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MAY 9, 2019 ISSUE 26.19

WWW.PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM WHO’S

FREE?

16

IRONMAN LEAVING? This may be last year for Whistler, as Penticton courts race

20

READY TO EVACUATE Whistler gets its first look at RMOW’s plan on total evacuation

76

WHALE OF A TALE Said the Whale set to perform with new album in tow


LOVE WHERE YOU LIVE

KEITH MCIVOR

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THIS WEEK IN PIQUE

58

76

40 Saving the spotted owls A unique breeding centre in Langley aims to recover B.C.’s endangered spotted owl population. - By Nicola Jones

16

IRONMAN OVERBOARD?

City of

58

TIMBER TIME

The Axemen Rugby Club captured

Penticton council approves plan to bring back Ironman Canada for 2020,

its first-ever BC Rugby Union Division 3 championship on May 4, capping

which could end its tenure in Whistler a year early.

a dominant season with a 33-3 win over Richmond.

34

70

GROWING PAWS

The Pemberton Animal

MOUNTAIN MAN

Renowned author Geoff Powter

Wellbeing Society (PAWS) can’t keep up with demand and needs to expand.

reflects on his decades of adventure writing ahead of the Whistler Writers

However, being based on Crown land is stalling its efforts.

Festival’s spring reading event called Unpacking the Idea of Home.

36

76

BIGGER FISH TO FRY

Sport fishers—led

WHALE OF A TALE

Said the Whale are

by Whistler conservationist Dave Brown—protest the government’s

spending their spring giving back to B.C.’s young musicians with a school

decision to restrict Chinook fishing in the Fraser River.

tour, a new contest and a music grant. Oh, and they have a new album, too.

COVER Before reading this feature, I will admit I didn’t know anything about the plight of these beautiful birds and now have so much admiration for the team trying to save them. - By Claire Ryan 4 MAY 9, 2019


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THIS WEEK IN PIQUE

Opinion & Columns 08 OPENING REMARKS Whistler was caught by surprise by Ironman’s decision to reach out to

#103 -1390 ALPHA LAKE RD., FUNCTION JUNCTION, WHISTLER, B.C. V8E 0H9. PH: (604) 938-0202 FAX: (604) 938-0201 www.piquenewsmagazine.com

Penticton to host the race as early as 2020, breaking its three-year contract with the resort. Is this good news or bad news?

10 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Submissions range from calling out the federal fisheries ministry

Founding Publishers KATHY & BOB BARNETT Publisher SARAH STROTHER - sstrother@wplpmedia.com

over its decision to stop recreational Chinook fishing to supporting solar-powered barges on our local lakes.

Editor CLARE OGILVIE - edit@piquenewsmagazine.com Assistant Editor ALYSSA NOEL - arts@piquenewsmagazine.com Sales Manager SUSAN HUTCHINSON - shutchinson@wplpmedia.com Production Manager KARL PARTINGTON - kpartington@wplpmedia.com Art Director JON PARRIS - jparris@wplpmedia.com

13 PIQUE’N YER INTEREST Alyssa Noel ponders whether the golden age of the music festival is over.

110

Advertising Representatives AMY ALLEN - aallen@wplpmedia.com TESSA SWEENEY - tsweeney@wplpmedia.com ANTHONY JOYCE - ajoyce@wplpmedia.com

MAXED OUT When local voices are left out of decisions that affect residents the results can

cause problems down the road, as neighbours are learning in Alpine Meadows.

Environment & Adventure

Sales Coordinator EMMA WILKINS - traffic@wplpmedia.com Digital Sales Manager FIONA YU - fiona@glaciermedia.ca Production production@piquenewsmagazine.com CLAIRE RYAN - cryan@wplpmedia.com LOU O’BRIEN - lstevens@wplpmedia.com WHITNEY SOBOOL - wsobool@wplpmedia.com

38 SCIENCE MATTERS David Suzuki explains that while electric vehicles won’t save us from runaway

Arts & Entertainment Editor ALYSSA NOEL arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

39 RANGE ROVER Columnist Leslie Anthony explores the idea of geological history, suggesting we

climate change, they’re part of the solution, along with support for public transit and active transport like waking and cycling.

Sports Editor DAN FALLOON - sports@piquenewsmagazine.com Features Editor BRANDON BARRETT - bbarrett@piquenewsmagazine.com Reporters BRADEN DUPUIS - bdupuis@piquenewsmagazine.com BRANDON BARRETT - bbarrett@piquenewsmagazine.com JOEL BARDE - jbarde@piquenewsmagazine.com MEGAN LALONDE - mlalonde@wplpmedia.com

switch perspectives when considering the land we live on.

48 TRAVEL Writer Virginia Aulin takes us on a bike and barge trip from Avignon to Aigues-Mortes, France. Her trip takes her through forests and tiny towns, vineyards and olive groves.

Classifieds and Reception mail@piquenewsmagazine.com Circulation and Accounts LAURA PRIOR - lprior@wplpmedia.com Office and Accounts Manager HEIDI RODE - hrode@wplpmedia.com I.T. and Webmaster KARL PARTINGTON Contributors G.D. MAXWELL, GLENDA BARTOSH, MICHAEL ALLEN, FEET BANKS, LESLIE ANTHONY, ALLEN BEST, ALISON TAYLOR, VINCE SHULEY, LISA RICHARDSON President, Whistler Publishing LP SARAH STROTHER - sstrother@wplpmedia.com Pique Newsmagazine (a publication of Whistler Publishing Limited Partnership, a division of Glacier Media) distributed to over 130 locations in Whistler and to over 200 locations from Vancouver to D’arcy. The entire contents of Pique Newsmagazine are copyright 2019 by Pique Newsmagazine (a publication of WPLP, a division of Glacier Media). No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the express written permission of the Publisher. In no event shall unsolicited material subject this publication to any claim or fees. Copyright in letters and other (unsolicited) materials submitted and accepted for publication remains with the author but the publisher and its licensees may freely reproduce them in print, electronic or other forms. Letters to the Editor must contain the author’s name, address and daytime telephone number. Maximum length is 250 words. We reserve the right to edit, condense or reject any contribution. Letters reflect the opinion of the writer and not that of Pique Newsmagazine. Pique Newsmagazine is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please contact (edit@ piquenewsmagazine.com). If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the web site at mediacouncil. ca or call toll-free 1-844-877-1163 for additional information. This organization replaces the BC Press council (and any mention of it).

ISSN #1206-2022 Subscriptions: $76.70/yr. within Canada, $136.60/yr. courier within Canada. $605.80/ yr. courier to USA. GST included. GST Reg. #R139517908. Canadian Publications Mail Product Sales Agreement #40016549.

Lifestyle & Arts

66 FORK IN THE ROAD When you consider all the plants—all the grain, the grass, the vegetables that the animals we eat live on—you quickly realize that virtually everything we eat depends on seeds, writes Glenda Bartosh.

68 EPICURIOUS Co-owner Eric Griffith and the rest of the Alta Bistro team are celebrating their first gold medal at the 2019 Vancouver Magazine Restaurant Awards after being named Whistler’s top restaurant.

72 NOTES FROM THE BACK ROW This week, Feet Banks goes after Pokémon—or at least he weighs in on the new film Pokémon Detective Pikachu starring the little furball.

74 MUSEUM MUSINGS George Benjamin really caught candid Whistler in his photographs. The George Benjamin collection consists of 8,236 images from the late 1960s to the early 1980s.

78 PIQUE CAL Before you hit the trails this season, learn how to tune up your ride at the Bike Maintenance Workshop, taking place at the library on Sunday. Also at the library, on Tuesday catch a screening of Black Panther.

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Celebrate the lovely life of beloved

DOREEN WATTS Monday, May 13, 2019, 4-6pm Whistler Conference Centre, Grand Foyer Many have asked what they can do to help in this time, and a GoFundMe has been created to help cover the costs of bringing family members to Whistler to share this time together. Any additional funds collected will be donated to St Paul's hospital's kidney clinic.

LOCATED


OPENING REMARKS

Is it goodbye to Ironman? WHILE THERE WERE definitely gasps of surprise this week when news broke that Ironman was courting Penticton to take back the triathlon, there were also many sighs of relief. This has become one of those love/hate relationships for the resort and the people who live and vacation here. Many have grown tired of the road closures and the rather entitled manner in which the race operates; from the garbage its athletes discard along the way, to the abandonment of supplies, to the cost to taxpayers, it’s an event that doesn’t quite fit the Whistler mould. Penticton, which voted unanimously to

BY CLARE OGILVIE edit@piquenewsmagazine.com

bring back Ironman at its May 7 council meeting, hosted it from 1983 to 2012. That’s not to say that the resort didn’t come out in spades to support it. Thousands of volunteer hours went into making it a success and accommodation providers, retailers and the restaurant industry stepped

33 countries, and the average party size was 4.2 people. The average length of stay was 5.2 nights; and 27 per cent of athletes came on a separate trip to train prior to the race, with an average stay of 4.2 nights. As well, $8.8 million in visitor spending was directly attributable to the event; it provided an $8.2-million boost to the provincial gross domestic product and supported $15.6 million in economic activity across the province. The event also supported 68 Whistlerarea jobs, $3.5 million in wages and salaries, and paid $3 million in taxes across the country. In each of the years it was here until last year, the Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) gave Ironman $250,000 in Resort Municipality Initiative funds—in 2018 it gave $282,000, with the increase due to the fact we paid the organization in U.S. funds. This broke down to: USD$100,000 for the host city fee; US$7,500 for the volunteer director; and contributions toward the traffic management plan, traffic engineers, and race-day operations to the tune of $125,000, and there is also roughly $57,000 worth of municipal services provided partially in kind.

... I, for one, urge caution if we are to usher this partner out the door with nary a “thank you” or “good luck.” up every year to make the participants and their supporters feel welcome and hosted. It also brought economic benefit to Whistler. After the 2017 event, an economic study produced by the Canadian Sport Tourism Association, using its Sports Tourism Economic Assessment Model, found that it had an $11.5-million impact in Whistler, up from $8.4 million in 2013. The study also found that the event drew nearly 12,000 unique attendees from

But if early media reports are to be believed, Whistler was getting a deal. According to the Penticton Herald, the town’s tentative agreement comes with a gross cost to the city of $663,000. It includes a $299,000 cash donation—$150,000 of which is the licensing fee—plus another $110,000 worth of in-kind services, such as space rentals, permits and policing. The Herald points out that an economic study conducted in 2004 estimated the local

annual economic impact of Ironman at $12.5 million. Whistler council is being tight-lipped about the news of the race’s re-location with a meeting slated for Pique’s press day, May 8. It’s not known whether Ironman faces a penalty if it breaks its three-year contract with the resort, which goes until 2020. For many, the jury remains out about what Ironman has done for Whistler. I think there can be little doubt that it put the resort on the map for a whole range of athletes that might not have come here otherwise, with many of them returning for vacations. But it is true that it was held at the height of the summer season, when in all likelihood the resort would have been close to maximum capacity. But I, for one, urge caution if we are to usher this partner out the door with nary a “thank you” or “good luck.” There might be a day in the not-so-distant future when we would love to host a multiday event with thousands of participants. Many respected economists have been predicting a recession as we move into 202021 and not much has happened to change that outlook. Indeed, worsening tensions between China, Canada and the U.S., confusion over Brexit in Europe, and other indicators should be making us cautious—is there a travel recession coming? There are indications that U.S. travellers are becoming more price sensitive with many citing it as the No. 1 concern when booking. Yet airfares and hotels remain expensive, including those right here in Whistler. And competition is fierce for the travel dollar, with new sparkly destinations such as Vietnam and other exotic locations tempting the traveller. In 2008’s recession, we saw more lastminute bookings, less money spent per holiday, and fewer long-haul travellers. Could we be facing these challenges in the next few years? Let’s make sure we keep the lights on for events, conferences and all our other visitors. n

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Something smells fishy Nothing infuriates me more than when a politician claims to be “following the science” and then goes against it—when he/she claims to be fighting for the environment while at the same time cutting funding to the very programs that support it. On Wednesday, May 1, I travelled to North Vancouver along with other Whistler and Squamish residents to attend a protest organized by Whistler local Dave Brown against the recent extensive closures of recreational salmon fisheries in our waters. The turnout was beyond expectations with more than 200 supporters and multiple TV and radio crews in attendance in front of (federal) Fisheries Minister Jonathan Wilkinson’s office. Speakers representing recreational fishermen and women, charter companies and local businesses expressed their support for protecting salmon populations, but their dismay at the lack of science-based decisions and real action in addressing the issues. As a former environmental scientist and a recreational fisherman, it was deeply frustrating to have our Liberal Fisheries Minister ignore his own department’s science and make a decision to completely shut down retention of Chinook salmon on the majority of the South Coast of B.C. until July 31. This decision will do little to protect the early Fraser Chinook populations of concern;

control, habitat protection and rehabilitation, key hatchery enhancement as well as adequate funding for fisheries officers and habitat staff. Attacking recreational anglers under the guise of conservation is a thinly veiled attempt at gaining political favour that inflicts serious harm to the B.C. economy and coastal communities, does not enhance the early Fraser River Chinook salmon stocks and side steps the need to take real and meaningful action. Be very wary when your elected officials claim to be “following the science.” Mark Steffens // Whistler

Bring on the food trucks

Department of Fisheries and Oceans’ (DFO) own DNA data shows recreational anglers catch 0.63 per cent of these Chinook stocks while there are numerous other healthy Chinook populations in our local waters, that should be open to retention. This spring, the Chinook salmon fishing has been nothing short of spectacular prior to this closure. This closure is severely impacting B.C. coastal communities and business—the very people who care deeply about healthy salmon populations. This is a missed opportunity to put in place a concrete, funded plan that

MOBILE

would actually help the Fraser River Chinook populations, rather than (only) giv(ing) the appearance of doing something. Interestingly, the public fishery in B.C. is a $1.1-billion industry and the largest economic contributor of all the fisheries, supporting 9,000 jobs. However, we catch less than 15 per cent of halibut and 10 per cent of salmon coastwide, and less than four per cent of total fish harvested in B.C. I want to see Fisheries Minister Wilkinson put into action a recovery plan for early Fraser Chinook that includes Chinook predator

Thanks to (Pique reporter) Brandon Barrett for spurring the conversation on food trucks in town (Pique’n, May 2). I’m lucky to be able to travel quite a bit for work and many of the cities I go to have a thriving food truck scene. Of course there would be resistance to this in town, and all you have to do is follow the money to see why, but food trucks differ from the dining experience and there is room for both in such a busy place. People are often quick to forget that the success of Whistler and Blackcomb was due to the competition between the mountains when they weren’t owned by the same company. Having more options for food for both residents and visitors would not only lower prices, but would create a culture with “musttry” cuisine that everyone will stop at when word gets out. Think of cheesesteak in Philly,

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 9145 WEDGE CREEK RISE pizza in Chicago, poutine in Montreal, or waffles in Belgium. The food is synonymous with the city, not one particular eatery. The same could happen for Whistler if people had the freedom to be creative with their food offerings and competitive with how they were presented. Steve Andrews // Whistler

A big thanks to the Whistler Kids program Now that the ski season has wrapped up, I wanted to take a moment and acknowledge Whistler Blackcomb’s ski program for children and youth. For greater context, I have history with the program, as a significant part of my own youth was spent in this same program (thank you Vicky Bunbury for your years of tolerance). The program has obviously evolved over the decades since I attended “Ski Scamps” at Creekside, and next season I will be registering our fifth child into what is now the Whistler Kids program. This past season, we had four children active in the program and I would like to convey how impressed I am with every aspect of Whistler Kids. At the end of this season, the progression of my children’s skiing ability and attitude towards skiing (my favourite sport in the world) is nothing less than phenomenal. I am so impressed with how the instructors/ coaches interacted with my children, and how they created an environment (in sometimes extremely difficult conditions) that has helped my children fall in love with skiing. For me, love of the sport is the endgame and developing a love for the sport starts in programs such as Whistler Kids. I can’t really say this any other way … you folks have just nailed it! I want to thank everyone from management to the instructors, coaches and daycare supervisors. You are doing such and fantastic job. Please keep it up. Beau Jarvis // Vancouver

WHA refines eligibility You can work from both sides of an economic issue: supply or demand. There is an axiom among economists: “With the economy you can do whatever you want, but avoid the consequences.” Looks like Whistler Housing Authority decided to work on demand restriction (fewer people on its waiting lists—very good as a political achievement itself but aggravating the never-ending housing issue), instead of a real supply expansion. The former will kick out more residents to the “free” housing market, pushing the actual crisis; the latter would move some residents to the affordable proposed one. Whistler’s housing crisis is due to investors, residents and businesses (big and small) being in an overlapping, unfair competition for the same housing stock. (Plus some greedy landlords, that use that to make their bread and butter from spare rooms and Airbnb their houses during long weekends. It’s so common

to see rental cars and U.S. plates on cars outside of houses just for long weekends while the owner’s car disappears. And they don’t really care about small local businesses and residents struggling for housing.) Very well known, and always good to remember, is the expression, “Think outside the box.” But not so common is “Look out of the box.” It’s happening now in a couple of European tourism-boom destinations where the community is starting to look at tourists and investors as the reason why they can’t live in their own towns anymore. The Resort Municipality of Whistler’s (RMOW) mandate is not to build houses, we’ve heard that a lot of times. But between what we have so far and the RMOW building houses, there could be intermediate solutions to explore. So, let’s think about what the real Whistler housing crisis is about. Then approach it looking for the consequences that you want to achieve for the best of our community. Jorge Ravenna // Whistler

Solar power is the answer A wise man once said, “Be the change you want to see in the world.” With that in mind, I present the solar party barge. There are these amazing electric motors out there. They are GPS, remote controlled, there’s even an app for your iPhone—all you need is a solar panel, a charge controller and a battery or two. Put them all together and you have the drive train of an amazing solar party barge. Free energy from the sun, zero emissions and no noise. There is a certain magic to cruising around the lake with a bunch of family and friends enjoying the beauty of nature knowing that you didn’t burn any oil or gas to do so. It’s possible, it’s easy and it’s cheap to get gas and oil motors off Alta Lake. Despite what you’ve heard most of the floating dock people I know care deeply about the environment and are well respected and upstanding members of our community (Pique, Letters to the Editor, April 25). Please don’t judge us all because of a couple run-down docks out there. Everyone cares about Alta Lake—we want to be good neighbours and have lots of fun in the sun. I think we have an opportunity here, to lead by example, to show Canada and the world how a world-class resort has the best eco-friendly, epic lake life anywhere. Mark Hall // Whistler

Our biggest environmental threat Whistler council’s definition of environmentalism centres on a value system of caring for environmental protection, regardless of whether one actually lives in a way that aligns with those values. This also appears true in Ottawa but that is another letter … on surfing. The true environmentalists are those whose lifestyles are the least carbon-intensive. A great example of this are many locals

Write to us! Letters to the editor must contain the writer’s name, address and a daytime telephone number. Maximum length is 450 words. Pique Newsmagazine reserves the right to edit, condense or refrain from publishing any contribution. Letters reflect the opinion of the writer and not that of Pique Newsmagazine.

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caught in the housing crisis who are unable to find affordable housing and are earning a “three-to-a-room” wage. These true locals use less electricity, have no houses or apartments of their own, drive less, fly less, and purchase less. They don’t fill the elite restaurants, have a private gondola or heli-ski regularly. Yet, even though one’s wealth positively correlates with one’s carbon footprint, the people who live the least carbon-intensive lifestyles are not often hailed as environmentalists. The environmental movement in Whistler, including Whistler’s current council, could benefit from looking to those who are not traditionally seen as environmentalists, but live the most environmentally friendly lifestyles, for guidance and modelling (personal, minus the couch surfing). Studies show wealthy, college-educated people are responsible for double the carbon emissions of low-income people across the developed world and the world’s richest 10 per cent is responsible for more than half of the world’s fossil fuel emissions. In practice, this means that both a Whistler family of four making more than $75,000, and an individual making more than $45,000 fall into this group. We pollute … a lot. Or at least what we get up to every day creates piles and piles of pollution. There is a disconnect between mainstream environmentalists and those actually living sustainably. A good example, sorry Happy Jack, is driving a Suburban. Or maybe flying around the globe for municipal business. The assumption that wealthier people are more likely to be environmentalists is often followed up with the idea that only the rich can afford to be, as they have the time and money to invest in habits, such as buying organic food, purchasing hybrid cars, and participating in expensive ecotourism vacations, whereas poorer people worry about food, paying rent (if they are lucky) and $1.78 fuel. However, mainstream environmentalism has rarely acknowledged those actually living out the values of sustainability as environmentalists. If you cannot afford a car, you take transit. If you can, you should not buy one. If you own two or even three cars, what on Earth are you doing? I am not idealizing couch surfing but rather pointing out that life with excessive wealth and waste should not be the environmental gold standard. One cannot be an environmentalist solely through intent without actually living sustainably. As a municipality this applies. We need to provide just enough for our residents to lift up their lifestyles in a way (that won’t) harm the planet. Survival here on minimum wage is essential to this goal. Somehow, this should be enough. Somehow, it must be enough, if we are to ever save this planet. This “spend it because we get it, raise taxes because everyone else did and grow, grow, grow” mentality of (some) Whistler councillors is simply bad for the planet. Period. Ignoring this also puts this green demographic most at risk from climate change because, as proven in multiple studies, the poor, or the people with sustainable lifestyles, suffer most from climate change. The rich environmentalists will not suffer because they can afford to adapt. Frankly, a wealthy environmentalist does not experience what it actually means to live sustainably, ever. Conversely, the people who lead lives with minimal impact on the

planet have the least say in the mainstream environmental movement. The common misconception that people with less money are worse environmentalists (no hybrid, cheap windows, no e-bike, complain about taxes and gas prices, drive a big, old truck etc.) is extremely harmful. It is what actually allows wealthy environmentalists (insert Whistler homeowner or Whistler councillor) to hide behind environmental values and to disguise the significant environmental harm of their (our … me included) overall lifestyle, and gives little credit or praise to those whose lifestyles and values define the true environmentalist. It would be great if we could avert the climate crisis while continuing to build more and bigger houses, travel more frequently and buy more stuff. But, for those of us living in Whistler with extremely high-carbon lifestyles, we cannot keep building, wanting and having more. The greatest danger to Mother Earth is that modern environmentalists are applauded even when their lives do not contribute to saving her but, in fact, are part of the top threat. Where is our next mayor, who is currently earning minimum wage and who parks and lives in her van wherever she can? And she likes it this way! This individual is a true environmentalist. She can hector me all day. I deserve it. Perri Domm // Whistler

Plant and bake sale success I would once again like to thank our community in Pemberton for its support. The Pemberton Women’s Institute held its annual plant and bake sale at the Legion on Saturday, April 27, and the town came out in full force to buy our goods, both baking and plants, as well as locally grown seed potatoes. We would also like to thank the friends of our group who so graciously donated plants, baking and potatoes for us to sell. As well, thank you to those who stayed to help us with the huge crowd that descended upon us. The leftover seed potatoes are now at Pemberton Valley Nurseries for you to purchase if you missed us. We have a few plants that we will take to the first Farmer’s Market on June 7 as well. Linda Welsh // Pemberton

Walking for a cause The weather again co-operated and the sun shone on all those who participated in the second Whistler Walk for Alzheimer’s on Sunday, May 5, on behalf of the Alzheimer’s Society of B.C. It was wonderful to have the support of the community, which came out to raise much-needed funds to help the many who are touched by dementia. Funds are still coming in and thanks to all our volunteers, and the champions who walked, cheered, and contributed food and auction items. Thank you for all your support and enthusiasm! The total amount is yet to be calculated but at this time we have raised more than $22,000. The Alzheimer’s Society of B.C. appreciates the generosity of the many local business contributions. We are only successful with community support. Erika Durlacher // Walk chair/Whistler n


PIQUE N’ YER INTEREST

The golden age of the music festival is over I WAS SITTING at my desk on a fall day in 2013 when a vague email popped up. But it wasn’t one of the countless irrelevant press releases I delete daily; rather, it alluded to some kind of vague, exciting announcement that would take place the next day in Pemberton.

BY ALYSSA NOEL arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

Rumours started to fly. The most convincing: the Pemberton Music Festival was returning. I wasn’t able to confirm it until I travelled down to the the Meadows at Pemberton golf course hosting the announcement party the next day. Strolling up to the restaurant, a PR person ushered media to a lineup for a helicopter ride. Inside, A.J. Niland, festival producer with Huka Entertainment, which put on the festival, sat in the front seat and guided guests through his vision for the revived festival on the site below. Later, bands played, people drank and food was served all in celebration of what was sure to be a long-lasting and wonderful addition to the summer offerings in Spud Valley. Now, with hindsight, we can say it: womp-womp.

To be fair, for three years before its spectacular 2017 collapse, the festival was really fun. The lineup was top-tier (I have a soft spot for the inaugural year in particular), the scenery was unparalleled, and the crowd was spread out and fairly mellow. But there was also an overdose death, mounds of trash left behind, and disruption that many locals didn’t like. The festival’s cancellation coincided with the growing fentanyl crisis and, to be honest, part of me was relieved,

it was finished in May, and, last week, the much-anticipated Woodstock 50 revealed its investors had pulled out, leaving its fate hanging in the balance. Certainly, there’s something special about gathering with your friends around a stage under the summer sun—with overpriced beer coursing through your veins—and dancing your cares away. And it might be a little sad to think this unique and beloved experience might not be available in the same way to future generations.

...it might be a little sad to think this unique and beloved experience might not be available in the same way to future generations.

considering just how many people take recreational drugs at music festivals. Festival season is officially upon us and, this year, it seems safe to declare that the golden age of the music festival— particularly the large-scale variety that offers on-site camping—is decidedly over. Want further proof? Sasquatch Festival (which I also attended many times) in neighbouring Washington state announced

But, really, is it such a bad thing? The flipside of those massive festivals is downright dirty. At various different festivals I have had my car puked on, hovered over horrendously overfilled porta potties, and picked my way around passedout bodies littered on the grass (often checking to make sure they’re breathing). Let’s also take a moment to reflect on the fact that it is under these circumstances

that Tinder has launched a new “Festival Mode” feature to help people find a festival hook up. #Romantic, right? All those things that seem manageable in your early 20s certainly lose their charm when you start marching through your 30s. Instead, it seems, some new festivals are moving in a different direction. For one, instead of blowing the budget on big-name headliners, they’re looking local and spending within their means. While, admittedly, I did not have high hopes that the inaugural Squamish Constellation Festival would offer much of a compelling lineup, I think organizers hit the right mark with well-regarded, accessible Canadian headliners such as Bahamas, Serena Ryder, Shad and Wintersleep. It’s unlikely to draw many people from Washington and Alberta the way the Pemberton Music Festival did, but it’s solid enough for locals and music fans from the Lower Mainland to purchase a pass. Another under-utilized format that just might be the future of festivals is the Sled Island or SXSW model where the festival takes place in a city and rather than a central location for all the shows, festival-goers jet around town to different bars and venues. It means smaller acts get better billing, bigger acts get intimate shows, and everyone goes home (or to a hotel) to defecate in their own clean toilets. Sounds pretty good to me. ■

MAY 9, 2019

13


FIRST PIQUE Home Auto Life Investments Group Business Farm Travel

Ironman on Whistler, according to a 2017 study

OUR ONLINE CONVERSATION Several stories on our social media captured users’ attention this week, including the police impoundment of a $462,000 car on the Sea to Sky Highway for speeding, local government’s new emergency evacuation plan and the death of Lorne Borgal. But it was information out of Penticton that Ironman was hoping to move back there and pull out of Whistler a year early that captured many. Said one commentator,

… Penticton thought they would be better off without because it’s an inconvenience for a weekend. They realized how much it did for tourism. Haters going (to) hate but I think it’s time people consider what Ironman does bring … lots of fit people who are likely to come back for a ski holiday or summer vacation.

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But many commentators said they wouldn’t mind if the race left the resort.

Not all products available in all provinces

We have outgrown this event and it does little for the town except frustrate all the other guests impacted,

said one commenter on Pique’s Facebook page, while another said, “There are a lot of great economic benefits to Ironman. That will be a loss in many ways, but in peak busy summer months is it this really necessary anymore?”

OF INTEREST

$

2,000 The amount the Village of Pemberton gives to support its local animal shelter, the Pemberton Animal Wellbeing Society (PAWS)

27% The percentage of athletes that came on a separate trip to train in Whistler prior to the Ironman race, with an average stay of 4.2 nights

DID YOU KNOW?

The Whistler Museum’s archive houses many documents, printed material, films, oral histories and photographs from Whistler’s rich cultural past. The George Benjamin collection consists of 8,236 images from the late 1960s to the early 1980s, and photos in the collection include images of early Whistler Mountain Ski Patrol, Soo Valley Toad Hall, Gelandesprung ski jump competitions, summer days spent at many of Whistler’s lakes, parties, and everyday shots of living and working in Whistler. This might be the most candid representation of Whistler during this era in the collection.  

THROWBACK THURSDAY

In this 2009 edition, now-Pique columnist Glenda Bartosh gave us an inside glimpse of what it’s like to run for city council—she ran in 2005 and again in 2008 in White Rock. “How is it that people draw a line in the sand, with politicians suspected of all things nefarious, hypocritical and sociopathic on one side and all decent, ordinary, honest, folks on the other?” asked Bartosh. “How did we move from regarding politics as the art and science of government, to politics as activities aimed at improving status or position that are devious or divisive?” n A playoff run

Metric wows WSSF

P. 30

P. 63

Bluegrass in Brack P. 66

FREE TO RUN

20

hours

My life in crime… er, I mean politics A peek behind the signs of an election

The longest predicted evacuation time to get everyone out of Whistler in an emergency

11.5M The economic impact of

14 MAY 9, 2019

16.18

$

April 30, 2009

|

WHISTLER’S WEEKLY NEWSMAGAZINE |

www.piquenewsmagazine.com


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NEWS WHISTLER

Ironman Canada leaving Whistler? CITY OF PENTICTON GIVES GO-AHEAD TO WOO IRONMAN CANADA FOR 2020

BY DAN FALLOON WHISTLER MAY HOLD its final edition of Ironman Canada in July. The City of Penticton council voted at its meeting on May 7 to allow staff to pursue an agreement with Ironman and bring the race back to the Okanagan with a five-year deal beginning in 2020. It is unclear at this moment what Whistler’s future with the event is, given that Ironman, the Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) and Tourism Whistler (TW) signed a contract extension in 2017 to keep the race in the resort until 2020, meaning a new deal with Penticton would encroach on that agreement. “The current contract to host the Subaru IRONMAN Canada and Subaru IRONMAN 70.3 Canada triathlons in Whistler spans 2018-2020,” an RMOW spokesperson wrote in an email on May 3, the date the City of Penticton revealed its triathlon strategy. “Details beyond 2020 have not been confirmed, and discussions are underway.”

RUNNING BACK TO THE OKANAGAN City of

Penticton council voted on May 7 to pursue bringing back Ironman Canada for a five-year contract beginning in 2020, which would mean the race would leave Whistler a year early. FILE PHOTO BY DAN FALLOON

16 MAY 9, 2019

Added a Tourism Whistler spokesperson via email on May 6: “Whistler’s current contract with IRONMAN spans through to 2020. What happens after that has not yet been confirmed.” It is unclear what penalties, if any, would be applicable if Ironman leaves the contract early. The RMOW did not share the contract with Pique at the time of renewal in 2017.

“City staff have been in discussions with IRONMAN over the past few months regarding the potential return of the full distance race to Penticton in 2020,” Kozak wrote in her report to council. “Previously bound by a Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA), City staff were tight lipped about their meetings with IRONMAN and were unable to provide information or updates to residents or the media until now.

“We need to bring this event back to the community” - JOHN VASSILAKI

In a follow-up email, a different spokesperson said the RMOW is unable to comment on third-party contracts. On May 3, the City of Penticton released its Committee of the Whole agenda with a presentation from Dave Christen, Ironman’s regional director for the Northwestern U.S. and Western Canada, and a council agenda with a presentation on its triathlon strategy from director of recreation and facilities Bregje Kozak. The presentation included staff recommendations to try to bring the race back to the city where it ran from 1983 to 2012.

“Staff proceeded with their due diligence including two face-to-face meetings with an IRONMAN representative in Penticton, and explored the total cash and in-kind commitments that would be required to bring IRONMAN back to Penticton.” Ironman Canada race director Christine Cogger referred comment to Christen, who did not respond to phone calls or emails. Christen’s only mention of the Whistler race was to highlight the $8.8 million in visitor spending during the 2017 event. He did not comment on the race’s future in his presentation to council during the

committee of the whole meeting, nor did Penticton council ask him about ending the relationship with Whistler before the contract was up. Later in the day, Penticton council voted unanimously to continue to negotiate a five-year contract with Ironman. “We need to bring this event back to the community,” Penticton Mayor John Vassilaki said. He called the outlay required of taxpayers, more than $400,000, “smart money.” A large crowd packed into council chambers broke into applause and cheers when the unanimous vote passed. According to Christen’s projections, bringing Ironman Canada back to Penticton would draw 2,500 athletes and 10,000 total visitors. Councillor Judy Sentes and Vassilaki were both on council when Penticton changed course from Ironman and opted to pursue agreements with other race hosts in 2012. However, since then, Ironman has grown while the other races in Penticton fizzled in comparison. “At that time it was the right thing to do in the circumstances,” Vassilaki said. “But you know, times change and we have to change with the times.” During Ironman’s run in Whistler, the RMOW has contributed between $250,000 and $282,000 annually in Resort Municipality Initiative funding. - with files from Castanet n


NEWS WHISTLER

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FORMER WHISTLER CEO DIES IN ‘TRAGIC’ PLANE CRASH

BY BRADEN DUPUIS EVEN THOUGH HUGH SMYTHE had his hands full in the lead up to the opening of Blackcomb Mountain in 1980, there was something about Lorne Borgal that Smythe knew was worth waiting for. Borgal—who died in a plane crash north of Smithers on May 4, along with two others—had interviewed for an administration position with the upstart mountain, but couldn’t start until he finished his MBA at Stanford University five months later, Smythe recalled. “We were trying to staff up on our side, and really needed some people around, but I thought, ‘You know what? Lorne is the right guy. I can probably hang on for five months until he gets here,’” Smythe said. It wasn’t as if Borgal was coming with a huge background in ski-area management, either. “What I was interested in was his academics that he had, that could be really helpful to us in marketing, the finance side, leadership, human resources and that,” Smythe said. “And I was really impressed with his personality—he was a positive, upbeat, articulate guy, and you don’t get into Stanford unless you’ve got a lot of smarts. “He seemed like a good fit for us.” The decision would prove consequential not only for Blackcomb, but for the Whistler resort as a whole. With Blackcomb, Borgal was something of a jack-of-all-trades, taking on marketing, sales and accounting, as well as launching the various businesses associated with the mountain. “When you’re developing a project the size of starting Blackcomb up from scratch … it’s a major job, and it takes a team to do all that,” Smythe said. “But I would say that Lorne was a major contributor, a very important part of that team in those early years.” In 1983, Borgal jumped ship, taking on the role of CEO of the Whistler Mountain Ski Corporation—but there were few hard feelings from Smythe. “He did an awesome job (at Blackcomb), and it was a major compliment to his reputation that he had gained, and what he had learned and everything at Blackcomb, to go over and take over the role of CEO of Whistler,” he said. “And to some degree, it upped the game even more.” When Borgal arrived at Whistler Mountain, he wasted little time making changes—partially in response to the competition from his now-former employer. In response to Blackcomb installing a T-bar up to 7th Heaven, Borgal oversaw the

installation of the Peak Chair on Whistler Mountain in 1986 (which is where Highway 86 gets its name). “And 1987, Blackcomb put in the Wizard and Solar (Chairs), so that really changed things,” said longtime Whistler ski patroller Cathy Jewett, who described those days as the “era of Coke and Pepsi.” “They would keep doing amazing things and we would have to do something more amazing, and so Lorne had this audacious idea of putting (the Whistler Village Gondola) in … We now have one of, if not the largest continuous system of gondolas now with the Blackcomb Gondola.” Borgal would also host weekly meetings for staff with beer and snacks, in which he would roll out maps of the mountain and ask for the opinions of his employees, Jewett said. “It was a really exciting time to be here, and what was so great about that time was the leaders that we had like Lorne, like Hugh, where we had access to the decision makers, and they listened,” she said. Borgal worked for Whistler Mountain until 1989, when he left the resort, but his name lives on in the alpine to this day—Whistler’s Bagel Bowl is so named for Borgal’s playful nickname, “the Lone Bagel.” Smythe said he lost track of Borgal around the time he left the resort, only starting to see more of him in recent years. The pair caught up over lunch at the Roundhouse less than two months ago, where Borgal excitedly told Smythe all about his new aerial mapping company, Precision Vectors Aerial Inc. “We had a lot of fun together in those early pioneering years at Blackcomb, and he was a big contributor,” Smythe said. “It’s such a tragic loss.” Andy Watson, the spokesman for the BC Coroners Service, said in a statement that the service is investigating the death of the pilot and two passengers after the Cessna 182 went down on Saturday, May 4. A fourth person who was on the plane survived the crash and was taken to a Vancouver hospital, Watson said. Transportation Safety Board spokeswoman Sophie Wistaff said a team of investigators will be gathering information and evidence looking into what may have caused the crash. The Joint Rescue Coordination Centre said it received a transmission from the plane’s emergency locator Saturday morning, prompting a search about 100 kilometres northeast of Smithers. When the site was found, a rescue technician was lowered by cable from a helicopter to check for survivors and the operation was turned over to police. -with files from The Canadian Press n

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NEWS WHISTLER

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Whistler exactly a month, and like a lot of recent resort arrivals, there are certain things he misses from back home: The food, the culture, his pet cat, named Tiger. But, when you’ve been given a second chance at life, those creature comforts tend to feel a little less important than they used to. “The only thing I really miss is my family. The food and the culture, you can live without,” said Yasen. “I know it’s very hard to live here, it’s very expensive— everything is expensive, but for me, it’s peaceful. I don’t care about anything but to feel safe. It’s something you cannot appreciate until you live it.” The 34-year-old Syrian is one of eight refugees in Whistler that have been sponsored by resident Laurie Cooper. (Whistler’s first settled refugees, a Syrian family of five, arrived here in 2016 and were sponsored by the Whistler Refugee Response Group.) A luxury B.C. resort town nestled into the mountains might as well be another planet when compared to war-torn Syria and Afghanistan, where each of the men hail from, but it’s been an unlikely haven so far, something that caught even Cooper by surprise. “I never ever expected the level of success that we’ve experienced. I didn’t anticipate that it would work this well,” she said. A former journalist who was inspired to do her part after volunteering at a crowded refugee camp in Greece, Cooper approached her former employer, the Fairmont Chateau Whistler, more than two years ago to discuss the possibility of securing jobs and accommodation for the refugees. The Fairmont agreed, and today, five of the eight men work in housekeeping at the hotel, with opportunities for advancement. “We’ve been really delighted with the program and the guys’ level of dedication to the work and getting on with their life and really building something different for themselves,” said Fairmont GM Norm Mastalir. (The other men work at Whistler Blackcomb, the Green Lake Station in Rainbow, and in the case of Hassan Al Kontar, who made international news last fall after being stranded in a Malaysian airport for months, he plans to move to Vancouver this week to continue his refugee advocacy work.) Having the security of a paying job and a place to live has been invaluable to the refugees, but it’s the international

makeup of the hotel’s staff housing—and the resort itself—that has helped them adjust to life here. “My roommates actually are so nice, so two are from England, one is from India, and all of them are working in Fairmont, so I don’t seem like I’m a stranger,” said 30-year-old Murhaf Ghaibour, who, like Yasen, spent years after fleeing Syria living as an outsider in Lebanon, sometimes illegally, while awaiting resettlement. “Now I’m living in the staff housing, so everyone came from some place else, so I didn’t feel like—how to say?—like I’m in special conditions. I just feel like I’m like everyone here.” Aside from the welcome the community has given them, the refugees’ relatively smooth transition can be attributed to Cooper herself. Along with organizing the men’s settlement, she has helped raise the funds and in-kind support required by Ottawa to sponsor a refugee, alongside the B.C. Muslim Association and a generous donor from California, a Syrian-American dentist who cut Cooper a cheque for $24,000. But it’s the sense of family she has fostered that has made the refugees feel so at home in a place they would never have been able to find on a map before arriving here.

“The only thing I really miss is my family.” - AHMAD FADEL YASEN

“It’s a weird connection between a mom and a son. I feel the same connection. It’s like mom, a spiritual mom. I don’t know how to explain it,” said Yasen. “When I need anything, when I feel lonely, when I feel any bad feelings, I just call her.” Cooper’s work is far from done, however. She has been approached by two other B.C. hotels about hiring refugees, and is now pushing to bring another 10 refugees from persecuted Afghani ethnic group, the Hazara, to Whistler. It’s all part of a tireless effort that Cooper and her “sons of the heart,” as she calls the men, hope will shift the public’s perception of what a refugee is. “If I consider myself as a Canadian or from Whistler and I hear (the word) ‘refugee,’ of course I’m going to have this idea of weak people who need help. But, actually, it’s not like that,” said Ghaibour. “I would like (people) to see me as an individual, as me.” n


NEWS WHISTLER

How to evacuate Whistler MULTIMODAL EVACUATION PLAN HEADS TO COUNCIL MAY 14 “all-hazard” plan, Marriner said, that can be used for any emergency—wildfire, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, hazardous material spills or even terrorist attacks. The MEP was developed by a steering committee consisting of the RMOW, District of Squamish, Village of Pemberton, Squamish-Lillooet Regional District, Whistler Transit, Squamish and Lil’wat nations, BC Ferries, Squamish Terminals, BC Wildfire Service, RCMP, Ministry of Transportation, Canadian Red Cross, BC Transit and Emergency Management BC.

BY BRADEN DUPUIS WHISTLER’S EVACUATION plan is headed to council after a presentation to the Emergency Preparedness Committee (EPC) on May 2. The plan—a joint venture (and 50/50 cost share) with the District of Squamish—lays out in detail how the Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) will evacuate the entire community in an emergency. The RMOW has had a “fairly robust” evacuation plan since 2014, said emergency planning coordinator Erin Marriner in a presentation to the EPC, but that plan didn’t actually look at evacuating all of Whistler. “Interestingly, when we reviewed our hazards at that time, we didn’t feel there was one that would cause a mass evacuation,” Marriner said. “And just the evolution over the last five years with the evacuations that have happened and the increasing hazards, when we reevaluated it, it was something we really felt that we need, and this committee was really the driving force behind that.” The Sea to Sky Multimodal Evacuation Plan (MEP), as it’s formally called, is an

MOVING TARGETS

FLIGHT PLAN Emergency program coordinator Erin Marriner presents to Whistler’s Emergency Preparedness Committee on May 2.

When trying to plan for the total evacuation of a resort community as bustling as Whistler, you’re going to be dealing with some moving targets in terms of population. As such, the MEP put added focus on understanding Whistler’s demographics— and found a lot of questions to be answered. “What we wanted to know is what is the maximum number of people that might need to evacuate, the maximum number of vehicles that would need to be on the highway, the potential demand for transit—

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NEWS WHISTLER << FROM PAGE 20 so how many people don’t have vehicles?” Marriner said. “Where will people need to go once evacuated? … How many people may require assistance to evacuate, so people with disabilities, or people that cannot evacuate on their own, and how many people may require shelter?” The RMOW ended up with three “design scenarios”: a peak winter day, a peak summer day, and an “average population equivalent” day. On a peak winter day, the total estimated number of evacuees is 53,480, with potential for 21,876 vehicles (90 per cent of which would be headed south). The estimated number of carless evacuees is 17,030, while 7,206 people may require lodging, and 267 may require assistance evacuating. On a peak summer day, the total estimated number of evacuees is 48,859 with potential for 21,065 vehicles (90 per cent of which would be headed south). The estimated number of carless evacuees is 8,442, while 5,221 people may require lodging and 244 may require assistance evacuating. On an average day, the estimated total number of evacuees is 33,361, with the potential number of vehicles to be 12,700 (90 per cent south). While the MEP will utilize all forms of transportation in evacuating Whistler—

road, air, marine and rail—the RMOW focused on Highway 99 for its in-depth analysis. “This is the mode we know most people are going to use to evacuate, whether to the north or south,” Marriner said, adding that ISL Engineering completed a detailed analysis of the highway using evacuation modelling. “So actually taking the number of cars in each neighbourhood, for different scenarios, and each car going onto the highway, and what that looks like, what our constraints are.” ISL’s analysis found Highway 99 to have a conservative lane capacity of 1,650 per hour, both north and south.

SEVEN SCENARIOS Out of seven scenarios examined in the MEP, the longest total evacuation time is estimated to be about 20 hours (a phased evacuation on a peak summer day—think Crankworx). “A no-notice evacuation on the same day … where people just start to go, would take approximately 15 hours,” Marriner said. “Implementing traffic control at stopcontrolled intersections, so any intersection that doesn’t have a stoplight on the highway, reduces it to about 12.5 hours.” Without traffic control, it could take up to 14 hours to clear a specific neighbourhood, Marriner added.

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“Basically, this informed us that there’s certain intersections that we absolutely need traffic controllers at, and that’s in the operational plan as one of the first steps,” she said. A no-notice evacuation on a peak summer day with Highway 99 converted to two lanes southbound will bring the evacuation time down even further, to about 10 hours. A phased evacuation on an average day will take about 13 hours. “While it takes a lot longer … a phased evacuation is a lot more comfortable for the actual individual travellers in terms of how long they spend on the highway, and as we know with traffic, once you start to see traffic you see more events like medical emergencies, people running out of gas,” Marriner said. Keeping the highway moving will be key, she added.

KNOW YOUR ZONE The MEP divides Whistler into 29 evacuation zones, and a big piece of the RMOW’s public education strategy will be to “Know Your Zone” in the event of an evacuation. “In most cases, we won’t be just issuing an evacuation order for the whole community, it will be for specific areas,” Marriner said. To keep things simple, the various zones are based on Whistler’s neighbourhoods. Complementing the zones are

six central muster points: At the first entrance to Emerald, Meadow Park Sports Centre, Rainbow Park, Gateway Loop, Creekside Parking Lot and the Whistler Interpretive Forest. “If we had a lot of advance notice, and a wildfire was kind of approaching and we were monitoring, most likely what we would do is have transit buses run their regular routes and pick up people at their transit stops, that didn’t have transportation, bring them to somewhere like the Gateway Loop, and bus them out using coaches and the local transit,” Marriner said. “We designed it so that hopefully nobody has to walk more than two kilometres to a central muster point. Ideally, people are able to get a transit bus close to their house, the one they usually take, but if it’s something that’s unfolding really fast, you just go to your closest muster point and a bus will take you out of town.” When it comes to managing traffic during an evacuation, there are a number of tools in the “toolbox,” Marriner said: lane reconfiguration on Highway 99 (implementing two southbound lanes from Lorimer Road to Depot Road in Squamish— ISL is currently writing a full traffic management strategy for this scenario); traffic control at intersections (which would likely happen right away); changes to traffic light times and more.

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NEWS WHISTLER << FROM PAGE 22 “We (also) looked at detours, road closures and controlling access,” Marriner said. “So if we were evacuating everybody from Whistler we would be closing the road into Whistler probably at Squamish somewhere, and just allowing specific resources to come through.”

MAKING THE CALL

have and the scale of the evacuation, but that’s another tool, as well as a public address system—so actually going through neighbourhoods with sirens on and loudspeakers.” In addition, the RMOW is developing a tool for its website to help people create an emergency plan based on their specific scenarios, as well as a mass notification system that residents and second homeowners can opt in to for updates.

“The decision sort of makes itself almost ... it’s not something that I think we should be ‘gutinstincting’—whether we want to evacuate or whether we don’t.” - MIKE FUREY

social media, via radio and TV broadcasts, through briefings with local media and more. “In an evacuation, ideally we’re issuing evacuation alerts and orders door to door,” Marriner said. “It depends on how much time we

N O W

O PE N

In determining the timeline to evacuate, the RMOW will consider the various scenarios modeled in the MEP along with a specific formula: [total number of vehicles (vehicles + buses) x 90 per cent (the percentage expected to go south)] divided by the number of vehicles per hour the highway can accommodate (one outbound lane = 1,650, two outbound lanes = 1,850). “Then that would give us (an idea of) how long we think it will take us to physically evacuate ... we need to start thinking (ahead) so that we’re ordering buses and planes and things from the province and whatever we need 120 hours ahead rather than 12 hours ahead,” Marriner said. “And we may not actually pull the trigger on moving them up here, but the more heads up we can give all of our partners and people that we’re going to get resources from, the more likely we’re ready to go when we actually need to pull the trigger.” The recommendation to evacuate will

come from a different agency depending on the emergency, Marriner added, and an operational flowchart will help determine when the RMOW needs to make the order itself (is there an immediate threat to public safety? How far is the threat? Is there time to issue an evacuation order and clear the area before people are hurt?). Once the order has been made, the public will be notified in many different ways: through the RMOW’s website and

KEY MESSAGES FOR THE PUBLIC From the view of Mike Furey, Chief Administrative Officer with the RMOW, the plan is “an amazing piece of work” by everyone involved. “That’s one of the best policy and

research documents that I’ve seen,” he said after the presentation, praising the plan’s focus on evidence-based decisionmaking and its formula for traffic management in particular. “The decision sort of makes itself almost … it’s not something that I think we should be ‘gut-instincting’—whether we want to evacuate or whether we don’t,” he said. “(But) I think the residents and the visitors … they sort of need to own this plan.” Some key messages for the public: Have an emergency plan and kit, and stay informed as best you can. Know your evacuation zone and the location of the closest central muster point. In an evacuation, follow the instructions of emergency officials. If you have a car, keep your fuel tank topped up to at least half. If you don’t, plan ahead for a ride. If you have a pet and no car, ensure you have a case to carry it in. Residents will have plenty of opportunity to familiarize themselves with the plan, as it will be heavily publicized in the coming weeks: at council on May 14, as well as in subsequent social media and public mail out campaigns and a community presentation on Thursday, June 18 (6 p.m. at the Whistler Public Library). There will also be workshops for individuals, businesses and other organizations. Head to www.whistler.ca/emergency for more. n

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NEWS WHISTLER

Goldsmith-Jones won’t seek re-election CONSERVATIVE PARTY NAMES ITS SEA TO SKY CANDIDATE

BY BRADEN DUPUIS PAMELA GOLDSMITH-JONES, MP for the West Vancouver-Sunshine CoastSea to Sky Country riding, will not seek re-election in October’s federal vote. The announcement came in a press release on May 8 (just before Pique’s weekly press deadline). “Serving as your MP and representing Canada on world issues has been a distinct honour. However, when I look forward to the next four years, I feel that I need to spend time closer to home, particularly with my parents,” Goldsmith-Jones said in the release. Goldsmith-Jones, who was first elected in 2015, said she believes in Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the Liberal team. “Going into the next election, I will do all I can to help ensure we have an outstanding candidate and that the Liberal Party continues to have a strong voice in Western Canada.” Meanwhile, the Conservative Party of Canada (CPC) has confirmed its candidate for the West Vancouver-Sunshine Coast-Sea to Sky Country riding ahead of October’s federal election.

Gabrielle Loren—a longtime accountant and entrepreneur in West Vancouver—won the nomination over one other nominee on Sunday, May 5. As someone with no prior political experience, Loren is looking at her campaign with an open mind and taking a “common sense” approach. “I think there’s a feeling … not just in our riding, but in the country, that people are sick and tired of career politicians, and they’re just going, ‘like, come on people, use some common sense,’” she said, when reached by phone on May 7. “And that’s exactly what I want to do.” Having never been a card-carrying member of a political party before, Loren said the CPC was the party that most closely aligned with her views on the economy. “I kind of went at it on the basis of, OK, so I just have to push them a little bit more on the environment. We are West Coast here, right?” she said with a laugh. “So there’s little things like that I’m sure I’m going to butt heads with, but I just look at it as, if you just keep your head on straight, you think common sense and you do what your gut and your ethics and morals say you should do, you should be able to do something when it comes to making sure that everyone is represented well.”

Though she lived in West Vancouver from 1966 to 2018, Loren and her husband now reside in North Vancouver (candidates do not have to live in the riding where they are seeking election). Loren said she makes it up to Whistler three or four times a year, most recently to teach tax courses to realtors and to

“ ... I feel that I need to spend time closer to home ... ” - PAMELA GOLDSMITH-JONES

mark her firm’s (Loren Nancke Chartered Professional Accountants) “end-of-taxseason” party. Even with her limited time in the resort, she’s identified two key issues ahead of the 2019 vote: housing and staffing. As for how she’ll advocate for Whistler voters on those issues, or the other priorities she’ll be focusing on in her platform, Loren is the first to admit she has some legwork to

do before the campaign begins in earnest. “I need to get myself up on what is even possible. I’ve got a lot of ideas percolating in my head, but I don’t know if they’re even realistic,” she said. “What I think is really important, is that whoever the MP is, they have to think outside the box. They can’t be the person that just follows blindly.” At this point in the process, it’s all about listening, Loren added. “It’s one of those things where I don’t know what I don’t know at this point … I’m so green, and I admit I’m so green,” she said. “I am willing to listen to anyone, but I have to filter out all the good and the bad and the ugly … which is the right way to do things? What is it that I’m even able to do?” With Goldsmith-Jones’ announcement, Loren becomes the only confirmed candidate in the Sea to Sky ahead of the Oct. 21 election (a representative with the Sea to Sky NDP said its annual general meeting will be held in three to four weeks. A rep with the Green Party did not respond to queries about its candidate before Pique’s deadline). Find more at www.gabrielleloren.ca. Loren can be reached by email at info@ gabrielleloren.ca. n

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NEWS WHISTLER

Playground incident prompts policy change at Spring Creek CELL PHONES ‘TO BE AWAY FROM STUDENTS’ DURING SCHOOL HOURS

BY BRADEN DUPUIS THOUGH A RECENT INCIDENT at Spring Creek Community School prompted emails home to parents, administrators with the Sea to Sky School District (SD48) are looking at it as a learning opportunity. The incident allegedly involved a large group of students chanting obscenities at a playground supervisor (some students filmed the incident and later posted it to social media)—though administrators declined to discuss the details. “We do kind of just look at things from that 30,000-foot level,” said director of instruction Phillip Clarke. “When our students make poor choices, or when they kind of behave in a developmental way with their decisionmaking part of their brains, how we wrap around and support students and staff in those scenarios (is) through the sort of practice of taking responsibility for their actions, and repairing harm if any harm is done.” While Clarke couldn’t confirm how many

students were involved or any specifics about the incident, he said it’s a learning moment for everyone involved. “We do know—especially in the developing brains of teenagers—that oftentimes they feed off of each other, and make decisions that they would otherwise not make when they are by themselves,” he said. “These are always learning moments for schools to reflect on how we expect our students to hold themselves, and also how to navigate tricky situations when you know you should be behaving a certain way but your peer group is behaving another way. “So there’s a lot of really positive dialogue that comes from when we have ‘trickies’ here and there at school.” Tracy Higgs, chair of the Spring Creek Parent Advisory Council, said she had heard about the incident secondhand from her own children. “As parents, we tried to turn it into a learning experience for our kids on how easy it is to join the crowd without really questioning in your mind what is really going on and to think for yourself instead

of getting caught up in the energy,” Higgs wrote in an email. After the incident, Spring Creek principal Stuart Bent wrote to parents explaining that he was conducting a review of the events, as well as the misuse of cell phones. In a follow-up email, he explained that moving forward, cell phones “are to be away from students” during school hours. Though SD48 has a district-wide code of conduct that outlines general expectations of behaviour for kids (which covers the use of cell phones), it’s up to individual schools to set policy around their use, said assistant superintendent Chris Nicholson. “We fully support technology as a tool for amplifying learning, and we would not be in a position to do a blanket ban. We think it’s much more important to teach kids responsibility,” Nicholson said. “They will be using these devices, as we all are in our lives, and one of our main roles, of course, is to prepare our kids to be contributing members of society for the future, so that would include responsible use of technology,

including cell phones.” If a school were to ban cell phones, it would never be in isolation, and never as a knee-jerk reaction, he added. A second incident at Spring Creek, less than a week later, involved a rag that was stuffed in the exhaust pipe of a school bus that eventually caught fire (students were removed from the bus and the fire was put out without anyone getting hurt). The events at Spring Creek come on the heels of news last month that Whistler Secondary School was broken into and vandalized (see Pique, April 3)—but district administrators aren’t concerned it’s a growing trend. “To be honest with you, kids today are making better and healthier choices than they have in any generation before,” Clarke said, pointing to the 85 students who participated in a 24-hour drum event in March as just one example. “There is just more awareness of when they do make mistakes, but we are always working with them to (make better choices) and to not make those same mistakes twice.” n

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NEWS WHISTLER

Neighbourhood calls for parking restrictions RMOW LOOKING AT OPTIONS, BUT WON’T GIVE TIMELINE FOR EXPECTED CHANGES

BY JOEL BARDE RESIDENTS OF ALPINE Meadow’s Mountainview Drive say they don’t want this summer to be like the last and are looking to the Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) to implement measures to stop illegal parking on their street before hiking- and mountainbiking season kicks into high gear—but it’s unclear if they will see changes anytime soon. As reported by Pique last year (“Some Mountainview Drive residents upset over illegal parking,” Sept. 30, 2018), Mountainview Drive has seen a significant increase in cars parking on the street thanks to the RMOW’s alpine trail network, a vast offering of alpine trails that opened in summer 2017. One of the entrances to the trails is at the far end of the cul-de-sac at the sumit of Mountainview Drive. Neighbourhood residents said it is now common to find hikers and bikers parked on both sides of Mountainview Drive (in contravention of Whistler bylaws) on busy days. Neighbours spoke out last year after the RMOW installed a porta-potty at the end of the cul-de-sac. (It is unclear whether or not the municipality will be bringing it back this summer.)

Mountainview resident Janet Hart is calling for the trailhead to be closed altogether, adding that the principal concern of residents is fire safety. “If there is a fire at the end of our cul-desac” and people are parked on both sides of the street, then “how does somebody get up there?” asked Hart. Residents are looking for some immediate measures to alleviate the problems, she said, explaining that residents would like the RMOW to replicate the “Lost Lake solution.” The area surrounding the popular lake had significant issues with illegal parking until the RMOW instituted a number of measures, including establishing towaway zones, installing better signage, and ramping up enforcement, said Hart. “I don’t think we need to reinvent the wheel,” she said. “We think this would be a pretty simple (approach).” Hart is not the designated spokesperson for the residents and added that some want Mountainview Drive to move to residentsonly parking. Last month, a group of about 25 people from the neighbourhood met with RMOW staff, said Hart, adding that she understands that the RMOW needs to be strategic. “In fairness to the muni, they have a lot of balls in the air, and I know they have to

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(take) an integrated approach,” she said. “I understand where they are coming from— as do our neighbours.” That said, the neighbours feel that signage is “a pretty simple solution” to implement quickly, said Hart. Backcountry access is an issue across the corridor, said Mayor Jack Crompton, adding he is interested in “long-term coordinated solutions.” “Staff are taking all issues raised into serious consideration, including moving the trailhead and whether to have portable washrooms on site. Staff will be reporting back in the coming weeks,” he said. Crompton did not give a definitive timeline for when any measures could be expected, saying that it is important to look at the system as a whole. “I think the most important piece of this is our Recreation Trails Strategy,” he said, of the forthcoming RMOW project that will establish policies to address management and access issues related to the alpine trail network. “We want long-term sustainable solutions for these challenges. I am not in favour of reactionary planning.” According to the RMOW, the Recreation Trails Strategy is expected to be launched later this year and the project is expected to take a year to complete.

RMOW staff has a wealth of experience to draw from when it comes to responding to parking issues, added Crompton. “There is a tremendous amount to learn from both our successes and the times when we haven’t got it perfectly right,” he said. When Pique first wrote about the Mountainview issues, then-mayor, Nancy Wilhelm-Morden, suggested that a proposed new parking lot—to be located under the BC Hydro transmission lines, between Stonebridge Drive and Nita Lake Drive, and accessed by Alta Lake Road—could help alleviate the Mountainview Drive issues That new parking lot was targeted for construction this summer. But according to RMOW staff, the project is now on hold and there is no timeline for advancing it. Crompton believes the parking lot would likely make little difference in terms of alleviating the Mountainview Drive issues. “The Skywalk Trail access and the Westside Trail access are two totally different locations,” he said. In Hart’s view, solutions are needed quickly, and residents are in the right to demand them. “We are not just fighting for our own neighbourhood; we are fighting for the integrity of (all) neighbourhoods around Whistler,” she said. n


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NEWS WHISTLER

Whistler police looking to ID suspect in bike theft POLICE BRIEFS: RCMP INVESTIGATING CASE OF DANGEROUS DRIVING; CAR DAMAGED IN PEMBERTON The woman was subsequently released with a court date in North Vancouver set for June 12. Whistler RCMP continues to investigate and is asking for witnesses, or anyone with dash camera footage of the incident to contact the detachment or Sea to Sky Crime Stoppers to remain anonymous

BY BRANDON BARRETT THE WHISTLER RCMP has released images taken from surveillance footage in the hopes of identifying a suspect connected to the recent theft of a mountain bike from Creekside. At approximately 12:15 a.m. on Saturday, May 4, police were notified that a bike had been stolen from the 2100 block of Lake Placid Road. The bike’s owner had entered a nearby business only to return to find the bike missing, police said. Review of surveillance video identified a vehicle, believed to be a dark-coloured Ford Fusion, arrive in the parking lot with two male occupants. The video then showed one of the occupants grabbing the bike before riding away. The driver and the vehicle then disappeared from view in the same direction as the bike and the suspect, police said. The stolen bike is described as a black and red, 2016 Scott Genius model. If anyone recognizes the vehicle or suspect, or has any other information on the reported theft, they should contact the Whistler RCMP at 604-932-3044, or Sea to Sky Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or solvecrime.ca to remain anonymous.

PEMBERTON POLICE INVESTIGATING DAMAGE DONE TO CAR

BIKE THEFT A still image from security footage of a suspect connected to the theft of a bike from Creekside. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WHISTLER RCMP

WEST VAN WOMAN ARRESTED FOR DANGEROUS DRIVING A West Vancouver woman is facing possible charges after being arrested for dangerous driving on Highway 99 last week, police said. At approximately 2:30 p.m. last Friday, May 3, Whistler RCMP were tipped off to a vehicle travelling northbound at excessive speeds and driving dangerously

near Spring Creek. Police have since learned that the black, 2017 Range Rover was trying to pass other vehicles on the shoulder of the road, and, according to one eyewitness, came “very close to cyclists who were also on the shoulder,” police said in a release. The vehicle was followed by a concerned citizen to Whistler Village, where officers arrested the 43-year-old driver for dangerous operation of a motor vehicle.

Pemberton police are investigating a report of mischief to a vehicle that was parked overnight on Portage Road this week. At roughly 8:45 a.m. on Sunday, May 5, Pemberton RCMP were notified of the damage done to a Blue Honda Fit in the 1400 block of Portage Road. The car’s front window had been broken and damage was also done to the side of the vehicle, police said in a release. The damage was reportedly done sometime between 8 p.m. May 4 and 8:30 a.m. the following morning. Anyone with information on this incident is asked to contact Pemberton RCMP at 604-894-6634, or Sea to Sky Crime Stoppers to remain anonymous. n

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as North America’s southernmost fjord). Concerned about dangerous landslides in the corridor he did much of the early work on The Barrier, the massive ice-contact lava wall, which (alarmingly) holds back the Garibaldi Lakes and has partly collapsed on multiple occasions to send huge rockslides down Rubble Creek. If you are interested in reading some of Mathews work, I recommend his “pocket” field guide published by the Geological Association of Canada in 1975: Garibaldi Geology, a popular guide to the geology of the Garibaldi Lake area. Aimed at “enthusiastic naturalists,” the guide demonstrates his gift for bringing geology to life. Mathews felt geology “need not be mysterious” but fun, and that a little bit of geological knowledge could enhance our outdoor experiences. By the time he passed away in 2003, Bill Mathews had forever changed the way we look at Western Canadian geology. His final book, Roadside Geology of Southern British Columbia, coauthored with one of his early graduate students, Jim Monger, was published posthumously in 2005. His legacy lives on today as a new wave of geologists stand on the shoulders of a true giant.

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Earth science—the study of a geological “fire and ice” environments similar to what can be seen in modern-day Iceland. Over a period of 21 years, Mathews described most of the iconic geological edifices that you can observe along the Sea to Sky corridor. Volcanoes of variable origin like The Black Tusk, Mount Garibaldi and The Table—a strikingly flat-topped feature (often called a tuya) formed from a volcanic eruption beneath an ice sheet. Mathews also described the Coast Mountains, including the Stawamus Chief (part of the second largest granitic body— batholith—in the world) and post-glacial ice age features like Howe Sound (often touted

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NEWS PEMBERTON & THE VALLEY

Land policy leaves puppies out in the cold PERMANENT BUILDING FOR PAWS UNLIKELY ON CROWN LAND

BY JOEL BARDE THE PEMBERTON Animal Wellbeing Society (PAWS) can’t keep up with demand and needs to expand. But issues around the organization being based on Crown land are stalling its efforts. “Currently, we have no space for dogs or puppies inside,” explained PAWS director, Rachael Goodyear. That means that the shelter’s dogs are forced to live outside—year round. “There is always concern that you are going to go out there, and there will be a little puppy who didn’t make it through the night,” said Goodyear. “Fortunately, that hasn’t happened, but it’s definitely a real concern for us.” While it maintains a relatively low profile, PAWS has become a busy little shelter, having adopted out 67 dogs and cats and spayed and neutered a dozen others in 2018 alone. The organization serves Pemberton, as well as Mount Currie and

OUTDOOR LIVING PAWS director Rachael

Goodyear said that the organization’s efforts to build permanent structures have not been supported by the Village of Pemberton (VOP)—but the VOP said it doesn’t have the right to OK them. PHOTO SUBMITTED

34 MAY 9, 2019

Lillooet, and operates on property located beside the Pemberton Regional Airport. The land and a trailer the organization operates out of are leased to it by the Village of Pemberton (VOP) free of charge, and the VOP also covers the cost of its hydro bills. That said, Goodyear said that the conversations she has had with VOP

Goodyear, suggesting that an additional trailer would be “totally fine.” The current trailer is divided into two rooms, with one housing Goodyear’s office, laundry and a washroom, and the other dedicated to cats, explained Goodyear. “We do fit puppies in there if they are really, really young—but it doesn’t really

“There is always concern that you are going to go out there, and there will be a little puppy who didn’t make it through the night.” -RACHAEL GOODYEAR

staff regarding what can and can’t be built have left her confused—the organization feels that any efforts to expand and construct needed buildings won’t be supported. “I feel that every time I speak with them ... I have more questions than when I started,” said Goodyear. “I don’t get a straight answer on what I can and can’t do.” Previous plans for the space were perhaps overly “grand,” but at this stage PAWS is looking at low-key options, said

work,” she said, stressing that she and the organization are extremely grateful for the support the VOP does provide. Pemberton Mayor Mike Richman said the VOP recognizes the importance of PAWS to the region and the Village has been increasing its support in coordination with the Squamish-Lillooet Regional District (SLRD) Area C. Traditionally, the VOP has donated $5,000 to Whistler’s animal shelter— Whistler Animals Galore (WAG)—and

supported PAWS through its current agreement. That has changed this year, with the VOP choosing to spilt its funding between the two organizations in its 2019 budget, with $3,000 for WAG and $2,000 for PAWS, said Richman. The VOP, in coordination with the SLRD, is also currently establishing an administrative body—known as a “local service area”—that will allow for more longterm support of PAWS, he added. “We’d like to give PAWS the security and knowledge that they will be funded on an ongoing basis, that it’s not just a one-off situation,” he said. That said, Richman added that the VOP is unable to support the construction of a permanent building at the current location. “We totally support (PAWS’) activity— and want to find any way to support them, but right now putting a permanent building in this location is not an option,” he said. According to Richman, PAWS operates on Crown-granted land, which means that the VOP is limited in terms of what can be developed. Goodyear said that the situation has left PAWS in a difficult place, and that it is looking at other options. In June, it will hold a fundraiser for fencing, insulated dog kennels, and heat lamps—all nonpermanent options. “We are getting busier and busier every year and we need more (help),” she said. n


NEWS PEMBERTON & THE VALLEY

VOP council critiques BC Parks engagement process COUNCIL BRIEFS: ZONING BYLAW AMENDMENTS; FIRSTQUARTER REPORTS

BY JOEL BARDE VILLAGE OF PEMBERTON (VOP) council criticized BC Parks engagement process for its much-awaited Joffre Lakes Provincial Park visitor management strategy during its May 7 regular council meeting. Jill Brooksbank, senior communications and grants coordinator, and Lisa Pedrini, manager for development services, updated council on an April 23 communityengagement session, organized by BC Parks, which they attended. “One of the questions that staff had (for BC Parks) was if we would be able to see the draft management plan before it gets finalized, and there was an indication that we would not be seeing it before it is finalized and shared with the public,” said Brooksbank. There was, she added, “not really an indication on whether (BC Parks) would be sharing the results” of a recently closed public survey on management strategies, either, she added. BC Parks is considering a wide range of initiatives to manage the crowds at Joffre, including establishing day-use fees, a shuttle system, limiting the numbers of visitors allowed in the park, and ramping up enforcement of illegal parking. BC Parks has so far provided council with a two-page document that outlines its “draft goals” and various “actions for 2019 and beyond” and is reportedly on stage three of a five-step process. Councillor Ted Craddock raised concerns about any plan that would call for the enforcement of highway parking restrictions through the towing of vehicles. Wheel locks—which could be unfastened once a fine is paid—may be a better option, said Craddock. “We don’t have a taxi service, (and) it’s a hell of a long walk into town,” he said. “What we don’t need is a couple hundred people walking down the highway in the evening.” Richman expressed frustration with BC Parks, saying he had expected council would have a chance to comment on a management plan rather than a “highlevel” document. “We (were) relying on (BC Parks) for a comprehensive management plan that we can then comment on,” said Richman. “We got a list of eight bullet (points) here that is basically everything that has already been talked about ... It just seems like there is no meat behind it.”

BYLAW AMENDMENTS During the meeting, council also passed a number of amendments to its comprehensive zoning bylaw, which was

passed last summer. Staff describes the changes as “minor” and “housekeeping in nature.” They involve adding sections that were inadvertently not carried over from the previous zoning bylaw, making corrections, and improving the clarity of certain regulations. A public hearing was held at 5 p.m. (prior to council’s 5:30 p.m. start), but no one attended. Coun. Amica Antonelli suggested that staff’s use of the term “housekeeping” to describe the changes may have deterred engagement. “I don’t think a lot of people will look beyond that title and really dig into issues that might affect them,” said Antonelli. “I think that the public might benefit from more explanation.” Antonelli was the lone councillor not in support of the amendments. Coun. Leah Noble was absent for the meeting.

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FIRST-QUARTER REPORTS Council also received first-quarter reports from key VOP departments at its May 7 meeting. During her presentation, Pedrini, manager for development services, explained that the VOP received seven building permits in the first quarter (Jan. 1 to March 31), totalling $2,962,230 in construction and $26,431 in permit fees. Pemberton Fire Chief Robert Grossman explained that Pemberton Fire Rescue saw a 20-per-cent rise in calls in the quarter compared to 2018 numbers. And David Ward, assistant manager of operations and projects, said the operations department has hired a new manager of operations and is now in the process of hiring a summer labourer position. The crabapple tree removal project is nearly complete, and the downtown enhancement plan is already well underway, said Ward. “For the most part, I would say they are sticking to their schedule,” said Ward of the extensive project. He also updated council on the Friendship Trail Bridge. The pedestrian bridge, which crosses the Lillooet River, was closed this winter after a dispute with landowners on the north end of the bridge. The design for the exit, explained Ward, will involve a cement lock block supported trail that swings underneath the bridge. The lock blocks will be used to build a ramp that can be ridden over on bicycle. “Having to keep (the exit) all on the Ministry of Transportation right of way has forced this design,” said Richman, following the meeting. The VOP has contacted a number of contractors seeking quotes to perform the work, which is anticipated to get underway soon. n

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DISPATCHES OUT OF RANGE

Fishery restrictions on Fraser River fail to address root causes of Chinook’s decline, say anglers LESS THAN 1% OF CHINOOK HARVESTED IN SOUTHERN GEORGIA STRAIT LAST YEAR WERE FROM STOCKS OF CONCERN

BY BRANDON BARRETT CLOSE TO 200 protesters gathered outside of federal fisheries minister Jonathan Wilkinson’s North Vancouver office last week to speak out against a decision to restrict Fraser River Chinook sportfishing that anglers are calling short-sighted. Last month, Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) announced mandatory catchand-release restrictions for commercial and recreational anglers it says are intended to protect dwindling Chinook stocks. The restrictions, which are in place until July 31, limit anglers to one Chinook per day. The DFO says the measures are needed to protect Chinook stocks that have been impacted by climate change and habitat destruction, with Fraser River Chinook particularly vulnerable due to increased sedimentation. “The science is clear: Pacific Chinook salmon are in a critical state,” read a statement from Wilkinson. “I want to ensure that we do not knowingly put these stocks on a path to extinction.” But anglers say the move fails to address the myriad root causes of the Chinook’s decline and doesn’t fall in line with the DFO’s own research.

SPEAKING OUT Close to 200 protesters gathered outside of fisheries minister Jonathan Wilkinson’s North Vancouver office last week to speak out against recent restrictions on sportfishing of Chinook salmon on the Fraser River.

PHOTO BY KK LAW

36 MAY 9, 2019

“There’s no plan in place,” said Whistler’s Dave Brown, member of the SquamishLillooet Sportfish Advisory Committee, who co-organized the May 1 protest. “We’re talking about issues that need to be addressed, and it starts in these rivers where these salmon lay their eggs, on the Upper Fraser watershed, where they are being hit hard by habitat degradation; there’s water extraction from agriculture; there’s lack of DFO enforcement presence in these areas. So they’re already off to a bad start.”

Sky Country, explained that the rationale behind the decision was “really about those weak Fraser River stocks.” “The conservation issue is a real one and the risk to the future of these stocks is very high and we’ve known that for some time,” she continued. “I think what’s really challenging for people is those that feel they are not part of the problem—and never would be. (Anglers) are as interested in conservation as anyone, but aren’t accepting that they create a risk to the mortality (of salmon). The

“How are we supposed to continue to manage this resource with no way of getting data?” - JASON ASSONITIS

According to data from the DFO’s Avid Anglers DNA program and creel survey, only 0.627 per cent of the Chinook harvested in the Southern Georgia Straight last year were from stocks of concern. “The overwhelming majority of the catch was from hatchery and healthy stocks—we know this by DNA evidence,” explained Jason Assonitis, owner of Bon Chovy Fishing Charters in Vancouver, who has been involved in salmon data collection for the DFO. “People need to realize that hundreds of different rivers contribute to local Chinook stocks, and a good portion are doing well.” Pamela Goldsmith-Jones, MP for West Vancouver-Sunshine Coast-Sea to

belief is that even a small risk is too much.” Aside from the economic and social impacts of restricting recreational fishing, an industry that generates about $1.1 billion in annual income and employs roughly 9,000 people in B.C., the DFO is also potentially losing significant monitoring of Chinook populations regularly carried out by anglers through the Avid Anglers program and coded wire tagging, Assonitis noted. “Now that the majority of the recreational fleet is off the water, the DFO does not have any measurable data sampling methods,” he said. “In this year, 2019, there is virtually no accurate data. One of the only ways that we’re going to get data is from people like me, who

are involved in this Avid Anglers program, to go out on their own accord to get this data. There is no other data coming in. “How are we supposed to continue to manage this resource with no way of getting data?” Conservation groups have mostly welcomed the closure, while acknowledging that a more comprehensive management plan for Chinook is needed at the DFO. “Fishery closures are always difficult, and (last month’s) announcement from Fisheries Minister Wilkinson was no exception. But with Fraser River Chinook in crisis, it was the right thing to do,” wrote the Watershed Watch Salmon Society in an April 16 Facebook post following the news. “We recognize and support this decisive action to protect endangered Fraser Chinook. We also appreciate the recognition in today’s announcement that the Chinook crisis is inextricably linked to climate change. However, what is required, along with these changes in fishing regulations, is a comprehensive program to monitor effort, catch, releases, compliance, and stock composition of the catch. We will then be able to ascertain—come this time next year— whether these measures were effective. “Several commenters here have pointed to other threats to endangered Fraser Chinook, like habitat degradation and salmon farms. We agree 100% that restricting fisheries is not enough and these other threats must be addressed head-on as well.” Goldsmith-Jones has committed to organizing a meeting between representatives from last week’s protest and Minister Wilkinson to discuss the restrictions. n


DISPATCHES OUT OF RANGE

Mountain News: Sizing up risk of smoke and wildfire in mountain towns allen.best@comcast.net ASPEN, COLO. —Across the North American West, mountain towns fret about summer wildfire season even as snow lingers. Aspen had a scare last year, nearly losing its electricity on the July 4th weekend, the result of a 12,500-acre wildfire about 32 kilometres down the valley near Basalt. Two transmission lines had gone down, and flames were licking up the wooden pole of a third transmission line when firefighters arrived. Had they not, Aspen would necessarily have participated in candle-light dinners. Pitkin County Sheriff Joe DiSalvo told the Aspen Daily News he wants to discuss a June to October fireworks ban this week. The big fireworks show in Aspen has already been altered, although for reasons not to do with fire danger. Instead, it is being replaced by a laser show that relies on drone technology. Across the Elk Range from Aspen, the Crested Butte-Gunnison communities have kicked off a year-long wildfire planning exercise, reported the Crested Butte News. Molly Mowery, who conducts landuse planning for Wildfire Planning International, has been retained to help the locals create plans with wildfire in mind. Landscaping regulations, watershed management plans, and building codes will be examined along with design standards for subdivisions. Mowery said, according to the News, that the pilot program was launched in

Also in the San Juans, La Plata County had a notable uptick in bad air-quality days last year, which the Durango Herald said is likely the result of smoke from the 416 Fire. At Lake Tahoe, a 38-home subdivision has measures in response to wildfire risk that the developer said hopes will serve as a “gold standard model” for other developments in mountain communities. Chris Nelson, the developer, established a forest-management and fuel-reduction plant that must be carried out before the homes are built, explained the Sierra Sun. In addition, each building will be equipped with advanced communications systems under control of the local fire district, which will send out early warning signals in case of fire. The 279-square-metre homeowners’ association building will be constructed with materials that will allow it to be a shelter-in-place facility for all residents if evacuation is not possible.

BANFF EXPECTING TO SEE FEWER CHINESE VISITORS BANFF, Alta.—Banff’s leading tourism organization has been rethinking its marketing strategy in light of geopolitical tensions between the Chinese and Canadian governments. Leslie Bruce, president of Banff Lake Louise Tourism, said her organization intends to diversify its marketing, putting more focus on Australia, South Korea and Mexico. It also plans to target France. “We’re not giving up on that market, but we’re certainly not as bullish about the growth opportunities there,” Bruce said

“We’re not giving up on that market, but we’re certainly not as bullish about the growth opportunities there ... ” - LESLIE BRUCE

Colorado’s Summit County. There, she said, the Community Planning Assistance for Wildfire program “found a real opportunity to look at not just where wildfires could be better inserted into land use documents, but where land use could be better inserted into wildfire documents.” Mountain Village, Telluride’s municipal sibling, is offering residents rebates of up to 50 per cent for mitigation work, up to $5,000, when property owners create defensible space. “If a homeowner creates defensible space by utilizing our incentive program in combination with a non-flammable roof, the structure’s chance of survival in a wildfire is 99 per cent. A structure has only a four per cent survival rate if the roof is flammable and no defensible action occurs on a property,” said Michelle Haynes, the town’s planning and development services director.

2018

BY ALLEN BEST

5

ANNIVERSARY MENU during a recent meeting covered by the Rocky Mountain Outlook. In December, the chief financial officer of Huawei, China’s leading telecom company and the world’s third largest manufacturer of smart phones, was arrested in Vancouver on a warrant out of the United States. She is charged with engaging in bank and wire fraud in violation of American sanctions against Iran. She has denied any wrongdoing. Bruce said the geopolitical fallout has not been felt directly in Banff, but her counterparts in Toronto and Vancouver have told her they’ve noticed an impact. The Banff organization has been pushing winter and shoulder-season tourism. The average room occupancy in Banff was 71.7 per cent in 2018, a gain of 100,000 room nights from just three years prior. Hotel occupancy in November exceeded 50 per cent for the first time, reported the Outlook. n

37

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SCIENCE MATTERS

Wellness Talks Nesters Market and Pharmacy offers wellness talks at its Whistler location. Join RHN and Certified Plant Based Chef Sarah Uy, Carissa Beu, RHN and Post Partum Doula Da-na Lemmon and Jasmin Wong each week for inspirational whole health ideas.

Government support for electric vehicles drives down emissions ELECTRIC VEHICLES (EV) won’t save us from runaway climate change, but they’re part of the solution, along with support for public transit and active transport like walking and cycling. The transportation sector accounts for almost one-quarter of the world’s carbon emissions, so it’s an area where change is necessary and possible. As Norway and other countries are demonstrating, incentives and tax policy can move people quickly into cleaner vehicle options. Half of Norway’s cars are expected to be electric this year, and it’s on track to meet its commitment to have only zero-emissions

BY DAVID SUZUKI

Vinaigrette Basics THURSDAY MAY 16, 10:30 �.�. WITH SARAH UY, RHN

Store bought dressings are good but homemade dressings are better. Learn the fundamentals of making a vinaigrette and harness your creativity while exercising your choice to use quality ingredients. The mantra of the season is to “eat more greens” and pair it with a great vinaigrette. Sarah Uy is a Certified Holistic Nutritionist, Certified Raw Plant Based Chef, Certified in 200 YYT and Yin Yoga and is currently studying Herbology. You can find her at Nesters Market as a wellness advisor and you can learn more about her and her nutrition coaching services at …... www.stardustwellness.org and Instagram as @stardustwellness1 Wellness Desk 604-932-3545 Ext 322

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38 MAY 9, 2019

cars sold by 2025. Its strong EV mandate, inexpensive hydropower, tax incentives and price parity with internal combustion engine vehicles contributed to this success. Reduced tolls, bus-lane access and free parking and ferry rides sweetened the option for Norwegians. Only four per cent of the country’s EV owners say they would go back to conventional cars. Norway is ahead of much of the world, but electric vehicles are on track to reach more than half of global new car sales by 2040. Government policies have driven this shift. The Norwegian government offered about US$1 billion in incentives this year, including waiving high vehicle import duties and taxes for electric car buyers. The government plans to phase these out in 2021, gradually replacing them with higher taxes on fossil-fuelled vehicles. 

purchased there last year were EVs. Quebec’s mandate sets a target for onethird of all new vehicles sales to be EV by 2030. B.C.’s mandate, expected to become law soon, requires that all new light-duty car and truck sales be zero-emission by 2040. That could play a big role in helping B.C. meet its transportation climate targets. Municipalities and provinces can help prepare for the EV transition by building more public charging infrastructure and requiring new residential buildings to install chargers or be electric-vehicle friendly. Other ways to lower transportation emissions include cleaning up the electricity used to charge EVs and reducing the carbon content of fuels for non-electric vehicles with biofuels or hydrogen produced from renewables. Even without government interventions, electric vehicles may cost less than gaspowered cars by 2024, according to Bank of America Merrill Lynch analysts. Add lower operating and maintenance costs and savings from forgoing high-priced gas, and there are many incentives to switch. HydroQuébec’s online calculator estimates it costs $10.65 to drive a gas-fuelled compact car 100 kilometres and $2.10 for an electric. EV travel range continues to increase and they’re performing well in cold weather. Electric motors are also efficient, whereas internal combustion engines waste much of the energy as heat. Used EV batteries are finding new lives in energy storage, and researchers are investigating how to make the lithium supply chain, from extraction to recovery, a model of the circular economy. Despite their appeal, single occupancy electric vehicles don’t address congestion in growing urban areas or the amount of valuable space parking consumes.

Only four per cent of the country’s EV owners say they would go back to conventional cars. China used government incentives to increase EV production last year by 50 per cent over the previous year, and built the world’s first fully electric bus fleet in Shenzhen. India has a US$1.4 billion, threeyear subsidy plan to jump-start electric and hybrid vehicle sales. Although Canada isn’t embracing the full policy package needed for significant behavioural change, it’s making progress, with commitments to reach 100 per cent zero-emission vehicle sales by 2040, and 2025 and 2030 targets coming. But it’s a long road ahead. Just 2.5 per cent of total vehicle sales last year were electrics. Federal rebates implemented in May should boost electric vehicle sales, but we need mandatory targets. Provincially, B.C. and Quebec are echoing California, which in 1990 became the first place to set up a zero-emission vehicle standard. One of 10 new vehicles

Investments in active transportation and transit infrastructure promote healthier lives and livable urban environments. Shared high-speed, non-polluting transit remains the gold standard for livability, equity and health. Committed federal funding for transit is essential to create the kind of resilient communities climate change demands. A recent study shows Canada’s climate is warming at twice the global rate and that to prevent environmental catastrophe, human behaviour must change. Canada would be wise to emulate Norway and other countries and speed up its transition to a low- to no-carbon future. David Suzuki is a scientist, broadcaster, author and co-founder of the David Suzuki Foundation. Written with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Communications and Policy Specialist Theresa Beer. Learn more at www.davidsuzuki.org. n


RANGE ROVER

The ground beneath our feet MANY SPEAK OF the lure of the mountains. Of a spiritual element in ascending to the heights, a realization of earthly beauty in the passage, a leaving behind of humanity’s petty struggles, a fulfillment of purpose—a summiting, some would have it, of one’s own soul.

BY LESLIE ANTHONY None of these points can be argued against, but there are other, less romantic ones to make. One which doesn’t get much traction is the general piquing of curiosity that mountain travel engenders. And I don’t here refer to the banal wonderings of explorers in the What’s over there? and How do we get to that other peak? sense. I speak instead of the deep-rooted curiosity that has propelled human evolution to the lofty heights of understanding we now possess as a species. This may be the most important element because it opens doors, often by degree, to the worth of any existential consideration. It begins with the simple reality of mountains: why and how they formed; what kind of processes were involved; and which of these might be ongoing. This is the realm of plate tectonics (planetary perspective), geology (the actual rock involved), and geomorphology (the formations and landforms that result from uplift, glaciation, weathering). There’s

PERSPECTIVE AND DIMENSIONALITY A view of

the East Greenland icecap from 12,000 metres truly gives you the lay of a land difficult to comprehend. PHOTO BY LESLIE ANTHONY

enough mulling in that troika alone to keep my mind occupied on any walk in the hills. But naturally and inevitably, there’s more. The idea that geodiversity and biodiversity are linked goes back to the late 18th-century travels of explorer Alexander von Humboldt, and was deftly born out in the writings of Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace as they came to understand the processes driving the ever-changing surface of our four-billion-year-old planet. Thus, as someone who has dipped a toe or two in the waters of professional biology, I am constantly equating that which I observe in the plant and animal realm with what the land they occupy is composed of, what sort of nutrients are available to support these relationships, and from whence (both physically and in time) these come. I

it in another light or different way in order to better understand it. A view that might deliver more dimensionality—one of the many amazing constructs the human mind is capable of considering. First Nations well-understood this, as the land and its waypoints always had a life of their own. This switch in perspectives has also long been the realm of the photographer and cinematographer. Think of early stereoscopic aerial photography, the moody black and white images rendered by Ansel Adams, or the work of any modern landscape master. Their genius is in helping us see the land and the processes that shape it in another way, both answering our curiosity and stimulating it. And now, in the era of helicopters, drones and shockingly high-resolution cameras we

...it’s the many intimate connections of daily endeavour to geology that yield the greatest sense of our diversity and, perhaps not so obviously, our unity.

often catch my mind soaring over the land like a bird: up gullies, down streams, over meadows, into the forest. Such unconscious mental perambulation delivers endless fascination with wherever I am, and not infrequent amazement. Mountains may be labyrinthine in form but can be likewise in nature—and thought. What this also delivers—and which is more in line with the traditional curiosity of map-readers—is a desire to switch perspective on the land before me, to see

are delivered of an entirely new and more intimate aerial perspective, one that often borders on phantasmagorical. The real pull of mountains lies in their allure as dimensional beings. And if we can see—and think of—mountains this way, why not other landforms?? that determine the places humans settle, live, labour and love? Here’s where I’m going with this. As another summer dawns with the opportunity to discover more of this great land we call Canada, I find myself excited

for the possibilities. It strikes me that the true depth and breadth of this nation cannot be measured by any yardstick of contemporary culture or oral tradition or industrial tally. Rather, it’s the many intimate connections of daily endeavour to geology that yield the greatest sense of our diversity and, perhaps not so obviously, our unity. The multitudinous nature of the land speaks to us in a way we don’t always consciously acknowledge, even when, for instance, we live on its very edge, forging a terraqueous existence with the sea. Consider that the provinces and territories, otherwise historical artifacts of political expediency, are, from a geological standpoint, stitched together in deterministic quilt: mountains unite the Yukon, B.C. and Alberta; Alberta shares its Prairie underpinnings with Saskatchewan and Manitoba, both of whom are married to the NWT, Ontario and Quebec by the granitic arc of the Precambrian Shield; Southern Ontario and Quebec are inextricably connected by the St. Lawrence and Ottawa Rivers. The Gaspé Peninsula, Magdalen Islands and Labrador create a link between Quebec and the Maritimes that cannot logically be usurped. From recreational pursuits in the mountains of B.C., to the work of avalanche forecasters, miners, fossil-hunters, gravelpit operators, coastal fishermen, and even urbanites living on Toronto’s lakeside islands, it all ties in to geological history. And here’s where we can truly summit our own souls: by acknowledging that to which we are inextricably tied—the ground beneath our feet. Leslie Anthony is a Whistler-based author, editor, biologist and bon vivant who has never met a mountain he didn't like. n

MAY 9, 2019

39


FEATURE STORY

A UNIQUE BREEDING CENTRE IN LANGLEY AIMS TO RECOVER B.C.’S ENDANGERED SPOTTED OWL POPULATION BY NICOLA JONES

T

HREE ADORABLE LITTLE BALLS OF FLUFF sit huddled together in a lab in Langley, the latest additions to a species struggling to survive. Chicks J, F, and G, hatched in late April and announced to the world this week, crazily represent at least 10 per cent of the total population of Northern Spotted Owls in British Columbia. One of their adopted “moms,” biologist Jasmine McCulligh, fires me a quick email in between 20-plus hour shifts to announce their arrival. So far, according to McCulligh, these little fighters are doing just fine. Things don’t always go so smoothly. In the spring of 2017, McCulligh spent four days straight desperately trying to nurse a sick, newborn spotted owl back to health. “He was uncomfortable, thrashing around, burning calories and not eating, not settling. He just kept crying,” she remembers, the frustration evident in her voice. “I couldn’t say one hour to the next if he was going to survive.” The tiny creature, called simply “chick D,” was all skin and bone. He weighed less than a golfball, and refused to eat. Four times a day, McCulligh dropped three tiny pinpoints of diluted antibiotics into his mouth; he would grimace in disgust, but at least that meant the bitter medicine was making it into his mouth. The only thing that would comfort him was being held in McCulligh’s palm. She lay on the cold, hard floor of the incubation room, cradling him in one hand, and texting the vet with the other, desperately waiting for any signs of improvement.

40 MAY 9, 2019


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MAY 9, 2019

41


FEATURE STORY On the fourth day, chick D turned a corner. “He was so hungry,” McCulligh remembers with a wide grin. The chick grew up, and the team changed his single-letter name to “Dante.” “It means enduring. It was perfect for him, and also for the species,” McCulligh says. Today, Dante is a feisty, healthy male owl, a prime candidate to sire his own kids and help expand his endangered species. McCulligh’s workplace is the world’s one and only breeding centre for the Northern Spotted Owl (NSO), one of Canada’s most endangered species. This bird’s entire Canadian range sits within Southwestern British Columbia, where, it is thought, there used to be a healthy population of about 1,000 spotted owls between the Fraser Canyon, Lillooet, and Pemberton. (The Northern Spotted Owl’s range extends south as far as Northern California, and the U.S. populations are officially considered threatened.) Depending on who you ask, there are thought to be between three and 10 spotted owls in the Canadian woods (yes, just three—that’s not a typo), plus 23 living in this breeding centre, which serves as home to the Northern Spotted Owl Breeding Program. The spotted owl’s story is a sad one. In B.C., they live only in old-growth forests, where broken and rotted tree stumps make suitable, premade nesting spots. Their population began to crash in the 1980s as mature forests were logged, leading environmentalists to protest, which included embedding metal spikes within trees to destroy loggers’ chainsaw blades. At the time, some in the logging industry developed a disdain for the owls, which stood in the way of their profits. In the U.S., the owls were granted federal protection in 1990, and logging was stemmed: timbre harvests on 9.7 million hectares of federal land dropped by 90 per cent. In Canada, they earned an official Species at Risk Act listing from the federal government in 1996; today, hundreds of thousands of hectares are being managed for the owls. But the owls haven’t bounced back. Their new enemy, on top of habitat loss, is the barred owl: a larger bully of a species prone to “attacking anything that moves,” says McCulligh, showing the scars on the backs of her hands left by barred owl attacks. The spotted owl is much pickier about its food, primarily eating pack rats and flying squirrels, so a spotted owl typically needs a hunting ground three to four times larger than its less-picky barred cousin. The features that make spotted owls so vulnerable in the wild also make up part of their charm. The owls are steady, reliable sorts—McCulligh says that, to her, they embody the serenity of the old-growth forest where they live. They pair up monogamously, usually for life. They will return to their nests year after year even if the surrounding forest is ravaged by fire or logging. Birders love to spot them, if they can: people notoriously mistake the more-common barred owls for spotted ones. For the record, spotted owls are smaller (the males are even smaller than the females). They have no ear tufts. As hinted by the name, they are more spotted than striped or barred. Every now and then, McCulligh gets a call from someone saying there’s a spotted owl in their backyard, and they hold up the phone so she can hear the call: it’s always the “Who cooks for you? Who cooks for you-all?” hoot of a barred owl, not the shorter, higher-pitched call of a spotted. In the face of continued problems in the wild, scientists eventually decided to take drastic measures to save them. They gathered up the spotted owls that they could, including those that had been injured in the wild, or chicks that had fallen from their nests, and started a breeding program. The NSO Breeding Program officially opened in 2007 with just six birds. Today, the centre covers 10 ha. of farmland, with some 20 spread-out aviaries and a small incubation room. It’s a tiny team, with just three full-time biologists: McCulligh, Katelyn West, and Hannah Tench. They have seen nine chicks successfully born thus far. If they get a stock of at least 10 breeding pairs (right now they have five), producing at least 10 chicks that survive a full year in the centre, McCulligh and her colleagues plan to start releasing 10 to 20 owls a year into the woods around Pemberton over the next 15 to 20 years. The earliest that might start is 2020. And there are plenty of hurdles to overcome before then, including just working out their basic breeding biology. “I wish you could just Google how to breed a spotted owl, but you can’t,” sighs McCulligh. The very land the centre is on, which they lease with money from government grants, is currently for sale (for $10 million), so there’s no guarantee they can even stay there. Eventually they will need better, larger aviaries that can hold flying squirrels, the owls’ natural prey, so the birds can learn to hunt

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and fend for themselves. Then there’s the question of whether there will even be enough suitable habitat left to release the owls into—a question that has left several environmental organizations fuming, saying that the province’s funding has prioritized the breeding program over habitat recovery. It’s altogether a hard task, and not guaranteed to work. But if they pull it off, they will save a species from local extinction. “I don’t like to think about the pressure of it,” says McCulligh. “It’s a big deal.”

Playing matchmaker Back in the 1990s, Shakkai was hit by a car near Harrison Hot Springs and broke her wing. She spent more than a decade in a rehabilitation centre, and then was moved to the Langley breeding centre after it opened in 2007. At the age of 13, she was introduced to Einstein, a young, wild-caught owl who was just a year old. “They hit it off immediately. Even though she’d never seen a spotted owl in her life,” McCulligh laughs. “When she saw him, she was so excited; she started calling immediately. She knew what to do.” They had a baby—the

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42 MAY 9, 2019


FEATURE STORY

“They hit it off immediately. Even though she’d never seen a spotted owl in her life. When she saw him, she was so excited; she started calling immediately. She knew what to do.” centre’s first—in 2008, a female named Shania. (Shania went on to have Dante, the sickly baby who fought for and won his life.) The art and science of birthing baby spotted owls is something the team has had to muddle their way through. “It’s incredible how different they are (from other owls),” says McCulligh. No one was sure what age they breed at, how many chicks they have per year, what makes for successful mating, and on and on. McCulligh and her small team have had to work it out themselves. Generally speaking, this is how it works: First, the team plays matchmaker. They take into account the owls’ age (the best pairs have an older female and a younger male), PHOTOS: LEFT: Jasmine McCulligh, facility coordinator for the Northern Spotted Owl Breeding Program in Langley, with a wild spotted owl. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE PROVINCE OF B.C.

RIGHT: Shakkai roosting on her nest branch in 2016. Shakkai was brought into captivity in 1994 after being hit by a truck and deemed unreleasable. She became part of the breeding program when it began in 2007. Shakkai passed away from cancer in April 2019, leaving behind a great legacy at the Northern Spotted Owl Breeding Program. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE NORTHERN SPOTTED OWL BREEDING PROGRAM

their genetics (biologists have completed genetic analysis of all their birds so they don’t accidentally pair up relatives), and even their personalities, and then make introductions by letting a pair share an aviary. The male will usually start courting in February (an appropriately romantic month), by bringing his lady friend dead mice. “You have to buy her dinner first,” laughs McCulligh. If she takes the food, it means she’s accepting his advances. It can take months or even years for a newly-introduced pair to hit it off. “Last year, we had a pair where it took a month and she was just saying, ‘No thanks, I’ll go get my own food.’ She could just be ignoring him even while he’s shoving food in her face,” McCulligh remembers. “Usually she’ll eventually accept it; I guess at that point it’s settling.” Once bonded, an owl pair will hopefully copulate in the spring: the male jumps on the female, she raises her tail, there’s a lot of wing flapping, and they basically bounce off each other. “It’s called a cloacal kiss,” says McCulligh. The timing has to be perfect: mating has to happen just as an egg developing inside the female is about to form a shell. A female spotted owl will typically lay two eggs in March—in the centre, they steal the eggs so the mother is tricked into thinking hers have been eaten or lost, so then she will lay another two in April. Usually only about one in four eggs is fertilized. And then only about a quarter of those will make it past the first days of development and actually hatch.

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FEATURE STORY

“When we see that heartbeat, our hearts beat a little faster too,” TOP: A 10-day-old spotted owl chick being fed by intern Maja Hampson in 2017. MIDDLE: Another nine-day-old spotted owl chick, this one born in 2018. The chicks are fed small amounts of rat meat throughout the day. BOTTOM: A nine-day-old chick born in 2017. Spotted owl chicks are returned to the nest at approximately 10 days old once they are able to stand up unassisted and have feathers to keep themselves warm. PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE NORTHERN SPOTTED OWL BREEDING PROGRAM

44 MAY 9, 2019

Needless to say, those odds are not good: 2019 already holds the record for most chicks born in a season (the previous annual record was just two). McCulligh doesn’t know if the statistics are similar in the wild. “There’s a reason they’re endangered. Some species are just challenging to breed,” she sighs. They keep playing around with their owls’ diet and other factors trying to bump up their fertility. Since 2011, the team has taken to artificially incubating the eggs that are laid, to raise the odds of chick survival. After an egg is laid, the team waits until the mother goes to relieve herself, and then they open a little secret door in the back of the nest and steal it, replacing it with a robotic decoy that collects data on things like temperature and humidity. “They don’t get mad. I don’t think they notice,” says West. The real egg goes into an incubator, where they watch to see for any signs of life, says McCulligh. Raising an egg can be tricky business. The liquid inside the egg has to evaporate to make room for the growing chick, but not so quickly that it dries out. The team has to keep a constant eye on the eggs’ weights, and twiddle the humidity and temperature to suit, in four microwave-sized incubators. A host of sensors and alarms are deployed in case anything fails. “We have equipment to back up the back-up equipment,” McCulligh laughs. The three staff members, who all live about 45 minutes away, get calls at all hours of the day or night to come in and fix the air conditioning, heaters, humidity controls, etc. At least once, they have had to glue a cracked egg back together. The team runs a parallel program for breeding barred owls, which runs about a month in advance of the spotted owl program. That lets them work out any bugs in the equipment, and train up new interns with a non-endangered species and non-critical eggs. “Can you imagine being in your 20s, in your first real job, and being handed an endangered animal?” McCulligh asks, shaking her head. “They get to practice. It’s a really good opportunity for us to work out any kinks.” After 32 days, a spotted owl egg will start to hatch, and the team launches into 24-hour care: in early April, one of the three staff, or a volunteer, is there 24-7. The egg hatching is a performance. Chickens take about 20 minutes, but spotted owls take 80 hours or more (with other owl species, breeding programs intervene after 70 hours; this team learned quickly that spotted owls need more time). A newborn owlet is tiny and helpless. “They look like mouldy fruit or raw chicken,” says McCulligh. Their eyes are sealed closed. They can’t hold up their heads. The team keeps hold of the newborns for 10 days, making sure they don’t get an infection and are gaining weight. They don’t want the owlets to think that the biologists are their mothers, so they don’t talk in the baby room. “It’s dead silent, or we play bird calls. They think they’re in the forest,” says McCulligh. Sometimes they give them little owl stuffies or sponges to cuddle up with. If they get sick, like Dante did, they have to experiment with different antibiotics, feeling their way to a cure with very little information to go on. Then they wait until mom goes off to relieve herself again, and sneak the chicks back into the nest. Fortunately, spotted owls will rear just about anything. “The one easy thing about raising spotted owls is they’re good, instinctive parents,” says McCulligh. You can give them their own chicks, or another owl’s, at any age, at any time of year, and they will usually take to feeding them. To be fair, it’s a relatively brief parental commitment: the owls fledge at about three weeks, and are independent after a few months. The team gives each chick a letter of the alphabet based on the order the eggs were laid; only when they’re much older can they tell, from blood tests, whether an owl is male or female, and they then pick a name. McCulligh talks about each owl with affection. Oregon, for instance, was dramatically rescued from his nest in 2013 after his father died. Zalea fell out of a tree before fledging and happened to be found by Ministry of Forests field staff, which brought her in to safety in 2017. She was raised by Amore and Sedin, a newly-bonded pair who hadn’t had a chick yet but didn’t blink when suddenly granted a three-week-old foster child. When the elderly Shakkai laid her last fertilized egg in 2014, the shell was too thin; the team jacked up the humidity in the incubator to 90 per cent and saved chick Jay’s life. Jay is now all grown up: he and partner Bella produced one of this year’s chicks. One egg was laid on McCulligh’s birthday when she first started as an intern in 2013. “I spent my entire birthday out in the rain waiting for her mom to get off the egg so we could take it,” she remembers. “All the owls have their own special story, but she’s mine … She’s my firstborn.” They named her Skalula, the Salish word for “owl.” For McCulligh, this clearly isn’t just a job, but a labour of love. “I’ve worked here since I was 23. It was my first real job out of university,” she says. “It has been six years now. These are my kids.” As for Shakkai, at 25 years old this year, she was too old to be a mom again. McCulligh and West had to make the hard decision to pull her away from her younger husband, Einstein, to give him a chance to sire children with a younger mate (he’s with Zalea now; they took to each other right away and produced one of this year’s chicks). “It’s very emotional for us,” says McCulligh. Shakkai sadly passed away in April from cancer.

Into the Pemberton wild Back in October 2018, McCulligh and West rolled into Pemberton with a travelling slideshow about their owls. About a dozen keenly interested locals turned up, including myself and my two kids (a rambunctious four-year-old and a curious six-year-old, both predisposed to be scientists-in-training). There were posters, and coffee and fruit, and candy for the kids in the


FEATURE STORY B A R O S O’S A N N I V E RS A RY

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Big Sky Golf Club, Maple Ridge Volkswagen, Pemberton Lions Club, Pemberton Valley Farms, Pemberton Valley Supermarket, Sabre Rentals, Scotiabank, Spark Event Rentals, Sysco, Town Square Restaurant, The McQuaids, DJ Carly J VOLUNTEERS (Bartenders, Casino Dealers, Food Prep/Servers, Golf Tournament Supporters, Set-up/Take Down, Ticket Sales): Adam Adams, Rennell Baiju, Laura Beks, Cheray Brandt, Flemming Brandt, Tanner Brandt, Linda Brown, Adam Boys, Andrea Boys, Pam Cook, Scott Coughlin, Helena Edmonds, Michele Garrett-Jones, Corrine Graves, Derek Graves, Graham Haywood, Dave Hellevang, Heather Hellevang, Sue Hellevang, Roxanne Joe, Jan Kennett, Arriya Kuiper, Brenda Lasnier, Ashley LeBlanc, Cherie LeBlanc, Hailey LeBlanc, Sharon Leinweber, Jeremy Lewis, Mel Lewis, James Linklater, Sasha McLachlan, Nic McPhee, Sharon Medd, Tony Medd, Louise Menzel, Lloyd Miller, Swuwa Patrick, Wendy Paulson, Brook Phare, Kelsey Phare, Lauren Phare, Quinn Phare, Valerie Phare, Grizz Robinson, Hana Ronayne, Stephanie Russell, Joanna Williams, Heather Wunder EVENT COMMITTEE MEMBERS: Tanis Ayers, Linda Den Duyf, Sue Hellevang, Mike Richman, Gail Talbot, Amanda Walker RED DEVILS ALUMNI ASSOCIATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS: Krigi Butler, Chuck Hustins, Rick King, Garth Phare, Krista Walden

MAY 9, 2019

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FEATURE STORY

“How can you expect to recover a species when you’re not affording it protected habitat?” run-up to Halloween. McCulligh and West fielded questions before their slideshow. It was a big trip for the biologist duo. Though the program had been going on for more than a decade at that point, it had been very hush-hush for years, West tells me. No one wanted to draw attention to the few remaining spotted owls in the wild. “This is our first time out of the Lower Mainland,” West says, her eyes a little wide. They came to Pemberton for a reason: the area has the best remaining spotted owl habitat, says McCulligh. This is where they plan to reintroduce them, making it important for the team to get to know the area and the mood of its inhabitants. My daughter and her friend dress up in little lab coats to “feed” stuffie versions of owls. “We’ll have to clean them,” the staff says; these are the actual stuffies used as surrogate siblings for the newborn owls. While large swaths of forest remain in the Pemberton area, it’s hardly undisturbed by logging, power lines and hydroelectric projects, all of which threaten to fragment spotted owl habitat. Right now, there are no known spotted owls in the Sea to Sky. Biologist Jared Hobbs, who used to work for the province and is now an independent contractor, says there are just three left in B.C., with no breeding pairs currently. In 1986, spotted owls were assessed as endangered by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada; 10 years later, it received a federal listing under the Species at Risk Act. In 2004, a coalition of environmental groups launched a legal case through the Sierra Legal Defence Fund (now called Ecojustice) seeking an emergency order to protect the owls under that act. In 2006, the B.C. government released a spotted owl recovery strategy, and so the case was withdrawn while waiting to see what actions the province took. So far, the groups have not been appeased. Problems remain, they say, with plans to conserve spotted owl habitat. The government plan led to $3.4 million of funding over five years, says Hobbs, but that was focused on the breeding program (which now runs at $300,000 a year) and efforts to cull barred owls in selected spots (Hobbs says that 189 barred owls have been removed, and 51 shot). In general, B.C. has not developed legislation to protect any of its 1,807 species at risk, according to a letter recently signed by more than ABOVE: Parents Scud and Shania with their six-week-old chick, Dante, born in 2017. Shania was the first spotted owl born at the breeding centre, and she and Scud are expecting another chick this year. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE NORTHERN SPOTTED OWL BREEDING PROGRAM

46 MAY 9, 2019

a dozen academics and published in The Narwhal. Officially, the B.C. government is managing more than 300,000 ha. for spotted owl recovery; according to a 2015 report, more than 7,000 ha. of that lies around Whistler. But, Hobbs notes, while that land is “capable” of supporting spotted owls sometime in the future, not all of it is currently suitable habitat—in some regions the trees are currently too young to provide good nesting sites. “Meanwhile, suitable territory outside managed territory is being ignored,” he adds. Plus, some logging is allowed even in managed regions. Although a very small area around known nesting sites is protected (about 500 metres), industry is under no obligation to look for nesting sites, notes Ecojustice lawyer Kegan Pepper-Smith. According to non-profit the Wilderness Committee, a logging company felled trees about a kilometre away from the nest of a breeding pair of spotted owls living in Enterprise Creek, near Lillooet, in both 2004 and 2010. Hobbs is reticent to say where in the wild the three spotted owls are currently living, to help guard them. They all live within managed forest areas, he notes, although there is a proposal that is currently on hold for cut blocks in one of the owl’s territories, Hobbs says. “How can you expect to recover a species when you’re not affording it protected habitat? Its disingenuous,” says Hobbs. “If you don’t address habitat you can’t fix anything.” On Wednesday, May 8, Ecojustice and the Wilderness Committee sent a letter to the federal government demanding action on the spotted owls after “decades of mismanagement by the provincial government,” according to their press release. “B.C. can breed as many owls as it likes, if they don’t also protect the Spotted Owl’s old-growth habitat, the only way the owls will survive is in cages,” says Pepper-Smith in the release. “Time is running out.” Given how things stand today, the breeding program is undoubtedly a vital part of the solution. “For a population in such dire straits, captive breeding is a logical step,” says Hobbs. It’s going slower than expected (Hobbs notes that for the nine born in captivity as of January 2019, they had also removed nine from the wild; it’s taking a while to arrive at a net gain of owls). But others might say that’s a good thing if it provides time for activists to help boost habitat preservation. Meanwhile McCulligh is simply focused on her babies, and making as many healthy new owls as they can. “I’m hopeful for five babies this year,” she said wistfully back before this year’s eggs were laid. “Don’t want to jinx it, though.” With three hatched already, and the season not yet over, they’re off to a good start. n


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the beach whistler Celebrating our 25th year

Box 1135 Pemberton BC, V0N 2L0 To all of our supporters of the ‘Day of the Devils’ fundraiser,

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We recently hosted our annual ‘Day of the Devils’ fundraiser, and it has been our most successful fundraiser yet! As we complete our fourth year of working to ensure that the athle�cs program in our small community con�nues, we, as a commi�ee, are taking a moment to reect on our purpose and examine the goals we strive to achieve. In the most basic terms, our goal is to ensure that all students in our one-school community have access to organized sport. While Pemberton Secondary certainly benets from this annual event, the real beneciaries are the young people of our community. School sport provides an opportunity for those who cannot afford ac�vi�es such as ice hockey or gymnas�cs. The differences between ‘educa�onal athle�cs’ and community-organized sports are many, but the benets we value as an associa�on include: 1. Educa�onal Athle�cs is less focused on outcome (winning) and is therefore able to integrate social educa�on, develop lifelong skills, and promote healthy lifestyles 2. Educa�onal Athle�cs is inclusive, and accessible to all students regardless of socio-economic status Our associa�on was created because we exist in a period of �me where there appears to be an expecta�on on society to ‘solve problems’ while government takes a back seat. A book en�tled, ‘Philanthrocapitalism: How Giving Can Save the World’ (Bishop & Green, 2009), states that: ….society is changing the way it solves its biggest problems, by bringing together business, nonprots, governments, social entrepreneurs and philanthropists in innova�ve partnerships. Giving has a crucial role to play... and (society depends on) the willingness of us all to give back.

NEW SPR I NG SWIMWEAR H AS ARRIVED

Thank you for recognizing the importance of this cause. While many rural communi�es are seeing their sports programs disappear, our students con�nue to be well taken care of by the generosity of our community. Together, we can ensure that their athle�cs programs will thrive for years to come. Sincerely, Krista Walden On behalf of, The Pemberton Red Devils Alumni Associa�on

604-932-7505

2018

We would simply not be able to support our youth without the help of so many organiza�ons and individuals such as yourself. We are so grateful for the support that our larger community con�nues to provide year a�er year. This year’s event raised more than ever, at over $27,750!

Located near the Olympic Rings on the Village Stroll. Follow us on Instagram @thebeachwhistler MAY 9, 2019

47


TRAVEL & ADVENTURE WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

From Avignon to Aigues-Mortes:

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Riding through forests art and tiny towns, vineyards and olive groves VIRGINIA AULIN

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48 MAY 9, 2019

VIRGINIA AULIN

VIRGINIA AULIN


TRAVEL & ADVENTURE

By Virginia Aulin

F

or several decades during the Middle Ages, Avignon was the capital of Christendom. The result is a legacy of opulent churches, chapels, convents and monuments in the middle of a walled Old Town. This is our embarkation point for a week-long bike and barge trip through Provence and we’ve arrived early to get over jet lag. My husband and I flew into Charles de Gaulle, where we met my sister. We soon realize that rail travel and bike boxes don’t pair well as we lug our baggage up and down steep stairs between platforms, struggle to find stowage space on the trains and have difficulty finding cabs big enough for our bikes. So, we’re a little frazzled when we get dropped on a corner in Old Town where the apartment we’ve booked is on a pedestrian-only street. Luckily our host finds us, whisks us to a medieval building, through big wooden doors and, grabbing one of our bags, leads us up a narrow, curving staircase to a huge apartment with tall windows and wrought iron balconies. She settles us in, gives us excellent resto recos and leaves us to enjoy our three days here. My husband takes on the ascent of Tour de France’s Mont Ventoux—1,912 metres in 23 kilometres with an average grade of 7.5 per cent. On the descent, both of his carbon wheels melt and the tires are trashed. Kind locals stop and somehow manage to stow him and his bike into their tiny Renault and take him to a bike shop. Blissfully unaware of this drama, my sister and I wander charming streets within the 14th Century walls. Palais de Popes sits atop the highest point in Avignon, a white granite majesty that rivals St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome, built when Clement V, elected Pope in 1305, refused to move to Italy. He set up the papal capital in Avignon because he was distressed by factionalism in Rome and under pressure to remain in France by the king. This is where the papacy remained, through seven popes (all French) until 1377, when Gregory returned it to Rome. Having absorbed religious and political history, it’s time for a change of pace: shopping. We try on clothes in several sleek boutiques. How is it that French women can—with a pouf of fabric here and a tug of a sleeve there—make any dress look wonderful? Except for a LittleHouse-on-the-Prairie pink frilly smock, which the sales lady labels “romantic,” but I know is better described as “the doily that ate my body” as I look in the changing room mirror. All too soon it is time to board our barge, the rather scruffy Caprice. The boat we were supposed to have sunk (we see the hull sticking out of the river later on our trip) and I suspect they dusted off Caprice from retirement. My husband and I can barely turn around in our tiny cabin with its two teeny beds. A thick wedge of plastic serves as the “door” to the miniscule loo and there are dead flies around the small porthole. Fortunately, we don’t spend much time

inside. The next morning our vivacious bike guide, Daniella, takes us on a 45-kilometre ride through deciduous forests and fruit orchards; across the Rhone; beside fields of pumpkins, flamboyant dill and sunflowers hanging their heavy heads, spent for the season; and through the gnarly, low-slung vineyards of Châteauneuf-du-Pape, where we stop for some tastings. My sister, a certified sommelier, is delighted to fondle the pudding stones— galets roulées—that top the terroir here. The stones absorb heat during the day and keep the vines warm through the night. The other helpful feature is the Mistral, which acts as a natural pesticide. My husband and I are on light road bikes while all the others ride heavyweight hybrids so we are cycling very, very slowly. This doesn’t bode well for my caloric burn, which I would like to be high to better enable me to indulge in the Provencal cuisine that I am expecting. Alas, I need not worry. Our cook is British and feeds us mediocre curries, unidentifiable fish, overcooked beef. Fortunately, the 20 people on the trip with us, most from Vancouver, are lively, intelligent and full of bon humour about the “cuisine.” And there is no lack of wine on board, including many bottles of very nice Côtes du Rhône rose. The next morning, we leave Avignon for another day of cycling through tiny villages, across busy bridges (with ultranarrow sidewalk lanes with large drops to the roadway, which tends to focus the riding mind) and along lanes lined by huge Sycamores, with artistic trunks and elegant limbs. We stop for lunch (which we make ourselves each morning from an unimaginative buffet of cheeses, meats and breads) at Pont du Gard—a Roman monument built in 1st century AD. It is a three-level aqueduct standing 50m high and allowed water to flow 50 km across the river to Nîmes. Roman architects and hydraulic engineers created a technical masterpiece that took 1,000 workers to build. It is a work of art. My husband and I swim in the clear, icy cold river below the aqueduct. More cycling takes us to a boutique olive oil mill. The owners explain the process: from “combing” the olive trees (by hand with an implement that resembles a big comb) to pressing the olives (pits and all) to achieve the “virgin” designation. The waste goes to fertilize the vines and to feed “combat bulls” who will “eat anything, including small children.” As a boutique olive oil house, they make a fraction of the production that houses in Spain, Italy or Greece would produce. By the way, the owners say “first press” can no longer be sold because it doesn’t meet safety regulations. If you see that term on a bottle, it’s a marketing ploy. We meet up with the barge at Aramon, where we sit on deck with some wine to joke about what cook will serve for dinner and hear Daniella tell us about tomorrow’s ride. Pick up Pique next week for Part 2. n

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ALL Combo Campers enjoy amazing afternoons on the lake in our popular paddle sports program with our top certified coaches For additional information and registration go to

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Kiddy Combo Camp (3 -5)

lauren@whistlersportsacademy.com

SUMMER 2019 CAMPS WYSC offers a well-structured program in each of its summer camp weeks that ensures players learn and improve their skills whilst having fun and being active. A team of experienced coaches will help players develop their technical and tactical skills as well as playing games for team building.

WEEK #1 JULY 2 – JULY 5

WEEK #2 AUGUST 12 – AUGUST 16

WEEK #3 AUGUST 19 – AUGUST 23

EUROPEAN FOOTBALL SCHOOL/SAIBO & WYSC COACHES

SANDI POTIS & WYSC COACHES

SANDI POTIS

5 days 9:30am to noon

5-9yrs ............................... $120

4 days 9:30am to noon

10-17yrs ........................... $120

10-17yrs

5 days 9:30am to noon

$150

WYSC IS LOOKING AT HOLDING AN EVENING COMP IN JULY – INFORMATION COMING SOON. More detailed information about summer camps is available here:

whistlersoccer.com

MAY 9, 2019

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Summer Camps

Phot o by Cour Sea to S k tesy Little y Photog ra Bear Prod phy / uctio ns

Come set your creative self free at

The

Point

Artist-run

Centre

CHILDREN'S CAMPS INTO THE GROVE MUSIC CAMP with acclaimed musician/instructor PaPa Josh

JULY 15th - 19th 2019 9am-3pm Ages 8 & Up early bird $300 until June 3rd Potential second camp July 22nd - 26th

kids improv & acting camp with Champion of Arts & Culture Award winner Ira Pettle JULY 29th - AuG 2nd 2019 9am-3pm Ages 6 to 12 early bird $300 until June 17th

children's expressive arts camp with multi-talented artist and musician Aude Ray

Aug 12th - 16th 2019 9am-3pm Ages 8 & Up early bird $300 until July 1st

flag stop teen acting mentorship program with coach performance & entertainer Ira Pettle

JUne 26th - Aug 7th 2019 7pm-9:30PM Performance at the Flag Stop Festival on August 10th!

Ages 13 to 17 $250 Registration & more information at

www.thepointartists.com

56 MAY 9, 2019

gill Photo by Darby Ma t Museum Ar in da Au y Courtes

SUMMER CAMPS


Summer Camps

r e m m u SCamp 2019

Let the fun begin!

LB Theatre Camp Series! Your kids will sing, dance, act, make sets, do fun arts and crafts, go on outings and have a healthy snack each day! Aaaaand... On Fridays, put on a show! It doesn’t get any better.

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July 29–August 2 and August 19–August 23 Space is limited so register today! www.lbpentertainment.com

Register now for Camp Tiny Tykes and Camp Action Adventure summer camps at the Resort Municipality of Whistler and know that you’re giving your preschooler and primary aged kid the social and foundational skills to set them up for life. Learn more at whistler.ca/summercamp. whistler.ca/notices | 604-935-8371  @RMWhistler |  @rmwhistler |  @rmowhistler

MAY 9, 2019

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SPORTS THE SCORE

Axemen win championship CLUB HOPES JUGGERNAUT SEASON THE START OF SOMETHING SPECIAL

BY DAN FALLOON FOR AS STRONG as the Axemen Rugby Club was in the BC Rugby Union’s Mainland Division 3 regular season, the club kicked it up a notch in the playoffs. Featuring players from all over the Sea to Sky, the Axemen capped an incredible 2018-19 campaign with its first title on May 4, downing Richmond 33-3. The local side lost just once this season, finishing the regular season 13-1 and outscoring opponents 481-82 while boasting easily the best offensive and defensive numbers in the league. Not that they needed it, but the Axemen caught a break with a first-round bye after their opponent from Langley couldn’t field a team. The squad then rolled Chilliwack 57-0 before topping Richmond. Head coach Blake Mahovic noted the club has enjoyed success in its first five seasons, reaching two semifinals and a final before this campaign. “It was nice to go out there and win— and win pretty convincingly, too,” he said. Given the team’s dominance throughout the season, Mahovic said there wasn’t more instruction to give in the lead-up to the final. Rather, it was a matter of getting everyone into the right state of mind.

BAD AXES The Axemen Rugby Club captured its first-ever BC Rugby Union Division 3 championship on May 4, defeating Richmond 33-3. PHOTO BY BROCK MANUEL

58 MAY 9, 2019

“We knew we could do it, but it’s always a case of people getting too anxious and trying to do a bit too much when we have a structure in place,” he said. “In that week of preparation, we were just keeping players calm, making sure that they trust in the system and we’re doing what we know we have to do. “There’s not really much coaching to be done.”

game,” he said. “We actually came out a lot stronger in the second half than we did in the first, and it was a testament to the boys.” Richmond, which scored at a rate trailing only the Axemen, couldn’t get anything going against a defence that bent, but never broke. “They were five metres from our try line for a solid 10 minutes of the first half and

“It was nice to go out there and win—and win pretty convincingly, too.” - BLAKE MAHOVIC

The championship game got off to perhaps a bit of a slow start for a team that had run wild on its challengers all season, as the Axemen held just a 5-3 advantage at halftime. However, the Axemen reeled off four tries in the second half to cruise to the win. Mahovic scored two of those, with Matthew Jolley, Jack Couzens and Stephen List scoring singles. Neil Irwin added four conversions. Mahovic sensed some nerves at the break, but the coaching staff helped the players reset to come out strong in the second half. “We went back out, straight back to the game plan and it was just like the start of the

we managed to keep them out,” Mahovic recalled. President and co-founder Al Macaulay said in an email that the victory provides a gratifying feeling after rebooting the club a half-decade ago. “I am not sure I have words for just how much this means to myself and the club, and all those who have been involved from the restart 5 years ago. I am incredibly thankful for all the players, the coaching staff, the fans and the sponsors who have all contributed to getting us where we are today,” he wrote. “It’s such an incredible feeling.” Macaulay noted that Mahovic coming in as coach three years ago helped elevate

the team from one that struggled at times to field 15 players to a real contender. “Once that was in place it all took off from there. Players bought into the club and the direction it was going. Over the past few seasons the club has grown to become more than just a rugby club, and if you ask any member they will tell you that we are all a family, and this is one of the biggest reasons for our success,” he wrote. Looking ahead, the Axemen will seek promotion to Division 2 with an eye on fielding a second team in Division 3. As well, the club is hoping to field a women’s team in 2019-20. “We’ll be fielding two more teams in September, hopefully,” Mahovic said, noting recruitment will be a major focus for the club this year. The club, which held a youth jamboree in Squamish on the weekend, is also looking to boost its programming for kids in seasons to come. A major part of the expansion involves finding and building a permanent home for the club, as it currently rents its practice fields. “It would be nice to have something that we could call our clubhouse, and then a field that we could have a centralized location where we would have the youth programs, the men’s and women’s programs, and we would open it up to the community over the weekend,” he said. Those interested in more information on the program can visit www.facebook. com/AxemenRugbyClub. n


SPORTS THE SCORE

EST.2006

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STRONG START Lara Esslinger, a German international student and equestrian in Pemberton, excelled at the Tbird Hunter Jumper April Season Opener in Langley last month.

PHOTO BY SALLY WARNER

Authorized by the Government of Canada to represent applications to the Minister of Immigration. Brooke graduated top of her class from UBC’s Certificate in Immigration: Laws, Policies and Procedures program and was recognized by the Canadian Association of Professional Immigration Consultants for her academic achievements.

Dazzling debut for Esslinger GERMAN INTERNATIONAL STUDENT PLACED AS GRAND CHAMPION, RESERVE CHAMPION IN FIRST EQUESTRIAN EVENT

BY DAN FALLOON LARA

ESSLINGER made an impression with her first-ever equestrian competition at the Tbird Hunter Jumper April Season Opener at Langley’s Thunderbird Show Park last month. The German student, who is living in Pemberton for the school year and training

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Esslinger is a seasoned rider in dressage, but had to learn some different skills to excel in equestrian. “I put my dressage riding into show jumping,” she said. “I had problems with changing my feet, because the feet in show jumping are way lighter than in dressage. Also, the way your body works with the horse is just different, so that was my biggest challenge, but I think I managed it pretty well.”

“I put my dressage riding into show jumping.” - LARA ESSLINGER

at the Pemberton Valley Equestrian Centre, excelled in her debut. Esslinger rode Rivaldi, owned by Sally Warner, to place as Grand Champion and Reserve Champion in the 0.85m Open Jumper and junior amateur jumper divisions. “I didn’t expect to win at all,” she said, later adding that the early success gave her more confidence and changed her mindset as the week progressed. The ability to get to know a horse and achieve success as part of a team is a major draw of equestrian to Esslinger, who has found that connection with Rivaldi. “I’ve been riding him since September, now, so I got to know him. It was quite an experience to go with him to the show,” she said. “That makes it even a better relationship because you experienced that together.”

(inside the Whistler Chamber of Commerce)

Esslinger will attend one more competition at Thunderbird Show Park later this month. Though she scored well in her debut, she knows there are elements to her riding that she can clean up. “I can work on some errors that we did last show. It wasn’t perfect, so we will work on that and hopefully, it will be another good show,” she said. Esslinger said she might compete in the 0.90-metre division, but that is still to be determined. While Esslinger will have to return home to Germany, she was glad to have come to Pemberton to learn and have the new experience of competing overseas. “I wanted to ride horses here. That’s why I came to Pemberton,” she said. She also plans to stick with equestrian when she returns to Europe. n

VOLUNTEER VOLUNTEERS

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IRONMAN Canada is excited to return to Would you like toagain raise $ this for your community groupare while Whistler year and we having a great day helping athletes reach their goals? looking for volunteers to make this a dayhas forVolunteer athletes. Captain IRONMANgreat Canada positions available for the race July 28, 2019 Come to our “Après Style” meeting on Wednesday, May 22 between 5-7 pm at Hunter Gather to learn more.

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MAY 9, 2019

59


SPORTS THE SCORE

NOTICE OF WAIVING OF PUBLIC HEARING ELECTORAL AREA D

ZONING AMENDMENT BYLAW FOR AGRICULTURAL CANNABIS PRODUCTION

Pursuant to Section 464 of the Local Government Act this is to provide notice of intent of the Squamish Lillooet Regional District to amend Electoral Area D Zoning Bylaw No. 1350-2016 in a manner consistent with Electoral Area D Official Community Plan Bylaw No. 1135-2013. Public Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 467 of the Local Government Act that a Public Hearing will be waived regarding the following bylaw: 1.

Squamish Lillooet Regional District Zoning Bylaw No. 1350-2016, Amendment Bylaw No. 1613-2019

PURPOSE OF BYLAW 1613-2019: The Squamish Lillooet Regional District needs to update all the Electoral Area zoning bylaws to align with the recent amendments to the Agricultural Land Commission Act (ALCA) and Regulation that came into force on July 13, 2018. These amendment bylaws seek to incorporate the Agricultural Land Commission (ALC) Order in Council 380/2018 changes which allow for agricultural cannabis production in the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR). Proposed Zoning Amendment Amendment Bylaw 1613-2019 sees the addition of agricultural cannabis production as a permitted use in the Agriculture Zones. Operations that meet the ALC requirements for farm use (i.e. soil based) are now defined as agricultural cannabis production and are permitted on a parcel of any size in the ALR. Operations that do not meet the ALC requirements for designation as farm use continue to fall under the cannabis production facility definition, and will require a non-farm use application to the ALC, as per the ALCA and Regulation. The following amendments are proposed for the Squamish Lillooet Regional District Zoning Bylaw No. 1350-2016: A new definition of Agriculture is proposed. A new definition of Cannabis Production, Agricultural is proposed. Agricultural Cannabis production is to be permitted on all AGR zoned parcels. These zoning amendments will apply to all lands in Electoral Area D. • • •

INFORMATION & SUBMISSIONS? A copy of the proposed bylaws and relevant background documents may be inspected at the Regional District office, 1350 Aster Street, Pemberton, BC, during office hours 8:00 am to 4:30 pm from May 6, 2019 to May 21, 2019 not including weekends and statutory holidays or on the SLRD website at www. slrd.bc.ca/inside-slrd/notices. A copy of the Board resolution waiving the public hearing is available for public inspection along with a copy of Bylaw No. 1613-2019 as set out in this notice. Third reading and adoption of Amendment Bylaw No. 1613-2019 is scheduled for May 22, 2019. All persons who believe that their interests are affected by the proposed bylaws shall be afforded a reasonable opportunity to present written submissions respecting matters contained in the bylaws. Kristen Clark, Director of Legislative and Corporate Services Squamish-Lillooet Regional District Box 219, 1350 Aster Street, Pemberton, BC, V0N 2L0 www.slrd.bc.ca P: 604-894-6371 TF: 1-800-298-7753 F: 604-894-6526 E: info@slrd.bc.ca

60 MAY 9, 2019

NEW GM Big Sky Golf Club general manager Mike MacNeil has taken over the role from longtime GM Woody Bishop. PHOTO SUBMITTED

Golf courses set to welcome the world MAJOR TOURNAMENTS COMING TO THE SEA TO SKY THIS YEAR

BY DAN FALLOON WHEN BIG SKY Golf Club welcomed its first players of the season on April 26, it was the first opening day as general manager for Mike MacNeil. MacNeil takes over for long-time GM Woody Bishop, who is now managing Glasgow Hills Resort and Golf Club on Prince Edward Island, and hopes to stay on the path Bishop started. In recent years, Big Sky has hosted non-golf events ranging from movie nights to painting classes to draw in as many people from the community as possible. “That’s a priority that will continue. If the kids are coming out and golfing, that’s great, but just getting them out to the facility, whether they hit some balls, play in the kids’ play area, or just come in for lunch … that’s what it’s here for,” he said. “We’re not going to try to reinvent the wheel. We’ve got a good business plan put in place so there’s definitely going to be some tweaks that we’ll make. We’ll try to improve on everything we’ve been doing and keep the momentum going in the right direction.” Another movie night is on track, while the club is also hosting larger live music nights, including The Hairfarmers on June 13. On the course, MacNeil said the conditions have been prime early in the season. “The weather has been fantastic and dry, which has been a bit of a different start for us in Pemberton, where we usually have such high water levels,” he said. “It’s been a very good opening first week and a half, so we’re really excited.” That bodes well for later in the summer, as the club is set to host the 117th BC Amateur Championship, BC Golf’s biggest event of the season, from July 9 to 12.

“That’s a very exciting event for us to be hosting. We’ll have the top 150 golfers in the province,” he said. “It’ll be a great field and a great way to showcase both Pemberton and (the) beautiful Big Sky Golf Course.” Next door at The Meadows at Pemberton, general manager Kevin McLeod has been bullish on the 2019 summer season, especially given the course’s April 13 opening date, as there has been nearly a month of play from which to judge. Like MacNeil, McLeod has been happy with the weather. “We haven’t had a whole lot of rain as of late. It’s starting to warm up overnight, so the morning rush is getting busy as well,” he said. The Meadows also has a major provincial event this summer, hosting the BC Juvenile Championships for more than 100 golfers aged 16 and under from Aug. 12 to 15. BC Golf brass were at Big Sky last year and popped by the neighbouring Meadow, where they were so impressed they wanted to bring the juvenile event there for 2019, McLeod said. “It’ll bring a lot of people to Pemberton that probably haven’t been here before,” he said. “It’ll bring more exposure for the course.” The Meadows is also serving as the home base for the 2019 Paragliding Nationals from July 20 to 28, which won’t affect play at the course, but might enhance the experience. “If people are out golfing, they’ll look up in the sky and see 60, 80, 100, 120 paragliders flying above,” he said. As for your average golfer, McLeod is pushing nine-hole play this year, as some people want to get out and hit a few balls, but don’t have time for a full 18 holes. Here in Whistler, meanwhile, courses are set to open this weekend.

SEE PAGE 60

>>


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MAY 9, 2019

61


SPORTS THE SCORE

RESORT MUNICIPALITY OF WHISTLER

BIKE HOST PROGRAM

• Do you love riding your bike? • Do you know Whistler’s biking and hiking trails well? • Do you connect with visitors on trails and in parks, giving directions to where they want to go? • Do you like great rewards and being part of a fun team while assisting others?

TEEING OFF Whistler Golf Club is welcoming its first golfers of the season on May 10. FILE PHOTO COURTESY OF WHISTLER GOLF CLUB

Join Whistler’s Bike Host Volunteer Summer Program. Enjoy being outside, active and involved in your community.

<< FROM PAGE 60

To apply or receive more information, contact Erin Morgan at ihost@whistler.ca or 604 935-8478

Whistler Golf Club is set to host its first rounds on May 10, and if the activity at the driving range is any indication, interest should start out hot, according to general manager Alan Kristmanson. Tiger Woods’ recent re-ascension is a boost not only for the club, he said, but the sport as a whole. “It’s huge. Everybody’s talking golf and

Resort Municipality of Whistler whistler.ca/committees

NEW MANAGEMENT

repair from tree roots or poor draining, so on Hole No. 1, there are a lot of cottonwood trees that have been causing problems for the cart paths. We’ve slowly been picking away at removing those,” he said, adding that holes No. 5 and 14 will also see cartpath improvements. Hole No. 5 will also see two of its tee boxes repaired. While 2019 should be a fine summer, the course is looking ahead to 2020, with a planned full-scale renovation for Table

“It’s going to take golf and put it on the next level for awareness for Whistler being a well-regarded, world-class golf destination.” - JASON LOWE

THE OWNERS OF THE BLACKCOMB LODGE ARE PROUD TO ANNOUNCE OUR NEW HOTEL MANAGEMENT CONTRACT WITH

62 MAY 9, 2019

everybody was pretty riveted by that,” he said. “The Masters gets everyone excited about golf and hopefully for us, it ties in with some good weather and getting the range open, which it did.” Like its Pemberton counterparts, the club is excited to bring in a set of talented golfers with the PGA of BC Championship on August 19 and 20. “It gets the staff really excited to get the course in tournament condition,” he said. “This golf course really holds up well to good players. Nobody ever goes really low here. The greens get up to speed really good here and they’ve got lots of slope.” It should provide a boost to the club, he said, as having pros from all over the province is “the best marketing we can get.” “We’ll be working towards fine tuning the golf course to get those speeds up nice and quick for those guys,” he said. Lastly, at Nicklaus North Golf Course, general manager Jason Lowe said golfers will notice some minor improvements when the course reopens on May 16, including repaved cart paths. “You’ve got cart paths that get in bad

Nineteen Lakeside Eatery beginning in the fall. Lowe also noted that the Golf Whistler group, which involves all local courses except the Meadows at Pemberton, has enjoyed a strong start to 2019 with round sales through the portal up 158 per cent and accommodations up 200 per cent thanks to improved marketing and sales approaches. “A big part of it is internal, what the Golf Whistler group has been doing in general to do a better job of marketing Whistler as a world-class golf destination. Those efforts, and the effectiveness of those efforts, have really increased in the last few years,” he said. Lowe added that the Golf Channel is coming this July to film content that will air next winter. “That’s going to be a real marquee happening for us. It’s going to take golf and put it on the next level for awareness for Whistler being a regarded, world-class golf destination,” he said, noting several parts of the U.S. still don’t have Whistler on the radar. The Fairmont Chateau Whistler Golf Course, meanwhile, will open on May 11. n


5 DAYS Last Day

THURSDAY 27TH JUNE.

Choice of one plate

Grilled Chicken Caesar Salad

Marinated chicken thigh, low fat yogurt dressing, capered focaccia croutons, Grana Padano crisp

2 Baja fish Taco

House slaw, avocado salsa verde+cilantro sour cream served in a flour tortilla

Johnny Mac Pizza

Capicolla, mushrooms, mozzarella, provolone

Beef Burger

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Mac and Cheese

Macaroni, 4 cheese sauce, light panko crust +garlic toast

Plus one craft beer Grizzly Brown Ale • Lifty Lager •Alta Lake Ale • 5 Rings IPA

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14.99

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EACH

SUNDAY TO THURSDAY EXCEPT HOLIDAYS

THANK YOU! The Resort Municipality of Whistler would like to thank the following for their generous contributions to the

Serving the corridor for over 25 years!

30th ANNUAL PITCH-IN DAY Thank you to the Whistler Fire Rescue Service for hosting the BBQ.

CORPORATE SPONSORS

Karen and her associate Krystle worked extremely hard on our mortgage for us. We have worked with her throughout the years and she is attentive and professional. It made the biggest investment of our life much easier with her guiding us through each step. I am happy to have found her and I have no doubt we will work together again in the future! - B & B Burton

PARTICIPANTS AWARE, Spring Creek Elementary, Whistler Waldorf School, Ecole la Passerelle, Rotary Club of Whistler, Coast Mountain Girl Guides, Whistler Soccer Club, Whistler Taekwondo, Whistler Skating Club, Whistler Village Hosts, Nester’s Market, IGA, The Village Grocery Store, Whistler Fire and Rescue, Independent, Your Independent Grocer, Delta Whistler Village Suites, Whistler Secondary School Outdoor Program and Four Seasons Resort and all the residents and volunteers who

Eileen Craig is dedicated and professional getting the job done and can be very knowledgeable with the new tougher financing rules.I highly recommend Eileen she is my first choice for referring business too.

participated by lending a hand.

THANK YOU! The support from all the sponsors and volunteers made this another great event!

- L.H.

karengarrett.ca / eileencraig.ca

Located at 106 - 7015 Nesters Rd Whistler BC V8E 0X1

Resort Municipality of Whistler whistler.ca MAY 9, 2019

63


SPORTS THE SCORE

Whistler Cycling Club starting fifth season SPORTS BRIEFS: WELSH HELPS SPRUCE KINGS TO DOYLE CUP; LOCALS RUN BMO VANCOUVER MARATHON

BY DAN FALLOON THE WHISTLER CYCLING CLUB is gearing up for its fifth summer on local roads. The club is always looking for new members, according to president Bob Barnett, and is also looking for existing members to take on the role of ride leaders. The club held its first workshop for ride leaders on May 8, with another planned for Sunday, May 12. Rides officially began on May 7. Barnett said the club will be hosting several events outside of its traditional rides on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Sundays, beginning with its GO Fest programming on May long weekend. The year’s biggest ride is always the summer solstice event, which this year will run alongside Stewart Blaser’s ride to remember former members Ross Chafe and Kelly Blunden, who died after being hit by a drunk driver on the Duffey in May 2015. The ride is set for June 15, though start and finish locations are still being determined. As well, a members-only social at Whistler Village Sports is slated after the Wednesday-night ride on May 22. In addition

BACK IN ACTION The Whistler Cycling Club, shown here during a past ride up to Cypress Mountain, has started

its fifth season.

taking their mountain bikes to the bike park. The acting regional representative for the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure is a cyclist, Barnett said, which is an exciting development and hopefully, a step forward in the relationship between the club and the ministry. “There have been little improvements over the years,” said Barnett, noting that cycling route signs have been installed and, when Highway 99 between Whistler and Pemberton was repaved, the shoulders were also repaved. There have already been some developments this summer, Barnett said. “They’re going to be repainting the fog lines this spring, so that is good for everybody on the road whether you’re riding or driving,” Barnett said, adding that Miller Capilano has started sweeping the highways and tarring the cracks on the roads. Those looking to register or get more information on the club’s rides can visit www.whistlercyclingclub.ca.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WHISTLER CYCLING CLUB

to offering prizes and refreshments, it’s also an opportunity for newer riders to get some bike tips. On the advocacy side of the club’s purview,

WALSH

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with increased traffic, safety becomes even more of an issue, and Barnett said the club is advocating on behalf of all cyclists, whether they’re road riders, commuters or downhillers

WELSH HELPS SPRUCE KINGS TO DOYLE CUP Whistler’s Nolan Welsh got hot at home during the Prince George Spruce Kings’

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SPORTS THE SCORE

GET IN LINE Registration for Crankworx Whistler races, including the Kidsworx B-Line race, is now open. PHOTO BY JAY FRENCH/CRANKWORX

Doyle Cup series against the Brooks Bandits. Welsh, of the British Columbia Hockey League champion Spruce Kings, scored two goals and an assist in Prince George’s home games to help them clinch the title over the Alberta champions in six games. Prince George clinched the series with a 4-2 win on May 4. Both teams will head back to Brooks for the RBC Cup national championship, which runs May 11 to 19. The tournament will also feature the Ontario Junior Hockey League’s Oakville Blades, the Central Canada Hockey League’s Ottawa Jr. Senators and the Manitoba Junior Hockey League’s Portage Terriers.

LOCALS COMPLETE BMO VANCOUVER MARATHON Several Whistler and Pemberton residents travelled to Vancouver to run the BMO Vancouver Marathon on May 5. Runners who completed the full marathon were: Anton Masich, James Bentley, Haruka Sekine, Matus Kirilak, Alex Porkhun, Oliver Handford and Jan Madsen of Whistler, and Pemberton residents Rhys Stuckey and Gwendolyn Kennedy. As for the half marathon, Hamish Hall, Walter Wallgram, Sophie Marsh, Alina Neumerzhitskaya, Roman Misyura, Saori Igarashi and Zahara Foyston of Whistler completed the course, as did Erica Hurtubise, Renee Howell and Adam Adams of Pemberton. Lastly, eight-kilometre finishers were: Jim Budge, William Goldstein, Emma Griffiths, Tyler Lalecheur and Tom Leson of Whistler, and Carrie Charron of Pemberton. Full results are online at www. bmovanmarathon.ca.

WORCA BIKE SWAP SET FOR SATURDAY With the Whistler Mountain Bike Park set to open on May 17, it’s time to get prepared at the Whistler Off-Road Cycling Association (WORCA) annual bike swap on May 11. The swap will run from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Whistler Olympic Plaza. Those interested in selling items must drop them off between 8 and 9:30 a.m., though anyone with 10 or more items should contact fundraising@worca.com in advance of the sale. The tag fee is $2 per item, with WORCA taking a commission of 15 per cent on the first $1,000 and 10 per cent on the remainder. Unsold items must be picked up between 2:30 and 4 p.m., after which they will become WORCA property. Volunteers are still needed for May 10 and 11.

a RED BULL MEDIA HOUSE production in association with SENDER FILMS

TOMMY

CALDWELL

KEVIN

JORGESON

CRANKWORX REGISTRATION OPEN Mountain bikers hoping to test their mettle at Crankworx Whistler can sign up now. Registration for both the pro and amateur categories in the Garbanzo DH (Aug. 9), Air DH (Aug. 12 and 13), 100% Dual Slalom (Aug. 14) and Canadian Open DH (Aug. 18) is now open. As well, groms looking to throw down can do so at Kidsworx in the Enduro (Aug. 9), B-Line Race (Aug. 11), BMX Challenge (Aug. 13), XC (Aug. 14) and Dirt Pump Track Challenge (Aug. 15). Those interested in signing up are encouraged to do so early as each event fills up each year. Check out www.crankworx. com for more or to register. n

MAY 9, 2019

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FORK IN THE ROAD

Seeds: Small things largely taken for granted JUST ADD WATER… WE FIRST THINK of them, if we think of them at all, as no big deal. They’re tiny, sometimes even a nuisance we have to scrape out of honeydews or squash. But mostly they’re just quiet things, behind the scenes. Beige. Truth is, seeds are a big deal. And they come in all kinds of packages. Some are whispy; some winged. Some are spiny, spiked or forked. The water

BY GLENDA BARTOSH caltrop seed (also called water chestnut, although it’s not a true Chinese water chestnut), is an amazing midnight-black mini-sculpture shaped like a bull’s head with curved horns. Raffia palm seeds mimic a map of the world; the traveller’s palm seed has an edible coating blue as a tropical sea. As for giant seeds, the first one that pops to mind is the brown, hairy coconut. Technically it’s a drupe—a fleshy fruit with a skin and central stone like an olive (druppa is Greek for “olive”). But we’re on the right track. The world’s largest true seed is the Coco de Mer, native only to two islands in the Seychelles. This humungous

FROM A LITTLE SPROUT Four-year-old Marisol

Reaves supervises mom, Simone McIsaac, co-owner and farmer at Pemberton’s Rootdown Organic Farm, who’s planting cilantro seeds in trays for later transplantation into the fields. PHOTO BY TYLER REAVES

66 MAY 9, 2019

seed can weigh up to 17 kilograms! Which is also its undoing. Coco de Mer palms are now endangered as the seed is so heavy it doesn’t disperse, instead dropping straight to the ground under its parent. There’s the black, wrinkly asparagus seed that comes from poisonous red berries. Fat nutmeg seeds with their orange lacey covering we grate for mace. Teeny Mayan mint seeds so small we can barely see them. As you can see, seeds are totally fascinating—and at least one local farmer agrees they’re also totally taken for granted. “I think people don’t understand how important (seeds) are in terms of food production and diversity—and how superresilient they are. They’re amazing!” says Simone McIsaac, co-owner and proud farmer at Pemberton’s Rootdown Organic Farm, where they buy $3,000 to $4,000 worth of seeds each year for their 30-plus veggie and herb crops. At one time, we humans grew our own food, or at least our parents and grandparents did. We were very connected to seeds then. Not anymore. “People in general are so disconnected from their food. A lot of children think that potatoes just jump into a grocery store, or something like that,” McIsaac adds with a laugh. “So I think that’s a further mark of disconnect… “Even being a farmer and buying seeds myself, I still don’t totally understand—and I feel very humbled by—the whole seedsaving, seed-breeding, seed-propagation thing. That’s a whole other world for us.” Our contemporary lack of consideration for the mighty little seed is even more ironic

given virtually everything we eat depends on seeds. According to National Public Radio, economists determined that the average American eats nearly a ton (and I’m using U.S. metrics here, as in 2,000 pounds) of food a year. Of that, 197 pounds is grain; 273 pounds, fruit; and 415 pounds, veggies. So about 44 per cent of the average American diet depends directly on plants sprouted from seeds. (Sorry, I’d love to give you Canadian equivalents, but economists have yet to crunch our national food consumption data. However, Statistics Canada at 150.statcan. gc.ca has more info.) When you add in all the plants—all the grain, the grass, the vegetables that the animals we eat live on—you quickly realize that virtually everything we eat depends on seeds. Ergo the huge global seed vault at Svalbard, Norway, where more than 400,000 different types of seed are stored in an isolated vault embedded in permafrost—permafrost that’s melting with climate change. But that’s a story for another day. In the meantime, know that the Pemberton Valley is famous for its healthy seed potatoes, largely due to its isolation which keeps seed potatoes, like those grown at Helmers Organic Farm or Across the Creek Organics, free from pests and disease. You can’t buy other seeds from Pemberton farmers, but you can from reliable suppliers to start your own seedy connections. Stefan Butler at Nutrient Dense Farm in Brackendale, where they also take great care with their 30-plus veggies and herbs, has these great tips.

First and foremost, find a good supplier that sells seeds not sprayed with pesticides or fungicides. Start with the BC Eco Seed Co-op, an excellent source of organic suppliers from across the province. “The seed co-op is really building up and it’s something worth supporting,” says Butler. “They only get seeds from within B.C., and those seeds are going to be way more adapted to the climate and growing conditions here.” West Coast Seeds in Vancouver is also good, offering 1,000+ varieties of untreated, non-GMO seeds. As for that Mayan mint seed, it comes from Central America. The plant’s oil is 1,500 times sweeter than sugar and makes an excellent substitute for stevia, proving you never know what a seed might hold. But you can learn lots about them, as I did, from the University of Chicago’s wonderful The Book of Seeds, a life-size guide to 600 species from around the world. Without lifting a finger or watering can, you can also enjoy the outstanding results carefully grown from well-sourced seeds at Rootdown and Nutrient Dense farms by ordering their CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) harvest boxes online. For Nutrient Dense’s fresh produce, also visit the farmers’ markets they sell at in Vancouver and Squamish, or their farmstand in beautiful Brackendale. And check out Pemberton’s and Whistler’s farmers’ markets for more happy seed results. Glenda Bartosh is an award-winning journalist. The first seed she grew was a bright orange marigold in a tin can on her Grade 1 classroom’s windowsill. n


MEADOW PARK SPORTS CENTRE SWIM • SKATE • SWEAT • SQUASH

Meadow Park Sports Centre is located 4 km north of Whistler Village. OPEN DAILY: 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Last entry by 9:30 p.m.

GROUP FITNESS SCHEDULE THU 9

FRI 10

SAT 11

Circuit 7:30-8:30a.m.

Low Impact Circuit 7:30-8:30a.m.

Total Body Conditioning 7:30-8:30a.m.

Cardio Core Workout 9-10a.m.

Circuit 9-10a.m.

Low Impact Circuit 9-10a.m.

SUN 12

MON 13

Low Impact Circuit 7:30-8.30a.m. Circuit 9-10a.m.

TUE 14

Low Impact Circuit 9-10a.m.

WED 15

Low Impact Circuit 7:30-8:30a.m

*Barre Aqua Fit *Parent & 11:45-12:45p.m. Shallow Baby Fit 10:30-11:30a.m. 9:30-10:30a.m.

Low Impact *Parent & Zumba Baby Fit Aerobics 10:30-11:30a.m. 10:30-11:30a.m. 10:30-11:30a.m.

*Stabilize It 12-12:45p.m.

*Mobilize It 12-12:45p.m.

Family Yoga* Ages 4-7 11:40-12:25p.m.

*Strong Hearts 12-1p.m. Zumba 12:15-1 p.m. *Gentle Fit for Seniors 1-2p.m.

*Gentle Fit for Seniors 1-2p.m. *PWR! Moves 1:15-2:15p.m.

*PWR! Moves 1:15-2:15p.m.

Box Fit 6:45-7:45p.m.

Grrls Bootcamp 4-4:45p.m.

*PWR! Moves 1:15-2:15p.m.

whistler.ca/notices

Strong by Zumba 5:30-6:30p.m

20/20/20 5:30-6:30p.m. *Spin 6-7p.m.

May 3, 4, or 5, due to spring tournaments

Total Body Conditioning 9-10a.m.

Aqua Fit Deep 9:30-10:30a.m.

Zumba 12:15-1p.m.

No Public Skate

Classes with * are registered or flexible registration (flex reg) programs and require registration of at least 5 people to start. All other classes are included in the price of admission.

See exact schedule of classess at the sports centre or online at:

Mind Body Stretch 8-9 p.m.

*Spin Bootcamp 5:10-6:10p.m. 6-7p.m.

TRX Mixer 5:10-6:10p.m.

Zumba *Pilates Mat 6:20-7:20p.m. Class 6:45-7:45p.m.

Zumba 6:20-7:20p.m.

Stretch & Restore Yoga 8-9 p.m.

whistler.ca/recreation

ARENA SCHEDULE THU 9

W&OT Drop-In Hockey

8:15-9:45a.m. Drop-In Hockey 10-11:30a.m.

FRI 10

Drop-In Hockey 8:15-9:45a.m.

SAT 11

SUN 12

NO PUBLIC SKATE

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

MON 13

55+ Drop-In Hockey 8:15-9:45a.m.

TUE 14

WED 15

Drop-In Hockey 8:15-9:45a.m.

Drop-In Hockey 10-11:30a.m. Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 6:30-8p.m.

POOL SCHEDULE THU 9

FRI 10

SAT 11

SUN 12

MON 13

TUE 14

WED 15

LEISURE POOL 9a.m. - 9p.m. LAP POOL, HOT TUB, SAUNA, STEAM ROOM 6a.m. - 10p.m.

whistler.ca/recreation | whistler.ca/notices | 604-935-7529  @RMWhistler |  @rmwhistler |  @rmowhistler

Camp Tiny Tyke For ages 3-5 years Every Tuesday and Thursday in July and August 9-12p.m Email kotg@whistler.ca to register now! whistler.ca/summercamp


EPICURIOUS

Alta Bistro named best of Whistler at Vancouver Magazine Restaurant Awards FIRST WIN AT PRESTIGIOUS AWARDS FOR MODERN FRENCH EATERY

BY BRANDON BARRETT FOR THE SECOND YEAR in a row, a first-time winner has been named as Whistler’s top restaurant at the prestigious Vancouver Magazine Restaurant Awards. “Well, sooner or later the local secret had to get out, and this is the year our judges decided to spill it: Gold winner Alta Bistro is the best restaurant in Whistler,” wrote Vancouver Magazine, the B.C. restaurant industry’s perennial tastemaker. Although the contemporary French restaurant has cracked the list before, this is the first time it will take home the gold, an honour that was mostly unexpected for co-owner and wine director Eric Griffith and his team. “We didn’t even plan to go to the awards because it wasn’t like we were expecting anything,” he said. “It’s amazing recognition from the group. It’s an institutional kind of magazine. We’re really happy.” The judges called Executive Chef Nick Cassettari “a model of overperforming for almost a decade now,” and also praised Griffith for curating Whistler’s “most interesting (wine) list.” Dishing out fine-dining-level food that speaks to the restaurant’s fierce commitment to eating locally and sustainably, Alta Bistro has managed to create a “young and carefree vibe” that has “none of the formality that can affect resort dining,” according to the magazine. Griffith believes that approachable environment goes back to the freedom management gives to its staff to express themselves. “We don’t force our staff into a box,” he said. “The personality of the staff is there, and everyone has their own personality and they are encouraged to be their own person and maintain professionalism within that.” Earning silver this year was The Grill Room, the Fairmont Chateau Whistler’s four-diamond steakhouse, which not only

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STRIKING GOLD Co-owner Eric Griffith and the rest of the Alta Bistro team can celebrate their first gold medal at the 2019 Vancouver Magazine Restaurant Awards after being named Whistler’s top restaurant. FILE PHOTO BY DAVID BUZZARD / WWW.MEDIA-CENTRE.CA

received its first nomination last year, but its first win in the Best Whistler category. Judges wrote that Chef Derek Bendig has shown that “being attached to a hotel … doesn’t mean that the food has to be expected and safe.”

“We didn’t even plan to go to the awards because it wasn’t like we were expecting anything.” - ERIC GRIFFITH

The bronze went to Whistler’s longest running fine dining restaurant, Araxi, which had its decade-long string of goldmedal wins snapped in 2018. This year marks only the third time Araxi has failed

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to win this category. Honourable mentions this year went to Araxi’s sister restaurant, Bar Oso, and Creekside’s hidden gem, Red Door Bistro. Without the history and prime villagecentral location of some of its fine-dining brethren, Alta Bistro has flown under the radar somewhat, and this award should help give the restaurant some valuable exposure throughout the Lower Mainland. “I think the restaurant community and people that are savvy in food and interested in gastronomy and interested in wine and that type of realm, they’ve known about us for years,” Griffith explained. “But the people that aren’t paying attention and do other things in their lives than talk about food and wine, like we do all the time, they need a helping hand and that’s where Vancouver Magazine comes in to communicate that there are things worth looking at and trying.” Griffith is also hopeful the hardware will encourage diners unfamiliar with what

Alta Bistro does to get outside their comfort zones and try something a little different from the norm. “Maybe next time a decision is being made by someone that’s coming to Whistler to dine from wherever it may be, they’ll say, ‘Well, we trust these guys,’” he said. “Maybe they’ll understand why we have a small menu and why it’s seasonal, and maybe it will push their boundary a little bit in terms of what they’re willing to try.” As for Alta Bistro’s contingent of loyal regulars? The honour doesn’t necessarily come as a shock. “Our regular client base is like, ‘Well, obviously,” Griffith said of their reaction to the win. “We’re very happy to have done this this year and be a part of that group,” he added. “We’re in our ninth year, going on 10, and we’re not going anywhere soon.” For the full list of winners, visit vanmag.com/taste/vancouver-magazinerestaurant-awards-2019. n

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MAY 9, 2019

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ARTS SCENE

Geoff Powter shares stories from his mountain home CANMORE-BASED OUTDOOR WRITER TO TAKE PART IN WHISTLER WRITERS FESTIVAL READING EVENT ON FRIDAY, MAY 17

BY ALYSSA NOEL A LOT HAS CHANGED in the world of outdoor recreation since renowned Canadian mountain writer Geoff Powter first started crafting essays for various publications more than three decades ago. “The world has changed and so have I,” he says. That’s why when Rocky Mountain Books first approached him about compiling his essays—steeped in tales of mountain adventure, particularly climbing—he gave pause before getting excited about the idea. “When I first started looking at some of the things I’d done, I thought, ‘Well, there are a lot of very different styles, different times, and different subjects even,’” he says. “But the more I looked at things, I got excited about (examining), how do you explain those differences? How do you make sense of the way things used to be compared to the way they are now?” That ranged from logistical—some of the pieces were written before the metric system was widely used and even some mountain names had been changed out of respect to Indigenous groups—to cultural. Geoff Powter is sharing stories of writing and mountain adventures in Whistler on May 17 and 18.

MOUNTAIN TALES

PHOTO SUBMITTED

70 MAY 9, 2019

“I recognize I came from a very privileged time in terms of how few people I shared the mountains with,” says Powter, who’s lived in Canmore, Alta. for the last 32 years. “That’s dramatically changed now. When I look through all the stories in that book, there’s two where I’m on a mountain with somebody else. That just doesn’t happen now.” To that end, as part of the resulting book, Inner Ranges: An Anthology of Mountain

your own and that sometimes had tragic consequences. Now, there are great ways to learn,” he says. Powter will be delving into some of these topics in Whistler on Saturday, May 18 during a free writing workshop called Finding the Words for Adventure. “I think there are back stories to the stories in my book that are fairly instructive—how it’s challenging to cover

“It’s hard to express what it’s like to see a transformative sunrise from a mountain peak or how you’ve changed inside. That’s a much taller order.” - GEOFF POWTER

Thoughts and Mountain People, Powter revisited those essays and stories and wrote his current-day reflections on them. “I elected to describe those challenges looking backwards,” he adds. There are, however, plenty of positive changes as well. “These days, having just as many women in the mountains as men is absolutely fabulous. Having really simplified access and, one of the biggest changes from my end was when I first started (climbing), you had to learn on

the outdoors sometimes,” he says. “Not everyone understands the ‘why.’ (There will be) tips and some storytelling as well. Some of the stories in the book had some really interesting stories behind them; some funny stories, some challenges, some sad stories. I’m interested in sharing those.” Before that workshop on Friday, May 17, Powter will also be part of the Whistler Writers Festival’s spring reading event, Travel, Place, Identity: Unpacking the Idea of Home. He’ll be on a panel that also includes authors Frank

Wolf, Pat Ardley and Becky Livingston. (Amy Fung was previously on the panel, but is now unable to attend.) One thing his home in Canmore has in common with Whistler: both have become much busier in recent years. “The other part of ‘home’ is history and deeply influenced by the sense of place around here, which includes the ways of approaching the mountains,” he says. “The long-term history of respect for the mountains and what I’m calling in talks I’ve been giving the ‘right’ way of doing things, that’s pretty rooted here. That’s something that’s been around for a long, long time. I hate to say it sometimes because it sounds kind of arrogant.” That’s not to say his own mountain stories don’t include some dark tales. In fact, he writes in his book, those are often easier to translate to the page. “It’s easier for people to grasp that falling and breaking your leg is pretty compelling and dramatic,” he says. “It’s hard to express what it’s like to see a transformative sunrise from a mountain peak or how you’ve changed inside. That’s a much taller order.” Tickets to the spring reading event, set to take place on May 17 at 7 p.m. at the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre, are $22 available at whistlerwritersfest.com. The writing workshop is a free event taking place at the Whistler Public Library on May 18 from 3 to 4:30 p.m. n


ARTS SCENE

WHAT’S ON @ THE AUDAIN FREE ADMISSION FOR AGES 18 & UNDER Including regular events & programs Art After Dark Fridays | Printmaking | May 10 3:30 – 5:30pm (youth-specific art making) Family Studio Sundays | Portraits | May 12 12 – 4pm presented by

WEEKLY EVENTS Free for members or with purchase of admission

CRAFT ON Muse Lab has launched as a new space in Function Junction for art and craft workshops. PHOTO BY YULIA GLADYSHEVA

Muse Lab helps locals put needle to fabric NEW WORKSHOP SPACE OFFERS ARRAY OF ART AND TEXTILE CLASSES

BY ALYSSA NOEL WHEN BARBORA VANICKOVA first arrived in Whistler in November 2011, she was only supposed to stay for a month before returning home to put her Master of Journalism degree to work. “I came in really blindly,” she says. “I was working in Prague and I wanted to take time off before I chose the newspaper I was going to stay at.” Because she spoke almost no English, a Canadian journalism job was out of the question. Instead, the Czech Republic resident found work as a housekeeper, dishwasher, and at several other jobs before she noticed a need for sewing services in the resort. “I started sewing for fun,” she says. “People started asking me to fix stuff, but also they wanted to learn. I opened a sewing business … (and) it really became a professional job where I have to work hard. I wanted something fun.” Eight years after her “one month in Whistler,” she’s celebrating the launch of Muse Lab, which she’s running alongside her business, Whistler Sewing Services. With space secured in Function Junction (at 1208 Alpha Lake Rd.), Vanickova hosted her first workshops out of Muse Lab earlier this month. One taught older kids to make “monster pillows” with sewing machines and the other helped younger ones create headbands. “It went well,” she adds. “We’re still learning. It’s the beginning of the process.” Next up, she’s hosting a pair of Mother’s Day events on Sunday, May 12. From 10:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m., moms can bring their kids in to make hand-stitched, felt animals (and enjoy tea and treats). Then, that afternoon, from 3 to 6 p.m., Vanickova will lead a modern embroidery class for moms alone.

“I had been checking on Eventbrite and when you put in ‘Mother’s Day’ in Vancouver, 40 workshops come up—and a lot of things that aren’t just going for brunch,” she says. “We have amazing brunches here and I love them, but I wanted to offer something where ladies can go do something.” While she’s slowly adding to her list of workshops—which also includes ongoing Sewing 101 every Thursday for locals to learn basic sewing machine skills and Mondays at Muse Lab where people can drop-in to use equipment for their own repairs from 12 to 9 p.m.—she’s also on the lookout for people who want to host their own art events in the space. “People want to learn more things and go back to making their own things, working with their hands. Leave the screen behind for a little bit,” she says. To that end, she has a European knife master and coming in to teach a knifemaking workshop while his artist girlfriend will also teach a marionette-building class in August. “They’re coming here for it,” Vanickova adds. “I don’t even believe it’s happening.” She will also be tapping into another niche market and teaching a sewing class specifically for people interested in creating festival costumes starting on June 4. “I have this experience that people come to me every year two weeks before Burning Man and say, ‘I wish I could do something, and now it’s too late,’” she says. “It’s a really long workshop because these things take time. (They can) come for a couple hours every week and work on their costume.” For more information on all the events taking place at Muse Lab, as well as their costs and how to register, visit yourcreativeuniverse.com or email be@ yourcreativeuniverse.com. You can also call 604-967-2422. n

Art After Dark Fridays | Printmaking | May 10 6:30 – 8:30pm (adult-specific art making) Yoga @ the Audain | Fridays 6:30 – 8:00pm | Instructor Laura Davies Public Walk & Talk Tours Wednesday through Sunday | Scheduled Times Visit audainartmuseum.com/events for details Open Daily 10am – 5pm Open Friday 10am – 9pm (Closed Tuesday)

4350 Blackcomb Way, Whistler audainartmuseum.com

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71


NOTES FROM THE BACK ROW

Furball noir POKÉMON ARE LIKE HERPES; they just keep coming back. Those little colourful creatures were created in 1995 (in Japan of course) and quickly took over the civilized world via video games, comics, cartoons, playing

BY FEET BANKS cards, merchandise, airplane paint jobs, groundbreaking augmented reality (who can forget Pokémon Go?) and now, almost 25 years after their first flare up, the little “Pocket Monsters” have their first live action feature film—Pokémon Detective Pikachu opens this week at the Whistler Village 8. Taking a page out of 1988’s Who Framed Roger Rabbit, this one is a hybrid of live action and animated characters living

CATCH ‘EM Pokémon Detective Pikachu hits theatres this week. COURTESY OF WARNER BROS. PICTURES

together in one world. Justice Smith (Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom) stars as Tim, a 21-year-old ex-wannabe professional Pokémon trainer living in Ryme City, a metropolis where humans and Pokémon live together harmoniously. While out searching for his missing father (‘cause you can’t have a kids’ movie without a dead or absent parent), Tim finds a Pikachu (voiced by Vancouver’s own Ryan Reynolds) and realizes that he alone can communicate with the little lightning-tailed bugger. Together the duo navigate their way through a child-friendly noir detective flick that’s also absurd enough (thanks to Reynolds/Deadpool’s snark/voice coming from a cute furry animal) to keep nonPokémon fanatics entertained. Detective Pikachu is no Cool World (1991’s R-rated cartoon/live action sexual thriller starring Brad Pitt) but director Rob Letterman (Monsters vs. Aliens, Shark Tale) has pieced together a standard-but-not-terrible buddy cop film with pretty slick visuals and a wellconstructed fantasy world. He gets props for trying to slide subversive humour into a kids’ flick (will your eight-yearold wonder what a “birth canal” actually is?)

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72 MAY 9, 2019

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but not all the jokes really land and the plot feels a little overstuffed at times. Even so, Detective Pikachu is fun for kids and one of the better videogame adaptation flicks we’ve seen (sorry Super Mario Bros). Also opening at the Village 8, but with no pre-screenings (bad sign this time of year), The Hustle stars Rebel Wilson (How to be Single, Bridesmaids) and Anne Hathaway (The Devil Wears Prada, Oceans 8) as a couple of con-artists working the south of France beat. Directed by newcomer Chris Addison, this one looks like a pretty typical oddcouple comedy with a bunch of jokes I won’t care for, but Hathaway is always a strong presence on-screen. Maybe she can save it. (I doubt it though.) The final flick opening this week, also without pre-screenings, is Poms. Looking like the bastard love-child of Calendar Girls and The Full Monty, this one stars Diane Keaton as a vivacious woman who starts a cheerleading squad in her new nursing home. At 73, Keaton is still a force on the screen (and Pam Grier co-stars!) so if you feel like a nursing home cheerleader movie is the missing ingredient in your life, you’d

best act fast cause this one might not be here next week. On the small screen, true crime freaks still looking to scrape the bottom of the barrel can check out the four-part Evil Genius series on Netflix. It starts with a pizza delivery guy with a bomb strapped to him and just gets crazier from there. By the time the threads are unravelled we’re given a look into the sordid underbelly of humanity (or is it just White American humanity?). Either way, it’s chilling. Also worth checking out, Captivated re-visits the 1991 trial of Pamela Smart, the schoolteacher accused of hiring three students (one allegedly her lover) to murder her husband just shy of their oneyear wedding anniversary. The trial was immediately jumped on by the era’s tabloid journalism shows like Inside Edition and Geraldo. The attention paid to this crime was the spark of our now ubiquitous 24-hour news fetish (the tipping point was O.J. in 1994) and it’s interesting to look back with hindsight and watch that dark obsession incubate. Crime doesn’t pay kids! And you don’t want to be that kind of famous. n

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ARTS NEWS

VILLAGE 8 SHOW SCHEDULE

FRIDAY, MAY 10TH - THURSDAY, MAY 16TH ADVANCED SCREENING OF “JOHN WICK CHAPTER 3 – PARABELLUM” THURSDAY, MAY 16TH AT 7:05PM

AVENGERS: END GAME (PG) FRI, SAT, SUN, TUES 3:55, 4:00, 7:40, 7:45 MON, WED, THURS 3:30, 3:35, 7:15, 7:20 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:10 MATINEES SATURDAY & SUNDAY 12:10, 12:15

POKEMON DETECTIVE PIKACHU (PG) DAILY 3:45, 3:50, 6:45, 6:50 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:20, 9:25 MATINEES SATURDAY & SUNDAY 12:45, 12:50

THE HUSTLE (PG) DAILY 4:00, 7:00 LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:30 MATINEES SATURDAY & SUNDAY 1:00

The Audain Art Museum has announced its new fall exhibit, Emily Carr: Fresh Seeing—French Modernism and the West Coast.

NEW EXHIBIT

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Audain Art Museum hosts Emily Carr show

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ALSO IN ARTS NEWS: MOUNTAIN MUSIC SERIES LINEUP REVEALED; ARTS-U TO OFFER GRANT-WRITING TIPS

BY ALYSSA NOEL THE AUDAIN ART MUSEUM has announced its new fall exhibit. Emily Carr: Fresh Seeing—French Modernism and the West Coast delves into the three years of Carr’s life (1910 to 1912) in which she travelled to France and gleaned important inspiration. With 50 pieces drawn from private and corporate collections, the show will include work by Carr’s instructors, as well as her paintings, watercolours and drawings. The show, set to open on Sept. 21, will also highlight the museum’s recent acquisition of Carr’s painting Le Paysage (Brittany Landscape).

MOUNTAIN MUSIC SERIES LINEUP REVEALED The Sea to Sky Gondola will be transforming into a music venue every Friday night starting May 31 until Sept. 13. As part of the annual Mountain Music series, the gondola sets up a stage on the Sky Pilot Patio overlooking Howe Sound. This year, the lineup includes plenty of Whistler and Pemberton talent. Kicking off the series is musical duo Team, featuring veteran musician Tim Hewitt (who has played in bands like Trooper and Prism) and professionally trained violinist Spring Burke on May 31. Classic rock band The Wells will follow on June 7 and Fleetwood Mac Cover Band will

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take the stage on June 14. The Hairfarmers, longtime Whistler favourites, are set to perform on June 21, Aug. 9, and Sept. 6. Local Celtic rock duo Ruckus Deluxe hit the stage on Aug. 23. Meanwhile, you’ll find Pemberton country heroes Dakota Pearl on the mountain on Aug. 30. The music runs from 6 to 9 p.m. and audiences can hike up or take the gondola with a ticket. To see the full lineup visit www. seatoskygondola.com/mountain-music-2019.

ARTS-U GRANT WORKSHOP Are you an artist who has struggled with landing grants? The next instalment of Arts-U is set to offer tips for writing successful applications. Leading the Arts Whistler-run event is theatrical director Hjeron O’Sidhe who will “share the tips, tricks and insider insights for writing grants that stand out from the crowd and get the funds, along with other insights from his incredible, creative career,” according to the workshop description. O’Sidhe has written, directed, acted and composed musical scores for 12 performance pieces over the last two decades. Most recently, he’s formed Mythmaker Productions, a theatre company “dedicated to re-empowering the ancient arts of storytelling by blending creative and performance arts of all genres.” The session takes place on June 7 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Maury Young Arts Centre. Tickets are $35 available at https:// artswhistler.com/event/arts-u-workshops. n

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MUSEUM MUSINGS

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THE WHISTLER MUSEUM’S archive houses many documents, printed material, films, oral histories, and photographs from Whistler’s rich cultural past, from the arrival of some of Whistler’s earliest pioneers to the journey of hosting the Olympic Games. It’s a treasure trove of interesting facts and unique stories that are unapologetically Whistler. One of the first major collections I catalogued while working in the archives as an intern at the Whistler Museum in the summer of 2011 was the George Benjamin photograph collection.   George Benjamin, originally from Toronto, Ontario, first came to Whistler in 1968 on a ski vacation, staying at the infamous Toad Hall. George, or “Benji,” as he was more commonly known, would move to Whistler in 1970. George was a semi-professional photographer. His family back in Ontario owned a photo-finishing business, and this allowed him to develop his photographs for free—a handy asset in the days before digital photography. The George Benjamin collection consists of 8,236 images from the late 1960s to the early 1980s. Photos in the collection include images of early Whistler Mountain Ski Patrol, Soo Valley Toad Hall, Gelandesprung ski jump competitions, summer days spent at many of Whistler’s lakes, parties, and everyday shots of living and working in Whistler. This might be the most candid representation of Whistler during this era in our collection.  

Folks living in Whistler during this time would have had more in common with Whistler’s early-20th century pioneers than with the Whistler of today. Many residents were still using outhouses, had little-tono electricity, and relied on wood stoves for their cooking needs. George’s photos capture this pioneer lifestyle, but with the added element of the counterculture movement of the 1960s and 1970s—and, of course, people that loved to ski.  George’s residence in Whistler was the infamous Tokum Corners. This cabin— which was once home to Whistler Museum Board Chair John Hetherington, had no running water, and was often repaired with found materials—would become one of the cornerstones of social life in the valley. George, who had access to 16mm film equipment, would often shoot on Whistler Mountain, capturing his days following ski patrol blasting and partaking in avalanche control. These film vignettes would be screened at Tokum Corners, usually with Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon playing over top to ever-growing crowds.        George opened the Photo Cell photography store in Creekside around 1973. He later became a commercial fisherman in the late-1970s. He moved from Whistler back to Toronto in the early 1980s and now lives in Port Perry, Ontario. George generously donated his collection of photographs and negatives to the museum in 2009. The bulk of George Benjamin’s photos are available on the Whistler Museum’s website www.whistlermuseum.org. If you have any interesting stories, films, or photographs from Whistler’s past, we would love to hear from you. n


PARTIAL RECALL

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1 FRIDAYS FOR FUTURE Whistler Secondary School students Matthew Ogilvie-Turner and Agostino Fravia attended a May 3 Vancouver student protest to demand action on climate change—and bumped into members of Protect Our Winters. L to R: Reuben Krabbe, Jeff Schmuck, Kelsey Serwa, Stan Rey, Ogilvie-Turner, Mike Douglas, and Fravia. PHOTO SUBMITTED. 2 HAPPY COUPLE Bob and Betty Dewhirst celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary at the Rimrock Café last weekend. PHOTO SUBMITTED. 3 99’ER Howard Goldsmid, 99, was up at the Umbrella Bar recently, enjoying a coffee and Bailey’s. PHOTO BY LESLEE WAKE. 4 WALK THE WALK The second annual Whistler Walk for Alzheimer’s, organized by Erika Durlacher on May 5, was a great success, with over $22,000 raised so far. PHOTO SUBMITTED. 5 TED TALKING Waldorf graduating students presented their year-long research projects at the Maury Young Arts Centre May 1 and 2. One student made her own album to be released while another made a short film about the effects of concussion in terms of depression and suicide. PHOTO SUBMITTED. 6 THE BEAUTIFUL PITCH The Janyk family and members of the Whistler Youth Soccer Club headed to the new Andrée Vajda Janyk Sports Field on the weekend to watch the beautiful game on the pitch. Andrée’s granddaughter plays with the U6 group while mom Britt coaches—a passing of the torch. PHOTO SUBMITTED.

SEND US YOUR PHOTOS! Send your recent snaps to arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

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MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

Said the Whale gives young B.C. musicians a boost VANCOUVER INDIE-ROCKERS ARE SET TO KICK OFF SUMMER WITH GO FEST CONCERT MAY 18

BY ALYSSA NOEL NEED

REPRIEVE from endless disheartening conversations about the housing market? You might want to invite Said the Whale frontman Tyler Bancroft to your next dinner party. “I think young people in Vancouver are surrounded by the idea of high-paying jobs and over-priced real estate and I think that probably adults around them are speaking a lot about the housing crisis and what it costs to live in Vancouver. And I just don’t think that’s something that teenagers should be worried about,” he says. “I think young people should be focusing on exploring their passions and interests and exposing themselves to as much culture as possible and following their dreams. I think people shouldn’t be making career choices on societal pressure to own a home.” Bancroft and bandmate Ben Worcester both grew up in the city (fun fact: keyboardist Jaycelyn Brown has called Whistler home for many years) and have remained deeply rooted in B.C. over the band’s dozen years together. With six well-received albums, endless touring and a Juno Award, Bancroft says he’s been able to make a living playing

WHALE TALE Vancouver’s Said the Whale play in Whistler on May 18 as part of GO Fest.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

76 MAY 9, 2019

music, but “I do struggle financially.” “I’m not comfortable by any means, but I’m fulfilled and happy. I think that’s important to stress. All of this isn’t to say kids shouldn’t be concerned with their future, they should be concerned if they don’t explore their passions they might end up older, unsatisfied and uninterested in their lives.” To that end, Said the Whale recently launched a new initiative to support burgeoning B.C. bands. The indie rockers

school tour eight years ago,” Bancroft says. “We decided to revisit it this spring because we want to give back to the community— more importantly to young people in music. I was trying to think of things that, when I was in high school, I would be really stoked on. Opening up for a band at a large venue, that’s one thing.” After a harrowing spring tour that included a broken down van (“the biggest cliché in rock ‘n’ roll”) and an emergency appendectomy (“it was fortuitous; it

“I think young people should be focusing on exploring their passions and interests and exposing themselves to as much culture as possible and following their dreams.” - TYLER BANCROFT

are set to launch a tour of 12 Lower Mainland high schools in May and June with Air Miles Stage Pass donating $1,000 to each of those schools and an ongoing GoFundMe to attract donations to music programs. They’ve also announced a contest for B.C. bands under the age of 18 to win an opening slot for their Sept. 6 show at the Malkin Bowl in Stanley Park. Finally, the group is launching a bi-annual grant in which they’ll offer a $2,500 prize to support young B.C. artists for the next five years. “We did a very miniature version of the

happened when I was at home”), Said the Whale is preparing for summer festival season, kicking off with a slot at GO Fest in Whistler on May 18. “We’ll be playing the songs people want to hear. We do have a long and deep catalogue—most of which we don’t know how to play,” Bancroft says with a laugh. “You can’t stay sharp on 60 songs—it’s not possible.” That setlist will include some tracks from their latest record, Cascadia, released in February as their debut on the Arts and

Crafts label. It runs the gamut from the sweet and sparse “Old Soul, Young Heart” to the lush and rambunctious “Shame” and the electro-infused rocker “UnAmerican.” The story behind the latter’s lyrics is arguably the stuff of Can-Con legends. As they were writing the album, the band was in talks with Broken Social Scene’s Kevin Drew (also the man behind their new label), about producing the record. “All of a sudden we had access to Kevin Drew, who is a huge influence to all of us,” Bancroft says. “I was tripping out a little bit being on the phone with him because I was such a big fan. Thirty seconds into the conversation with him it became very obvious he was in the bath. He didn’t say it, but I could hear it. His parting words to me were, ‘Just go write a pop song.’” The result was the opening lines to “UnAmerican”: “Kevin wants to hear a pop song.” “One thing that’s consistent between our songs is we write from our own experience,” says Bancroft, who splits writing duties with Worcester. “Whatever that is at the time— life in the city intertwined with nature, to a degree, family goings on for me, being a young father and how those experiences were starting to shape my life. I think the most important thing about our song writing is it’s always drawn from personal experience. Everything we’re writing about is extremely meaningful.” Catch Said the Whale at GO Fest on May 18 on the Village Square mainstage at 7:30 p.m. n


MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

ON TRACK Pemberton musician and pro skier Austin Ross is set to play around the Sea to Sky corridor this summer. PHOTO BY SHANE ROY/ HTTPS://INSTAGRAM.COM/_SHANEROY_/

Pro skier Austin Ross hits the stage AFTER DEBUTING HIS MUSICAL TALENTS LAST YEAR, THE PEMBERTON ATHLETE IS READY TO MAKE MORE MUSIC

BY ALYSSA NOEL AUSTIN ROSS might be best known as a professional skier, but ever since he was a teen growing up in Pemberton, he’s also been quietly strumming away on his guitar. “I’ve always just loved music my whole life,” he says. “It’s something I inherited from my parents.” While he’s been writing songs—and bringing his guitar along with him to ski destinations around the world—it wasn’t until last summer that he played his first real gig at the Big Sky golf course. One afternoon he went to meet his girlfriend, who works at the course, after work for a drink when he noticed a musician playing guitar for the small audience. “I said to her, ‘This is cool. I could do this,’” he recalls. His girlfriend agreed and talked to her boss who immediately signed him up for a gig. Ross figured it would be the perfect debut with a small crowd that wouldn’t really be paying much attention as they enjoyed their beer on the patio. Only, it didn’t turn out that way. “Next thing I know, it gained so much momentum,” he says. The show was packed with Pembertonians keen to see the hometown boy playing in public for the first time. “It turned into this big thing, but it was cool,” he says. “It all went really smoothly. It lit a fire for me to keep perfecting my set list and learn what songs work and what songs don’t.” Since then, he’s played about a dozen shows in Pemberton and Whistler. While his true passion lies in playing his own songs, Ross also offers a unique range of covers in his set—from Lyle Lovett to Guy Clark. “It’s a lot of classic Texas singersongwriters,” he says. “That’s my jam, so I

sprinkle my originals in and, for the most part, people don’t know.” One unique challenge of performing in the Sea to Sky corridor, however, is gigs tend to span three-hour slots over entire evenings. “A lot of people start by playing open mics and jam nights,” Ross says. “I never did that. I skipped that step and went to a three-hour performance. (At first) I didn’t know how to fill it … I’ve learned a lot about putting a set together. That’s one of my favourite things.” Another highlight has been when crowds react well to his original songs. “I don’t play a lot of the typical cover songs that you hear bands play on patios,” he says. “I just have a huge desire to play more original music. I go to a lot of concerts and writing is a huge passion.” To that end, he hopes to eventually polish enough of his own songs to record an EP in the future. (For now, you’ll have to check him out live to hear those tracks.) “I’m a real perfectionist when it comes to the originals,” he says. “I want to make sure I’m totally satisfied with the tunes.” While he’s only a year into performing, Ross says he’s had a boost from many established local musicians he calls friends— from Marcus Ramsay to Jay Greenway from Marble Canyon and Matt King from Blame the Weekend, who’s his neighbour. Next up, he’s opening for Marble Canyon at Norman Rudy’s in Squamish on May 16 at 7 p.m. “I’m psyched to keep getting the call,” he says. “I have a lot of spare time in the off season being a skier. If I can justify spending the time (on music), I’ll reach out to a few more venues … Our communities are pretty small, but people seem to like to come out and support live music.” To keep up to date on Ross’ gigs, follow him on Instagram at instagram.com/ austinross88. n

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77


PIQUECAL

YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL EVENTS & NIGHTLIFE For a complete guide to events in Whistler, visit piquenewsmagazine.com/events

THU

ROTARY CLUB OF WHISTLER MILLENNIUM

5.9

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES

Docents will provide visitors with an introduction to the Audain Art Museum and its permanent collection. Visitors will be encouraged to explore the galleries afterwards. These drop-in tours are free with the purchase of admission or museum membership. 604-962-0413. > 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

Join the Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium to learn about what the club is doing to support your local community and international projects. Lunch is available for $20. Everyone welcome. > 12:15 pm > Pan Pacific Mountain Side

DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB

The club meets every week and visitors are welcome. For a partner, please call Gill at 604-932-5791. > 1-5 pm > Whistler Racquet Club

COMMUNITY

LUNA PRESENTS THURSDAY NIGHT YOGA

BNI MOUNTAIN HIGH

BNI provides a positive and structured environment for the development and exchange of quality business referrals. It does so by helping you build personal relationships with dozens of other qualified business professionals. Register by emailing David Livesey at david_livesey@cooperators.ca. $20. > 6:45-8:30 am > The Venue

Come shake your shanti in a 90-minute Hatha Flow yoga class. Get in the flow with an emphasis on breathing and movement. Eighteen- to 35-year-olds only, free positive vibes for all in attendance! $3 for non-members, free for Luna members. > 5:30-7 pm > Maury Young Arts Centre

WHISTLER YOUTH BAND WOMEN’S KARMA YOGA

Drop-in for weekly yoga classes led by an all-female team of certified, 200-hour yoga instructors. Includes mat use and childminding. All women, all ability levels welcome. This program is made possible by yoga instructors and childminders donating their time. Contact us to join the team. Free. 604-962-8711. > 9:30-10:30 am > Whistler Women’s Centre

Let the trumpets sing! The Whistler Youth Band is a beginner band for youth ages 10 and up. Grab an instrument and make music with friends. > 6-7:30 pm > Myrtle Philip Community School

Connect with friends, new and old, through weekly activities. Meet at Whistler Community Services Society. In partnership with the Mature Action Community. > 9:30-11 am > Whistler Community Services

Party at Whistler’s longest-running locals’ night. Specials all night long. For VIP table bookings or guest list, email info@garfinkels.ca. > 7:30 pm > Garfinkel’s

KARAOKE WITH JACK-QUI NO

Put it on the rocks and call it a show! Hosted by Jack-Qui No. > 8-11 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

SEAN MICHAEL

Jimi Hendrix, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Kurt Cobain and Bob Marley play major roles in Sean’s guitar style and vocal melody. > 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

Venture on out to Function Junction for the most sophisticated après of the week! Funk, soul, jazz, blues, rare groove, disco and other rare beats curated by Stache, paired with the best beer and service in Whistler! Free. > 3:30-7:30 pm > Coast Mountain Brewing

Stache has been on a nomadic musical adventure for almost a decade, travelling to more than 50 countries and sharing his passion for music with others. Drawing influences from all four corners of the globe, his appetite, understanding and energetic delivery will guarantee a funky smorgasbord of beats. Free. > 9 pm-1 am > Three Below

Her vocals and guitar are back to entertain you with her soulful, folk, sultry R&B vibe. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

SHUT UP AND PARTY

Start your weekend off one night early and come get wild with Whistler’s loosest bar staff. With music from Fidel Cashflow and DJ Shearer. Email info@maxxfish. com for VIP and other special perks. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

COCKTAIL DANCE PARTY PARENT INFANT DROP-IN

An opportunity to develop a supportive social network with other parents of young babies. Speakers and a public health nurse are often in attendance. Free. > 11 am-12:30 pm > Whistler Public Library

Start your weekend early with a handcrafted cocktail. Then hit the dancefloor or rock our legendary dancing cage with help from DJ Peacefrog. > 7 pm > Buffalo Bills

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THURSDAY NIGHT FUNK FEATURING DJ DAKOTA

He spins old school and new school, ya need to learn though, he burns baby BURNS…like a hip-hop inferno! No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

SEA TO SKY

WORKBC EMPLOYMENT SERVICES DROP IN

Drop in to the Pemberton Public Library every Thursday afternoon and learn how WorkBC can assist you in your job search and career planning. All services are free. For details, call 1-877-932-1611. > 1-5 pm > Pemberton Library (Pemberton)

#TBT WITH THE SOUNDS OF STACHE

JENNAMAE TOGADO

MUSIC

COAST MOUNTAIN THURSDAYS! ACTIVATE AND CONNECT FOR SENIORS 50+

LOCALS’ NIGHT

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FRI

5.10

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

PRESCHOOL STORY TIME

Books, songs and rhymes for preschool-aged children, accompanied by a caregiver. Registration is not required. > 10:30 am > Whistler Public Library

WALK AND TALK SERIES See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 3, 5:30 & 7 pm > Audain Art Museum

COMMUNITY

WELCOME CENTRE MULTICULTURAL MEET UP

Come and say “hi” if you are new to Canada and Whistler! Everyone and every age is welcome. Casual meet up, workshops, information about living in Canada. Check calendar at welcomewhistler.com for full details. Contact info@welcomewhistler.com or 604-698-5960. > 9:30 am-noon > Whistler Public Library

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LIVE MUSIC

Solo artists perform every week, except on the first Friday of every month when they swap out for a full band. No cover, no lineups. > 6-9 pm > Whistler Brewing Company

LADIES’ NIGHT

We have a gift for all ladies. Enjoy a glass of champagne then hit the dancefloor and dance the night away with DJ Peacefrog. Info@buffalobills.ca for guestlist or table bookings. > 7 pm > Buffalo Bills

CHAMPAGNE FRIDAY

Kick off your weekend at Garf’s. Get on the guest list and join the party: info@garfinkels.ca. > 7:30 pm > Garfinkel’s

RUCKUS DELUXE

Ruckus Deluxe features former Cirque Du Soleil lead singer Chad Oliver and Grammy-nominated violinist Ian Cameron playing Celtic and classics on mandolin, fiddle and electric guitar. > 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

WILL ROSS CHAMPAGNE FRIDAY MAY 10 GARFINKLE’S

Winner of the 2014 Whistler’s Music Search, Will Ross is a live-looping extraordinaire, he will have you mesmerized from the start of his show right to the end. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

ONGOING & DAILY ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WHISTLER MUSEUM

Learn more about Whistler’s culture and history. Now open by donation. > Daily 11am-5pm, Thu until 9pm > Whistler Museum

THE CULTURAL CONNECTOR: A JOURNEY OF ADVENTURE AND DISCOVERY

Grab a Cultural Connector guide and explore Whistler’s world of culture. As you follow the Cultural Connector route, you’ll discover the stories that enrich Whistler’s culture, the venues that celebrate it and the milestones that we’ve achieved along the way. The pathway will lead you through beautiful surroundings and six cultural institutions: Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre, Whistler Museum, Whistler Public Library, Maury Young Arts Centre, Lost Lake PassivHaus, and Audain Art Museum. Free. > Ongoing > Maury Young Arts Centre

COMMUNITY

GAMES CAFE

Come in and enjoy a massive selection of popular games. Sunday to Thursday. > 4-8 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

WEEKEND GETAWAYS AT TOMMYS WHISTLER YOUTH CENTRE DROP-IN

INDOOR PICKLEBALL

For ages 13 to 18. We offer ping pong, a skateboard mini-ramp (skateboards and helmets to borrow), free Wi-Fi, Xbox One, PS3 & PS4, guitars, board games, a projector and widescreen TVs. Free. 604-935-8187. > 3:30-11 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

Have fun with others playing the fastest-growing sport in North America! All levels welcome. Free paddle rental. $10. 604-932-1991. > 4-6 pm > Whistler Racquet Club

Let’s send it on and off the mountain this weekend! DJ Dre Morel spinning rock, pop and hip hop all night! For VIP reservations and guestlist inquiries, please visit www.tommyswhistler.com. > 9 pm-2 am > Tommys Whistler

MUSIC

FRIDAY NIGHT ALL LOVE NO CLUB FEATURING DJ TYMETAL

Shake off your work week by grooving to deep cuts featuring classics and future gems...you can’t help but move to the beats! No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

FEEL GOOD FRIDAYS SPORTS

SEAN MICHAEL

WHISTLER TRI CLUB SWIM SQUAD

Triathlon-focused swim squads. Full details at whistlertriclub.com/training-sessions. Free to members for fall (includes entry into Meadow Park). Nonmembers $8 drop-in (includes entry into Meadow Park). > 6-7:15 am > Meadow Park Sports Centre

Jimi Hendrix, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Kurt Cobain and Bob Marley play major roles in Sean’s guitar style and vocal melody. > 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

Start the weekend off right with music by B.C.’s finest party DJs mixing the best in hip hop, rap, R&B and party anthems. Whistler’s most-energetic dancefloor. > 9:30 pm > Moe Joe’s

FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE CALEB MCKENZIE

McKenzie plays all your crowd-pleasing hits as well as his own originals. We have no doubt you’ll be singing along. > 6-9 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

Sea to Sky

Live music by Whistler favourites Red Chair. > 9:30 pm > Tapley’s Pub

SAT

5.11

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 1 & 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

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Get the BC RECYCLEPEDIA App WE DON’T WANT YOUR NAME...

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1-800-222-8477 (TIPS) Visit us on facebook Sea to Sky Crime Stoppers

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79


PIQUECAL

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BIKE MAINTENANCE WORKSHOPS WITH WHISTLER BIKE CO. MAY 12 WHISTLER PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMUNITY

SINGING WITH THE BABIES

Learn songs and rhymes to soothe and entertain baby while encouraging early language development. For kids up to walking age. Free. > 11-11:30 am > Whistler Public Library

WILL ROSS

If you haven’t seen Ross play before, now is your chance. This solo artist loops together a handful of instruments to sound like the whole band. > 6-9 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

A parent-directed hour with board games, crafts and a story corner with felt puppets. A drop-in program for families of all ages. Free. > 3:30-4:30 pm > Whistler Public Library

It’s Whistler’s No. 1 stop for stag and stagette parties. DJ Turtle and friends mix up everything from hip hop, R&B, new rap, dance hall and Top 40 bangers. Email guestlist@moejoes.com for VIP and group perks. > 9:30 pm > Moe Joe’s

SATURDAY NIGHT SHAKER WHISTLER YOUTH CENTRE DROP-IN

See Friday’s listing for more info. > 6-10 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

MUSIC

Come wind down your ski day or ramp up your Saturday night festivities with the boys from Brother Twang. > 9 pm-midnight > FireRock Lounge

LIVE @ BLACK’S LADIES’ NIGHT

FAMILY TOGETHER TIME

BROTHER TWANG

With music from Fidel Cashflow and DJ C Stylez, two of Whistler’s hardest-working and most-loved DJs spinning the best in Top 40, mash-ups, electro, hip hop and party anthems that will keep your booty shakin’ all night long. Email info@maxxfish.com for VIP and other special perks. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

Every Friday and Saturday, party with local and touring musicians at Black’s Pub. > 9 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

TyMetal’s eclectic DJ feats. No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

SUPREME SATURDAY

DJ Nikky from Vancouver brings the Whistler’s biggest weekend party and best vibe. VIP champagne parades along with the hottest hip hop and remixes! For VIP and guest list, email info@garfinkels.ca. > 10 pm > Garfinkel’s

SEA TO SKY

OPEN MIC WAG FUNDRAISER WITH YVR POP CHOIR

This event will raise money for Whistler’s local animal shelter in collaboration with Whistler Brewing and YVR Pop Choir. All sales of Whistler Rescue Session Ale will be donated, as well as a charity raffle with lots of local prizes to be won including bike rentals, NBA jerseys, dinner for two, food shopping vouchers, plus much more donated from local Whistler businesses. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

ST. JOHN THE DIVINE ANNUAL SPRING FLING AND PLANT SALE All are welcome to our annual plant and bake sale, raffle, knife sharpening and more! Free. 604-898-5100 > 9 am-1 pm > St. John the Divine Anglican Church (Brackendale/Squamish)

FIRST RACE WEEKEND MICHAEL FABRO

Michael Fabro is a Canadian acoustic pop-rock performance artist. With a focus on crowd-pleasing hits and infectious vocal hooks, the young artist has fused multiple styles into dynamic live act. > 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

DELUXE WEEKEND GETAWAYS AT TOMMYS RUCKUS > 9 pm > 9 pm-2 am > Tommys Whistler

> Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

SATURDAY NIGHT ALL LOVE NO CLUB FEATURING DJ TYMETAL

He got your blood pumping last night, now satiate your thirst for amazing cocktails and unique beats with

80 MAY 9, 2019

Join the Pemberton Stockcar Association for a fun and exciting afternoon of racing! The Pemberton Speedway is only one of two dirt tracks in the province. Adult Admissions $10. Children and seniors are free. Please visit pembertonstockcars.com or facebook.com/ pembertonstockcars. > 5-9 pm > Pemberton Speedway (Pemberton)


PIQUECAL

SUN

5.12

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 1 & 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

COMMUNITY

BIKE MAINTENANCE WORKSHOPS WITH WHISTLER BIKE CO. These workshops will cover the basics of day-to-day bike maintenance, and you’ll learn what you should be able to do at home (or on the trail), and what warrants a trip to the shop. These workshops are intended for beginners—we won’t cover brake or suspension maintenance. > 2-4 pm > Whistler Public Library

SUNDAY NIGHT THEORY WITH TYMETAL

TyMetal’s diversified taste translates to deep cuts featuring classics and future gems, guaranteed to tweak your brain stem! No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

SEA TO SKY

OPEN MIC

Come join in with this afternoon of music. Bring your instruments and come early to sign up. > 12-2 pm > Grimms Deli (Pemberton)

FLAG STOP THEATRE MENTORSHIP PROGRAM 2019 Call For Auditions Leading roles, bit parts & understudy opportunities in original play for Flag Stop Theatre & Arts Festival and following performances Looking for all genders and all ethnicities between late teens and 50s

FIRST RACE WEEKEND

> 12-4 pm > Pemberton Speedway (Pemberton)

GAMES NIGHT AT PANGEA

Challenge your crew: Cards Against Humanity, Jenga, Settlers of Catan, HedBanz, and many more. Drinks and food specials all night long. > 4 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

MUSIC

JERRY’S DISCO

Dust off your Gaper Day getup, from backwards helmets to gorby gaps, ‘cos the best Jerry outfit gets a free bottle of prosecco! > 7-10 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

SEND IT SUNDAYS

With music from T-Zen and DJ Shearer. Keep your weekend alive, and join us on Sunday nights for one of Whistler’s wildest industry nights. Email info@ maxxfish.com for VIP plus special perks. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

SOULFUL SUNDAYS

Soul Club Whistler spinning that funky soul soundtrack. > 9 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

MON

5.13

COMMUNITY

MUSIC & WORDS

This drop-in program is for kids two to four years and it focuses on early literacy through music, rhyme, stories and movement. Free. > 10 am > Whistler Public Library

MONDAYS IN MUSE LAB

MONDAY MAY 13, 2019 7-9:30PM THE POINT ARTIST-RUN CENTRE

Must be able to commit to Thursday evenings May 30 – August 8. First Performance August 9, 2019 Email whistleractors@gmail.com to schedule audition time www.thepointartists.com

Stop by and repair ripped seams, sew on the loose buttons, patch the jeans! With love for community Whistler Sewing Services is opening the Muse Lab, new creative space in Function. Six sewing machines and all the supplies are ready to fix, mend and create. Visit your creative universe! $10 per hour. 604-967-2422. > 12-9 pm > Muse Lab

WORKBC EMPLOYMENT SERVICES DROP IN

Get your resume reviewed, learn about the local labour market, job search tips, and more. All services are free. For details, call 1-877-932-1611 or go to WhistlerESC.com. > 3-6 pm > Whistler Public Library

THE SUNDAY GLOW PARTY

Moe Joe’s is transformed into a psychedelic, UV-infused rave cathedral, as Fidel Cashflow, Zapps and La Dooda cook up an aural feast of house and electro beats. Arrive early to beat the line. > 9 pm > Moe Joe’s

OPEN MIC JAM NIGHT

An open stage invitation for all who can sing, perform or even just wanna jam out with our house band. Whistler’s longest-running jam night every Sunday at Crystal Lounge. All instruments are provided. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

RUCKUS DELUXE

> 9 pm > Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub

SUNDAY SESSIONS

The best locals’ party in Whistler. > 9 pm > Tapley’s Pub

WONDER CLUB

The Wonder Club is an outdoor program open to students in Grades 1 and 2 and will run from October until May. Explore the wonders of science, nature and all the wild and wonderful things in the library’s beautiful backyard. Join us for interactive activities, creativity in nature, science experiments, and active games while we have lots of fun getting curious about the things about the living world around us! Registration is required, so call us at 604-935-8436, email youthservices@whistlerlibrary.ca, or drop by the library to sign up! > 3:30-4:30 pm > Florence Petersen Park

DOREEN WATTS CELEBRATION OF LIFE

Celebrate the life of Doreen Watts. She touched so many lives in the Whistler community. Connect through memories, stories and laughter. Photos can be sent to rotarywhistler2000@gmail.com and a GoFundMe account has been created. > 4-6 pm > Whistler Conference Centre

ON THE BIG SCREEN SATURDAY MAY 11 Preliminaries: 5pm | Main Event: 7pm At Merlin’s in the Upper Village

MAY 9, 2019

81


PIQUECAL SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

WHOLE-FOOD, PLANT-BASED COMMUNITY POTLUCKS MAY 15 THE GREEN MOUSTACHE JUICE LAB

SPORTS

WHISTLER TRI CLUB SWIM SQUAD

See Friday’s listing for more info. > 6-7:15 am > Meadow Park Sports Centre

SPORTS

MEATY MONDAY

Sport and beer what more do you need? How about a chance to win our famous Meat Raffle? Proceeds donated to charity. > 9 pm > Tapley’s Pub

OPEN MIC

Open Mic night at Cranked Espresso Bar with host Jenna Mae. This is a super fun night for music lovers and artists of all levels. Cranked is the perfect place for new artists to try performing in front of a small, supportive audience. This night always bring a solid mix of seasoned and budding artists together, and opportunities to collaborate. Always looking for new musicians to joins them. > 6-9 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

MONDAY NIGHT LIVE WITH WHAT A RACKET!

Local legend Monty Biggins offers hits of the eras in an Americana Swing sound. His soulful voice has been described as a journey of the heart. An entire rat pack in one man, he’ll tip his glass to you with that jazzy swagger. > 7-10 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

The Crystal Lounge hosts trivia every Monday night! Bring your friends and test your knowledge for a night of fun, laughs, prizes and the chance to “burn your bill.” Conditions apply. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

The wildest party in Whistler on a Monday night continues with music from Fidel Cashflow, Dan Darley, The Rogue Killers and DJ Shearer. Throwing down all the hottest tunes you know and love. Deep, tech, bass, house, trap, hip hop and more. Email info@maxxfish. com for VIP plus special perks. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

MONDAY MADNESS

Fidel Cashflow, Dan Darley and Billy The Kid throw down all the hottest deep and dirty beats you know and love. Deep tech, bass, house, trap, plus more. > 9:30 pm > Maxx Fish

MARTINI MONDAY

CORY CURTIS

He has a wide range of contemporary as well as classic songs and a very unique voice; not your average acoustic guitar performer. > 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

This program gives toddlers, parents and caregivers the opportunity to learn songs, rhymes and finger plays together. Movement is encouraged and your preschooler’s early language and literacy development is supported. For more information, please come to the library, call 604-935-8436 or email youthservice@ whistlerlibary.ca. Free. > 10:30 am > Whistler Public Library

FVCK MONDAYS

SEA TO SKY > 7:30 pm > Buffalo Bills

5.14

RHYME & SONG TRIVIA NIGHT

MUSIC

TUE

ACOUSTIC COFFEE HOUSE

The Acoustic Coffee House is back! Come join in with this afternoon of music. > 4-6 pm > Grimms Deli (Pemberton)

BEST PICTURE SERIES: BLACK PANTHER

Didn’t see all the Best Picture nominees on the big screen? The library will be screening a nominated film on the first and second Tuesday of each month this summer! Next up, catch Black Panther. > 7-9 pm > Whistler Public Library

COMMUNITY

Whistler Cycling Club rides for A, B and C level road riders. See whistlercyclingclub.ca for details. Free with club membership. > 5:15-8 pm > Whistler Village Sports

WE RUN WHISTLER: WORCA TRAIL NIGHT

For one week only We Run Whistler will be skipping our weekly run for a WORCA Trail Night. Please show your support by helping to build a new Yummy Numby connector trail. Apres burgers and beers included for all volunteers. Details available on our Facebook page: facebook.com/groups/werunwhistler/ > 5:30 pm > Yummy connector trailhead

MUSIC

BINGO

Channel your inner granny and dominate bingo at the locals’ living room. > 8 pm > Tapley’s Pub

THE MOUNTAIN VILLAGE SOCIAL GATHERING AND MEETING

What if housing wasn’t just a place to live, but rather, a way of life? The Coastal Village is connecting people who want to live in community with others who have similar values for the betterment of our health, happiness and well-being. Research shows that both men and women thrive in community. Free. 778-840-1529. > 5:30-8:30 pm > 3309 Ptarmigan Place

For more information on featured events find us online at

WWW.PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM 82 MAY 9, 2019

WHISTLER CYCLING CLUB TUESDAY RIDES

TOMMY TUESDAYS

Tommys Tuesday with resident DJ Dre Morel and guests bringing you all the best of the best every Tuesday evening! Visit tommyswhistler.com. > 8 pm-2 am > Tommys Whistler

BLACK ‘N’ BLUES

Blues night with Sean Rose. > 8 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

CORY CURTIS

> 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge


PIQUECAL CELLAR SESSIONS

With live music from Neverland Nights and guests, playing all your rock, alternative and party jams all night long. Plus DJ sets from Fidel Cashflow. > 9 pm > Maxx Fish

KARAOKE NIGHT

“I Will Survive” won’t sing itself, so come over to Whistler’s longest-running karaoke night and belt out all your favourite hits. Arrive early to avoid disappointment. > 9 pm > Crystal Lounge

ALLSORTS

Bringing a wide variety of sounds to your Tuesday evening, ED:WIN will be playing “AllSorts” of music to get you dancing down at Three Below every Tuesday night. Listen to hip hop, R&B, house, garage and disco! Free. > 9 pm-1:30 am > Three Below

WED

5.15

INTERACT CLUB OF WHISTLER

Interact is a club for young people ages 12 to 18 who want to make a difference in their community, mentored by the Rotary Club of Whistler and Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium. The club includes students from Whistler Secondary School, Waldorf, Spring Creek and Myrtle Philip who want to join together to tackle the issues in their community they care most about. > 4-5 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

MOUNTAIN SPIRIT WHISTLER TOASTMASTERS

Build communication, public speaking, and leadership skills with Mountain Spirit Whistler Toastmasters. Everyone welcome. > 5:30-7 pm > Pan Pacific Mountain Side

WHOLE-FOOD, PLANT-BASED COMMUNITY POTLUCKS

Join us for a monthly whole-food, plant-based potluck at The Green Moustache Organic Café in Function Junction. Please bring a whole-food, plant-based dish to share—see website for details. Everyone welcome. 604-962-4161. > 6:30-8:30 pm > The Green Moustache Juice Lab

MUSIC

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

INDUSTRY NIGHT

Live music from Neverland Nights. > 6 pm > Buffalo Bills

FOXY GET FUNKY QUEER WEDNESDAYS

We reserve the prime family-style table by the Ola Volo mural for our LGBTQ2+ family. Get your game (or gay’m) on. > 5-8 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

Whether you know her as DJ Foxy Moron or just Ace, you know she kills it on the vinyl. Join us as this homegirl legend spins you silly. > 8-11 pm > Pangea Pod Hotel

PATRICK GAVIGAN LET’S GET QUIZZICAL

Are you smarter than the average fifth grader? Let’s hope so as Stache brings you trivia with a Whistler twist. All the regular rounds plus our weekly degenerate round full of public and celebrity scandals. Great banter and awesome prizes! Free. > 9-10:30 pm > Three Below

SPORTS

Vancouver-based singer songwriter, formerly of the 99.3 FM CFOX Seeds-winning band theTURN. > 8-11 pm > Mallard Lounge

ERIK VAN MEERBERGEN AND THE BIG LOVE BAND

The “Big Love” is back in town for one night only. Guaranteed good times and old friendly faces! > 9 pm > Mallard Lounge

INDOOR PICKLEBALL DROP-IN > 10-11:30 am > Whistler Racquet Club

WHISTLER CYCLING CLUB WEDNESDAY RIDES

Whistler Cycling Club rides for emerging road riders. See whistlercyclingclub.ca for details. Free for club members. > 5:15-7 pm > Whistler Village Sports

COMMUNITY

EAT LOCAL!

Join the library for this brand new series and learn how to eat local! For more information, visit whistlerlibrary. ca/events/eat-local. > 7-8:30 pm > Whistler Public Library

Fine Italian Cuisine

JAM NIGHT

Jam Night with Kostaman and Friends every Wednesday night from 9 pm. > 9 pm > Black’s Pub & Restaurant

WILDIN’ OUT WEDNESDAYS FEATURING DJ GAINZ

He’s hot, he’s sicker than your average, Gainz comin’ through mixin’ tracks like a savage. No cover. > 10 pm-2 am > The Keg

SPRING

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83


ASTROLOGY

Art on the Lake EARLY BIRD SAVINGS UNTIL MAY 20!

Arts Whistler members save $75 off the price of any workshop.

REGISTER TODAY: artswhistler.com/art-on-the-lake MAY 25-26, 2019 | Tie Dye 101 with Tony’s Tie Dyes JUNE 1-2, 2019 | Textured Acrylic Landscapes JUNE 8-9, 2019 | The Bold and The Beau�ful - Experimen�ng with Acrylics JUNE 15-16, 2019 | Intui�ve Tex�le Design JUNE 22-23, 2019 | Wax On Wax Off - Pyrography & Encaus�c Techniques JULY 13-14, 2019 | The Art of Lavender JULY 20-21, 2019 | Illuminated II - Crea�ng Compelling Light in Your Pain�ngs AUGUST 3-4, 2019 | Digital Photography AUGUST 10-11, 2019 | Half Life-Sized Portraiture AUGUST 24-25, 2019 | Travel Sketching and Watercolours SEPTEMBER 14-15, 2019 | Silver Jewelry - Embellished Ring & Silver Cas�ng Our summer art workshop series offers weekend programs for all skill levels in a spectacular and unforge�able se�ng. From dabblers to experienced ar�sts, our local and visi�ng professional instructors will help you take your skills to the next level.

Arts Whistler’s AGM – Annual Great Member Social (and Annual General Meeting) May 22 | 5:30pm | Free | Maury Young Arts Centre 4335 Blackcomb Way, Whistler

artswhistler.com/event/arts-whistler-agm Members! Join us for a social night with a li�le business thrown in. We kick off at 5:30pm with our Annual General Mee�ng reviewing 2018’s ac�vi�es, followed by a member social, including a complimentary beverage and appies. Expect surprise-filled fun and games with the Arts Whistler team. All a�endees are entered into a draw for a $150 Rim Rock gi� card.

Mother’s Day Special Mother + Son or Daughter Tarot Reading A 45 min reading for $90 + entry to win Mother’s Day Gift Box* (valued at $50) (Mother’s Day weekend only) We have a range of Mother’s Day gift package ideas and packages

(up to 20% off). Stop by The Oracle and find the perfect gift for mom. *Mother’s Day draw happens Sunday May 12 @ 6:30 pm

Psychic Readings Daily Across from the Olympic Plaza 604-905-0084 • theoracle.ca

84 MAY 9, 2019

Free Will Astrology WEEK OF MAY 9 BY ROB BREZSNY

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Time to shake things up! In the next three weeks, I invite you to try at least three of the following experiments. 1. See unusual sights in familiar situations. 2. Seek out new music that both calms you and excites you. 3. Get an inspiring statue or image of a favourite deity or hero. 4. Ask for a message from the person you will be three years from now. 5. Use your hands and tongue in ways you don’t usually use them. 6. Go in quest of a cathartic release that purges frustration and rouses holy passion. 7. Locate the sweet spot where deep feeling and deep thinking overlap. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): According to science writer Sarah Zielinski in Smithsonian magazine, fireflies produce the most efficient light on Earth. Nearly 100 per cent of the energy produced by the chemical reaction inside the insect’s body is emitted as a brilliant glow. With that in mind, I propose that you regard the firefly as your spirit creature in the coming weeks. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you, too, will be a dynamic and proficient generator of luminosity. For best results, don’t tone down your brilliance, even if it illuminates shadows people are trying to hide. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Here’s a message from author Susan J. Elliott: “This is not your week to run the Universe. Next week is not looking so good either.” Now here’s a message from me: Elliott’s revelation is very good news! Since you won’t have to worry about trying to manage and fine-tune the Universe, you can focus all your efforts on your own self-care. And the coming weeks will be a favourable time to do just that. You’re due to dramatically upgrade your understanding of what you need to feel healthy and happy, and then take the appropriate measures to put your new insights into action. CANCER (June 21-July 22): The next three weeks will be an excellent time to serve as your own visionary prophet and dynamic fortune-teller. The predictions and conjectures you make about your future destiny will have an 85-per-cent likelihood of being accurate. They will also be relatively free of fear and worries. So I urge you to give your imagination permission to engage in fun fantasies about what’s ahead for you. Be daringly optimistic and exuberantly hopeful and brazenly self-celebratory. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Leo poet Stanley Kunitz told his students, “You must be very careful not to deprive the poem of its wild origin.” That’s useful advice for anyone who spawns anything, not just poets. There’s something unruly and unpredictable about every creative idea or fresh perspective that rises up in us. Do you remember when you first felt the urge to look for a new job or move to a new city or search for a new kind of relationship? Wildness was there at the inception. And you needed to stay in touch with the wildness so as to follow through with practical action. That’s what I encourage you to do now. Reconnect with the wild origins of the important changes you’re nurturing. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I have no complaints about the measures you’ve taken recently to push past unnecessary limits and to break outworn taboos. In fact, I celebrate them. Keep going! You’ll be better off without those decaying constraints. Soon you’ll begin using all the energy you have liberated and the spaciousness you have made available. But I do have one concern: I wonder if part of you is worried that you have been too bold and have gone too far. To that part of you I say: No! You haven’t been too bold. You haven’t gone too far. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Dreamt of a past that frees its prisoners.” So wrote Meena Alexander in her poem “Question Time.” I’d love for you to have that experience in the coming weeks. I’d love for you to be released from the karma of your history so that you no longer have to repeat old patterns or feel weighed down by what happened to you once upon a time. I’d love for you to no longer have to answer to decayed traditions and outmoded commitments

and lost causes. I’d love for you to escape the pull of memories that tend to drag you back toward things that can’t be changed and don’t matter any more. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Desire is a profoundly upsetting force,” writes author Elspeth Probyn. “It may totally rearrange what we think we want. Desire skews plans and sets forth unthought-of possibilities.” In my opinion, Probyn’s statements are half-true. The other half of the truth is that desire can also be a profoundly healing and rejuvenating force, and for the same reasons: it rearranges what we think we want, alters plans, and unleashes unthought-of possibilities. How does all this relate to you? From what I can tell, you are now on the cusp of desire’s two overlapping powers. What happens next could be upsetting or healing, disorienting or rejuvenating. If you’d like to emphasize the healing and rejuvenating, I suggest you treat desire as a sacred gift and a blessing. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “So much of what we learn about love is taught by people who never really loved us.” My Sagittarian friend Ellen made that sad observation. Is it true for you? Ellen added the following thoughts: so much of what we learn about love is taught by people who were too narcissistic or wounded to be able to love very well; and by people who didn’t have many listening skills and therefore didn’t know enough about us to love us for who we really are; and by people who love themselves poorly and so of course find it hard to love anyone else. Is any of this applicable to what you have experienced, Sagittarius? If so, here’s an antidote that I think you’ll find effective during the next seven weeks: identify the people who have loved you well and the people who might love you well in the future—and then vow to learn all you can from them. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn fantasy novelist Laini Taylor creates imaginary worlds where heroines use magic and wiles to follow their bliss while wrangling with gods and rascals. In describing her writing process, she says, “Like a magpie, I am a scavenger of shiny things: fairy tales, dead languages, weird folk beliefs, and fascinating religions.” She adds, “I have plundered tidbits of history and lore to build something new, using only the parts that light my mind on fire.” I encourage you to adopt her strategies for your own use in the coming weeks. Be alert for gleaming goodies and tricky delicacies and alluring treats. Use them to create new experiences that thrill your imagination. I believe the coming weeks will be an excellent time to use your magic and wiles to follow your bliss while wrangling with gods and rascals. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “I was always asking for the specific thing that wasn’t mine,” wrote poet Joanne Kyger. “I wanted a haven that wasn’t my own.” If there is any part of you that resonates with that defeatist perspective, Aquarius, now is an excellent time to begin outgrowing or transforming it. I guarantee you that you’ll have the potency you need to retrain yourself: so that you will more and more ask for specific things that can potentially be yours; so that you will more and more want a haven that can be your own. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I’m not a fan of nagging. I don’t like to be nagged and I scrupulously avoid nagging others. And yet now I will break my own rules so as to provide you with your most accurate and helpful horoscope. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you aren’t likely to get what you truly need and deserve in the coming days unless you engage in some polite, diplomatic nagging. So see what you can do to employ nagging as a graceful, even charming art. For best results, infuse it with humour and playfulness. Homework: Nietzsche said, “One must have chaos within oneself if one is to be a dancing star.” Are you a dancing star? Comment at FreeWillAstrology.com.

In addition to this column, Rob Brezsny creates

EXPANDED AUDIO HOROSCOPES

In-depth weekly forecasts designed to inspire and uplift you. To buy access, phone 1-888-499-4425. Once you’ve chosen the Block of Time you like, call 1-888-682-8777 to hear Rob’s forecasts. www.freewillastrology.com


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SEEKING

ACCOMMODATION WANTED Professional Family looking for a property to rent long term while we build our house

Come and visit Whistler’s funkiest thrift store and get (almost) everything you need for your EPIC season! Winter clothes, skis, boards, boots, bindings, goggles, toques and more! As well as all the usual stuff to make that rented closet feel like a palace. You may even find some hidden treasure you never knew needed. Shopping and Donation hours: 11am - 6pm, 7 days a week 8000 Nesters Road 604-932-1121

For Free consults and Quotes call 604-935-8825 Located in function junction mariomarble@shawbiz.ca Showroom #103-1010 Alpha Lake Rd.

Re-Build-It Centre Furniture, appliances, kitchen cabinets, doors, plumbing, tools, flooring, hardware, lumber, lighting and more!

Open 10am-5pm, 7 days a week 1003 Lynham Road, Function Junction 604-932-1125 Recycle, Re-build and Re-invest in your community. All proceeds support 28 programs and services such as the food bank, outreach services, and counseling assistance offered by Whistler Community Services. www.mywcss.org Like us on Facebook @ Whistler Community Service Society

Professional Family looking for a property to rent long term for 18 to 24 months while we build our house on Treetop Lane. Three bedroom as a minimum. Willing to do any property maintenance. Rent $5000 for the right temporary home for us. No rental management fees. 604-905-9105 shauna@shaunaocallaghan.com

Come visit our showroom for all your renovation and supply needs

FAQwhistler FLOORING

GARAGE SALES

SHAW CARPET & FLOOR CENTRE

WHISTLER

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS #805-3050 Hillcrest Drive Garage Sale in Alta Vista Children’s toys, dance costumes, Books, black woolen evening jacket, clothes, crocheted bags, and more May. 11 9:00 AM-2:00 PM Rain or Shine

Family owned & operated

www.roxysinwhistler.com

Open Monday through Friday 8:30 - 4:30 Saturday 10:00 -4:00 Sundays and Evenings by appointment only.

For the Time of Your Life!

3-1365 Alpha Lake Road Whistler, B.C, V0N1B1

604 -938 - 6 4 56 roxysinwhistler.com roxys_in_whistler

FAQwhistler

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Phone 604-938-1126 email shawcarpet@shaw.ca MAY 9, 2019

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USE A WALSH CUBE TRUCK FOR FREE TO MOVE YOUR POSSESSiOnS TO WALSH STORAgE

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massage clinic & spa

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86 MAY 9, 2019

COUNSELLING

Deep Tissue Massage, Relaxation, Thai & Shiatsu, Therapeutic Massage, Reflexology, Aromatherapy & Hot Stone Massage Registered Therapists available on request

604-938-0777 #206 - 4368 MAIN ST. 2ND FLOOR, MARKET PAVILION

Community

NOTICES

Emotional distress can be difficult to manage on your own. The goal of Ashlin Tipper Counselling is to promote health and happiness by providing welcoming, kind, supportive, non-judgmental, goal-oriented, practical, clinically-based emotional support.

Website: ashlintippercounselling.com Email: ashlintippercounselling@gmail.com Phone: (604) 916 8979

SPORTS & ACTIVITIES

8 x 10 COntAIneRS

100

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+ tax per month

2 hRS fRee tRuCk tIMe

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Call Mike Walsh

604 698 0054

mike.walsh@walshrestoration.ca

Thomas S. Watson, age 59, passed away peacefully at home on April 25, 2019. He was born November 4, 1959 to Wendell and Grethyll Watson (nee Bray). Tom spent most of his life in the communities of Pemberton, Clinton, Cache Creek, and Ashcroft. After receiving his Red Seal Electrical Certification, Tom worked for his company, Walt Adams Electric for most of his adult life. He also worked for School District 74, as well as volunteering his time coaching soccer, participating in the Cache Creek Graffiti Days, and as an acting member of his union. Tom truly lived life to the fullest and was always a spirited, friendly, and helpful member of the community. Tom’s kindness and hardworking personality reached all those he touched in a deep and positive way. Tom is survived by his children, Meghan (Duncan), Justin, and Elijah, his granddaughter, Sierra, his brothers Jim (Donna), John, and Mark, several nieces and nephews, and his adopted, extended family, Kayla, Eamon, and Grace. Tom had recently mourned the death of his brother, Mike (Chris), but had simultaneously gained a profound love and happiness with his girlfriend, Susan. A celebration of life will be held June 1st at 1pm at the Cache Creek Park. In lieu of flowers, we appreciate your donations and volunteer involvement with the South Cariboo Minor Soccer Association. Tom will be forever missed #LEGEND.

RMT specials on request

PICK UP YOUR COPY TODAY!

Winter 2019 Issue

604.932.1968

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Serving Whistler for 25 years in:

Pemberton Industrial Park 1944 Stone Cutter Place Owner Residence On-Site

NORTHLANDS

IN WHISTLER

2997 Alpine Cresent (Alta Vista) www.sallyjohnphysiotherapy.com

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SALON & SPA

We Added More Containers!

PRICES

17 years of making orthotics

Registered Massage, Registered Counselling & Registered Chiropractic

WALSH

AVAILABLE

CUSTOM-MADE ORTHOTICS at competitive prices for ski boots & shoes, including training shoes.

+ Limited Number -

ReStoRAtion

BEST PRICES IN WHISTLER FURNITURE, CARS, BOATS & MOTORCYCLES ETC STORAGE AVAILABLE

IN HOME PHYSIOTHERAPY AVAILABLE

Heater on Shelf

Call 604.935.9370 or email gphare@shaw.ca

STORAGE SPACE

REGISTERED PHYSIOTHERAPIST

Light, Duplex Plug and

Outdoor storage for RV’s, Boats, Campers, Vehicles etc $2 per LFT.

STORAGE

ONE-ON-ONE PHYSICAL-THERAPY

Service With Overhead

per month

24 HR ACCESS,

Sally John Physiotherapy WHISTLER’S

on select stands and in Whistler hotel rooms

Stabilize it! Mondays 12-12:45 pm This class will focus on core strength, as well as single arm and leg stability, think Pilates meets functional movement patterns. www.whistler.ca/recreation 604-935-PLAY (7529)

GENERAL NOTICES ROTARY CLUBS OF WHISTLER & PEMBERTON

Tuesdays at 7:15 a.m. BG Urban Grill: 604-905-5090 & Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. at the Pan Pacific, Mountainside. www.whistler-rotary.org Pemberton Rotary Club at the Pemberton Community Centre, Wednesdays at 7:15am www.pembertonrotary.ca

U.S.

Exchange Rate

30% as recommended by:


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Welcome Centre at Whistler Public Library - Information, support, community connections and ESL practice groups for newcomers and immigrants. Meet people, make connections, volunteer, build your communication skills in English. Multicultural Meet Up every Friday 9.3012pm.604-698-5960 info@welcomewhistler. com FB: WhistlerWelcomeCentre

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Blackcomb Peaks Accommodations

VOLUNTEERS

seeks a

Big Brothers, Big Sisters Sea to Sky Volunteer to Mentor- just 1hr/week - and make a difference in a child's life. Call 604892-3125.

MAINTENANCE PERSON

Volunteers Needed for Whistler Half Marathon, June 1st! volunteer@whistlerhalfmarathon.com

The successful candidate will need to be able to shift

for a Full-Time position. between duties rapidly, be very organized, and lift 25+ lbs. Tools are provided. Good time

EDUCATION

management skills are very important, and after

FIRST AID AND SURVIVAL

starting wage provided to the successful candidate.

3 months; benefits will be offered. Competitive Please contact admin@blackcombpeaks.com with your resume to apply.

LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 2004 • $241.50 Bi Weekly Staff Housing (Incl bills) • Staff Meals & FREE COFFEE • 15% Grocery Discount At “The Grocery Store” • Local Customer Base • Competitive Wages • Parties, Perks & Positive Vibes

“Great Team & Awesome Staff Housing” - Irelands Finest Export PADDY BRANGAN POP INTO SEE IAN AT DELISH CAFE OR EMAIL ian@whistlergrocery.com

Canadian Leader in Wilderness Medical Training

WILDERNESS FIRST AID TRAINING SPRING 2019 Wilderness First Responder May 18-25

EXCLUSIVE LUXURY LAND ROVER EXCURSIONS

80-hr program for outdoor professionals and backcountry guides. Required course for many outdoor companies. Nationally Recognized Certification meets requirements of WMS, ACMG, BC River Outfitters Association, Sea Kayak Guides Alliance of BC, Outward Bound, NOLS

FULL TIME / PART TIME

NATURE TOUR GUIDE Guide Income ranges from $20 to $35+ per hour

Advanced Wilderness First Aid May 14-17 This 40-hr program has become a minimum standard for outdoor professionals, guides and instructors. Also re-certifies Wilderness First Responder course.

QUALIFICATIONS: • Must have BC Class 5 drivers license • Wildlife Tour Guiding & Outdoor photography skills are a bonus

New Mountain Bike Advanced Wilderness First Aid Training May 1-4

* If you are passionate about wildlife & nature, we can train you!

In Squamish. MBIA Specialized MTB course. WFR recertification accepted

Please forward resumes to info@whistlerdiscoverytours.com

SIRIUS WILDERNESS MEDICINE

Roland’s Pub & Red Door Bistro are looking for experienced line cooks and dishwashers. Full time and part time available, mostly night shifts. Competitive wages, tips, staff meal, staff discounts, and many other perks. Full time staff eligible for Extended Medical & Dental benefits after 3 months. Come join the coolest group of locals at the coolest local establishment. Apply in person to 2129 Lake Placid Road, or email resume to info@rolandswhistler.com

REGISTER ONLINE AT: www.siriusmed.com Toll Free (877) 982-0066

COMMUNITY LISTINGS ARTS & CULTURE Arts Whistler - Full arts & culture listings. Comprehensive artist directory & programs, events & performances year-round. For info 604-935-8410 or visit www.artswhistler.com Pemberton Arts Council - Connect with other artists, writers, artisans, musicians & help make Pemberton a vibrant arts community. Call 604-452-0123 or visit www. pembertonartscouncil.com Whistler Community Band - Rehearsals on Tuesdays 7 - 8:15 pm CONTACT whistlerchorus@gmail.com FOR LOCATION

Guest services AGent

Pinnacle Hotel Whistler has an opening for a full time or part time guest services agent. We are looking for a customer service professional who will help our guest enjoy their experience at our hotel. Duties include check in and checkout of guests, concierge and reservations. Experience preferred but we will train the right person. Please contact Roger Dix   rdix@pinnaclehotels.ca or ph: 604-938-3218

Kaze Sushi is looking for Experienced Sushi Chef

Must be able to create rich sushi menu including maki, nigiri and sashimi with various ingredients such as raw fish, fresh fruits & vegetables. Minimum one year as a sushi chef experience required. Wage: $14.50 per hour, FT, to work at Kaze Sushi in Westin Whistler. Please apply in person with resume at the Whistler restaurant from 5:30pm onwards

Call or email Tom on 604-938-4565 or tokyotom111@hotmail.com

MAY 9, 2019

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COMMUNITY LISTINGS

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

ARTS & CULTURE Pemberton Writers - Meet with other writers to review and critique monthly. Opportunities for writing in a comfortable and creative setting. Email crowley7@telus.net

Basalt Wine + Salumeria are currently looking to fill the roles of:

The Beacon Pub and Eatery is currently looking for: LINE/ PREP COOKS (FULL-TIME & PART-TIME) HEAD CHEF DISHWASHERS Wages are very competitive (based on experience), great perks and benefits. Come join the best team in Whistler! Interested applicants please email your resume to skeenan-naf@Crystal-Lodge.com

ASSISTANT MANAGER LINE COOKS DISHWASHERS Wages are very competitive (based on experience), great perks and benefits. Full and Part Time positions available. Come join the best team in Whistler!

to join our growing team. RDC specializes in High Performance Custom Homes and Renovations. WE OFFER: Positive work environment Work on innovative energy efficient projects â&#x20AC;&#x201C; new homes and renovations Leadership training Extended health benefits Tool purchase support

Please send your resume to: info@rdcfinehomes.com

We offer competitive wages, a unique environment, seasonal bonuses, staff discounts and benefits. Ask about accommodation.

High-Performing Experienced Carpenters

Whistler Singers Resumes September 11th, 2018 for the fall/winter season. Rehearsals are Tuesdays from 7 to 9pm at Myrtle Philip School in the Toad Hall room. Everyone is welcome! Inquiries can be sent to whistlersingers@gmail.com For more info, visit: https://www.facebook.com/whistlersing ers/

Please send your cover letter and resume to skeenan-naf@crystal-lodge.com

Come Grow Sport with us at our Whistler Olympic Legacy Venues

RDC Fine Homes is looking for positive and reliable

Sea to Sky Singers - Invites new & former members to join us for an exciting new term, the spring & fall terms culminate with a concert. Choir meets Tues, 7-9pm at Squamish Academy of Music, 2nd Ave. Veronica seatoskysingers@gmail.com or 604892-7819 www.seatoskysingers.net

We are recruiting for:

Whistler Athletesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Centre (High Performance Training and Accommodation) Lead, Lodge Attendant Kitchen Porter / Lodge Attendant

Whistler Sliding Centre (Bobsleigh, Luge & Skeleton) Positions for this venue are currently filled

Whistler Olympic Park (Nordic Skiing, Snowshoeing and Outdoor Activities) Positions for this venue are currently filled

Visit our website to view current postings and to apply: www.whistlersportlegacies.com/careers

CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS Donate Used Clothing & Household Goods- To be distributed to local charities by Sharon 604-894-6656 for pick up. Playground Builders: Creating Play Building Hope - Playground Builders is a registered charity that builds playgrounds for children in war-torn areas. Learn more, volunteer or donate at www.playgroundbuilders.org Sea to Sky Community Services running dozens of programs in Whistler to help people through times of crisis and with everyday challenges. www.sscs.ca 1-877-892-2022 admin@sscs.ca Stewardship Pemberton Society and the One Mile Lake Nature CentreConnecting community, nature and people through education, cooperation, and community involvement. www.stewardshippemberton.com Whistler Health Care Foundation raises funds for improving health care resources and services. New board members welcomed. Contact us at info@whistlerhealthcarefoundation.org or call Karen at 604-906-1435.

SPORTS & RECREATION Alpine Club of Canada Whistler Section - Outdoor club focused on ski/split board touring, hiking, mountaineering and skills training. More info: accwhistler.ca Trip Schedule: accwhistler.ca/trips/

Whistler Bungee is hiring:

is currently hiring for the following position:

EXCAVATOR OPERATORS CLASS 1 TRUCK DRIVER Please send resume to

admin@tktcontracting.ca NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

88 MAY 9, 2019

JUMP CREW Applicants must be outgoing, enthusiastic and love to bungee jump! Please send your cover letter and resume to: jobs@whistlerbungee.com

Griffin Squadron Squamish Air Cadets- Open to youth 12-18yrs at Don Ross Secondary School on Tues at 6:30pm. Pemberton Valley Trails AssociationMeets the second Wed of each month. 7pm at the Pemberton Recreation Centre. Call 604-698-6158 Sea to Sky RC Flyers - Model Aeronautics Association of Canada Club active in the Sea to Sky Region flying model airplanes, helicopters and multi-rotors. Contact S2SRCFLY@telus.net


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Whistler Adaptive Sports Program Provides sports & recreation experiences for people with disabilities. Chelsey Walker at 604-905-4493 or info@whistleradaptive.com Whistler Martial Arts offers Kishindo Karate for kids age 4 and up, Capoeira and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu for kids and adults. Also Kickboxing, Judo, Yoga and Bellyfit for adults. Call Cole 932-2226 Women's Karma Yoga - Thursdays, 9:30-10:30, ongoing by donation and childminding provided. Whistler Women's Centre: 1519 Spring Creek Drive. Drop-in for weekly yoga classes led by an all female team of certified yoga instructors. All women, all ability levels welcome. hswc.ca | 604-9628711

SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 48

The Sea to Sky corridor’s top civil construction company. We are currently recruiting professionally minded people to join our team.

School District No. 48 (Sea to Sky) is accepting applications for a full-time, permanent Mechanic position in the Squamish area.

Required are:

Labourers Equipment Operators Class 1 or Class 3 Truck Drivers Please send resume to: Email: info@whistlerexcavations.com Fax: 604-932-8748 Mail: Box 1145, Whistler, BC V0N 1B0. Drop off @ Suite 202, 1400 Alpha Lake Road, Whistler (Function Junction)

www.whistlerexcavations.com Last modified by:

Whistler Children's Chorus Rehearsal Tuesdays at MILLENNIUM PLACE (4 - 5:30 pm) contact whistlerchorus@gmail.com Whistler/Pemberton Girl Guides Adventures for Girls age 5 & up. Sparks & Brownies (Gr K,1,2,3) Guides (Gr 4,5,6) Volunteers always welcome. coastmountaingirlguides@gmail.com Whistler Youth Centre - Drop - in: Fridays 3:30 - 11 PM & Saturdays 6 10 PM for ages 13 - 18. Located downstairs in the Maury Young Arts Centre (formerly Millenium Place). We offer: a Ping pong table, Pool table, Skateboard mini ramp w. skateboards and helmets to borrow, Free Wi-Fi, Xbox One, PS3 & PS4, Guitars, Board games, Projector and widescreen TV's. Facebook THEYC Crew, www.whistleryouthcentre.com or call 604-935-8187.

Server Assistants Restaurant Hosts FREE golf, more perks $575 housing, private room Great culture/events, competitive wages, Whistler’s Best Patio, more Inquires: info_nicklaus@golfbc.com

Pemberton Women's Institute Meets the third Mon of each month in the activity room at St. David's United Church at 7:30pm. New members welcome. Linda Ronayne at 604-8946580

Further information regarding this position and the School District can be found at https://www.makeafuture.ca/regionsdistricts/bc-public-school-districts/metro/sea-to-sky/ Please note applications for this position will be received up to 4:00 pm on Monday May 13, 2019 and we ask that applications be submitted through the Make a Future website. While we thank all applicants for their interest, only those applicants who have been given consideration for an interview will be contacted. P.O. Box 250 · 37866 Second Avenue · Squamish, B.C. · V0N 3G0 Tel (604) 892-5228 · Fax (604) 892-1038

is now hiring for the following position:

Guest Service Agent Room Attendant* Duty Manager Maintenance Person $300 signing bonus Full-time and Part-time Seasonal incentives available *Short-term accommodation available Please email resume to hr@listelhotel.com

Duplicate Bridge ClubWhistler Racquet Club reconvenes in late fall. The club meets every week and visitors are welcome. For partner, please call Gill at 640-932-5791.

Mountain Spirit Toastmasters- Builds communication, public speaking, and leadership skills . Wednesdays at the Pan Pacific Mountainside - Singing Pass Room, 5:30-7pm. Email contact 8376@toastmastersclubs.org www.whistler.toastmastersclubs.org

This position is covered by our CUPE Collective Agreement and offers a competitive rate of pay and benefits package.

KP

LEISURE GROUPS

Knitty Gritty Knit Night- Held every Tues 6-8pm. Free evening open to everyone with a love for knitting/crocheting. Beginners welcome. For location and further details email knittygrittywhistler@gmail.com or find us on facebook.

Always Supporting Learners Valuing Individuals  Fostering Pride  Expanding Opportunities

MECHANIC

YOUTH ACTIVITIES 1st Whistler Scout Group - outdoor & adventure program for girls and boys aged 5-17. Times and locations vary. More info: http://1stwhistlerscoutgroup.webs.com. Contact scoutsatwhistler @gmail.com or 604-966-4050.



Thank you for your interest. Only those applicants being considered for an interview will be contacted.

WE ARE LOOKING TO HIRE:

BUSSERS HOSTS SERVERS EXPERIENCED LINE COOKS Full-time and year round. We feature evening work only, staff meals, competitive wages and a great work environment. So if you’re looking for a change or some extra hours, come by and see us. Flexible schedules are available. REPLY IN PERSON WITH RESUME BETWEEN 3-5 AT QUATTRO 4319 Main St. in the Pinnacle Hotel

NOW HIRING: FT Bakery FT & PT Cashiers COMPETITIVE WAGES, BENEFITS AND FLEXIBILITY email jobs@pembertonsupermarket.com online application at pembertonsupermarket.com fax (604) 894-1107 or apply within! MAY 9, 2019

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COMMUNITY LISTINGS LEISURE GROUPS Rotary Club of Whistler - Meets Tuesdays AM & PM www.whistler-rotary.org Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium Meets every Thurs at 12:15pm at Pan Pacific Mountainside. 604-932-7782

JOIN THE MONGOLIE CREW! We are hiring for:

Hosts FULL & PARt tIME GRILL CHEFs

Hourly wage + tips, flexible schedule, fun & fast-paced work environment, staff meals. Learn how to cook with flair!

Send your resume to careers@mongoliegrill.com Or drop off your resume in person before 5pm!

Shades of Grey Painters Meets twice a week - Tuesdays, Watercolour, 11.00am-2.30pm @ The Rec, Pemberton. Thursdays, Acrylic, 1.00pm-3.30pm @ The Amenities Building, Pioneer Village, Pemberton. We are like-minded people that get together & paint. Gretchen is the painting coach. $5 to attend. Whistler Reads - Meets to discuss a new book every eight weeks. Go to bookbuffet. com & click on Whistler Reads for the latest book/event. Paula at 604-907-2804 or wr@ bookbuffet.com

COMMUNITY CENTRES Maury Young Arts Centre - Whistler's community centre for arts, culture & inspiration. Performance theatre, art gallery, daycare, youth centre, meditation room, meeting facilities. www.artswhistler.com or 604-935-8410 Pemberton & District Community Centre - Located at 7390 Cottonwood St. Fitness Centre, facility rentals, spray park, playground, children, youth, adult & seniors programs. For more info 604-894-2340 or pemrecinfo@slrd.bc.ca

Be a part of our dynamic team at one of Whistler’s busiest spots!

The Listel Hotel Whistler is now hiring for the year-round leadership position of

At The High Mountain Brewing Company, Whistler Brewhouse, we take pride in our product and service - From the busy patio to the cozy two-sided fireplace, from our exceptional pizzas to our hand-crafted beer.

FRONT OFFICE MANAGER

We are currently looking for

Front of House Manager Dishwasher Line Cook We offer comprehensive benefits packages after a probationary period, as well as competitive wages. Please come by with your resume or apply via email to adam@mjg.ca

4355 BLACKCOMB WAY WHISTLER, BC, V0N 1B4

• Responsible for leading a dynamic front office team and daily operations • Competitive Salary and incentives provided • Extended Management Health and Wellness Benefits available For more information and application, please send resume and cover letter to hr@listelhotel.com Thank you for your interest. Only those applicants being considered for an interview will be contacted.

DOUG BUSH SURVEY SERVICES LTD. is looking for a

SURVEY FIELD TECHNICIAN The Adara Hotel, Whistler We now have the following positions available:

RESERVATION SUPERVISOR FRONT DESK SUPERVISOR HOUSEKEEPERS We offer better than competitive wages, benefits, spirit or epic ski pass and more. The Adara Hotel is a small boutique hotel nestled in the heart of Whistler close to all amenities and services. We take care of our staff and experience is an asset not a requirement.

90 MAY 9, 2019

With a two or three year college or technical school program in geomatics. Three years experience and proficient in the use of robotic survey instruments and GPS equipment for engineering and building construction layout, topographic site surveys, site improvement surveys and precise monitoring. Experience with AutoCAD Civil 3D also an asset to assist in office with computations and drawing preparation. Please call Ian @ 604-932-3314 or email @ ian@dbss.ca #18-1370 Alpha Lake Rd. Whistler BC V0N 1B1 Serving Squamish, Whistler and Pemberton

MUSEUMS Squamish Lil'wat Cultural Centre Explore First Nations Art Galleries, and Interactive Exhibits. Gift Shop & Cafe are in our admission free area. Open Tuesday'sSunday's per week. 10am-5p.m.. Whistler Museum & Archives Society Explore interactive exhibits, listen to local stories & discover Whistler's journey. Open daily 11am-5pm, 4333 Main St. www. whistlermuseum.org or 604-932-2019

PROFESSIONAL NETWORKING BNI Mountain High - Meets at 6:45-8:30am every Thursday at The Venue. BNI provides a positive and structured environment for development and exchange of quality business referrals. It does so by helping you build personal relationships with dozens of other qualified business professionals. Register by emailing blair@blairkaplan.ca Whistler Chamber of Commerce - Is the leading business association in Whistler that works to create a vibrant & successful economy. Learn more about the programs & services at www.whistlerchamber.com Women of Whistler - Group that provides opportunities for Whistler businesswomen to network, gain knowledge & share ideas in a friendly, relaxed environment. Learn more at www.womenofwhistler.com

FOR SENIORS Outreach Services - Free confidential support for adults dealing with the challenges of social wellness. Please call our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker.


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Activate & Connect - Come join us Thursday mornings 9:30am to 11:00am at Whistler Community Services for a weekly drop in program for seniors 50+. Everyone welcome, in partnership with Mature Action Community. www.mywcss.org

Mature Action Community (MAC) - Represents seniors in Whistler and welcomes new members. MAC meets for fun and interaction with local seniors and those just visiting on Thursday mornings from 9:30 to 11:00 a.m. at the Whistler Community Services Community Room for Activate and Connect. Come join us for coffee and socializing while engaging in fun activities. Check us out at www.whistlermac. org or view our schedule on Facebook Whistler Mature Action Community Group page.

Pemberton Men's Shed - Weekly social meetings WED. 11-2 in the Seniors/youth Rec. bldg. beside library. Social meeting with BYO Bag lunch, card games and pool/ snooker. Help out in YOUR community, operating the Pemberton Tool Library.

Dubh Linn Gate is hiring:

BAR MANAGER Dubh Linn Gate is seeking an experienced bar manager. Areas of expertise include ordering and inventory, menu design and costing, managing an experienced bar team, providing exceptional leadership and delivering good craic. A minimum of 2 years’ management experience in a high volume bar or pub, and a minimum of 3 years’ bartending experience are required. We offer a competitive salary, tips, a ski pass, housing if required, a flexible schedule and a great working environment. Drop by the pub to speak with Diane or Louise between 9:30am and 3pm Monday to Saturday.

Senior Citizen Organizations - Is an advocacy group devoted to improving the quality of life for all seniors. Ernie Bayer 604576-9734 or ecbayer2@gmail.com

ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY Earthsave Whistler - Providing info & support to people who are interested in making healthier, greener, more peaceful food choices. earthsavewhistler.com

Healthy Home, Healthy Planet - Expert in green cleaning offers tricks, info & advice on the best way to green clean your home or work space! Call France 604-698-7479. Free private presentation on request. www. healthylivingwhistler.com

Re-Build-It Centre - Daily 10:00am to 5:00pm. Accepting donations of furniture, quality used building supplies & new items. Deliveries and pickups available for $35. Call 604.932.1125, www.mywcss.org, rebuildit@ mywss.org

District of Squamish Technology Transformation Program Project Manager We are looking for a superior Project Manager who can also consecutively manage individual technology projects that comprise the multi-year program. The ideal candidate will demonstrate extraordinary leadership, have proven experience leading finance system and ERP implementation, a background in Finance (preferably municipal finance), as well as a background in IT.

Visit squamish.ca/careers to find out more!

Regional Recycling - Recycle beverage containers (full deposit paid) electronics, appliances, batteries, Lightbulbs, drop-off times are 9am-5pm on Nesters Rd. Pick up service 604-932-3733

Re-Use-It - Daily 11:00am to 6:00pm, Donate all household goods in good shape. Accepting bottles & cans, old electronics, anything with a cord, and light fixtures for recycling. All proceeds to WCSS. Call 604.932.1121, www.mywcss.org, reuseit@ mywcss.org.

The Association of Whistler Area Residents for the Environment (AWARE) Whistler's Natural Voice since 1989. Regular events, project and volunteer opportunities. www.awarewhistler.org info@awarewhistler.org

ASSISTANT RESTAURANT MANAGER Seeking a full-time Assistant Manager to help inspire, develop, oversee and manage our front-of-house team. The Assistant Manager will help oversee day-to-day operations and uphold Araxi Restaurant’s exceptional levels of hospitality. Qualifications • Previous restaurant leadership experience is required • WSET Level 2 or equivalent is an asset Excellent training and growth opportunities available within an award-winning restaurant group. We offer year-round full hours, competitive wages, gratuities, extended medical & dental, accommodations, potential for future growth within the company, and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants. Please email your resume & cover letter to:

careers@araxi.com

Sundial Boutique Hotel at 4340 Sundial Crescent, Whistler BC V0N 1B4 is currently hiring for a

Housekeeping Supervisor The Pinnacle Hotel Whistler has the following positions available:

This position is FT year around. Wage is $21.75/hr + benefits. Job duties include: Supervising dept duties, inspection of work, administration, assist with recruiting, perform training and cleaning duties.

HOUSEMAN

Skill requirements: 1 year’s prior experience as a housekeeping supervisor”, tourism, administration and customer service.

ROOM ATTENDANTS Please reply by email: parmstrong@pinnaclehotels.ca

Please fax or email your resume with attention to “Human Resources Department” to:

604-932-7152 hr@sundialhotel.com MAY 9, 2019

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ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

District of Squamish Recreation Opportunities ResortQuest Whistler is currently hiring:

Group Sales Coordinator Maintenance Benefits include - activity allowance, extended medical, RRSP match, opportunities for growth and more. To apply for this opportunity, please specify the position and email your resume and cover letter to:

. Recreation Program Leader (Temporary Full-Time) . Recreation Program Instructor 1- Biking (Casual and Temporary Full-Time) . Recreation Program Leader – Biking (Casual) Visit squamish.ca/careers to find out more!

beth.fraser@resortquestwhistler.com We thank all applicants for their interest but only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

The Mountain Village Social Gathering - Join us at one of our regular social gatherings on the last Wednesday of every month. There is a group of us at The Mountain Village who are forming a sustainable, multi generational neighbourhood based on the co housing model. WHAT IF... Housing wasn't just a place to live, but rather, a way of life? To find out more, visit our Facebook page @themountainvillage or go to our website www.themountainvillage.ca

FAMILY RESOURCES Baby/Child Health Clinics - Free routine immunizations & newly licensed vaccines for purchase, growth & development assessments & plenty of age appropriate resources avail. By appointment 604-932-3202 Camp Fund - Provides financial assistance to enable children of financially restricted families to attend camp. Call WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. www.mywcss.org Families Fighting Cancer In The Sea To Sky - We are a non profit partner with Sea to Sky Community Services. We provide financial and practical support to children and parents with dependants diagnosed with cancer. Please contact us on our confidential email: ffcseatosky@gmail.com, visit our Facebook Page or website www.familiesfightingcancer.ca KidsArt - Provides financial assistance to enable children of financially restricted families to participate in arts and culture education. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. www.mywcss.org.

Nagomi Sushi is hiring experienced

Kitchen Helpers in Whistler

Red Door Bistro & Roland’s Pub are looking for full time line cooks. Wage based on experience. Extended Medical & Dental Benefits, tips, staff meal, and staff discounts. Apply in person or email resume to info@rolandswhistler.com

We are currently hiring Full and Part Time Sales Representatives with personality! We have staff accommodation available for full time, starting in May Please stop by our Whistler Village location with your resume to fill out an application and say Hi to Michelle or Tina. (4154 Village Green)

92 MAY 9, 2019

Full time and Part time available Available to start immediately Benefits: 2 weeks vacation per year, potential staff accommodation and Spirit Pass Program. Start date: As soon as possible. Address: 108-4557 Blackcomb Way, Whistler, BC, V0N 1B4 Apply by email at nagomisushi@outlook.com

www.whistlerwag.com

Looking for a dog to adopt? Look for WAG’s bright orange bandanas on dogs being walked by volunteers! These dogs are looking for their forever home. 604.935.8364 | www.whistlerwag.com

Kids on the Move - Provides financial assistance to enable children of financially restricted families to participate in sport programs. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker. www.mywcss.org. Outreach Services - Free confidential support for adults and families experiencing challenges with mental health, food insecurity, housing insecurity, substance use, misuse or addiction, employment, eating disorders, violence in relationships, roommate conflict or homesickness. Contact our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker or visit www.mywcss.org. Pemberton Parent Infant Drop-In Facilitated by Capri Mohammed, Public Health Nurse. Every Mon 11am12:30pm at Pemberton Public Library. Pemberton Strong Start Family Drop-In- A play group for you and your under-5 child. Signal Hill Elementary, Mon, Tues, Wed & Fri, 9am-12pm. Thurs only 12pm-3pm. Call 604-8946101 / 604-966- 8857 Whistler Public Library - Open MonThurs 10am-7pm, Fri 10am-6pm, Sat & Sun 11am-5pm. Music & Words, Mon 10am. Rhyme & Song, Tues 10:30am. Parent & Infant drop-in, Thurs 11am. Preschool Story Time, Fri 10:30am. Singing with the babies, Sat 11am. Call 604-935-8433

SOCIAL SERVICES Access to Justice - Need legal advice but are financially restricted? Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 to find out more or visit www.mywcss.org.


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Counselling Assistance Available WCSS subsidizes access to a private counselor for $35-$50/hr depending on financial need. Contact an outreach team member at 604-932-0113 www.mywcss.org Counselling Assistance WCSS subsidizes access to a private counsellor depending on financial need. Contact an outreach worker at 604.932.0113 or visit www.mywcss.org. ESL Volunteer Tutor Program Volunteer one-to-one tutoring for new immigrants & Canadian citizens. For more information or to register, contact the Whistler Welcome Centre info@welcomewhistler.com or call 604.698.5960 Run by Sea to Sky Community Service. Open every second Monday. 604 894 6101

Housekeepers Needed

-Signing Bonus & Great Benefits!The Four Seasons Housekeeping team is looking for Guestroom Attendants for contracts starting immediately or for summer hire! Candidates will receive a $500 signing bonus. Benefits include Guaranteed housing, one meal per working shift, health & medical after 90 days, a winter leisure package, and more!

Earls is starting to build our team for Spring and Summer Servers, Cooks, Hosts, Expeditors, Bartenders & Shift Managers Visit us at the restaurant anytime to apply in person or via email at apply.whistler@earls.ca

Food Bank Whistler - Located at 8000 Nesters Road, every Monday from 10am to noon. For emergency food bags, please call 604.935.7717 for assistance. www.mywcss.org, foodbank@mywcss.org Learn how to prepare healthy affordable meals at this outreach program. Sea to Sky Community Services 604-894-6101

Meadow Park Rec Credit - If you are financially restricted, you may be eligible for a $131.20 municipal recreation credit. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak with an outreach worker. www.mywcss.org. Services for family, friends & community. Mental illness info, support & advocacy. Call Chris Dickenson at 604-966-7334 Outreach Services - Free, confidential support for youth experiencing challenges with mental health, food insecurity, housing insecurity, substance use, misuse or addiction, employment, eating disorders, violence in relationships, roommate conflict or homesickness. Contact our office at 604.932.0113 to speak with an outreach worker or visit www.mywcss.org.

Details: Please apply online via jobs.fourseasons.com For possible same day offers, please come to our drop-in hours every Tuesday between 1pm-4pm. Please bring your resume and two references in order to be considered!

WORK. LIFE. BALANCE.

ASSOCIATE, CONFERENCE SALES Full Time, Year Round

The Sales Associate’s main responsibility is to support the fulfillment of Tourism Whistler’s goals and objectives through the building of relationships with our clients.

Pearl's Safe Home - Temporary shelter for women & children experiencing abuse in relationships. Locations in Whistler & Pemberton avail 24/7. All services are free. 1-877890-5711 or 604-892-5711

Through the use of outstanding communication, interpersonal skills, a high level of enthusiasm and initiative, the Sales Associate will deliver superior service to our clients with a strong passion for our industry and purpose. The ideal candidate is extremely organized, motivated and an excellent team player with two year of sales experience, preferably in a hotel or tourism setting.

RMOW Rec Credit - If you are financially restricted, you may be eligible for a $127.60 municipal recreation credit. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 www.mywcss.org

Tourism Whistler is also recruiting for the following year round positions:

Support Counselling - For women regarding abuse & relationship issues. No charge. Call 604-894-6101 Victim Services - Assists victims, witnesses, family members or friends directly affected by any criminal act or traumatic event. Call 604-905-1969 Whistler Community Services Society - Outreach Services Now Available Monday to Saturday at our new location - 8000 Nesters Road (next to WAG) 604.932.0113 www.mywcss.org

• • • •

We’re Hiring! Join Our Diverse & Fun Team at Nita

In anticipation of a busy summer, we are hiring for many positions in the hotel including seasonal housekeeping, culinary, service positions (patio season is coming!) and management. Competitive wages Flexible working hours Great perks & benefits Discounts on F&B + Spa services Staff housing available

Coordinator, Research Executive Assistant Travel Consultant Visitor Centre Agent

For a complete job description and to apply, visit us online at whistler.com/careers.

Check out www.nitalakelodge.com/careers to learn more

contact us today

careers@nitalakelodge.com www.nitalakelodge.com I @nitalakelodge

SUBSCRIPTIONS - 52 $76.70/YEAR

CANADA - REGULAR MAIL

ISSUES

$136.60/YEAR

CANADA - COURIER

$605.80/YEAR USA - COURIER

PAY BY MASTERCARD, VISA OR AMEX. TEL. 604-938-0202 | FAX. 604-938-0201

MAY 9, 2019

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COMMUNITY LISTINGS SOCIAL SERVICES Whistler for the Disabled - Provides info for people with disabilities on what to do & where to go. Visit www. whistlerforthedisabled.com

NESTERS MARKET & WELLNESS CENTRE

NOW HIRING AT OUR WHISTLER LOCATION If you are a student 15 years or older, we have flexible hours and we want you!

Grocery Clerks Produce Clerks Deli Clerks Meat Clerks Bakery Clerks Juice Bar Clerks E-mail or drop in your resume to: bruce_stewart@nestersmarket.com please cc ian_fairweather@nestersmarket.com or call us at 604-932-3545 PERKS • Competitive wage – Depending on expereince • Access to medical and dental benefits for full time applicants • Percentage discount from store bought goods • Flexible and set schedule • Relative training

Whistler Housing Authority - Long term rental & ownership housing for Whistler residents. Visit www.whistlerhousing.ca

Whistler Mental Health & Addiction Services - If you or someone you know needs help with a mental health issue or substance misuse or addiction problem, we can assist. Mon-Fri 830am-430pm. 604-6986455

Whistler Multicultural Network Settlement information, social support and programs for newcomers and immigrants living/working in Whistler. 604-388-5511 www.whistlermulticulturalnetwork.com

Whistler Opt Healthy Sexuality Clinic - Professional sexual health services at a reduced cost. Free HIV testing. Clinics at Whistler Health Care Ctr, 2nd floor on Tues 4:30-7:30pm. Winter hours Thurs. 5:00pm7:00pm. Confidentiality assured.

Whistler Women's Centre - Provides confidential support, resources, referrals and advocacy for women living in the Sea to Sky corridor. All services are free of charge and include access to emergency safe housing, child/youth counselling, play space and computer access. Drop-In Centre open Mon 12-230, Tue-Thu 12-5. 1519 Spring Creek Drive. You can also access our services at the Whistler Public Library on Mondays from 3-6 p.m. www.hswc.ca or call (604)962-8711. 24 HR Crisis Line: 1-877-890-5711

Whistler WorkBC Employment Services Centre - Provides free one-stop employment services to job seekers and employers. Drop in services at the Pemberton Library Thursdays 1-5 PM, and at the Whistler Public Library on Mondays from 3-6 PM. For more information visit www.WhistlerESC.com or call us at 604-932-1600

SUPPORT GROUPS

EXCITING CAREER OPPORTUNITIES APPLY TODAY! Diamond Resorts Canada Ltd., Whistler, BC

LOCALLY OWNED AND INDEPENDENT SINCE 1980 • $241.50 Bi Weekly Staff Housing (incl bills) • 15% Grocery Discount • Competitive Wages • Parties, Perks and Positive Vibes

CHARACTERS WANTED “Work with all your pals, have a good laugh and meet heaps of people” - Chief Morale Officer ROB STANNARD POP INTO THE STORE AND SPEAK TO A MANAGER 4211 VILLAGE SQUARE WHISTLER

94 MAY 9, 2019

Full & Part Time Housekeepers Eligible successful candidates may receive*:

• Retention Bonus Program of up to $1,200 for eligible candidates. • Extensive benefits package which may include; ski pass or wellness allowance, disability coverage, travel insurance and extended health and dental. • Travel Allowance and discounted employee rates at any Diamond Resort International resort.

Birth, Baby and Beyond - Join a registered counsellor and meet other moms with the opportunity to ask questions and share experiences in a safe, welcoming and nonjudgmental setting. Call 604.932.0113 for more information or visit www.mywcss.org.

Concussion Support Group - WCSS is offering a recurring 8 week program to support people living with persistent postconcussion symptoms. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak with an outreach worker about upcoming sessions or visit www.mywcss.org.

Epilepsy Support Group- For individuals & families seeking guidance or support. Contact eswhistler@gmail.com

• Full-time work year round and a FUN work environment. *eligibility and conditions based on DRCL policies and practices set out in general terms and conditions of employment.

Email your resume with the position you wish to apply for to: Madiha.Hassan@diamondresorts.com

Immigrant Peer Educators - Immigrants providing support and information for those who may be experiencing challenges adjusting to a new culture. 604-388-5511 info@whistlermulticulturalnetwork.com


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SMART Recovery Whistler (SelfManagement and Recovery Training) A Cognitive-Behavioural group for individuals with substance abuse con-cerns. Drop-in: Registration is not necessary. Wednesdays 5:30-7:00pm Whistler Health Centre (2nd floor-group room)

Roman Catholic Church- Come celebrate mass at Our Lady of the Mountains, Whistler on Saturday 5pm, Sunday 9am, Tuesday 5:45pm, Wednesday 7pm, Thursday/Friday 5:45pm. St. Francis of Assisi, Pemberton on Sunday 12:30pm and Friday 9am. St. Christopher's, Mt. Currie on Sunday 11am. 604-905-4781

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# 26 Health Benefits | Colleague Housing | Leisure Package

Staff Meals | Hotel Stay Discounts Great Events & Recognition | Opportunity for growth

APPLY TODAY AT FAIRMONTCAREERS.COM

5 1 4 2 8 3 8 5 6 7 9 Dubh 4 2Linn Gate Irish Pub is hiring: 9 1 5 LINE COOK 1 3 DISHWASHER 4 7 3 4 9 2 Work at Whistler’s best location!

Sea to Sky Healing Room - For Blessing/Prayer/Encouragement In the Community Church building, 7422 Dogwood Street, Pemberton. Every 1st and 3rd Wednesday: 4-6 PM

6 9 5 2 3 1

Whistler Church- Join us for worship and fellowship around Jesus. Sunday 10 am at Myrtle Philip Community School, 6195 Lorimer Rd. Nursery, Sunday School to gr. 6, Youth gr. 7 and up. Call Pastor Jon 604-7983861 / Kelvin 204-249-0700 or www.whistlerchurch.ca

6FUR & FEATHERS 8 9 2 5

Get Bear Smart Society - Learn more about coexisting with bears. To report a conflict, garbage or attractant issue call 604-905BEAR (2327) www.bearsmart.com Pemberton Wildlife Association Advocates for the conservation of fish, wildlife & wilderness recreation. Also offering target shooting & archery facilities. www.pembertonwildlifeassociation.com V. EASY

WAG - Whistler Animals Galore - A shelter for lost, unwanted, and homeless cats and dogs. Let us help you find your purrfect match...adopt a shelter animal! For more info 604-935-8364 www.whistlerwag.com

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LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: MILE 33 BUS DRIVER

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8 1 7 2 1 8 5 7 3 5 4Seeking Room 7 Attendants, Dishwashers and In Room Dining Overnight Servers! 3 2 ***$500 Signing Bonus Offered*** 7 1 8 Our Benefits Include:

Jesus Rock Of Ages Ministry- A bible based church that holds services at Millennium V. Efloor ASYtheatre at 4:30pm. www. Place's main jesusrockofages.com

Fix

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

SMART Recovery Pemberton - (SelfManagement and Recovery Training) A Cognitive-Behavioural group for individuals with substance abuse con-cerns. Pemberton Health Centre (Board Room) January 17th, 24th, 31st, and February 7th 2019 4:30-6:00pm **drop in welcome.

2 1 6 8 3 6 7 RELIGION 5

Work

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

SUPPORT GROUPS Pregnancy and Infant Loss - Facilitated by a registered counsellor, this program is designed for couples and individuals who have experienced loss of a child, either before or after birth. Please call WCSS at 604.932.0113 and speak to an outreach worker for more information or visit www. mywcss.org.

Rent

Position Type: Categories: Location: FTE: No. of Positions: Reporting to: Salary: Posting Date: Closing Date: Start Date:

Mile 33 Bus Driver Bussing Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 1 1 Supervisor of Facilities and Services As per the Bussing Salary Grid April 4, 2019 Posted until position is filled Immediately

Details: Under the supervision of the Head Bus Driver and the Supervisor of Facilities and Services the Bus Driver will drive the Mile 33 Bus Route. (Lower Lake Band Area). Key Deliverables: • Pre-trip inspection of bus and proper warm up • Mile 33 to Xet’olacw Community School and Signal Hill Elementary and Pemberton Secondary School • Arrive at School for drop-off • Other bus runs as requested • Clean and fuel up if required • Routes are subject to change by the Supervisor of Facilities and Services if required. Key Qualifications and Attributes: • Must have minimum Class 2 • Driver’s Abstract • Criminal Record Check • Ensure all busses are inspected for SAFETY required • Make sure insurance for bus is up to date • Ensure log books are kept up, including mopping and washing seats once a week • Review fuel bills when requested • Other duties as required • This route is on Forestry Road. Driver needs to be capable and confident on unpaved road. Driver needs to be strong and in good health Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter, resume, and driver’s abstract and criminal record check by fax. Contact Information:

Glenda Gabriel, Receptionist/Secretary Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604, Mount Currie, B.C., V0N 2K0 Tel: 604 894-6131 Fax: (604) 894-5717

We thank you for your interest, however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

Refine or jump-start your culinary career in our 28 fast-paced and busy #kitchen. We offer competitive wages, tips and a season ski pass. Please stop by the pub between 10am and 5pm with a copy of your resume. You can also submit your resume via email to careers@dubhlinngate.com

Advantage EJ School # 27

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Currently seeking a dynamic, caring, reliable individual to teach/ animate a new program in Tourism and Hospitality (20 hours/week). # 28 Teaching 7 experience 2 8 6 5 would 1 3 be 9 an 4 asset, but not essential. 5 6 3 7 4 9 2 1 8 Minimum qualifications: 1 9Degree, 4 3 management 8 2 5 7 experience 6 Bachelor’s in the hospitality industry 4 52 years). 2 1 Courses 3 7 8 in6Tourism 9 (minimum and Hospitality would be desirable. 3 1a resume 5 6 8and 4 cover 2 7 letter to info@advantage-ej.com Please9email 6 8 7 9 2 4 1 5 3 8 7 9 2 1 3 6 4 Advantage 5 E/J www.advantage-ej.com 2 4 5 8 7 6 9 3 English 1 School 604-932-0965 3 1 6 4 9 5 7 8 (PTIB 2 Designated)

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Pan Pacific Whistler is currently hiring for: HR Coordinator Reservations & Revenue Supervisor Guest Services Agent Night Auditor Preventative Maintenance Technician Maintenance Associate Room Attendant Overnight Houseperson Breakfast Cook Breakfast Dishwasher Discover new opportunities to embark on a career in Hospitality with Pan Pacific Whistler, located at Whistler’s best address. We offer competitive wages, ski pass, and staff accommodation. To apply, please submit your cover letter and resume to careers.ppwhi@panpacific.com

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

GREAT RETAIL OPPORTUNITY! Snowflake in Fairmont Chateau Whistler is looking for a

manager

We specialize in Canadian made or designed outerwear and accessories, and have been in Whistler for almost 30 years. Good base salary; commissions on every sale, incentives, bonuses, staff discount, underground parking nearby, on the job training, and access to Health Club at the Chateau.

Check list… retail experience. Love to sell. Team leader and team player. Organized. energetic. enthusiastic. good time management. able to motivate others. Fluent in both written and spoken english. Flexible regarding shifts worked.

Please email resume to megan@snowflakecanada.com

All Positions The Pony restaurant is currently seeking applicants for the following positions: Line cook: day and night shifts available. Must have 3+ years experience, competitive wages and bi-weekly tip out. Dishwasher: Evening shifts, entry level position.Wages + bi-weekly tip out. Bartender: Experienced bartender, mainly day shifts, full time preferred. Please email or drop off your resume to The Pony events@thepony.ca Full Time SUTER HOMES-Position available immediately to join our team in new home construction. Two years experience and basic tools required. Benefits package and competitive wages for a motivated individual. 604-905-8426 paul@suterhomes.com suterhomes.com Local construction company looking for motivated labourers for summer time construction work. Great wages available contact scott@scottybsolutions.com

TEMP WORK/ FULL-TIME JOBS - Whistler Personnel Solutions Take the next step in your career OR find your Side Hustle! www.whistler-jobs.com

The Body Shop Seasonal Customer Consultant Do you want to learn from a company that does business as a force for good? Are you a leader looking for your next opportunity? Then we want to connect with you! Apply to The Body Shop Whistler! We are always looking for amazing leaders to join our brand and help us promote our cruelty-free products, and fair trade initiatives. We can’t wait to connect! * P/T 10-29 Hours *Starting from $16 p/h *Opportunity for permanent and management positions. Apply in store or online. https://ww w.thebodyshopcareers.com/en/

Experienced Journeyman and Apprentice’s needed.

Delta by Marriott Whistler Village Suites Is currently recruiting for the following positions:

- Front Desk Manager - Executive Housekeeper

- Housekeeping Room Attendant

- Houseperson / Public Area Attendant - Bellperson

Commercial and residential. Projects in Whistler, Squamish, Pemberton. High attention to detail, ability to work unsupervised and run projects/crews.

$25-35 per hr. Resumes kanegray@baseelectric.ca

STAFF HOUSING IS AVAILABLE! Start your journey today with: competitive wages, growth opportunities, a positive team environment, medical benefits, play money (ski pass, etc), 100% provincial health care coverage. To Apply: either submit an application online at Marriott.com/careers or send your resume to barbara.fraser@deltahotels.com

96 MAY 9, 2019

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LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: TEACHER ON-CALL Demi Chef de Partie Overnight Steward Steward Front Desk Agent Spa Supervisor The Four Seasons team is looking for these roles to start immediately. $500 signing bonus available for all hires

Details: Please apply online via jobs.fourseasons.com For possible same day offers, please come to our drop-in hours every Tuesday between 1pm-4pm. Please bring your resume and two references in order to be considered!

PIQUE NEWSMAGAZINE

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52 ISSUES $76 /YEAR .70

REGULAR MAIL WITHIN CANADA

$136.60/YEAR

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COURIER WITHIN USA

EXCITING CAREER OPPORTUNITIES APPLY TODAY! Diamond Resorts Canada Ltd., Whistler, BC

In-House Marketing Concierge Full Time & Part Time Eligible successful candidates may receive*: • Extensive benefits package which may include; ski pass or wellness allowance, disability coverage, travel insurance and extended health and dental. • Travel Allowance and discounted employee rates at any Diamond Resort International resort.

Position Type: Location: Status: Reporting to: Salary: Closing Date:

Teacher On-Call Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 Full-time Education Director Commensurate with Experience Posted Until Position filled

Details: Xet’olacw Community School is a Lil’wat Nation School situated 35 minutes north of Whistler, B.C. in the Mount Currie Community. The school is a modern, dynamic institution with a strong First Nations curriculum as well as academics from N to 12. Key Qualifications and Attributes: • The ability to teach various high school subjects • Member of the Teacher Regulation Branch • In possession of a degree in Education • Experience with and appreciation of First Nations culture • Ability to work within a Cooperative Discipline framework • Innovative and energetic • Positive thinking and ability to work as a team member • Ability to work in a collaborative culture • Background in relationship-based, learning and discursive practices • Adventurous, versatile and a nature lover • Must complete a criminal record check. Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter and resume including references. Contact Information:

Verna Stager, Education Director Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604, Mount Currie, B.C., V0N 2K0 Tel: 604 894-6131 Fax: (604) 894-5717 Email: glenda.gabriel@lilwat.ca

We thank you for your interest, however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

• Full-time work year round and a FUN work environment. *eligibility and conditions based on DRCL policies and practices set out in general terms and conditions of employment.

Email your resume with the position you wish to apply for to: embarc@diamondresorts.com

PAY BY MASTERCARD, VISA OR AMEX TEL. 604-938-0202 FAX. 604-938-0201

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CNC Machinist

THIS

Whistler CNC shop requires Machinist / Operator for the manufacture of bicycle products.

WITHOUT IT

FT permanent position. 40hrs per week, day or afternoon shifts available.

FREE

Email resume to sales@northshorebillet.com

TOWN

Metal working experience minimum requirement for applicants.

PICK IT UP EVERYWHERE

FAQwhistler MAY 9, 2019

97


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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

CURRENT OPPORTUNITIES FRONT-OF-HOUSE Experienced Server (Araxi) Cocktail Bartender (Bar Oso) Server Assistant Expeditor BACK-OF-HOUSE Pastry Cooks Line Cooks (1-2 years experience) Dishwashers

Staff Housing Available! Competitive Wage + Benefits Package We’re Hiring

WHISTLER ATV Whistler’s longest running ATV tour company is hiring for busy spring & summer season Restaurants

ATV GUIDES

Must have min 80 hour first aid, class IV driver’s license an asset. Previous guiding/or customer service skills also an asset. Full and part time positions available.

Visit us at - whistleratv.com Please apply via email shawn@blackcombsnowmobile.com

DISHWASHERS

TOP RATED NEARBY NEIGHBOURHOOD MENUS BROWSE BY CATEGORY Music

On the Mountains

On-the-job training offered APPLY TODAY!

What To Do?

MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES Assistant Bar Manager • A strong knowledge of spirits and cocktails • Previous experience in a premium food and beverage operation is an asset • A professionally recognized wine certificate is an asset (WSET or equivalent) Please email your resume & cover letter to careers@araxi.com or present in person at Araxi between 3-5 pm daily. We offer year-round full and part-time hours, gratuities, potential for future growth within the company, and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants.

Whistler Premier Resorts, Whistler’s leading property management rm is currently recruiting! What We Offer You:

Competitve Wages Health & Wellness Benets Full Time/Part Time Positions Supportive Team Environment Current Career Opportunities:

GUEST SERVICES AGENT • JUNIOR ACCOUNTANT APPLY TODAY AT PEOPLE@WHISTLERPREMIER.COM

WIDE OPEN WELDING IS CURRENTLY LOOKING TO FILL THE FOLLOWING POSITION:

FABRICATOR/ERECTOR Please forward your resume to contactus@wideopenwelding.com

98 MAY 9, 2019

Events

Resort Municipality of Whistler

Employment Opportunities · Senior Bylaw Officer · Human Resources Coordinator – Benefits · Facility Maintenance I Resort Municipality of Whistler whistler.ca/careers

Classifieds

m.piquenewsmagazine.com

Our outstanding team is looking to add individuals with a variety of skill sets and experience. Friendly, hard working candidates are invited to apply.

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

H I R I N G F O R S UM M E R

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

Pique in your pants Pique Newsmagazine’s mobile site is your guide to everything in Whistler. Search over 167 restaurant listings, events, activities and more. Search for a job, a place to live, a used snowboard or the closest grocery store. Keep Whistler in your pocket and always be the smarty pants.


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O&R Restaurants seeking full-time

IS SEEKING TWO LEADERS TO JOIN OUR TEAM:

Banquet Manager & Team Driver

EXECUTIVE SOUS CHEF, LINE COOK, BAKER, DISHWASHER, SERVER, BARTENDER We offer competitive pay, a social work environment, seasonal bonuses*, food discounts when not working, meals with every shift*, and a variety of F&B establishments to work. We’re looking forward to you joining our family!

For a complete job description please visit SLCC.ca/Careers. We thank you for your interest; however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

*for kitchen staff only

Please send resume to aaron@labocca.com

WHISTLER BLACKCOMB An extraordinary company, an extraordinary career. Are you ready to begin your extraordinary experience? Current Career Opportunities: Guest Services Manager Restaurant General Manager, Wildflower Restaurant General Manager, Mallard Lounge Talent Acquisition Manager Purchasing Manager HVAC Utility 1 Shift Engineer Colleague Experience & Lifestyle Coordinator We offer: Health Benefits Competitive Wages Leisure Package Hotel Stay Discounts Great colleague events & recognition! To review job descriptions and apply, please visit www.fairmontcareers.com

Love what you do! Because that’s what we’re all about. Whether you’re looking for a seasonal job or wanted to build an exciting career, we’ve got you covered.

WE’RE CURRENTLY HIRING FOR A VARIETY OF FULL-TIME OPPORTUNITIES: RETAIL POSITIONS:

FOOD & BEVERAGE POSITIONS:

Senior Bike Mechanic

Prep Cook, Station Cook

Provisioner Assistant Store Manager

& Lead Cook positions

Whistler Clearance Centre Store Manager

Head Chef Rendezvous

Mountain Top Store Manager

Head Chef Christine’s

Please visit whistlerblackcomb.com/jobs to find out more and apply!

/

/

/

/ MAY 9, 2019

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THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Here’s to the Journey At Westin, we recruit the brightest, most energetic people in pursuit of developing an exciting and rewarding career. Marriott International has 30 renowned hotel brands in over 122 countries around the world, and we’re still growing. Opportunities abound! STEWARD BANQUET SERVER (FT/CASUAL) ROOM ATTENDANT MAINTENANCE ENGINEER SHIPPER/ RECEIVER

ROOMS CONTROLLER OVERNIGHT SECURITY AGENT SECURITY SUPERVISOR ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE COORDINATOR ACCOUNTING MANAGER

PERKS AND BENEFITS • MSP COVERAGE • DISCOUNTED MEALS • FLEXIBLE SCHEDULES

• STAFF ACCOMMODATION • MARRIOTT “EXPLORE” PROGRAM ASSOCIATE HOTEL DISCOUNTS

Email your resume to work@westinwhistler.com or visit Monday to Friday, 9am - 5pm

Sales Coordinator Pique Newsmagazine is looking to fill a focal role of sales coordinator in our advertising sales department. The chosen candidate will possess uncompromising customer service and work well under pressure while thriving in a fast-paced deadline driven news media environment. The ideal applicant will have previous experience working with a print/digital media sales team. Strong administrative and communication skills are essential in this role, and attention to detail is a must. You will be highly organized and able to act as a liaison between departments, as well as possess a high level of professionalism when dealing with clients. We offer an excellent remuneration package as well as a benefits plan. Located in the mountain resort town of Whistler, British Columbia, Pique Newsmagazine is the unequivocal leader in reporting, interpreting and understanding the culture of the Coast Mountains and what it means to those who live, work and play in Whistler. Established in 1994, Pique’s success is derived from hard work, quality design, insightful editorial and an impressive list of regular advertisers. Our readers are informed, enlightened and entertained, and our advertisers receive the exposure and the results they expect. It is part of Glacier Media, one of Western Canada’s leading community media publishers, with more than 75 weekly, bi-weekly and daily community newspapers. Pique has been chosen by both the BCYCNA and News Media Canada as the top newspaper in its circulation category in 2017. Interested candidates should forward their resume and a cover letter to: Susan Hutchinson at shutchinson@wplpmedia.com Deadline: May 17th, 2019

WHISTLER PUBLISHING Limited Partnership

100 MAY 9, 2019

Is looking for a

SALES ASSOCIATE Snowflake, a Canadian retailer specializing in Great Canadian Design is looking for a sales associate to join our team.  Great wage + incentives (including fitness pass) Opportunity for advancement  Must be enthusiastic, fluent in both written and verbal English and able to work days/evenings/weekends. Sales experience and asset but not required.  Please send your resume to kathleen@snowflakecanada.com  Snowflake, Fairmont Chateau Whistler 4599 Chateau Blvd (Upper Village)  SNOWFLAKECANADA.COM


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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

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LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: GRADE ONE TEACHER Position Type: Categories: Location: FTE: No. of Positions: Reporting to: Salary: Posting Date: Closing Date: Start Date:

Grade One Teacher Elementary Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 1 1 Principal As per the Teaching Salary Grid March 15, 2019 Posted until position is filled August 26, 2019

Details: Xet’olacw Community School is a Lil’wat Nation school situated 35 minutes north of Whistler, BC in the Mount Currie Community. The School is a modern, dynamic institution with a strong First Nations curriculum as well as academics from N to 12. Applicants need to be willing to work in a collaborative environment including involvement in an aboriginal student achievement program, which includes First Nations School Association coaching that improves student and teacher performance. This position provides an opportunity for high quality Professional Development Key Deliverables: • Experience with Read Well, DIBELS and Six Minute Solution an asset/willingness to attend professional development • Ability to work collaboratively. Must be cooperative in strategies with Professional Learning Communities under direction of First Nations School Association • Experience with Saxon Math an asset/ willingness to attend professional development • Experience and/or education in special needs an asset • Can use data to drive classroom/school wide improvement initiatives • Maintain open and consistent communications with students and their families about academic progress • Be a positive team player committed to the belief that all children can learn at high levels • Commitment to ongoing professional development including willingness to be coached by the Elementary Supervisor and Regional Principal via school visits, video teleconference call and joining Provincial Professional Learning Community model (in Vancouver) and a School-Wide PLC model on site • Enjoy participating in school event days such as Sports Day, Eagle Run, and Flake Rodeo etc. • Implement strong classroom management strategies Key Qualifications and Attributes: • Possession of or eligibility for a BC Teaching Certificate • Membership in the Teacher Regulation Branch • Ability to work with First Nations students in a First Nations community • Innovative and energetic • Positive thinking and ability to work as a team member • Skill in developing instructional strategies based on essential skills and engaging for students • Teaching record of success an asset. • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills • Ability to build positive student relationships • Reflective practices • Familiarity with BC’s new curriculum • Have a desire to learn and grow professionally Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter, resume, including reference, transcripts, copy of degrees and TQS Category, prefer by fax. Contact Information:

Glenda Gabriel Receptionist/Secretary Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604 Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 Tel: 604 894-6131 Fax: (604) 894-5717

We thank you for your interest, however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

We provide our people with a caring and fun work environment and cater to lifestyles of adventure seekers. We are centrally located in the heart of Whistler Village and provide our employees with the opportunity to work flexible hours based on their adventure or family requirements.

Join our Adventure Service Team at the Whistler Village Inn and Suites! WE OFFER • A great work environment with opportunities for development and career advancement • Free coffee and tea service • Training for advancement • Use of facilities based on occupancy (Gym, Sauna, Hydro Spa and Pool) • Highly competitive compensation in Whistler • Employee accommodation discounts with Atlific Hotels and Resorts • Medical and Dental for full time employees • Some staff discounts on local activities • Staff housing based on availability • Increments to pay scale based for longevity • Flexible hours and work schedules based on your requirements • Bike Storage based on availability

CURRENTLY HIRING • Front Desk Agents (Commission based incentives) • FT Night Auditor - Premium Wage (Commission based incentives) • FT or PT Room Attendants (Commission based incentives) • FT Maintenance (Commission based incentives) Resumes can be submitted to karen@wvis.ca

CREATIVE AND COLLABORATIVE? WORK WITH US! We are currently recruiting amazing people to be part of our team.

Summer Programs Opera�ons Team Whistler Street Entertainment & Arts Whistler

Full-�me seasonal posi�on | Applica�ons considered as received

Cra� Facilitator

Whistler Street Entertainment & Arts Whistler Casual | Applica�ons considered as received

Summer Marke�ng & Communica�ons Assistant Full-�me seasonal posi�on | Applica�on deadline: April 26, 2019

Summer Program & Events Assistant

Full-�me seasonal posi�on | Applica�on deadline: April 26, 2019

Community Promo�ons Assistant Casual | Applica�ons considered as received

APPLY TODAY!

artswhistler.com/careers

Apply to: getinvolved@artswhistler.com | attn: Susan Holden Maury Young Arts Centre | 604.935.8410

MAY 9, 2019

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THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Security Systems Technician – Black Tusk Fire and Security Inc

Black Tusk Fire & Security Inc. is seeking an experienced Accountant Black Tusk andinSecurity is hiring for the following positions: to join ourFire team Squamish. The successful individual will oversee Security Systems Technician: and manage the activities of our financial system.

Position: Full time Service/Installer working in and around Squamish/Whistler,

Responsibilities BC area. The position offers excellent hourly rate with use of Company vehicle, lap smartaccounting phone withresponsibilities full medical & dental benefits. • top, Full cycle Qualifications: Knowledge and experienceaccounts in the building industry an asset, • Review/approve bank reconciliations, payable, accounts previous work with CCTV, Honeywell or DSC products desirable. Criminal receivable and financial statements records ClearA/P driver’s basic on hand tools required. • Liaisecheck, with A/R, and abstract, management a regular basis

• Compile information year-end audits Alarm Response Guardfor / Office Assistant: • Lead problem accounting department Position: Full timeresolution (Mon-Fri) within office person required working in the whistler • Perform other duties assigned head office. Clerical dutiesasinclude filing, collections, data entry, and responding to alarms throughout the Whistler area. Full medical & dental benefits and ride Requirements sharing available. Qualifications: Record Driver’s Abstract, Security Tusk FireCriminal and Security isCheck, hiringClear for the following positions: •Black At least 3 years of related experience Licence for Alarm Response an asset. Candidate must be a Canadian •Security CPA designation considered an asset Systems Technician: permanent resident or citizen. • Knowledge of CRA requirements

Security Systems Technician – Black Tusk Fire and Security Inc

Position: Full time Service/Installer working in and around Squamish/Whistler,

•BCProficient computer including MSuse Office Suite andvehicle, area. Theinposition offersapplications excellent hourly rate with of Company 109-1330 Alpha Lake Rd., Whistler, software lapaccounting top, smart phone with full medical & dental benefits.BC V0N 1B1 Whistler: 604.935.1140 | Squamish: 604.892.9793 and in the building industry an asset, •Qualifications: Ability to meetKnowledge deadlines andexperience manage priorities Vancouver: | www.BTFSI.com work with skills CCTV,1.877.657.1140 Honeywell or DSC products desirable. Criminal •previous Good analytical records check, Clear driver’s abstract, basic hand tools required.

WeAlarm offer competitive wages, extensive benefits, education/training and Response Guard / Office Assistant: flexPosition: hours. Full time (Mon-Fri) office person required working in the whistler head office. Clerical duties include filing, collections, data entry, and responding to alarms throughout the Whistler area. Fullcurrent medicalresume & dentaltobenefits and ride To apply, please forward a copy of your sharing available. hr@btfsi.com, with reference to the Accountant position. We thank all Qualifications: Criminal Record Check, Clear Driver’s Abstract, Security interested applicants, but only those qualified will be contacted. Licence for Alarm Response an asset. Candidate must be a Canadian permanent resident or citizen.

109-1330 Alpha Lake Rd., Whistler, BC V0N 1B1 Whistler: 604.935.1140 | Squamish: 604.892.9793 Vancouver: 1.877.657.1140 | www.BTFSI.com

Hilton Whistler Resort & Spa Hospitality

Integrity

Leadership

Teamwork

Ownership

Now

COOKS CHEF DE PARTIE STEWARD ROOM ATTENDANT HOUSE ATTENDANT BELL TEAM ~ AWESOME PEOPLE WORK HERE ~ Apply online on hr@hiltonwhistler.com or in person Monday to Friday from 9am to 4pm We thank all interested applicants, however only those selected for an interview will be contacted

102 MAY 9, 2019

We are currently interviewing:

Project Coordinator Carpenters Carpenters Helpers Labourers Level 2 First Aid Attendant Please submit resume to: info@evrfinehomes

Whistler’s Premier Estate Builder


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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

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LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: GRADE SEVEN TEACHER Position Type: Categories: Location: FTE: No. of Positions: Reporting to: Salary: Posting Date: Closing Date: Start Date:

Grade Seven Teacher Elementary Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 1 1 Principal As per the Teaching Salary Grid April 3, 2019 Posted until position is filled August 26, 2019

Details: Xet’ólacw Community School is a Lílwat Nation school situated 35 minutes north of Whistler, BC in the Mount Currie Community. The School is a modern, dynamic institution with a strong First Nations curriculum as well as academics from N to 12. Applicants need to be willing to work in a collaborative environment including involvement in an aboriginal student achievement program, which includes coaching that improves student and teacher performance. This position provides an opportunity for high quality Professional Development Key Deliverables: • Teach all subjects in the Grade 7 class with Physical Education, Ucwalmícwts (traditional language), and a library time supervised by other teachers or staff. • Implement strong classroom management strategies. • Is committed to excellent instructional preparation and consistent record keeping. Timely reporting to administration when necessary e.g. report cards, attendance records and data request • Can use data to drive classroom/school–wide improvement initiatives • Maintain open and consistent communication with students and their families about their academic progress • Can operate and teach numeracy and literacy in collaboration with others according to the school’s strategies for improving academic outcomes • Be a positive team player committed to the belief that all children can learn at high levels • Commit to ongoing professional development including willingness to be coached by the Elementary Supervisor and Regional Principal via school visits, video teleconference calls etc. and joining Provincial Professional Learning Community model (in Vancouver) and a SchoolWide PLC model on site. • Working in Reading Mastery/Corrective Reading Program (platooned) as well as Literature program and centers. • Work with Saxon Math in collaboration with other Intermediate teaching staff • Experience and/or education in special needs an asset • Enjoy participating in school event days such as Sports Day, Eagle Run, and Flake Rodeo etc.

Nagomi Sushi is hiring experienced Japanese Chefs in Whistler. • • • • • • • • •

Preparing Sushi and cooking other Japanese traditional food. Plan menu and ensure food meets quality standards. Estimate food requirements and estimate food and labour costs. Instruct Kitchen Helpers and Cooks in preparation, cooking, and presentation of food. Assist Head Chef and supervise cooks and kitchen helpers. Inspecting ingredients for quality and freshness and supervising all food preparation. Create new menu, recipes and specials. Ensure excellent customer services at the Sushi bar. Work as a team and ensure orders are completed in a timely manner.

Qualifications: • Completion of secondary school and 2 years of cook/chef experience

Full-time, Permanent

All season, 30-35 hours per week $24 per hour Language of work is English

Benefits: 2 weeks vacation, extended health plan. Start date: As soon as possible. Address: 108-4557 Blackcomb Way, Whistler, BC, V0N 1B4 Apply by email at whistlernagomisushi@hotmail.co.jp

Key Qualifications and Attributes: • Possession of or eligibility for a BC Teaching Certificate • Membership in the Teacher Regulation Branch • Ability to work with First Nations students in a First Nations community • Innovative and energetic • Positive thinking and ability to work as a team member • Skill in developing instructional strategies based on essential skills and engaging for students • Teaching record of success an asset. • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills • Ability to build positive student relationships • Reflective practices • Familiarity with BC’s new curriculum • Have a desire to learn and grow professionally Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter, resume, including reference, transcripts, copy of degrees and TQS Category, prefer by fax. Contact Information:

Glenda Gabriel, Receptionist/Secretary Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604, Mount Currie, B.C., V0N 2K0 Tel: 604 894-6131 Fax: (604) 894-5717

We thank you for your interest, however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

MAY 9, 2019

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THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS Be part of the action to deliver exceptional fine dining experience to guests in an award-winning and fast-paced dining room. The Bearfoot Bistro, considered one of Canada’s top restaurants, featuring an inventive and sophisticated fine dining menu and one of the country’s most complete wine lists looks for people like you to offer that unique experience to our guests.

We are hiring for the following positions:

Catering Chef Sommelier Pastry Sous-Chef Catering Chef qualifications:

5+ years experience in a hotel or restaurant kitchen or a catering operation

Sommelier qualifications: Previous experience as a sommelier ISG or WSET certification or equivalent an asset

Pastry Sous-Chef qualifications: 5+ years experience in pastry

We are looking for candidates with the following skills: Ability to focus attention on guests needs Excellent communication skills Strong interpersonal skills Highly responsible and reliable Ability to work well under pressure Ability to work without supervision

The Bearfoot Bistro offers year-round employment, industry leading wages, medical services plan, staff meals, staff discounts and more…

If you with anyany of those positions, pleaseplease submitsubmit your resume If you are areinterested interested with of those positions, your and cover letter to Colin Schira at colin@bearfootbistro.com resume and cover letter to Colin Schira at colin@bearfootbistro.com

I 4121 Villaeg Green | Adjacent to Listel Hotel 604 932 3433 I bearfootbistro.com 604 932 3433 | bearfootbistro.com 4121 Village Green

Employment Opportunities:

DO YOU LIVE IN PEMBERTON? THEN WHY COMMUTE TO WHISTLER?

Adjacent to Listel Hotel

Guest Services Agents Room Attendants Maintenance Helper

LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: GRADE SIX TEACHER Position Type: Categories: Location: FTE: No. of Positions: Reporting to: Salary: Posting Date: Closing Date: Start Date:

Grade Six Teacher Elementary Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 1 1 Principal As per the Teaching Salary Grid March 15, 2019 Posted until position is filled August 26, 2019

Details: Xet’ólacw Community School is a Lílwat Nation school situated 35 minutes north of Whistler, BC in the Mount Currie Community. The School is a modern, dynamic institution with a strong First Nations curriculum as well as academics from N to 12. Applicants need to be willing to work in a collaborative environment including involvement in an aboriginal student achievement program, which includes coaching that improves student and teacher performance. This position provides an opportunity for high quality Professional Development Key Deliverables: • Teach all subjects in the Grade 6 class with Physical Education, Ucwalmícwts (traditional language), and a library time supervised by other teachers or staff. • Implement strong classroom management strategies. • Is committed to excellent instructional preparation and consistent record keeping. Timely reporting to administration when necessary e.g. report cards, attendance records and data request • Can use data to drive classroom/school–wide improvement initiatives • Maintain open and consistent communication with students and their families about their academic progress • Can operate and teach numeracy and literacy in collaboration with others according to the school’s strategies for improving academic outcomes • Be a positive team player committed to the belief that all children can learn at high levels • Commit to ongoing professional development including willingness to be coached by the Elementary Supervisor and Regional Principal via school visits, video teleconference calls etc. and joining Provincial Professional Learning Community model (in Vancouver) and a School-Wide PLC model on site. • Working in Reading Mastery Program (platooned) as well as Literature program and centers. • Work with Jump Saxon Math in collaboration with other Intermediate teaching staff • Experience and/or education in special needs an asset • Enjoy participating in school event days such as Sports Day, Eagle Run, and Flake Rodeo etc. Key Qualifications and Attributes: • Possession of or eligibility for a BC Teaching Certificate • Membership in the Teacher Regulation Branch • Ability to work with First Nations students in a First Nations community • Innovative and energetic • Positive thinking and ability to work as a team member • Skill in developing instructional strategies based on essential skills and engaging for students • Teaching record of success an asset. • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills • Ability to build positive student relationships • Reflective practices • Familiarity with BC’s new curriculum • Have a desire to learn and grow professionally Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter, resume, including reference, transcripts, copy of degrees and TQS Category, prefer by fax. Contact Information:

Glenda Gabriel, Receptionist/Secretary Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604, Mount Currie, B.C., V0N 2K0 Tel: 604 894-6131 Fax: (604) 894-5717

Apply to: jobs@pembertonvalleylodge.com

Competitive wages, health benefits, casual environment

104 MAY 9, 2019

We thank you for your interest, however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.


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THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

WHISTLER’S RE-IMAGINED ITALIAN RESTAURANT

The storied restaurant offers a modern taste of Italy to bring a fresh, contemporary style of dining to the mountain.

CURRENT OPPORTUNITIES FRONT-OF-HOUSE Experienced Dining Room Server Server Assistant Host / Hostess

BACK-OF-HOUSE

ARE YOU A FOODIE?

Line Cooks (1-2 years experience) Dishwashers

Your Local Community IGA Whistler is hiring passionate resident foodies for all DEPARTMENTS

Staff Housing Available! Competitive Wage + Benefits Package

• We offer flexible scheduling options like evenings, weekends, and weekday daytime shifts.

WE’RE HIRING

• We also have accommodations available for some long term positions.

DISHWASHERS On-the-job training offered. Apply today!

•Kitchen experience, customer service and cashier experience an asset

RESERVATIONS MANAGER

We thank all candidates in advance for their interest and advise that only those considered for interviews will be contacted.

The ideal candidate is well spoken, organized, confident, outgoing, and well-presented. • Previous experience in a fine dining environment is required • Post Secondary education is an asset • Familiarity with a reservations management platform is an asset We offer year-round full and part-time hours, gratuities, potential for future growth within the company, and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants. Please email your resume & cover letter to careers@ilcaminetto.ca

Job Types: Full-time, Part-time, Permanent Please forward your resume and what department you want to work in to nadinej@georgiamain.com or markb@igabc.com

We are seeking flexible, hardworking and hard playing Diverse construction company with

residential/commercial projects across the sea to sky corriDor

we are currently hiring

Site Supervisors Carpenters Labourers

FRONT DESK AGENT FULL-TIME BELLMEN HOUSEKEEPERS/HOUSEMAN PART-TIME AND FULL-TIME HOURS AVAILABLE

PART-TIME NIGHT AUDIT Please apply if you can bring your smile and positive energy to our team and our guests!

We offer; employee benefits and full time employment year round.

Please email your resume to: roberto@aavawhistlerhotel.com

To apply: call 604.935.2683 or email dcoTe@coasTconsTrucTion.ca

Thank you for your interest.

Your next big adventure starts here.

Only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted

MAY 9, 2019

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LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: GRADE SEVEN TEACHER Position Type: Categories: Location: FTE: No. of Positions: Reporting to: Salary: Posting Date: Closing Date: Start Date:

High School Career and Planning/English Teacher 1.0 FT High School Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 1 1 Principal As per the Teaching Salary Grid April 24, 2019 Posted until position is filled August 26, 2019

Details: Xet’ólacw Community School is a Lílwat Nation school situated 35 minutes north of Whistler, BC in the Mount Currie Community. The School is a modern, dynamic institution with a strong First Nations curriculum as well as academics from N to 12. Applicants need to be willing to work in a collaborative environment including involvement in an aboriginal student achievement program, which includes coaching that improves student and teacher performance. This position provides an opportunity for high quality Professional Development Key Deliverables: • Teach Career Education 8, 9, 10, Career Life Education 11/12, and English First Peoples 10 • Implement strong classroom management strategies. • Is committed to excellent instructional preparation and consistent record keeping. Timely reporting to administration when necessary e.g. report cards, attendance records and data request • Can use data to drive classroom/school–wide improvement initiatives • Maintain open and consistent communication with students and their families about their academic progress • Can operate and teach numeracy and literacy in collaboration with others according to the school’s strategies for improving academic outcomes • Be a positive team player committed to the belief that all children can learn at high levels • Commit to ongoing professional development including willingness to be coached by the Administration Coordinator, Principal and Regional Principal via school visits, video teleconference calls etc. and joining Provincial Professional Learning Community model (in Vancouver) and a School-Wide PLC model on site. • Prepare and prep students for English 10 Provincial Assessment • Experience and/or education in special needs an asset • Enjoy participating in school event days such as Sports Day, Eagle Run, and Flake Rodeo etc. Key Qualifications and Attributes: • Possession of or eligibility for a BC Teaching Certificate • Membership in the Teacher Regulation Branch • Ability to work with First Nations students in a First Nations community • Innovative and energetic • Positive thinking and ability to work as a team member • Skill in developing instructional strategies based on essential skills and engaging for students • Teaching record of success an asset. • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills • Ability to build positive student relationships • Reflective practices • Familiarity with BC’s new curriculum • Have a desire to learn and grow professionally

www.glaciermedia.ca/careers 106 MAY 9, 2019

R001408475

Glacier Media Group is growing. Check our job board regularly for the latest openings:

Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter, resume, including references, transcripts, copy of degrees and TQS Category, prefer by fax. Contact Information:

Glenda Gabriel, Receptionist/Secretary Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604, Mount Currie, B.C., V0N 2K0 Tel: 604 894-6131 Fax: (604) 894-5717

We thank you for your interest, however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.


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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

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Are you excited? Apply today!

OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS The Bearfoot Bistro, Whistler’s premier fine dining restaurant is growing its team.

Be part of the action to deliver exceptinal fine dining experience to guests in an award-winning and high volume dining room. We are hiring for the following position:

Dishwashers We offer year-round or seasonal employment, industry leading wages, medical services plan, staff meals, staff discounts and more... Please send your resume to info@bearfootbistro.com or apply in person between 3-5pm. 4121 Village Green | Adjacent to Listel Hotel 604 932 3433 | bearfootbistro.com

Let us take care of you! • • • •

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604-932-7152 hr@sundialhotel.com We thank you for your interest. Only candidates chosen for further consideration will be contacted. MAY 9, 2019

107


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108 May 9, 2019

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puzzles ACROSS

68 Banqueted 69 Brick oven 71 Sets 72 Bay of - 75 NASA destination 76 Hackman or Wilder 77 Gem surface 78 Sasquatch cousin 79 Snorted with glee 82 Fundamental principle 83 Removes selectively (2 wds.) 87 Pummel 88 Alpine region 89 Pick pears 90 Sharp -- -- tack 91 Thoughtless 94 Paris’ abductee 95 Soap bubbles 96 Big celebrations 98 Cheerleader’s yell 99 Some parents 100 Hunter’s need 101 With least slack 103 Party cheese 105 Subscribe again 106 Cutlass kin 108 Disloyal 109 Masculine principle 110 Walk off with 111 Hostilities 112 Say more 114 “Raiders of the Lost Ark” serpents 115 Runs into 117 Lintel companion 118 Characteristic 120 Balloon filler 123 Psychic’s power

1 Killer whales 6 Hammett gumshoe Sam 11 Wraps up 15 Transported kids 20 Alan Ladd film 21 Gave alms 22 Gold measure 24 Extremist 25 Stogie 26 Pithy saying 27 LuPone role 28 Aleut language 29 Weak 31 Squeezed dry 33 Be an accomplice 34 Surgical knife 35 Careful investigator 37 Scornful snorts 39 Smidgen 41 Run around a lot 42 Oil jobs 43 Nonflying bird 44 Composure 46 Mournful wail 50 Compass pt. 51 Senor’s dwelling 52 Cello kin 53 Wry face 57 Patchwork cat 59 Curtail 61 Turns white 62 Adoption org. 63 Piano keys 65 Brillo rival 66 “The Little Engine That --” 67 Ernie of the PGA

3

9 1 7 9 2 3 4 8 3 5 6 2 6 7 2 9 4 2 8 3 1 6 8

8

9

3 5 4

V. EASY

124 125 130 132 134 136 137 138 140 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150

Senor’s son Peer Sacred place October’s stone Stock or bond Round object Cruise port Corny Some skirts Uttered shrilly Victor -- Hugo Kept More peculiar Fix a manuscript Fall flower Docs prescribe them Fresco base Leg of a race

DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

5 6

7

5 8 1 2

# 25

Golden statuette German white wine Parakeet homes Make -- -- for oneself Soap opera Sink downward Wind toy Loves madly Object Paradise Barely get by Hogan dweller (var.) -- and drabs Overfeed Fabricates Forearm bone Overcharged Susan Lucci character Took out

4

23 30 32 36 38 40 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 51 52 54 55 56 58 60 61 64 66 70 71 72 73 74 76 77 78 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 88

5 3 4

Like many sailors Friday’s companion Scary disguise Letterman network Oklahoma city Has the flu Throne Disagreeable people Printer’s measures Sour Extravagant Maria Conchita -Foal’s parent Encouraging word Arched ceiling Oil cartel NCAA Bruins Cushy Spanish hero El -Castaway’s refuge Fishing gear Trapshooting DeMille of epics Gary’s st. Alexander of “Seinfeld” Voicemail sound -- be an honor! Fam. member Irislike flower Passengers Bread ingredient Slugger’s stat Bo Derek film Rule Combine Horse operas Depletes (2 wds.) Likes and dislikes Conical abode

2

2 1 6 8 3 6 7 5

6 9 1 9

89 Viking letter 91 Deuterium finder 92 Zip 93 Wrathful Kirk foe 94 Yarn measures 95 Fill-ins 96 Good times 97 James or Kett 99 Nursery’s needs (2 wds.) 100 Duds 102 Listens in 104 Universal rival 105 Tpks. 106 Where Pago Pago is 107 Uncommon things 111 Whey-faced 113 German article

116 117 118 119 120 121 122 124 125 126 127 128 129 131 133 135 139 141

Stranger Dumped a lover General drifts Woman’s coat Delta preceder Rap sheet info Get underway Unsophisticated All kidding -Sound, as a bell Ward off Fight locale Toy bear Fifi’s friend Baby carriage Inversion problem MS readers Full-house letters

Last Weeks’ Answers

3

9

8 1 7 2 1 8 5 7 3 5 4 7 3 2 7 1 8

V. EASY

# 26

Enter a digit from 1 through 9 in each cell, in such a way that: • Each horizontal row contains each digit exactly once • Each vertical column contains each digit exactly once • Each 3x3 box contains each digit exactly once Solving a sudoku puzzle does not require any mathematics; simple logic suffices.

Level of difficulty: VERY EASY

6 8

9 6

5 9 1 6 4

4 2 9 7

1 4 7 3 8

4 2

3 1 4 7 7 5 8

8 6 3 2 1 1 9 2 4

V. ESolution, ASY tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com# 27

7

6 8 2 V. EASY

6 9 5 2 3 1 9 5

5 1 4 2 3 8 5 7 4 9 1 1 3 7 4 9

2 5 4 3

8 6 9

2 # 28

Answers on page 95

May 9, 2019

109


Maxed out

Where is the local’s voice in decision making? A number of years ago, way back when the word “overtourism” had never been uttered on these shores and Tiny Town yearned for more and more visitors, back when there were shoulder seasons and many businesses more or less shut down to renovate or give their owners and workers a chance to escape to somewhere they could holiday, a time before Festivals, Events and Animation—in other words a long, long time ago—someone proposed a trolley service in Whistler. This wasn’t a trolley designed to alleviate congestion on the highway, for there was no

By G.D. Maxwell congestion to speak of except for Saturday and, particularly, Sunday afternoon during the winter when skiers from Vancouver— yes, this was a time we actually encouraged semi-local and regional skiers to come here, egged on by relatively low prices and flexible lift products—all headed south at the same time, happy and exhausted but dreading the fact they had to go back to work the next day. It wasn’t a trolley that would make it easier for worker bees with no car of their own to get to work. Whistler Transit did that job reasonably well ... as long as you worked in the village. It was a trolley tourists could ride. An amusement. What, I hear you ask, would the tourists see when they rode the trolley? Well, if you’d have lived here then, they may have seen you. Yes, you! The trolley was going to give tourists a glimpse of what it was like to be a local in Whistler. “Oh, look; see the locals in their colourful fleece garb going into ... is that the famous Nesters? I wonder what they’re going to buy? What do you suppose locals eat?” This was, of course, before Jim Pattison bought Nesters and they started sprouting up like mushrooms in the fall around the Lower Mainland. As well as Nesters, the trolley was going to make the rounds. Meadow Park (“Oh look, they play hockey too!”), the local neighbourhoods no one believed actually existed, the Mushroom House, Citta’s; all the hot, local spots. While many locals found this highly amusing, in a sort of, “Wow, that’s really lame,” kind of way, others were just a bit peeved at the idea. “We live here!” they exclaimed. “We are not tourist attractions. Our houses and neighbourhoods are not tourist attractions. We are a community.” More vocal locals even went further. “Keep the tourists in the village,” they cried. After all, that’s what the village was built for ... a tourist compound. “Our homes are our sanctuaries,” some said.

110 May 9, 2019

WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

It all was for naught. The See-The-Locals trolley barely made it off the ground. It was, after all, a dumb idea. In a tangentially related episode in the ongoing saga of Tiny Town, there was a contentious debate among locals over the issue of tourist accommodation. Again, there were those who believed, “Hey, we built the village for tourists to stay in. Let’s keep them there.” Though no one went so far as to suggest fencing the village to keep them from escaping. Others wanted to have tourists come to their homes and stay there and pay them the money they would have paid some hotel or condo in the village. Historical aside: This was a time before Airbnb; it wasn’t that easy for tourists to find places in neighbourhoods where people wanted to cash in on their wistful desire to stay somewhere other than the village. After a lot of cantankerous debate, council of the day, showing uncharacteristic, Solomonic wisdom, zoned areas in town— Nicklaus North, for example—for tourist accommodation. People who own homes in areas so zoned could, legally, have people come and stay for a price. People who own homes in areas without tourist accommodation zoning couldn’t. Thus was created the notion that some parts of town were strictly residential while some were more touristy. People who didn’t want lost tourists knocking on their doors asking where they could park while they stayed in someone’s house were relieved. It wasn’t that they

didn’t like tourists, they just preferred tourists didn’t stay in their neighbourhoods. That was then. This is now. Whistler still has that zoning. Many people wish it didn’t. They want to cash in on tourists, especially now that Airbnb makes it so easy. Heck, some who own Whistler Housing Authority homes even want to cash in. They have no shame. But this isn’t about tourist accommodation. This is about tourist attractions. This is about the Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) and certain groups in town who seem not to appreciate there are still locals who aren’t that keen on having their quiet neighbourhoods turned into tourist attractions, that there are people who won’t sell their souls for another busload of tourists, who just want to live in relative peace and quiet. Like the folks who live up near the end of Mountainview Drive. Last year, their neighbourhood—which ends at a cul-desac—became a tourist attraction. More particularly, it became the well-publicized trailhead for the Skywalk trail. Suddenly, where only snowplows and lost souls turned around, where there had been no parking allowed, their cul-de-sac became a de facto parking lot. Like most parking lots, it also became a magnet for trash, both inanimate and human. Some hikers parked there overnight. A few even camped there. Quite a few relieved themselves there, if you know what I mean. You see, the people who conceived of

and created the Skywalk trail never asked the people who live there whether they wanted a well-publicized trailhead at the end of their street. Heck, they never even seemed to take them into consideration. They were hell-bent on creating another tourist attraction. Earlier this year, some RMOW workers where scouting the cul-de-sac for a good place to put a porta potty. Ever wonder where in your neighbourhood would be a good place for one? I didn’t think so. When confronted by a homeowner, the RMOW person said, “People who drive up to hike here need a place to relieve themselves.” How’s that for clueless? When the homeowners confronted the mayor, among others, he asked them if they’d lost sight of the fact they live in a resort. They were too kind to ask the mayor where in his neighbourhood he’d like a porta potty. And so now, the RMOW’s Trails Planning Working Group want to create a group of stakeholders to plot out the future growth of the muni’s Alpine Trails Network. Guess which stakeholders aren’t included? That’s right, you, me, the people kinda like those on Mountainview whose neighbourhood may be the home of future porta potties for coffee-bloated tourists. Cool, eh? But then, it’s the model for working groups in this town. Ignore local representation and leave it to the RMOW, business groups, Tourism Whistler and others. Locals? Yer kidding. Not this time. n


Welcome to the best place on earth Engel & Völkers Portfolio of Fine Homes SOLD

BLUEBERRY HILL

BLUEBERRY

EVA LAKE VILLAGE, NORDIC ESTATES

WHISTLER CREEKSIDE

Like New! This contemporary, ‘Junior Executive’ style home has been lightly used since its completion in 2017. Architecturally designed and built to exacting standards by award winning Vision Pacific, no cost has been spared. $2,225,000

Elegant and grand chalet with panoramic views of Blackcomb! At appox. 4,000 sq ft, this 4 bed + bonus den/office | 3.5 bath home impresses with vaulted ceilings & custom finishes. A wine room and large garage make this one perfect! $4,500,000

Eva Lake Village is a conveniently located complex within the Nordic Estates neighbourhood that is occupied by employees or retirees of Whistler and as a result offers a wonderful feeling of community. $499,000

Lake Placid Lodge 1 Bdrm. and bathroom. Flexible zoning allows full time owner use or nightly rentals. Easy access to Creekside Gondola for biking and skiing. Heated pool & hot tub. Comes fully furnished updated kitchen & court yard. No GST. $675,000

Jane Frazee

Katherine Currall

Maggi Thornhill *prec

Nick Swinburne *prec

1057 Madeley Place

3366 Osprey Place

604-935-2135

31-2230 Eva Lake Road

604-966-1364

604-905-8199

212-2050 Lake Placid Road

604-932-8899

VILLAGE

VILLAGE

WHISTLER CREEK

BAYSHORES

The Hideout is a newly renovated, cozy & spacious 1 bed apartment conveniently located within the heart of Whistler Village, yet it enjoys a peaceful, private setting within a wooded area. Don’t miss this great property. $799,000

It’s all about location! Roll out of bed and be on the lifts in less time than it takes to read this. West facing with great revenues. Zoning allows for 56 nights per year owner use. Go to http://863.digitalopenhou.se for full site. $525,000

Enjoy this beautiful, fully renovated, turn-key unit and relish in the highest cap rate of any nightly rental property currently available on the market. Amenitites include pool, hot tub, sauna, garden space. $1,050,000

4 Bed, 3.5 Bath home in Bayshores! Just moments to tennis courts, trails, lakes, and Creekside village. Private sundeck, hot tub, double car garage, and more! Turn key ready with beautiful furnishings throughout. Available June – Nov! Rental: $4600.00

Peter Lalor

Ken Achenbach

Jeremy Fairley

Jake Breuer

53 -4335 Northlands Boulevard

604-902-3309

863-4090 Whistler Way

302 A/B – 2129 Lake Placid Road

604-966-7640

604-935-9150

2741 Millars Pond

604-698-7259

DOWNTOWN

WHISTLER VILLAGE

BLACKCOMB BENCHLANDS

BLUEBERRY

One of the largest patios at The Main. 2 bed + den + flex condo in downtown Squamish. Modern finishing’s, 9ft ceilings & European kitchen. Secured parking. Mortgage payment lower than paying rent! $448,000

Glacier’s Reach (Phase 1) close to vibrant Whistler Village shops + events. 2 bedroom / 2 bathroom features “lock-off” option. Relaxing garden area, underground secured parkade, complex heated pool, hot tub and exercise room. $1,068,000 + GST

5 star luxurious unit in the Four Seasons Resort. Completely furnished with a cozy gas fireplace & balcony to soak in the mountain views. The ultimate in services: 24hr front desk, concierge, room service, bike/ski concierge, spa and fitness room. $409,000

Offering breathtaking views of both Whistler and Blackcomb, this spacious 4.5 bedrooms, 3 bathroom is fully furnished and turn key ready to be your perfect mountain getaway! Flexible zoning allows for nightly rentals. $1,899,000

Caronne Marino *prec 604-905-8324

Jocelyn Cseff

206-37881 Cleveland Avenue

Angie Vazquez *prec

778-318-5900

101 / 101A – 4388 Northlands Blvd

Rachel Edwards

604-966-4200

501-4591 Blackcomb Way

204-3212 Blueberry Drive

Whistler Village Shop

Whistler Creekside Shop

Squamish Station Shop

36-4314 Main Street · Whistler BC V0N 1B4 · Phone +1 604-932-1875

325-2063 Lake Placid Road · Whistler BC V0N 1B2 · Phone +1 604-932-1875

150-1200 Hunter Place · Squamish BC V8B 0G8 · Phone +1 778-733-0611

whistler.evcanada.com

whistler.evcanada.com

whistler.evcanada.com

Engel & Völkers Whistler *PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION ©2018 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage is independently owned and operated. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified.

604-907-2074


#37 - 8400 Ashleigh McIvor Dr.

$2,199,000

Red Sky offers luxury West Coast contemporary design complete with inspiring panoramic views of both Whistler and Blackcomb mountains. Blessed with all day sun, this spacious mountain home features built-in millwork, fir, shaker-style interior doors with satin chrome door hardware & stain resistant berber carpeting.

Josh Crane

2.5

604.902.6106

#4 - 1446 Vine Road

$669,900

2 Garibaldi Drive

$699,000

#11 - 2211 Marmot Place

$949,900

Just in time for building season - this 7535 flat vacant lot in Black Tusk is ready for your client. 15 minutes south from Whistler Creekside you arrive at the gated community of Black Tusk Village. This private community offers single family housing at an attractive price point.

2 bedroom/2 bath corner townhouse located in Whistler Creek! These townhomes do not come on the market often. Located walking distance to the Creekside Gondola, bike park, shopping & restaurants. This updated townhouse boasts a spacious master and second bedroom, new flooring throughout and an open concept kitchen and living area.

Laura Barkman

Matt Chiasson

604.905.8777

#312 - 7445 Frontier Street

$589,000

604.935.9171

#3 - 2134 Sarajevo Drive

2

$545,000

This gorgeous 3 bedroom 2 bathroom end unit will check all your boxes! Geothermal heating and cooling, stainless appliances, large double garage for all your toys, located in one of, if not the best locations in the complex! Come have a look and learn why the Pioneer Junction townhomes are the most sought after townhome properties in Pemberton.

Top floor corner unit. This 1302 sq ft condo is located in the “tower” corner looking south east offering superior views of sunrises and Mount Currie. Essentially having two master bedrooms, each with 4 piece ensuite bathrooms, you will love the generous floor spaces, high ceilings, ample storage and in-suite laundry.

Renovated Gondola Village unit with vaulted ceilings backing onto the forest, and mountain views from the bedroom. Move-in ready, with newer windows and tasteful upgrades to the kitchen, bathroom and bedroom, the new owner can enjoy the unit as a full time residence, weekend getaway, or chic little airbnb cabin.

Matt Kusiak

Patrick Saintsbury

Richard Grenfell

3

604.935.0762

#15 - 4636 Blackcomb Way

$1,949,000

Corner townhome fronts right onto the golf course with great fairway and mountain views. Features 3 upgraded full bathrooms, heated slate flooring, an open concept living/ dining and kitchen area, granite countertops and stainless steel appliances, 2 sundecks and lots of storage.Matterport 3D Showcase: http://bit.ly/15Gleneagles

Sally Warner*

3

604.905.6326

8468 Matterhorn Drive

$5,388,000

604.935.9114

#214 - 2050 Lake Placid Rd.

2.5

$675,000

Lake Placid Lodge is in a PRIME location at the base of the Creekside Gondola which is now open winter and summer. This lovely 1 bedroom 1 bath has new flooring and is well laid out for full time living, weekends or nightly tourist accommodation. The pool, hot tub, bbq area and landscaping are all brand new making this a great buy.

Sherry Baker

604.932.1315

#205B - 2036 London Lane

1

$123,500

1

604.902.4260

#22 -2101 Whistler Road

$389,000

Roomy studio townhome walking distance to the Creekside ski lift. This garden level home was redone with new kitchen, bathroom, flooring and cabinetry throughout. Great opportunity for the first time buyer.

Ted Morden

604.938-3606

2578 Snowridge Crescent

.5

$6,200,000

Thosewithanappreciationforquality &designwill valuethebeautiful post&beamconstruction, vaultedceilingswskylights, warmwood flooring wcustommill work,doors,lighting &sound throughout, woodburningstonefireplace,mediaroom,bootwarmers,chef’skitchenwwalk-in pantry, glasswineshowcase, expansivedeckwfiretable,patiofurniture&BBQ.

This quarter ownership unit faces the ski slopes, so you can do your own weather & snow conditions check in the morning. Highlights include a gas fireplace, recently renovated kitchen & a pull out sofa. Swim in the outdoor pool or soak in hot tub after a great day on the slopes.

Enjoy the views of Whistler Peak and the Dave Murray Downhill from your patio Hot Tub. Picture your family skiing or riding home for lunch. Walking down to Dusty’s or shopping without having to get into your car. In the summer the bike park is right there as well. Fine dining is a short walk, as are the two lakes in the Creekside Area.

Ann Chiasson

Bob Cameron*

Bruce Watt

604.932.7651

6

WHISTLER OFFICE 106 - 7015 Nesters Road, Whistler, BC V8E 0X1 604.932.2300 or Toll Free 1.888.689.0070 *PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

remax-whistler.com awarded best website 2018 by Luxuryrealestate.com

Property Management remaxseatoskypm.com

604.935.2214

1

604.905.0737

5

PEMBERTON OFFICE 1411 Portage Road, Pemberton, BC V0N 2L1 604.894.6616 or Toll Free 1.888.689.0070

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Pique Newsmagazine for May 9, 2019

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