor eye, was dry and these moments showcased how Whistler

ED

E IC

C DU

RE

PR

BLACKCOMB BENCHLANDS

423 - 4809 Spearhead Drive $699,000

9109 Riverside Drive $3,895,000

Fully renovated ski-in/ski-out. 1BR/1BA with pool / hot tub / sauna. Zoned for unlimited owner usage + AirBNB.

604 902 7270

10 MAY 23, 2019

WEDGEWOODS

6.5BR/4.5BA 4500 sq ft luxury custom home with river front access.1.1 Acre lot / Possession for spring/summer 2019.

davidlewisliving.com


COMING SOON! Spacious ground floor two bed townhome in Alpine Greens with a fabulous location along the golf course. Live the dream, enjoy the dream with this fully furnished home. Zoning allows for shortterm rental. No GST $1,315,000 FULLY FURNISHED 1/4 OWNERSHIP CONDO/HOTELS IN WHISTLER CREEKSIDE

CONTACT JAMES FOR AVAILABILITY

JAMES COLLINGRIDGE

THINKING OF BUYING OR SELLING? CALL JAMES FOR MORE INFORMATION.

CALL JAMES, THE LEGENDS & EVOLUTION SPECIALIST Direct: 604-902-0132 Toll Free: 1-888-689-0070 james@whistlerrealestate.net www.whistlerrealestate.net

sally@sallywarner.ca 106-7015 Nesters Rd, Whistler

604-932-7741

propertiesinwhistler.com

#212-4910 SPEARHEAD DRIVE - WOODRUN OPEN HOUSE ALL WEEKEND 10am-4pm

Blackcomb ski in/ski out ground floor location Minutes to Lost Lake Park and the Fairmont Chateau Golf Course 1.5 Bed | 2 Bath No GST!

$1,249,000 DOUG TRELEAVEN 604-905-8626 dougtreleaven.com

w Ne

st Li

, $2

in

49

g!

0 9,

WHISTLER’S #1 RE/MAX AGENT

Sea to Sky Real Estate Whistler INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED

Office: 604.932.2300 Toll Free: 1.888.689.0070

Marshall Viner PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

PremieretoLifestyle Neighbourhood Register atWhistler’s marshallviner.com receive weekly real estate updates

2724 Millars Pond Crescent • 3 Bdrms + Den + Recreation Room, 3.5 Bath family home • Adjacent to Millars Pond Park and Valley Trail • Ideal floorplan, immaculate home and property for a Whistler family • Minutes to Creekside lifts, Spring Creek Elementary School

$2,299,000 T 604 .935.2287 E marshall@marshallviner.com

marshallviner.com

00

6 6 42 C E DA R GR OVE LANE W HISTLER CAY ESTATES CR

BE AV ER LA NE

AB

CRABAPPLE CORNER

WHISTLER GOLF COURSE

AP

PLE

DR

IVE

SINGING CEDARS 8TH HOLE TEE BOX

7TH HOLE VAL LEY TRA IL

6642 CEDAR GROVE LANE OLD GROWTH GIANT CEDARS

STAF F HO USE o r B UIL DI NG LOT 5 BED HOUSE + 2 BED SUITE

3 BATHROOMS

2835 SQFT

LOCATION! This proven revenue producer is currently operating as a staff house on a prime flat building lot (10,712 sqft). Located at the end of the cul-de-sac, this home is set under the natural beauty of old growth giant cedars. The property neighbours the “Singing Cedars” 8th hole of the Whistler Golf Course. Behind the home you have direct access to Whistler’s iconic 40 km Valley Trail system which connects you to every part of Whistler. Walk to Crabapple Corner Hut (3 mins), River of Golden Dreams (5 mins), Myrtle Philip School (10 mins), Emerald Forest Conservation Area (5 mins), bike to Rainbow Park at Alta Lake (10 mins). Get in touch for more details.

6 04.902.6106 josh@myseatosky.com whistlerrealestatemarket.com RE/MAX Sea to Sky Real Estate • 105-4360 Lorimer Rd, Whistler

New to Market | $14,900,000 3827 Sunridge Drive, Sunridge Plateau

3827 Sunridge Drive is a fantastic ski-in/ski-out, post & beam masterpiece that is located in one of Whistler’s most unique, exclusive & superior neighbourhoods; Sunridge Plateau. Perched on a bluff, high above the Whistler Valley this fantastic mountain home offers a new owner 6.5 generously sized bedrooms, 8 bathrooms across 4 levels and 7,925 sq/ft of living space. Property features include; cozy theatre room where you can sit back, relax and watch your favourite movies, outdoor hot tub to relax in and take in the crisp mountain air, your very own indoor swimming pool & spa area that you can enjoy year round & billiard room just to name a few! You will never tire of the picturesque views offered by this amazing mountain home - summer or winter the backdrop is something that will continue to leave you speechless for years to come. Sunridge Plateau is a very short distance to the magnificent Whistler Village where there are numerous dining, shopping and recreation options. Welcome to the Best Place on Earth!

Maggi Thornhill Personal Real Estate Corporation Mobile +1-604-905-8199 Maggi.Thornhill@evcanada.com

©2019 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.

MAY 23, 2019

11


Five bedroom home with revenue suite This high-quality Whistler style home is now available in Alpine Meadows. The lot boasts over 10,800 sq.ft, and allows ample flat parking for seven cars plus a generous sized double garage. Soak in the mountain views from the hot tub after a full day of enjoying everything that Whistler has to offer. Now priced at $2,695,000

Laura Wetaski

604-938-3798 laura.wetaski@evcanada.com

Whistler

Nick Davies, Whistler local and experienced family lawyer practising across BC and Yukon.

Call at 604-602-9000 or visit www.macleanlaw.ca Maclean Law is headquartered in Vancouver with offices across British Columbia.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR is truly one of the best communities, from the inside out. Lastly, we want to thank BC Hospitality Foundation for matching the donations to $5,000, and Samatha Rahn for presenting the cheque as well as donating her namesake wine to the event. Our event volunteer fundraising team started as a random group of people who cared for this family, and now we have become lifelong friends. We are proud of what a small group of people can accomplish when everyone is willing to donate a little of their time or a little of their possessions.

“We have been reminded that living in this exciting world of flavour, fun, and friends is nothing without life’s greatest asset: time. So thanks for the time, Whistler. You really are inspiring, awakening and beautiful.” - NIKKI BEST AND TERRY CLARK

We have been reminded that living in this exciting world of flavour, fun, and friends is nothing without life’s greatest asset: time. So thanks for the time, Whistler. You really are inspiring, awakening and beautiful. If you were unable to make it to the event, and would like to learn more or how to contribute to this lovely family, you are welcome to visit: www. gofundme.com/help-julie-a-new-mom-fightbreast-cancer. Nikki Best and Terry Clark // Whistler

Mature Action Community AGM and Spring Fling The Mature Action Community (MAC) had its AGM in April with board members Stacey Murl, Bob Calladine, and Rosemary Cook ending their six years on the board. John McGregor, Charalyn Kriz, Jody Wilson and Arlene Egido all stepped up to become new board members with Kathy White at the helm. We are sure this will be the beginning of a new day for MAC as MAC also secured a Community Enrichment Grant from the RMOW for 2019 and will be working towards an “Age Friendly Community” with a new strategic plan going forward. MAC started the new year with a Spring Fling Dinner at the Alpine Cafe with great giant-flower decorations provided by one of our ex-board members, Janice Lloyd. Everyone enjoyed the great dinner put on by Martini for a very reasonable price. We’ll be back again soon! Stacey Murl, past chair, MAC // Whistler

Mountain Psychology and Neurofeedback Centre

Stephen L. Milstein, Ph.D., R. Psych. BC #765 - 604.938.3511 Dawna Dixx Milstein, OT. COTBC # AA0201 - 604.938.3523 Whistler: #107 - 4368 Main St, Whistler, B.C. V0N 1B4 Squamish: 38077 2nd Ave, Squamish, B.C. // 604.848.9273

Serving sea to sky for 18 years

12 MAY 23, 2019

We raised $4,017 to fund our programs for children and adults. Special thanks to our enthusiastic volunteers who donated, collected, sorted, transported and sold books, and to Kima and Tony Grieve for providing our worksite. Our appreciation to IGA Marketplace for hosting the sale, to Nesters Market, Creekside Market, TD Canada Trust and the Whistler Public Library for being donation sites, to the library staff for their assistance and Pique Newsmagazine for its advertising.

Book sale success The Friends of the Whistler Public Library would like to thank the Whistler community for its generous support for our Used Book Sale on May 18.

Please visit the Friends Plant Sale on Saturday, June 8 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the Library’s plaza. Herb pots, lettuce pots, perennials, bulbs and annuals will be available. Happy summer reading and gardening! Susan Annand // Whistler Friends of the Library

Supporting those fighting cancer On behalf of Families Fighting Cancer In The Sea To Sky (FFCSS), I would like to thank all of the enthusiastic supporters who came out to Buck Cancer 2019 at Dusty’s on April 27. It was a sold-out event raising more than $13,000 that will help assist families in need living through cancer in the Sea to Sky corridor. This year’s event added axe throwing and a firefighter challenge to the fun and the everpopular mechanical bull! The silent auction was a huge success thanks to the generous donations from many Sea to Sky businesses and individuals who are far too many to mention here. Please go to FFCSS’s website www. familiesfightingcancer.ca under events to see a complete list of supporters, or visit our Facebook page and then give us a “like.” There are a few special thank yous that FFCSS would like to make to Forged Axe Throwing, Walsh Restoration, Dusty’s Bar and Barbecue, SAXX, Ryan Donohue, Tina Symko and Dean Albrecht. It is through your generous sponsorship and assistance that we were able to create such a fun and profitable event! FFCSS will gratefully look forward to continuing to provide financial assistance and other support where we can thanks to the Sea to Sky corridor communities’ generosity. See y’all next year at Buck Cancer 2020! Lisa Geddes // Co-founder FFCSS n

Write to us! Letters to the editor must contain the writer’s name, address and a daytime telephone number. Maximum length is 450 words. Pique Newsmagazine reserves the right to edit, condense or refrain from publishing any contribution. Letters reflect the opinion of the writer and not that of Pique Newsmagazine.


PIQUE N’ YER INTEREST

How now, brown pow MOUNTAIN BIKING has a problem. Several problems actually, all of which stem from recent trends that could upset the delicate balance the sport’s pioneers worked so hard to create. I’m old, ish, and remember a time when mountain bikes weren’t entirely welcome. Driven by complaints, bikes

BY ANDREW MITCHELL were increasingly shut out of areas, trails were being closed and dismantled, and governments were being forced to make hard decisions over a newish sport that was creeping into places it was not supposed to go. It seemed everybody—search and rescue teams that dragged broken riders out of the backcountry, conservationists concerned with erosion, hikers concerned by close encounters—had a beef. Faced with the real possibility of losing access, mountain bikers reformed their badass image. They formed groups like the North Shore Mountain Bike Association and Whistler Off-Road Cycling Association and started working with governments and other stakeholders to rein in rogue elements. They voluntarily decommissioned trails

that were dangerous or built into sensitive areas, raised money to maintain the trails that remained, adopted new standards for trail design that were safer and more environmentally friendly, sanctioned and insured races and events, built up youth programs, and in general promoted a new, universal version of the sport that was safe, family friendly, inclusive, and respectful to other users. It wasn’t easy or without controversy, but riders finally gained legitimate access to the woods, and the sport was allowed to grow and thrive. Every new biker pedalling off-road for the first time owes a debt to these pioneers. However, recent developments make it feel like we’re pedalling backwards, and that worries me. I’m worried that the rogue trail-building element is resurfacing because the sport is being marketed the wrong way. I’m worried that the arrival of e-bikes has weakened the health and fitness angle that made the sport palatable to land managers, while also contributing to the growing trail maintenance deficit. I’m worried that the sport is moving away from trail standards that opened the sport to a wider audience, and that mountain biking is once again become a niche activity for the hardcore. As mentioned, I’m old, ish, and people

can take my opinions with a grain of salt. This is very much a “back in my day” column with a splash of “get off my lawn.” But I think it’s important not to take our hard-won access for granted. First, the rogue element. Every year there seem to be more secret, unsanctioned trails. Some are legitimate, well-built additions, while others are private loam tracks through steep forests. These trails aren’t built to any standard, turn into rooty staircases in a year, and create new creeks in the woods. This kind of trail was a big part of the reason bikes were almost banned. Then there’s the whole “brown pow” marketing angle. We’ve all seen images of bikes ripping through the forest, pinning around corners and kicking off dirt in all directions. The major problem is that dirt doesn’t fall from the sky like snow—it’s placed there by hard-working trail builders. That effort isn’t being respected. Enduro/ Strava-style racing through the woods is incredibly hard on trails and increases the need for maintenance. Then we have e-bikes. These motorized bikes, pedals notwithstanding, give average nobodies the ability to ride up hills like the fastest World Cup riders without breaking a sweat. I’ve been passed like I was standing still on trails that took me months of training to climb. One of the main reasons bikes weren’t

banned two decades ago was that mountain biking had one redeeming quality—it was an intensely physical, human-powered activity that promoted heath and fitness. E-bikes take that glorious suffering away— health is no longer a prerequisite or side effect of the sport. They also increase erosion on trails. I do think there should be exceptions for properly licensed riders with disabilities, but otherwise motorized vehicles have no place in the forest. Lastly, I’m worried mountain biking is once again becoming a niche, hardcore sport. There are only a handful of beginner and intermediate trails on the map, and almost every new trail is black diamond or higher. When we do maintain trails, upgrades often make trails harder—such as the massive wall rides and new “A” frames on A River Runs Through It. The moment mountain biking stops being safe and inclusive is the moment when non-riders will start to question why it’s allowed on public land. Mountain-bike access is being taken for granted when the reality is that we were only ever tolerated because of the hard work pioneers did to make it legitimate. All bets are off if we start repeating the mistakes of the past. That’s just one old, ish, man’s opinion, of course. But it might also be the truth. n

MAY 23, 2019

13


FIRST PIQUE Home Auto Life Investments Group Business Farm Travel

final Nimby Fifty on May 25, which marks its 10-year anniversary as well.

OUR ONLINE CONVERSATION

Need car insurance with ICBC? We do Autoplan! Visit your ICBC agency at Nesters Plaza. David Livesey Financial Advisor

David Livesey & Associates Inc 212-7015 Nesters Rd | Whistler 604-938-6100 | www.cooperators.ca/David-Livesey-Associates

Not all products available in all provinces

While speeding drivers in B.C. may have topped the list of long-weekend worries throughout the province, according to one survey, the story about this topic in particular topped the list of most-commented-on posts last week. However, most followers seemed more concerned about “slow drivers and lane hogs” than speeders: “There is a common problem on most tourist season days that leads to these problems. You have people who do 60 through the curves, then punch to 120-140 on the straights,” read one post. “These people also veer rather sketchily through the corners because they aren’t familiar with the highways … You can blame the erratic drivers, or blame the locals who know the road who don’t want to be behind the people who mash the brakes on all corners.” One commenter even called for speed limits along the Sea to Sky to be increased to their previous level, adding “and ticket people for going 20+ km under the limit in the passing lane.” Another reader disagreed with the survey results, writing, “Not at all! Speeding drivers go right past me. My concern is the illiterate drivers who can’t read the ‘Keep right except to pass’ signs.” Followers also had much to say about a story detailing Whistler council’s investigation into a potential ban of singleuse plastics, while treading carefully to avoid a protracted legal battle with the industry. “I support banning single-use plastics but I don’t support wasting taxpayer money on legal fees. My taxes are unaffordable as is,” read one comment. “This council is worried more about a lawsuit than its children’s future. I am disgusted,” wrote another. Meanwhile, another commenter commended council for “thinking before taking action.” “Sounds like they’re making progress since the infamous oil company letter. I support the reduction of single-use plastics. All-out ban? Maybe in time. Good conversation,” read the post.

OF INTEREST

522,896 The amount of construction material, in kilograms, diverted from landfill by Sea to Sky Removal in 2018.

DID YOU KNOW?

In 1986, Whistler held its first Whistler Adventure Film Festival (WAFF). Co-sponsored by the Whistler Resort Association (known today as Tourism Whistler) and organized by One Step Beyond Adventure Group of Canmore, Alta., which also organized the Banff Festival of Mountain Films (today known as the Banff Mountain Film Festival) at that time, it started a great tradition of resort-based film festivals that continue to this day.

THROWBACK THURSDAY

Pique’s cover feature in 2015, “Howe Sound: Eco Tourism, Recovery and Understanding the Marine Environment,” looked at the history of Howe Sound and its recovery as a marine ecosystem. Today, those on the sound encounter orcas, dolphins and seals and the herring population is rebounding. In the news section, readers learned of the shocking fatal stabbing of 19-year-old Luka Gordic who was swarmed in Whistler Village May 17, 2015. This week, we learned that two of the three youths convicted in his death have filed with the B.C. Court of Appeal. The three youths were sentenced on Jan. 11. One of them was convicted of seconddegree murder and sentenced as an adult, given life in prison. The B.C. Prosecution Service confirms that youth has appealed his life sentence. The second youth was convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to three years—18 months in custody, and another 18 under supervision. That person has appealed their conviction and sentence, according to the B.C. Prosecution Service. The third offender was given that same sentence as the second youth, but has not filed an appeal. No hearing dates have been set for the youths’ appeals. n

500800m

Combating violence P.12

Dennehys’ Order of B.C. P.13

VSO Institute P.66

FREE

NATURAL BEAUTY

The size of the debris span of the Joffre Peak landslide last week, which travelled a distance of 5.2 kilometres.

650 14 MAY 23, 2019

ECO TOURISM, RECOVERY AND UNDERSTANDING THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT

22.20

The number of riders expected to take part in the

May 21st, 2015

|

WHISTLER’S WEEKLY NEWSMAGAZINE

| www.piquenewsmagazine.com


Discover Sunstone Master Planned: a thoughtfully planned neighbourhood on a sunny, south facing forested hillside.

TOWNHOMES

HOMESITES

ELEVATE YOUR LIVING

ROOM TO GROW

Spacious, elegant homes feature open-concept layouts and unobstructed views complete with expansive decks and large garages thoughtfully designed for your active Pemberton lifestyle.

24 carefully planned lots ranging from 8,900 sq ft

Community: Green space, parks, community garden and access to hiking and biking trails from your backyard. Access: Adjacent to recreational amenities and new Friendship Trail. Various sizes of single-family building lots, estate lots, as well as multi-family home options. Views: Amazing, elevated views of Mount Currie and the Pemberton Valley. South Facing: All day sun. Great Value: 25 minutes from Whistler yet a fraction of the price.

from $649,000

Now selling. ElevateSunstone.com

KAROLEENA HOMES starting from $1.2 million

from $279,000

to 19,700 sq ft. Situated on a sunny south-facing hillside adjacent to trails, amenities and recreation.

Now selling. SunstonePemberton.com

Keith McIvor 604-935-2650 1-800-667-2993

appointment, call 604-935-2650 sunstonepemberton.com

The developer reserves the right to make changes and modification to the project design, specifications and features without notice. E&O.E.


NEWS WHISTLER

Another quiet May long, but the work isn’t over ‘WELL-BEHAVED’ CROWDS A FAR CRY FROM YEARS PAST

BY BRADEN DUPUIS WHISTLER’S MAY LONG weekend has made big strides in shedding its reputation as a weekend to avoid in recent years, but local officials aren’t fooling themselves into thinking the work is done “This is not something I think we fix and walk away from,” said Mayor Jack Crompton. “In my opinion, we will continue to invest in programming that builds on that familyfocused atmosphere, (and) we will continue to invest in strong and consistent policing so that the resort is a safe place to be. “ The Resort Municipality of Whistler’s (RMOW) GO Fest—designed to attract families to the resort—helped provide a “vibrant atmosphere” in Whistler Village, Crompton said. “Nice weather, lots of people, and anecdotally I saw more families than I had in the past,” he said. “And (I was) happy to hear from the RCMP that May long weekend was a peaceful one for Whistler … I think that speaks to the diligence of the RCMP throughout the village, and the RMOW focus on creating a positive, all-ages atmosphere, which is the

GOING STRONG Whistler’s GO Fest was wellattended over another relatively quiet May long. PHOTO BY CLINT TRAHAN/COURTESY OF THE RESORT MUNICIPALITY OF WHISTLER

16 MAY 23, 2019

primary goal of GO Fest.” The five free musical performances were well attended, Crompton added, with between 500 and 1,500 in the crowd for each show. In past years, the local police blotter wrapping up the notorious weekend was typically dotted with reports of violence, vandalism and unruly mobs.

responded to 117 calls for service from May 17 to May 20, Hayes said in an email, with alcohol being a factor in many of them. “Overall this year the crowds were well behaved and seemed to be mostly families and folks very much enjoying everything Whistler has to offer,” Hayes said. “Most of the files we attended to over the weekend were centred around assaults

“This is not something I think we fix and walk away from.” - JACK CROMPTON

In 2015, the violence came to a head when 19-year-old Luka Gordic was swarmed and stabbed to death in Whistler Village (two of four people convicted in his death have filed with the B.C. Court of Appeal, while a third—who was sentenced as an adult to life in prison—is appealing that sentence. All three were 17 at the time of the attack and are protected under a publication ban. The fourth offender, Arvin Golic, was tried as an adult, convicted of manslaughter, and given seven years last June). But during the 2019 edition of the May long weekend, police were mostly kept busy with “folks who chose to drink too much,” said Staff Sgt. Paul Hayes. Whistler and Pemberton RCMP

and causing disturbances—almost all had an alcohol component.” Official stats from the weekend weren’t ready as of press time, but Hayes said he suspects they were on par or below the stats from last year. As it did last year, the Whistler RCMP set up a large check stop just north of Brandywine on Friday evening, but was not responsible for a stop further south near Britannia, Hayes said. (Pique reached out to the RCMP’s BC Traffic Division with questions about the Britannia stop, which caused long traffic delays on Friday, but did not hear back before press time.) “I can say that over the course of the

weekend Whistler RCMP continued to remove drivers from the road for alcoholrelated reasons along with prohibited drivers, vehicles without insurance and various Motor Vehicle Act and regulation offences,” Hayes said. The local hotels didn’t have any problems to report either, said Saad Hasan, chair of the Hotel Association of Whistler. “It was very smooth, very uneventful, and we certainly want to give credit to the organization, to the RCMP and also to the municipality,” Hasan said. “It was a very positive experience, I think, for our guests who were in town, and really enjoyed the weather and also the family events that we had, so I think all in all (it was) a good solid weekend.” Like the police stats, it’s too early to say how full the resort’s hotels were, but “it seemed like everyone was consistent with their pace and did well,” Hasan said. While the weekend’s course correction is welcomed, like Crompton, Hasan sees more work ahead. “I would say we should stay the course, I would say we should keep our foot on the pedal, but I would hesitate to say that it’s behind us and now we can sort of relax,” Hasan said. “I think it’s a question of creating a habit, and I think we are (heading) in the right direction, looking at the past couple of years … but to change the habit, I think we have to stay the course for another few years before we can say that it is safely behind us.” n


NEWS WHISTLER

FANTASTIC VIEWS! 5134 ALTA LAKE RD WHISTLER • $3,569,000

Sea-to-Sky parents must provide immunization records going forward

• Private luxury residence nestled above Alpha Lake. Views of Whistler Blackcomb. • 4 Bedrooms + 3 Baths with 5 decks, chefs kitchen & cozy wood burning F/P. • Classic log details complimented by a beautiful modern renovation. • Gorgeous Nanny/Rental suite located above the massive two-car garage.

SD48 BRIEFS: DEFERRED ENROLMENT POLICY

BY KEILI BARTLETT IMMUNIZATION RECORDS for Seato-Sky students must be provided to the school for the 2019-20 school year. However, at a recent school board meeting, School District 48 superintendent Lisa McCullough made it clear that this does not mean that a child must be immunized, but rather that the student’s records be provided. “No child will ever be removed from a school,” said McCullough. “No child will be told they can’t attend our school. It’s more a documentation effort.” Previously, Sea to Sky school district policy, like many across B.C., said it would prefer parents to provide vaccination

Under the School Act, a parent may currently chose to defer registration of their child into kindergarten for one year. The following year, it is not an automatic decision that the student is placed in kindergarten—they could be put into Grade 1. This has led to some concerns raised by parents. In addressing these concerns the SD48 board consulted the School Act, the Ministry of Education and The Human Rights Tribunal, all of which said the school board policy does not violate human rights. “The intent and the spirit of deferred enrolment is that you would stay with your age-appropriate peers and the process we use is consulting a collection of information over time so the family has other information to consider, and the principal has other information to

DANA FRIESEN SMITH • REALTOR® SEATOSKYDREAMTEAM.COM • 604.902.3878

own, play & earn THE TRUSTED LEADERS IN WHISTLER

“No child will ever be removed from a school.” - LISA MCCULLOUGH

records if available. However, since the measles outbreak in the Lower Mainland in early 2019, the Ministry of Education is making it mandatory for schools to ask for the record of immunization. Trustee Celeste Bickford voiced concern about the immunization records policy, which she feared might confuse parents making it sound like students are required to be vaccinated. “Are we saying kids need to be immunized to attend our schools?” Bickford asked. She added that while she is a proponent of vaccinations and documenting, Bickford is concerned the policy may cause anxiety in parents of unvaccinated children. Bickford also suggested that getting immunization documents might be difficult for families coming from outside the country. But McCullough said those families are already required to have that documentation to enter Canada. It’s mostly local families, McCullough said, who don’t come with documentation. The B.C. measles scare has resulted in a 106-per-cent increase in vaccinations for school-aged children compared with a year ago.

DEFERMENT POLICY The May 8 school district policy meeting revisited what has become a much-discussed topic: the placement of students who defer registration into kindergarten.

consider,” explained McCullough. “There’s never a decision made in that moment.” While parents will be included in the consultation, the principal has the final say in student placement. The school board said it would consider providing more information about how the consultation process works instead of only outlining it in the deferred registration policy. “The legislation branch and the ministry are very clear kindergarten is an optional program,” said McCullough. Bickford said parents should feel like valued partners in the placement process, not like victims, and that the policy should be clear so parents don’t unwittingly miss out on kindergarten. Since there are combined kindergarten and Grade 1 classes, McCullough added that students are in the same classrooms and environments as they would be if they entered kindergarten. The superintendent added that the information gathered about students allows a principal—an education professional—to do research a parent wouldn’t be able to do. Rick Price, the board chair, said it’s wrong to assume a parent arrives at school with all the information about how their child would behave in a classroom environment. Moving forward the district policy will clarify what parents can expect. It will be edited and brought back to the board for the next meeting. n

608 PAN PACIFIC MOUNTAINSIDE

$468,000

V8E 1A9

MAY 23, 2019

17


NEWS WHISTLER

BC Parks investigating second Joffre landslide NO INJURIES REPORTED; NLHÁXTEN/CERISE CREEK CONSERVANCY IS CLOSED

BY BRADEN DUPUIS BC PARKS is investigating and the Nlháxten/Cerise Creek Conservancy is closed following a second landslide on Joffre Peak. Both slides occurred on the northeast face of Joffre Peak in the Cerise Creek Conservancy. BC Parks has not received any reports of injuries or missing persons from either of the slides, and has closed the Cerise Creek trailhead to Keith’s Hut, according to a spokesperson. The first landslide occurred Monday, May 13 at 7:40 a.m., affecting the Cerise Creek area and ending on the flats just south of Cayoosh Creek and Highway 99. “Debris appears to have spanned 500-850 metres in width and travelled a total distance of roughly 5.2 kilometres,” the spokesperson said. “The second slide occurred Thursday, May 16 on the same side of the mountain. There does not appear

to be any threats or risks to Joffre Lakes Park associated with these events.” While landslides are common in steep, mountainous topography, in this case, the failure was likely “preconditioned by the amount of alpine permafrost melting” seen in recent years, said Brent Ward, co-director of the Centre for Natural Hazards Research in the Earth Sciences Department at Simon Fraser University. “With the summers getting warmer, we’re starting to see degradation of the permafrost, and this landslide, the initial landslide, is pretty strongly associated with that really high heat wave we had last week, where we had above-average temperatures,” Ward said. With rapid snowmelt, water trickles down into rock fractures and builds up along some of the “failure planes,” Ward said. With enough pressure, it can weaken the rocks and trigger a failure. With hotter, drier summers in the longterm forecast, can we expect to see more of these types of slides? “That is what people are trying to

NATURAL HAZARD The aftermath of two landslides on Joffre Peak. PHOTO BY WILFRIED BRAUN

research,” Ward said. “They’re trying to see if there is an increase in frequency, and part of the issue we have is these things can happen in pretty remote areas, and we don’t know about it.” That being said, “yeah, we’re

concerned,” Ward added. “It’s kind of like a cascading hazard situation, where we have global warming, and that can trigger other types of hazards.

SEE PAGE 20

CURE LAKESIDE PATIO SEASON SPECIALS

SUNDAY FUNDAY all day happy hour drinks!

LOUNGE &PATIO

MEATLESS MONDAY vegan feature sandwich $15

SANGRIA TUESDAY all day sangria $7

‘GO LOCAL’ WEDNESDAY THIRSTY THURDAY cure burger $15 all day 1/2 price select beer $5 bottles of bubbles & house wine $7 select wine

HAPPY HOUR daily drink specials 2:00 - 4:00 pm 9:00 - 10:00 pm

2131 lake placid road, whistler creekside | www.nitalakelodge.com | 604 966 5700 | free shuttle to/from whistler village | complimentary parking 18 MAY 23, 2019

>>


NEWS WHISTLER << FROM PAGE 18 “Here, people are arguing that we’re starting to see an increase in these highalpine landslides, again, due to permafrost melting.” Avid hiker and Abbottsford resident Wilfried Braun couldn’t resist the opportunity to scope out the damage for himself over the May long weekend. A longtime volunteer spotter with the Civil Air Search and Rescue Association (CASARA), Braun accepted CASARA pilot Daniel Jun’s invitation to head up for a bird’s eye view—and to snap a few photos— on Saturday, May 18. “It’s more and more impressive when you see it with your own eyes,” said Braun when reached by phone. “When you see a picture, you see one thing. The picture I had, with the whole slide in one picture, that was actually an awesome opportunity because from the right angle, that (view of the slide) wasn’t published before.” The resulting damage, he added, “was obviously more devastating than expected.” Following the slides, experts told Pique the hiking trail in Joffre Lakes Provincial Park, located on the opposite side of the mountain to the slides, remained unaffected. Though debris appears to be falling into Upper Joffre Lake in one shot captured by Braun, he estimates that’s the result of normal springtime activity—but adds that

AFTERMATH An aerial photograph showing the landslide deposit down the valley. PHOTO COURTESY OF BC PARKS

this year’s activity, by his estimates, might have resulted in slightly more debris falling into the lake than usual. “In the spring, when the snow starts to melt there’s little slides here and there,” explained Braun. “It seems like it’s a constant crumbling coming down (into

Whistler's Favourite Steakhouse In 1998, Canada's Premier Steakhouse opened on the mountain. After 20 years, we're proud to be named Whistler's Best, year after year.

Four-Course Spring Menu Start with our famous Cheese Toast, then choose from a selection of Hy's favourite appetizers, entrées and desserts.

4995

$

Sunday to Thursday

HY’S STEAKHOUSE WHISTLER | 4308 MAIN ST ( I N T H E D E LTA H OT E L ) | 6 0 4 .9 0 5 .5 5 5 5 | H Y S S T E A K H O U S E.C O M

20 MAY 23, 2019

the lake), it’s just the opposite side of the slide, so there’s obviously something going on there. “It’s hard to judge it that way, but it looks interesting from that angle, that’s for sure,” he added. So, did seeing the significant damage

for himself make Braun reconsider hiking in the Joffre region this year? “Obviously, safety is always a concern. It just makes you more aware, but it wouldn’t stop me at all from going again,” he said. -with files from Megan Lalonde n


Your adventure awaits Ziptrek Ecotours hosts a selection of breathtaking zipline tours. Our wilderness adventure area is located directly above Whistler Village, in the spectacular temperate rainforest valley between Whistler and Blackcomb Mountains.

Discover eco-exhilarationÂŽ

ziptrek.com 604.935.0001


NEWS WHISTLER

Sea to Sky Removal recognized by Recycling Council of BC COMPANY HAS DIVERTED OVER 900,000 KILOGRAMS OF WASTE SINCE 2017

BY BRADEN DUPUIS THE ACCLAIM KEEPS PILING UP for Sea to Sky Removal. The local waste removal company recently accepted an Environmental Award from the Recycling Council of British Columbia (RCBC) for its efforts in diverting construction waste from landfills. Just one week earlier, the company announced it is now a Certified B Corporation (recognizing the overall positive impact of the business). “It’s a pretty huge deal,” said Cinci Csere, who co-founded Sea to Sky Removal with her husband Chris Arkell in 2016. “It actually raises the bar of how construction waste is managed, and it really sets a new standard of being environmentally conscious in the industry, so I think it’s a really big message.” The new accolades come on the heels of a Best Concept award at the 2018 BC Small Business Awards and a Sustainability in Action Business nod at the 2018 Whistler Excellence Awards.

Based in Squamish and operating throughout the Sea to Sky and Lower Mainland, the company works with construction firms to recycle construction waste and divert materials from the landfill, sorting through waste by hand. They are the first company in the region to install recycling stations on construction sites (which Csere estimates divert about 136 kilograms per service alone). “We saw that that was actually a real benefit on construction sites, and the crews actually really loved that,” she said. “They actually saw the visual impacts that those recycling stations did, and they saw us actually deconstruct construction waste onsite.” Looking at its diversion rates, it’s easy to see why the company is garnering such attention. In 2017, the company hauled 607,968 kilograms of material and diverted 367,863 kgs from the landfill. That number grew massively in 2018, to the tune of 814,815 kgs of material hauled away and 522,896 kgs diverted from landfills. “In terms of the construction industry, for having just the two trucks, (those stats

are) extremely impressive,” Arkell said. “I think that pushed us over the top.” With a client list of more than 300 contractors throughout Metro Vancouver and the Sea to Sky, Arkell estimates his crew hits “at least 500” construction sites every year—which means a lot of work for his five staff members (seven if you count himself and Csere).

“We have to do this. It’s not a matter of, ‘we should be doing this ... ’” - CHRIS ARKELL

“It does take a little bit more time than the traditional way of throwing everything out, but we’ve got everything down to a pretty good science and a system,” he said. “So it doesn’t take that much longer, which is one of the things we’re trying to stress to everyone: that if you get your crews and everyone trained properly it’s not that

big of a time difference between doing it the right way or everything just getting thrown out.” Having been involved in the construction industry since he was 14 years old, Arkell sees Sea to Sky Removal as his way of servicing that industry. “We’re very focused on the environment and what’s happening in the world, and we kind of figured that for anything to actually happen you need to be responsible for your actions, and you need to be able to basically put your money where your mouth is,” he said. “It’s our way of being able to make sure that whatever we touch is actually handled properly.” The hope is that the broader message spreads, whether to contractors and workers on construction sites or the general public. “I think it’s a matter of constant education, and we educate our clients and even people who aren’t our clients all the time, and just get the word out and say, ‘Look, you know what? We have to do this. It’s not a matter of, ‘we should be doing this,’” Arkell said. “We have to do this if we want things to change, and we figured why not start in our own backyard?”n

EQUIPPED FOR LIFE'S AUTHENTIC ADVENTURES

2019 OUTBACK STARTING FROM $31,095 ^ Includes Freight & PDI

LEASE / FINANCE

0.5

%*

UP TO 36 MONTHS

or

RECEIVE

2,000

$

CASH REBATE

Northshore Auto Mall | 809 Automall Drive, North Vancouver, BC | (604) 980-2464 | JPSubaruNorthshore.com ^Pricing applies to a 2019 Subaru Outback 4-cyl 2.5i CVT (KD225) with MSRP starting from $31,095 including freight & PDI ($1,800). Documentation fee ($395), wheel locks ($100), A/C levy ($100), tire levy ($25), and taxes extra. *0.5%/0.5% lease/finance APR available on all new 2019 Subaru Outback models up to a 36/36-month term. Financing and leasing programs available through Subaru Credit Canada Inc. on approved credit. Vehicle shown solely for purposes of illustration, and may not be equipped exactly as shown. Offers valid until May 31, 2019. Some conditions may apply; offers are time limited and may change without notice. See Jim Pattison Subaru Northshore for complete details. Dealer #40224.

22 MAY 23, 2019


NEWS WHISTLER

BC AdventureSmart team hits the Sea to Sky TEAM WAS IN SQUAMISH ON MONDAY, MAY 20 AND WILL RETURN TO CORRIDOR FOR FOUR DAYS IN JUNE

BY JOEL BARDE WITH SUMMER JUST AROUND the corner, the BC AdventureSmart team is in the full swing of things, getting its safety message out to backcountry users across the province. Two members of the team held court at the Chief in Squamish on Monday, May 20. The goal of the outreach is to increase awareness about safety and reduce the number and severity of search and rescue calls in the province, explained BC AdventureSmart Coordinator Sandra Riches. “They talk to hikers and climbers and park visitors, mainly about the three Ts,” she said, referring to trip planning, training and taking the essentials (more on this to come). Team members also distribute safety equipment—such as emergency whistles, safety emergency shelters, and emergencysignalling cards that can be used to signal to aircrafts—or other interested parties. Over the summer, the AdventureSmart team will spend four days in the upper Sea to Sky corridor. (They can be found at the Overland Rally in Whistler on June 27 and 28, Joffre Lakes Provincial Park and a Blackcomb

SAFETY FIRST The AdventureSmart team will be in the corridor for four days this summer, getting its safety message out in-person at busy recreation destinations.

PHOTO BY ALYSSA NOEL

Helicopter event on June 29, and then back at the Chief in Squamish on June 30.) “The corridor is a busy area, and search-and-rescue members and searchand-rescue groups are some of the busiest in the province,” said Riches. But with a budget that comes in at just under a half a million dollars, the AdventureSmart team is limited in terms of the resources it can dedicate to the region, she said.

“I’d love to have my crew up (in the corridor) all summer … and just work between Lillooet and the North Shore,” said Riches. “It would definitely go to good use and is needed. (But) our budget is for the province, and I need to represent all of the regions we work with.” Outreach workers hammer home the “Three Ts” to all the outdoor enthusiasts they encounter: • TRIP PLAN: This involves planning a

trip and filing a trip plan, which are separate things. Riches said the AdventureSmart app is particularly helpful with this, as it prompts users to let family and friends know where you are going, who you are with, and when you’re planning on being back. • TRAINING: Ensuring that you are adequately prepared is also critical, said Riches. Make sure you are physically fit for where you are going and have completed any relevant courses. • TAKE THE ESSENTIALS: Bring a fire making kit, extra clothing, and a signalling device. More information can be found on the AdventureSmart website at www.adventuresmart.ca/land/surviveessentials.htm. It is also important to be aware of your surroundings and the situation including any dangerous features, such as cliffs, or cold water. You have to know your limits—know what you are capable of taking on, said Riches. “Are you capable of mountain biking that trail? Are you capable to hike it?” she said. The BC AdvenutreSmart Trip App is available for download on Apple and Android devices. It is also available for use via web browser here: plan. adventuresmart.ca. n

49

3 COURSES FOR

$

UNTIL MAY 31ST

ONLY 9 DAYS LEFT

DON’T MISS OUT! RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED

GOING OUT FOR DINNER, GO LOCAL! LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED FOR OVER 33 YEARS.

604.932.5565 CALL FOR RESERVATIONS

www.rimrockwhistler.com

24 MAY 23, 2019


20th ANNIVERSARY!


NEWS WHISTLER

Man injured after fall in Brandywine Falls Provincial Park POLICE BRIEFS: TRUCK STOLEN FROM CHEAKAMUS CROSSING PARKADE; CAR KEYS, TIRES SLASHED IN SEPARATE INCIDENT

BY MEGAN LALONDE A 21-YEAR-OLD MAN from Burnaby was injured after he fell approximately 30 metres while hiking in Brandywine Falls Provincial Park on Saturday, May 18, said Whistler RCMP.

Whistler RCMP was called to the scene at approximately 1:40 p.m. “The male suffered substantial injuries, not believed to be life threatening, and required (Search and Rescue) helicopter extraction,” read the release. Whistler Search and Rescue (WSAR), Blackcomb Helicopters, BC Ambulance, BC Parks and Whistler RCMP closed the

PICKUP TRUCK STOLEN FROM UNDERGROUND PARKADE IN CHEAKAMUS A black Toyota Tacoma pickup truck was stolen from an underground parkade in Cheakamus Crossing over the weekend. At approximately 10:15 p.m. on Monday, May 20, police were notified that

“The male suffered substantial injuries, not believed to be life threatening, and required (Search and Rescue) helicopter extraction.” - RCMP NEWS RELEASE

According to a release, the man was hiking near the base of the falls when he began to climb up towards the first observation deck. During the climb, he lost his footing and fell approximately 30 metres, or 100 feet, to the rocks below.

park for approximately two hours on the busy holiday weekend in order for WSAR to safely extricate the injured male and his caregivers, via a long line, to the Brandywine parking lot, where an ambulance was waiting to transport him to hospital.

the vehicle, a 2017 model with a BC licence plate of LA6848, was missing from the 1300 block of Cloudburst Drive. According to the release, the vehicle was stolen sometime between the hours of 3 p.m. on Sunday, May 19 and 8:30 p.m. on

Fertility consultations now available in Whistler! We are delighted to announce the opening of our satellite office at the Whistler Medical Clinic to bring our brand of excellence in fertility care to the patients of the SeaͲtoͲSky Corridor. PCRM is Canada’s largest Fertility Clinic, with offices in British Columbia and Alberta. We provide a full spectrum of fertility services including consultation, IUI, IVF, Egg freezing, and reproductive genetics. Talk with your health care provider today for a referral to see us.   If you have questions, call us at 604 422 7276 or visit us at:





BC        AB   Toll Free 





Whistler Burnaby Surrey  Vancouver Edmonton 1 866 481 7276

26 MAY 23, 2019

pacificfertility.ca



201Ͳ4380 Lorimer Road 500Ͳ4601 Canada Way 1201Ͳ13737 96 Avenue 507 West Broadway 9888 Jasper Avenue

Monday, May 20. If you see the vehicle, police are reminding you not to approach it or any of the occupants and to call 911, Whistler RCMP at 604-932-3044 or Crimestoppers.

POLICE LOOKING FOR INFORMATION AFTER CAR KEYED, TIRES SLASHED Whistler RCMP is investigating after receiving a report of a vehicle that had its hood “keyed” and two tires slashed last week. At roughly 7:30 a.m. on May 18, police were notified of the damage to a 2015 Hyundai Sonata. Police believe the damage occurred while the vehicle was parked in the 1400 block of Alta Lake Road between the hours of 4 p.m. on Friday, May 17 and 6 a.m. on Saturday, May 18, said a release. Whistler police have yet to locate any video evidence or potential witnesses to the incident. If you have any information about this event, police ask that you contact the Whistler RCMP at 604-932-3044 or Crimestoppers. n


LOBSTER SEASON IS IN FULLSEASON SWING! LOBSTER IS FULL SWING! FullIN lobster at half price

Cheryl Anne Morningstar

C

JUNE 5, 1959 – MAY 10, 2019

heryl, truly a bright shining star, passed away May 10, in Vancouver at George Pearson Centre. She leaves behind her ever-loving partner of 30 years Robbie Metza, her two precious sons, Birken and Braden, her dedicated and loving twin sister, Susan Morningstar, nephews and nieces.

Cheryl was born in Edmonton, Alberta and attended M.E. LaZerte High School. She became fluent in French during her year in Grenoble, France. She graduated from BCIT in the Hotel and Hospitality program and moved to Whistler in 1982. For 10 years she worked with the Delta Hotel and became the Sales Manager. Cheryl worked as a ski instructor for Whistler/Blackcomb and managed the Sun Dog Eyewear line in Whistler. She then joined her husband and partner as Office Manager of Rainbow Electric. Cheryl was kind, caring, talented and loads of fun! She sparkled with joy and laughter and loved a challenge. A beautiful mother and strong partner, Cheryl’s passion was supporting, loving and sharing with her family. She enjoyed cooking and if ever you were at her table on a special occasion you know she loved to try new recipes and prepared a wicked good pastry! Savary Island was a favourite place to share with her family. Cheryl was an active person in paddling, skiing, hiking, biking, playing squash and always stayed fit with her chin up bar! She was a powder hound on Friday mornings with her best girlfriends and spent hours on the Nordic ski trails at Whistler Olympic Park and Lost Lake. She was a skillful and early adopter of mountain biking and introduced Robbie to the love of the sport and the trails. She was a longstanding member of WORCA.

50 50

% OFF %

Full lobster at half price

OFF

Offered à la carte or as part of the 3-course & 5-course Spring menu options. Offered- àFRIDAY la carte |orLIMITED as part of TIME the 3-course SUNDAY OFFER & 5-course Spring menu options.

Our lobsters are sourced from the Iles de la Madeleine (Magdalen Islands),

SUNDAY - FRIDAY | LIMITED TIME OFFER a small archipelago in the Gulf of St-Lawrence in Quebec, and are shipped directly to us by local fishermen. Magdalen Islands lobsters are known for their high quality and enhanced flavour due to the rocky seabed and cold Our lobsters are sourced from the Iles de la Madeleine (Magdalen Islands), waters surrounding the archipelago, giving them a solid and mineral-rich shell. a small archipelago in the Gulf of St-Lawrence in Quebec, and are shipped directly to us by local fishermen. Magdalen Islands lobsters are known for their high quality and enhanced flavour due to the rocky seabed and cold waters surrounding the archipelago, giving them a solid and mineral-rich shell.

Come taste Canada’s best lobster exclusively at Bearfoot Bistro. Come taste Canada’s best lobster exclusively at Bearfoot Bistro.

Cheryl was a formidable and efficient organizer, logistics magician and communicator. From birthday parties to special gatherings, the Whistler Canoe Classic, the Whistler Loppet – Cheryl made things happen no matter the challenges. She was founder, board member, coach and tireless volunteer organizer of the Whistler Nordics Ski Club. Cheryl honed her public speaking skills with Toast Masters and always presented a polished presentation at work or special events. Cheryl was all about community and she loved the town of Whistler. Her boys grew up in Whistler, moving through the local school system. She volunteered at the schools with PAC and the volunteer lunch programs. In turn the community has surrounded our family and Cheryl with heartfelt love and support. We are enormously grateful to the community - to each and every person who has helped, fundraised, visited, brought food, sent messages and showed kindness in innumerable ways. Cheryl coped with the outcome of her accident with dignity and determination. She was consistently gracious to all who came to visit. During her stay at GPC Cheryl was loved by nursing, care staff and residents. They remarked “Cheryl always said ‘Thank You’ whenever we did something involving her care.” Our family acknowledges and is deeply grateful for all the amazing care, beginning with the skill and expertise of the rescue team, the ER staff at Whistler Medical Clinic, the outstanding care and intervention of the ICU and Spinal Unit at VGH, the attention and support of all the health care providers at George Pearson Centre and GF Strong. A special thank you to the nursing staff, Dr. Dunne and Dr. J for their compassion and care in the final days. So, look to the sky to see that a new star is born in the galaxy as Cheryl continues to shine brightly – inspiring us all to live our lives and hold precious our time with loved ones. In lieu of flowers please consider giving a gift to your favourite charity. A Celebration of Life is planned for Sunday June 16 at the Fairmont Chateau Whistler at 3pm.

4121 VILLAGE GREEN ADJACENT TO LISTEL HOTEL 604 932 3433 | BEARFOOTBISTRO.COM 4121 VILLAGE GREEN ADJACENT TO LISTEL HOTEL 604 932 3433 | BEARFOOTBISTRO.COM

MAY 23, 2019

27


NEWS PEMBERTON & THE VALLEY

Pemberton takes over recreational services from SLRD VOP MAYOR SAYS MOVE MAKES SENSE GIVEN PLANS FOR NEW RECREATION PROJECTS

BY JOEL BARDE THE SQUAMISH-LILLOOET Regional District (SLRD) and the Village of Pemberton (VOP) have finalized the transfer of management of the Pemberton and District Recreation Service. Effective June 1, the service will be managed by the VOP. The agreement will last for a five-year term, allowing both parties to review the agreement and make any required modifications at the end of that time. “We have retained all of the same staff at the community centre and other recreation staff,” said VOP Mayor Mike Richman. The move makes sense given that many recreational assets sit within the boundaries of the VOP and other slated projects will as well. “The obvious example is our new soccer fields,” said Richman, referring to the plan for the new VOP recreational lands that sit off Pemberton Farm Road East. Richman was also quick to commend the SLRD for its management of the service over the years (it was managed by the Resort Municipality of Whistler prior to that) and

NEW MANAGEMENT The Village of Pemberton

is set to take over management of the Pemberton and District Community Centre and other recreation services amenities. PHOTO SUBMITTED

28 MAY 23, 2019

underline that no one will be losing their job in the changeover. “This is an administrative and management transfer,” said Richman. “Staff and managers have done an awesome job. It just makes sense at this point for the administration (to run) through the Village of Pemberton.” Governance of the department, however, will continue to be overseen by

Meadows and Signal Fields, as well as the new field on the recreation lands. The VOP currently has a major project planned for the recreation lands, a $4,224,405 regulation FIFA-sized soccer field and amenity building on the property. It has applied for a grant from the Community, Culture and Recreation Infrastructure Program, a financial-support stream supported with both provincial and

“We have retained all the same staff at the community centre and other recreation staff.” - MAYOR MIKE RICHMAN

the Pemberton Valley Utilities and Services Committee, which oversees joint services between the SLRD and the VOP and is made up of elected representatives and staff from the VOP and SLRD. Angela Barth will stay on as recreation services manager for the department, said Richman. “She does an awesome job and has a super strong team that works for her,” he said. The Pemberton and District Recreation Services operates and programs the Pemberton and District Community Centre, the Youth and Senior Centre, Pemberton

federal tax money, to fund the majority of the project, and will likely scale the project down if it cannot secure funding for it. The VOP is expecting to hear back about its application in December. “Currently, where our kids play soccer is on leased land from the school district,” said Richman, adding that has impeded the VOP’s ability to significantly invest in the soccer fields. Improving recreation amenities remains a major priority for the current council, added Richman. “We’ve got an active youthful

community, with athletes that punch well above their weight class,” said Richman. “We want to make sure we provide these recreational facilities.” Yet when it comes to an indoor pool— something that many in the community want—Richman said that it’s still likely a ways off. “We don’t feel at this point we have the tax-base to be able to support that,” said Richman, adding that the maintenance alone would present a “huge financial burden on our taxpayers.” According to SLRD Area C Director Russell Mack the transfer deal makes sense and is fully supported on the SLRD side of things. “I think it will work out just fine,” said Mack, adding that the entities have been discussing the transfer for years. “It just seems like it’s a better idea for them to be managing all of the infrastructure, and Area C just pays into it as a joint service,” said Mack adding that it was critical that no one lost their job in the transfer. “That absolutely was a priority to me—and I think everyone else,” he said. “It’s the right thing to do.” Mack said he is looking forward to the evolution of the recreational lands going forward, which are poised to serve as a recreational hub for the Pemberton Valley. “(It) will be a really nice facility once it’s done,” said Mack. “It will be great for the community. n


NEWS PEMBERTON & THE VALLEY

WE KNOW PEMBERTON INSIDE & OUT 7374 PEMBERTON FARM ROAD

$3,499,000

PEMBERTON

Amazing family home on 8.1 acres with rezoning potential in the Village of Pemberton! Located adjacent to The Ridge and Sunstone housing developments.

BUILDING PEMBERTON The Pemberton and District Chamber of Commerce hs received money that will be used

Bedrooms:

to develop an economic development strategy and action plan for the Pemberton area.

7

PHOTO BY NATLIE LANGMANN

Pemberton Chamber secures $100,000 for economic development strategy and action plan

WHILE

ECONOMIC

ACTIVITY

may be humming along in the Pemberton Valley, some feel the area lacks a clear vision for how things should unfold in the coming decades. That is about to change, as a group of stakeholders has just secured a $100,000 provincial government grant to develop a Community Economic Development Strategy and Action Plan for the area. “We feel a bit of a change coming in Pemberton,” said Pemberton and District Chamber of Commerce president Graham Turner. A “strategy and plan” is needed to guide a surge of economic activity going on in the area, he added. The winning application was developed with support from the Pemberton and Area Economic Collaborative, a group that meets quarterly and includes representatives of the chamber, the Squamish-Lillooet Regional District, The Village of Pemberton (VOP) and local First Nations. While the grant application was made by the chamber, the money will be administered through the VOP, as the chamber isn’t large enough to have audited financials. In Turner’s view, the money will allow the collaborative to build on previous work and develop a guiding vision for the Pemberton area. “We’re all kind of working on this off the side of our desks right now,” said Turner. Some of the money—$60,000 over two years—will be used to hire a dedicated project manager who will advance the project. “We’ve had some very good applicants already,” said Turner. “We will be interviewing for that (position) in the next couple weeks.” Pemberton hotels are filled with construction and internet-infrastructure workers, remarked Turner. “Do we even

have enough beds today for tourists? These are the (important) questions, but who is actually sitting somewhere and looking at (them)?” There will also be money for a consultant charged with stakeholder engagement, added Turner. “We are talking about discussions between the Village, [Squamish Lillooet Regional District], N’quatqua (and) Lil’wat (Nations). This is hard work ... This has never really been done before,” he said. The project will also receive in-kind support totalling $25,000 from the SLRD, the VOP and the Lil’wat and N’Quatqua Nations.

5

DAN SCARRATT* dan@wrec.com 604 938 4444

7463 ASPEN BOULEVARD

$1,069,000

PEMBERTON

Must see 3 bedroom family home in central location with 2 bedroom conforming suite. Flexible layout and stellar views.

PROJECT IS BEING STEERED BY GOVERNMENT, FIRST NATIONS, AND BUSINESS STAKEHOLDERS, SAYS CHAMBER PRESIDENT

BY JOEL BARDE

Bathrooms:

Bedrooms:

Bathrooms:

5

4

DANIELLE MENZEL* danielle@wrec.com 604 698 5128

7604-B PEMBERTON MEADOWS RD. PEMBERTON

$1,899,000

Experience ever ything that Pemberton has to offer from this custom estate home sitting on almost three quarters of an acre with spectacular views of Mount Currie. Bedrooms:

4.5

“We feel a bit of a change coming in Pemberton.”

Bathrooms:

2.5

ERIN MCCARDLE STIEL erin@wrec.com 604 902 0520

- GRAHAM TURNER

#305 PEMBERTON GATEWAY

$275,000

7330 ARBUTUS ST., PEMBERTON

It will work in coordination with Nuk’w7ánttal’, an ongoing relationship building process that involves the VOP, Lil’wat and N’quatqua Nations and the SLRD. The initiative is the latest high-profile project for the chamber, which recently received $10,000 from the BC Rural Dividend Program to develop a “data portal,” which showcases current data and statistics for the region. With the funding ready for the strategy, Pemberton is in a much better position to guide its economic future in a sound way, said Turner. “Economic development is … happening all around us,” he said. “We are at a point where there is an opportunity to steer this boat.” n

Why rent when you can own? Centrally located one bedroom condo in the Pemberton Gateway with westerly views. Offering a bright living space with an open layout. Bedrooms:

1

Bathrooms:

1

LISA AMES

lisaa@wrec.com 604 849 4663

* Denotes Personal Real Estate Corporation

604 894 5166 | WHISTLERREALESTATE.CA MAY 23, 2019

29


DISPATCHES OUT OF RANGE

Will new outdoor partnership budge the D.C. stalemate on climate change? BY ALLEN BEST In early February, the new Outdoor Business Climate Partnership faced its first test, and its response made some people cranky. The president of the International Ski Federation had made remarks to a Swiss newspaper that seemed dismissive of the threat of climate change. “To everyone who approached me shivering, I said ‘Welcome to global warming!’” said Gian-Franco Kasper, the head of the FIS since 1998, referring to the cold at the PyeongChang Olympics last year. “There are always some winters that are cold and others warm.” Kasper was showered with denunciations, but the trio of industry heavyweights who the previous week had announced their partnership to seek climate change solutions remained publicly mum. “We didn’t feel that we needed to come out and have a social media attack on him,” says Chris Steinkamp, who represents the Park City-based Snowsports Industries America, or SIA. “That’s not our role.” Instead, says Steinkamp, his organization, SIA, had “high-level

GLORY DAYS ARE OVER Coal production is tumbling from its once-royal status. Nationally, production in 2018 fell to the lowest level in 39 years according to the Energy Information Administration.

PHOTO BY ALLEN BEST

30 MAY 23, 2019

discussions” with the appropriate people in what he calls a “more thoughtful and measured approach.” “We are not just attracted by shiny objects,” says Geraldine Link, director of public policy for the National Ski Areas Association. “The foundation for our partnership is working with respect when we’re trying to affect climate change, and some of the messaging we saw—using profanities and calling the leader of the FIS a dinosaur and a denier, calling people names and using labels—that’s not what we’re all about.” At least in its early phase, this partnership is all about working with lawmakers in Washington D.C. and their staff, making the case for climate change as a business opportunity as well as an existential threat. The emphasis is finding bipartisan common ground. Putting a price on carbon emissions to accelerate innovation is one among several goals. Conversation is the key thing.

HEADING TO WASHINGTON Members of the three business trade groups— NSAA, Snowsports Industries America, and the Outdoor Industry Association—that comprise the Outdoor Business Climate Partnership descended on Washington D.C. for a lobbying blitz May 21 and 22. Orchestrating the effort will be the much larger Ceres Policy Network, a Boston-based non-profit that has more than 50 members,

including major companies such as Microsoft, Ben & Jerry’s, and Kaiser Permanente. In its 2019 Policy Outlook, Ceres identified carbon pricing as among its top five priorities. “In 2018, we saw a carbon-pricing bill introduced by a bipartisan group of House lawmakers, and another introduced by House Republicans—the first Republican carbon-pricing legislation since 2010,” the report says. “We will work to advance the conversation with lawmakers in both parties, and in both chambers, providing business support for meaningful progress.” Ceres also wants to see incentives for electric-vehicle infrastructure restored, appropriations for climate and clean energy research continued, and climate change mitigation integrated into new and existing infrastructure policy. A particular focus in Washington is the bipartisan House Climate Solutions Caucus. Like Noah’s Ark, it requires membership in pairs: a Republican for every Democrat. In the last election, it lost 20 Republicans and hence 20 Democrats. The total membership in the caucus slimmed from 90 members to 50, according to Roll Call. In going to Washington D.C., the new climate partnership can claim to represent a hunk of the US$837 billion outdoor recreation industry. Largest among the three trade organizations is the Boulder-based Outdoor Industry Association. It proclaims itself as the voice of the outdoor recreation industry, both

locally and in Washington D.C. Members include more than 1,200 manufacturers, retailers, distributors, suppliers, and others from across the country. Andrew Pappas, manager of state and local policy for OIA, says the message he’ll make in Washington, D.C. is that climate change is a business issue, not just an environmental issue. “Our businesses do rely upon the certainty of environmental quality, and there needs to be a bipartisan solution to climate change,” says Pappas. One blueprint for achieving bipartisan climate change action in Washington, says Pappas, is the reauthorization of the Land and Water Fund as part of a public lands package. Funding remains missing, although a bill with bipartisan support proposes to make funding permanent.

BRIDGING THE GAPS Even the reauthorization for multiple years “definitely did not happen overnight,” says Pappas. “I think it’s the same thing with climate. It won’t be overnight. We need to bridge gaps and find common ground, and hopefully this partnership can find those common grounds and bring business voices to (achieve) solutions.” That sounds hopelessly naïve. Climate change has become a partisan issue. Republicans have only occasionally bucked Donald Trump, and Trump has called


DISPATCHES OUT OF RANGE

SEEING OPPORTUNITIES, NOT GLOOM This gloominess, though, will not be the entrée of the businesses descending upon congressional offices. “If you talk about resorts being out of business that’s a pretty tough statement to make, so you had better be careful,” says Steinkamp. Rather, the talk will be primarily of silver linings: opportunity for economic growth in ways that reduce climatic and hence economic peril. If a price on carbon ranks high on the agenda, the partnership isn’t married to a specific policy. But the goal is to decarbonize the economy by 2050, says Steinkamp. The climate partnership began coming together in discussions last autumn. Part of the impetus, says NSAA’s Link, was the Trump administration’s rollback of energy and safety requirements, including the weakening of the fuel efficiency standards. A new category of economic data from the U.S. government that measures the economic bulk of the recreation industry adds muscle to the argument, Link says. “It gives us a lot of power on the national stage.” In her view, the new partnership can deliver synergies in reducing carbon

footprints of the individual members. For example, can aggregated power-purchase agreements provide renewable electricity supplies, much as what Vail Resorts was able to do with its purchase of generation from a wind farm in eastern Nebraska? In making efforts to reduce their own carbon footprints, says Link, the members will be able to add credibility to lobbying efforts. “We are optimistic that we can at least begin a dialogue and build support.” The last significant climate change legislation in Congress was in 2009. Called the Waxman-Markey bill, after its primary sponsors, Rep. Henry Waxman, of California, and then-Rep. (and now Sen.) Ed Markey, of Massachusetts, it would have instituted a cap-and-trade system, forcing innovation by effectively limiting emissions. Congressional members from farm and coal states sank the legislation. Wyoming remains the nation’s largest producer of coal. As of 2017, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, it was responsible for 41 per cent of production, followed by West Virginia at 12 per cent. Will this delegation try to entertain a conversation with one of Wyoming’s congressional delegation, perhaps Sen. John Barrasso? “Absolutely,” Steinkamp answered when posed the rhetorical question. “There are a lot of conversations going on about climate change behind closed doors.”

2018

global warming a Chinese hoax and done everything in his power to bring back the failing coal industry and to stall other efforts to decarbonize the economy. Given this backdrop, can this new coalition really hope to make headway in Washington? SIA’s Steinkamp sees a different reality than the overt partisan divide. The reality of human-caused climate change is accepted by people on both sides of the political aisle, he says. What remains absent is consensus about the immediate need for a broad response at the federal level. When he goes to Washington, he will emphasize that major action now will avert the worst damage of the future. Think spending $1 today to avoid spending $10 in a few decades. “You have a lot of people, conservatives, who are not coming out against climate change,” says Steinkamp, who headed Protect Our Winters for 10 years. “I do think they believe that climate change is real, but they need to be given compelling arguments to address it. And I think the compelling argument is the economic case.” For ski areas, though, the climate case is a business case. “The ski industry in Colorado, if we don’t take action now, we’ll lose 80 per cent of our ski season by 2090,” says Steinkamp. In the long run, low-elevation ski areas clearly will be in trouble. Whistler already gets lots of rain during winter at the base area. Rain will creep up the mountain. Some resorts in California may not make it. Rocky Mountain resorts, being higher and more inland, will likely have snow well through the 21st century. But the warming climate has arguably already shortened ski season and will continue to do so even more. Plus, January rain will become more common. (See story from 2016.) As well, climate havoc in world economics may erode the affluence that that allows people to take vacations in Colorado.

PROVIDING COVER What the climate partnership must do, whether it’s Barrasso or other members of Congress, is provide “the rationale and cover to speak out on it,” says Steinkamp. “This isn’t a red-and-blue state thing any more. It just can’t be. John Barrasso is a rational human being who has to understand that climate change is real.” Even more, added Steinkamp, Barrasso has seen coal tumble from its once royal status. Coal production nationally in 2018 fell to the lowest level in 39 years, the Energy Information Administration reported. “Warning bells are ringing across Wyoming’s Powder River Basin that the largest producing coal region of the country is in big trouble,” reports Heather Richardson of the Casper-Star Tribune in April. “Wyoming made its peace with the idea that coal’s best years were likely behind her, but that a more modest future for Wyoming coal, with manageable losses over time, was also likely,” Richardson added. “That may not be the case.” The Outdoor Business Climate Partnership agenda is still being invented. If there’s agreement on the need for carbon pricing, it’s not the singular goal. A carbon tax in France yielded the yellowvest protests. Government must foster alternatives, such as cleaner cars. “That’s where the Trump administration regulatory rollbacks make no sense,” says NSAA’s Link. But the most important thing is joining of singular voices into one. “Getting the trade groups behind climate change is something we have been talking about for a long time,” says Steinkamp, “and it’s finally happening.” n

Begins Monday, May 27th

Offered Sundays - Thursdays

Reservations recommended

apres daily in the lounge from 3-5 pm oyster specials & bar menu dinner from 5 pm

4222 village square

604 932 4540

www.araxi.com MAY 23, 2019

31


DISPATCHES OUT OF RANGE

EST.2006

Immigrating great people to a great country. We are experts in Canadian immigration law with an established reputation for delivering results. Our Roadmap Consultation identifies options for immigrating to Canada or hiring a foreign worker. Our clients agree this is a vital step to achieving their immigration objectives. Head Office in Whistler: 201 – 4230 Gateway Drive

(inside the Whistler Chamber of Commerce)

Brooke Finlay, Partner & Managing Director, RCIC #514337 Authorized by the Government of Canada to represent applications to the Minister of Immigration. Brooke graduated top of her class from UBC’s Certificate in Immigration: Laws, Policies and Procedures program and was recognized by the Canadian Association of Professional Immigration Consultants for her academic achievements.

E:

Call us at 1-888-266-1161 info@whistlerimmigration.com w: whistlerimmigration.com

Serving the corridor for over 25 years!

Karen and her associate Krystle worked extremely hard on our mortgage for us. We have worked with her throughout the years and she is attentive and professional. It made the biggest investment of our life much easier with her guiding us through each step. I am happy to have found her and I have no doubt we will work together again in the future! - B & B Burton

Eileen Craig is dedicated and professional getting the job done and can be very knowledgeable with the new tougher financing rules.I highly recommend Eileen she is my first choice for referring business too. - L.H.

karengarrett.ca / eileencraig.ca

Located at 106 - 7015 Nesters Rd Whistler BC V8E 0X1

32 MAY 23, 2019

Mountain News: Big winter is over, but the digging out still continues BY ALLEN BEST allen.best@comcast.net ASPEN, COLO. —Much of the “roar” in the Roaring Fork River has been diminished, as the Aspen Times’ Scott Condon observed some years ago, because of transmountain diversions from the river’s headwaters near Independence Pass. This year, there was much roaring of avalanches. Those avalanches and the uncommonly deep snowfall have made life more challenging for caretakers at Grizzly Reservoir, where water is stored for diversion under the Continental Divide. The primary customers for the diverted waters are Colorado Springs and Pueblo, located at the foot of the Rocky Mountains 322 kilometres away. The Aspen Times reported that the yearround caretakers at Grizzly Reservoir were snowbound for 16 days this past winter. Their cabin at the reservoir is located nine kilometres up a gravel road from Highway 82. The highway during winter months is closed nine kilometres below, a few kilometres outside of Aspen. To buy groceries, they commonly drive through the six-kilometre tunnel under the Continental Divide during winter, emerging on a plowed Highway 82. In March, though, the highway that then goes to Leadville and Buena Vista was blocked by four avalanches, the caretaker, Glenn Schryver, told the Times in an e-mail interview. That left them for 16 days unable to leave except for snowmobiling or skiing. Now that spring has arrived, more or less, he has plowed the road out to Highway 82, but that took 13 days, compared to the three or four days that has been more common in the last decade. Opening of Highway 82 across 3,660metre Independence Pass—under which the tunnel passes, more or less—has similarly been delayed. The Aspen Daily News reported the road for the last decade has been opened by the Thursday before Memorial Day. But Colorado Department of Transportation officials are reluctant to say when they think the highway will open this year. Crews have encountered many avalanches that have left snow festooned with the trunks of pine and aspen trees. This week, helicopters were to be dispatched to drop 40 to 60 explosive charges on cornices overhanging the highway, to preemptively trigger any avalanches that might happen in the next few weeks on their own.

SQUAW VALLEY SNOW NOW 1,778-PLUS CENTIMETRES FOR SEASON TRUCKEE, Calif.—It was another snowy weekend in the Sierra Nevada. Total snowfall for this season at Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows has pushed above 1,778 centimetres, making it the third most on

record. But it will have to be a very, very snowy late May for the resort to get above the record of 2,057 cm that fell during the 201011 season, the record. Squaw will remain open seven days a week until Memorial Day, when it will switch to three-day weekends through the Fourth of July. In Colorado, Aspen has enough snow to reopen for Memorial Day. Arapahoe Basin goes until June 9.

FLOWING WITH CURRENT, FRISCO WANTS 100% CLEAN ELECTRICITY FRISCO, Colo.—Frisco has now set a goal of 100-per-cent renewable energy. But unlike some other resolutions adopted in the last decade, this one isn’t purely aspirational. It’s swimming with a strong current. With the resolution adopted last week by the town council, Frisco joins 10 other Colorado towns and cities, plus Pueblo and Summit counties, in adopting 100-per-cent goals. The goal is to get the municipality’s electricity to 100-per-cent by 2025 and the community altogether by 2035. The language of the resolution specifies that this goal is for electricity only. Decarbonizing electricity will be far easier than transportation, and transportation far easier than buildings. Many see carbon-free electricity as being crucial to both, a concept called “beneficial electrification.” Electricity for Frisco comes from Xcel Energy, an investor-owned utility that is making giant steps toward decarbonizing its power supply. Xcel first announced plans to close its work-horse power plants early to take advantage of now-cheap wind and solar resources plus what will be the largest battery storage project east of the Rocky Mountains. All this will be accomplished by 2026 and will put Xcel at 55 per cent renewable generation in Colorado. In December, a week after Frisco launched the process that produced the resolution, Xcel announced further steps, an 80 percent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions by 2030 as compared to 2050 levels. By 2050, the company vows to be 100 per cent “carbon-free” energy by 2050. Frisco’s non-binding goals were triggered by Fran Long, who is retired and living in Frisco. For eight years, though, he worked for Xcel in helping shape its response to the declining prices of renewables. In his retirement, he has also helped put together the aspirational goal adopted by Breckenridge for 100-per-cent renewables. A task force that Long led identified a three-pronged approach. First, the city government must lead by example. The resolution calls for the town to spend $25,000 to $50,000 annually during the


DISPATCHES OUT OF RANGE next several years to improve energy efficiency in its municipal facilities. Then, through an Xcel program called Renewable Connect, it can pay an added cost to allow it to say it uses 100-per-cent electricity from renewable sources. Beyond that, Frisco wants to work with high-end businesses to encourage buying output from solar gardens or other devices that will allow them to proclaim 100-percent renewable energy. The task force also recommends a marketing program directed to homes and smaller businesses. Goals of 100-per-cent renewable electricity are problematic. Aspen Electric, which provides electricity for about twothirds of the town, by 2015 had secured enough wind and hydro, mostly from distant locations, to allow it to proclaim 100 per cent renewables. In fact, some of those electrons in Aspen almost certainly originate in coal or gas plants. That doesn’t make Aspen’s claim wrong. But the fact remains that nobody has figured out how, at least at affordable cost, to deliver 100-per-cent clean energy on a broad basis. Xcel Energy, which supplies more than 60 per cent of electricity in Colorado, one of six states in which it operates, has a taller challenge. But it is a very different utility than it was in 2004, when it spent heavily in advertising to oppose a mandate that it would have to achieve 10 per cent of its electricity from renewable sources by 2020.

Once it lost the election, though, Xcel set out to comply. Integrating renewables proved far more easily than was feared. It has more than doubled the original mandate for 2020. Wind delivers 82 per cent of that generation, with another 18 per cent coming from community, rooftop, and utility-scale solar. The company has become steadily more proficient at juggling different intermittent power supplies while ensuring lights and computers remain on. This is partly the result of practice but also of relatively minor

by turbines. This has allowed the company to use its coal and natural gas plants less.M Moreover, prices of wind and then solar declined slowly at first and then dramatically. Xcel is now comfortable that existing technology will allow it to push from 55 per cent renewables in 2026 to an 80 per cent carbon reduction goal by 2030. But when announcing their goal of emissions-free energy by mid-century in December, the company’s Minneapolisbased chief executive, Ben Fowke, and

If they were all orchestrated as one in an expanded energy market across the West, however, electricity supplies and demands could more easily be matched.

technological wrinkles, such as improved weather forecasting, according to an Energy News Network story published in March. For example, a Boulder company, Global Weather corporation, projects wind—and hence electrical production—from turbines for 10 days ahead. It updates its forecasts every 15 minutes. Forecasts have become so good, said John T. Welch, director of power operations for Xcel in Colorado, that the utility uses 95 per cent to 98 per cent of the electricity generated

Alice Jackson, the chief executive of the company’s Colorado subsidiary, freely admitted they had no idea how they will achieve it. “I have a lot of confidence they will be developed,” Fowke said of new technologies. Everything is on the table, they said, including nuclear. But also including fossil fuels, if the carbon dioxide can be sequestered. So far, such technology has proven prohibitively expensive despite billions of dollars in federal support for

research and deployment. They suggested it might involve new technology. Xcel’s Welch told Energy News Network that he believes solar must play a larger role, and he believes solar forecasting must improve. Storage technology must also improve. Batteries, such as produced by Tesla at its Gigafactory near Reno, can store electricity for hours, maybe even a few days. But batteries that can store large amounts of electricity for months will be needed in Colorado. Wind is plentiful in spring but not so much in summer, when air conditioners crank up. Increased sharing of cheap renewable generation among utilities will also allow deeper penetration of carbon-free energy. Western US states and Canadian provinces are all on one grid, but the different parts are Balkanized. In other words, California is largely its own energy balancing authority, ensuring electricity supplies match electricity demands. Ditto for Colorado. The Pacific Northwest has its own balancing authority. If they were all orchestrated as one in an expanded energy market across the West, however, electricity supplies and demands could more easily be matched. California’s surplus of solar on summer afternoons, for example, might be moved to Colorado. Colorado legislators in early May adopted a bill that requires the state’s Public Utilities Commission to begin study by late this year of an energy imbalance market or regional transmission organization. n

STA RT

SUM

OM

FR 17 ING 290 R ME$17

A TRIP FOR EVERYONE escape the crowds & explore summer with us

Carbon Neutral tourism flights since 2017

blackcombhelicopters

SAVE 20% on a sightseeing tour on any date this summer, if booked before the end of May 2019. Promo code MEMORIAL19 MAY 23, 2019

33


SCIENCE MATTERS

The hearing aid that gives you a full day’s power. Every day. Oticon Opn S™ is the hearing aid that gives you the 360° sound experience. This groundbreaking hearing aid closes the gap to normal hearing and is available in a rechargeable style. Just place the hearing aids in the charger for three hours, and you’ll have power for the entire day. It’s convenient, practical, and easy to use.

Call for your Free Demo of this amazing new technology!

SQUAMISH 604.815.0808

$1,500 OFF

1335 Pemberton Ave.

A pair of Premium Hearing Aids1

WorkSafeBC and other Provincial WCB Networks, VAC, BCEA and NIHB accepted

Mandy Fisch

Dr. Ramia Narayanan

M.Sc., RAUD, RHIP

Conditional Active Audiologist

Registered under the College of Speech and Hearing Health Professionals of BC Offer valid only at the Squamish NexGen Hearing clinic until May 31, 2019. 1

Public No�ce Council Procedure Amendment Bylaw No. 864, 2019 First, Second and Third Reading

Pu Pursuant to Sec�on 124 (3) of the Community Charter the Village of Pemberton gives no�ce that Council will consider giving First, Second and Third Reading to a Council Procedure Amendment Bylaw at the Regular Council Mee�ng on May 28th, 2019 held at 9am. amendme is to provide clarifica�on The purpose of the amendment respec�ng Sec�on 31 (Reconsideration by Council Member) of Council Procedure Bylaw No. 788, 2015. Specifically, that reconsidera�on of a mo�on may only be brought forward by a Council member who voted with the majority. Que Ques�ons related to the Council Procedure Amendment Bylaw may be directed to Sheena Fraser, Manager of Corporate & Legisla�ve Services at sfraser@pemberton.ca. To view the proposed amending bylaw, visit the News Sec�on at www.pemberton.ca. Sheena Fraser, Corporate Officer

34 MAY 23, 2019

True leaders work for us, not the fossil fuel industry SOME POLITICIANS believe protecting a sunset industry’s interests is more important than looking out for the citizens who elected them. In Australia, the coal industry holds sway over government policy. In Canada, bitumen and fracked gas rule. In the U.S., it’s all of the above. Fortunately, many people, especially youth, are heeding the rational voices of those who acknowledge the tremendous opportunities in cleaner energy and economic diversification. Politicians often justify their undying support for the fossil-fuel industry by claiming they’re looking out for jobs and the economy—but those claims don’t hold up.

BY DAVID SUZUKI Despite assertions of some political representatives in Australia and the U.S., coal doesn’t have a bright future and “clean coal” doesn’t exist. In Canada, pipeline opponents, Indigenous communities and environmental groups aren’t putting bitumen jobs at risk; automation, market forces and change in the face of the climate crisis are behind the declines. Suncor Energy recently switched to automated haulage systems at its North Steepbank bitumen mine, and expects to increase to 150 driverless haul trucks in its oilsands operations over the next five years—affecting hundreds of jobs. Other companies are following suit. Industry is also switching to automated technologies like drones for work ranging from

Recent research shows wind energy can also reach this level, while solar is closer to 9:1 or higher. Oilsands bitumen is 5:1 or lower, because large amounts of energy are required to extract, process and refine it, which makes it costly, inefficient and much more emissions-intensive than conventional oil. Transporting bitumen through pipelines is also expensive, as every 10 barrels of bitumen must be diluted with three barrels of condensate, which costs more than light crude. Costs and inefficiency make oilsands products less desirable on world markets. Climate change poses the biggest threat to the future of energy sources like bitumen and coal. Under the Paris Agreement, all countries committed to reduce emissions to try to keep the global average temperature from rising more than 2 C over preindustrial levels, with an aspirational goal of 1.5 C. We’re already near 1 C! That means we can’t burn much of the oil, coal and gas still in the ground. Clean energy technologies are advancing rapidly, fossil-fuels divestment is increasing and people are finding ways to reduce use of these polluting energy sources. But instead of a rational debate about how to shift from fossil-fuels to cleaner energy with minimal disruption to workers and society, media and short-sighted politicians inundate us with logical fallacies and absurd conspiracy theories about who’s funding the people and organizations that want a prosperous future with clean air, water and soil and a stable climate. True concern for workers means helping them find new ways to employ their skills, including offering retraining and incentives for jobs in the growing clean energy sector—a process Canada’s government recently

In 2017, Kieron McFadyen, then Cenovus Energy’s executive vice-president, told investors that his company’s long-term vision was to “de-man oilsands” operations. surveying to pipeline inspections. In 2017, Kieron McFadyen, then Cenovus Energy’s executive vice-president, told investors that his company’s long-term vision was to “de-man oilsands” operations. Market forces are also having a huge impact on fossil-fuel jobs and economic prospects, especially for highly polluting coal and dirty, hard-to-extract oil, such as oilsands bitumen. The bitumen market has been hit from several angles. A global oil glut, fuelled partly by a U.S. oil fracking boom, has driven prices down, especially for inferior products like bitumen. Calculations of “energy return on energy invested”—the amount of energy output over the amount required to produce it— shows one reason for bitumen’s lower price compared to conventional oil. The latter historically delivered 30 units or more for each unit invested, although that’s declining as easily accessed sources become depleted.

started with its Just Transition Task Force for Canadian Coal-Power Workers and Communities. All political parties should find ways to reform employment policies to reduce waste, inequity and rampant consumerism, including improved work-life balance with shorter workweeks. Decision-makers who care about the people they represent and understand science, social trends and technological potential know that a low-carbon future offers better health, liveability and economic resilience. The fossil fuel industry is still the most profitable (and among the most destructive) in human history, but those days are coming to an end. True leaders understand this. David Suzuki is a scientist, broadcaster, author and co-founder of the David Suzuki Foundation. Written with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington. n


RANGE ROVER

In praise of Vårvinter IT HAS BEEN EXACTLY five years since I kicked off this column in Pique with the tale of a week of ski-touring from a two-masted, 24-metre, wooden ketch around Stjernøya (Star Island) in the far north of Norway, hundreds of kilometres above the Arctic Circle (“Star Power,” May 22, 2014).

BY LESLIE ANTHONY The touring on that trip was varied but superb, most of it map-in-hand exploration, its daily theme a half-day tour followed by a single, 1,000-or-so-metre descent from a nameless summit in perfect weather—a spell of bluebird warmth unprecedented for late May so far north. After each day out, we’d Zodiac back to the mothership, jump into the ocean to cool and cleanse our sweaty bodies, then lounge on deck with beers while tracking dolphins, whales and sea eagles, and ogling ski lines on the horizon. Though most of us were veterans of enjoying Norway’s significant mountain bounty during the winter, after only a day of skiing off the boat we’d all had the same thought: this was the best trip ever. Since the mountains that far north are generally low, a lot of the appeal and stellar conditions had to do with the interaction of latitude and time of year. Here, the wellsettled maritime snowpack lingered lower and longer in the fjords, with the added

SPRING WINTER How’s vårvinter looking in your neighbourhood? Last week in Swedish Lapland near the town of Abisko. PHOTO BY LESLIE ANTHONY

bonus of being relatively safe, our quotidian missions enriched by days that stretched past midnight, with only a dusky blue, three-hour twilight before the sun rose again. So addictive was this combination that few of us who were on that trip have missed a year of far-north spring skiing since. While most in North America are done with sliding by this point (exceptions being the ski-mountaineering crew in the Rockies, and, at least last week, the California Sierra), the circumpolar second season is just beginning, and airports in Ottawa, Oslo, Stockholm and Reykjavik bustle with folks dragging ski bags northward. Instagram feeds at this time of year are packed with reports of touring, ski-mountaineering and heli-skiing from Baffin Island, Greenland, Iceland’s Westfjords and Akureyri region,

also be loosely seen in the alpine areas of most mountain ranges (certainly we’ve enjoyed it here in Whistler this year). Vårvinter is characterized by spring flowers like snowdrops, melting snow and flooding streams in lower altitudes/latitudes, and extensive, slow-to-disappear snow at higher altitudes/latitudes. With the latter, snow-covered areas start to experience above-zero day temperatures, below-zero night temperatures, and sunlight that feels much stronger as it reflects off the snow. These cyclical daytime thaws and nigh time freezes result in hard crusts that morph into soft surfaces during the day—ideally the perfect, ego-boosting corn snow skier’s rave about. In general, it’s a definitive transition time which sees no prolonged typical winter weather, yet no prolonged spring

Vårvinter translates simply as “spring winter,” and refers to the long, slow dissolve from one season to another emblematic of the far north ...

the Abisko, Riksgrånsen and Kebnekaise lodges of Sweden, and Norway’s Stjernøya, Lyngen Alps and high-Arctic archipelago of Svalbard. No small number of these folks are on boat-ski trips like the one I wrote of, all lured by something captured in the delightful Swedish term vårvinter (pronounced vōar-vinter). Vårvinter translates simply as “spring winter,” and refers to the long, slow dissolve from one season to another emblematic of the far north, which can

weather either, making for a happy set of alternating conditions. As I discovered in a Swedish language blog, compounding the noun “vårvinter” can precisely describe the experience, as in the expression Det var en vacker vårvinterdag—“It was a beautiful spring-winter day.” (Such conditions are so common in the far north of the country that the Swedish national weather service apparently treats vårvinter as a de facto fifth season.) Though big storms aren’t uncommon

and snow occasionally tumbles from the sky in high volume, when the sun’s out during this period, the snow-and-ice-covered land has a tendency to reduce relative humidity because its lower temperature relative to the air reduces evaporation. Once snowmelt starts in earnest, however, it warms quickly because of the strengthening sun, length of daylight, and increase in humidity. In alpine areas like we have in Whistler, the great contrast in heat/humidity between valley and mountaintop results in thermals boiling up around the peaks as the sun gains strength; at higher latitudes, daylight is added faster but the sun is at a lower angle relative to the earth, and its strengthening not as acute. During our final 24 hours of that boat trip five years ago, we knocked in two huge tours during the day, and then, while anchored in a gorgeous fjord ringed by tinsel waterfalls, added a post-dinner tour in the midnight sun, enjoying genuinely amazing skiing under copper light that ended at the water’s edge. Having learned the term, I now celebrate the many opportunities I’ve had to enjoy this special time of year around the White Planet, and can recall many a golden vårvinterdag in my own backyard that I hadn’t characterized as such at the time—a June fishing/skiing mission in Bella Coola, a late-April trip to the Kootenays that turned into an unexpected powderfest, and some gorgeous, picnic worthy days touring off of Whistler Mountain in May. In fact, in retrospect, vårvinter may be my favourite part of winter—oh, and spring. Leslie Anthony is a Whistler-based author, editor, biologist and bon vivant who has never met a mountain he didn’t like. n

MAY 23, 2019

35


FEATURE STORY

B y Brade n D u p u is, Megan Lalonde, Brand on Barr ett a n d Ke i l i Ba rtl e tt

36 MAY 23, 2019


FEATURE STORY FIG 1.

I

’m riding solo on a highway near Chilliwack when a call comes in over dispatch. A car is broken down on the side of a highway, slowing up traffic. Plates registered to an older lady—shouldn’t need backup for this one. As I roll up, I take a deep breath and lick my moustache for good luck (an old cop trick from the ‘70s, I think). But as I approach the stalled-out minivan, it doesn’t take long for me to realize that it is no “older lady” on the scene—but a fullygrown man, wielding a pipe wrench. And he’s smashing the ever-loving shit out of the minivan. Now what? As a police officer, I have many tools at my disposal. My training has taught me when and how to employ each one, in any number of situations. Assess the situation, and the subject’s behaviour—what kind of “threat cues” is he giving off? What is he doing with his hands? What are my own tactical considerations? Do I have backup? A proper escape route? Keep my distance. Be firm. Deep breaths. Remember my training. Another quick lick of the stache. Let’s do this. I assess the situation—briefly, as my nerves are starting to build—and make my decision. Baton, motherfucker—It’s time for some hand-to-hand combat. My confidence in my decision—full and robust as I made it—is completely shattered by the sounds of laughter somewhere behind me, followed by a voice in my ear. “Listen to what he’s saying,” says Const. Tom Flynn, an instructor at the RCMP’s Pacific Region Training Centre in Chilliwack. I pause. The crazed man with the pipe wrench has fallen silent. “Say it again, Nick,” Flynn calls out to my subject. “I’M GOING TO BASH YOUR FUCKING HEAD IN!” he obliges. Ah. Somehow, in the stress of remembering my training, I missed this very direct and violent threat to me, an officer of the law. “Now what do you think you need for this situation?” Flynn asks me. It’s painfully obvious now. “You need your firearm,” Flynn says without hesitation. I fumble with my gun—a bluecoated training pistol loaded with blanks—for a few seconds while my perp waits patiently. When I finally get it out and point it at my suspect, he realizes the gravity of the situation and tosses his pipe wrench to the side. But he’s not finished. He wants to fight, he tells me. Mano-a-mano. The pathetic, orange moustache I grew for this occasion—a feeble attempt to truly assume the mindset of a real, live police officer—quivers, and this time I forget to lick it for luck. I point my gun at the bad guy and tell him to get on the ground. Confident, I tell myself, and most assuredly a badass. But my assailant remains defiant, and asks if I’m going to shoot an unarmed man. I know my objective is to achieve a “behavioural change”—an action that will dampen the aggression level of my perp—and I know exactly what to say. My three hours of classroom training earlier this morning have taught me all I need to know. “I have no problem shooting an unarmed man,” I tell the troublemaker confidently.

“I point my gun at the bad guy and tell him to get on the ground.”

Fig. 1: Officer-in-training Braden Dupuis assumes big-gun-holding pose. PHOTO BY MEGAN LALONDE

MAY 23, 2019

37


FEATURE STORY In retrospect (as Whistler RCMP Staff Sgt. Paul Hayes would gleefully relay to me later), this was a poor choice of words. Eventually, with some more guidance from the voice in my ear, I subdue my subject using a less-than-defensive baton takedown. All in all, the call is a disaster. I have just threatened to shoot an unarmed man in full view of public bystanders, and then proceeded to beat him down with my (plastic training) baton. Luckily for me (and the general public), I am not a police officer. But after an eye-opening day learning about the RCMP’s Incident Management/Intervention Model, and the myriad pressures linked to each and every call that comes over the radio, I have a newfound respect for the women and men who do the work. -BRADEN DUPUIS

CLASS IS IN SESSION

Earlier that day, a grey, drizzly Friday morning, our group of four reporters arrived at the RCMP Pacific Region Training Centre in Chilliwack—the first media to have a tour of the centre in “six or seven years,” according to Hayes. As we settled into an unremarkable beige classroom, seated in front of a projected PowerPoint presentation, Cpl. Nick Widdershoven informed us that we were about to experience the same type of training thousands of RCMP officers undergo every year. The idea was to give us, as journalists, a better baseline understanding about how police officers operate, that we can use to reference when reporting on police incidents. With experienced officers Const. Nick Fleming, Flynn and Hayes joining to help facilitate the discussion, we learned that 2,000 RCMP members come through the Lower Mainland facility—formerly the home of CFB Chilliwack—each year alone. Our main topic of study during the morning classroom discussion? The RCMP’s Incident Management/ Intervention Model (IMIM), last updated in 2008 (see sidebar). The training aimed to familiarize us with the IMIM’s guiding principles and the RCMP’s risk-assessment processes— basically, all the important elements police, as the last line of defence, need to keep in mind whenever they attend a call (much of the same information Braden recalled and, to our delight, promptly disregarded during his scenario-based training exercise

“Every time you do a traffic stop as a police officer, I consider it an unknown risk.”

RBC Dominion Securities Inc.

later that afternoon). The IMIM isn’t law or a linear continuum, explains Widdershoven, but rather a visual, teaching and articulation aid officers can reference when responding to any number of events. “We don’t have to progress our options on the use of force because it could really put ourselves or the public at a detriment if we had to try things as we go,” he says. “Somebody pulls a gun, I’m not going to work through my OC (pepper spray), baton and taser before I pull my pistol because it’s not going to be safe for anybody.” The model is designed to be dynamic and circumstantial—just as any real-life scenario can be. “What we first interpret a situation to be and what it ends up being can change five, six, seven times during an interaction,” explains Widdershoven. “Every time you do a traffic stop as a police officer, I consider it an unknown risk. I don’t know who is in that car, how they’re going to react, what condition or state they’re in just based on some driving evidence,” he continued. That means having to continually reassess the risks at hand, which can run the gamut from weather conditions and lighting to their subjects’ behaviour and perceived abilities—i.e. the aforementioned “threat cues.” Officers tend to look for “the abnormals to social norms,” notes Widdershoven. “If you’re being too friendly, I get on edge. If you’re calling the police for help and you’re too friendly, I’m worried about getting baited into something. It might not be the case and it might just be you, but I’m going to take pause of that.” “People do all sorts of weird stuff with us,” he continued. “We have a ton of tools—they’re my tools, but if I get hurt, they can become yours. If people start … eyeing our belt, I get really worried. In all honesty, and it’s one of the things that the public doesn’t always recognize, every single call we go to is potentially a gun call—because we brought one.” Luckily, those weapons rarely have to be used. “All day, every day, 24/7 from coast to coast to coast in communities big and small, when we’re interacting with the public, less than 0.1 per cent (of interactions) are a use-of-force encounter,” explained Flynn.

FIG 2.

Let ’s Create Your Winning FinanCiaL game PLan

Integrated wealth management for individuals, families and business owners

■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■

Create strong financial plans Align business and personal strategies Build investment portfolios to achieve goals Establish peace of mind through risk management solutions Plan for the long term through Will and estate consulting Make sound tax planning decisions

Don Brett, mBa, cim, cfp, clu Wealth Advisor 1-888-612-9566 | don.brett@rbc.com www.donbrett.com

Let’s start a conversation about your future. Contact Don today.

RBC Dominion Securities Inc.* and Royal Bank of Canada are separate corporate entities which are affiliated. *Member-Canadian Investor Protection Fund. RBC Dominion Securities Inc. is a member company of RBC Wealth Management, a business segment of Royal Bank of Canada. ®Registered trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada. Used under licence. © RBC Dominion Securities Inc. 2015. All rights reserved. 15_90805_VDW_001

38 MAY 23, 2019


Fig. 2: The RCMP’s Incident Management/Intervention Model. GRAPHIC SUPPLIED

FIG 4. FIG 5.

Throughout the morning, the conversation continued to deviate from the formal presentation, instead drifting into an easy back-and-forth between our questions and the officers’ thoughtful, starkly honest answers—which came as somewhat of a surprise given the RCMP’s historical reputation for opacity. For example, how does their approach shift, if at all, when dealing with populations who have historically had negative interactions with police, such as Indigenous groups, which are disproportionately represented in Canada’s prison system? In Flynn’s experience, “I can say with absolute, 100-per-cent certainty that I have never worked with another officer who has said, ‘We are going to initiate this course of action based on someone’s race.’” However, “That doesn’t mean (those officers) don’t exist,” he notes. It’s something the RCMP works to prevent with “Fair and Impartial” training courses, notes Widdershoven, and fostering positive relationships with the communities they serve, adds Flynn. “One of the things that I really hate and really upsets me is when parents’ kids are misbehaving and they say, ‘If you’re not good, I’m going to get that policeman to arrest you!’” Flynn says. “Then I have to go and repair that damage and tell the kid, ‘Hey, if you’re ever in trouble and you need help, come talk to us. We’re your friends.’” When it comes to working with First Nations communities in particular, “It’s not as old as people think,” Widdershoven explains, referring to Canada’s residential school policy, which the RCMP helped enforce. “It’s one generation. There are grandparents that still talk to their grandkids about it and are still imparting that, depending on their experience. So it’s just about being aware of your approach.” Here in the Sea to Sky, Whistler and Pemberton police “are very proactive about interacting with agencies within our jurisdictional boundaries, whether that be in Squamish right up through Mount Currie,” adds Hayes. “We’re currently working side by side with St’atl’mx Tribal Police in their communities as they train and develop new officers. “I would say that now more than ever in my career, we are much more involved in relationship building and maintenance than we ever were.” Fleming, for instance, began his policing career in Bella Coola,

FIG 3.

FEATURE STORY

Fig. 3: Cpl. Nick Widdershoven during the classroom portion of the day. PHOTO BY BRADEN DUPUIS

Fig. 4: Officer-in-training Brandon Barrett listens intently. PHOTO BY MEGAN LALONDE

Fig. 5: Officers-in-training Keili Bartlett (L) and Megan Lalonde (R) gear up for the day ahead. PHOTO BY BRANDON BARRETT

North Shore’s Largest Personal Injury Law Firm

Over 70 years of combined legal experience resolving ICBC CLAIMS CAR ACCIDENTS CYCLING ACCIDENTS PEDESTRIAN ACCIDENTS ALL SPORTING ACCIDENTS SLIP AND FALL ACCIDENTS WRONGFUL DEATH CLAIMS MAJOR CATASTROPHIC ACCIDENTS MOTORCYCLE/SKIDOO ACCIDENTS SKIING/SNOWBOARDING ACCIDENTS IMMIGRATION LEGAL SERVICES

Visit us at: www.hansonco.ca

Call for a FREE consultation: 604-984-7555 #300-1401 Lonsdale Avenue, North Vancouver

MAY 23, 2019

39


FIG 9.

FIG 8.

FIG 7.

FIG 6.

FEATURE STORY

Fig. 6: Brandon Barrett follows constables Fleming and Flynn down a training centre hallway, as Keili Bartlett and Megan Lalonde look on. PHOTO BY BRADEN DUPUIS

Fig. 7: Const. Flemming shows Brandon how to load his training pistol. PHOTO BY MEGAN LALONDE

Fig. 8: Keili Bartlett takes aim as constable Flemming and Widdershoven look on. PHOTO BY MEGAN LALONDE

Fig. 9: Braden Dupuis takes a few practise shots with a standard RCMP training pistol under the watchful eye of Const. Fleming. PHOTO BY MEGAN LALONDE

and wound up serving as the RCMP’s community liaison with the local Nuxalk Nation. “When it came to community events, I was expected to show up,” he recalls. “I was the face of the detachment and the RCMP as well as my (First Nations) boss there. I learned as I went, and just talking to people as well and engaging with those community events, like going to potlatches and events and hearing about what people went through and their history. It just gives you a baseline to work off of.” That proactive approach often applies to subjects with mental health issues as well, adds Widdershoven. “We do a lot of mental health work outside of apprehensions. Especially in the smaller community, the more you get to know people.” In cases where apprehensions are necessary, “We’re not arresting people for being mentally ill,” emphasizes Flynn. “Mental illness is not a crime and it’s nothing to be ashamed of. We’re there to ensure that when people are not able to make rational decisions about their health and safety, that society has a mechanism to bring those people to experts who can provide care and get them those assessments. Unfortunately, because of the unpredictability of mental illness, that has fallen to police because we are perhaps the best equipped to ensure that safety for everyone.” It comes down to “treating people with respect,” he adds. -MEGAN LALONDE

THE FINAL SCENARIO

The tensions were high as we prepared for our final training scenario of the day. Unlike the previous simulated calls, which were all based on real-life incidents, we were not only banned from recording the proceedings, but half of our group was sequestered in another room while the other two were dispatched to the scene. It would soon become clear why our training officers took this tact.

40 MAY 23, 2019

There was a certain ominous feeling permeating the room, a massive air-dome structure outfitted with plywood rooms meant to mimic various locations that police might attend. The mood stood in stark contrast to the mostly lighthearted tone of the rest of the day. It was obvious the instructors had saved the most complicated training call for last. “Boy, have we got a scenario for you,” says Flynn, a sly grin slowly spreading across his face. I would serve as the lead officer, with Braden in tow as backup. We huddled in front of a pair of old cop cruisers littered with neoncoloured paintball marks, lingering signs of the thousands of RCMP members who have passed through this centre over the years. The call was fairly straightforward: There were reports of a man with a violent history in the apartment building of his ex-wife and son. We were told to do a wellness check at Apartment C, and off we went, slowly walking down a long corridor dotted with doors. About halfway down the hall, one of the doors swings open, and a figure donned all in black emerges. (Const. Fleming, the training actor, sports dark-coloured padding and an imposing, Darth Vader-esque helmet throughout much of the day.) Out of the corner of my eye, I notice a shotgun partially hidden behind Fleming’s right leg. I immediately draw my service weapon and fight an overwhelming urge to fire several rounds (of blanks) at the suspect. It’s difficult to overstate here just how thoroughly influenced my generation has been by action movies and first-person shooter games. I felt at once immersed in and separated from reality, conditioned by countless hours playing GoldenEye and Grand Theft Auto growing up. In those mediums, when you see a bad guy with a gun, you shoot. It’s really that simple. Real life, as we all know, is rarely that cut and dry. “DROP THE GUN!” I scream repeatedly, closing the distance. The suspect doesn’t flinch. “WHAT ARE YOU DOING?” I shout. Our masked man slowly turns his head in our direction, and icily responds: “None of your business,” before cocking his gun


FEATURE STORY with a loud cha-chung. It’s an image that will be imprinted on my mind for some time, despite knowing the scenario was completely simulated. Then, to our surprise, the suspect turns away and calmly continues down the hallway at a plodding pace. (I would later recount to the training officers that he had sprinted away; a sign of the ways stress can warp your memory.) At this point, we start to panic, and rush after the suspect, screaming directions at him once again to drop his weapon. But it was already too late. The man walks into Apartment C and slams the door behind him. We then hear the deafening booms of three shots; he had just killed his wife and son before turning the gun on himself. After a moment of eerie silence, I turn to Braden, eyes wide as saucers. “What the fuck just happened?” I exclaim. We had failed. Big time. After spending hours getting drilled on the appropriate use of force—and seeing firsthand in Braden’s previous scenario what can happen when an officer uses too much force—we were so focused on protecting ourselves from the many risks officers can face that we forgot about what should be the first priority for any police: protecting the public. In the debrief that follows, Widdershoven asks us what we should have done differently. “We should’ve shot him,” Braden says. That much is clear. But when? Should I have fired when I first noticed the shotgun? “Well, is it legal in this country to carry a firearm?” Widdershoven asks. “Could he have been a duck hunter returning home after a hunt? Maybe he was a janitor who happened to find the gun laying around the building.” So it was too soon to fire upon spotting the suspect. And it was clearly too late by the time he had reached the apartment. So sometime between when the suspect failed to respond to our commands and when he entered the apartment. “Somewhere in there, you should have fired. But everyone’s line is different,” says Widdershoven, reiterating that there are a multitude of variables to consider when use of force comes into play, including an officer’s past experiences and their assessment of the situation. In policing as in life, there is no black-and-white rule. To have successfully subdued the suspect, we would have had to shoot a man in the back who posed no immediate or direct threat to us. With the benefit of hindsight, it seems obvious what we should have done. But in the heat of the moment, with only seconds to react and the stress levels climbing, we took the path of least resistance, and that proved fatal. Factor in the other considerations at play for an officer—how will the public perceive a cop shooting a man in the back in a busy apartment building?—and you realize how difficult the decisionmaking process can be. That’s not to apologize for those instances when cops do go overboard. Throughout the day we discussed several concerning use-of-force incidents, such as the 2013 death of 18-year-old Sammy Yatin, who was shot eight times on a Toronto streetcar, leading to a rare murder conviction for the responding officer. What the day did do for us is give a deeper understanding of the role of police and the many complexities that come with this very challenging job that we typically don’t hear about on the 11 o’clock news. It’s easy to forget that, behind the badge, these are people, people who work hard and, in almost all cases, want to do what’s best for the community they serve. At the start of our training day, Const. Flynn tells a story about heading to Best Buy decked out in full uniform on the day the new Call of Duty video game was released. Employees at the store immediately assumed something was amiss. “They couldn’t fathom that we are normal people who do normal things,” Flynn recalls.

“... in the heat of the moment, with only seconds to react and the stress levels climbing, we took the path of least resistance, and that proved fatal.”

JUST 2 HOURS NORTH TYAX LODGE & HELISKIING. HURLEY RIVER FOREST SERVICE ROAD

99

PEMBERTON MEADOWS

PEMBERTON WHISTLER

SEASON OPENING SPECIAL

99

JOIN US IN THE PRISTINE SOUTH CHILCOTIN THIS SPRING

BOOK 2 NIGHTS GET THE SECOND NIGHT Offer valid May 31st - June 27th for minimum 2 night stays, in lodge rooms. New reservations only, subject to availability. Enter ‘SPRING2019’ when booking online at

www.tyax.com

50% OFF

-BRANDON BARRETT

MAY 23, 2019

41


FIG 10.

FEATURE STORY

Fig. 10: Const. Flemming, left, and Flynn, right, demonstrate how RCMP’s range of training weapons function. PHOTO BY BRADEN DUPUIS

THIS IS (NOT) AMERICA THE INFLUENCE OF AMERICAN MEDIA ON CANADIANS’ PERCEPTION OF POLICE

I

’m standing over a drunk, belligerent man—who I just pepper sprayed—and am about to put handcuffs on. “You have the right to remain silent,” I tell him in as commanding a tone as I can muster. Nope, the training instructor says over my shoulder. That’s not what police say in Canada. My mind goes blank as I realize I don’t know what to say. As it turns out, I’m not the only one unaware of the difference between the American and Canadian police process. When Dr. Christopher Schneider, now an associate professor of sociology at Brandon University, began teaching criminology at the University of British Columbia, the Chicago-born prof noticed his Canadian students didn’t know the legal terminology used in their own country. “I get in there and I’m teaching, and the students have no idea what the hell I’m talking about,” Schneider says of his first semester teaching in Canadian universities. “I found that I was teaching them these terms through an American lens, which sort of both fascinated and horrified me at the same time.” So he did a study of 12 students who watched the popular, longrunning American cop show, Law & Order. All of the students but one—although it was a small study—could recite part or all of the Miranda rights nearly word for word. None of them could do the same for Canadian Charter warnings. None of the students in the study, Schneider notes, said they had ever been arrested. “But everybody knows how to be arrested. If a cop says to you,

42 MAY 23, 2019

‘I’m placing you under arrest,’ you know where to put your hands and you know to duck your head when you’re getting into the back of the car so you don’t bang your head on the squad car,” he says. “We’ve seen this and the perp walk done a million times on Law & Order and movies, and we’ve seen action versions of it on news media. While a small per cent of the population have actually been arrested, pretty much everybody knows how to be arrested. That speaks to the very powerful influence of the media.” For many, their only knowledge of the criminal system comes from entertainment or the news. How crime is covered can make it seem like there’s more crime, especially more violent crime, than the statistics show because the tendency is to report on rare or severe crimes. (Canada’s homicide rate, for instance, has been on a mostly steady downswing since the 1970s.) So, could the influence of American media in Canada leave us with the impression that similar issues are mirrored in our country, even if that’s not the case? The short answer, Schneider says, is yes. Even though Canadian man Sammy Yatin was shot to death by an on-duty officer in Toronto in 2013, Schneider points out it wasn’t until after the 2014 deaths of Eric Garner and Michael Brown at the hands of white police officers in the U.S. that #ICantBreathe and Black Lives Matter launched a national and international discussion about police treatment of minorities and the push to implement body-worn cameras for officers. “The murder and killing of black men is not a new phenomenon,” Schneider says. “What is new... is the circulation of these videos on social media that bring our attention to things like Black Lives Matter.” Since 2014, chapters of Black Lives Matter have sprung up across the U.S. and in Canadian cities such as Toronto and Vancouver. “These things don’t stop at the border,” Schneider says. “What ends up happening then is these issues get picked up by the public, which of course, are the primary clientele of the police.” Up north, however, “the racial issues that plague Canadian police are different. Primarily with people of colour, related to the treatment of Indigenous people.” (Statistics Canada released a report last year that showed the overrepresentation of Indigenous peoples in the B.C. corrections systems has continued to rise over the past decade across all demographic groups: Men, women and youth.) In 2016, the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police held a conference called “What happens there matters here,” exploring how globalization impacts public trust in Canadian police. As for the discussion around body-worn cameras for police, both the public and officers were generally in favour of the technology. The idea being that video footage would reduce police brutality and complaints from the public by showing a fuller image of a situation. While there have been few and inconclusive studies to support these assumptions, Schneider says, police in the U.S. and Canada have hired dedicated media liaison officers to give the news media information, or what Schneider refers to as the police narrative, because of the power the press has on public perception. “I’ve seen some extremely fair questioning, reporting on some really egregious actions and I’ve seen some really sensational reporting on stuff that’s completely reasonable,” Cpl. Nick Widdershoven says. “There’s a lack of understanding of what we can and can’t do. So people make assumptions based on the actions they see.” It’s been five or six years since media has toured the RCMP Pacific Region Training Centre in Chilliwack, B.C., where Pique completed its training. The officers told us it’s because they’re rarely asked. “The reason there may not be that ask … I think a lot of people have already made up their minds,” Const. Fleming says. “I watch Law & Order. I know that.” “Social media in some ways removed the crime narrative control away from police by the posting of videos,” Schneider says. Those videos can go viral, and like Schneider mentioned, ideas are not stopped by borders. It’s no longer the pen that is mightier than the sword. It’s the video footage and the narrative framing it. But who is behind the narrative that shapes our perceptions of the police and our country? Is it the media, the police or the bystander with a camera? -KEILI BARTLETT To view a multimedia version of this feature, complete with photos and video of the reporters’ training scenarios, visit www. piquenewsmagazine.com. n


SUMMER 360 EXPERIENCE Board the new Blackcomb Gondola and transport yourself to summer in Whistler’s alpine. There’s a whole new world waiting just beyond the PEAK 2 PEAK Gondola, with uncharted discoveries from atop the Cloudraker Skybridge and Raven’s Eye, with miles of alpine hiking trails to explore. Expand your universe – and your summer – with unlimited mountain access for just $89 with a 360 Pass when you purchase by May 31.

BENEFITS OF UNLIMITED SUMMER ACCESS WITH A 360 PASS: THE BLACKCOMB ASCENT TRAILS allow you to get away from the crowds and feel the exhilarating burn on the 6.2km the hike up, all with the convenience of a gondola download. EXCLUSIVE PERKS including discounts on Bring-A-Friend tickets, bike rentals, tours and more.

UNLIMITED SUMMER MOUNTAIN * ACCESS

89

$

*Purchase by May 31

THE SEASONS OF SUMMER offer something new every month, with the ever-changing landscape from early summer snow walls to blooming wildflowers and ancient glaciers. whistlerblackcomb.com/360experience

the beach whistler 2018

p: David McColm

FLIGHT. BEYOND. HORIZONS.

We Are LOVING Our New Active Wear Brands

YOGA . R UN NI NG . GYM FI TNESS . BEACH

Located near the Olympic Rings on the Village Stroll. Follow us on Instagram @thebeachwhistler

604-932-7505 MAY 23, 2019

43


TRAVEL & ADVENTURE WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

PHOTO BY ALLEN BEST

ALAM Understanding Texas through the blood-bathed lens of the

ASK ABOUT OUR FREE WHISTLER PICKUPS MARCH 30, APRIL 13 + 27, MAY 11 + 25, JUNE 15

44 MAY 23, 2019


TRAVEL & ADVENTURE

E

very place has its creation myth, and in Texas it’s all about the Alamo. It was there, in the middle of what is now downtown San Antonio, that an armed band comprised mostly of illegal immigrants fought—and lost in a blood bath—to the superior force of the Mexican army in 1836. The defeat was a temporary setback for those Texicans and Tejanos—Anglos and Hispanic respectively—who wanted independence from Mexico. Soon after, they wrested military control of the territory, which then became the Republic of Texas. Maybe the Mexicans should have built a big, beautiful wall. We had driven into downtown San Antonio from a cheap motel on the edge of the city, technically the seventh largest in the United States although only 24th among metropolitan areas. Even in a brief visit San Antonio revealed itself to have good food and at least a couple of good used bookstores. We all have our metrics for evaluating the worth of a destination. San Antonio also has the Riverwalk, a

spectacle unto itself located just blocks from the Alamo. The narrow walkways along Venetian-like canals of water provide access to restaurants, stores, and hotels. It’s a place to see and to be seen. Despite these charms, we would have instead been in Austin, 90 minutes to the north, but for the South by Southwest conference that had just gotten underway. Even Motel 6, the budget chain, was charging US$309. Most of the 14 or so Democratic presidential candidates announced as of early March were there, Washington Governor Jay Inslee talking about climate change and Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren outlining how she would contain the unhealthy power of Apple, Facebook and other big, strapping tech companies. Former Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper was there, too. He says it’s crazy to try to oust the 10 to 11 million people who are in the United States illegally. That takes us back to the Alamo. It was a mission, one of many built along the San Antonio River by Spanish colonizers. The Spanish used the missions to recruit

the native Americans to Catholicism and also a different way of life. We tarried for a morning at one, the Mission San José, the best preserved. It had a church, of course, but also a courtyard enclosed by walls of adobe. There, local natives had learned European religion and agriculture. They were also given protection from attacks from Comanche and Apache. It was a devil’s bargain. The local bands lost their own religions and their own languages. Some nearly lost their tribal names. They also lost their lives in droves after being exposed to smallpox and other diseases to which they had no immunity. Borders work better for some purposes than others. At the time, France and England were also partitioning North America. By 1836, the pivotal year here, the United States was independent of England, Mexico had been birthed from Spain, and the Texians and Tejanos wanted out of Mexico. Defeat at the Alamo created martyrs, who inspired the triumph soon after and hence creation of the Republic of Texas. At least on paper, it included not only

what we thought of as Texas today, but bigger—with a horn sticking up through Colorado and into Wyoming. Had those boundaries prevailed, Aspen, Breckenridge and Vail would today be part of Texas. Instead, Texas was trimmed when admitted to the United States in 1845. It remained big, and still is, second only to Alaska among states. In population, its 29 million are second only to California’s 39 million. (British Columbia has five million, but 944,735 kilometres, compared to 695,662 square kilometres for Texas). Big and burly, Texas has long punched above its weight in U.S. politics. The Alamo explains much of how Texas views itself. Texas doesn’t like taking orders, and it believes devoutly in the sanctity of spilled blood. Statues in front of the Alamo show men with guns but also a buxom woman in robes, the inscription below praising the “heroes who sacrificed their lives at the Alamo” to enable the founding of Texas. It’s a myth, not because it’s a false, but a myth in its storytelling sense. It’s a state apart. It even has its own electrical grid. n

PHOTO BY ALLEN BEST

MO

By Allen Best

WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Meticulously restored Revelstoke Heritage Home 103 3rd St East 2 Bedroom / 2 Bath with deck and hot tub off master bedroom Just a few steps from Revelstoke’s shops and restaurants

$749,000.00 FOR MORE INFO PLEASE CONTACT

Joe Lammers at Royal Lepage Revelstoke joelammers@royallepage.ca

|

cell 250-814-8200 MAY 23, 2019

45


SPORTS THE SCORE

Final Nimby Fifty set for May 25 CO-FOUNDERS LOOK BACK ON FAVOURITE MEMORIES FROM PAST YEARS

BY DAN FALLOON IT’S FUNNY SOMETIMES how people react when they find out something is going away. Take the Nimby Fifty, for example. Co-founder Terry Evans said the race reached its cap of 420 riders just once in its first nine years, but when he and co-founders Dean Linnell and Russ Wood announced that Year 10 would be its last, demand soared. They opened more spots and thus, are expecting roughly 650 riders to take on the 37-kilometre race just east of Pemberton on May 25. Wood said the race was originally going to be open to past participants, but eventually decided to allow rookies to give it a go. “We kind of felt bad saying no, so we just opened it up,” he said. “It’s pretty cool to see how many people have decided to come out this year. We definitely wanted to do one last one and make it special.” Evans said that in recent years, the number of entries had dropped to roughly 300 so the three organizers decided to make the 10th year the final edition. “We saw the numbers come down, and

LAST RUN The Nimby Fifty will have its last hurrah this Saturday, May 25. PHOTO BY TERRY EVANS

46 MAY 23, 2019

because we’ve been doing it a long time— we all have kids and families and are super busy—it just takes a lot of time and effort to put the event on,” he said. “We made the call last year. Because this year was Year No. 10, it was a good number to close it out with.” Added Wood: “Ten years ago, I only had one kid and they were young, and we all had just had families. As life goes on, it gets a bit more complicated and more things

the finish line. As well, there will be a Friday night sign-in for locals and those staying in Pemberton or Whistler to avoid the chaos of signing in on Saturday’s race day. The Nimby Fifty has always included live music to help create a fun après atmosphere, though never more than one act. Papa Josh performed for each of the first eight years, but when he was unavailable, DJ J to the U stepped in. This year, both will perform, as will Ari Neufeld.

“It’s pretty cool to see how many people have decided to come out this year. We definitely wanted to do one last one and make it special.” - RUSS WOOD

start to happen, so basically, we felt like we were not able to put enough time into the event to make it what we wanted to be … We wanted to go out on top rather than just hanging on forever.” The increase in ridership necessitated a move back to the race’s original location, at the old Pemberton Music Festival grounds just across Highway 99 from the traditional North Arm Farm hub, which will still serve as

“We’ve always tried to make it more than just a bike race, but (also) a really good party,” Evans said. “Apart from the course, one of the things that’s always made the race something that people put on their calendars and want to get to is that the event itself is something that they want to be at. “We race as well, so we’re creating a race that we’d want to race.”

Evans fondly recalled the race’s origins at the Pemby Fest grounds before moving to North Arm Farm for its second year and beyond. “We had 200 people and it was a really cool vibe hanging out in the field on hay bales. Papa John is playing his tunes and everyone is hanging out drinking beer. It’s what we’d always hoped for,” he said. “Then it kept growing every year.” It’s also attracted some big names for a local race, with three-time Olympian and 2011 world champion Catharine Pendrel regularly signing up, while Olympians like Max Plaxton also made their way to the race. “Catharine Pendrel actually came out for our first year, so right from the beginning, we were (thinking), ‘Oh, wow,’” he said. “We thought we were holding this race for people in the Sea to Sky, people from Vancouver, and all of a sudden, Catharine Pendrel shows up. “We thought we were onto something.” Wood added that he was particularly proud of adding a race-within-a-race, the downtime contest, into an early edition of the Nimby Fifty at a time when such challenges were uncommon. He was also pleased to see local ridership from Pemberton grow to roughly 70 athletes this year after some initial rockiness in the race’s early going. For more information, visit www. nimbyfifty.com. n


SPORTS THE SCORE

Lady

In Memoriam ... Thank you for the beautiful time. We will miss you dearly!

May 20th 2019

R.I.P.

HAWAII-BOUND Marla Zucht will head back to Kona after qualifying for the Ironman World Championships.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Zucht sets new personal best at Santa Rosa LOCAL IRONMAN RACER QUALIFIES FOR WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

BY DAN FALLOON MARLA ZUCHT KNOWS she’ll be heading back to Hawaii in October. The 47-year-old took third in the women’s 45-to-49 age category at Ironman Santa Rosa on May 11 to punch her ticket to the Ironman World Championships for a fourth time. The Whistlerite also managed to complete the course in a personal-best time of 10 hours, 38 minutes and seven seconds (10:38:07) as she successfully opened her season. Zucht said pulling off such an accomplishment was a bit difficult to imagine, as she was skiing the weekend before heading to California in early May. However, she managed to get into summer mode quickly, even if she didn’t realize her pace in the moment. “I didn’t know while I was on the course that I was on-track for doing that,” she said. “I had a really great race. I felt prepared going into it. My body feels good.” Zucht said her swim, 18th best among her division, was on par for what she normally achieves, but her bike time helped provide a major boost to her overall result. She had worked hard over the winter to strengthen her bike performance by riding an indoor trainer, and the improvement was apparent as she was third in her division. “I felt super strong on the bike,” she said. Wrapping with the marathon, Zucht stayed strong, once again earning the thirdbest time among her peers. “I was able to turn the legs over really well. I started off with a really strong pace, which I maintained for most of the marathon. In the last 5 km, I started to slow down a little bit. I was getting quite fatigued at that point 10 hours in,” she said. With Santa Rosa being her 14th

Ironman, Zucht said she’s making gradual improvements every time out, with her nutrition and hydration working better this time around. “In the past, I’ve gone into the marathon where I’ve been in a calorie deficit, so I don’t have enough energy in the tank to pull off a marathon,” she said. “It just seemed like everything came together for me this time. “There’s something to be said for more experience and familiarity.” That confidence will help Zucht keep going throughout the summer knowing worlds is on the way. Qualifying early

“I felt prepared going into it. My body feels good.” - MARLA ZUCHT

is key to Zucht mapping out her season accordingly with the knowledge that her season will run until October rather than wrapping in July. “Not that I’ll be off the gas by any means—with those distances, I have to keep up the training consistently—but it for sure takes some of the pressure off going into Whistler for the Ironman Canada,” she said. Zucht has a few other events before returning to the Big Island. She’ll compete in the Oliver Half Iron and inaugural Whistler X Triathlon in June before taking on Subaru Ironman Canada at the end of July. Zucht is particularly excited for the Whistler X Triathlon, slated for June 9, for a change of pace, as she last raced an off-road triathlon about 15 years ago. “I mountain bike lots and I trail run lots, so I’m really excited about it,” she said. n

Planning your perfect Whistler wedding? P I C K U P Y O U R C O P Y T O D AY !

MAY 23, 2019

47


SPORTS THE SCORE

NEW BASE The 100% Dual Slalom (and CLIF Speed and Style) at Crankworx Whistler will be held at Blackcomb Base 2 starting this August. FILE PHOTO BY DAN FALLOON

Support Community Learn how to make the gift of a lifetime.

Movin’ on up DUAL SLALOM AND DUAL SPEED AND STYLE EVENTS HEADING TO BLACKCOMB BASE 2

whistlerfoundation.com

BY DAN FALLOON WHILE IT’S BENEFICIAL in some ways to have the Boneyard as a central hub during Crankworx Whistler, organizers are betting it’ll be better to give a few events some breathing room. For the 2019 festival, the dual slalom and dual speed and style events will move up to Blackcomb Base 2. Crankworx World Tour executive director Darren Kinnaird said the festival had hoped to make the change for 2018, but construction of the new Blackcomb Gondola monopolized the tube park and made the move impossible. Kinnaird said reducing congestion down in the village should be a boon for athletes across the slate of events. “That’s going to make the athlete experience just that much better. (There will be) more training opportunities, more dedicated training opportunities, more dedicated training for the slopestyle athletes as well,” he said, adding that spectators should also enjoy the new sightlines. Joyride Bike Parks president Paddy Kaye is excited for the move, working with “new canvas” to create a fresh look. He added that the focus on slopestyle made it difficult to get creative with the other disciplines. “We’ve been really limited over the past two years as the slopestyle track grew. It put a bit of a squeeze on the other track. Last year, we added the pump track into the whole mix in the Boneyard, so we’ve been limited with what we can do with the dual slalom and the speed and style,” he said. “This new venue is going to allow us to put some more focus on the tracks themselves.” Kaye explained that the dual slalom and dual speed and style events will share a start gate and finish corral, but will otherwise be their own beasts. “They’ll have their own style and design,” he said. “They’ll roll through the

48 MAY 23, 2019

first feature, which will be something simple, and then the dual slalom would break off to the right-hand side and the speed-and-style would go to the left-hand side. They’d work their way down the slope and then perhaps cross, is what we’re looking at.” Meanwhile, the course for the new women’s speed and style event is being considered to use the top of the dual slalom track before hitting the men’s speed and style course at the intersection. Kaye explained designers and builders are taking the same tack as they do with the slopestyle course, balancing being a challenge for athletes and a draw for fans while also being fun and safe to ride. “It’s managing the size of the features. Safety is a huge thing. We also want to encourage women to race hard and push themselves but also to have a good experience, come back in the future and help grow the sport,” he said. “A big part of it is making the track accessible.” Though stressing that the course is still being designed, Kaye offered that the separated speed and style course could see additional slopestyle features, like a flat drop or a cannon log. “It would bridge the gap, so to speak, between old-school and new-school racing, and try to spice it up. That being said, they would be rideable, raceable features, nothing huge and not part of the judged features,” he said. The 100% Dual Slalom is set to run on Aug. 14 while the CLIF Speed and Style is set for Aug. 16. In other Crankworx news, Kinnaird said there will be additional Kidsworx events this year, including an invitational speed and style with 16 boys and eight girls aged 13 to 15. As well, there will be a pump track clinic on Aug. 12 featuring pro riders Anneke Beerten and Martin Soderstrom. The duo previously held a similar event in Rotorua and are eager to connect with local groms. For more information, visit www. crankworx.com. n


WOMEN’S NIGHTS

MEN’S NIGHTS

Women’s Nights bring together the female riding community with perfect balance of learning and socializing. Plus, every lesson wraps up with an après session at Merlin’s Bar and Grill with tons of give-aways.

Men’s nights are all-male drop-in nights that are perfect if you want to train for Phat Wednesdays, or if you’re new to the sport and want to find some buddies to ride with.

Choose to drop-in for lessons on Monday or Wednesday nights, or sign up for one of our Season Long programs.

Choose to drop-in for lessons on Tuesday nights, or sign up for our Season Long program.

Starting Next Week!

whistlerblackcomb.com/bike | 1.800.766.0449

THE WHISTLER HALF MARATHON Presented by Smartwool

would like to advise residents and travellers along Highway 99 and Municipal Streets in Whistler of temporary road closures and traffic control measures to accommodate the event on Saturday June 1, 2019. EXPECTED HOURS OF IMPACT ARE: • Highway 99 closure at Lorimer Road: 7:25am to 7:40am (15 min. closure) and 7:50am – 8:05am (15 min. closure) • Lorimer Road CLOSED to westbound traffic West of Highway 99 7:30am to 8:15am • Neighbourhood and Village streets West of Highway 99 expect MINOR DELAYS 7:30am to 11:00am • Neighbourhood and Village streets East of Highway 99 expect MINOR DELAYS 8:00am – 11:30am

Traffic control personnel will be stationed at major intersections and access points along the race route, shown here, to safely manage traffic. Motorists are asked to avoid travel during impacted hours and consider alternative times for corridor trips or alternative routes for local trips. Motorists that need to travel during these times are advised to plan ahead for potential delays and short duration stoppages on the affected route. Traffic and Transit Advisory In addtion to street traffic and transit delays, please also note that much of Lost Lake Park will play host to the event. Expect heavy trail usage between hours of 7:00am to Noon on Saturday, June 1, and Sunday, June 2 from 7:30am to 11:00am. The Whistler Half Marathon organisers and participants thank you for your patience and cooperation and remind you to drive safely. NEIGHBOURHOOD ROADWAYS AFFECTED IN:

TRANSIT ROUTES AFFECTED BY POSSIBLE MINOR DELAYS:

- Whistler Cay - Blueberry Hill - Alta Vista - Whistler Village

- Route 30 connector north to Emerald Estates - Route 30 connector south from Emerald Estates - Blueberry/Tapley’s connector

MAY 23, 2019

49


SPORTS THE SCORE

From Whistler to Yellowknife in 10 days GROUP OF NINE ROAD RIDERS SET TO TAKE ON THE RIDE OF YOUR LIFE

BY DAN FALLOON THE SOJOURN MAY SOUND a little bit unbelievable, but Quinn Lanzon believes he and his motley crew of eight other road riders can pull it off. 2,206 kilometres. 10,906 metres of climbing. 10 days. That’s the plan for Lanzon and Co. as they get set to embark on The Ride of Your Life on May 25. Lanzon, who will celebrate his 30th birthday on May 24, initially came up with the idea to go to his birthplace of Yellowknife to mark the jump into a new decade, but taking bikes wasn’t initially part of the plan. Lanzon was talking about long-distance riding with Will Cadham, who had pondered riding from South Korea to Vladivostok, Russia, before realizing it wasn’t reasonable. “I just thought ‘I haven’t been up north (since childhood) and it could be an interesting ride,’” recalled Lanzon, who grew up in the Ottawa area. “I pitched it to the wrong person, because he immediately thought it would be a great idea.” From that point, Lanzon started to go about determining logistics, eventually zeroing in on late May as an ideal time

considering weather and traffic. The first day will have the riders start in Whistler and end in Lillooet. At 169 kms travelled, it will officially be the shortest ride of the tour. There will be a detour, however, as the nine participants will switch bikes to race the final Nimby Fifty near Pemberton. “The first day is seeing if you’re up to fitness,” Lanzon said. From there, the shortest day is 180 kms while the final day, from Fort Providence to Yellowknife, clocks in at an eye-popping 316 kms. “That’s purely logistics because it’s the Arctic. There’s no one there. There are no towns,” Lanzon said. “The two closest towns are Fort Providence and Yellowknife.” The night prior to reaching Fort Providence, the riders have no choice but to camp in two six-man tents in Sixtieth Parallel Territorial Park just north of the Alberta border. Lanzon explained that he hopes the journey gets more solitary as it progresses. “Hopefully (there will be) less traffic as we get farther north. The biggest concern that we have as far as sections of road is between Williams Lake and Prince George, because we’ll still be on the highway. After that, we’re going to cut toward Dawson Creek and it should be a little quieter,” Lanzon said.

One potential wrench, he acknowledged, could be the schedule, as it is a tight 10 days, leaving on May 25 and arriving in Yellowknife on June 3. “Talking to other road cyclists who have done these types of trips, the main thing they flag is that usually when you do something like this, you take a break after five days,” he said. “If anyone has any type of injury that’s plaguing them, or just for your sanity— mostly sanity—the rest day is recommended.

“It’s about pushing through the hard stuff and the experiences that you can get out of that ... ” - QUINN LANZON

“It’s about pushing through the hard stuff and the experiences that you can get out of that, and see what you can do,” he added. Lanzon, the director of public relations for the Whistler Off-Road Cycling Association (WORCA), is more of a mountain biker than

road rider, as is the case with nearly everyone else on the journey. However, they’ve committed to learning the sport and doing the ride properly. “Most of us have been training since December,” he said. “The winter was when most of the volume of the training happened and then as the snow started to melt, we did a couple practice rides. We drove up to Lillooet while there was still snow here … We rode Lillooet to Clinton and back. That was our first big road test. It was a horrible day. It was so cold with really, really strong winds.” In total, the crew has done four rides of between 150 and 200 kms to train. Two riders, Huw Thomas and Braedyn Kozman, have experience riding on the road and the remaining participants will lean heavily on them to ride in packs and deal with wind. The biggest change from mountain biking to road riding, Lanzon explained, is in the legs. “On a mountain bike, there’s always resistance so it forces your leg to stay straight because your muscles are engaged. On a road bike, especially when you’re in a pack, you’re drafting,” he said. “Any time there’s weirdness to your pedal stroke, it’s exposed and you can feel it.” Graeme Meiklejohn, who was the

MAY 31 – JUNE 2, 2019

WHISTLER OLYMPIC PLAZA

whistlerhalfmarathon.com

RESORT MUNICIPALITY OF WHISTLER

BIKE HOST PROGRAM

• Do you love riding your bike? • Do you know Whistler’s biking and hiking trails well? • Do you connect with visitors on trails and in parks, giving directions to where they want to go? • Do you like great rewards and being part of a fun team while assisting others?

SUPPORTING WAG

Join Whistler’s New Bike Host Volunteer Summer Program. Enjoy being outside, active and involved in your community. To apply or receive more information, contact Erin Morgan at ihost@whistler.ca or 604 935-8478

Resort Municipality of Whistler whistler.ca/committees

50 MAY 23, 2019

FRI, MAY 31, 3:30pm & 5pm

SAT, JUNE 1, 7:30pm

Run with Rob Krar

Opening Presentation by Rob Krar

whistlerhalfmarathon.com/ guided-trail-runs

whistlerhalfmarathon.com/ film-festival

SUN, JUNE 2, 9am Register online whistlerhalfmarathon.com/ dog-jog


SPORTS THE SCORE

Pemberton Valley Transit

Service Changes Effective June 3, 2019

One additonal round trip in the evenings on the route 99 Pemberton Commuter. For more information, visit bctransit.com or pick up a Rider’s Guide on board.

Village of Pemberton

Transit Info 604·932·4020 • www.bctransit.com

9004

cinematographer for Chasing Sunrise, which won Best Short Mountain Film at the Banff Mountain Film Festival in 2018, will follow along in the support car while shooting a documentary on the ride. He’ll also plan to hop on his own bike to get some closer shots for the film. “As soon as I heard, I was like ‘I’m going to make a movie about this because it’s outrageous and it’s going to make for a very interesting film, just based off the initial group of people who are going to be going on the ride,’” he said. “As that roster of people has grown, it’s gotten only better.” The rest of the team is: Alex Conlin, Mark Taylor, Matthew Tirrell and David Kenworthy. Jamie Blades was initially slated to ride but suffered an injury and will instead ride in the support car with Meiklejohn. Lanzon notes six of the riders grew up in the Ottawa-Gatineau area and have known one another for 15 to 20 years. There is a charitable element to the effort to the ride as well. Lanzon and crew received support from Tourism Northwest Territories, and through them, connected with the local mountain bike association and Rotary Club, which are in the process of raising funds to build a bike park in Yellowknife. More than $100,000 has been raised and builders will break ground on a pump track later this year. Lanzon hopes the Ride of Your Life will garner another $5,000 for the park; they’d already raised $1,800 as of May 22. For more information or to donate, visit www.therideofyourlife.ca. n

PEMBERTON + DISTRICT CHAMBER & ROTARY CLUB OF PEMBERTON PRESENT

14TH ANNUAL GOLF TOURNAMENT JUNE 7, 2019 AT BIG SKY GOLF CLUB 12:00PM REGISTRATION | 1:00PM SHOTGUN START

$135 INCLUDES GOLF WITH POWER CART, APPIES, DINNER & LIVE MUSIC $50 DINNER TICKETS ALSO AVAILABLE

Sign up today! www.pembertonchamber.com/golf

MAY 23, 2019

51


SPORTS THE SCORE

Whistler, Squamish minor hockey associations vote for changes SPORTS BRIEFS: WHISTLER BMX SEASON STARTING MAY 28; WELSH’S SPRUCE KINGS FALL IN FINAL

BY DAN FALLOON THE MINOR HOCKEY associations in both Whistler and Squamish have worked closely in recent years to help ice teams in older age groups that neither would be able to put together individually. But both recently voted to implement changes for their midget (17-and-under) and bantam (14-and-under) A-level programs beginning with the 2019-20 season. The two associations, which had recently combined to run teams in those programs, both separately voted to bring those programs under the administration of BC Hockey through its BC Hockey Zone Program, which allows players to join a team from a wider boundary to compete at higher levels. The provincial organization has done similar work in other jurisdictions around B.C. “What’s happened in the past when we’ve had shared teams is you would each pay your own association and the executive from each association would have to work really hard on figuring

out how to share the costs, working out schedules,” said Whistler Minor Hockey Association (WMHA) president Anita Cote. “We had a lot of issues in the last couple years making it work between the needs of the two communities. “BC Hockey agreed to come in. Originally, they were just helping facilitate our discussions, and then it became ‘Why don’t we operate it?’ That takes away the politics and the time and management needed.” In particular, Squamish and Whistler have shared a midget team in recent years, with the associations generally alternating which one hosted from season to season. Last season, the associations also agreed to share a team at the bantam level, though it fell apart in the late stages. “We want to work together, but obviously, both associations have a little bit of a different perspective. We want to do what’s best for the kids in the corridor, so that’s how (BC Hockey) got involved,” Cote said. Squamish Minor Hockey Association (SMHA) president Emma Moses said while there have been successes when Whistler and Squamish work together, there have also been challenges. With the provincial

association taking the lead with these particular programs, she’s expecting a smoother flow. “They’re two completely different organizations trying to marry teams. That’s sometimes difficult with rotating board members and different visions, so the reason for it was, with the support of BC

“They’re two completely different organizations trying to marry teams. - EMMA MOSES

Hockey, we would ensure the longevity of shared teams, rather than have it dependent on the board of the season,” she said. In addition to handling constant change, Moses noted balancing ice time in Squamish and Whistler and considering travel arrangements for the parents

involved is a factor. Another benefit, according to Cote, is that with a combined player pool, more kids will get the opportunity to stay in rep hockey either at the A1 or A2 levels. “The goal is to have two teams at each division, an A1 and an A2, and then you’d have your house teams,” she said. “What happens in small communities is one year, a first-year kid might not make the rep team—or maybe they do get on—but sometimes, year to year, you don’t know who’s going to get on these teams. “In the city, they can have four or five teams at a given age group, so if you don’t make the top team, you’ve got a spot on the next team and you can play competitive hockey.” Cote said the Whistler association is not considering any changes at lower levels, as the player pools are large enough to keep teams in house in the younger age groups. Cote said the WMHA did a cost analysis before voting on the change, determining that the majority of registration fees go to cover ice time, officials and coaching. “It doesn’t really affect our bottom line,” she said.

Maximize revenues, minimize headaches. Professional Operating in Whistler since 2004.

Is taking bookings now! PATIOS PAINTING INTERIOR FINISHING

RENOVATIONS EXTENSIONS DECKS

Efficient Low expenses, high bottom-line revenues. Comprehensive Full-service unit care.

LOCALLY OWNED · 25 YEARS IN WHISTLER

Consistently outperforming self-management.

Need a hand? Call or email Scotty:

Call us at 604-932-3510

604 902 3098 I Scott@scottybsolutions.com

WWW.WORCA.COM

TOONIE SCHEDULE

Will & EstatEs

%

BusinEss laW REal EstatE fREE consultation In person or by phone

S h o lt o S h aw

52 MAY 23, 2019

604.932.3211 332-4370 lorimer road s.shaw@raceandco.com

r a c e a n d c o m pa n y. c o m

TONIGHT'S TOONIE MAY 23

SPONSORS: Origin, Whistler Bike Co, Whistler Cooks, Devinci, Arcteryx, Coast Mountain Brewing COURSE: Up / Down Enduro, Chiller + Thriller SIGN-IN: Lost Lake Passivhaus, 5:30 pm APRÈS: Hunter Gather

%

NEXT WEEK'S TOONIE - MAY 30

SPONSORS: Arbutus Routes, Handlebar, FiFi's Bistro, Whistler Sliding Centre, Coastal Ford COURSE: Up / Down Enduro, Thriller on Blackcomb SIGN-IN: Arbutus Routes/Handlebar/FiFi's Patio, 5:30 pm APRÈS: Handlebar

Avoid line-ups and buy your membership and toonie season pass online BEFORE sign-in.

Y For Toonie patrol & first Aid on-course Phone: 604.902.2104 Y


SPORTS THE SCORE Moses said while the change is expected to make Squamish’s registration a bit more expensive, the board felt the trade-off is worthwhile. “It does come with a slight increase in costs, but that actually comes with more resources and a higher calibre of coaching. We now have the experts running it, rather than local boards, so the benefits are definitely worth the cost,” she said. Cote added the new arrangement is already up and running, as tryouts were held earlier this month. BC Hockey spokesman Keegan Goodrich said in an email that the organization runs the Zone Program to benefit players as well as minor hockey associations (MHA). “BC Hockey is helping administratively on those ends but work with each MHA to try and make sure ice times are split (when possible) between the two centres. But players register through our zone program registry, and assist in hiring the staff. This allows MHA’s to remain focused on grassroots programming, recreationallevel hockey and try hockey programming,” he wrote.

WHISTLER BMX SEASON STARTING MAY 28 Rippers of all ages can get pumped for the 2019 Whistler BMX season. Weekly racing at the local track, located at Cheakamus Crossing’s Bayly Park, will begin on Tuesday, May 28. Registration will run from 5:30 to 6 p.m., with half-track racing for run-bikers and young pedal bikers kicking off at 6 p.m. Full-track racing gets underway at 6:30 p.m. Race fees for half-track options are $3 while full-track is $7. Annual membership in BMX Canada, meanwhile, is $65. “We’re attracting such a diverse group of riders, it’s awesome. From tiny two-year olds on run bikes, to rippin’ dudes on dirt jumpers and moms and dads elbow-toelbow on cruiser bikes, our races are fun for everyone, spectators included! It’s an exciting sport to watch—almost as much fun as actually racing,” Whistler BMX president Jody Hallett said in a release. “For those who love bikes, dirt, adrenaline, friendly competition and a great team culture, Whistler BMX might be the perfect fit for you!” The club is also set to host clinics for new BMXers every Wednesday night in June beginning on June 5. The clinics run from 5 to 6:30 p.m. and have experienced Whistler BMX coach Erin Tierney at the helm. Registration is $10 per session or $30 (plus a free race) for all four. Also new at the track are some improvements to the course, including a newly paved start hill and finish area, tuned-up corner berms, and adjustments to the first berm to lower its height and make the entry grade mellower. For more information on the club, visit www.whistlerbmx.com.

WELSH’S SPRUCE KINGS FALL IN FINAL The Prince George Spruce Kings, featuring

Whistler forward Nolan Welsh, took care of the Brooks Bandits during the Doyle Cup series between the respective British Columbia and Alberta Jr. ‘A’ champions, winning the best-ofseven series in six games. Normally, that would mean Prince George would be done with Brooks, but with the Bandits hosting the National Jr. ‘A’ Championship, they once again stood in the way of Welsh and his squad. Brooks ended up taking home the national championship on May 19, edging Prince George 4-3. Welsh scored in the game’s final minute to cut the lead to one, but the Spruce Kings couldn’t find the equalizer. It was Welsh’s second goal of the tournament; he also tallied in a 5-1 win over the Portage Terriers in round-robin play.

WHISTLERITES EXCEL IN LOCAL SQUASH TOURNAMENT The Whistler Squash Club wrapped its 201819 campaign in style over the May long weekend. The club held its annual year-end tournament at the Meadow Park Sports Centre from May 17 to 19, hosting local players as well as those from Squamish, Vancouver and Seattle, though Whistler players held their own. In the women’s ‘A’ final, Whistler’s Holly Cox topped local Grade 8 student Sage Eberhard. Eberhard had beaten a pair of players she had never won against before in Heather Lynskey and her own mother Carol Eberhard. As well, the weekend prior, Eberhard was fourth in the women’s ‘A’ division at the BC Championships at Hollyburn Country Club. In the men’s ‘A’ final, club president Ben Thomas eked past club administrator Rob Eberhard in five games, while Ben Day topped fellow Pembertonian Matt McNamara in the men’s ‘C’ final. As well, Tim Ng won the men’s ‘B’ consolation final. Lastly for the locals, Adam Corless got past Mackenzie Bland in the men’s ‘D’ final. Both are Whistler Secondary School students who only recently started playing through the school’s intramural league run by the Whistler Squash Club. There was a treat for spectators at the end, as the pro draw featured Canada’s highest-ranking professional, Shawn Delierre, and South African touring pro Tristan Elsele in the final. Ultimately, Delierre, a Pan Am Games gold medallist in 2015, earned the win.

R E L T S I H W

B U L C BMX Racing Every Tuesday

Registration at 5:30pm

All Bikes All Ages All Levels

FREE RACING on June 11 to

celebrate Olympic Day

Come try the awesome sport of BMX! Volunteers always needed

No experience required!

WhistlerBmx info@whistlerbmx.com

JUNE 9, 2019 . LOST LAKE

MOTOCROSS ACTION COMING TO PEMBERTON Future West Moto is bringing motocross racing to Pemberton’s Green River Motocross Park this Sunday, May 26. As part of the fourth stop of the BC Championship Series, racing will be offered in 26 different categories, including open pro. Practice on race day starts at 7:45 a.m. with racing commencing soon afterward. Admission is $10 per person up to $40 per family. Children five and under are free. For more information, visit www. futurewestmoto.ca. n

SPORT . CHAMPIONSHIP . RELAY

70% SOLD OUT!

VOLUNTEER FOR A FUN DAY & JOIN US FOR A VOLUNTEER AFTER PARTY!

WHISTLERTRICLUB.COM/WHISTLER-X-TRI MAY 23, 2019

53


FORK IN THE ROAD

These are a few of my favourite things SAVVY, CONSCIENTIOUS FOOD PRODUCERS HIT THE SPOT “SO, BARTOSH,” somebody was razzing me the other day. “You don’t like palm oil. You don’t like sugar. You don’t like processed stuff. And you don’t like meat. What do you like?” Actually, I do like sugar. In small doses. Likewise meat, but only if it’s well-bred, ahem. Palm oil is a definite no-no. As for processed foods—well, I like a few. Very few, for good reason. You know the old grocery store mantra, shop the outer aisles? We pretty much follow that in our household. When you do venture

BY GLENDA BARTOSH into the centre aisles where processed foods are, the only way you can do nutritional justice to yourself and your loved ones and justice to the world at large is to be selective. You do that by reading labels. I’ve been a label reader for years. They’re fascinating: You learn about nutrients. Place and country of origin. Ingredients. Values. And often you even find sweet little moments, like the “Made by Really Nice Canadians” wordmark on Nature Clean products. Once you stake out a product, you can make your claim with confidence. Just remember to re-check the labels once in

MADE WITH SMARTS & GOOD INGREDIENTS

(L to R) Sunny Boy hot cereal from Alberta; Purdy’s Vancouver-made buckwheat bar; Three Farmers’ lentil snacks; Leclerc’s Célébration butter cookies; and Pacific Foods’ oat “milk” are all winners. PHOTO BY GLENDA BARTOSH

54 MAY 23, 2019

a while to make sure the manufacturer is still using ingredients and approaches, like Fair Trade, you believe in. If not, zzzzt—disqualified. It’s not everyone’s cup of tea to read labels at the store, but maybe you’ll get the habit. To get you started, here are a few of my favourite things. They’re all winners, and four out of five are Canadian. I especially love supporting farmers and producers in Western Canada. (You can take the girl out of Alberta but you can’t take Alberta out of the girl.) If you’re not an aisle label-reader, you can always DuckDuckGo products later. It’s pretty interesting what you can unearth—and what you can affect. As one of many Gerolsteiner fans who emailed the company urging them to return to glass bottles for their sparkling water after they moved to plastic, it felt good when they sent me a note saying they were going “glass” again. Knowledge is power, power can effect change, and good information is your foundation.

TAKE A SUNNY BREAK FROM PROCESSED BREAKFASTS Leave your sugary “granolas” and chocolate krispies behind. Besides oatmeal, when it comes to a tasty, high-fibre, knock-out porridge, there are two camps this side of the Great Lakes: Sunny Boy from Alberta and Red River from Manitoba. It’s like the age-old Edmonton/Calgary rivalry. No one knows when or how it started but the fight goes on. Personally, I’m a third-generation, born-and-bred Sunny Boy girl because

our roots are Albertan. Sunny Boy has been made since 1929 in Camrose, home to some of the richest farmland in Canada and family and friends over the years. It’s quick and easy to make and has a delicious flavour due to the lovely whole grains. “Fresh. Smart. Wholesome.” is the tagline. Wheat, rye and flax is the ingredient list. That’s it. No salt, no sugar, no nada. They’ve also got an organic version. Find it at Nesters Market, BuyLow, Save-On and more.

BUCK UP WITH PURDY’S BUCKWHEAT TREAT My mom has often remarked that given all the trendy new chocolatiers, Purdy’s has kept up with the times. And their new toasted buckwheat white chocolate bar with Himalayan salt and hints of caramel is proof of the pudding. I just about fell off my desk chair when hubby gave me one right after my buckwheat column last month. Mmmmmm good, with just the right balance of sweet/creamy and crunchy/salty, and they use sustainable cocoa. Canadian-made in Vancouver since 1907.

YOUR CAPPUCCINO WILL FEEL ITS OATS Thanks to the good baristas at Alpine Meadows Cafe for this tip: Pacific Foods Barista series oat “milk.” Dairy- and carrageenan-free, this yummy oat beverage is great straight up plus it froths up beautifully for your favourite latte or cappuccino. Made by Pacific Foods out of Oregon, a company with a conscience that supports local farmers and food banks. Available at Olives Community Market and more.

NO TIME TO BAKE? CELEBRATE! If you haven’t discovered Leclerc’s fabulous Célébration chocolate-coated butter cookies, you’re in for a treat. These delicious cookies are readily available plus they’re palm oilfree—a miracle in today’s commercial cookie world. In fact, their ingredients are about as wholesome as homemade, and they’re proudly Canadian. Francois Leclerc baked his first cookies in the back of the Quebec City family home in 1905. See the heart on the brandmark? It symbolizes the love the company has for its employees and products.

QUICKEN THE PULSE OF A PULSE FARMER One hot August, we were driving the flatlands of Southern Alberta. Just past a wind farm, I yelled, “Stop!” I’d spotted a mystery crop I totally didn’t recognize, and got out to pluck a yellowed pod and figure it out. Chickpeas! Not many Canadians realize Canada is a leading producer and exporter to 120-plus countries of pulses—those powerhouse legumes like chickpeas and lentils that are high in protein and fibre. I love what they’re doing at Three Farmers Foods in Saskatoon, Sask. (shout out to cousins Don and Bev at Turtle Lake!): Churning out pulse snacks that taste fabulous and actually satisfy you. Roasted, never-fried green peas; crunchy little lentils; roasted chickpeas, all with tasty flavours. Find them at London Drugs, Choices and more. BTW, this smart Canadian outfit believes “everyone deserves access to clean, nutritious food.” See how uplifting good labels and good products can be? Glenda Bartosh is an award-winning journalist who tries to shop mindfully. n


MEADOW PARK SPORTS CENTRE SWIM • SKATE • SWEAT • SQUASH

Meadow Park Sports Centre is located 4 km north of Whistler Village. OPEN DAILY: 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Last entry by 9:30 p.m.

GROUP FITNESS SCHEDULE THU 23

FRI 24

SAT 25

Circuit 7:30-8:30a.m.

Low Impact Circuit 7:30-8:30a.m.

Total Body Conditioning 7:30-8:30a.m.

Cardio Core Workout 9-10a.m.

Circuit 9-10a.m.

Low Impact Circuit 9-10a.m.

SUN 26

MON 27

Low Impact Circuit 7:30-8:30a.m. Circuit 9-10a.m.

Low Impact *Parent & Zumba Baby Fit Aerobics 10:30-11:30a.m. 10:30-11:30a.m. 10:30-11:30a.m.

Total Body Conditioning 9-10a.m.

*Barre 11:45-12:45p.m.

*Parent & Baby Fit 10:30-11:30a.m.

Zumba 12:15-1p.m.

Zumba 12:15-1 p.m. *Gentle Fit for Seniors 1-2p.m.

*Gentle Fit for Seniors 1-2p.m.

*Gentle Fit for Seniors 1-2p.m.

*PWR! Moves 1:15-2:15p.m.

*PWR! Moves 1:15-2:15p.m.

*PWR! Moves 1:15-2:15p.m.

20/20/20 5:30-6:30p.m.

Bootcamp 5:10-6:10p.m Classes with * are registered or flexible registration (flex reg) programs and require registration of at least 5 people to start.

Mind Body Stretch 8-9 p.m.

Low Impact Circuit 9-10a.m.

WED 29

Low Impact Circuit 7:30-8:30a.m

Aqua Fit Shallow 9:30-10:30a.m.

Aqua Fit Deep 9:30-10:30a.m.

Box Fit 6:45-7:45p.m.

TUE 28

All other classes are included in the price of admission.

See exact schedule of classess at the sports centre or online at:

Strong by Zumba 5:30-6:30p.m *Spin 6-7p.m.

Zumba *Pilates Mat 6:20-7:20p.m. Class 6:45-7:45p.m.

TRX Mixer 5:10-6:10p.m. Zumba 6:20-7:20p.m.

Stretch & Restore Yoga 8-9 p.m.

whistler.ca/recreation

ARENA SCHEDULE THU 23

W&OT Drop-In Hockey

8:15-9:45a.m. Drop-In Hockey 10-11:30a.m. Public Skate 12-3p.m.

FRI 24

Drop-In Hockey 8:15-9:45a.m.

SAT 25

SUN 26

MON 27

55+ Drop-In Hockey 8:15-9:45a.m.

TUE 28

WED 29

Drop-In Hockey 8:15-9:45a.m.

Drop-In Hockey 10-11:30a.m. Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 6:30-8p.m.

Public Skate 6:30-8p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 6:30-8p.m.

POOL SCHEDULE THU 23

FRI 24

SAT 25

SUN 26

MON 27

TUE 28

WED 29

LEISURE POOL 9a.m. - 9p.m. LAP POOL, HOT TUB, SAUNA, STEAM ROOM 6a.m. - 10p.m. POOL WILL BE CLOSED Saturday 25 and Sunday 26 from 12-7:30p.m.

whistler.ca/recreation | whistler.ca/notices | 604-935-7529  @RMWhistler |  @rmwhistler |  @rmowhistler

at Meadow Park Sports Centre on May 25 and 26 from 12 to 7:30 p.m. for a Sea Wolves Swim Meet.


EPICURIOUS

First-annual Whistler Taco Fest is bringing a taste of Mexico to the Sea to Sky WHISTLER GOLF CLUB ‘A PERFECT VENUE’ FOR THE EVENT

BY MEGAN LALONDE JONI TOEWS loves tacos. So much so, that when the longtime Whistler resident attended Taco Fest Toronto—a massive food truck festival produced by a few of his university friends, through their company Cravings Food Co. in collaboration with Taste Toronto—he couldn’t understand why Whistler wasn’t already home to a similar event. Now, two years after Toews first began putting wheels in motion to bring a scaleddown version to Whistler (with those friends’ blessings, of course), his vision is finally becoming a reality. Despite a series of hurdles, the first-ever Whistler Taco Fest will bring a taste of Mexico to the Sea to Sky—more specifically, the Whistler Golf Club—on Monday, June 3. “It definitely wasn’t easy to orchestrate,” said Toews, best known around town as one half of the local DJ duo Case of the Mondays. “It was really hard to find a venue.” Toews decided to reach out to the Whistler Golf Club, “a perfect venue” for Taco Fest, after previously hosting a Case of the Mondays event at the course. “That kind of opened the window,” he explained. “I’m really stoked that Ro Davies from the Whistler Golf Club was happy to have us.” Unlike the last event, next month’s Taco Fest is more likely to include lawn games and acoustic covers than fist pumping. “This is going to be more alldemographics fun. It doesn’t matter whether you’re 19 or 50 or whatever, as long as you like tacos and margaritas and beer, then it’s probably the right scene for you.” The event will feature three taco vendors from throughout the South Coast: Vera’s Taco Shack from Vancouver and Flaca’s Tacos, a Squamish-based food truck, while the Whistler Golf Club’s eatery will design a one-day-one pop-up shop, dubbed Palmer’s Taqueria.

TACO TALK The first-ever Whistler Taco Fest takes place at the Whistler Golf Club on Monday, June 3. While menus are still being finalized, vendors are being encouraged to branch out from their usual offerings in favour of new special creations, specifically for Taco Fest. Those will run the gamut from the more traditional end of the spectrum— think chicken, steak or crispy cod—to more out-of-the-box innovations. For instance, one rumour Toews heard

“We want to keep prices low so people can try as many tacos as possible ... ” - JONI TOEWS

from a vendor includes talk of a—get ready for it—jalapeno battered shrimp taco. “Everyone’s going to put their own little twist one it,” he said. Tacos will range in price from $4 to $8. “We want to keep prices low so people can try as many tacos as possible,” Toews explained. Hornitos Tequila will be on hand to fuel

� Vista Place LIVE, WORK, PLAY

Residential, Office

Commercial Space and Commercial Available Now! Rental Spaces info@vistaplacebc.com 56 MAY 23, 2019

a margarita bar and Whistler Brewing will bring a selection of summer beers, each available for $5, while other basic spirits will also be available for purchase. The event also offers Toews the opportunity to see another longtime dream realized: a condiment bar, but rather than ketchup and mustard, a variety of hot sauces. “I’m a massive hot sauce fan. I’ll

drink it at lunch, just because I enjoy it that much,” he said with a laugh. A tiered ticketing system functions to keep crowds and lines low and service speeds high. Tickets will provide their holders entry between 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. and 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Toews has allocated 200 tickets per tier, around

NOW ACCEPTING Lease Applications

www.VistaPlacePemberton.com

IMAGE SUBMITTED

20 of which will be set aside for purchase at the door. Once attendees have entered, they’re welcome to stay for however long they’d like—until last call, currently set for 8:45 p.m., that is. “Now the tickets are moving, the event’s up, the stoke level’s there and now it’s just going to be fine-tuning the décor and decorations and working with local artists or whoever I can find to help make the event look really cool,” Toews said. “It’s 100 per cent going to become an annual thing.” If you’re a local artist or musician interested in getting involved, Toews can be reached through the Taco Fest Whistler Facebook page. This event will be 19+, with valid I.D. required for entry. Entry tickets range from $5 to $8 and are available at www.ticketlabs. com/event/15668/?fbclid=IwAR0WBLnovz J4Gb5Z1Mtk-0CNjdMxwEzTU0F6WHIAcD 4xVBWHtvDdM5OTe0Y. As of press time, 50 per cent of tickets were sold out. n

Now ng! Hiri

OPEN 10-8

WE CUT & COLOUR • NOW HIRING OPEN UNTIL 8PM • SINCE 1994


$49 - FOUR COURSE

SPRING SPECIAL

$21

3 COURSE MENU

PRIX FIXE MENU OFFERED SUNDAYS THROUGH THURSDAYS

AVAILABLE SUNDAY TO THURSDAY - NOT AVAILABLE ON HOLIDAYS

FIESTA HOUR

CELEBRATE SPRING FLAVOURS WITH CHEF WALT’S ITALIAN-INSPIRED SEASONAL CREATIONS.

5pm to 6:30pm EVERYDAY

Double Margaritas $8.50

Coronas $5

BEGINS MONDAY, MAY 27TH Dinner from 5:30pm. Reservations recommended.

Sunday to Thursday 5pm – 9:30pm Friday & Saturday 5pm – 10pm

FOLLOW US ON

At the Base of Whistler Mountain in the Sundial Hotel 12-4340 Sundial Crescent / 604.962.4450

Insta

4242 VILLAGE STROLL

www.themexicancorner.ca

ILCAMINETTO.CA

SUSHI VILLAGE WILL BE CLOSED

5 DAYS Last Day

THURSDAY 27TH JUNE.

Choice of one plate

604 932 4442

FROM MONDAY MAY 27TH TO FRIDAY JUNE 7TH

Grilled Chicken Caesar Salad

Marinated chicken thigh, low fat yogurt dressing, capered focaccia croutons, Grana Padano crisp

2 Baja fish Taco

House slaw, avocado salsa verde+cilantro sour cream served in a flour tortilla

Johnny Mac Pizza

Capicolla, mushrooms, mozzarella, provolone

WE’RE INSTALLING AN AWESOME A/C UNIT TO KEEP OUR GUESTS, OUR STAFF AND ESPECIALLY THE FISHES COOL FOR THE SUMMER

Beef Burger

Ground chuck, fried onions, lettuce, tomato

Mac and Cheese

Macaroni, 4 cheese sauce, light panko crust +garlic toast

Plus one craft beer Grizzly Brown Ale • Lifty Lager •Alta Lake Ale • 5 Rings IPA

ONLY

14.99

$

EACH

SUNDAY TO THURSDAY

SUSHIVILLAGE.COM 604-932-3330

EXCEPT HOLIDAYS

MAY 23, 2019

57


ARTS SCENE

Local photographer wins prestigious award ORTHOPEDIC SURGEON-TURNED-PHOTOGRAPHER HAD FIVE IMAGES FEATURED IN PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHERS OF CANADA EXHIBIT

BY ALYSSA NOEL IT MIGHT BE HARD to imagine what an orthopedic surgeon and a photographer have in common. But according to Whistler’s Paul Wright, who has had successful careers in both fields, it’s more than you think. “It’s knowing the equipment really well, knowing what your outcome will be. It’s being realistic. It was a natural transition for what I trained for,” Wright says. To back up a little bit: Wright had a long and successful career as an orthopedic surgeon working in Burnaby when, at 57, serious sleep apnea forced him to retire. “I went back to Langara right away,” he says. “I never had that ‘what am I going to do’ stage in life of retirement.” Heading towards his 60s, he found himself taking courses (primarily on lighting) with young people who had yet to start their first career. “I realized they didn’t always read the manuals,” he says. “As an orthopedic surgeon, you always read the manuals. When people ask how I became successful, my answer is, ‘I always read the manuals.’”

PICTURE PERFECT “Into the Vastness,” Paul

Wright’s photo captured at the Buzz Bowl at Whitecap Alpine, won the Bronze Medal at the World Photographic Cup in 2018. PHOTO BY PAUL WRIGHT

58 MAY 23, 2019

To that end, it didn’t take long for Wright to launch into his new career. With a partner, he ran a photography business, primarily shooting corporate events and high-end family shoots. His eye for photography didn’t come out of nowhere though. “When I was 19 … I couldn’t decide whether to be a wildlife photographer or go into medicine,” he says. “In those days,

He’s captured whales and spirit bears in the Great Bear Rainforest, athletes in motion at the Paralymics, and dancers and actors on stage. And, earlier this spring, he had five images selected for a national exhibit hosted by the Professional Photographers of Canada. Ranging from backcountry skiing to the “pick-up man” at a rodeo who rescues

“I had this pent-up creative side that had been squashed and supressed all these years. I could go and be a little risky because others had to be successful—they had to feed their kids ... ” - PAUL WRIGHT

you didn’t care about dollars. It was what was going to be most challenging.” While he chose medicine, he also took photos throughout that career—just not as much as he’d like. “I had this pent-up creative side that had been squashed and supressed all these years. I could go and be a little risky because others had to be successful—they had to feed their kids,” he says. In recent years, Wright has combined his outdoor pursuits and travel with photography—sometimes submitting to The Canadian Press archives for publication and other times selling limited edition prints.

bowled-over cowboys, they were on display in Montreal earlier this year as part of the National Image Salon. “Photographers must show extraordinary talent to win an award among such illustrious company,” says Charles van den Ouden, chair of the National Exhibition Committee, in a release about the award. “We were thrilled to see so many inspiring entries in the competition his year. The salon images clearly demonstrate exceptional skill and quality that professionals bring to the medium of photography.” That honour is in addition to earning a

bronze medal in the reportage category at the 2018 World Photographic Cup, as well as the Nations Award, the highest-scored image entered by Team Canada. “In my lifetime, that’s the most significant thing I’ll ever place in in photography,” Wright says, adding, “When I look around at the other photographers in the World Cup, these are rock stars and I’m a wannabe. I call myself a 20-year-old photographer in a senior citizen’s body.” Wright is profoundly humble about his achievements as a photographer, particularly since moving to Whistler four years ago and being amongst so many “world-class photographers.” “We had a cabin in Whistler and when I had this sudden retirement, we looked around at where to live,” he says. “The nicest community we found in all of B.C. was Whistler. There’s the carnival front of Whistler, but then there’s a real community. It’s such a nice place to live.” Now, having just finished chemotherapy treatment for lymphoma, Wright is getting his strength back and preparing for busy and adventure-filled summer ahead—from kayaking to hiking to a cross-Canada trip to help his daughter move back west. “I have life activities and then I shoot images while I’m undertaking that,” he says. “I sneak around and do little things that interest me. It’s just being out there. If I come back with no photos, I still have as nice a day as if I did.” To see some of Wright’s images visit wrightmoment.com. n


ARTS SCENE

New Sea to Sky children’s book stars Squamish pooch PROFITS FROM THE ADVENTURES OF SQUAMISH FINN GO TO LOCAL SPCA

BY ALYSSA NOEL

WHAT’S ON @ THE AUDAIN New Special Exhibition Now Open! Artistry Revealed: Peter Whyte, Catharine Robb Whyte and Their Contemporaries | On display until August 26

FREE ADMISSION FOR AGES 18 & UNDER Including regular events & programs Art After Dark Fridays | May 24 3:30 – 5:30pm (youth-specific art making) Family Studio | Mountain Prints | May 26 12 – 4pm presented by

IF YOU FOLLOW The Squamish Chief (Pique’s sister paper) on Facebook, you might recognize Finn. Over the last year, the pup’s owner, Lindsay Waite, has been sharing images of him posed in picturesque places in the corridor. “I said, ‘You should really do a kids’ book with these,” says Jennifer Thuncher, editor of The Chief. “After a year of saying that, I was like, ‘Maybe that’s not your thing.’” Writing, however, is her thing. So, last summer while on vacation hiking in Pemberton, Thuncher put pen to paper—or, more accurately, words to Waite’s photos—to create a children’s book called The Adventures of Squamish Finn. All the proceeds from its sale will go towards the Sea to Sky BC SPCA. “Last year I had a weekend off and I was up in Pemberton hiking … I’m terrible on vacations. I can’t handle it. I’m so jittery and I need to be doing something all the time. Before the next hike, my husband said, ‘Why don’t you sit over there and write that book you’ve been talking about?’ On that vacation, I wrote it,” Thuncher explains. Using Waite’s photos of Finn from around the corridor and Vancouver—at Newport Beach, beside the Mamquam River, on Vancouver’s Seawall—to build the story. It follows Finn’s happy Squamish life frolicking in the outdoors with his two moms

WEEKLY EVENTS Art After Dark Fridays | May 24 6:30 – 8:30pm (adult-specific art making) Yoga @ the Audain | Fridays 6:30 – 8:00pm | Instructor Laura Davies Public Walk & Talk Tours Wednesday through Sunday | Scheduled Times

POOCH PIC

Finn poses with The Adventures of Squamish Finn, which he stars in.

and return. “We all get that,” Thuncher adds. “There are some people who say, ‘In the city there are more things to do. You can go to more clubs and restaurants. There’s more activity.’ It’s something all of us have heard in the corridor.” But, of course, many of us draw the same conclusion as Finn. The book’s target audience, meanwhile, gave a stamp of approval before Waite and Thuncher sent it to be printed on Vancouver Island. (The pair self-published the project.) “I have kids, but they’re grown,” Thuncher says. “Lindsay has nieces and nephews, so we did test runs on them. It was cute. They didn’t like that Finn ran away, but they were happy

“ ... We didn’t want it to be something we were earning from. We both have dogs and, for exploiting Finn’s cuteness, we thought we should give back to the local SPCA.” - JENNIFER THUNCHER

until one day, his uncle and his dog—a black, shiny boxer named Louise—come to visit from the big city. Louise plants a seed: Vancouver life is better than small-town Squamish. Frustrated after he has to go to work with one of his moms, Finn decides to run away and check out Louise’s claims. “He runs through all these landmarks in Squamish on his way to Stanley Park—then gets really scared in the park in the city (with) the big, honking machines, and he ends up trying to get home,” Thuncher says. “He gets home and realizes Squamish is the best place ever.” It’s perhaps a relatable tale—particularly in Whistler where so many residents leave

Visit audainartmuseum.com/events for details

PHOTO BY LINDSAY WAITE/SUBMITTED

he made it back.” As for the SPCA, they were pleased to hear 100 per cent of the book’s profits would be coming their way. “For both of us, it’s a fun project,” Thuncher says. “There was never any thought that we’d make money from it. We didn’t want it to be something we were earning from. We both have dogs and, for exploiting Finn’s cuteness, we thought we should give back to the local SPCA.” You can get a copy of The Adventures of Squamish Finn online at Barnes and Noble (https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/theadventures-of-squamish-finn-jennifer-thunc her/1130921099?ean=9780228811022). There is also an ebook version on Amazon. n

Open Daily 10am – 5pm Open Friday 10am – 9pm (Closed Tuesday)

4350 Blackcomb Way, Whistler audainartmuseum.com

SPRING FEATURE 3 COURSE VILLAGE SIGNATURE DINNER $35

$5 ASAHI BEER & 1/2 PRICE HOT SAKE Add a side of Prawns, Salmon or Scallops to any entrée for $10

SUNDAY - THURSDAY Located in the Hilton Resort & Spa overlooking the Village Stroll

| 6pm – close |

(excluding holidays)

reservations recommended

teppanvillage@shaw.ca • 604.932.2223 • teppanvillage.ca

MAY 23, 2019

59


NOTES FROM THE BACK ROW

Tight lips on new Tarantino flick THE CANNES FILM FESTIVAL is on right now and in amongst all the yacht parties and media circuses (Margot

BY FEET BANKS Robbie wore sequined pants on the red carpet! Gasp!) there are also some movies screening. And some projects looking for money—including director Roman Emmerich’s Moonfall, an end of the world spectacular about the moon crashing into the earth. Emmerich is asking for $150 million (with no takers as of yet). The biggest hype out of Cannes so far has been Rocketman, the Elton John biopic that’s hoping to ride some of that Bohemian Rhapsody success all the way to the bank/Oscars. But the real excitement is

A WHOLE NEW WORLD A new live action version of Aladdin opens at Village 8 this week. PHOTO BY DANIEL SMITH/ DISNEY ENTERPRISES

on Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon A Time in Hollywood, which premiered just as the column was going to press. It’s been 25 years since Tarantino rocked Cannes with Pulp Fiction and, perhaps harkening back to those simpler, more analogue times, he released a statement before his premiere imploring fans and critics to respect the artform of cinema and refrain from posting spoilers and key plot points online. I wasn’t there, but I’m onboard with Quentin’s tactic—Once Upon A Time in Hollywood hits theatres over here on July 25 and all you need to know is it stars Brad Pitt, Leonardo DiCaprio and Margot Robbie and is set in Tinseltown in 1969, which astute historians will recall is the year of the Sharon Tate murder and that whole thing with the Manson cult. No more needs to be said except that Tarantino has never made a bad movie and, by early accounts, that trend continues. The Cannes critics agree the less you know about this one going in, the more fun you’ll have. Speaking of not giving too much away,

LIVE MUSIC! TUESDAY

BLACKS’N’BLUES

with Sean Rosevv

5 NIGHTS LIVE @ $5 LIVE MUSIC WITH HAPPY HOUR PRICES TUESDAY TO SATURDAY

HAPPY HOUR 9am-12pm & 9pm-1am

60 MAY 23, 2019

WEDNESDAY

JAM NIGHT

with Kostaman

THURSDAY

TWO HOURS PRIOR FRIDAY

KARAOKE SATURDAY

with Kate

MARCUS RAMSAY

there were no pre-screenings for the new live action Aladdin flick, which opens here Friday at the good old Whistler Village 8. The lack of sneak peeks seems odd, seeing as how nearly everyone knows the story—street urchin/parkour master falls in love with a princess, is bullied into stealing a lamp with a comedic genie inside, does everything he can to get the girl, and then realizes that all that makes us princely is what’s inside, not the girth of our elephant caravan. Plus there is a lot of singing. Will Smith stars as the blue genie, reprising a role made iconic by the late Robin Williams, while Naomi Scott (the pink ranger in Saban’s Power Rangers) steps into the Princess Jasmine role and newcomer Mena Massoud comes in hot in the title role. My worries on this one are the music and songs—a lot of the Disney catalogue doesn’t play as well with live action—but you can expect slick action and dynamic camerawork from director Guy Ritchie (Snatch, Swept Away). Fun for kids for sure. The bigger question though is, “Do we need this movie at all?”

Disney seems to think so. Not content with taking all our money through the Marvel Universe, Star Wars and all the Pixar flicks, the house the mouse built is hammering out the remakes—a liveaction Lion King is set for July (well, a CGI animation that looks live action), as well as live Mulan in 2020, with Pinocchio, The Little Mermaid and The Sword in the Stone slated for 2021. That is, of course, if the moon doesn’t smash into the Earth before that. Also opening this week, Booksmart, a best friend, end-of-high-school, goodkids-doing-bad-stuff, party flick in the vein of Superbad, but female-driven and potentially even funnier. The directorial debut of actress Olivia Wilde, Booksmart also has Will Ferrell and Adam McKay attached as producers (see also: Talladega Nights, Anchorman, Step Brothers) and a four-woman writing team stacked with up and comers. This is the best movie of the summer so far, and might be the definitive teen movie for a generation. Don’t sleep on Booksmart. n

HOCKEY & BASKETBALL PLAYOFFS ARE IN FULL SWING! CATCH ALL NHL & NBA ACTION ON OUR 9 FLAT SCREEN TV’S WITH VOLUME ON! COME CHEER YOUR FAVOURITE TEAM 604 932 5940 • 2129 LAKE PLACID RD


ARTS SCENE

VILLAGE 8 SHOW SCHEDULE

FRIDAY, MAY 24TH – THURSDAY, MAY 30TH ADVANCED SCREENING OF “GODZILLA: THE KING OF MONSTERS”

THURSDAY, MAY 30TH AT 4:00 & 7:00PM

ALADDIN (PG)

WHISTLER’S NEWEST RESTAURANT & COCKTAIL BAR

BIG CROWD A large group gathered on the lawn at Whistler Olympic Plaza last August to take in the Deep Summer

Photo Challenge as part of Crankworx.

PHOTO BY KIKE ABELLEIRA

Deep Summer wildcard entry open CRANKWORX ANNOUNCES PHOTO, VIDEO COMPETITORS

BY ALYSSA NOEL LAST YEAR, a whopping 5,000 people packed the lawn at Whistler Olympic Plaza for the Deep Summer Photo Challenge. Heading into its 11th year, the event has become a major part of Crankworx’s offerings. “Now that we’re in our 11th year, (photographers) really have to bring something new to the table,” says Jennifer Smith, who organizes both Dirt Diaries and Deep Summer. “Storyline has become a big focus. It’s also become a big focus in content creation too. It’s important they can put together a show.” While the mountain bike festival might still be a couple months away, organizers are now accepting submissions for Deep Summer’s “Wildcard” entry. Five professional photographers have been selected to spend three days shooting a team shredding on their mountain bikes in the Sea to Sky corridor (that’s a change from previous years when images had to be from Whistler Valley) and the Whistler Mountain Bike Park and turn in a three-tofive minute slideshow. However, the wildcard photographer—who makes up the sixth competitor—is chosen a little differently. To earn that position, photographers submit three images to a panel of judges who will select five finalists. Their photos will then be posted on Pinkbike for readers to vote on their favourite. “The people who do shine in that are obviously seasoned photographers,” Smith says. “That said, one of the wildcard people last year was 18. His work was pretty phenomenal. One big change over the years is the level of work that comes from even a high school student is markedly different. They have photo labs and digital photo labs in high school. They’ve got skills coming

right from an early age.” The contest is open to photographers anywhere, but often those in the Sea to Sky have an advantage when it comes to voting. “There is a little bit of Sea-to-Sky bias,” says Smith. “There’s an element of popularity, but part of being a great content producer and professional photographer is being able to market yourself and being a player in that social space.” Meanwhile, the professional photographers already invited to compete include Katie Lozancich, Peter Jamison, Michael Overbeck, Cassandra Prochera, and Jim Topliss. The overall winner with the best resulting slideshow—which will be on display at the event on Aug. 13—will win $5,000. As for the selected competitors, Smith says organizers aimed to represent a range of talent. “We really focus on bringing more women into Crankworx and being as equal as possible in that brand,” Smith says. “It’s really important the creative industry be reflective as well. We’re out specifically looking for women, and I also looked for an age range. There is unique talent coming from young people and also unique story lines you can only truly understand if you’ve been riding for decades.” Dirt Diaries, which will screen mountain bike “diary” films, is set to take place on Aug. 14 at Whistler Olympic Plaza. This year’s competitors vying for the $5,000 first-place prize, second $3,000 prize, and third $2,000 prize include Damien Vergez, Paul Cain, Anne Cleary, Max Sauerbrey, Michael Sousa, and Tom Wilson. The deadline to submit a wildcard entry for Deep Summer is June 15. Voting for the best entry out of five will take place from June 25 to July 5 with the winner announced on July 9. For more information or to enter visit www.pinkbike.com/contest/ deepsummer/. n

DAILY 3:45, 6:45 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:35 MATINEES SATURDAY & SUNDAY 12:45

BOOK SMART (14A)

DAILY 4:10, 7:10 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:40 MATINEES SATURDAY & SUNDAY 1:10

located in The Pan Pacific Whistler Village Centre

BRIGHTBURN (18A)

SERVING FOOD & DRINKS 3-MIDNIGHT DAILY

AVENGERS: END GAME (PG)

SPRING SPECIALS AVAILABLE 7 DAYS A WEEK

$33

3 COURSE DINNER 5:30-10PM

& ALL DAY HAPPY HOUR

menu & group booking details WWW.THERAVENROOM.CA

DAILY 4:05, 7:05 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:15 MATINEES SATURDAY & SUNDAY 1:05 DAILY 3:40; FRI – SUN & TUES 6:30; MON, WED & THURS 7:20 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:30 MATINEES SATURDAY & SUNDAY 12:05

JOHN WICK CHAPTER 3 - PARABELLUM (18A) DAILY 3:35, 6:35 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:40 MATINEES SATURDAY & SUNDAY 12:25

THE SUN IS ALSO A STAR (PG)

FRI – WED 7:00 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:20

POKEMON DETECTIVE PIKACHU (PG)

DAILY 3:40, 7:15 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 10:00 MATINEES SATURDAY & SUNDAY 12:40

A DOG’S JOURNEY (G)

DAILY 3:55, 6:55 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:25 MATINEES SATURDAY & SUNDAY 12:55

www.imaginecinemas.com

DAILY

DRINK SPECIALS

MONGOLIEGRILL.COM MAY 23, 2019

61


ARTS NEWS

WALSH

RESTORATION USE A WALSH CUBE TRUCK FOR FREE TO MOVE YOUR POSSESSIONS TO WALSH STORAGE We Added More Containers!

WALSH STORAGE Pemberton Industrial Park - 1944 Stone Cutter Place Owner Residence On-Site

8 X 10 CONTAINERS

100

$

+tax per month

2 HOURS FREE TRUCK TIME

8 X 20 CONTAINERS

160

$

+tax per month

4 HOURS FREE TRUCK TIME

Call Mike Walsh

604 698 0054

mike.walsh@walshrestoration.ca

SPRING SPECIAL

$30 FOUR COURSE MENU Whistlers favourite deal on now! Available 7 days a week Limited to parties up to 6 people (one bill) Drink specials available 604.962.0404 | nagomisushi.com @nagomisushiwhistler

62 MAY 23, 2019

FEST FUN The Ta Daa Lady leads a group of kids on an adventure at the Whistler Children’s Festival at Whistler Olympic Plaza. PHOTO BY REBECCA ROBBINS PHOTOGRAPHY

Whistler Children’s Festival announces performers ALSO IN ARTS NEWS: DREAM BIG POP-UP RETURNS; WHISTLER MOUNTAIN BIKE HERITAGE WEEK KICKS OFF IN JUNE; AND SQUAMISH LIBRARY SEEKS ARTISTS

BY ALYSSA NOEL THE WHISTLER Children’s Festival has unveiled its lineup. Set to run for the 36th year from July 5 to 7, this year’s performers include a mix of new faces and old favourites. On Friday, the festivities kick off with a free all-ages pyjama dance party, featuring local family favourite Ira Pettle (who was recently named the Whistler Excellence Award’s Champion of Arts and Culture). Ventriloquist Kellie Haines and singer Smilin’ Rylan will also be on hand. Then, on Sunday, catch Juno Awardwinning kids’ performers Bobs and LoLo wrapping up the fun. In between you can also find The Roaming Diva, a circus-styled songstress, wandering the grounds at Whistler Olympic Plaza; Will’s Jams, from CBC Kids Television; Angela Brown, The Ta Daa Lady & Nylon Zoo; and the Musical Playground, an interactive installation of experimental instruments. For more information and tickets, visit whistlerchildrensfestival.com.

DREAM BIG RETURNS Dream Big is back with a one-day vintage clothing sale event set for Saturday, May 25 at Alpine Café. Cat Leduc and Helen Hamilton held their most recent second-hand pop-up sale at Mount Currie Coffee shop in April. Now they’re trying out a new, expanded space in the outdoors and welcoming an all-female lineup of local craft makers—including Lovestone Whistler, Rock Your Feather,

Flying High Postcard Co., and Little Luna Candles—as well as music from DJ Whitness. The party starts at 6 p.m. and runs until 9 p.m.

WHISTLER MOUNTAIN BIKE HERITAGE WEEK TO KICK OFF The Whistler Museum is set to host Whistler Mountain Bike Heritage Week for the fourth year from June 6 to 13. Celebrating a history that stretches back more than three decades, the events will include speakers, films, and a chance to show off your retro bikes and gear. The goal is celebrate Whistler’s distinct mountain bike scene. For more information, visit http://www. whistlermuseum.org/mtbweek.

SQUAMISH LIBRARY SEEKS ART The Squamish Public Library is on the hunt for art to fill its space dedicated to teens. Its selection committee is currently accepting proposals for wall graphics, murals, or outside-the-box art to spruce up the large wall. The competition is open to youth, students, professional and emerging artists with some experience in large-scale murals, paint, graphic design or photography. (They also have to be able to meet the deadline and finish the piece in July or August this year.) The deadline to send in a submission for consideration is June 17. For full requirements and information on how to submit, visit https://squamish.bc.libraries. coop/files/2019/05/Call-for-Artists-TeenArea-Mural-1.pdf. n


Wellness Talks Nesters Market and Pharmacy offers wellness talks at its Whistler location. Join RHN and Certified Plant Based Chef Sarah Uy, Carissa Beu, RHN and Post Partum Doula Dana Lemmon and Jasmin Wong each week for inspirational whole health ideas.

OUR NEW

SUMMER MENU

LAUNCHES

FRESH NEW DISHES · CLASSIC WHISTLER FAVOURITES 2011 INNSBRUCK DR. CREEKSIDE · 604.935.0055

Proudly supporting local designers.

Making Sense of the Numbers THURSDAY MAY 30, 10:30 A.M. WITH ERIC POULIN, NESTER’S PHARMACY MANAGER Feeling overwhelmed by all the numbers? Blood pressure, blood sugar, cholesterol levels, these values can vary over time and can be stressful to understand. Come chat with Eric Poulin, Pharmacy Manager of Nesters Pharmacy, about how to make sense of these numbers and not be burdened by them

10% TUESDAYS mention this ad and receive 10% off of all products on Tuesdays L o c a t e d i n t h e To w n P l a z a a c r o s s f r o m T h e G a p 6 0 4 . 9 0 5 . 6 2 9 0

TAKE HOME THE FLAVOURS OF WHISTLER

Eric Poulin is the Pharmacy Manager at Nesters Pharmacy, and has worked here for 9 years. In that time, he has been continuously inspired by the wonderful people he has met in this community. Wellness Desk 604-932-3545 Ext 322

7019 Nesters Rd. Whistler, B.C.

BUY IT TODAY AT:

ARMCHAIR BOOKS, NESTERS MARKET + WHISTLER KITCHEN WORKS MAY 23, 2019

63


MUSEUM MUSINGS

Now Serving

BREAKFAST EVERY WEEKEND!

8:30am-12pm

FRAME BY FRAME Not only can you watch adventure films here, but Whistler has been the setting for many adventure-based film projects, including documentaries, commercials and instructional video series like Extreme Explorations Into the Powder seen here.

Call for Reservations: 604-962-4450 12-4340 Sundial Crescent (at the base of Whistler Mountain, 2nd floor of the Sundial Hotel)

FOLLOW US ON

themexicancorner.ca

Insta

WHISTLER QUESTION COLLECTION, 1993

Whistler’s film festivals have a storied past BY ALLYN PRINGLE

M

ER N N I W 9 1 0 AY 23RD, 2

Clay

PET of the

week Name: Clay

Clay is a 4-year-old Flat Coated Retriever also fondly known as Brown Dog or Schmalios. He enjoys long hikes in the woods with his family, giving them kisses when they bend down to take off their shoes, raiding fruit from the garden and taking up the whole couch at the end of a long day.

Visit a Whistler Happy Pets store to pick up your prize. Function Junction: #101-1085 Millar Creek Rd. Bring a copy of this ad to redeem your prize.

YOUR PET COULD BE NEXT!

Email your pet photo with name & details to tsweeney@wplpmedia.com

64 MAY 23, 2019

IN 1986, Whistler held its first Whistler Adventure Film Festival (WAFF), an event not all that different from the Whistler Film Festival’s sixth annual Adventure Film Series that took place this past weekend as part of GO Fest. (The museum also ran some Valley of Dreams Walking Tours and a Discover Nature station as part of the festival; if you missed us, our Valley of Dreams and nature tours all start up again daily June 1 and Discover Nature will be back at Lost Lake for July and August!) The WAFF was co-sponsored by the Whistler Resort Association (today known as Tourism Whistler) and organized by One Step Beyond Adventure Group of Canmore, Alta., which also organized the Banff Festival of Mountain Films (today known as the Banff Mountain Film Festival) at that time. Set to take place over the third weekend of November, WAFF was timed to excite attendees for the coming winter season and the adventures that might await them. The films selected featured various “adventure activities” including skiing, white-water sports and climbing expeditions. In total, the festival screened 11 films over two days, with a reception on the Friday evening featuring David Breashears. In 1985, Breashears became the first American to summit Mount Everest more than once, having already completed the climb in 1983. By the time he appeared at the WAFF, he had already won an Emmy for an ABC Sports special Triumph on Mt. Everest, which featured the first videotape, microwave transmission from the summit. According

to the Squamish Citizen, at the opening reception Breashears was going to show a selection of his film accomplishments as well as talking about his career and the search for Mallory and Irvine, who disappeared during their 1924 Everest expedition. Following his talk was a screening of Everest—North Wall, Laszlo Pal’s account of the 1982 American China-Everest Expedition narrated by Robert Redford. Over the next two days, the WAFF screened more films, including three on sailing, an Irish film Beyond the North Wind about the 1981 Irish Arctic Expedition to Northern Ellesmere Island, a CBC/ BBC collaboration Hell and High Water documenting a kayak and raft adventure through the Grand Canyon of the Stikine, and To the End of the Earth, a film recording the exploits of the Trans-Globe Expedition. Two of the New Zealand ski films shown at the WAFF, Incredible Mountains and Across the Main Divide, are available for viewing online at NZ On Screen. The WAFF does not appear to have been long lived: We can find no evidence of it in our research binders after 1986. Today, however, there are plenty of opportunities to view adventure films in Whistler. The Whistler Film Festival’s Adventure Series each spring features many of the same sports and adventures that could be seen in 1986, though some have evolved over time. You can even catch some of the Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour in Whistler each February, brought to town by Escape Route. Since it began in 1976, the festival has grown to include a World Tour in which a selection of the best films from the festival go out on tour in approximately 305 cities in 20 different countries. n


PARTIAL RECALL

2

1 3

4

5

6

1 GO SAILING Jill Wynott and Francois Hebert of the Whistler Sailing Association head out on Alta Lake during GO Fest sailing clinics on Sunday, May 19. PHOTO BY CAITLIN TURRELL. 2 SOCCER ON STILTS These kids weren’t concerned about picking on somebody their own size when a soccer game with the stilt-wearing Whistler Street Entertainers broke out on the Village Stroll on Sunday, May 19. PHOTO BY MEGAN LALONDE. 3 TOONIE MARSHALS Pique volunteers were all smiles as they hiked up to their marshal points for the Whistler Off-Road Cycling Association’s first toonie race of the season. PHOTO SUBMITTED. 4 STAFF ESCAPE Hatley team members spent their spring staff party successfully breaking out of one of the rooms at Escape! Whistler. PHOTO SUBMITTED. 5 HOCKEY HEROES The Whistler Secondary School hockey team celebrates after winning the BC Hockey Tier 3 Championship—for the third year in a row—on May 14. The local team beat Sands Secondary School from North Delta 4-1 to claim the title. PHOTO SUBMITTED. 6 STUDENT COUNCIL Whistler Mayor Jack Crompton consults with the newest members of council—rather, the Grade 4 and 5 students who came out to the Maury Young Arts Centre as part of the Resort Municipality of Whistler’s Student Council Contest—on Tuesday, May 21. Every year, Whistler students submit applications explaining why they would like to take on the role of mayor, councillor or the acting staff roles before getting the chance to hold their own council meeting. PHOTO SUBMITTED.

NEW LUNCH SPECIAL

black ohm tattoos

20

years tattooing Whistler and the world!

604 938 8878 located in function junction



$10 LUNCH DEAL Beef pie Beef Dip Pulled Pork Kaiser Mon-Thurs: 12pm - 4pm

THE HOPPIEST HOUR

$15 PITCHERS & $2 OFF NACHOS From 4pm - 7pm | Mon - Thurs

*Plus applicable taxes

1045 Millar Creek Rd, Whistler, BC V8E0W5

MAY 23, 2019

65


MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

The Planet Smashers combat grumpy climate with ska VETERAN MONTREAL BAND SET TO PLAY THE DUBH LINN GATE ON THURSDAY, MAY 30

BY ALYSSA NOEL IF YOU’RE LIKE MANY Canadian music fans who grew up in the ‘90s, you have blasted The Planet Smashers’ “Surfing in Tofino” at least once while navigating the winding Pacific Rim Highway. Despite the fact that the beloved ska gem turns 20 this year, it might still be the most infectious ode to the West Coast. “My brother still lives there,” says Matt Collyer, frontman for the longrunning Montreal ska-punk band. “The song is about him. Right after university, he was trying to make my parents keep the summer cottage. My mom said, ‘If you put in a washer/dryer, I’ll consider it.’ … It took him the whole summer to do it—and they sold it after.” In reaction, he dropped everything, packed his bags and moved to Tofino. “My bass player, Dave (Cooper), was like, ‘We’ve got to write a song about your brother Mike,’” he recalls. “We still go

SMASH IT The Planet Smashers are celebrating

their 25th anniversary as a band this year. Catch them in Whistler at the Dubh Linn Gate on May 30. PHOTO SUBMITTED

66 MAY 23, 2019

visit him once a year. It’s a fairytale land. Whistler’s kind of got that, too.” The Planet Smashers—who are celebrating their 25th anniversary and a recently released ninth album, Too Much Information—have always done well in towns whose raison d’être is having a good time.

sick of everyone hating. This is happy.’” For proof of that, consider that Collyer—who also runs the Stomp Records label—helped host a massive Montreal festival on the May long weekend, called Pouzza Fest, featuring everyone from Andrew W.K. to Against Me!

“It’s OK to say, ‘I hate this, I hate that.’ It’s old man grumpiness. But that’s perfect because ska music is happy. It’s gonna be, ‘I’m so sick of everyone hating. This is happy.’” - MATT COLLYER

While the popularity of ska music has ebbed and flowed over the years, pockets of fandom have remained steady, particularly in Canada—and now the upbeat, good-time music seems to be coming back in a more widespread way. “We’re seeing a resurgence,” Collyer says. “I think also with the climate, politically, it’s OK to hate everything. It’s OK to say, ‘I hate this, I hate that.’ It’s old man grumpiness. But that’s perfect because ska music is happy. It’s gonna be, ‘I’m so

“It was a huge outdoor show,” he says. “I don’t want to toot my own horn, but I will. My band had the biggest crowd. There were 9,000 people there. It was unbelievable and it was super cool.” Now, The Planet Smashers are set to embark on a Western Canada tour that includes the major cities as well as smaller venues in Banff, Rossland and at the Dubh Linn Gate in Whistler on May 30. “Our roots are playing in small clubs; that’s where we know how to do our stuff,”

Collyer says. “It’ll be a really fun show. You cannot leave a show not feeling happy or better. That’s what we’re all about.” With nine full-length albums to their name, he promises crowds will hear old favourites, but they also plan to introduce some of the tracks from their new album— which tackles everything from eating too much ice cream to our current propensity to over share. “We’re old dogs and it’s hard to teach us those new tricks, man,” Collyer says. “When we play the new songs we get a little nervous. That comfort level isn’t there yet with the new songs, but it is fun for us to play them. It’s not as fun for people who don’t know the new songs, so we’ll play from the past eight albums with a heavy dose of tunes from Life of the Party.” One encouraging sign that ska is here to stay: the multigenerational crowds at many of their shows. “In general, our crowd is 30 to 37,” he says. “Recently, we’ve been seeing a younger crowd getting into it … When you get to play these large festivals like Pouzza Fest, we’ll probably see an influx of younger people getting into the music again.” Catch The Planet Smashers with K-Man & The 45s at the Dubh Linn Gate on Thursday, May 30 at 9:30 p.m. n


Fine Italian Cuisine

SPRING SPECIAL

40% OFF ALL FOOD VALID WITH A DRINK PURCHASE LIMITATIONS APPLY EXCLUDES ADD-ONS

Two of Whistler’s best patios with one smokin’ deal Valid: April 23-Mid June, 2019

3 COURSE MENU

ON NOW

SUNTHURS FRISAT

$35 $45

Choose your favorite item from each course and create your own 3 COURSE EXPERIENCE! (A la Carte also Available)

Selected Signature and specialty items are also available for an extra charge. (Prices will vary)

CELEBRATING

OVER 20 YEARS IN WHISTLER

Reservations Recommended menus are available for viewing/ download on our website.

4319 Main Street 604.905.4844 Quattro at Whistler

quattrorestaurants.com

SPRING SPECIALS AVAILABLE 7 DAYS A WEEK

3 40

Course Dinner

for

$

THREE COURSE DINNER WITH CHOICES FROM OUR ENTIRE MENU

3 29 Small Plates

for

$

ONLY IN ...

The Attic ABOVE 21 STEPS

FOR RESERVATIONS CALL

604-966-2121 w w w. 2 1 s t e p s . c a MAY 23, 2019

67


PIQUECAL

YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL EVENTS & NIGHTLIFE

THU

For a complete guide to events in Whistler, visit piquenewsmagazine.com/events

ROTARY CLUB OF WHISTLER MILLENNIUM

5.23

Join the Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium to learn about what the club is doing to support your local community and international projects. Lunch is available for $20. Everyone welcome. > 12:15 pm > Pan Pacific Mountain Side

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES

Docents will provide visitors with an introduction to the Audain Art Museum and its permanent collection. Visitors will be encouraged to explore the galleries afterwards. These drop-in tours are free with the purchase of admission or museum membership. 604.962.0413. > 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

COMMUNITY

BNI MOUNTAIN HIGH

BNI provides a positive and structured environment for the development and exchange of quality business referrals. It does so by helping you build personal relationships with dozens of other qualified business professionals. Register by emailing David Livesey at david_livesey@cooperators.ca. $20. > 6:45-8:30 am > The Venue

WOMEN’S KARMA YOGA

Drop in for weekly yoga classes led by an all-female team of Certified 200 Hour Yoga Instructors. Includes mat use and childminding. All women, all ability levels welcome. This program is made possible by yoga instructors and childminders donating their time. Contact us to join the team. Free. 604-962-8711. > 9:30-10:30 am > Whistler Women’s Centre

ACTIVATE AND CONNECT FOR SENIORS 50+

Connect with friends, new and old, through weekly activities. Meet at Whistler Community Services Society. In partnership with Mature Action Community. > 9:30-11 am > Whistler Community Services

PARENT INFANT DROP-IN

An opportunity to develop a supportive social network with other parents of young babies. Speakers and a public health nurse are often in attendance. Free. > 11 am-12:30 pm > Whistler Public Library

WORKBC EMPLOYMENT SERVICES DROP IN

Drop in to the Pemberton Public Library every Thursday afternoon and learn how WorkBC can assist you in your job search and career planning. All services are free. For details call 1-877-932-1611. > 1-5 pm > Pemberton Library (Pemberton)

DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB

The club meets every week and visitors are welcome. For a partner, please call Gill at 604-932-5791. > 1-5 pm > Whistler Racquet Club

LUNA PRESENTS THURSDAY NIGHT YOGA

Come shake your shanti in a 90-minute Hatha Flow yoga class. Get in the flow with an emphasis on breathing and movement. Eighteen to 35-year-olds only. $3 for non-members, free for LUNA members. > 5:30-7 pm > Maury Young Arts Centre

WHISTLER YOUTH BAND

Let the trumpets sing! The Whistler Youth Band is a beginner band for youth ages 10 and up. Grab an instrument and make music with friends. > 6-7:30 pm > Myrtle Philip Community School

WHISTLER FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP

The Whistler monthly support group is organized by the North Shore Schizophrenia Society for family and friends of those with a mental health challenge. Receive support from others who have been there. No registration is required. > fourth Thursday of every month, 6:30 pm > Whistler Secondary School

SPORTS

CANSKATE AND PREPOWER SKATE PROGRAMS

The Whistler Skating Club offers CanSkate and PrePower learn-to-skate programs on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Ages three and up. For more information or to register, call 604-935-PLAY (7529) or visit www. whistler.ca/recreation. > 4:15-5 pm > Meadow Park Sports Centre

HOCKEY SKATING SKILLS FOR YOUTH

Whistler Skating Club offers skills training for youth hockey players. For more information or to register, call 604-935-PLAY (7529) or visit www.whistler.ca/ recreation. > 6-6:45 pm > Meadow Park Sports Centre

MUSIC

MICHAEL FABRO

Michael Fabro is a Canadian acoustic pop-rock performance artist. With a focus on crowd-pleasing hits and infectious vocal hooks the young artist has fused multiple styles into dynamic live act. > 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

GEORGE

Georgina is acoustic/folk singer songwriter from Australia who pours her heart and soul into her songs. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

SHUT UP AND PARTY

Start your weekend off one night early and come get wild with Whistler’s loosest bar staff. With music from Fidel Cashflow and DJ Shearer. Email info@maxxfish. com for VIP and other special perks. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

COAST MOUNTAIN THURSDAYS!

THROWBACK THURSDAYS WITH MR. TWITCH

COCKTAIL DANCE PARTY

BAND CAMP

Venture on out to Function Junction for the most sophisticated après of the week! Funk, soul, jazz, blues, rare groove, disco and other rare beats curated by Stache. Free. > 3:30-7:30 pm > Coast Mountain Brewing

Start your weekend early with a handcrafted cocktail. Then hit the dancefloor or rock our legendary dancing cage with help from DJ Peacefrog. > 7 pm > Buffalo Bills

LOCALS’ NIGHT

Party at Whistler’s longest-running locals’ night. Specials all night long. For VIP table bookings or guest list, email info@garfinkels.ca. > 7:30 pm > Garfinkel’s

KARAOKE WITH JACK-QUI NO

Put it on the rocks and call it a show! Hosted by Jack-Qui No. > 8-11 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

Enjoy a musical journey of nostalgia curated by Mr. Twitch. Disco-funk-hip-hop-house and whatever else. Old-school vibes, remixes mash-ups and new stuff to keep you on your toes. Free. 604-962-0601 > 9 pm-midnight > Three Below

Band Camp is a local talent development night at Black’s Pub. This is where new talent to Whistler debuts and artists who have been honing their skills at Jam Nights make their debut. This week it is Nicole and Alex a.k.a. Hot Licks on guitar and vocals from 9 p.m. Free. 604-932-6408 > 9 pm-midnight > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

#TBT WITH THE SOUNDS OF STACHE

Stache has been on a nomadic musical adventure for almost a decade, travelling the to over 50 countries and sharing his passion for music with others. Drawing influences from all four corners of the globe, his appetite, understanding and energetic delivery will guarantee a funky smorgasbord of beats. Free. > 9 pm-1 am > Three Below

CUSTOM HOMES • RENOVATIONS • DESIGN

Your one stop shop for design build services in the Sea to Sky Corridor 604 938-0688 www.peakventures.ca MEMBER OF THE CANADIAN HOME BUILDER ASSOCIATION

68 MAY 23, 2019

The InsiderS’ Guide to Whistler

SUMMER edition out now

Fit it in your pocket. Take it everywhere. Free.


PIQUECAL SUBMITTED FILE PHOTO

ONGOING & DAILY ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WHISTLER MUSEUM

Learn more about Whistler’s culture and history. Now open by donation. > Daily 11am-5pm, Thu until 9pm > Whistler Museum

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

THE CULTURAL CONNECTOR: A JOURNEY OF ADVENTURE AND DISCOVERY

Grab a Cultural Connector guide and explore Whistler’s world of culture. As you follow the Cultural Connector route, you’ll discover the stories that enrich Whistler’s culture, the venues that celebrate it and the milestones that we’ve achieved along the way. The pathway will lead you through beautiful surroundings and six cultural institutions: Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre, Whistler Museum, Whistler Public Library, Maury Young Arts Centre, Lost Lake PassivHaus, and Audain Art Museum. Free. > Ongoing > Maury Young Arts Centre

C0MMUNITY

PRENATAL CLASSES Northern Ignition Tommys Whistler, Thurs. May 24 at 9pm

THURSDAY LOCALS’ NIGHT

Come join our legendary locals’ night every Thursday, kicking off the night with a game of skate at 9 p.m. followed by DJ Praiz and friends throwing down some dope tracks. Prizes to be given away each week include concert tickets, snowboards, electric sunnies and skateboards! Email info@garfinkels.ca for guest list and VIP options. 1-604-932-2323. > 9 pm-2 am > Garfinkel’s

NORTHERN IGNITION LIVE AT TOMMYS

“Live at Tommys” with Northern Ignition first up to hit the Stage! For guest list and all Inquiries, please visit www.tommyswhistler.com > 9 pm-2 am > Tommys Whistler

For more information on featured events find us online at WWW.PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM

THURSDAY NIGHT FUNK FEATURING DJ DAKOTA

He spins old school and new school, ya need to learn though, he burns baby BURNS like a hip-hop inferno! No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

FRI

> 10:30 am > Whistler Public Library

WALK AND TALK SERIES > 3, 5:30 & 7 pm > Audain Art Museum

COMMUNITY

GLOBAL CLIMATE STRIKE

5.24

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

PRESCHOOL STORY TIME

Books, songs and rhymes for preschool-aged children, accompanied by a caregiver. Registration is not required.

Award winning Design and Maintenance

This program helps support women and their partners in making informed decisions about their prenatal and birth experience. Classes are ongoing and by appointment. To sign up, please call Bev Nolan-Newsome, certified childbirth educator, internationally certified lactation Consultant and registered doula at 604-8945389. > Ongoing > Whistler

Join students in the Fridays for Future protest May 24 as they march through the village demanding action on climate change by all levels of government. Everyone is welcome. Bring protest signs and tell all your friends to come. The march will finish at Municipal Hall. Protesters are welcome to stay and protest until the end of the school day. For more information contact Matt at mattogilvieturner@gmail.com. > 9:30 am > Whistler Olympic Plaza!

WELCOME CENTRE MULTICULTURAL MEET UP

Come and say, “hi” if you are new to Canada and Whistler! Everyone and every age is welcome. Casual meet up, workshops, information about living in Canada. Check calendar at www.welcomewhistler.com for full details. Contact info@welcomewhistler.com or 604-698-5960. > 9:30 am-noon > Whistler Public Library

IMMIGRANT SETTLEMENT SERVICES

Information and support to help immigrants and newcomers living and working in Whistler as they adjust to life in Canada. Information about, and

Recycle? Yes or no?

Get the BC RECYCLEPEDIA App

www.heikedesigns.com

Did you know ? Plants love food and water Proud member of Make sure you fertilize at the right time Use the right plant in the right place PlantSomething BC is a great program. Check out who is part of it! See full series and more information at www.heikedesigns.com

www.rcbc.ca RECYCLING COUNCIL OF B.C. MEMBER MAY 23, 2019

69


PIQUECAL

BROTHER TWANG Firerock Lounge, Sat. May 25 at 9 pm help with accessing, Canadian government and local services, documents and application forms, Canadian immigration and citizenship processes. For more information or an appointment, call 604-6985960 or email info@welcomewhistler.com www. welcomewhistler.com FB: WhistlerWelcomeCentre. > 9:30 am-noon > Whistler Public Library

WHISTLER YOUTH CENTRE DROP-IN

For ages 13 to 18. We offer ping pong, a skateboard mini-ramp (skateboards and helmets to borrow), free Wi-Fi, Xbox One, PS3 & PS4, guitars, board games, a projector and widescreen TVs. Free. 604-935-8187 > 3:30-11 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

SPORTS

WHISTLER TRI CLUB SWIM SQUAD

Triathlon focused swim squads. Full Details at https:// www.whistlertriclub.com/training-sessions. Free to members for fall (includes entry into Meadow Park). Non-members $8 drop-in (includes entry into Meadow Park). > 6-7:15 am > Meadow Park Sports Centre

INDOOR PICKLEBALL DROP-IN

Have fun in a relaxed setting learning the fastest growing sport in North America. Beginners, new players, and more skilled players are welcome. Equipment provided. $10. 604-932-1991. > 4-6 pm > Whistler Racquet Club

70 MAY 23, 2019

MUSIC

MARC CHARRON

One-man band on the run, songwriter, world traveller, original van lifer. > 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

LIVE MUSIC

Solo artists perform every week, except on the first Friday of every month when they swap out for a full band. No cover, no lineups. > 6-9 pm > Whistler Brewing Company

MATTHEW HOLLAND

He’s an up-and-coming singer-song writer from New Brunswick who shreds his guitar like no tomorrow and sings with his unforgettable raspy vocals. > 6-9 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

LADIES’ NIGHT

We have a gift for all ladies. Enjoy a glass of champagne then hit the dance floor and dance the night away with DJ Peacefrog. Info@buffalobills.ca for guestlist or table bookings. > 7 pm > Buffalo Bills

BLUE PHOENIX LIVE AT ALPINE CAFE

Join us for a night of ballads and blues with Blue Phoenix a.k.a the local legend Don Free. > 7-9 pm > Alpine Cafe

CHAMPAGNE FRIDAY

Kick off your weekend at Garf’s. Get on the guest list and join the party: info@garfinkels.ca. > 7:30 pm > Garfinkel’s

THE TEQUILA MONKEYS

The Tequila Monkeys met in Whistler and mashed together their love for punk, rock, funk and reggae for their unique sound. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

THE WHISKEY RICHARDS

The Whiskey Richards are a group of Celtic Gypsy punk rockers who have spent the better part of a decade carving a reputation for themselves as “one hell of a good time.” > 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE

Live music by Whistler favourites Red Chair. > 9:30 pm > Tapley’s Pub

FEEL GOOD FRIDAYS

Start the weekend off right with music by B.C.’s finest party DJs mixing the best in hip hop, rap, R&B and party anthems. Whistler’s most energetic dancefloor. > 9:30 pm > Moe Joe’s

FRIDAY NIGHT ALL LOVE NO CLUB FEATURING TYMETAL

Shake off your work week by grooving to deep cuts featuring classics and future gems you can’t help but move to the beats! No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

KARAOKE WITH JUAN

Like chocolate and peanut butter, karaoke was always meant to go with the amount of social lubricant that fights fear on Friday. Get your drink on and join host Juan singing your heart out at Black’s Pub on the edge of forever. Multiple mics for groups. Free microphones. 604-932-6408 > 9 pm-midnight > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

WEEKEND GETAWAYS AT TOMMYS Let’s send it on and off the mountain this weekend! DJ Dre Morel spinning rock, pop and hip hop all night! For VIP reservations and guest list inquiries, please visit www.tommyswhistler.com. > 9 pm-2 am > Tommys Whistler

SAT

5.25

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES > 1 & 3 pm > Audain Art Museum


Reduce your environmental

Housing contributes 30% of all greenhouse gasses

A PASSIVE HOUSE uses up to 90% less energy than a normal house To learn more go to: SUMMERHILLCONSTRUCTION.COM

Sea to Sky

WE DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T WANT YOUR NAME...

just your information!

1-800-222-8477 (TIPS) Visit us on facebook Sea to Sky Crime Stoppers

Copyright The Listel Hotel Whistler 2010

MAY 23, 2019

71


PIQUECAL DREAM BIG VINTAGE POP-UP-SHOP

Fun evening of shopping unique and fun pieces picked by the gals from Dream Big. Shop to the soundtrack of Whistler’s finest female musical maestro DJ Whitness, playing from 7-9pm Free. > 6-9 pm > Alpine Cafe

COMMUNITY

SINGING WITH THE BABIES

Learn songs and rhymes to soothe and entertain baby while encouraging early language development. For kids up to walking age. Free. > 11-11:30 am > Whistler Public Library

FAMILY TOGETHER TIME

A parent-directed hour with board games, crafts and a story corner with felt puppets. A drop-in program for families of all ages. Free. > 3:30-4:30 pm > Whistler Public Library

WHISTLER YOUTH CENTRE DROP-IN

> 6-10 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

SPORTS

FLAT TRACK MOTORCYCLE RACING Vancouver Flat Track Club and Honda Centre present Flat Track Motorcycle Racing at Pemberton Speedway, May 25, 2019. Gates open at noon, rider’s registration from 2:30 to 4pm Practice starts at 4:30pm and racing begins at 6pm Free camping, food truck and lots of racing action! Gate $10, Gate + Pit Pass $20, Free camping! 604-329-0757. > 6-10 pm > Pemberton Speedway (Pemberton)

BROTHER TWANG

PHOTO SUPPLIED

Come wind down your ski day or ramp up your Saturday night festivities with the boys from Brother Twang. > 9 pm-midnight > FireRock Lounge

SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE & LOCAL

Saturday Night Live & Local features a wide variety of local talent performing live from Black’s Pub to wrap up their $5 nights live Tuesday to Saturday. This Saturday night enjoy the rootsy stylings of Marcus Ramsay. Free Spirit. 604-932-6408 > 9 pm-midnight > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

WEEKEND GETAWAYS AT TOMMYS > 9 pm-2 am > Tommys Whistler

LADIES’ NIGHT

It’s Whistler’s No. 1 stop for stag and stagette parties. DJ Turtle and friends mix up everything from hip hop, R&B, new rap, dance hall and Top 40 bangers. Email guestlist@moejoes.com for VIP and group perks. > 9:30 pm > Moe Joe’s

SUPREME SATURDAY

Dj Nikky from Vancouver brings the Whistler’s biggest weekend party and best vibe. VIP champagne parades along with the hottest hip hop and remixes! For VIP and guest list, email info@garfinkels.ca. > 10 pm > Garfinkel’s

SATURDAY NIGHT ALL LOVE NO CLUB FEATURING TYMETAL

He got your blood pumping last night, now satiate your thirst for amazing cocktails and unique beats with tyMetal’s eclectic DJ feats. No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

DJ Whitness LIVE

MUSIC

MARC CHARRON

> 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

DJ WHITNESS LIVE AT ALPINE CAFE

The talented DJ Whitness has all the fun fresh and funky tunes to get you grooving. Have a boogie while browsing all the goodies at the vintage pop-up-shop presented by Dream Big happening the same night! Free. > 6-9 pm > Alpine Cafe

STEPHEN VOGLER

Saturday Night Live with Stephen Vogler. Vogler is a local writer and musician. His styles of music ranges from ska, reggae and gypsy jazz, to roots, blues and R&B. > 6-9 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

SATURDAY NIGHT SHAKER

With music from Fidel Cashflow and DJ C Stylez, two of Whistler’s hardest-working and most-loved DJs spinning the best in Top 40, mash-ups, electro, hip hop and party anthems that will keep your booty shakin’ all night long. Email info@maxxfish.com for VIP and other special perks. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

THE WHISKEY RICHARDS > 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

72 MAY 23, 2019

Alpine Cafe, Sat. May 25, 6-9pm

SUN

GAMES CAFE

5.26

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES > 1 & 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

COMMUNITY

AWARE KIDS NATURE CLUB

These free sessions educate local and visiting youth about all things environmental through fun and interactive activities. Open to all, but mainly intended for kids ages five to 11. All kids must be accompanied by a parent. Free. > Last Sunday of every month, 10-11:30 am > Whistler Public Library

BIKE MAINTENANCE WORKSHOPS WITH WHISTLER BIKE CO. These workshops will cover the basics of day-to-day bike maintenance, and you’ll learn what you should be able to do at home (or on the trail), and what warrants a trip to the shop. These workshops are intended for beginners–we won’t cover brake or suspension maintenance. > 2-4 pm > Whistler Public Library

Come in and enjoy a massive selection of popular games. > 4-8 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

MUSIC

OPEN MIC

Come join in with this afternoon of music. Bring your instruments and come early to sign up. > 12-2 pm > Grimms Deli (Pemberton)

GAMES NIGHT AT PANGEA

Challenge your crew: Cards Against Humanity, Jenga, Settlers of Catan, HedBanz, and many more. Drinks and food specials all night long. > 4 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

GYPSY

“Sunday session” with Gypsy. If you haven’t had a chance to catch this Whistler songbird you are missing out. Her killer vocals paired with guitar are unforgettable and draw crowds. > 4:30-7:30 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

JERRY’S DISCO

Dust off your gaper-day getup, from backwards helmets to gorby gaps, ‘cos the best Jerry outfit gets a free bottle of Prosecco! > 7-10 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

EVAN KENNEDY

Evan creates a unique live performance mixing in lesser-known album songs with the songs of today. > 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

SEND IT SUNDAYS

With music from T-Zen and DJ Shearer. Keep your weekend alive, and join us on Sunday nights for one of Whistler’s wildest industry nights. Email info@ maxxfish.com for VIP plus special perks. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

SOULFUL SUNDAYS

Soul Club Whistler spinning that funky soul soundtrack. > 9 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

THE SUNDAY GLOW PARTY

Moe Joe’s is transformed into a psychedelic UV-infused rave cathedral, as Fidel Cashflow, Zapps and La Dooda cook up an aural feast of house and electro beats. Arrive early to beat the line. > 9 pm > Moe Joe’s

THE MCQUAID TRIO

The McQuaid Trio bring the noise with an eclectic mix of foot stomping and electric instruments, fiddle, bass and guitar. Celtic, bluegrass, pop, folk and originals. > 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub


Public No�ce

Spring Reminders

Provision of Permissive Tax Exemp�on First, Second and Third Reading

Level 2 Watering Restric�ons Begin June 1st

The Village Villa of Pemberton is providing no�ce that Council will be considering 1st, 2nd and 3rd readings of Permissive Tax Exemp�on (Pemberton Search & Rescue Society) Bylaw No. 846, 2018 , Amendment Bylaw No. 865, 2019 at the Regular Council Mee�ng to be held on Tuesday, May 28,2019 at 9:00 a.m. The purpose of the amending bylaw is to correct inaccuracies in the Legal Descrip�on. A Permissive Tax Exemp�on is a means for Council to support organiza�ons that further Council’s objec�ve to enhance the quality of life while delivering services economically. The land hereina�er described below and the improvements thereon which are set apart and in use for not for profit ac�vi�es, to be exempted from municipal taxa�on under sec�on 224 (2) (a) of the Community Charter for the following period:

Due to unseasonably warm temperatures and predicted dry weather in the coming weeks, the Village has ini�ated Level 2 Watering Restric�ons as of June 1st. For more informa�on, review the Outdoor Water Use Regulation Bylaw No. 792, 2015 at www.pemberton.ca.

En�ty Name

Have you installed new landscaping/sod? Avoid a fine by contac�ng the Village Office at 604.894.6135 or admin@pemberton.ca to obtain an Outdoor Water Use Permit for $30.

No. of Years Pembeton Search & Rescue Society 10 Years

Revenue Foregone Year(s) 1, 2, 3 $395, $403, $411

Property Descrip�on: District Lot 4769, Lillooet District Except Plans KAP44479, KAP87467 and KAP92761 (for 2019). Part shown on Plan EPP78910, Lot 1 District Lot 4769 Lillooet District Plan KAP92761 (for 2020 to 2028). General enquiries regarding the proposed Amendment Bylaw should be directed to Sheena Fraser, Manager of Corporate & Legisla�ve Services at 604-894-6135 or sfraser@pemberton.ca

Boulevard Maintenance Bylaw Boul Reminder

Are you planning on repaving or paving your driveway? Installing a culvert to extend or build a new entrance to your property? Landscaping the ditch in front of your home? Don't forget to apply for a Boulevard Improvement Permit! A link to the permit can be found here: http://www.pemberton.ca/public/download/documents/37450

Sheena Fraser, Corporate Officer

VillageOfPemberton

www.pemberton.ca

Sheena Fraser, Corporate Officer

MAY 23, 2019

73


PIQUECAL OPEN MIC JAM NIGHT

An open stage invitation for all who can sing, perform or even just wanna jam out with our house band. Whistler’s longest-running jam night every Sunday at Crystal Lounge. All instruments are provided. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

SUNDAY SESSIONS

ACOUSTIC COFFEE HOUSE

SUNDAY NIGHT THEORY WITH TYMETAL

TYMetal’s diversified taste translates to deep cuts featuring classics and future gems, guaranteed to tweak your brain stem! No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

5.27

COMMUNITY

MUSIC & WORDS

This drop-in program is for kids two to four years and it focuses on early literacy through music, rhyme, stories and movement. Free. > 10 am > Whistler Public Library

MONDAYS IN MUSE LAB

Stop by and repair ripped seams, sew on the loose buttons, patch the jeans! With love for community Whistler Sewing Services is opening the Muse Lab—new creative space in Function. Six sewing machines and all the supplies are ready to fix mend and create. Visit your creative universe! $10 per hour. 604-967-2422. > 12-9 pm > Muse Lab

WORKBC EMPLOYMENT SERVICES DROP IN

Get your resume reviewed, learn about the local labour market, job search tips, and more. All services are free. For details call 1-877-932-1611 or go to WhistlerESC. com. > 3-6 pm > Whistler Public Library

IMMIGRANT SETTLEMENT SERVICES > 3-6 pm > Whistler Public Library

GAMES CAFE

> 4-8 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

SPORTS

WHISTLER TRI CLUB SWIM SQUAD

Whistler Skating Club offers an adult and teen skating program. Returning to skating or wanting to learn. For more information or to register, call 604-935-PLAY (7529) or visit www.whistler.ca/recreation. > 6:30-7:30 pm > Meadow Park Sports Centre

MUSIC

The best locals’ party in Whistler. > 9 pm > Tapley’s Pub

MON

ADULT AND TEEN SKATING

The Acoustic Coffee House is back! Come join in with this afternoon of music. > 4-6 pm > Grimms Deli (Pemberton)

OPEN MIC & PATIO JAM

Outdoor patio jam and open mic session at Cranked Espresso Bar with host Kostaman. This is a super fun night for music lovers and artists of all levels. Cranked is the perfect place for new artists to try performing in front of a small supportive audience. This night always bring a solid mix of seasoned and budding artists together, and opportunities to collaborate. Everyone is welcome. > 6-9 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

MONDAY NIGHT LIVE WITH WHAT A RACKET!

Local legend Monty Biggins offers hits of the eras in an Americana Swing sound. His soulful voice has been described as a journey of the heart. An entire rat pack in one man, he’ll tip his glass to you with that jazzy swagger. > 7-10 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

MARTINI MONDAY > 7:30 pm > Buffalo Bills

EVAN KENNEDY > 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

FVCK MONDAYS

The wildest party in Whistler on a Monday night continues with music from Fidel Cashflow, Dan Darley, The Rogue Killers and DJ Shearer. Throwing down all the hottest tunes you know and love. Deep, tech, bass, house, trap, hip hop and more. Email info@maxxfish. com for VIP plus special perks. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

MEATY MONDAY

Sport and beer what more do you need? How about a chance to win our famous Meat Raffle? Proceeds donated to charity. > 9 pm > Tapley’s Pub

TRIVIA NIGHT

The Crystal Lounge hosts trivia every Monday night! Bring your friends and test your knowledge for a night of fun, laughs, prizes and the chance to “burn your bill.” Conditions apply. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

MONDAY MADNESS

Fidel Cashflow, Dan Darley and Billy The Kid throw down all the hottest deep and dirty beats you know and love. Deep tech, bass, house, trap, plus more. > 9:30 pm > Maxx Fish

> 6-7:15 am > Meadow Park Sports Centre

For more information on featured events find us online at

WWW.PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM 74 MAY 23, 2019

TUE

SPORTS

5.28

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

RHYME & SONG

This program gives toddlers, parents and caregivers the opportunity to learn songs, rhymes and finger plays together. Movement is encouraged and your preschooler’s early language and literacy development is supported. For more information, please come to the library, call 604-935-8436 or email youthservice@ whistlerlibary.ca. Free. > 10:30 am > Whistler Public Library

COMMUNITY

GAMES CAFE

> 4-8 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

THE MOUNTAIN VILLAGE SOCIAL GATHERING AND MEETING

What if housing wasn’t just a place to live, but rather, a way of life? The Coastal Village is connecting people who want to live in community with others who have similar values for the betterment of our health, happiness and well-being. Research shows that both men and women thrive in community. Free. 778-840-1529. > Fourth Tuesday of every month, 5:30-8:30 pm > The Mountain Village

NATURE WALK AND FOREST BATHING EXPERIENCE

Join the Whistler Naturalists on Tuesday, May 28th at the Lost Lake Passiv Haus from 5:30pm to 7pm for a Nature Walk and Forest Bathing experience offered in partnership with Forest and Flow. Free for members, by donation for non-members. 604-902-3733 > 5:30-7 pm > Lost Lake Passive Haus

WE RUN WHISTLER: GROUP RUN + RECOVER

Group run for intermediate runners and above. Two distance options: approximately 5 km and 10 km. Visit facebook.com/groups/werunwhistler for weekly updates. This week’s run will finish at The Westin for recovery yoga with Rich Sievewright of RICHLIFE. Check out our full summer schedule at werunwhistler.com Free. #werunwhistler > 5:55pm > Lululemon

LAVENDER FOR HOME, BODY, AND SOUL

Join Catherine, owner of From The Garden Shed, to discover the uses and benefits of lavender for your wellness, home decor, and culinary delights. A lavender farmer in the Pemberton Meadows, she will share her knowledge of the different species and varieties of lavender, their attributes, and how they can be used in your everyday life. As part of the workshop, everyone will make and take home one lavender bath tub tea. All materials will be provided. Email publicservices@ whistlerlibrary.ca to claim a spot (maximum two per person). This workshop is intended for adults. > 6-8 pm > Whistler Public Library

BINGO

Channel your inner granny and dominate bingo at the locals’ living room. > 8 pm > Tapley’s Pub

CANSKATE AND PREPOWER SKATE PROGRAMS > 4:30-5:15 pm > Meadow Park Sports Centre

WHISTLER CYCLING CLUB TUESDAY RIDES

Whistler Cycling Club rides for A, B and C level road riders. See www.whistlercyclingclub.ca for details. Free with club membership. > 5:15-8 pm > Whistler Village Sports

MUSIC

CONOR FITZPATRICK

Once the word gets out, everyone is going to want to see this guy play. He is already one of Cranked’s favourites. On warmer days, he will be playing outside on their sunny patio. > 4:30-7:30 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

BLACK ‘N’ BLUES

Blues night with Sean Rose. > 8 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

GREG NEUFELD

Armed with a guitar, stompbox and one of the best, soulful voices you will ever hear. > 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

CELLAR SESSIONS

With live music from Neverland Nights and guests, playing all your rock, alternative and party jams all night long. Plus DJ sets from Fidel Cashflow. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

KARAOKE NIGHT

“I Will Survive” won’t sing itself, so come over to Whistler’s longest-running karaoke night and belt out all your favourite hits. Arrive early to avoid disappointment. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

THE MCQUAID TRIO

> 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

ALLSORTS

Bringing a wide variety of sounds to your Tuesday evening, ED:WIN will be playing “AllSorts” of music to get you dancing down at Three Below every Tuesday night. Listen to hip hop, R&B, house, garage and disco! Free. > 9 pm-1:30 am > Three Below

TOMMY TUESDAYS

Tommys Tuesday with resident DJ Dre Morel and Guests bringing you all the best of the best every Tuesday evening! Well singles $5.50/Doubles $8.50 + + Doors 8pm. Happy hours 8pm – 10pm. For guest list and VIP packages / reservations please visit www. tommyswhistler.com > 9 pm-2 am > Tommys Whistler


WIN A PEMBERTON EXPERIENCE PACKAGE!

10 ROUNDS OF GOLF AT BIG SKY DINNER FOR TWO AT BARN NORK

VOTE ONLINE

www.piquenewsmagazine.com/vote WIN WEEKLY PRIZES! A PAIR OF MOVIE PASSES TO VILLAGE 8! Results will be published in our July 18th issue. Deadline for submissions is 11:59pm on Sunday, June 16th 2019. Only online submissions will be accepted. No photocopies, faxes or mailed entries. Only one entry per email address will be used. Please note we track user registration from individual IP addresses. We reserve the right to eliminate contest entrants if fraud is suspected. Pique makes every effort to create a concise list of Whistler businesses in the multiple choice drop downs. If you are a business owner in Pemberton we encourage you to check the details and email us with corrections and omission suggestions. Email traffic@wplpmedia.com.


PIQUECAL NOTICE OF PROVISION OF ASSISTANCE The Squamish-Lillooet Regional District (“SLRD”) hereby gives notice that pursuant to section 272 of the Local Government Act, the SLRD intends to provide assistance by disposing of an interest in land and improvements to the Village of Pemberton (the “Village”) for less than fair market value. The proposed assistance is related to the transfer of the management of the Village and SLRD Electoral Area C shared recreational service (the “Recreation Service”). As part of this, existing SLRD-owned Recreation Service assets will be provided to the Village via a licence of use between the SLRD and the Village. The licence of use will be for a 5 year term, starting on June 1, 2019 and ending on May 31, 2024 and the consideration to be paid by the Village to the SLRD is $1.00 per year. The licence of use pertains to existing SLRD-owned Recreation Service assets, as follows: • the improvements comprising the Pemberton and District Community Centre (and surrounds, including the Youth/Seniors Centre, the Outdoor Spray Water Park and the Children’s Nature Play Park), located at 7390 Cottonwood Street in Pemberton, BC; and • the land and improvements comprising Gates Lake Community Park (located at 9184 Portage Road, in Birken, BC). (For more information regarding the transfer of management of the Recreation Service, please see the SLRD website https://www.slrd.bc.ca/ The transfer of management of the Recreation Service from the SLRD to the Village will not have any impacts to the operations of the Recreation Service, and the funding model and governance structure remain unchanged.)

ALPHABET SOUP PRESENTS

WED

5.29

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES > 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

COMMUNITY BOOK CLUB

Join Whistler Public Library and Armchair Books on the fourth Wednesday of every month for this community book club. Free and open to all. Pick up the book at the library or mention the book club to buy it for 15-percent off at Armchair Books. Free. > Last Wednesday of every month, 7 pm > Whistler Public Library

COMMUNITY

GAMES CAFE

> 4-8 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

LET’S GET QUIZZICAL

Are you smarter than the average fifth grader? Let’s hope so as Stache brings you trivia with a Whistler twist. All the regular rounds plus our weekly degenerate round full of public and celebrity scandals. Great banter and awesome prizes! Free. > 9-10:30 pm > Three Below

1-DAY SUPPORTIVE CANCER CARE WORKSHOP

Have you or a loved one been touched by cancer? If so, please join our medical doctors and nutrition team for a free workshop on supportive cancer care. Practical and evidence-based sessions will cover topics including: nutrition, exercise, stress management, emotional support. Learn empowering information. 604-734-7125 > 10 am-3:30 pm > 55 Activity Centre (Brackendale/ Squamish)

INTERACT CLUB OF WHISTLER Thursday, May 30, 6 p.m. Squamish Lil'wat Cultural Centre Free to attend, but space is limited! This film is rated 14A.

Interact is a club for young people ages 12 to 18 who want to make a difference in their community, mentored by the Rotary Club of Whistler and Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium. The club includes students from Whistler Secondary School, Waldorf, Spring Creek and Myrtle Philip who want to join together to tackle the issues in their community they care most about. > 4-5 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

MOUNTAIN SPIRIT WHISTLER TOASTMASTERS

Build communication, public speaking, and leadership skills with Mountain Spirit Whistler Toastmasters. Everyone welcome. > 5:30-7 pm > Pan Pacific Mountain Side

THE GREAT CANADIAN SHORELINE CLEANUP, HOSTED BY THE RBC WATER WARRIORS

The Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup is a conservation partnership by Ocean Wise Conservation Association and WWF-Canada. Shoreline Cleanups take place any time of the year, anywhere land connects with water, including creeks, streams, rivers, oceans, marshes and even storm drains. Every cleanup team makes a positive impact on shorelines. > 5:30-7:30 pm > Lakeside Park

76 MAY 23, 2019

BUILDING A SUSTAINABLE NEIGHBOURHOOD. INTERESTED? JOIN US!

Join us at one of our regular social gatherings on the last Wednesday of every month. To find out where and when, visit their Facebook page @themountainvillage or go to our website themountainvillage.ca > Last Wednesday of every month

FOOD + DRINK

QUEER WEDNESDAYS

We reserve the prime family-style table by the Ola Volo mural for our LGBTQ2+ family. > 5-8 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

SPORTS

INDOOR PICKLEBALL DROP-IN > 10-11:30 am > Whistler Racquet Club

WHISTLER CYCLING CLUB WEDNESDAY RIDES

Whistler Cycling Club rides for emerging road riders. See www.whistlercyclingclub.ca for details. > 5:15-7 pm > Whistler Village Sports

WEDNESDAY NIGHT RACING, SAILING

Join the Whistler Sailing Association for our weekly Wednesday Night Race Night and social. Competitive sailing race, followed by a social evening (barbecue or après at a local restaurant). Please visit http://whistlersailing.com/racesfamily-club-sail/ for prices, prerequisites & registration. Rig at 5:30 p.m., first horn at 6:15 p.m. > 5:30 pm > Whistler Sailing Club

TENNIS LOCALS’ NIGHT

All Levels are welcome to join in the Locals-Night. Clinic for beginners and casual play for int/adv. Free racket rental, snacks and beverage included! $20. > 6-8 pm > Whistler Racquet Club

MUSIC

WILDIN’ OUT WEDNESDAYS FEATURING DJ GAINZ

He’s hot, he’s sicker than your average, Gainz comin’ through mixin’ tracks like a savage. No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

INDUSTRY NIGHT

Live music from Neverland Nights. > 6 pm > Buffalo Bills

FOXY GET FUNKY

Whether you know her as DJ Foxy Moron or just Ace, you know she kills it on the vinyl. Join us as this homegirl legend spins you silly. > 8-11 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

GREG NEUFELD

> 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

JAM NIGHT

Jam Night with Kostaman and Friends every Wednesday night from 9 pm. > 9 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant


ASTROLOGY

Free Will Astrology WEEK OF MAY 23 BY ROB BREZSNY

ARIES (March 21-April 19): In the coming weeks, I suspect you will have the wisdom to criticize yourself in constructive ways that will at least partially solve a long-standing problem. Hallelujah! I bet you will also understand what to do to eliminate a bad habit by installing a good new habit. Please capitalize on that special knowledge! There’s one further capacity I suspect you’ll have: the saucy ingenuity necessary to alleviate a festering fear. Be audacious! TAURUS (April 20-May 20): What standards might we use in evaluating levels of sexual satisfaction? One crucial measure is the tenderness and respect that partners have for each other. Others include the ability to play and have fun, the freedom to express oneself uninhibitedly, the creative attention devoted to unpredictable foreplay, and the ability to experience fulfilling orgasms. How do you rate your own levels, Taurus? Wherever you may currently fall on the scale, the coming months will be a time when you can accomplish an upgrade. How? Read authors who specialize in the erotic arts. Talk to your partners with increased boldness and clarity. While meditating, search for clues in the depths. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): If there were a Hall of Fame for writers, Shakespeare might have been voted in first. His work is regarded as a pinnacle of intellectual brilliance. And yet here’s a fun fact: The Bard quoted well over a thousand passages from the Bible. Can you imagine a modern author being taken seriously by the literati if he or she frequently invoked such a fundamental religious text? I bring this to your attention so as to encourage you to be Shakespeare-like in the coming weeks. That is, be willing to draw equally from both intellectual and spiritual sources; be a deep thinker who communes with sacred truths; synergize the functions of your discerning mind and your devotional heart. CANCER (June 21-July 22): “People will choose unhappiness over uncertainty,” writes Cancerian author and entrepreneur Timothy Ferriss. He doesn’t do that himself, but rather is quite eager to harvest the perks of dwelling in uncertainty. I presume this aptitude has played a role in his huge success; his books have appeared on bestseller lists and his podcasts have been downloaded more than 300 million times. In telling you this, I’m not encouraging you to embrace the fertile power of uncertainty 24 hours a day and 365 days of every year. But I am urging you to do just that for the next three weeks. There’ll be big payoffs if you do, including rich teachings on the art of happiness. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Many 18th-century pirates were committed to democracy and equality among their ranks. The camaraderie and fairness and mutual respect that prevailed on pirate ships were markedly different from the oppressive conditions faced by sailors who worked for the navies of sovereign nations. The latter were often pressed into service against their will and had to struggle to collect meager salaries. Tyrannical captains controlled all phases of their lives. I bring this to your attention, Leo, with the hope that it will inspire you to seek out alternative approaches to rigid and hierarchical systems. Gravitate toward generous organizations that offer you ample freedom and rich alliances. The time is right to ally yourself with emancipatory influences. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Don’t wait around for fate to decide which decisions you should make and what directions you should go. Formulate those decisions yourself, with your willpower fully engaged. Never say, “If it’s meant to be, it will happen.” Rather, resolve to create the outcomes you strongly desire to happen. Do you understand how important this is? You shouldn’t allow anyone else to frame your important questions and define the nature of your problems; you’ve got to do the framing and defining yourself. One more thing: don’t fantasize about the arrival of the “perfect moment.” The perfect moment is whenever you decree it is.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In the coming weeks, I hope you’ll regularly give yourself to generous, expansive experiences. I hope you’ll think big, funny thoughts and feel spacious, experimental emotions. I hope you’ll get luxurious glimpses of the promise your future holds, and I hope you’ll visualize yourself embarking on adventures and projects you’ve been too timid or worried to consider before now. For best results, be eager to utter the word “MORE!” as you meditate on the French phrase “joie de vivre” and the English phrase “a delight in being alive.” SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): According to Popular Mechanics magazine, more than three million sunken ships are lying on the bottoms of the world’s oceans. Some of them contain billions of dollars’ worth of precious metals and jewels. Others are crammed with artifacts that would be of great value to historians and archaeologists. And here’s a crazy fact: fewer than one per cent of all those potential treasures have been investigated by divers. I bring this to your attention, Scorpio, because I hope it might inspire you to explore your inner world’s equivalent of lost or unknown riches. The astrological omens suggest that the coming weeks will be an excellent time to go searching for them. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Some days you need god’s grace,” writes poet Scherezade Siobhan. “On other days: the feral tongue of vintage whiskey and a mouth kissed by fire.” I’m guessing, Sagittarius, that these days you might be inclined to prefer the feral tongue of vintage whiskey and a mouth kissed by fire. But according to my astrological analysis, those flashy phenomena would not motivate you to take the corrective and adaptive measures you actually need. The grace of God—or whatever passes for the grace of God in your world—is the influence that will best help you accomplish what’s necessary. Fortunately, I suspect you know how to call on and make full use of that grace. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn poet William Stafford articulated some advice that I think you need to hear right now. Please hold it close to your awareness for the next 21 days. “Saying things you do not have to say weakens your talk,” he wrote. “Hearing things you do not need to hear dulls your hearing.” By practicing those protective measures, Capricorn, you will foster and safeguard your mental health. Now here’s another gift from Stafford: “Things you know before you hear them— those are you, those are why you are in the world.” AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Love is an immoderate thing / And can never be content,” declared poet W. B. Yeats. To provide you with an accurate horoscope, I’ll have to argue with that idea a bit. From what I can determine, love will indeed be immoderate in your vicinity during the coming weeks. On the other hand, it’s likely to bring you a high degree of contentment—as long as you’re willing to play along with its immoderateness. Here’s another fun prediction: I suspect that love’s immoderateness, even as it brings you satisfaction, will also inspire you to ask for more from love and expand your capacity for love. And that could lead to even further immoderate and interesting experiments. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You will know you are in sweet alignment with cosmic forces if you have an impulse to try a rash adventure, but decide instead to work on fixing a misunderstanding with an ally. You can be sure you’re acting in accordance with your true intuition if you feel an itch to break stuff, but instead channel your fierce energy into improving conditions at your job. You will be in tune with your soul’s code if you start fantasizing about quitting what you’ve been working on so hard, but instead sit down and give yourself a pep talk to reinvigorate your devotion and commitment.

SHOW ME THE MONEY – GRANT WRITING FOR CREATIVES

With Hjeron O’Sidhe

JUNE 7, 2019

6-9pm | 19+ | Maury Young Arts Centre

Funky and fearless ar�st Hjeron O’Sidhe has a talent for successful grant wri�ng. He’s funded several of his own crea�ve projects by applying for ar�st grants. Don’t miss his insider �ps on finding the money to make art happen.

$30 Arts Whistler Member $35 Non-Member

Get more info and your �ckets: artswhistler.com/event/arts-u-workshops

Homework: Make up a secret identity for yourself. What is it? How do you use it? Testify at FreeWillAstrology.com

In addition to this column, Rob Brezsny creates

EXPANDED AUDIO HOROSCOPES

In-depth weekly forecasts designed to inspire and uplift you. To buy access, phone 1-888-499-4425. Once you’ve chosen the Block of Time you like, call 1-888-682-8777 to hear Rob’s forecasts. www.freewillastrology.com

MAY 23, 2019

77


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

RENT SELL HIRE

ADULT SERVICES

持持持持持持持持持持

ADULTS ONLY

PRINT & ONLINE SELF-SERVE CLASSIFIEDS.PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM

DISPLAY ADS

   

MARKETPLACE

WHISTLER

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS

FOR SALE - MISC

long term rental management services

Short Term Rentals

THEBACHELORPLAN.COM

Monthly or seasonal rental accommodation that is available to local renters for less than 12 months, or where the rental price varies throughout the year.

Your gentleman’s concierge for…

Vacation Rentals

FOR PRINT ADS

Accommodation

Monthly rental accommodation that is available to local renters for a minimum of 12 months.

D E A D L I N E

LONG-TERM RENTALS

Long Term Rentals

CALL OR PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED WITH OUR ONLINE SERVICE FOR EITHER PRINT OR ONLINE...OR BOTH!

Secure & scamless Fully searchable Targeted online community Categorised listings No reposting Trusted by locals Make your listing stand out with featured locations

Accommodation

A C C O M M O D AT I O N LISTINGS, DEFINED:

Where locals look

LONG-TERM RENTALS

Beautiful Hot Blonde - Cherry Double D Delicious. Tight & pristine, extremely blessed, gorgeous girl. She loves to be watched, loves attention & wants to entertain you with her lust crusade. Duos & Stags. 24Hrs. 1-604-902-1112. Clean, classy & discreet.

Classifi eds

Tuesday 4pm

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

• • • • •

Adrenaline-fueled adventures Customized nightlife itineraries Luxury transportation Awesome chalet parties Unique female entertainment

Nightly and/or weekly rental accommodation, available to visitors over a short period of time.

4 Bedroom & 3 Bath Home - Close to Alta Lake Available August 1 Beautiful four-level cozy home. Optional bachelor suite. One year minimum lease. Contact 604-218-1843 or email r.wong@telus.net.

$11 per week

Packages start with 4 lines of text. Additional text .....$1/line Add one image in print and up to three online as per package level. Bolding .............50¢/word Border .......................... $2

Get the added punch to make your business ad standout with a classified display ad. Free ad design, colour options, incentives for ad frequency. Contact a sales rep today.

604-938-0202 piquenewsmagazine.com

78 MAY 23, 2019

helene@WhistlerProperty.com Duane Kercher 604-932-7849 duane@WhistlerProperty.com

VIEW AVAILABLE RENTAL LISTINGS AT:

BEDS IN STOCK! ALTA LAKE (WESTSIDE)

*

* Rates are based on using Pique’s self-serve online application at classifieds. piquenewsmagazine.com

Helene Huang 604-902-0608

WHISTLER FURNITURE CO

Advertising Options

rosie Blaser 604-932-8864 rosie@WhistlerProperty.com

Re-Build-It Centre Furniture, appliances, kitchen cabinets, doors, plumbing, tools, flooring, hardware, lumber, lighting and more!

Open 10am-5pm, 7 days a week 1003 Lynham Road, Function Junction 604-932-1125 Recycle, Re-build and Re-invest in your community. All proceeds support 28 programs and services such as the food bank, outreach services, and counseling assistance offered by Whistler Community Services. www.mywcss.org Like us on Facebook @ Whistler Community Service Society

Marketplace

FREE STUFF FREE STUFF

online print only & online

Forrest chittick 604-902-7178 forrest@WhistlerProperty.com

FURNITURE

Sell your stuff

Shopping and Donation hours: 11am - 6pm, 7 days a week 8000 Nesters Road 604-932-1121

simon Westwood 604-967-1195 simon@WhistlerProperty.com

MARKETPLACE

$5

Free for 30 days

licenseD rental agents:

WhistlerProperty.com

List your accommodation rental in print & online * a week from only

*

Property Owners seeking Annual or Seasonal Rental Income from screened Tenants, please contact one of our 6 Rental Agents to discuss revenue, services & fees.

Come and visit Whistler’s funkiest thrift store and get (almost) everything you need for your EPIC season! Winter clothes, skis, boards, boots, bindings, goggles, toques and more! As well as all the usual stuff to make that rented closet feel like a palace. You may even find some hidden treasure you never knew needed.

MARKETPLACE 1 Bdrm at Marketplace available May 1 for long term rental. Furnished, utilities included, 1 parking stall, hot tub. $2000/mth Please contact bookings@ mountainhideaways.ca.

MATTRESSES-BUNK BEDSSOFA BEDS-CUSTOM SOFAS

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS

GARAGE SALES WHISTLER

Queen mattresses from $289.99 Bunk Beds from $699.99 Sofa beds from $1099.99

NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

whistlerfurniture.ca 2-1020 Millar Creek Road

604.938.4285

ALWAYS HIRING ALWAYS HIRING

STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! DEALERS AND BIKINI CLAD CADDIES. ESCORTS MAKE ANY PARTY AMAZING!! STRIPPERS TOPLESS BLACKJACK DEALERS 6 0SEXY 4 -SKI9 INSTRUCTORS! 38-6456 For the Time of Your Life! MAKE ANY PARTY AMAZING!

SAME DAY DELIVERY!

Murphy Wall Bed Horizontal Double Light Maple Color H-60" L-80" D-16" $400 Call or Text 604-315-3007 indra.patrick@telus.net

8521 ROPE TOW WAY Rainbow Street/ Garage Sale Come check out the Garage sale deals and visit Rope Tow Way in Rainbow for gear, clothing and furniture items. May. 25 9:00 AM-12:00 PM Rain or Shine

HOME SERVICES BUILDING AND RENOVATIONS OAKHAVEN CONSTRUCTION

www.roxysinwhistler.com

604 -938 - 6 4 56 For the Time of Your Life!

roxysinwhistler.com roxys_in_whistler

Red Seal Qualified. Scheduling new projects today. Call 604-966-4491 today for a free consultation. alan@akhavenconstruction.com oakhavenconstruction.com


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

BUY

RENT

WORK

FIX

DRIVE

SELL

Services

HOME SERVICES

HOME SERVICES

HOME SERVICES

HOME SERVICES

HEALTH & WELLBEING

BUILDING AND RENOVATIONS

CLEANING

MOVING AND STORAGE

MOVING AND STORAGE

COUNSELLING

Wiebe Construction Services Serving Whistler for over 25 years

• Kitchen and Bath • Renovations & Repairs • Drywall • Painting • Finishing • Minor Electrical & Plumbing

Ray Wiebe 604.935.2432 Pat Wiebe 604.902.9300 raymondo99.69@gmail.com

VACATION RENTAL CLEANING & PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

FRIEND US ON:

mariomarble@shawbiz.ca Showroom #103-1010 Alpha Lake Rd.

SPACE NOW AVAILABLE!

CALL SARA

sara@goldmedalcleaning.ca goldmedalcleaning.ca

+ Central Location,

www.whistlerwag.com

free

OPEN / 7 DAYS WEEK

* PREPAY 3 MONTHS GET 4TH FREE

604.932.1948

1209 Alpha Lake Rd., Function Junction

www.a1ulock.com

LOWEST PRICES IN THE CORRIDOR GAURANTEED UNITS STARTING AT

65

$

Shipping Containers + Insulated With 1.5” Foam Ceiling, Walls and Doors + Pre-wired 20-Amp Service With Overhead Light, Duplex Plug and Heater on Shelf + Limited Number 10’x8’ Containers,

24 HR ACCESS,

electronic monitoring

CONTACT

604.966.8080 8080Nesters@telus.net www.nestersstorage.ca

WALSH StoRAge

FAQwhistler

Pemberton Industrial Park 1944 Stone Cutter Place Owner Residence On-Site

FLOORING

NORTHLANDS

Family owned & operated

AVAILABLE

BEST PRICES IN WHISTLER FURNITURE, CARS, BOATS & MOTORCYCLES ETC STORAGE AVAILABLE

BEST

PRICES

IN WHISTLER

8 x 10 COntAIneRS

100

$

+ tax per month

2 hRS fRee tRuCk tIMe

8 x 20 COntAIneRS

160 +

$

tax per month

4 hRS fRee tRuCk tIMe

Call Mike Walsh

604 698 0054

mike.walsh@walshrestoration.ca

BLUE HIGHWAYS MASSAGE & SPA

massage clinic & spa

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE Serving Whistler for 25 years in: Deep Tissue Massage, Relaxation, Thai & Shiatsu, Therapeutic Massage, Reflexology, Aromatherapy & Hot Stone Massage

SPORTS & ACTIVITIES

Sign up TODAY to avoid disappointment

Mon and/or Fri 10:30-11:30 am Prenatal Yoga

Starts June 4 6:45-7:45 pm

www.whistler.ca/recreation 604-935-PLAY (7529)

Registered Therapists

Community

Registered Massage, Registered Counselling & Registered Chiropractic

GENERAL NOTICES

available on request

RMT specials on request

604-938-0777 #206 - 4368 MAIN ST. 2ND FLOOR, MARKET PAVILION

PHYSICAL THERAPY

Sally John Physiotherapy ONE-ON-ONE PHYSICAL-THERAPY

REGISTERED PHYSIOTHERAPIST IN HOME PHYSIOTHERAPY AVAILABLE

CUSTOM-MADE ORTHOTICS at competitive prices for ski boots & shoes, including training shoes. 17 years of making orthotics

2997 Alpine Cresent (Alta Vista)

604.932.1968

Website: ashlintippercounselling.com Email: ashlintippercounselling@gmail.com Phone: (604) 916 8979

Parent and Baby Stroller Fit

‘Sally John Physiotherapy’

3-1365 Alpha Lake Road Whistler, B.C, V0N1B1

Emotional distress can be difficult to manage on your own. The goal of Ashlin Tipper Counselling is to promote health and happiness by providing welcoming, kind, supportive, non-judgmental, goal-oriented, practical, clinically-based emotional support.

SALON & SPA

fenced & gated access.

We Added More Containers!

STORAGE SPACE

HEALTH & WELLBEING

+ Paved, 24/7

Call 604.935.9370 or email gphare@shaw.ca

STORAGE

Services

No Heat now available

Outdoor storage for RV’s, Boats, Campers, Vehicles etc $2 per LFT.

SHAW

piquenewsmagazine.com/events

Overhead Doors, Light,

per month

USE A WALSH CUBE TRUCK FOR FREE TO MOVE YOUR POSSESSiOnS TO WALSH STORAgE

Phone 604-938-1126 email shawcarpet@shaw.ca

one month *

+ 20’ (one-trip)

WALSH

Open Monday through Friday 8:30 - 4:30 Saturday 10:00 -4:00 Sundays and Evenings by appointment only.

BEST STORAGE

Whistler Village

ReStoRAtion

CARPET & FLOOR CENTRE

WHISTLER’S

5 Minutes North of

STORAGE

Located in function junction

8080 Nesters Road Whistler, BC

604.848.8987

HIGH AND DRY

For Free consults and Quotes call 604-935-8825

STORAGE

Housekeeping - daily, weekly monthly Move in/out & Construction Cleaning IICRC Professional carpet cleaning Caretaker Services

MOVING AND STORAGE

Come visit our showroom for all your renovation and supply needs

8080 NESTERS

NOTICES

ROTARY CLUBS OF WHISTLER & PEMBERTON

Tuesdays at 7:15 a.m. BG Urban Grill: 604-905-5090 & Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. at the Pan Pacific, Mountainside. www.whistler-rotary.org Pemberton Rotary Club at the Pemberton Community Centre, Wednesdays at 7:15am www.pembertonrotary.ca

U.S.

Exchange Rate

30% as recommended by:

(604) 698-6661

www.sallyjohnphysiotherapy.com

MAY 23, 2019

79


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com Community

NOTICES

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

COMMUNITY LISTINGS COMMUNITY LISTINGS COMMUNITY LISTINGS COMMUNITY LISTINGS

MEETING PLACE

CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS

YOUTH ACTIVITIES

MUSEUMS

ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY

Welcome Centre at Whistler Public Library - Information, support, community connections and ESL practice groups for newcomers and immigrants. Meet people, make connections, volunteer, build your communication skills in English. Multicultural Meet Up every Friday 9.3012pm.604-698-5960 info@welcomewhistler. com FB: WhistlerWelcomeCentre

Playground Builders: Creating Play Building Hope - Playground Builders is a registered charity that builds playgrounds for children in war-torn areas. Learn more, volunteer or donate at www. playgroundbuilders.org

Whistler/Pemberton Girl Guides Adventures for Girls age 5 & up. Sparks & Brownies (Gr K,1,2,3) Guides (Gr 4,5,6) Volunteers always welcome. coastmountaingirlguides@gmail.com

Squamish Lil'wat Cultural Centre Explore First Nations Art Galleries, and Interactive Exhibits. Gift Shop & Cafe are in our admission free area. Open Tuesday'sSunday's per week. 10am-5p.m..

Earthsave Whistler - Providing info & support to people who are interested in making healthier, greener, more peaceful food choices. earthsavewhistler.com

PEMBERTON COMMUNITY LISTINGS Pemberton and District Museum and Archives Society. Located at 7455 Prospect St. Open: May to Nov annually from 10am-5pm. Guided tours and activities for all ages. Join us for "Tea & Tales" every Tuesday at 2pm in July and August. Some seasonal closures. Closed on holidays. www.pembertonmuseum.org

VOLUNTEERS Big Brothers, Big Sisters Sea to Sky Volunteer to Mentor- just 1hr/week - and make a difference in a child's life. Call 604892-3125.

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

Sea to Sky Community Services - running dozens of programs in Whistler to help people through times of crisis and with everyday challenges. www.sscs.ca 1-877892-2022 admin@sscs.ca Stewardship Pemberton Society and the One Mile Lake Nature Centre- Connecting community, nature and people through education, cooperation, and community involvement. www.stewardshippemberton. com

LEISURE GROUPS Whistler Health Care Foundation raises funds for improving health care resources and services. New board members welcomed. Contact us at info@ whistlerhealthcarefoundation.org or call Karen at 604-906-1435.

SPORTS & RECREATION Alpine Club of Canada Whistler Section - Outdoor club focused on ski/split board touring, hiking, mountaineering and skills training. More info: accwhistler.ca Trip Schedule: accwhistler.ca/trips/

ARTS & CULTURE Arts Whistler - Full arts & culture listings. Comprehensive artist directory & programs, events & performances year-round. For info 604-935-8410 or visit www.artswhistler.com

Pemberton Arts Council - Connect with other artists, writers, artisans, musicians & help make Pemberton a vibrant arts community. Call 604-452-0123 or visit www. pembertonartscouncil.com

Pemberton Writers - Meet with other writers to review and critique monthly. Opportunities for writing in a comfortable and creative setting. Email crowley7@telus. net

Sea to Sky Singers - Invites new & former members to join us for an exciting new term, the spring & fall terms culminate with a concert. Choir meets Tues, 7-9pm at Squamish Academy of Music, 2nd Ave. Veronica seatoskysingers@gmail.com or 604-892-7819 www.seatoskysingers.net

Whistler Community Band - Rehearsals on Tuesdays 7 - 8:15 pm CONTACT whistlerchorus@gmail.com FOR LOCATION

Whistler Singers - Resumes September 11th, 2018 for the fall/winter season. Rehearsals are Tuesdays from 7 to 9pm at Myrtle Philip School in the Toad Hall room. Everyone is welcome! Inquiries can be sent to whistlersingers@gmail.com For more info, visit: https://www.facebook.com/ whistlersingers/

Griffin Squadron Squamish Air CadetsOpen to youth 12-18yrs at Don Ross Secondary School on Tues at 6:30pm. Pemberton Valley Trails AssociationMeets the second Wed of each month. 7pm at the Pemberton Recreation Centre. Call 604-698-6158 Sea to Sky RC Flyers - Model Aeronautics Association of Canada Club active in the Sea to Sky Region flying model airplanes, helicopters and multi-rotors. Contact S2SRCFLY@telus.net Whistler Adaptive Sports Program Provides sports & recreation experiences for people with disabilities. Chelsey Walker at 604-905-4493 or info@whistleradaptive. com Whistler Martial Arts offers - Kishindo Karate for kids age 4 and up, Capoeira and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu for kids and adults. Also Kickboxing, Judo, Yoga and Bellyfit for adults. Call Cole 932-2226 Women's Karma Yoga - Thursdays, 9:30-10:30, ongoing by donation and childminding provided. Whistler Women's Centre: 1519 Spring Creek Drive. Drop-in for weekly yoga classes led by an all female team of certified yoga instructors. All women, all ability levels welcome. hswc.ca | 604-962-8711

Duplicate Bridge Club- Whistler Racquet Club reconvenes in late fall. The club meets every week and visitors are welcome. For partner, please call Gill at 640-932-5791. Knitty Gritty Knit Night- Held every Tues 6-8pm. Free evening open to everyone with a love for knitting/crocheting. Beginners welcome. For location and further details email knittygrittywhistler@gmail.com or find us on facebook. Mountain Spirit Toastmasters- Builds communication, public speaking, and leadership skills . Wednesdays at the Pan Pacific Mountainside - Singing Pass Room, 5:30-7pm. Email contact - 8376@ toastmastersclubs.org www.whistler. toastmastersclubs.org Pemberton Women's Institute - Meets the third Mon of each month in the activity room at St. David's United Church at 7:30pm. New members welcome. Linda Ronayne at 604-894-6580 Rotary Club of Whistler - Meets Tuesdays AM & PM www.whistler-rotary.org Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium Meets every Thurs at 12:15pm at Pan Pacific Mountainside. 604-932-7782 Shades of Grey Painters Meets twice a week - Tuesdays, Watercolour, 11.00am-2.30pm @ The Rec, Pemberton. Thursdays, Acrylic, 1.00pm-3.30pm @ The Amenities Building, Pioneer Village, Pemberton. We are like-minded people that get together & paint. Gretchen is the painting coach. $5 to attend. Whistler Reads - Meets to discuss a new book every eight weeks. Go to bookbuffet. com & click on Whistler Reads for the latest book/event. Paula at 604-907-2804 or wr@ bookbuffet.com

Whistler Museum & Archives Society Explore interactive exhibits, listen to local stories & discover Whistler's journey. Open daily 11am-5pm, 4333 Main St. www. whistlermuseum.org or 604-932-2019

PROFESSIONAL NETWORKING BNI Mountain High - Meets at 6:45-8:30am every Thursday at Whistler Chamber Boardroom. BNI provides a positive and structured environment for development and exchange of quality business referrals. It does so by helping you build personal relationships with dozens of other qualified business professionals. Register by emailing melissa@betterbrainhealth.info

Whistler Chamber of Commerce - Is the leading business association in Whistler that works to create a vibrant & successful economy. Learn more about the programs & services at www.whistlerchamber.com

Women of Whistler - Group that provides opportunities for Whistler businesswomen to network, gain knowledge & share ideas in a friendly, relaxed environment. Learn more at www.womenofwhistler.com

FOR SENIORS Activate & Connect - Come join us Thursday mornings 9:30am to 11:00am at Whistler Community Services for a weekly drop in program for seniors 50+. Everyone welcome, in partnership with Mature Action Community. www.mywcss.org

Mature Action Community (MAC) - Represents seniors in Whistler and welcomes new members. MAC meets for fun and interaction with local seniors and those just visiting on Thursday mornings from 9:30 to 11:00 a.m. at the Whistler Community Services Community Room for Activate and Connect. Come join us for coffee and socializing while engaging in fun activities. Check us out at www.whistlermac. org or view our schedule on Facebook Whistler Mature Action Community Group page.

Outreach Services - Free confidential support for adults dealing with the challenges of social wellness. Please call our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker.

COMMUNITY CENTRES YOUTH ACTIVITIES

CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS

1st Whistler Scout Group - outdoor & adventure program for girls and boys aged 5-17. Times and locations vary. More info: http://1stwhistlerscoutgroup. webs.com. Contact scoutsatwhistler @gmail.com or 604-966-4050.

Donate Used Clothing & Household Goods- To be distributed to local charities by Sharon 604-894-6656 for pick up.

Whistler Children's Chorus Rehearsal Tuesdays at MILLENNIUM PLACE (4 - 5:30 pm) contact whistlerchorus@gmail.com

80 MAY 23, 2019

Whistler Youth Centre - Drop - in: Fridays 3:30 - 11 PM & Saturdays 6 - 10 PM for ages 13 - 18. Located downstairs in the Maury Young Arts Centre (formerly Millenium Place). We offer: a Ping pong table, Pool table, Skateboard mini ramp w. skateboards and helmets to borrow, Free Wi-Fi, Xbox One, PS3 & PS4, Guitars, Board games, Projector and widescreen TV's. Facebook THEYC Crew, www.whistleryouthcentre. com or call 604-935-8187.

Maury Young Arts Centre - Whistler's community centre for arts, culture & inspiration. Performance theatre, art gallery, daycare, youth centre, meditation room, meeting facilities. www.artswhistler.com or 604-935-8410 Pemberton & District Community Centre - Located at 7390 Cottonwood St. Fitness Centre, facility rentals, spray park, playground, children, youth, adult & seniors programs. For more info 604-894-2340 or pemrecinfo@slrd.bc.ca

Pemberton Men's Shed - Weekly social meetings WED. 11-2 in the Seniors/youth Rec. bldg. beside library. Social meeting with BYO Bag lunch, card games and pool/ snooker. Help out in YOUR community, operating the Pemberton Tool Library.

Senior Citizen Organizations - Is an advocacy group devoted to improving the quality of life for all seniors. Ernie Bayer 604576-9734 or ecbayer2@gmail.com

Healthy Home, Healthy Planet - Expert in green cleaning offers tricks, info & advice on the best way to green clean your home or work space! Call France 604-698-7479. Free private presentation on request. www. healthylivingwhistler.com Re-Build-It Centre - Daily 10:00am to 5:00pm. Accepting donations of furniture, quality used building supplies & new items. Deliveries and pickups available for $35. Call 604.932.1125, www.mywcss.org, rebuildit@ mywss.org Regional Recycling - Recycle beverage containers (full deposit paid) electronics, appliances, batteries, Lightbulbs, drop-off times are 9am-5pm on Nesters Rd. Pick up service 604-932-3733 Re-Use-It - Daily 11:00am to 6:00pm, Donate all household goods in good shape. Accepting bottles & cans, old electronics, anything with a cord, and light fixtures for recycling. All proceeds to WCSS. Call 604.932.1121, www.mywcss.org, reuseit@ mywcss.org. The Association of Whistler Area Residents for the Environment (AWARE) Whistler's Natural Voice since 1989. Regular events, project and volunteer opportunities. www.awarewhistler.org info@awarewhistler.org The Mountain Village Social Gathering Join us at one of our regular social gatherings on the last Wednesday of every month. There is a group of us at The Mountain Village who are forming a sustainable, multi generational neighbourhood based on the co housing model. WHAT IF... Housing wasn't just a place to live, but rather, a way of life? To find out more, visit our Facebook page @themountainvillage or go to our website www.themountainvillage.ca

FAMILY RESOURCES Baby/Child Health Clinics - Free routine immunizations & newly licensed vaccines for purchase, growth & development assessments & plenty of age appropriate resources avail. By appointment 604-9323202 Camp Fund - Provides financial assis-tance to enable children of financially restricted families to attend camp. Call WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. www.mywcss.org Families Fighting Cancer In The Sea To Sky - We are a non profit partner with Sea to Sky Community Services. We provide financial and practical support to children and parents with dependants diagnosed with cancer. Please contact us on our confidential email: ffcseatosky@gmail.com, visit our Facebook Page or website www. familiesfightingcancer.ca KidsArt - Provides financial assistance to enable children of financially restricted families to participate in arts and culture education. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. www. mywcss.org.


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

BUY

RENT

WORK

FIX

DRIVE

SELL

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

The Whistler Brewing Company in Function Junction is hiring...

Cook

Part-time and Full-time positions available $15.50/hr + tip out. Join an awesome, fun, small hardworking team. Good hours, free meal each shift & beer perks! Apply within!

PLAY HERE is now hiring for the following position:

Guest Service Agent Room Attendant* Maintenance Person $300 signing bonus Full-time and Part-time Seasonal incentives available *Short-term accommodation available Please email resume to hr@listelhotel.com Thank you for your interest. Only those applicants being considered for an interview will be contacted.

The Adara Hotel, Whistler We now have the following positions available:

RESERVATION SUPERVISOR FRONT DESK SUPERVISOR HOUSEKEEPERS » piquenewsmagazine.com/jobs

We offer better than competitive wages, benefits, spirit or epic ski pass and more. The Adara Hotel is a small boutique hotel nestled in the heart of Whistler close to all amenities and services. We take care of our staff and experience is an asset not a requirement.

MAY 23, 2019

81


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Full & Part-Time Class 2 Drivers Excellent hourly wage

Required Skills and Experience: - Customer service skills - Class 2 (w/ Air Brake) preferred - Class 4 Unrestricted License - Will train for Class 2 License upgrade for excellent candidates

We offer competitive wages, a unique environment, seasonal bonuses, staff discounts and benefits. Ask about accommodation.

Come Grow Sport with us at our Whistler Olympic Legacy Venues Whistler Athletesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Centre

(High Performance Training and Accommodation) Lead, Lodge Attendant Kitchen Porter / Lodge Attendant Lodge Attendant

Whistler Sliding Centre

(Bobsleigh, Luge & Skeleton) Summer Operations Trainee (Canada Summer Jobs)

Whistler Olympic Park

(Nordic Skiing, Snowshoeing and Outdoor Activities) Summer Operations Trainee (Canada Summer Jobs) Biathlon Tour Guide, Summer Guest Activity Rep, Summer E-Bike Guide

Great team atmosphere with a well-established local company.

Please send resume to info@vipwhistler.com

Visit our website to view current postings and to apply: www.whistlersportlegacies.com/careers

FAMILY RESOURCES Kids on the Move - Provides financial assistance to enable children of financially restricted families to participate in sport programs. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. www. mywcss.org. Outreach Services - Free confidential support for adults and families experiencing challenges with mental health, food insecurity, housing insecurity, substance use, misuse or addiction, employment, eating disorders, violence in relationships, roommate conflict or homesickness. Contact our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker or visit www. mywcss.org. Pemberton Parent Infant Drop-In Facilitated by Capri Mohammed, Public Health Nurse. Every Mon 11am-12:30pm at Pemberton Public Library. Pemberton Strong Start Family Drop-InA play group for you and your under-5 child. Signal Hill Elementary, Mon, Tues, Wed & Fri, 9am-12pm. Thurs only 12pm-3pm. Call 604894-6101 / 604-966- 8857 Whistler Public Library - Open Mon-Thurs 10am-7pm, Fri 10am-6pm, Sat & Sun 11am5pm. Music & Words, Mon 10am. Rhyme & Song, Tues 10:30am. Parent & Infant dropin, Thurs 11am. Preschool Story Time, Fri 10:30am. Singing with the babies, Sat 11am. Call 604-935-8433

SOCIAL SERVICES Access to Justice - Need legal advice but are financially restricted? Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to find out more or visit www. mywcss.org.

The Beacon Pub and Eatery is currently looking for: LINE/ PREP COOKS (FULL-TIME & PART-TIME) DISHWASHERS SOUS CHEF Wages are very competitive (based on experience), great perks and benefits. Come join the best team in Whistler! Interested applicants please email your resume to skeenan-naf@Crystal-Lodge.com

Counselling Assistance Available - WCSS subsidizes access to a private counselor for $35-$50/hr depending on financial need. Contact an outreach team member at 604932-0113 www.mywcss.org Counselling Assistance - WCSS subsidizes access to a private counsellor depending on financial need. Contact an outreach worker at 604.932.0113 or visit www.mywcss.org. ESL Volunteer Tutor Program - Volunteer one-to-one tutoring for new immigrants & Canadian citizens. For more information or to register, contact the Whistler Welcome Centre info@welcomewhistler.com or call 604.698.5960 Food Bank, Pemberton - Run by Sea to Sky Community Service. Open every second Monday. 604 894 6101

NOW HIRING:

is currently hiring for the following positions:

EXCAVATOR OPERATOR CLASS 1 TRUCK DRIVER Please send resume to

admin@tktcontracting.ca NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

82 MAY 23, 2019

Food Bank Whistler - Located at 8000 Nesters Road, every Monday from 10am to noon. For emergency food bags, please call 604.935.7717 for as-sistance. www.mywcss. org, food-bank@mywcss.org

FT Bakery PT & FT Cashier PT Grocery

Healthy Pregnancy Outreach ProgramLearn how to prepare healthy affordable meals at this outreach program. Sea to Sky Community Services 604-894-6101

COMPETITIVE WAGES, BENEFITS AND FLEXIBILITY email jobs@pembertonsupermarket.com online application at pembertonsupermarket.com fax (604) 894-1107 or apply within!

Meadow Park Rec Credit - If you are financially restricted, you may be eligible for a $131.20 municipal recreation credit. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak with an outreach worker. www.mywcss.org.


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

BUY

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

RENT

WORK

FIX

DRIVE

SELL

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

SOCIAL SERVICES

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

North Shore Schizophrenia Society Services for family, friends & community. Mental illness info, support & advocacy. Call Chris Dickenson at 604-966-7334

Outreach Services - Free, confidential support for youth experiencing challenges with mental health, food insecurity, housing insecurity, substance use, misuse or addiction, employment, eating disorders, violence in relationships, roommate conflict or homesickness. Contact our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker or visit www.mywcss.org.

Pearl's Safe Home - Temporary shelter for women & children experiencing abuse in relationships. Locations in Whistler & Pemberton avail 24/7. All services are free. 1-877-890-5711 or 604-892-5711

Nagomi Sushi is hiring experienced Japanese Chefs in Whistler. • Preparing Sushi and cooking other Japanese traditional food. • Plan menu and ensure food meets quality standards. • Estimate food requirements and estimate food and labour costs. • Instruct Kitchen Helpers and Cooks in preparation, cooking, and presentation of food. • Assist Head Chef and supervise cooks and kitchen helpers. • Inspecting ingredients for quality and freshness and supervising all food preparation. • Create new menu, recipes and specials. • Ensure excellent customer services at the Sushi bar. • Work as a team and ensure orders are completed in a timely manner. Qualifications: • Completion of secondary school and 2 years of cook/chef experience

Full-time, Permanent

RMOW Rec Credit - If you are financially restricted, you may be eligible for a $127.60 municipal recreation credit. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 www.mywcss.org

All season, 30-35 hours per week $24 per hour Language of work is English

Benefits: 2 weeks vacation, extended health plan. Start date: As soon as possible.

Support Counselling - For women regarding abuse & relationship issues. No charge. Call 604-894-6101

Address: 108-4557 Blackcomb Way, Whistler, BC, V0N 1B4 Apply by email at whistlernagomisushi@hotmail.co.jp

Now Hiring for the Following Positions:

HOUSEKEEPERS – CASUAL • Competitive Wages - $25/HR • Associate Housing • Discounted Food • Flexible Schedule • Spa Discounts Discover new opportunities and embark on a career in Hospitality with Pan Pacific Whistler To apply, please submit your cover letter and resume to careers.ppwhi@panpacific.com

Victim Services - Assists victims, witnesses, family members or friends directly affected by any criminal act or traumatic event. Call 604-905-1969

Whistler Community Services Society Outreach Services Now Available Monday to Saturday at our new location - 8000 Nesters Road (next to WAG) 604.932.0113 www. mywcss.org

WHISTLER’S PREMIER VISITOR MAGAZINE

Whistler for the Disabled - Provides info for people with disabilities on what to do & where to go. Visit www. whistlerforthedisabled.com

ON STANDS NOW!

Whistler Housing Authority - Long term rental & ownership housing for Whistler residents. Visit www.whistlerhousing.ca

Whistler Mental Health & Addiction Services - If you or someone you know needs help with a mental health issue or substance misuse or addiction problem, we can assist. Mon-Fri 830am-430pm. 604-6986455

Whistler Multicultural Network Settlement information, social support and programs for newcomers and immigrants living/working in Whistler. 604-388-5511 www.whistlermulticulturalnetwork.com

Pick up our SUMMER 2019 issue now Find it on select stands and in Whistler hotel rooms

DOUG BUSH SURVEY SERVICES LTD.

The Sea to Sky corridor’s top civil construction company. We are currently recruiting professionally minded people to join our team. Required are:

Labourers Equipment Operators Class 1 or Class 3 Truck Drivers Please send resume to: Email: info@whistlerexcavations.com Fax: 604-932-8748 Mail: Box 1145, Whistler, BC V0N 1B0. Drop off @ Suite 202, 1400 Alpha Lake Road, Whistler (Function Junction)

www.whistlerexcavations.com Last modified by:

KP

is looking for a

SURVEY FIELD TECHNICIAN Whistler Opt Healthy Sexuality Clinic - Professional sexual health services at a reduced cost. Free HIV testing. Clinics at Whistler Health Care Ctr, 2nd floor on Tues 4:30-7:30pm. Winter hours Thurs. 5:00pm7:00pm. Confidentiality assured.

Whistler WorkBC Employment Services Centre - Provides free one-stop employment services to job seekers and employers. Drop in services at the Pemberton Library Thursdays 1-5 PM, and at the Whistler Public Library on Mondays from 3-6 PM. For more information visit www.WhistlerESC.com or call us at 604-932-1600

With a two or three year college or technical school program in geomatics. Three years experience and proficient in the use of robotic survey instruments and GPS equipment for engineering and building construction layout, topographic site surveys, site improvement surveys and precise monitoring. Experience with AutoCAD Civil 3D also an asset to assist in office with computations and drawing preparation. Please call Ian @ 604-932-3314 or email @ ian@dbss.ca #18-1370 Alpha Lake Rd. Whistler BC V0N 1B1 Serving Squamish, Whistler and Pemberton

The Pinnacle Hotel Whistler has the following positions available:

HOUSEMAN Please reply by email: parmstrong@pinnaclehotels.ca MAY 23, 2019

83


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS The Bearfoot Bistro, Whistler’s premier fine dining restaurant is growing its team.

Be part of the action to deliver exceptinal fine dining experience to guests in an award-winning and high volume dining room. We are hiring for the following position:

Dishwashers

Red Door Bistro & Roland’s Pub are looking for full time line cooks. Wage based on experience. Extended Medical & Dental Benefits, tips, staff meal, and staff discounts. Apply in person or email resume to info@rolandswhistler.com

We offer year-round or seasonal employment, industry leading wages, medical services plan, staff meals, staff discounts and more... Please send your resume to info@bearfootbistro.com or apply in person between 3-5pm. 4121 Village Green | Adjacent to Listel Hotel 604 932 3433 | bearfootbistro.com

SOCIAL SERVICES Whistler Women's Centre - Provides confidential support, resources, referrals and advocacy for women living in the Sea to Sky corridor. All services are free of charge and include access to emergency safe housing, child/youth counselling, play space and computer access. Drop-In Centre open Mon 12-230, Tue-Thu 12-5. 1519 Spring Creek Drive. You can also access our services at the Whistler Public Library on Mondays from 3-6 p.m. www.hswc.ca or call (604)962-8711. 24 HR Crisis Line: 1-877-890-5711

SUPPORT GROUPS Birth, Baby and Beyond - Join a registered counsellor and meet other moms with the opportunity to ask questions and share experiences in a safe, welcoming and nonjudgmental setting. Call 604.932.0113 for more information or visit www.mywcss.org.

Concussion Support Group - WCSS is offering a recurring 8 week program to support people living with persistent postconcussion symptoms. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak with an outreach worker about upcoming sessions or visit www.mywcss.org.

Epilepsy Support Group- For individuals & families seeking guidance or support. Contact eswhistler@gmail.com

Nagomi Sushi in Whistler is hiring experienced:

Kitchen Helpers Servers Hosts in Whistler

Full time and Part time available Available to start immediately Benefits: 2 weeks vacation per year, potential staff accommodation and Spirit Pass Program. Start date: As soon as possible. Address: 108-4557 Blackcomb Way, Whistler, BC, V0N 1B4 Apply by email at nagomisushi@outlook.com

Now Hiring for the Following Positions: BREAKFAST / BISTRO ASSOCIATE (Seasonal Bonus) GUEST SERVICE AGENT (Commission Incentives) • Competitive Wages • Associate Housing • Wellness Allowance • Discounted Food • Extended Medical Benefits • Spa Discounts Discover new opportunities and embark on a career in Hospitality with Pan Pacific Whistler To apply, please submit your cover letter and resume to careers.ppwhi@panpacific.com

Immigrant Peer Educators - Immigrants providing support and information for those who may be experiencing challenges adjusting to a new culture. 604-388-5511 info@whistlermulticulturalnetwork.com

Pregnancy and Infant Loss - Facilitated by a registered counsellor, this program is designed for couples and individuals who have experienced loss of a child, either before or after birth. Please call WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak to an outreach worker for more information or visit www. mywcss.org.

SMART Recovery Pemberton - (SelfManagement and Recovery Training) A Cognitive-Behavioural group for individuals with substance abuse con-cerns. Pemberton Health Centre (Board Room) January 17th, 24th, 31st, and February 7th 2019 4:30-6:00pm **drop in welcome.

RELIGION Jesus Rock Of Ages Ministry- A bible based church that holds services at Millennium Place's main floor theatre at 4:30pm. www. jesusrockofages.com

Kaze Sushi is looking for Experienced Sushi Chef

Must be able to create rich sushi menu including maki, nigiri and sashimi with various ingredients such as raw fish, fresh fruits & vegetables. Minimum one year as a sushi chef experience required. Wage: $14.50 per hour, FT, to work at Kaze Sushi in Westin Whistler. Please apply in person with resume at the Whistler restaurant from 5:30pm onwards

Call or email Tom on 604-938-4565 or tokyotom111@hotmail.com

84 MAY 23, 2019

We are hiring for the following positions:

LINE COOK BARTENDER SERVER Send cover letter and resume to jobs@altabistro.com Or drop off resume at Alta Bistro (in the Pinnacle Hotel on Main Street) Monday to Friday, 3pm-5pm

Roman Catholic Church- Come celebrate mass at Our Lady of the Mountains, Whistler on Saturday 5pm, Sunday 9am, Tuesday 5:45pm, Wednesday 7pm, Thursday/Friday 5:45pm. St. Francis of Assisi, Pemberton on Sunday 12:30pm and Friday 9am. St. Christopher's, Mt. Currie on Sunday 11am. 604-905-4781

Sea to Sky Healing Room - For Blessing/Prayer/Encouragement In the Community Church building, 7422 Dogwood Street, Pemberton. Every 1st and 3rd Wednesday: 4-6 PM


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

BUY

COMMUNITY LISTINGS RELIGION

RENT

WORK

FIX

DRIVE

SELL

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Whistler Church- Join us for worship and fellowship around Jesus. Sunday 10 am at Myrtle Philip Community School, 6195 Lorimer Rd. Nursery, Sunday School to gr. 6, Youth gr. 7 and up. Call Pastor Jon 604-7983861 / Kelvin 204-249-0700 or www.whistlerchurch.ca

FUR & FEATHERS Get Bear Smart Society - Learn more about coexisting with bears. To report a conflict, garbage or attractant issue call 604-905BEAR (2327) www.bearsmart.com

Pemberton Wildlife Association Advocates for the conservation of fish, wildlife & wilderness recreation. Also offering target shooting & archery facilities. www.pembertonwildlifeassociation.com

WAG - Whistler Animals Galore - A shelter for lost, unwanted, and homeless cats and dogs. Let us help you find your purrfect match...adopt a shelter animal! For more info 604-935-8364 www.whistlerwag.com

LOCALLY OWNED AND INDEPENDENT SINCE 1980 JOIN THE MONGOLIE CREW! We are hiring full time & part time:

• $241.50 Bi Weekly Staff Housing (incl bills) • 15% Grocery Discount • Competitive Wages • Parties, Perks and Positive Vibes

GRILL CHEFS HOSTS

Hourly wage + tips, flexible schedule, fun & fast-paced work environment, staff meals. Learn how to cook with flair!

CHARACTERS WANTED “Work with all your pals, have a good laugh and meet heaps of people” - Chief Morale Officer ROB STANNARD POP INTO THE STORE AND SPEAK TO A MANAGER 4211 VILLAGE SQUARE WHISTLER

Send your resume to careers@mongoliegrill.com Or drop off your resume in person before 5pm!

The Listel Hotel Whistler is now hiring for the year-round leadership position of

Be a part of our dynamic team at one of Whistler’s busiest spots!

FRONT OFFICE MANAGER

At The High Mountain Brewing Company, Whistler Brewhouse, we take pride in our product and service - From the busy patio to the cozy two-sided fireplace, from our exceptional pizzas to our hand-crafted beer. We are currently looking for

• Responsible for leading a dynamic front office team and daily operations • Competitive Salary and incentives provided • Extended Management Health and Wellness Benefits available

OUT NOW!

Front of House Manager Dishwasher Line Cook

For more information and application, please send resume and cover letter to hr@listelhotel.com

We offer comprehensive benefits packages after a probationary period, as well as competitive wages. Please come by with your resume or apply via email to adam@mjg.ca

Thank you for your interest. Only those applicants being considered for an interview will be contacted.

4355 BLACKCOMB WAY WHISTLER, BC, V0N 1B4

Become part of a dynamic team and surround yourself with art. The Audain Art Museum is currently seeking:

Whistler’s only dedicated wedding magazine. WHISTLERWEDDINGMAGAZINE.COM

Guard Full time and part time positions available

Guest services AGent

Guards provide security for the art and educate visitors ensuring protocols are upheld and enforced adhered to by both the staff and public. No experience required. For complete job descriptions please visit: audainartmuseum.com

To apply, please email your resume to bbeacom@audainartmuseum.com Photo: Tourism Whistler/ Justa Jeskova

Pinnacle Hotel Whistler has an opening for a full time or part time guest services agent. We are looking for a customer service professional who will help our guest enjoy their experience at our hotel. Duties include check in and checkout of guests, concierge and reservations. Experience preferred but we will train the right person. Please contact Roger Dix   rdix@pinnaclehotels.ca or ph: 604-938-3218

MAY 23, 2019

85


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

We’re Hiring Housekeepers Needed

-Signing Bonus & Great Benefits!The Four Seasons Housekeeping team is looking for Guestroom Attendants for contracts starting immediately or for summer hire! Candidates will receive a $500 signing bonus. Benefits include Guaranteed housing, one meal per working shift, health & medical after 90 days, a winter leisure package, and more!

Do you or someone you know... Have the drive to build a career with a growing company? Have a passion for providing extraordinary customer service? Strive to work for a company that offers competitive salaries and great employee benefits? If you answered yes to all of these, Gescan might be the company for you!

Details: Please apply online via jobs.fourseasons.com For possible same day offers, please come to our drop-in hours every Tuesday between 1pm-4pm. Please bring your resume and two references in order to be considered!

LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 2004 • $241.50 Bi Weekly Staff Housing (Incl bills) • Staff Meals & FREE COFFEE • 15% Grocery Discount At “The Grocery Store” • Local Customer Base • Competitive Wages • Parties, Perks & Positive Vibes

“Great Team & Awesome Staff Housing” - Irelands Finest Export PADDY BRANGAN POP INTO SEE IAN AT DELISH CAFE OR EMAIL ian@whistlergrocery.com

We are currently hiring an Assistant Manager Full Time and Part Time Sales Representatives We have staff accommodation available for full time, starting in May Please stop by our Whistler Village location with your resume to fill out an application and say Hi to Michelle or Tina. (4154 Village Green)

86 MAY 23, 2019

Warehouse are currently currentlyrecruiting recruitingfor foraaCounter We are Sales/ Counter Associate located in Whistler. Warehouse Associate located in Whistler. Apply online today at

Gescan.com/careers applicants must have accommodations. Powered by Difference

Now Hiring for the Following Positions: HOUSEKEEPERS **$500 Signing Bonus** plus: • Competitive Wages • Wellness Allowance • Associate Housing • Discounted Food • Extended Medical Benefits • Complimentary Associate Stays • Flexible Schedule • Spa Discounts

All Positions The Pony restaurant is currently seeking applicants for the following positions: Line cook: day and night shifts available. Must have 3+ years experience, competitive wages and bi-weekly tip out. Dishwasher: Evening shifts, entry level position.Wages + bi-weekly tip out. Bartender: Experienced bartender, mainly day shifts, full time preferred. Please email or drop off your resume to The Pony events@thepony.ca

Full Time As a Lodging Attendant, you will be responsible for cleaning condo units, hotel rooms, resort common areas and maintaining commercial contracts. These daily services will be your responsibility, so guests get the best first impression of our resort and of their accommodations. Employee Housing Available. www.panoramaresort.com/employment

Full Time Panorama Mountain Resort is looking for entry level and experienced cooks to join the culinary team. The successful candidates must be able to work unattended in both a production atmosphere and on stations in the resort kitchens. You must work well in a team environment and have a willingness to learn. Employee Housing Available. www.panoramaresort.com/employment

LODGE MANAGER Eagle Pass Heliski is now hiring. The Lodge Manager is responsible for the general overview and day to day operations of the lodge to ensure an unparalleled experience for our guests. For full job description and how to apply visit our website. www.eaglepassheliskiing.com/ jobs/ MountainView Accommodation Room Attendent This is a full or part-time, year-round position. Excellent pay, benefit packages for full-time employees. No previous experience is required as we do offer full training. Staff housing is available. Job description includes cleaning rooms, linen stocking, common area cleaning, and seasonal projects. christina@mvawhistler.com

Discover new opportunities and embark on a career in Hospitality with Pan Pacific Whistler To apply, please submit your cover letter and resume to careers.ppwhi@panpacific.com

Edin Boutique in the Village is hiring:

Full-time Sales Person (30+hr/week)

• $18 per hour • Subsidized Staff housing available • Staff discount and ski pass after 3-month probationary period provided • We offer flexible hours in our relaxed boutique where ladies come to shop for beautiful and unique clothing We are located on the Village Stroll next to the “Anne of Green Gables” Chocolate store.

Please drop by with a resume and introduce yourself (604)938-9922

Looking for a dog to adopt? Look for WAG’s bright orange bandanas on dogs being walked by volunteers! These dogs are looking for their forever home. 604.935.8364 www.whistlerwag.com


5 7 6 8 4 9 2 3 1

classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

BUY

RENT

WORK

FIX

DRIVE

SELL

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS The Body Shop Assistant Manager Do you want to learn from a company that does business as a force for good? Are you a leader looking for your next opportunity? Then we want to connect with you! Apply to The Body Shop Whistler! We are looking for amazing leaders to join our brand and help us promote our cruelty-free products, and fair trade initiatives. We can’t wait to connect! * Great Perks. *Full-time flexible schedule. *Competitive Wage. + Bonus. *Excellent Medical Benefits & MSP. robyn.camley@thebodyshop.com https://thebodyshop.avature.net/T BScareers/JobDetailRetail?jobId=51977

WORK. LIFE. BALANCE.

1 5 1 2 7 4 4 6 5 4

4 6 8

8

9 3 6 1 5 8 2 3 9

TOP RATED NEARBY NEIGHBOURHOOD MENUS

9 3 Operations team, the Maintenance Working within 6 the Building

Benefits Package . Wellness Bonus . Great Team . Flexible Hours Technician / Cleaner is responsible for the daily cleaning, beautification, security and minor repair of the Whistler Conference Centre, Tourism Whistler offices, and the Whistler Golf Club buildings. # 26

Music

The ideal candidate is a professional, mature, self-motivated individual who thrives in a customer oriented, hands-on, team environment.

On the Mountains

To view our current career opportunities and to apply, please visit: www.whistler.com/careers

What To Do?

Classifieds

8

9 3 Pique in your pants 4 2

Pique Newsmagazine’s mobile site is your guide to everything in Whistler. Search over 167 restaurant listings, events, activities and more. Search for a job, a place to live, a used snowboard or the closest grocery store. Keep Whistler in your pocket and always be the smarty pants.

Maintenance

FULL TIME, YEAR ROUND

MEDIUM

Events

ResortQuest Whistler is currently hiring:

MAINTENANCE TECH / CLEANER

Restaurants

3 5 8

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

6 7 9

Group Sales Coordinator Guest Service Supervisor Benefits include - activity allowance, extended medical, RRSP match, opportunities for growth and more. To apply for this opportunity, please specify the position and email your resume and cover letter to: beth.fraser@resortquestwhistler.com We thank all applicants for their interest but only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

4 9 5

Blackcomb Peaks Accommodations

2

seeks a

1 MAINTENANCE PERSON FULL TIME 5 4

Starting wage min $20p/h based on experience.

4between duties rapidly, be very organized, and 9 8 3 are provided. Good time lift 25+ lbs. Tools management skills are very important, and after 7 8 6

2 4 1

The successful candidate will need to be able to shift

3 months; benefits will be offered. Competitive

m.piquenewsmagazine.com MEDIUM

# 28

starting wage provided to the successful candidate. Please contact admin@blackcombpeaks.com with your resume to apply.

# 27

Page 7 of 25

9 4 3 6 1 7 5 2 8

Answers 7 6 2 5 4 8 3 1 9

1 8 5 9 2 3 6 4 7

3 9 7 8 6 2 1 5 4

2 1 4 7 5 9 8 6 3

8 5 6 1 3 4 7 9 2

6 3 9 4 7 1 2 8 5

5 7 8 2 9 6 4 3 1

Resort Municipality of Whistler 4 2 1 3 8 5 9 7 6

# 28

3 5 7 2 1 6 8 4 9 Opportunities Employment 8 2 1 4 7 9 6 3 5 6 9 4 8 5 3 7 2 1 · Human 9 3 8 Resources 1 4 5 2 6 Coordinator 7 5 4 6 3 2 7 9 1 8 1 7 2 6 9 8 3 5 4 7 8 3 5 6 4 1 9 2 Resort 2 6Municipality 5 9 8 1 4of7Whistler 3 whistler.ca/careers 4 1 9 7 3 2 5 8 6

4/11/2005

– Benefits

Whistler Landscaping is looking for energetic and reliable landscape labourers & gardeners to join our team. Interested individuals can get more information and apply online at

www.whistlerlandscaping.ca/employment MAY 23, 2019

87


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

We are currently interviewing:

Project Coordinator Carpenters Carpenters Helpers Labourers Level 2 First Aid Attendant

Seeking Room Attendants, Dishwashers and In Room Dining Overnight Servers!

***$500 Signing Bonus Offered*** Our Benefits Include: Health Benefits | Colleague Housing | Leisure Package Staff Meals | Hotel Stay Discounts Great Events & Recognition | Opportunity for growth

Please submit resume to: info@evrfinehomes

Whistler’s Premier Estate Builder

APPLY TODAY AT FAIRMONTCAREERS.COM

We are the Spa for you If you are looking for a new place to call home: • We manifest positive energy • We have a long term and loyal team • We treat you fairly and look out for your wellness • You are listened to • We give you proper breaks and time to set up between services • We offer extended medical benefits • We have potential staff housing at affordable rates • You can enjoy $5.00 cafeteria meals • You have the opportunity to work for other Vida locations in slow season We are here for you.

We’re Hiring! JOIN #TEAMNITA

We are looking to expand our team for peak summer season and hiring the following positions: • Spa Receptionist • R.M.T. • Restaurant Manager • Engineering Associate • Culinary positions • Night Audit

Vida Spa at the Fairmont Chateau Whistler is currently recruiting: REGISTERED MASSAGE THERAPIST ESTHETICIAN GUEST SERVICE AGENT To join our unique Vida family, email Bonnie@vidaspas.com Vida Spas - Vancouver & Whistler Live well. Live long. vidaspas.com Thank You for applying Only those considered will be contacted.

88 MAY 23, 2019

We offer a fun and professional environment with competitive wages, great perks, benefits & seasonal bonus. To apply email: careers@nitalakelodge.com

contact us today

careers@nitalakelodge.com www.nitalakelodge.com I @nitalakelodge


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

BUY

RENT

WORK

FIX

DRIVE

SELL

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

IS SEEKING TWO LEADERS TO JOIN OUR TEAM:

Banquet Manager & Team Driver PIQUE NEWSMAGAZINE

SUBSCRIPTIONS

For a complete job description please visit SLCC.ca/Careers. We thank you for your interest; however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

52 ISSUES $76.70/YEAR

REGULAR MAIL WITHIN CANADA

$136.60/YEAR

COURIER WITHIN CANADA

$605.80/YEAR

COURIER WITHIN USA

PAY BY MASTERCARD, VISA OR AMEX TEL. 604-938-0202 FAX. 604-938-0201

Earls is starting to build our team for Spring and Summer Servers, Cooks, Hosts, Expeditors, Bartenders & Shift Managers Visit us at the restaurant anytime to apply in person or via email at apply.whistler@earls.ca

Crepe Montagne, French restaurant in Whistler since 1997, is looking for:

Server Server Assistant Crepes Maker (Cook) Prep Cook / Dishwasher Competitive wage based on experience + great tips + flexible schedule to enjoy Whistler! Visit us from 10am to 2pm or email us your resume at alicia@crepemontagne.com.

MAY 23, 2019

89


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: MILE 33 BUS DRIVER Position Type: Categories: Location: FTE: No. of Positions: Reporting to: Salary: Posting Date: Closing Date: Start Date:

Mile 33 Bus Driver Bussing Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 1 1 Supervisor of Facilities and Services As per the Bussing Salary Grid April 4, 2019 Posted until position is filled Immediately

Details: Under the supervision of the Head Bus Driver and the Supervisor of Facilities and Services the Bus Driver will drive the Mile 33 Bus Route. (Lower Lake Band Area). Key Deliverables: • Pre-trip inspection of bus and proper warm up • Mile 33 to Xet’olacw Community School and Signal Hill Elementary and Pemberton Secondary School • Arrive at School for drop-off • Other bus runs as requested • Clean and fuel up if required • Routes are subject to change by the Supervisor of Facilities and Services if required. Key Qualifications and Attributes: • Must have minimum Class 2 • Driver’s Abstract • Criminal Record Check • Ensure all busses are inspected for SAFETY required • Make sure insurance for bus is up to date • Ensure log books are kept up, including mopping and washing seats once a week • Review fuel bills when requested • Other duties as required • This route is on Forestry Road. Driver needs to be capable and confident on unpaved road. Driver needs to be strong and in good health Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter, resume, and driver’s abstract and criminal record check by fax. Contact Information:

Glenda Gabriel, Receptionist/Secretary Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604, Mount Currie, B.C., V0N 2K0 Tel: 604 894-6131 Fax: (604) 894-5717

We thank you for your interest, however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

Sundial Boutique Hotel at 4340 Sundial Crescent, Whistler BC V0N 1B4 is currently hiring for a

Housekeeping Supervisor This position is FT year around. Wage is $21.75/hr + benefits. Job duties include: Supervising dept duties, inspection of work, administration, assist with recruiting, perform training and cleaning duties. Skill requirements: 1 year’s prior experience as a housekeeping supervisor”, tourism, administration and customer service. Please fax or email your resume with attention to “Human Resources Department” to:

604-932-7152 hr@sundialhotel.com

90 MAY 23, 2019

OUT NOW!

Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub is hiring:

LINE COOK DISHWASHER Work at Whistler’s best location! Refine or jump-start your culinary career in our fast-paced and busy kitchen. We offer competitive wages, tips and a season ski pass. Please stop by the pub between 10am and 5pm with a copy of your resume. You can also submit your resume via email to careers@dubhlinngate.com

Whistler’s only dedicated wedding magazine. WHISTLERWEDDINGMAGAZINE.COM

THE

RAVEN ROOM Whistler's newest restaurant and cocktail bar Join our kitchen team lead by the talented Chef Erin Stone Looking for:

Experienced Line Cooks Breakfast and Evening Dishwashers Please email erin@theravenroom.ca to apply

YOU CA

N ’T D O

THIS N

T OHW OUT IT WIT

FREE

PICK IT UP EVERYWHERE

FAQwhistler


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

BUY

RENT

WORK

FIX

DRIVE

SELL

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: HIGH SCHOOL CAREER & PLANNING/ENGLISH Position Type: Categories: Location: FTE: No. of Positions: Reporting to: Salary: Posting Date: Closing Date: Start Date:

Team!

High School Career and Planning/English Teacher 1.0 FT High School Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 1 1 Principal As per the Teaching Salary Grid April 24, 2019 Posted until position is filled August 26, 2019

Details: Xet’ólacw Community School is a Lílwat Nation school situated 35 minutes north of Whistler, BC in the Mount Currie Community. The School is a modern, dynamic institution with a strong First Nations curriculum as well as academics from N to 12. Applicants need to be willing to work in a collaborative environment including involvement in an aboriginal student achievement program, which includes coaching that improves student and teacher performance. This position provides an opportunity for high quality Professional Development Key Deliverables: • Teach Career Education 8, 9, 10, Career Life Education 11/12, and English First Peoples 10 • Implement strong classroom management strategies. • Is committed to excellent instructional preparation and consistent record keeping. Timely reporting to administration when necessary e.g. report cards, attendance records and data request • Can use data to drive classroom/school–wide improvement initiatives • Maintain open and consistent communication with students and their families about their academic progress • Can operate and teach numeracy and literacy in collaboration with others according to the school’s strategies for improving academic outcomes • Be a positive team player committed to the belief that all children can learn at high levels • Commit to ongoing professional development including willingness to be coached by the Administration Coordinator, Principal and Regional Principal via school visits, video teleconference calls etc. and joining Provincial Professional Learning Community model (in Vancouver) and a School-Wide PLC model on site. • Prepare and prep students for English 10 Provincial Assessment • Experience and/or education in special needs an asset • Enjoy participating in school event days such as Sports Day, Eagle Run, and Flake Rodeo etc. Key Qualifications and Attributes: • Possession of or eligibility for a BC Teaching Certificate • Membership in the Teacher Regulation Branch • Ability to work with First Nations students in a First Nations community • Innovative and energetic • Positive thinking and ability to work as a team member • Skill in developing instructional strategies based on essential skills and engaging for students • Teaching record of success an asset. • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills • Ability to build positive student relationships • Reflective practices • Familiarity with BC’s new curriculum • Have a desire to learn and grow professionally Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter, resume, including references, transcripts, copy of degrees and TQS Category, prefer by fax. Contact Information:

Glenda Gabriel, Receptionist/Secretary Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604, Mount Currie, B.C., V0N 2K0 Tel: 604 894-6131 Fax: (604) 894-5717

We thank you for your interest, however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

Summer

We offer some of the best benefits in town!

WHEN: Friday, May 24, 2019

 Life & Leisure Program

TIME: 1 PM to 4 PM WHERE: Hilton Whistler Resort & Spa, Cheakamus Room Sweets and refreshments provided

 Health Benefits  Gym and Pool Access

Please bring your resume, cover letter and a smile!

 Parking  Free Meals  Free Yoga  Tuition Program  Year-round Positions  AMAZING Team Member Travel Program including Friends & Family Benefits

Let us take care of you! • • • •

Staff housing available Competitive wages Full time hours year around Free staff parking in Whistler Village

Come be our: • • • • •

G Guestt S Services i R Representative t ti Night Audit Representative Maintenance Representative Room Attendant Houseperson

6 REASONS L: TO WORK AT SUNDIA Place to sleep + $ for activities es + more $ for activiti + convenience + security + Free Ski Pass

Whistler = A good life in

Please fax or email your resume with attention to “Human Resources Department” to:

604-932-7152 hr@sundialhotel.com We thank you for your interest. Only candidates chosen for further consideration will be contacted. MAY 23, 2019

91


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: GRADE SIX TEACHER

O&R Restaurants seeking full-time

EXECUTIVE SOUS CHEF, LINE COOK, BAKER, DISHWASHER, SERVER, BARTENDER We offer competitive pay, a social work environment, seasonal bonuses*, food discounts when not working, meals with every shift*, and a variety of F&B establishments to work. We’re looking forward to you joining our family!

Position Type: Categories: Location: FTE: No. of Positions: Reporting to: Salary: Posting Date: Closing Date: Start Date:

Grade Six Teacher Elementary Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 1 1 Principal As per the Teaching Salary Grid March 15, 2019 Posted until position is filled August 26, 2019

Details: Xet’ólacw Community School is a Lílwat Nation school situated 35 minutes north of Whistler, BC in the Mount Currie Community. The School is a modern, dynamic institution with a strong First Nations curriculum as well as academics from N to 12. Applicants need to be willing to work in a collaborative environment including involvement in an aboriginal student achievement program, which includes coaching that improves student and teacher performance. This position provides an opportunity for high quality Professional Development

*for kitchen staff only

Please send resume to aaron@labocca.com

F/T CASHIER F/T SALES ASSOCIATES Whistler Home Hardware has the immediate openings for the above mentioned positions. Previous retail experience in a similar role or working environment will be an asset. You need to have good communication skills, be willing to work in a team environment and be professional and courteous by nature. We offer a positive work environment, competitive wages and a benefits program. Please apply in person with your resume and references to: #1-1005 Alpha Lake Rd. in Function Junction Location: Function Junction

92 MAY 23, 2019

Key Deliverables: • Teach all subjects in the Grade 6 class with Physical Education, Ucwalmícwts (traditional language), and a library time supervised by other teachers or staff. • Implement strong classroom management strategies. • Is committed to excellent instructional preparation and consistent record keeping. Timely reporting to administration when necessary e.g. report cards, attendance records and data request • Can use data to drive classroom/school–wide improvement initiatives • Maintain open and consistent communication with students and their families about their academic progress • Can operate and teach numeracy and literacy in collaboration with others according to the school’s strategies for improving academic outcomes • Be a positive team player committed to the belief that all children can learn at high levels • Commit to ongoing professional development including willingness to be coached by the Elementary Supervisor and Regional Principal via school visits, video teleconference calls etc. and joining Provincial Professional Learning Community model (in Vancouver) and a School-Wide PLC model on site. • Working in Reading Mastery Program (platooned) as well as Literature program and centers. • Work with Jump Saxon Math in collaboration with other Intermediate teaching staff • Experience and/or education in special needs an asset • Enjoy participating in school event days such as Sports Day, Eagle Run, and Flake Rodeo etc. Key Qualifications and Attributes: • Possession of or eligibility for a BC Teaching Certificate • Membership in the Teacher Regulation Branch • Ability to work with First Nations students in a First Nations community • Innovative and energetic • Positive thinking and ability to work as a team member • Skill in developing instructional strategies based on essential skills and engaging for students • Teaching record of success an asset. • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills • Ability to build positive student relationships • Reflective practices • Familiarity with BC’s new curriculum • Have a desire to learn and grow professionally Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter, resume, including reference, transcripts, copy of degrees and TQS Category, prefer by fax. Contact Information:

Glenda Gabriel, Receptionist/Secretary Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604, Mount Currie, B.C., V0N 2K0 Tel: 604 894-6131 Fax: (604) 894-5717

We thank you for your interest, however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

BUY

RENT

WORK

FIX

DRIVE

SELL

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: TEACHER ON-CALL Position Type: Location: Status: Reporting to: Salary: Closing Date:

Teacher On-Call Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 Full-time Education Director Commensurate with Experience Posted Until Position filled

Details: Xet’olacw Community School is a Lil’wat Nation School situated 35 minutes north of Whistler, B.C. in the Mount Currie Community. The school is a modern, dynamic institution with a strong First Nations curriculum as well as academics from N to 12. Key Qualifications and Attributes: • The ability to teach various high school subjects • Member of the Teacher Regulation Branch • In possession of a degree in Education • Experience with and appreciation of First Nations culture • Ability to work within a Cooperative Discipline framework • Innovative and energetic • Positive thinking and ability to work as a team member • Ability to work in a collaborative culture • Background in relationship-based, learning and discursive practices • Adventurous, versatile and a nature lover • Must complete a criminal record check.

IS HIRING A RENOVATION MANAGER True Pro Property Maintenance is a rapidly growing full service maintenance company based in Whistler B.C. We currently have an exciting opportunity for a self motivated and energetic person to join our team as our Renovation Manager. True Pro is an expanding company with plenty of room for upward growth. If you are a Sea to Sky resident looking for a career that supports your lifestyle True pro would love to hear from you. Renovation Manager Responsibilities are as follows: Understands all aspects of Home Maintenance Manage Renovation projects Manage carpenters and sub-trades Works well with customers Knowledge of basic electrical and plumbing would be an asset Skilled carpenter Self-starter Highly motivated and energetic Good Communicator Knowledgeable in Excel and Word Minimum of 5 years experience True Pro offers a starting wage of $30.00+ per hour based on experience, Health benefits after 3 months probation and $1000 Recreation Credit. Please email resumes to miche@truepro.ca

Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter and resume including references. Contact Information:

Verna Stager, Education Director Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604, Mount Currie, B.C., V0N 2K0 Tel: 604 894-6131 Fax: (604) 894-5717 Email: glenda.gabriel@lilwat.ca

We thank you for your interest, however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

WE ARE LOOKING TO HIRE:

EXPERIENCED LINE COOKS (ACCOMMODATION AVAILABLE) BUSSERS HOSTS SERVERS Full-time and year round. We feature evening work only, staff meals, competitive wages and a great work environment. So if you’re looking for a change or some extra hours, come by and see us. Flexible schedules are available. REPLY IN PERSON WITH RESUME BETWEEN 3-5 AT QUATTRO 4319 Main St. in the Pinnacle Hotel

Here’s to the Journey At Westin, we recruit the brightest, most energetic people in pursuit of developing an exciting and rewarding career. Marriott International has 30 renowned hotel brands in over 122 countries around the world, and we’re still growing. Opportunities abound! ROOM ATTENDANT MAINTENANCE ENGINEER ROOMS CONTROLLER OVERNIGHT SECURITY AGENT BANQUET SERVER (FT, CASUAL) SECURITY SUPERVISOR KITCHEN STEWARD IT TECHNICIAN PERKS AND BENEFITS • MSP COVERAGE • DISCOUNTED MEALS • FLEXIBLE SCHEDULES

• STAFF ACCOMMODATION • MARRIOTT “EXPLORE” PROGRAM ASSOCIATE HOTEL DISCOUNTS

Email your resume to work@westinwhistler.com or visit Monday to Friday, 9am - 5pm

MAY 23, 2019

93


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

WHISTLER’S PREMIER VISITOR MAGAZINE ON STANDS NOW!

NESTERS MARKET & WELLNESS CENTRE

NOW HIRING AT OUR WHISTLER LOCATION If you are a student 15 years or older, we have flexible hours and we want you!

Grocery Clerks Produce Clerks Deli Clerks Meat Clerks Bakery Clerks Juice Bar Clerks E-mail or drop in your resume to: bruce_stewart@nestersmarket.com please cc ian_fairweather@nestersmarket.com or call us at 604-932-3545

Pick up our SUMMER 2019 issue now

PERKS • Competitive wage – Depending on expereince • Access to medical and dental benefits for full time applicants • Percentage discount from store bought goods • Flexible and set schedule • Relative training

Find it on select stands and in Whistler hotel rooms

Diverse construction company with

residential/commercial projects Basalt Wine + Salumeria are currently looking to fill the roles of:

across the sea to sky corriDor

ASSISTANT MANAGER LINE COOKS DISHWASHERS BARTENDER HOSTS/ EXPEDITORS

we are currently hiring

Please send your cover letter and resume to skeenan-naf@crystal-lodge.com Wages are very competitive (based on experience), great perks and benefits. Full and Part Time positions available. Come join the best team in Whistler!

94 MAY 23, 2019

Site Supervisors Carpenters Labourers We offer; employee benefits and full time employment year round. To apply: call 604.935.2683 or email dcoTe@coasTconsTrucTion.ca

piquenewsmagazine.com/events


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

BUY

RENT

WORK

FIX

DRIVE

SELL

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

We provide our people with a caring and fun work environment and cater to lifestyles of adventure seekers. We are centrally located in the heart of Whistler Village and provide our employees with the opportunity to work flexible hours based on their adventure or family requirements.

Now Hiring for the Following Positions: RESERVATIONS & REVENUE SUPERVISOR RESERVATIONS & REVENUE COORDINATOR MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN HOUSEPERSON – OVERNIGHT ACCOUNTANT VALET BANQUET SERVERS - CASUAL • Competitive Wages • Associate Housing • Wellness Allowance • Flexible Schedule • Discounted Food • Extended Medical Benefits • Spa Discounts Discover new opportunities and embark on a career in Hospitality with Pan Pacific Whistler To apply, please submit your cover letter and resume to careers.ppwhi@panpacific.com

Overnight Steward Steward Front Desk Agent Spa Supervisor Employee Experience Manager The Four Seasons team is looking for these roles to start immediately. $500 signing bonus available for all hires

Join our Adventure Service Team at the Whistler Village Inn and Suites! WE OFFER • A great work environment with opportunities for development and career advancement • Free coffee and tea service • Training for advancement • Use of facilities based on occupancy (Gym, Sauna, Hydro Spa and Pool) • Highly competitive compensation in Whistler • Employee accommodation discounts with Atlific Hotels and Resorts • Medical and Dental for full time employees • Some staff discounts on local activities • Staff housing based on availability • Increments to pay scale based for longevity • Flexible hours and work schedules based on your requirements • Bike Storage based on availability

CURRENTLY HIRING • Front Desk Agents (Commission based incentives) • FT Night Auditor - Premium Wage (Commission based incentives) • FT or PT Room Attendants (Commission based incentives) • FT Maintenance (Commission based incentives) Resumes can be submitted to karen@wvis.ca

CREATIVE AND COLLABORATIVE? WORK WITH US! We are currently recruiting amazing people to be part of our team.

Client & Event Services Coordinator Full-�me posi�on | Applica�ons considered as received

Summer Programs Opera�ons Team Whistler Street Entertainment & Arts Whistler

Full-�me seasonal posi�on | Applica�ons considered as received

Bartender

Casual | Applica�ons considered as received

Cra� Facilitator

Whistler Street Entertainment & Arts Whistler Casual | Applica�ons considered as received

Details: Please apply online via jobs.fourseasons.com For possible same day offers, please come to our drop-in hours every Tuesday between 1pm-4pm. Please bring your resume and two references in order to be considered!

APPLY TODAY!

artswhistler.com/careers

Apply to: getinvolved@artswhistler.com | attn: Susan Holden Maury Young Arts Centre | 604.935.8410

MAY 23, 2019

95


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

WE ARE HIRING WE ARE HIRING WE ARE HIRING

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

SURFACE WEATHER OBSERVERS SURFACE WEATHER OBSERVERS WE ARE HIRING WE ARE HIRING WE ARE HIRING SURFACE WEATHER OBSERVERS PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: GRADE ONE TEACHER

SURFACE SURFACEWEATHER WEATHEROBSERVERS OBSERVERS SURFACE WEATHER OBSERVERS Whistler CWO

Whistler CWO A permanent position  as a Surface Weather Observer Whistler CWO A permanent position  Surface Weather Observer with ATS Services Ltd. as a at the Whistler Contract Weather Whistler CWO with ATS Services Ltd. as a at the Whistler Contract Weather Whistler CWO Office.  A permanent position  Surface Weather Observer Whistler CWO A permanent position  as a Surface Weather Observer Office.  A permanent position  Weather Observer Weather with ATS Services Ltd.as a at Surface the Whistler Contract with Ltd. atatthe Whistler Contract Weather A permanent position  Surface Weather Observer withATS ATSServices Services Ltd.as a the Whistler Contract Weather Office.  Office. 

No experience required No experience required Training provided @ NAV Centre, Cornwall, ON No experience required Noexperience experience required No required Training provided @ NAV Centre, Cornwall, ON June to July 12th 2019 No3rd experience required

with ATS Services Ltd. at the Whistler Contract Weather Office.  Office. 

Training provided @ NAV Centre, Cornwall, ON June 3rd to July 12th 2019 Training provided @ NAV Centre, Cornwall, ON ON Travel, accommodations and meals provided. Training provided @ NAV Centre, Cornwall, June 3rd to July 12th 2019 Training provided @ NAV Centre, Cornwall, ON June 3rd to July 12th 2019 and meals provided. Travel, accommodations June 3rd to July 12th 2019 Travel, accommodations and June 3rd to July 12th 2019 Travel, accommodations andmeals mealsprovided. provided.

Travel, meals provided. Travel, accommodations accommodations andand meals provided.

$14.00 starting wage $14.00 $14.00 starting wage $14.00starting startingwage wage $14.00 starting wage $14.00 starting $300            signing bonus upon wage graduation and successful $300                   signing graduation and    signingbonus bonusupon upon graduation andsuccessful successful $300     $300     certification      signing bonus upon graduation and successful site site certification $300              signing bonus upon graduation and successful  site certification    site certification $300      certification    signing bonus upon graduation and successful      site site certification

ATS ATSSERVICES SERVICESLTD LTD- -1-888-845-4913   1-888-845-4913  

ATS LTD- 1-888-845-4913   - 1-888-845-4913   ATSSERVICES SERVICES LTD FAX FAX1-613-221-9815 1-613-221-9815 ATS SERVICES LTD - 1-888-845-4913   FAX 1-613-221-9815 1-613-221-9815 FAX CAREERS@ATSSERVICES.CA   CAREERS@ATSSERVICES.CA   ATSCAREERS@ATSSERVICES.CA   SERVICES LTD - 1-888-845-4913   FAX 1-613-221-9815 PLEASE ABOUT CAREERS@ATSSERVICES.CA   PLEASEINQUIRE INQUIRE ABOUTOTHER OTHERSITE SITEVACANCIES VACANCIESAND ANDTRAINING TRAININGDATES DATES FAX 1-613-221-9815 PLEASE INQUIRE ABOUT OTHER SITE VACANCIES AND TRAINING CAREERS@ATSSERVICES.CA   DATES

PLEASE INQUIRE ABOUT OTHER SITE VACANCIES AND TRAINING DATES CAREERS@ATSSERVICES.CA   PLEASE INQUIRE ABOUT OTHER SITE VACANCIES AND TRAINING DATES PLEASE INQUIRE ABOUT OTHER SITE VACANCIES AND TRAINING DATES

Position Type: Categories: Location: FTE: No. of Positions: Reporting to: Salary: Posting Date: Closing Date: Start Date:

Grade One Teacher Elementary Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 1 1 Principal As per the Teaching Salary Grid March 15, 2019 Posted until position is filled August 26, 2019

Details: Xet’olacw Community School is a Lil’wat Nation school situated 35 minutes north of Whistler, BC in the Mount Currie Community. The School is a modern, dynamic institution with a strong First Nations curriculum as well as academics from N to 12. Applicants need to be willing to work in a collaborative environment including involvement in an aboriginal student achievement program, which includes First Nations School Association coaching that improves student and teacher performance. This position provides an opportunity for high quality Professional Development Key Deliverables: • Experience with Read Well, DIBELS and Six Minute Solution an asset/willingness to attend professional development • Ability to work collaboratively. Must be cooperative in strategies with Professional Learning Communities under direction of First Nations School Association • Experience with Saxon Math an asset/ willingness to attend professional development • Experience and/or education in special needs an asset • Can use data to drive classroom/school wide improvement initiatives • Maintain open and consistent communications with students and their families about academic progress • Be a positive team player committed to the belief that all children can learn at high levels • Commitment to ongoing professional development including willingness to be coached by the Elementary Supervisor and Regional Principal via school visits, video teleconference call and joining Provincial Professional Learning Community model (in Vancouver) and a School-Wide PLC model on site • Enjoy participating in school event days such as Sports Day, Eagle Run, and Flake Rodeo etc. • Implement strong classroom management strategies Key Qualifications and Attributes: • Possession of or eligibility for a BC Teaching Certificate • Membership in the Teacher Regulation Branch • Ability to work with First Nations students in a First Nations community • Innovative and energetic • Positive thinking and ability to work as a team member • Skill in developing instructional strategies based on essential skills and engaging for students • Teaching record of success an asset. • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills • Ability to build positive student relationships • Reflective practices • Familiarity with BC’s new curriculum • Have a desire to learn and grow professionally Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter, resume, including reference, transcripts, copy of degrees and TQS Category, prefer by fax. Contact Information:

Glenda Gabriel Receptionist/Secretary Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604 Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 Tel: 604 894-6131 Fax: (604) 894-5717

We thank you for your interest, however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

96 MAY 23, 2019


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

BUY

RENT

WORK

FIX

DRIVE

SELL

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

WHISTLER’S RE-IMAGINED ITALIAN RESTAURANT

The storied restaurant offers a modern taste of Italy to bring a fresh, contemporary style of dining to the mountain.

CURRENT OPPORTUNITIES FRONT-OF-HOUSE Experienced Dining Room Server Server Assistant Host / Hostess

BACK-OF-HOUSE

ARE YOU A FOODIE?

Line Cooks (1-2 years experience) Dishwashers

Your Local Community IGA Whistler is hiring passionate resident foodies for all DEPARTMENTS

Staff Housing Available! Competitive Wage + Benefits Package

• We offer flexible scheduling options like evenings, weekends, and weekday daytime shifts.

WE’RE HIRING

• We also have accommodations available for some long term positions.

DISHWASHERS On-the-job training offered. Apply today!

•Kitchen experience, customer service and cashier experience an asset

RESERVATIONS MANAGER

We thank all candidates in advance for their interest and advise that only those considered for interviews will be contacted.

The ideal candidate is well spoken, organized, confident, outgoing, and well-presented. • Previous experience in a fine dining environment is required • Post Secondary education is an asset • Familiarity with a reservations management platform is an asset We offer year-round full and part-time hours, gratuities, potential for future growth within the company, and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants. Please email your resume & cover letter to careers@ilcaminetto.ca

Job Types: Full-time, Part-time, Permanent Please forward your resume and what department you want to work in to nadinej@georgiamain.com or markb@igabc.com

Delta by Marriott Whistler Village Suites Is currently recruiting for the following positions:

Roland’s Pub & Red Door Bistro are looking for experienced line cooks and dishwashers. Full time and part time available, mostly night shifts. Competitive wages, tips, staff meal, staff discounts, and many other perks. Full time staff eligible for Extended Medical & Dental benefits after 3 months. Come join the coolest group of locals at the coolest local establishment. Apply in person to 2129 Lake Placid Road, or email resume to info@rolandswhistler.com

- Front Desk Manager - Housekeeping Room Attendant - Executive Housekeeper - Bellperson - Houseperson / Public Area Attendant - Strata External Maintenance 3 days/week

STAFF HOUSING IS AVAILABLE! Start your journey today with: competitive wages, growth opportunities, a positive team environment, medical benefits, play money (ski pass, etc), 100% provincial health care coverage. To Apply: either submit an application online at Marriott.com/careers or send your resume to barbara.fraser@deltahotels.com

MAY 23, 2019

97


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: GRADE SEVEN TEACHER Position Type: Categories: Location: FTE: No. of Positions: Reporting to: Salary: Posting Date: Closing Date: Start Date:

Barista Reservation Agent Guest Experience Team Lead Staff Housing Caretaker Spa Experience Team Lead Spa Experience Supervisor Carpenter or Carpenter Helper

Grade Seven Teacher Elementary Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 1 1 Principal As per the Teaching Salary Grid April 3, 2019 Posted until position is filled August 26, 2019

Details: Xet’ólacw Community School is a Lílwat Nation school situated 35 minutes north of Whistler, BC in the Mount Currie Community. The School is a modern, dynamic institution with a strong First Nations curriculum as well as academics from N to 12. Applicants need to be willing to work in a collaborative environment including involvement in an aboriginal student achievement program, which includes coaching that improves student and teacher performance.

WE OFFER:

WE ARE LOOKING FOR:

This position provides an opportunity for high quality Professional Development

• • • • • •

• • • •

Key Deliverables: • Teach all subjects in the Grade 7 class with Physical Education, Ucwalmícwts (traditional language), and a library time supervised by other teachers or staff. • Implement strong classroom management strategies. • Is committed to excellent instructional preparation and consistent record keeping. Timely reporting to administration when necessary e.g. report cards, attendance records and data request • Can use data to drive classroom/school–wide improvement initiatives • Maintain open and consistent communication with students and their families about their academic progress • Can operate and teach numeracy and literacy in collaboration with others according to the school’s strategies for improving academic outcomes • Be a positive team player committed to the belief that all children can learn at high levels • Commit to ongoing professional development including willingness to be coached by the Elementary Supervisor and Regional Principal via school visits, video teleconference calls etc. and joining Provincial Professional Learning Community model (in Vancouver) and a SchoolWide PLC model on site. • Working in Reading Mastery/Corrective Reading Program (platooned) as well as Literature program and centers. • Work with Saxon Math in collaboration with other Intermediate teaching staff • Experience and/or education in special needs an asset • Enjoy participating in school event days such as Sports Day, Eagle Run, and Flake Rodeo etc.

Growth opportunities Subsidized housing Free yoga classes Ski pass or wellness package Free massage after 3 month probation Bath membership for you and a friend

Above and beyond attitude Leadership experience Commitment to your role Passion for the hospitality and tourism industries

Apply now: www.scandinave.com/en/careers/location/whistler/

We are seeking flexible, hardworking and hard playing

FRONT DESK AGENT FULL-TIME BELLMEN HOUSEKEEPERS/HOUSEMAN PART-TIME AND FULL-TIME HOURS AVAILABLE

PART-TIME NIGHT AUDIT Please apply if you can bring your smile and positive energy to our team and our guests!

Your next big adventure starts here.

Please email your resume to: roberto@aavawhistlerhotel.com Thank you for your interest.

Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter, resume, including reference, transcripts, copy of degrees and TQS Category, prefer by fax.

Only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted

Contact Information:

YOU CAN’T DO

THIS TOWN WITHOUT IT

98 MAY 23, 2019

Key Qualifications and Attributes: • Possession of or eligibility for a BC Teaching Certificate • Membership in the Teacher Regulation Branch • Ability to work with First Nations students in a First Nations community • Innovative and energetic • Positive thinking and ability to work as a team member • Skill in developing instructional strategies based on essential skills and engaging for students • Teaching record of success an asset. • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills • Ability to build positive student relationships • Reflective practices • Familiarity with BC’s new curriculum • Have a desire to learn and grow professionally

PICK IT UP

EVERYWHERE FAQwhistler

Glenda Gabriel, Receptionist/Secretary Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604, Mount Currie, B.C., V0N 2K0 Tel: 604 894-6131 Fax: (604) 894-5717

We thank you for your interest, however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.


classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

BUY

RENT

WORK

FIX

DRIVE

SELL

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Our outstanding team is looking to add individuals with a variety of skill sets and experience. Friendly, hard working candidates are invited to apply.

CURRENT OPPORTUNITIES FRONT-OF-HOUSE

L

H

AC

KC O

M B

B

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

EL

ICOPTER

S

BLACKCOMB HELICOPTERS FLEET & EQUIPMENT MANAGER

Experienced Server (Araxi) Cocktail Bartender (Bar Oso) Server Assistant Expeditor

Blackcomb Helicopters is a full-service helicopter company with bases in Vancouver, Squamish, Whistler, Pemberton, Sechelt, and Lillooet. We are currently looking for a full-time Fleet & Equipment Manager based at our Pemberton base, but with Company wide responsibilities.

BACK-OF-HOUSE

Reporting to the Base Manager, Pemberton, this position will oversee the Fleet & Equipment Department, ensuring all assets are operating at maximum efficiency. Focusing on the maintenance and upkeep of company vehicles and other non-aircraft equipment, such as pumps, re-fueling systems, trailers, and helicopter gear, you will ensure a robust tracking system is followed to ensure maintenance schedules and regulatory requirements are adhered to. You will assist in budget preparation and forecasting recommendations of fleet & equipment replacement planning. You will also assist in facility and ground support equipment repair and upkeep, including managing of related staff. You will be responsible for all fleet insurance policy additions and renewals. You will oversee the training program for all personnel using lifts, forklifts, crane trucks, skid steers, and all company ground vehicles and equipment. In addition to the mobile refueling equipment, you will oversee a maintenance and monitoring program and coordinate supplier relations for our static fuel tanks. You are comfortable with commercial driving and would be able to implement a Class 1 or Class 3 vehicle program if required for fuel and other transportation. You are willing to take on occasional commercial driving duties.

Pastry Cooks Line Cooks (1-2 years experience) Dishwashers

Staff Housing Available! Competitive Wage + Benefits Package We’re Hiring

DISHWASHERS On-the-job training offered APPLY TODAY!

MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES Assistant Restaurant Manager

JOB PURPOSE & OVERVIEW:

EXPERIENCE REQUIRED: • Commercial driver’s licence for British Columbia - Class 3 with Air Brakes endorsement minimum. • Experience and/or training in automotive and mechanical maintenance, and ideally, heavy duty mechanic experience; • Excellent understanding of commercial fleet and insurance policies; • Excellent communication skills and ability to work within a team framework;

Seeking a full-time Assistant Manager to help oversee day-to-day operations and uphold Araxi Restaurant’s exceptional levels of hospitality.

• Above average computer skills (Excel, word processing);

• Previous restaurant leadership experience is required • WSET Level 2 or equivalent is an asset

• Good attitude and excellent work ethic:

Excellent training and growth opportunities available within an award-winning restaurant group.

• Analyze problems and have good decision-making abilities;

Please email your resume & cover letter to careers@araxi.com or present in person at Araxi between 3-5 pm daily. We offer year-round full and part-time hours, gratuities, potential for future growth within the company, and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants.

WIDE OPEN WELDING IS CURRENTLY LOOKING TO FILL THE FOLLOWING POSITION:

FABRICATOR/ERECTOR Please forward your resume to contactus@wideopenwelding.com

• Excellent understanding of business requirements from an operational perspective, enable to make informed decisions about capacity and service; • Strong attention to detail, particularly pertaining to paperwork; • Legally entitled to work within Canada. This is a unique opportunity for an individual who loves all things mechanical – suffice to say, we have some pretty cool gear. If you are a self-starter, with a bordering on obsessive attention to detail, this job is for you. Salary will commensurate with experience. We offer an excellent benefits program, and an energetic and diverse working environment. Interested applicants are asked to send their resumes to: Tracy Rogers Vice-President, Human Resources at trogers@mcleangroup.com

Employment Opportunities:

DO YOU LIVE IN PEMBERTON? THEN WHY COMMUTE TO WHISTLER?

Guest Services Agents Room Attendants Maintenance Helper

Apply to: jobs@pembertonvalleylodge.com

Competitive wages, health benefits, casual environment MAY 23, 2019

99


CALL THE EXPERTS

Want to advertise your service on this page? AUTOMOTIVE

Call Pique at (604) 938-0202, or email sales@piquenewsmagazine.com

BLINDS ETC.

BLINDS ETC.

FIX AUTO PEMBERTON • Certified Insurance Collision Repair Facility • Insurance & Private Auto Body Repair • Courtesy Vehicles on Site

Visit fixautopemberton.com to schedule an appointment or call 604-894-6767

SUNCREST WINDOW COVERINGS Custom Blinds • Shades • Draperies

Tel: 604-935-2101 Email: windowcov@shaw.ca www.whistlerwindowcoverings.ca

CARPET CLEANING

WINDOW COVERINGS

BLACK BEAR CARPET CLEANING LTD.

David Weldon david@summersnow.ca 604-938-3521

• Wood blinds • Sunscreens • Shades • Motorization

www.summersnow.ca

Summer Snow Finishings Limited

• SHUTTERS • DRAPERY

Connie Griffiths

BLINDS ETC. Whistler’s Source for Blinds since 1989

• BLINDS • SHADES

• CARPETS • UPHOLSTERY

Custom Window Treatments Contact us today for a free quote or consultation info@suncrestwindowcoverings.com

604.698.8406

CARPET CLEANING

• TILES • CAR INTERIORS

100% ECO FRIENDLY CERTIFIED www.blackbearcarpetcleaning.ca • 604 698 6610

PROUDLY SERVING WHISTLER FOR OVER 25 YEARS

CHIMNEY

GLASS

BLACKCOMB CHIMNEY PATROL LTD.

TIRED OF THOSE OLD CONDENSATED, MOLDY WINDOWS AND DOORS?

Serving Whistler since 1986

Specialized in cleaning

Wood Energy Technology Transfer Inc.

Chimneys, Furnace & Airducts, Dryer vents.

604.932.5775 / 1.877.932.5775 blackcombchimney@yahoo.ca

GLASS

WINDOW REPLACEMENT

WANT TO ADVERTISE

your service here?

Take advantage of the benefits and savings you will receive from new windows and doors.

Call Pique at (604) 938-0202, or email sales@piquenewsmagazine.com

Call Whistler Glass for your onsite consultation

MORTGAGES

PAINT

604.932.1132 whistlerglass.com

MORTGAGE BROKER SERVICES Residential & Commercial • First-time Home Buyers Non-residents • Pre-Approvals • Reverse Mortgages

AUTO GLASS SPECIALISTS · Frameless Shower Enclosures · Complete Window/Door Packages · Custom Railing Glass Systems · Fogged/Failed Window Replacements

mountainglass.ca | info@mountainglass.ca

604-932-7288

Annie de la Chevrotiere | Mortgage Broker www.peaktopeaktmortgage.com annie@peaktopeakmc.com 1328 Main Street, Squamish, BC, V8B 0R2

604.905.8483

THE COMPLETE GLASS CENTRE

SURVEYING

SURVEYING

BUNBURY & ASSOCIA

Surveys Surveys

▪ ▪ ▪

Surveys Plans

Surveys

www.bunbury-surveys.com

Phone: 604-932-3770

100 MAY 23, 2019

SQUAMISH OFFICE #207 - 38026 Second Avenue Phone: 604-892-3090 email: squamish@bunbury-surveys.com

604-894-6240 7426 Prospect St, Pemberton

SURVEYING DOUGLAS J BUSH AScT, RSIS

Serving the Sea to Sky Corridor Since 1963 ▪ ▪ ▪

Book your in-home leen Consultation with Col today!

DOUG BUSH SURVEY SERVICES LTD

BC LAND SURVEYORS North Vancouver to Lillooet

Our paint team has over 25 years combined paint sales experience, and we can help you get things right the first time. Now offering In Home Paint Consultations! Pemberton Valley Rona. Let us help you love where you live.

THE RIGHT TOOLS. THE RIGHT PEOPLE. Surveying | Mapping | Engineering | Environmental | Landscape Architecture | Planning To learn more visit: www.mcelhanney.com

p: 604-932-3314 c: 604-935-9515 Engineering & construction layout Topographic & site improvement surveys Municipal, volumetric & hydrographic surveys GPS - global positioning systems www.dbss.ca // dougb@dbss.ca


PUZZLES ACROSS 1 6 10 15 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 32 34 36 37 40 41 42 44 48 49 50 53 55 56 58 59 61 63 64 65 66 67 69

Plant life Water sport Mom’s brother Wash out More discourteous Entices Tooth type Like a rotunda Pick Rajah’s land -- donna Medieval trade union Sundowns Potatoes go-with In an agitated way Off-white shade Halos Not common Fava -Above, poetical Decade number Sharply pungent Boutique Cobbler’s tool Wand Pasternak woman Countrified New Haven student Blush Teeming Held fast Dot in a river Shower feature Opera singers Chimed Museum sculptures Shawls Evil habit

8 2 6

4 9 3 9 5

3 7 8 9 4

70 Not for 71 Rani’s servant 74 Before, to poets 75 Most lemony 78 More cruel 81 Fellow 82 Poetic twilights 83 Luau staple 84 Silica mineral 86 Green parrot 87 Wild tee shirt (hyph.) 89 Type of pudding 93 Wire measure 94 Price increase 95 Unpleasant look 96 Pacific island 97 Swing for acrobats 100 Fixed 102 “The King and I” actress 103 Fill with happiness 104 Look forward to 108 Static 109 Rabbit 110 Green Hornet’s valet 111 -- -down cake 112 Give alms 113 Hurtful remark 115 To a smaller extent 116 AMA members 117 Pasture 118 Merriment 120 Chair part 121 Dazzle 123 Avg. size 124 Baroness Karen 125 1,101, to Caesar 127 Piano pieces 129 Thin cookies

131 Unprincipled one 136 Intertwine 138 Software purchasers 142 Comic-strip queen 143 Browned bread 144 Dog-tired (2 wds.) 145 Painting on a wall 146 Taxi riders 147 Like “The Twilight Zone” 148 Combine 149 Ecru 150 Cuff links 151 Foxier 152 Wedding invitation encl. 153 Requested

DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 21 31

2 3 3 8 7 2

8 6 7 9 1 4 6

MEDIUM

# 25

Golfer -- Couples Humdinger Verse forms Guess -- -craftsy Drop-kicker Peace and quiet “Star Wars” princess Honshu port Foul-ball caller 1066 raider Paper holders Tibetan monk QED part Proceeded slowly Waves of applause Exclude Wooded hollow Small whirlpool Tilted to one side Modicum

33 Right away 35 Actress -- Hagen 37 Medieval entertainer 38 Basin companion 39 Swit co-star 42 Put up pictures 43 Dot-com alternative 45 Finland’s capital 46 Margarine 47 Peach centers 49 Descartes’ name 50 Reside 51 Make -- -- buck 52 Thing, in law 53 Viking letters 54 A Barrymore 57 One of a sinkful 58 Least green 59 Movie reviewer 60 Ornamental fabric 62 Sp. miss 64 Boldly attempt 66 Burrito kin 68 Midnight rider 69 Speedway sound 71 Elev. 72 Avril follower 73 Capital of South Australia 76 Drone’s home 77 BLT part 79 Expression of alarm 80 Charlotte of “Bananas” 82 Hole for a shoelace 85 Organ part 88 Society newbies 90 Double - 91 Unmixed 92 Map collection

4 6 8

8

9 3 6 1 5 8 2 3 9

94 98 99 100 101 102 103 105 106 107 109 111 114 115 116 119 121

Wields an ax Informers Jolts of electricity Jagged tear Plug away Large movie ape Barely make it Has a fever Project starter Valuable wood Prompt Press for Landed Permit Safeguard Chewed the scenery Melbourne mate

122 123 124 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 137 139 140 141

More soggy Canyon Newsstand buys Gross Personal journal Q-tips Tom Jones’ country Latin dance Big galoots -- du jour Machu Picchu locale Sporty vehicles Caroler’s number Ms. Fitzgerald Viking name Hit the ceiling Arctic transport

LAST WEEKS’ ANSWERS

1 5 1 2 7 4 4 6 5 4 9 6 3

MEDIUM

# 26

Enter a digit from 1 through 9 in each cell, in such a way that: • Each horizontal row contains each digit exactly once • Each vertical column contains each digit exactly once • Each 3x3 box contains each digit exactly once Solving a sudoku puzzle does not require any mathematics; simple logic suffices.

LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY: MEDIUM

6

6 2

3 9

5 4 7 9 1

8 7 2 5 7 9 4 5 5 6 4 1 9 3 8 9 2

MEDIUM Solution, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com# 27

3 5 8 9 3 4 2 4 1 MEDIUM

8

6 7 9

2 9 8 7

4 9 5 2

4

1 5 4 3 8 6 # 28

ANSWERS ON PAGE 87

MAY 23, 2019

101


MAXED OUT

Whistler—where you can escape the real world at least for a while “Blow up your TV, Throw away your paper, Go to the country, build you a home. Plant a little garden, Eat a lot of peaches, Try to find Jesus on your own.” – John Prine

LET US PAUSE, momentarily, and take stock of the world around us as we segue into what Canadians think of as summer, notwithstanding summer is astronomically a month away. Since we are Canadian and the sine

BY G.D. MAXWELL qua non of Canadian-ness continues to be a deeply rooted pride in the fact we aren’t USers, as the “Americans” south of the border ought to call themselves instead of usurping the general name given to two entire continents, let us walk a mile in the moccasins of our brothers and sisters south of the border. If you lived in the USofA right now chances are you’d be more than just a little bit scared. Of course, if you live on this side of the border, which most of you do, chances are you’re a little scared too, but for very different reasons. You’d think after almost two decades of various administrations built, it seems, on scaring the pants off the populace, our southern friends would be more or less inured to fright and worry. But it’s one thing to be scared of the boogie man terrorists half a world away; it’s another thing entirely to have the boogie man living next door to you ... or at a minimum, concentrated in large urban areas riddled with liberal elitists, whatever they are. If you live in the U.S. right now you see the paradox of your way of life slipping away from you, hand in hand with your grand mythology of being the world’s invulnerable superpower, while, at the same time, having a madman in the White House telling you he’s made America great again. On this side of the border we shake our collective heads and tsk-tsk to ourselves, wondering how anyone could be so taken in by the loony ravings of the child president. Unless, of course you’re Conrad Black who thinks Trump’s smarter than people give him credit for and toadies up with enough lickspittle to get a pardon for his crimes. How do you spell sycophant, Connie? In the U.S. right now, the only thing stronger than the house-of-cards economy—built as it is on low interest rates, tax cuts for the wealthy and labour laws designed to ensure the profits of labour flow uphill to executives, business owners and shareholders—is the scourge

102 MAY 23, 2019

WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

of opioids and growing resentment for out of it to finance an unsustainable, but anyone and everyone who isn’t like us, us patriotic, lifestyle of consumption. Many, being those who believe the path to making however, lost their home—and pretty America great again is white, conservative, much everything else they had—when evangelical, racist and not particularly they became part of the 75 per cent of bright. Everyone else, them if you will, personal bankruptcies caused by medical is suspect and undesirable and probably bills racked up due to sickness or accidents, believe in science. after which opioids did the rest. For the first time since statistics were But Canadians tsk at their own peril. As invented, the life expectancy of white near as the other side of the mountains east males in America is decreasing. Of course, of B.C., Thumper Kenney has proclaimed a statistics is a branch of mathematics and “Summer of Repeal.” Unlike, say, the Summer mathematics is generally considered of Love, this one is all about making Alberta a science so it’s quite likely this bit of great again. Not coincidentally, it follows information qualifies as fake news in the the Trump gameplan. So what’s going to MAGA population. White American males get repealed? Every single bit of legislation aren’t statistically living as long because passed by the previous government that, so many of them are dying a junkie’s death, in any way, was designed to tackle climate courtesy of the Sackler family and their change. For Thumper, climate change money-making Oxycontin, an opioid they either doesn’t exist, is an act of God or so successfully distributed by convincing simply gets in the way of makin’ money. the medical community everything they’d Also to be repealed are any laws that let learned about addiction in med school was working people organize, which is to say wrong. The docs, in turn, handed Oxy out unionize, to bargain for liveable wages. like popcorn to those injured on the job or The temerity. Stealing hard-earned profits in accidents or those who needed to salve from the their rightful owners and giving their pain from losing the only job they ever some small part of them to the people who had that paid enough to live on when it was actually produced them. either outsourced to a third-world country And, of course, the warhorse of or taken over by robots. conservative magical thinking, tax cuts, And then, there were those whose will play a starring role. Well, almost. Not pain was caused by losing their home to even Thumper is daft enough to suggest foreclosure. Some had spent the better Albertans should be paying something as part of a decade mistaking their home for obviously communistic as a sales tax. After an ATM and regularly sucking the equity all, you can’t cut zero, can you?

Further east, in the Old Country— Ontario—we have the spectacle of the non-crackhead Ford brother who is doing everything he can to bring back the 20th century ... the early 20th century. The one celebrating cheap beer, fast cars, no sex ed and mass transit only for the poor working schmucks who deserve it. I suspect he’d be even more popular if he did smoke crack. Barring the route John Prine suggested— and I’ve done my best to follow it except it’s too cold to grow peaches at Smilin’ Dog manor, and the only Jesus I’ve found is a Mexican immigrant who has a landscaping business—the only obvious solution to the problems south and east of the border is to get in your car, fill up your tank, play Border Delay Roulette, drive through downtown Vancouver and up the Sea-to-Hell highway or across several mountain chains and frolic your worries away at Whistler. We’ve got a summertime of diversions, as usual, weekends so chock full of festivals, events and animation you’ll pray for Monday to roll around so you can get some down time. Restaurateurs and hoteliers are ready to feed your growing hunger and pamper your tired body and if that’s not enough, you can spa your way to your own personal bliss. Heck, we’ve got it all, except for a bowling alley and a curling rink ... and at least one of those pops up every now and then in some rezoning proposal. So get your fun on and forget the unreal world. Ignorance is bliss. So is a good peach. n


Welcome to the best place on earth Engel & Völkers Portfolio of Fine Homes

NORDIC ESTATES

WHISTLER VILLAGE

ALPINE MEADOWS

CREEKSIDE

Eva Lake Village is a conveniently located complex within the Nordic Estates neighbourhood that is occupied by employees or retirees of Whistler and as a result offers a wonderful feeling of community. $499,000

The Hideout is a newly renovated, cozy & spacious 1 bed apartment conveniently located within the heart of Whistler Village, yet it enjoys a peaceful, private setting within a wooded area. Don’t miss this great prperty. $799,000

A perfect weekend retreat or f/t residence, this 4bed/2bath home offers gorgeous mountain views, ample deck space and open concept living. Close proximity to Meadow Park Sports Centre, Alpine Café, & Whistler High School.. $1,749,000

Flexible zoning allows for nightly rental, unrestricted owner use or a mix of both in this furnished, renovated studio that sleeps 4. Steps from Creekside lifts, restaurants, shops and lakes. Highland Annex has low HOA fees and secured storage. $379,000

Maggi Thornhill *prec

Peter Lalor

Suzanne Wilson

Nick Swinburne *prec

31-2230 Eva Lake Road

53-4335 Northlands Boulevard

604-905-8199

604-902-3309

8716 Idylwood Place

110-2109 Whister Rd.

604 966 8454

604-932-8899

WHISTLER VILLAGE

FUNCTION JUNCTION

ALPINE MEADOWS

WHISTLER VILLAGE

Glacier’s Reach (Phase 1) close to vibrant Whistler Village shops + events. 2 bedroom / 2 bathroom features “lock-off” option. Relaxing garden area, underground secured parkade, complex heated pool, hot tub and exercise room $1,029,000 + GST

Landmark building at the gateway to Whistler’s Function Junction with over 9600 SF of commercial retail space. Original anchor tenant since 1995. Sidewalk improvements project underway will lead the Valley Trail to your front door . $4,995,000

Well maintained 5 bdrm home, offers mtn views, media room, hot tub, two fireplaces, and excellent parking in addition to the double garage. Also the large suite is an excellent mortgage helper. $2,695,000

The Whistler Blackcomb is your front yard. Whistler Golf Course is your back yard West facing with great revenues. Owner’s use 56 nights per year. Full website & details at http://863.digitalopenhou.se $525,000

Kathy White

Jody Wright

Laura Wetaski

Ken Achenbach

101 / 101A – 4388 Northlands Blvd

604-616-6933

1005 Alpha Lake Road

8621 Drifter Way

604-935-4680

863-4090 Whistler Way

604 938 3798

604-966-7640

SQUAMISH – NEW TO MARKET

VALLEYCLIFF

BRACKENDALE

SQUAMISH

3 bedroom 2 bath PENTHOUSE suite in the Spectacle building. This is THE BEST unit in the building, 14’ ceilings, white quartz kitchen countertops, & breathtaking SW mountain views!! www.401spectacle.info. $595,000

Immaculate 3 bed townhome in Creekside Estates. Open floor plan. Single car garage with 2 extra parking spots. Easy access to the highway. Close to schools. Fenced back deck with views of green space & creek. $650,000

On apx. 1/4 acre on Dryden Creek you’ll find this 3,150 sf ‘TimberKings’home.Outside:lushgardens,basaltcolumns, sauna cabin, whirlpool spa & workshop. Inside: 3 beds + familygamesroom/4thbed+office,3baths+2-cargarage.A warm&invitingmountainhome!$1,798,000

The perfect family home awaits! ‘Rivers Walk’ Townhouse in Brackendale. Modern 3.5 Bed/ 3 Bath/ 2,350sf. Open concept living featuring 2 living areas. Dbl garage, patio, hot tub & outdoor dining. Greenspace & Mountain views. $799,900

David Wiebe *prec

Angie Vazquez *prec

Katherine Currall

Rachel Edwards

401-40437 Tantalus Road

4-38247 Westway Avenue

604-966-8874

41496 Meadow Ave

778-318-5900

48-40632 Government Road

604-966-1364

Whistler Village Shop

Whistler Creekside Shop

Squamish Station Shop

36-4314 Main Street · Whistler BC V0N 1B4 · Phone +1 604-932-1875

325-2063 Lake Placid Road · Whistler BC V0N 1B2 · Phone +1 604-932-1875

150-1200 Hunter Place · Squamish BC V8B 0G8 · Phone +1 778-733-0611

whistler.evcanada.com

whistler.evcanada.com

whistler.evcanada.com

Engel & Völkers Whistler *PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION ©2018 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage is independently owned and operated. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified.

604-966-4200


7465 Aspen Boulevard

$675,000

Located in the centre of Pemberton with beautiful views of the High School campus and the spectacular back drop of Mt Currie, all of Pemberton’s amenities are only two blocks away. The upper main floor has impressively large living spaces, including 3 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms plus a one bedroom suite on the lower floor.

Patrick Saintsbury

5

604.935.9114

#25 - 2217 Marmot Place

$629,000

Bright corner unit with mountain views make this one-bedroom apartment stand out from the rest. The complex is very well maintained and managed, and the gardens are beautiful. Walking distance to the shops at Creekside and the Gondola to Whistler Mountain, which runs for both summer and winter sports.

Sherry Baker

1

604.932.1315

#3 - 2134 Sarajevo Drive

$545,000

Renovated Gondola Village unit with vaulted ceilings backing onto the forest, and mountain views from the bedroom. Move-in ready, with newer windows and tasteful upgrades to the kitchen, bathroom and bedroom, the new owner can enjoy the unit as a full time residence, weekend getaway, or chic little airbnb cabin.

Richard Grenfell

1

604.902.4260

#22 -2101 Whistler Road

$389,000

#104G4 - 4653 Blackcomb Way

$299,000

This unique townhome style 2 bedroom quarter share in Horstman House offers over 1200 square feet on 2 levels. It features it’s own mud room, open plan living/ dining/kitchen area, 2 full bathrooms and a powder room, 2 spacious bedrooms, and easy access to the pool/hot tub and exercise gym.

Sally Warner*

2

604.905.6326

#203 - 1411 Portage Road

$295,000

Roomy studio townhome walking distance to the Creekside ski lift. This garden level home was redone with new kitchen, bathroom, flooring and cabinetry throughout. Great opportunity for the first time buyer.

Wake up to the warmth of the morning sun at your Mountains Edge home. This complex boasts green living with an R2000 energy rating, with close proximity to Pemberton Village and all it has to offer, including shopping, dining and steps away from the community centre. Strata fees include hot water.

Ted Morden

Ursula Morel*

.5

604.938-3606

1

604.932.8629

Open House Sat/Sun 2 to 5 pm

9096 Corduroy Run Court

$2,999,950

Stunning new contemporary home by Heritage West Homes offering 4600 square feet of living space with a stunning main floor of 3500 square feet and 1100 sq ft finished lower level to accommodate guests and family gatherings. 5 bedrooms and 4.5 bathrooms, a delightful chef’s kitchen with ample sunshine. Easy to show.

Ann Chiasson

4

604.932.7651

9483 Emerald Drive

$2,695,000

#114D - 2020 London Lane

$119,500

Enjoy all of the benefits of luxury condo ownership at the base of Whistler Mountain at a fraction of the cost. This 1 bed/1 bath quarter ownership property in Evolution offers custom finishings, contemporary design & comes fully equipped. Building amenities include: outdoor pool, hot tub, sauna, steam room, games room, exercise room & media room.

Bob Cameron*

1

604.935.2214

8353 Mountain View Drive

$4,950,000

2578 Snowridge Crescent

$6,200,000

Enjoy the views of Whistler Peak and the Dave Murray Downhill from your patio Hot Tub. Picture your family skiing or riding home for lunch. Walking down to Dusty’s or shopping without having to get into your car. In the summer the bike park is right there as well. Fine dining is a short walk, as are the two lakes in the Creekside Area.

Bruce Watt

604.905.0737

#10 - 2400 Cavendish Way

5

$744,900

Looking for a special property? Now offered for sale, is this solid log post and beam Artisan quality chalet set on a private view lot! Large living spaces include four bedrooms, an office, 4.5 baths, media room with Bose surround sound, family room, as well as a piano area. Matterport 3D Showcase: rem.ax/9483emerald

This home features 5 Bedrooms/ 5 Bathrooms plus media/rec room. The Master is made for a king with vaulted ceilings, fireplace, sitting area, walk in closet and gorgeous bathroom. This home was made for entertaining. Open and flowing living and dining space connected to your custom designed kitchen and quality finishings throughout.

This clean and tidy 2 bedroom townhouse in Whiski Jack is ready to move in. The suite has new carpet and fresh paint with plenty of upgrades including granite counter tops, kitchen cabinets, heated floors, new by-fold doors and ceiling fan. With a large secured crawl space under the building, this property is suitable for full time living or a weekend getaway.

Chris Wetaski

Dana Friesen Smith

Dave Beattie*

604.938.2499

4

WHISTLER OFFICE 106 - 7015 Nesters Road, Whistler, BC V8E 0X1 604.932.2300 or Toll Free 1.888.689.0070 *PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

remax-whistler.com awarded best website 2018 by Luxuryrealestate.com

Property Management remaxseatoskypm.com

604.902.3878

5

604.905.8855

2

PEMBERTON OFFICE 1411 Portage Road, Pemberton, BC V0N 2L1 604.894.6616 or Toll Free 1.888.689.0070

Profile for Whistler Publishing

Pique Newsmagazine 2621  

Pique Newsmagazine for May 23, 2019

Pique Newsmagazine 2621  

Pique Newsmagazine for May 23, 2019

Advertisement