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Jumping the tracks P.14

Warning from WB P.16

DJ Riddim Fernandez P.62

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January 24, 2019

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WHISTLER’S WEEKLY NEWSMAGAZINE  

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Week IN PIQUE Letters News Travel Sports Food Arts Music PiqueCal Classifieds

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Whistler council charts new territory with portfolio approach - By Braden Dupuis

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Pique Newsmagazine (a publication of Whistler Publishing Limited Partnership, a division of Glacier Media) distributed to over 130 locations in Whistler and to over 200 locations from Vancouver to D’arcy. The entire contents of Pique Newsmagazine are copyright 2019 by Pique Newsmagazine (a publication of WPLP, a division of Glacier Media). No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the express written permission of the Publisher. In no event shall unsolicited material subject this publication to any claim or fees. Copyright in letters and other (unsolicited) materials submitted and accepted for publication remains with the author but the publisher and its licensees may freely reproduce them in print, electronic or other forms. Letters to the Editor must contain the author’s name, address and daytime telephone number. Maximum length is 250 words. We reserve the right to edit, condense or reject any contribution. Letters reflect the opinion of the writer and not that of Pique Newsmagazine. Pique Newsmagazine is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please contact (edit@piquenewsmagazine.com). If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the web site at mediacouncil.ca or call toll-free 1-844877-1163 for additional information. This organization replaces the BC Press council (and any mention of it).

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LOGAN AND THE LOCOMOTIVE

Local skier Logan Pehota completes jump over railway tracks as train approaches

AGAINST THE WORLD

Darcy Sharpe heads to FIS Snowboard World Championships in Utah looking for a second medal

56

ART HISTORY

62

Riddim Fernandez’s double life as a teacher and DJ/producer

68

New installation at the Crystal Lodge & Suites digs into Whistler’s past

MATH MAN PIQUECAL

Whistler Olympic Park hosts its third annual Women’s Day on Saturday, Jan. 26 with crosscountry ski lessons, apres, clinics and more

46

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OPE NING

Remarks

Food for thought

N

ot sure about you, but I am still feeling full after the holidays. Between multiple turkey dinners, mince tarts, homemade chocolates, more New Year’s canapés than you can shake a stick at, and the 24-hour feasting schedule, I’m done with food. And perhaps that is a good thing, too.

Clare Ogilvie

By

edit@piquenewsmagazine.com

A disturbing report out of the Lancet medical journal this month tells us that unless we radically alter our relationship with food, we will not be able to feed our growing global population, and the impact on climate change will be significant. The report was compiled by 30 scientists from around the globe that study nutrition or food policy. They worked together for over three years considering the different side effects of food production in the hopes of coming up with some recommendations for governments to help them handle food and population growth. By managing factors such as greenhouse gases, water and crop use, nitrogen or phosphorous from fertilizers, the report’s authors argue that climate-change-inducing gases could be reduced and enough land could be

reserved to feed the world’s growing population. What are the biggest changes we need to make? Meat and sugar consumption need to be cut by 50 per cent. Dairy, too, needs a second look. You can imagine the outcry that came with the findings of this report from lobby groups representing meat and dairy farmers and various manufacturers of processed foods and beverages. “You have a million people whose lives depend on dairy,” chief science officer for the U.S. National Dairy Council Greg Miller told National Geographic in its story on the report. The authors have branded their plan as The Great Food Transformation offering strategies from very simple advice about sharing information to ideas about altering food production, which could even impact the price we pay at the grocery store for what we buy. Obviously, these ideas are not going to stop climate change, as we all know that transportation, electricity, and burning fossil fuels for industry are leading contributors to greenhouse-gas emissions. But what the report does encourage us to think about is the fact that climate change is multi-faceted in its origins and that means every one of us can make choices to combat it. Sure, switching to an electric car would be great if that fits in your budget in 2019,

but so is eating less meat, choosing locally grown food if possible and trying to consume non-processed food that is heavily packaged. I have really noticed recently an increase in the number of people arriving at checkout counters with their produce rolling around free from individual plastic bags, for example. Now is not the time to throw up our hands and complain that the problem is so big that an individual act is pointless. Interestingly, this week also saw the release of the new Canada Food Guide. Until now, the guide had been heavily influenced by food- and beverageindustry lobby groups. But this time around, Health Canada declared that “during the policy development of the new Canada’s Food Guide, officials from Health Canada’s Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion will not be meeting with representatives from the food and beverage industry.” And amazingly, the guide suggests that water be the go-to beverage for Canadians, not juice. It goes without saying that the food and beverage industry will have a lot to say about the new guide. But in all honesty, it simply reflects the common sense we should all use when shopping and preparing food. Part of this food chain, and another contributor to climate change, is the

shockingly poor job we do from home to restaurant to factory in the area of food waste in Canada. Whistler is more progressive than most with our recently introduced solid waste bylaw. The new bylaw requires all commercial and strata properties to collect and divert food waste, implement three-stream waste collection (recycling, compost and garbage) and monitor and prevent contamination of recycling and organic waste. Resort Municipality of Whistler staff has worked with the Association of Whistler Area Residents for the Environment over the past year to support businesses and stratas through the transition. But consider this: An incredible 58 per cent of all food produced in Canada—35.5 million tonnes—is lost or wasted, according to a new report, titled, “The Avoidable Crisis of Food Waste.” It also found that a third of that wasted food could be “rescued” and sent to communities in need across the country. The report found that about 4.82 million tonnes of food, or nearly $21 billion worth, is lost or wasted during the processing and manufacturing process, while 2.38 million tonnes of food, or more than $10 billion worth, is lost at the consumer level. It’s clearly time to put our shopping and food-consumption lists in order as we head into 2019. n

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Letters T O T HE ED I T O R Applause for the mayor on climate change letter I am so dismayed to read the recent “Letters to the Editor” regarding the mayor’s letter to the oil and gas companies. Climate change is real and instead of being scared out of their minds about the current state of the planet, (the fossil-fuel industry) vilifies environmentalists and “tree huggers.” Many times, these naysayers are the ones that profit the most from the destruction of the Earth’s crust and vegetative layer. It doesn’t take a genius to see that things are almost beyond repair unless we take drastic measures. Total system collapses are occurring in every single ecosystem across the globe, from northern boreal forests to the great Amazon, yet everyone still wants their piece of the pie. But the pie is our planet and not meant to be cut up purely for human usage or profit. What is hypocritical is that these critics bully the mayor for making a living supplying (bus) transportation. And for those of you who think all of us horrible greenies should either move to a cave and cook our buffalo over a firepit or shut up, well, I’m sorry but we ain’t going

anywhere and we ain’t going to shut up, because without us, what then of our poor planet? I congratulate the mayor and team, and fellow B.C. municipalities, for calling out oil and gas producers. Good on them. Isn’t this the same as suing cigarette companies and Monsanto for Round-Up? The oil and gas companies have no incentive to shift towards a less-polluting business model if they can continue to profit without paying a share of the costs of said pollution. The trillion-dollar fossil-fuel industry has the knowledge to implement a shift towards alternatives, but unless they are held accountable, there is no impetus towards change. Sarah Valentine Whistler

WHY ICBC RATES RISE

Two young men appeared at the scene and managed the traffic to ensure that my car was not hit again. My car had been pushed into the northbound lane, facing west as a result of the impact of the head-on collision. The police were called and information exchanged. I went to Avis to rent a car and on my return home, the woman that had hit me was standing on the corner of the scene of the accident. I drove her home and during our conversation she again apologized and suggested that she should pay for my car rental. I pointed out that accidents happen, that I obviously was not happy about the accident but appreciated her apology and offer of payment. I declined the offer of payment for the car rental.

I read Catherine Power-Chartrand’s Letter to the Editor, Jan. 10, 2019, (in Pique) “Seeking a Witness,” and it encouraged me to write a letter as well, as I too am seeking a witness. On Dec. 8, 2018, I was driving home (south) on Gondola Way at approximately 11:15 a.m. As I was passing Marmot Place, I saw a car heading (north) swerve around the corner into my lane. I stopped my car at Powder View in the hope that the driver of the oncoming vehicle would be able to correct the direction of her car and go around me. Unfortunately, this was not the case, and she hit me head on, resulting in my car being a write-off. The woman emerged from her car in tears apologizing profusely for hitting me.

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Letters T O T H E E D IT O R I called ICBC to report the accident upon my return home that afternoon. On Monday, Dec. 10, 2018, I called ICBC again to get an update and learned the woman who had hit me had changed her story claiming that I had been in her lane. Had this been the case, she would have hit me on the driver’s side of the car. So I am looking for a witness who is able to validate my statement that I was not at fault, in that he may have heard the driver of the vehicle that hit me accept responsibility for the accident and apologize for the same. Nancy Forrest Whistler

OIL AND GAS COMPANIES’ ECONOMIC CONTRIBUTIONS

Much has been written about Whistler’s mayor’s poorly thought out (climate-change) letter to Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. I am heartened, quite frankly, by the realistic backlash to that letter by many B.C. residents as well. In fact, so much has been written in contradiction to Mr. Mayor’s illconceived letter that I will not spend time on this issue other than to provide him, and all citizens of B.C., a little economic update. With regard to the oil and gas industry, I will not comment on the vast amount of tax dollars that have been paid to the provincial coffers, nor the benefit in jobs created in the province, nor the economic benefit of goods and services provided or created by virtue of the petroleum industry. I will provide you with one statistic only. Twelve times a year, the B.C. Crown offers petroleum and natural gas rights for sale in the province. These lands are bid on by industry in a competitive process. The funds generated by those sales go into general revenue for the government of the day to spend as it sees fit on anything from healthcare to forest-fire

protection and anything and everything in between. I cannot speak to the choices a government of the day makes in its spending budget. However, just so you know, between January 2005 and Dec. 31, 2018, industry has invested, in land-sale acquisition only, the staggering amount of a little over $7.8 billion dollars. This equates to an average of $561 million every year or an average of $47 million every month for 14 years. Notwithstanding the other economic contributors mentioned earlier in this letter, imagine the benefit to the residents of British Columbia that those land-sale dollars alone have provided. To those that have written letters condemning the foolish letter written by the mayor of Whistler, thank you for your support. To those that continue to denigrate the Canadian oil and gas sector, think of the contribution of the oil and gas industry each time you use a government service. Les Burden Alberta

REMEMBRANCE OF LATE JANE BURROWS

Further to your welcome eulogy by Pique columnist Glenda Bartosh about the remarkable contribution of Jane Burrows to her community of Whistler, the article also notes that Jane (nee Archer) Burrows’ hometown was Kirkland Lake, in Northern Ontario (Pique, “Fork in the Road,” Jan 17). Also, Kirkland Lake will be hosting a 2019 Summer Homecoming from Saturday, June 22 to Sunday, July 7. We will be celebrating 100 years as an incorporated community. The Archer family was well known in Kirkland Lake; her father and brother, as owners of Archers Dairy and past presidents of the Milk Marketing Board of Ontario. With pride, I note that Ken Pickering and two of my sons, now of Squamish, also share Kirkland Lake as their home community. I suspect there

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R A C E A N D C O M PA N Y. C O M 14-07-03 3:20 PM

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 24, 2019 | 9


Letters TO TH E ED I TO R

FOR

are others in the area and would welcome hearing from them. The common links are the Britannia Mine, forestry and the love of skiing and the outdoor activities that this fine area offers. Pique and community are to be commended for their remembrance of citizens and their lifelong efforts in creating such a thriving area. Paul Filteau Ontario

WHISTLER SKATING CLUB THANKS

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TRACEY CRUZ MAKING YOUR DREAMS A REALITY

A huge thank you to everyone who came out last month, on Dec. 14, to support the Whistler Skating Club’s skate performance and fundraiser, Starry Night Holiday Show. We would like to thank the many club parent volunteers, coaches, program assistants and the Meadow Park staff for their hard work in the production of this event. And, to the community of parents, family members, friends and skating fans that came out to celebrate the beauty and joy of skating, providing donations at the entry, silent auction, turkey toss, dinner and bake sale, we also say thank you! We graciously thank the Real Estate Association of Whistler, Whistler Blackcomb Foundation and many other businesses, groups and individuals that kindly contributed to our Starry Night Holiday Show. These generous contributions help make it possible for our club to achieve its goal of providing recreational and competitive skating opportunities to the Whistler community. Anyone inspired to learn to skate or improve their skating can register for skating programs starting in April of 2019. For more information or to register, call 604-935-7529 or visit whistler.ca/recreation. Heidi Florio Whistler Skating Club

CALLING OUT HYPOCRISY

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www.traceycruz.com 10 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

off your high perch and educating us all about the perils of climate change (Pique, “Letters to the Editor,” Jan. 10, 2019). Your grasp of the English language is truly remarkable. How you get all those big words in one sentence is beyond my scope. The reason that we call out the hypocrisy is because it’s the low-hanging fruit. When we go after the low-hanging fruit it does one of two things: opens a meaningful and honest debate, or brings out the anger and the fury of the far left-wing Marxist ideologues. It’s a dirty tactic, I know, and yes, it looks juvenile as you pointed out, but what’s the alternative? We have been told the debate is over, the consensus is in, the computer models work, and we are all doomed. Unless, however, you pay us a carbon tax and we will surely fix the problem. You expect us all to have short memories and ignore the fraud and mismanaging of the funds geared toward the climate-change file right here in town. Forget about the complete failure of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the Copenhagen Summit emails that exposed their true colours. Forget about Al Gore and his banker buddies at Goldman Sachs and their profitable carbon-exchange system. Forget about the democide (non-military deaths, civilian deaths by own government) between 200 and 300 million in the last century. Forget about the human-rights violations of the member countries of the Paris Agreement. Forget about the United Nations and other non-governmental organizations’ alleged cover-ups of fraud and pedophilia within their organizations. We are not going to be silenced or easily offended by your command of the English language. I will send a donation to Rebel Media today and then go skiing on our Republicanendorsed mountains. David McLatchie Whistler n

Backcountry Advisory Conditions may vary and can change rapidly. Check for the most current conditions before heading out into the backcountry. Daily updates for the areas adjacent to Whistler Blackcomb are available at 604-938-7676, or surf to www.whistlerblackcomb.com/mountain-info/ snow-report#backcountry or go to www.avalanche.ca. AS OF WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23

A round of storms took aim at the Whistler area early- to mid-week and brought a pile of new snow with some pretty rockin’ winds. As expected, this rapid accumulation of snow made for unstable snow during and immediately after the storm. Usually, a few days after a storm passes, the snowpack becomes more stable. However, there are important factors that may make the current situation a little bit more complex. The recent new snow sits on a weak layer that consists of surface hoar, facets and on solar aspects a crust—crystal types that often take some time to heal. In addition to

this, the weather forecast for the weekend is for some very spring-like conditions. Freezing levels are expected to rise to 3,000 metres on Saturday, potentially bringing alpine temperatures up to around +3 C. Periods of warming often cause a rise in avalanche activity, especially right after a storm, when there is a lot of fresh snow. Add a little sunshine to the mix and the likelihood of avalanches rises even higher, especially on south facing slopes. While fair weather often lures us to the mountain tops after a storm, it is important to consider the potential for sun and warm temperatures to destabilize the snowpack. n


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Pique’n YO U R I N TER EST Is this the best men can get?

W

histler is often fondly referred to as a bubble. For me, that bubble is full of friendly, accepting people with, more often than not, pretty progressive views. But every once in a while, something comes along to pop that ideal illusion. Last week, that something was a Gillette commercial. The nearly two-minute commercial turns around the razor company’s

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Serving sea to sky for 18 years 12 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

recognizable slogan, asking, “Is this the best a man really can get?” It portrays men looking at themselves in the mirror before cutting to depictions of troubling behaviour, like men harassing or talking over women, and an endless row of dads standing over steaming barbecues saying “boys will be boys,” as children wrestle on the grass. Eventually, a voice acknowledges, “something finally changed,” as a montage of news anchors talking about sexualassault and sexual-harassment allegations fills the screen. The narrator says, “There will be no going back, because we believe in the best in men.” A dad steps out from behind the grill to separate the kids’ tussle, explaining, “that’s not how we treat each other.” One man stops his friend before he can catcall a woman walking down the street. The ad aims to inspire men to stand up to toxic masculinity and set a good example for the next generation. Immediately after the ad dropped, a group of (mostly) men collectively lost their minds on the internet, accusing the razor company of vilifying an entire gender—including here in Whistler. A member of the local Whistler Winter Facebook group posted the video, praising it as “a step in the right direction by advertisers.” Clearly, not everyone agreed. Several commenters expressed opposition to the ad, including one who accused Gillette of vilifying “natural male behaviour through the lens of toxic feminist misandry,” (The same Facebook user, if I’m remembering correctly, who commented on a Pique story about local International Day of the Girl celebrations asking when International Day of the Boy is …) I won’t continue on, but feel free to head to Facebook to read through the exhausting back-and-forth. Reading those comments is just a reminder that my beloved bubble, and our wider society, isn’t always as equal or as open-minded as the majority of

interactions I experience day-to-day might suggest. It’s clear none of the men offended by this ad have ever walked to their car clutching their keys in their hand, just in case the guy walking a few metres behind them in an empty parking lot wasn’t just heading in the same direction. They’ve never had to decide whether to ignore or respond to someone whistling at them on the street, or felt the discomfort of being asked to explain why they didn’t want to accept a drink, a phone number or a ride home from a stranger at the bar. Or even put themselves in the shoes of someone who has. No one is trying to say all men, or masculine traits for that matter, are toxic. From my perspective, all Gillette is trying to say is that the kind of troubling behaviour shown in the ad exists, and when it does, the majority of men who know better should stand up and say something, rather than turning a blind eye, or worse, making excuses for their peers. “We really wanted to shine a light on some of the bad behaviors that were happening in society, but more importantly on some of the good ones because that’s where we know most guys are really at. There are a few bad behaviors that we wanted to call out, so that we’re all holding ourselves to a higher standard because we think that’s better for guys, women and society,” explained Damon Jones, vice president of global communications and advocacy at Gilette’s parent company Procter and Gamble, to Forbes Magazine. Unfortunately, I think the backlash has made it clear that it’s a message many men aren’t ready to hear. Some commenters also questioned whether corporations or brands should be trying to take a social stand in an advertisement, accusing them of virtue signalling, or inauthentically jumping on a social issue to drive sales. I argue that they should. With so many options in our consumer-based economy, we’re constantly being told that every dollar we spend is a vote for the kind of world we want to live in. I want to support brands that use their considerable platforms to take a stand when they see an injustice—even if it means alienating a portion of their consumers, as backlash to both Gillette’s new ad and Nike’s 2018 ad featuring Colin Kaepernick proves. Although, if Gillette really wants to make a social impact—even if all they want is to take my money—they can stop charging more for women’s razors than they do for men’s. Don’t they know there’s still a wage gap? But that’s a different conversation. n


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W H ISTLER

14 News

Pehota hits daring jump STUNT AHEAD OF APPROACHING TRAIN PROMPTS CALL FROM CN Dan Falloon

sports@piquenewsmagazine.com

L

ogan Pehota heard the train a-comin’. It was rolling ‘round the bend. And in the winter sunshine on Friday, Jan. 18, the young skier from Pemberton backflipped over the tracks as the locomotive approached to land a stunt while his father, Eric, snapped a photograph. The photo went viral on social media, though Pehota had hoped for an even more captivating shot. “It was hard for me to time it because I (couldn’t) see anything. I’m up in the forest and I couldn’t see the train. My father was on the radio and we tried to time it and we honestly didn’t time it that great,” he said. “For the photo, it would have been nicer if (the train) was a little bit more underneath me.” Pehota had scouted the location earlier this winter, as mountain bikers regularly complete the jump—which he estimated at between six and nine metres, child’s play compared to others he’d completed—in the summer months. However, it was only hours before that he decided to actually attempt the trick. “I woke up with intentions of going snowmobiling, and then things fell through there. I thought ‘I don’t really want to go up the hill today, so why don’t I go check this out and see if I can do this instead?’” Pehota recalled, described his preparation on a clear track as completing a couple of straight airs before doing a backflip. In the days before, the 23-year-old had asked his mom, Parveen, to piece together the train schedule going south. Naturally, on the day he decided to attempt the stunt. the locomotive was an hour later than anticipated. While she knew of his plans before,

one of the most striking parts of Eric’s post was about his decision call his mom declaring his intentions and asking her to send help if she didn’t hear from him afterward. Parveen, instead of just waiting, sent husband Eric to act as a spotter as well as a photographer. “I really did call her because I went out there by myself earlier,” he said. “Nobody was there. “I was like, ‘Well, I guess I should tell somebody in case I try it and gaffe it and don’t actually make it. I could actually get hurt really badly. I could get run over by a train when I’m just laying in the middle (of the tacks) unconscious.’” Having been married to a risk-taker in Eric for a quarter century, Parveen said while she has some twinges of fear, both her husband and son have a strong track record of not biting off more than they can chew. “It was a little bit nerve wracking but I’m pretty confident in Logan and Eric and what they do,” she said. Eric, meanwhile, witnessed Logan’s backflip practice attempt and felt “100-percent confident” in his son’s ability to complete the stunt. “He’s a pretty calculated individual. He’ll take risks, but they are pretty calculated risks with him,” he said. “Obviously, it’s a little bit nerve wracking as a parent. “If I thought it was undoable and super dangerous, I would be the first one to step in.” With more than 800 shares of Eric’s original Facebook post and nearly 5,000 likes on Logan’s Instagram post, Eric knew that the stunt wouldn’t stay quiet for long. Sure enough, he heard from CN Police on Jan. 21. “I always expected a call,” he said. “That jump has been hit many times on bikes and whatnot, but I don’t think it’s really seen social media (coverage) like that.

14 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

MINDING THE GAP Logan Pehota backflips over rail tracks near Pemberton as a CN train approaches on Jan. 21. PHOTO BY ERIC PEHOTA

“When it comes out in a movie or in a magazine, maybe CN doesn’t see it, but when it goes on social media like Facebook and gets shared by however many people, I guess it leaked out.” The elder Pehota said the officer reiterated not only the danger to Logan if something went horrifically wrong, but the trauma to the train operator in that circumstance. Logan also spoke with the officer later in the day. He was not charged and agreed to use his online clout to share information about train safety and to discourage others from doing similar stunts. Those witnessing unsafe actions on CN property can contact police at 1-800-4659239 while more information on rail safety is available at www.operationlifesaver.ca. “We’re responsible adults and we’re not promoting young kids jumping over trains and endangering themselves,” Eric said.

T HI S SEC T I O N

By

Meanwhile, the younger Pehota has taken a year away from competing on the Freeride World Tour, where he has two wins and was second overall in his 2016 rookie season, to stay at home and pursue some different paths, this trick included. Logan didn’t completely forgo the Freeride World Tour this season, however, as he is set to attend February’s event at Kicking Horse as a wildcard. He’s also registered for the second edition of the rebooted Saudan Couloir Ski Race Extreme as part of April’s World Ski and Snowboard Festival. Pehota had signed up for its return engagement in 2018 but was forced to back out because of injury. “It’s been awhile since I’ve raced, so we’ll see if I’ve still got it,” he said. Logan is also set to work with Matchstick Productions for an upcoming movie and is looking to get more involved in sledding movies with 509 Films. n

6 W B WARNING Operator sounds alarm on after-hours access 1 18 C OUNCIL BRIEFS Letter writers no more? 22 C HAMBER AWARDS Nominations open until Feb. 3 24 P OLICE BRIEFS Crime Stoppers up 25% last year


News WH I S T L E R Whistler eyes geopark designation COUNCIL APPROVES GRANT APPLICATION FOR UNESCO GLOBAL GEOPARK PROJECT By Braden

T

Dupuis

he Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) is hoping to shine a brighter light on the Sea to Sky’s eclectic and dynamic natural environment via a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Global Geopark designation. At its Jan. 22 meeting, council approved a grant application for $962,336 to the Canada-British Columbia Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program to help pay for the $1.3-million project. According to UNESCO, a geopark is a “single, unified geographical area where sites and landscapes of international geological significance are managed with a holistic concept of protection, education and sustainable development.” There are 136 worldwide, and only three in Canada (Tumbler Ridge became the first and only geopark in B.C. in 2014). In Whistler’s case, it would begin with a “nucleus” of five sites (of a potential 55 identified) connected by and accessed from the Sea to Sky Trail: The Cheakamus lava escarpment, Loggers Lake, Basalt features near Cal-Cheak north and south, glacier views from Green Lake and the Mystery Creek rockslide. The proposed geopark would cover about 2,500 square kilometres, said manager of cultural planning and development John Rae, in a presentation to council. “It’s a dynamic landscape which really captures the interplay of volcanism, glaciation and plate tectonics, the unique landforms, and also the physical human geography that’s occurred as a result of that,” Rae said. The project will include the installation of interpretation materials, as well as trail improvements and infrastructure like boardwalks and viewing platforms. Visitors to the park will be able to use a free app accessible on any smartphone to see detailed map descriptions, watch interpretive video vignettes and even interact with augmented reality software. The hope is that residents will develop a deeper understanding of Whistler’s unique sense of place, which they can then share with visitors to the geopark. “It also attracts a more purposeful traveller, someone who wants to experience a destination in its entirety … not just checking a box,” Rae said. “And it’s also, quite simply, a

diversification of our tourism economy. It’s attracting new clientele, (and) it’s not weather-dependent.” While the geopark has been an RMOW solo effort to this point, the project is a corridor-wide initiative that will include partnerships with local First Nations, the provincial government and communities throughout the corridor, Rae said. If the grant application is approved, council will have to decide if it wants to commit the remaining $350,000 to the project—a number Councillor Ralph Forsyth said he (respectfully) wasn’t ready to support. “My reasons are I fear the ongoing liability of cost,” he said. “We have a budget workshop coming up tomorrow, and I don’t want to spend the $350,000.” There is currently no budget for the ongoing maintenance costs associated with the project, Rae said, but the costs would mostly be back-of-house, related to the “digital infrastructure” of the park. The physical infrastructure would be taken into the RMOW’s existing asset management program. The RMOW committed $50,000 to explore the project in 2018, along with another $50,000 in 2019 and $25,000 in each of the three years after that. The geopark designation doesn’t come with any change to legislation in terms of ecological protection, and is also not to be confused with the Howe Sound Biosphere Region Initiative, which is seeking to have the Howe Sound region designated by the United Nations as an UNESCO Biosphere. “Would this be connected at all? Are they competing for the same dollars?” asked Coun. Cathy Jewett. “How would we cooperate with them to make sure that this would be something that would be good for the whole region?” Rae said he’s been in contact with Ruth Simons of the biosphere initiative, and that both parties feel the projects are complementary endeavours. “And they are actually slightly different, because the biosphere reserve ends up actually having restrictions on it, and it’s actually more of a protective exercise, as opposed to an actively engaged exercise,” he said, adding that most of the envisioned geopark falls outside of the proposed boundaries of the Howe Sound Biosphere Initiative. Whistlerites will get their first look at the 2019 budget—including a list of proposed projects—at an open house next month. n

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News WHI STLER WB sounds alarm on after-hours travel on mountains SKINNING UP IS FORBIDDEN AND A SIGNIFICANT SAFETY RISK, SAYS PATROL DIRECTOR By

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16 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

n light of significant safety concerns for both staff and skiers and boarders, Whistler Blackcomb (WB) is trying to get an important message out to the wider public: When terrain is closed, stay off the mountains. This year has seen instances of backcountry recreationalists using WB terrain to access Garibaldi Provincial Park when the resort is closed, skinning or walking up before the mountain officially opens. “When we’re operating after hours, it’s still a big, huge plant we’re operating, with lots of moving parts,” explained Adam Mercer, patrol director for WB.

via Singing Pass. In addition, there are two official access points into the park from the resort, at the top of Flute on Whistler and via the Blackcomb Glacier. These areas include an information kiosk, as well as transceiver checkers, and are accessible when the mountain is fully open, when all lifts and all zones are operational. “We’ve got people that are accessing the backcountry (through designated areas), and then we’ve got people using ski-touring equipment, snowshoes, or walking within our ski-area boundary and walking up. To me, they’re two different issues,” said Mercer. Marc Riddell, communications director for WB, noted that there has been significant growth in ski touring in

“We want to get through to people that we do have a policy around uphill access on Whistler Blackcomb.” As noted on the resort’s website, that policy clearly states that uphill skiing is not permitted on Whistler or Blackcomb mountains at any time, with the exception of the designated Flute Bowl footpath when conditions permit. There are, of course, a host of serious accidents that could result from trespassing in the early hours of the morning, as groomers, snowcats, and patrol buzz around the mountain preparing for the day in marginal light. “(WB) is a 24-7 operation,” said Mercer. “So there are a number of things going on after hours, which from time to time include avalanche control.” He emphasized that WB is not discouraging people from accessing the backcountry—it just wants people to do so at designated access points when conditions permit. From the base of Whistler Mountain, users can access Garibaldi Provincial Park

recent years, attracting new people into the sport that may assume that skinning up in the early morning is acceptable. Noting that that segment of WB’s guests is small, Riddell said some may look at the layout of the area and say, “Hey, we know that there is a provincial park behind the resort. We’re just going to walk through this tenure, because it’s a heck of a lot easier making it up there than making our way up Singing Pass.” Mercer underlined that trespassing in the resort jeopardizes the safety of both staff and guests. He encouraged people to look out for each other, and to let people know that poaching the resort is unacceptable if they see someone doing it. “It’s a big mountain community,” he said. “You kind of take care of each other out there.” To learn more about WB’s uphillskiing policy and information regarding backcountry travel, check out the following website: whistlerblackcomb. com/the-mountain/about-the-mountain/ backcountry.aspx. n


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News WHIST L ER Letter writers no more? COUNCIL BRIEFS: RGS SUPPORT DEFERRED; WHA BUILDING ADVANCED By

Braden Dupuis

W

histler council seems to have lost its taste for letter writing. Following the Resort Municipality of Whistler’s (RMOW) announcement that it lacks the legal authority to force local businesses to close their doors, Luke O’Beirne-Kelly took to the podium at the Jan. 22 council meeting to suggest council consider writing letters to the upper management of businesses with “open-door” policies in Whistler. “Letters from council may give a bit more clout to the upper management of those particular stores,” O’BeirneKelly said. Whistler council’s goal is to work locally, Mayor Jack Crompton said in response. “So working on the ground with managers of the stores, and then maybe if we want to reach out—phone calls,” Crompton said. “We’ll be focusing our attention on

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what we can do in our community.” Council can be forgiven for its new aversion to letter writing—its now-infamous letter to oil companies demanding they pay their fair share for climate-related impacts (which made national headlines last month) is still

expressing dismay). With slight variations, the thank-you letters were all identical. “As long as the fossil fuel industry makes billions of dollars on the assumption that we alone will pay for the costs of climate change, big oil

“working on the ground with managers of the stores, and then maybe if we want to reach out—phone calls” - JACK CROMPTON

drawing attention at municipal hall. Following up the Jan. 8 council package, which included 35 pieces of correspondence about the letter (all voicing their complete displeasure), at the Jan. 22 meeting, council received eight pieces of correspondence thanking it for the letter (along with one more

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companies like Chevron and Exxon Mobil will have every incentive to continue to stand in the way of real action on climate change,” the letters read, in part. The council package also included a letter from Andrew Gage of West Coast Environmental Law (from which the

“climate accountability” letter-writing campaign originated) and Tracey Saxby of My Sea to Sky, thanking council for its leadership and asking it to take two more steps: begin tracking the costs of climate change locally, and help convene a meeting with interested local government officials to explore litigation and legislation as tools to recover those costs. The letter was received and referred to staff. “My preference is to spend our resources taking action on climate in Whistler as opposed to undertaking litigation elsewhere, would be my comment,” Crompton said.

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News WHIST L ER Council briefs < FROM PAGE 18

chance to discuss the matter in depth with the SLRD board. The SLRD has been working on the amendment (considered to be an update rather than an overhaul) since 2016. On June 5, 2018, council endorsed in principle a draft of the document, while suggesting two changes: specifically identifying certain types of development, like new destination resorts or backcountry resorts, as triggers for RGS amendments (which would require approval from member municipalities), and; adding option sites (which could be developed) that are already included in the Whistler Blackcomb Master Development Plan to Whistler’s Settlement Plan map in the proposed RGS. “The RMOW’s proposed changes pertaining to amendment triggers were extensively discussed, but not supported by the remainder of the steering committee,” said senior planner Jake Belobaba, in a presentation to council. “The prevailing opinion was that the proposed changes are adequately

addressed by the existing wording in the draft of the RGS, and other SLRD approval processes.” The second change was supported by the steering committee and incorporated into the draft. While the option sites will now be included in Whistler’s Settlement Area in the RGS, any proposed development would require an amendment to Whistler’s Official Community Plan (currently sitting at first reading), as well as a rezoning. Any development would also have to fit within Whistler’s existing bed cap. Whistler’s request to include the option sites in its settlement plan drew attention from proponents of the proposed Garibaldi at Squamish (GAS) ski resort on Brohm Ridge at a recent Squamish council meeting. According to the Squamish Chief, GAS’ proponents argue that if Whistler’s option sites are to be included within RGS settlement boundaries, it would only be fair to include GAS in that zone as well. The assertion prompted a discussion, with Squamish council ultimately deciding to tell the SLRD a discussion ought to be had on the matter, and that

Expertise

the SLRD make further considerations about the fairness of the process. But the comparison GAS is making to Whistler’s option sites is potentially misleading, Crompton said after the Jan. 22 meeting. “The comparison of Whistler Blackcomb, which is a ski resort in an existing municipality with a Master Development Agreement and 30 years history, to a speculative development outside of a municipality, is a conversation that is misleading in and of itself,” he said. The SLRD’s next meeting is Wednesday, Jan. 30. The RGS amendment will come back to council at a future meeting.

WHA BUILD GETS VARIANCE PERMIT

A new Whistler Housing Authority building in Cheakamus Crossing is working its way through the permit process. The project at 1330 Cloudburst Dr. came back to council on Jan. 22 for approval of setback variations following a review by the municipal Advisory Design Panel. A public hearing held on Dec. 18 in relation to the project garnered no

Dedication

written or verbal submissions. The building will house 103 employee beds in 45 units, and is expected to be open in 2020. Two other WHA builds—1020 Legacy Way (53 beds, 24 units) and 8350 Bear Paw Trail (39 beds, 20 units)—will be ready in summer 2019.

CHILDCARE FUNDING APPLICATION

Also at the Jan. 22 meeting, council passed a motion to direct staff to apply for the Union of BC Municipalities Community Child Care Planning (CCCP) program to do a childcare needs assessment, as well as manage any funds received through the program. The CCCP—a partnership between the Ministry of Children and Family Development and UBCM—will provide up to $25,000 for local governments to develop a “childcare space creation action plan.” “I think that now would be a good time for us to do a check in with the working group on childcare, which has been kind of ad hoc,” said Councillor Jen Ford. “(It’s) a good time to kind of bring those people together and have a discussion.” n

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News WHIST L ER Nominations for the Whistler Excellence Awards are open until Feb. 3 ANNUAL CELEBRATION OF LOCAL BUSINESS AND ARTS COMMUNITY SET FOR APRIL 30 By

Brandon Barrett

N

ominations are now open for the Whistler Excellence Awards, the annual celebration of the resort’s business and arts community hosted by the Whistler Chamber of Commerce. The black-tie gala, scheduled for April 30 at the Fairmont Chateau Whistler, honours “excellence in the areas of service, innovation, sustainability, outstanding leadership in the arts, business and community service,” according to the chamber. “It’s an opportunity for the community to celebrate its achievements and the leaders of our business community. It’s really that time that we get to, as a group, as a community, celebrate those that really shine,” explained chamber CEO Melissa Pace. Nominations are open until Sunday, Feb. 3. The 2019 event will feature nine separate categories, including the

return of the Above & Beyond award, which recognizes an individual that has made “an outstanding contribution or accomplishment eclipsing normal individual and/or company boundaries that will benefit our community in unique and meaningful ways,” according to the chamber’s criteria. It replaces last year’s Locals’ Choice Award. The other award categories are: CITIZEN OF THE YEAR. First handed out in 1969, this longstanding award is selected by the Community Foundation of Whistler to honour an “outstanding community member who contributes significant volunteer time to enhancing quality of life in Whistler.” INNOVATIVE BUSINESS OF THE YEAR. This award is given to a Whistler-made business that has shown “recent innovative talent in developing a new product or service” that is “creative, cutting edge, unique and out of the ordinary.” RISING STAR OF THE YEAR. This honour

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has contributed to the development of arts and culture in Whistler in a meaningful way. Pace said it is particularly important to celebrate the accomplishments of local companies given the current business landscape in Whistler. “We know there are a lot of struggles out there, and in part, what the chamber is trying to achieve is to really get out there and start to really understand what’s going on in the business community, even more so today,” Pace explained. “So when we get to the Whistler Excellence Awards, this is an opportunity not only for the business community to celebrate but it’s also for the chamber to celebrate the achievements of the businesses coming through what I would consider, what many people would consider, a really challenging year on so many different levels.” Early-bird tickets are available at whistlerchamber.com. n

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News WHIST L ER Crime Stoppers tips were up 25% last year, leading to increase in arrests POLICE BRIEFS: NO MAJOR INCIDENTS TO REPORT OVER MLK WEEKEND DESPITE RISE IN CALLS By

2

Brandon Barrett

018 was a landmark year for Sea to Sky Crime Stoppers, which saw a significant increase in public tips, leading to more than double the number of arrests than the year prior. In a release sent earlier this month, Sea to Sky Crime Stoppers reported a 25-percent jump in tips to the service, leading to a 114-per-cent rise in arrests and a 160-percent increase in charges laid that were attributable to information from the public. The recovery of stolen property as a result of tips also went up, by 125 per cent—but the most remarkable statistic from last year was the whopping 2,600-percent jump in the amount of drugs seized. Sea to Sky Crime Stoppers president Jeff Cooke attributed that dramatic increase to a relatively small sample size the year before, along with a number of major busts over the past year.

“There’s been an increase in quantity (of seizures) but the incidents have been sizable for the most part,” he explained. The organization has also ramped up its social-media activity in the past few years, leading to more tips, Cooke said. “With the way media is consumed these days, social media is such a huge (platform), and it allows people, when they see a story or an incident that’s important to them, to share it and reach a lot of people in a very quick period of time,” he noted. Along with a higher volume of tips, the quality of information coming from the public has also improved, Cooke acknowledged. “Through our social media and through just educating the public as to the kind of information we’re looking for, we’re finding that people are calling in sooner and giving more detail about incidents,” he said. Sea to Sky Crime Stoppers was the

2017 recipient of the Milestone Award, a provincial honour given to a Crime Stoppers organization with the most stolen property recovered in relation to its local population. That year, public tips helped lead to the recovery of $177, 340 worth of stolen goods. The organization is currently seeking volunteers to serve on its board. No background in policing is necessary. “It’s a great way to give back to the community and do something with a pretty limited amount of time and effort,” Cooke said. Those interested should email stscrimestoppers@gmail.com. As always, anonymous tips can be left by phone or text to 1-800-222-8477, or online at solvecrime.ca.

RCMP SEES RISE IN CALLS OVER MLK WEEKEND, BUT NO MAJOR INCIDENTS

Whistler RCMP saw an increase in calls for service over the American Martin Luther

King holiday weekend, but no major incidents to report, confirmed police. “Martin Luther King Weekend historically results in a large increase of visitors to the community with a corresponding increase in calls for service,” said Staff Sgt. Paul Hayes in a release, adding that this year was no different. A popular weekend for young visitors from the U.S., it should come as no surprise that a large portion of the calls police dealt with were alcohol-related. In all, Mounties investigated 49 incidents between 5 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 18 and 11:59 p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 20, 20 more files than the previous weekend. Of those incidents, 13 were for causing a disturbance, seven for public intoxication, two for breaching the peace, and five for bylaw offences. A dozen individuals were arrested over the weekend “because they were intoxicated enough not to be able to care for themselves,” police said, compared to two arrests the previous weekend. n

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News WHIST L ER Student receives Loran scholarship program’s provincial award MOLLY LONG IS ALSO A FINALIST FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO’S NATIONAL SCHOLARSHIP By

Megan Lalonde

A

pplying to university can be a stressful process for any Grade 12 student—even those with grades as excellent as Whistler Secondary School student Molly Long’s. However, a pair of nominations for two national scholarship awards is making the transition that much easier. “It shows me that I’m at the same level as some of the other exceptional students who are applying,” Long said. “I feel like I would belong with them.” Long was one of 518 semi-finalists chosen from a field of 5,089 applicants to be interviewed and considered for the prestigious Loran Award, a $100,000 scholarship granted to “up to 34” students. Although she missed out on the top prize, Long was one of up to 50 students awarded

a $2,000 provincial award. “I was hoping to make the finals, but I was still happy,” she said. The Loran Award—short for Long-Range Aid to Navigation—evaluates applicants using a “rigorous selection process” based off three points: values of character, service and leadership. “Molly, definitely, stands out as an exceptional student,” explained Jamie Walzl, Long’s physics and computer programming teacher at Whistler Secondary School (WSS), in an email. “Her intellectual talents are complemented by her focus, determination, and commitment to success. It has been wonderful to see Molly challenge herself with new experiences during the past year.” “During the last 12 months, Molly has been part of Whistler Secondary’s Mathematics team, Physics Olympics team, and the SHAD youth

STAR STUDENT Molly Long, a Whistler Secondary School Grade 12 student, has been nominated for a pair of prestigious national scholarships. PHOTO SUBMITTED

leadership program,” a trio of experiences that have taken her to universities across the country. In addition to her academic endeavours, Long also competes in and coaches volleyball, plays piano, runs cross country and track and field, and serves as a member WSS’s leadership club and student council, as well as other volunteer positions. Long, who plans to study engineering, has already been accepted to Queen’s University, and is currently awaiting responses from the University of British Columbia, the University of Waterloo and the University of Toronto (U of T). However, her chances of acceptance to U of T are looking good—Long is one of 20 finalists for the university’s National

Evening Events

Join us for Whistler's legendary fundraising event of the season and celebrate 26 years of making a difference in our communities! This action-packed weekend features fun-filled ski events, wine, beer and food galore, our famous silent and live auctions and fabulous live entertainment. All proceeds from the event go to support non-profit charities. Come on out and join us for an event that you don’t want to miss!

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26 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

Scholarship Program, awarded to a student, “who demonstrates superior academic performance, original and creative thought, and exceptional achievement in a broad context,” while WSS has also nominated Long for the University of Toronto’s book award. The National Scholarship award covers tuition, incidental and residence fees for up to four years of study for 10 students, according to the U of T. Long is preparing to travel to Toronto next month for an in-person interview for the scholarship. “It’s been great to see Molly take chances and be rewarded,” wrote Walzl. “Molly’s (Loran) Scholarship award is a wonderful way to celebrate Molly’s efforts and achievements.” n

A Whistler Blackcomb Foundation Charity Fundraiser

Sample from an extensive collection of fantastic wine, beer, spirits and gourmet cheese. Enjoy delectable appetizers from local restaurants including the Bearfoot Bistro, Purebread and Portobello while listening to fabulous live entertainment. Last pour at 10pm. NOCHES DE LA HAVANA MOUNTAIN TOP GALA PRESENTED BY SAMSUNG Saturday, March 2 | Roundhouse Lodge, Whistler Mountain | $250 Noches de la Havana is a centuries-spanning, fedora-demanding, flower-splashed fiesta. Come dance the rumba amongst colonial columns, salsa through Hemingway’s sea of rum and hand rolled cigars and mambo into the modern madness of the Tropicana nightclub. Ladies, your bata cubanas are calling your name; gentlemen, your guayaberas will not be ignored! On a Caribbean island at the top of a mountain, we will defy our weather together! Pre-register for the online silent auction at wbfauction.com


News W H I STLER Naturespeak: The super blood wolf moon By

I

Mallory Lakins

f you had (by chance or design) the good fortune to look up to the stars on Sunday night, you may have caught sight of the “super blood wolf moon.” This incredible natural phenomenon is not (as our ancestors feared, and as far as we know) a harbinger of doom. Instead, it is a natural, though a relatively rare sight. Sunday marked the intersection of three distinct events: A full moon, a supermoon, and a lunar eclipse. A full moon is a common and regular visitor, illuminating the night with its full, round face once every 27.3 days. For the 12 or 13 full moons we see each year, three or four happen when the moon is within 10 per cent of its perigree—the closest it comes to the Earth in its orbit. This proximity to the Earth makes it a supermoon, and it appears about 14 per cent larger, and 30 per cent brighter. Lastly, a lunar eclipse, which can

only happen during a full moon, occurs approximately once a year when the Earth passes directly between the sun and moon, partially blocking the sun’s light. A total lunar eclipse, when the Earth completely blocks the sun from the moon, occurs every one to three years. These are the “blood moons,” so called because of the vibrant red colour produced by the sun’s rays passing around the Earth and through the Earth’s atmosphere. This interference between the Earth’s atmosphere and the sun’s rays are the same reason we enjoy spectacular red sunsets, and the inspiring pink-orange alpenglow. Now where does the “wolf” bit come in? Early peoples frequently followed the lunar calendar, instead of the solar calendar, or the Gregorian calendar that is now the norm. In the lunar calendar, each full moon cycle had a name. The “wolf moon” marked a time where hungry wolves were heard howling and seen stalking around villages. Other peoples named this moon the “old

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BIG MOON The super blood wolf moon was on full display last Sunday, Jan. 20.

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moon,” “ice moon,” “snow moon” or “moon after yule.” The “blood moon” also holds its place in history as a sign of serious trouble. As people who lived their life close to the rhythms of the land, water, and sky, I can imagine how alarming a lunar or solar eclipse might appear. Many cultures used it as a time to act and to help fight off the threat to their gods. Others used it as an excuse for war or for peace. I’m glad to be part of a time where I can sit back and enjoy the show knowing

the light will return. If you missed your chance to howl at the moon, the next two full moons (Feb. 19 and March 20) will also be supermoons, and the next total lunar eclipse will be on May 26, 2021. As for the next “super blood wolf moon?” You’ll have to wait until 2036— lots of time to plan. Mallory is a volunteer with the Whistler Naturalists. To learn more about Whistler’s natural world, go to WhistlerNaturalists.ca. n

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WEL L , THAT WA S…

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News PEMBERT ON & T H E V A L L E Y

GO TIME Village of Pemberton council wants to build a major project on its recreation lands. It instructed staff to apply for a grant that would cover the majority of the cost at its Jan. 22 council meeting. PHOTO BY JOEL BARDE

Pemberton seeks funding for additional soccer field and amenity building for its recreation lands COUNCIL BRIEFS: EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTRE CONSIDERED; RIDE HAILING DISCUSSED By Joel Barde

T

he Village of Pemberton (VOP) is seeking funding to build a FIFA regulation-sized soccer field on its recreation lands on Pemberton Farm Road East. The project would see the construction of a 64-by-100-metre grass field, and an amenity building that includes washroom and changeroom facilities, lights, a concession area, and bleachers. A soccer field was built on the land last year, and will be open for play this spring. In her presentation to council, Jill Brooksbank—senior communications grants coordinator for the VOP—said the project has the enthusiastic support of the Pemberton Off Road Cycling Association and the Pemberton Youth Soccer Association. The funding is being sought through the Community, Culture and Recreation Infrastructure Program, a financial-support stream supported with both provincial and federal tax money. The total cost of the project would be $4,224,405. Under the application guidelines, the VOP must contribute 26.67 per cent of the project cost of its application if successful.

That means it would have to contribute $1,126,649, though it can look to other partners for help. The VOP is therefore hoping for a significant contribution from the SquamishLillooet Regional District (SLRD). “We will be sending a letter to (SLRD) Director (Russell) Mack, saying that this is what it will cost if we share it 50-50,” said Mayor Mike Richman. “The whole recreation site is something that will be used by Village of Pemberton residents as well as Area C residents. “When we enter into these conversations, we enter into them hopeful to be partners on them.” If successful, the VOP is seeking to pay the balance without additional costs to taxpayers, using development-related fees and funds, and a $40,000 donation from the Rotary Club. Following the meeting, Richman said the soccer field would be great for the community on a number of fronts. Soccer is an accessible sport for families and is popular, he added. Focusing on the soccer fields, and building up the recreation lands, is a smart long-term move as the fate of the pitch at the old high school on Pemberton Meadows Road is uncertain, explained Richman.

30 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

It’s owned by the school district, not the VOP, making it hard to justify major expenditures on it. “Recognizing that it can’t be the future home for soccer and that we could lose it in the near future, we wanted to plan ahead,” said Richman, adding that the goal has always been to have two fields on the site. “One soccer field is great, but it’s not enough to run a full soccer program on.” You need two adjacent fields, especially if you’re running tournaments and that sort of thing.”

EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTRE

At the meeting, council also supported a funding application to upgrade its emergency operations centre (EOC), which is headquartered in Council Chambers (7400 Prospect St.). The VOP is seeking the funds through the Union of BC Municipalities’ Community Emergency Preparedness Fund. The grant has a limit of $25,000, so the VOP would be required to contribute $2,045 to cover the remaining costs of the project, which is budgeted at $27,045. Purchases would essential include communications equipment, computer workstations with required software, office

supplies and a generator for back-up power. “As I’ve said before, we want to up our game when it comes to emergency planning,” said Richman. “This would be our EOC in the event of a smaller, localized emergency, and we’re currently not equipped for it,” continued Richman, adding that localized flooding or mudslides are possible issues it would help the community respond to.

RIDE HAILING

Council also approved correspondence to the province’s select standing committee examining ride hailing. Pemberton lost Greyhound and taxi service in 2018, so ride hailing is seen as something that may help area residents. The correspondence will make it clear that the needs of a rural place like Pemberton are different than for large urban centres. It recommends that operating boundaries should or drivers in rural areas should be “less geographically stringent” than those for urban areas in order to increase the economic feasibility of offering a ride-hailing service. It will also call for all divers to have Class 4 restricted driver’s licences, and for fares to operate on a supply-anddemand basis. n


20th ANNIVERSARY!


O U T O F R AN G E

32 Dispatches

BROOD CAPTURE Fisheries and Oceans Canada scientists capture salmon brood as part of the Tenderfoot Creek Hatchery’s enhancement program.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

The DFO program aiming to return salmon numbers to historical levels BRACKENDALE HATCHERY HOME TO BROODSTOCK PROGRAM ENHANCING SALMON RETURNS Brandon Barrett edit@piquenewsmagazine.com

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or the past several years, Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) has been carrying out a conservation initiative aimed at getting dwindling salmon returns to their prior historical levels. Focused primarily on chum and chinook locally, the broodstock program is an effort to better understand the often unpredictable nature of the species’ return to the Squamish River system. “The trends are all over the place,” said Jordan Uittenbogaard, operations manager at the Tenderfoot Creek Hatchery, of the last decade of chum returns. “I think it was back in 2016 when we had a record return of chum to the hatchery, and then the following year it was an all-time low.” Scientists recorded approximately 2,000 returning chum to the hatchery last year, below its rough annual average of 6,000, and well below the record of 26,000 set in 2016, the highest number tallied since the hatchery began counting in 1981. Hatchery staff will collect chum spawn from the Tenderfoot Creek before fertilizing and hatching the eggs in its facility and redistributing the fry to streams, creeks

and rivers around the Squamish area. It’s a process that “mimics Mother Nature” while fostering higher survival rates than usual “because they’re in that setting with no predators and they are getting fed,” Uitenbogaard said. “We will put a certain amount of eggs back into Tenderfoot Creek to ensure that we get brood stock returning, so adults continue to come back. Then, the surplus eggs, we divvy up unto local urban streams in Squamish. We’ll do three to four streams per cycle—a cycle is four years—and what we’re trying to do is transplant these chum into these streams for four years to build back populations to historic levels,” he added. After a four-year cycle, the scientists move to a new set of streams, a process they will repeat and, if effective, continue until “we should technically have a really healthy population of chum,” Uitenbogaard said. A fatty, nutrient-rich fish, chum play a vital role in the local ecosystem, explained Dave Brown, local member of the Sea to Sky Fisheries Roundtable. “When they lay their eggs, not only do they create more chum salmon, they put nutrient load back into the river, which feeds all salmon, trout and steelhead species,” he said. “The Squamish itself is a very nutrient-poor river, so these salmon, they’re like a fertilizer for the

32 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

entire river and they help other species do well. Poor chum returns can be the canary in the coalmine for poor returns of other salmon.” The enhancement program is smaller in scope for pink, coho and chinook salmon, which have seen stronger returns than chum in recent years, relative to their respective populations. Last year was the first since the program was launched in 2014 to see chinook return to their home rivers to spawn, and although it’s still early, Uitenbogaard said “just visually, we had a large hatchery fish return” of chinook. “It looks like our survival (rate) is going to be great.” Scientists insert microchips into the fish fry they capture to track their migration route. (The DFO asks anglers to turn in the heads of salmon with their adipose fin missing—a sign that the fish has been chipped.)

T HI S SEC T I O N

By

“It tells us a lot,” Uitenbogaard said. “That pin goes with that fish over its entire life and when it’s caught by a sport angler, commercial fisheries or it returns to us, we can now take that head from that salmon, that pin, and it gives us the whole assessment for the program.” The DFO has also partnered with the province, the Squamish Nation and the Squamish River Watershed Society to open up fish habitat in the region. For years, a large boulder in the Upper Elaho River has choked off “kilometres of abundant habitat” for salmon, said Uitenbogaard. Blasting has already cleared the boulder, and hatchery staff will release 15,000 chinook fry into the upper reaches of the river in May. “This will hopefully result in a healthy and new population of chinook salmon in the coming future,” Uitenbogaard added. n

3 MOUNTAIN NEWS The trouble with weed 3 34 ECOLOGIC Climate change and beer and wine 35 T HE OUTSIDER A deep dive into avalanche study 36 FEATURE Whistler council charts new territory with portfolios approach


Mountain News: As cannabis becomes more available, questions remain

The behaviour is not alarming, Dan Rafla said, while pointing out that attacks on humans are rare. social media showed four of the cougars, also called mountain lions, walking through a neighbourhood on the edge of the pinyon-and-juniper forest that surrounds the town. A state game warden told the Glenwood Post he believed it was a mother and her three maturing cubs. Another mountain lion had been trapped and killed. Why wouldn’t it instead be transplanted? Dan Cacho, the state game warden, said any place it would have been transplanted likely already has a mountain lion. “If there is a healthy lion in that area, then we are just setting them up for failure,” Cacho explained. “We have to euthanize them for human health and safety.” n

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NADIAN M

O

TAIN GUIDE UN

CRESTED BUTTE, Colo.—Effects from the shutdown of broad swathes of the U.S. government will likely linger far into coming months. In Crested Butte, News editor Mark Reaman pointed to the nearby Rocky Mountain Biological Lab. The laboratory at the foot of the Anthracite Range has many scientific studies, including some devoted to understanding the effects of climate change. But there’s also a project called SnoEx, in which some of the scientists are working with NASA to develop new technology to measure the water content of snow to improve water predictions. “The intent has been to do a series of major flights in the Gunnison (River)

BANFF, Alta.—It was a cats-eat-dog world on the edge of Banff, the town in the eponymously named Banff National Park. Dan Rafla, a human-wildlife conflict specialist for the park, told the Rocky Mountain Outlook that the two cougars had made quick work of the coyote carcass. He surmised that the cougars had been drawn to elk in the area. As for the threat to people, he downplayed any risk. The behaviour is not alarming,” he said, while pointing out that attacks on humans are rare. In Colorado, cougars have been seen in a residential neighbourhood of Glenwood Springs, which is about an hour down-valley from both Aspen and Vail. One video widely circulated on

OF

SNOW SURVEYS MAY BE DELAYED

A CATS-EAT-DOG WORLD

IATION

ANFF, Alta.—Mountain towns continue to smooth the rollout of stores selling cannabis to recreational customers. In Alberta, Banff has five applications for retail shops. In Colorado, the town of Fraser has adopted new regulations that permit extended business hours and locations. But is this increased access truly a good thing? Alex Berenson, a former New York Times reporter, has written a short book called Tell Your Children: The Truth about Marijuana, Mental Illness, and Violence. In it, he argues that cannabis poses more risk than has been commonly acknowledged. That there is correlation between mental illness and cannabis consumption is undisputed. Whether cannabis use causes mental illness is disputed by the industry. The National Academy of Medicine, however, does see causality. “Cannabis use is likely to increase the risk of developing schizophrenia and other psychoses; the higher the use, the greater the risk.” This and other parts of Berenson’s book are dissected by Malcolm Gladwell (think: “Outliers,”) in The New Yorker. He pointed out something that cannabis users probably know very well. Recent developments in plant breeding and growing techniques have caused the typical concentration of THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, to go from the low single digits to more than 20 per cent. It is, he said, a difference like that between a swig of near-beer to a tequila shot.

OC

B

SS

allen.best@comcast.net

Basin and coordinate those ground measurements by RMBL scientists to better calibrate and interpret air-based measurements,” Reaman explained. “But, NASA is closed and so planning for the flights has stopped. If the project does not resume in the next several weeks, it will be delayed a year, since the timing of the flights is critical. Snow measurements cannot be pushed into the summer.”

A

Allen Best

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By

2018

Dispatches O U T O F R A N G E

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 24, 2019 | 33


EcoLogic It stole my beer W

e know that climate change is affecting global weather patterns in a way that will require us to adjust everything from coastal habitations to agricultural expectations. We’ve heard plenty about future food security as a result of regional weather shifts, but another dimension has recently emerged: potential effects on indulgence industries, things not strictly necessary for survival but which affect our collective quality of life—like wine and beer.

By Leslie Anthony

Village of Pemberton

2019 Budget Info Sessions Take Part in the 2019 Budget Process Ways to Have Your Say In Person: A�end the Public Budget Info Session March 5, 2019 @ 5:30pm Council Chambers, Chambe 7400 Prospect Street

In Wri�ng:

What to Expect

The public is encouraged to a�end the following budget sessions to learn about 2019 projects and expenditures. At the Budget Sessions, the Commi�ee of the Whole will be considering and discussing budget informa�on presented by Staff. At the Budget Info Session on March 5th, Staff will make a presenta�on and the public will have it's opportunity to ask ques�ons regarding the budget. The presenta�on will be available the following day at www.pemberton.ca for those who are unable to a�end.

Budget Session Dates

Budget Session #1 (During Commi�ee of the Whole Mee�ng) 2019 Opera�ng Budgets, Capital and Project Budgets Tuesday, February 5, 2019 @ 1pm| Council Chambers, 7400 Prospect St.

Email your Comments Budget Session #2 (During Commi�ee of the Whole Mee�ng) to budget @pemberton.ca 2019 Revised Opera�ng, Capital and Project Budgets Tuesday, February 19, 2019 @ 1pm | Council Chambers, 7400 Prospect St. prior to March 1, 2019. All input will be summarized summari Budget Session #3 (During Commi�ee of the Whole Mee�ng) and adressed at the Budget Tax Implica�ons of 2019 Revised Budget Info Session on March 5th. Tuesday, March 5, 2019 @ 1pm | Council Chambers, 7400 Prospect St. Public Budget Bud Info Sesson | 2019 Review (Prior to Council)

Tuesday, March 5, 2019 @ 5:30pm| Council Chambers, 7400 Prospect St.

Budget Session #4 (During Commi�ee of the Whole Mee�ng) Capital and Project Budgets with Tax Implica�ons Tuesday, March 19, 2019 @ 1pm | Council Chambers, 7400 Prospect St.

VillageofPemberton 34 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

www.pemberton.ca

Granted, a shortage of alcoholic beverages is unimportant compared to lifethreatening climate impacts such as floods and fires, but it will affect social aspects of human life and commerce, as well as— dare I say—coping mechanisms for many. With both industries studying the future impacts of climate change on production and pricing, one might even come to say—paraphrasing a famous Whistler band name, which itself echoes a universal party/ pub lament—“It stole my beer.” Research indeed suggests trouble brewing on the beer front, with extreme heatwaves and droughts increasingly damaging the global barley crop and leading to dramatic price spikes. One study employed various models to examine the effects of extreme weather on barley yields over the next 80 years, and its impact on beer supply and price. Under current carbon-emission scenarios, beer consumption fell by about a third in Ireland, Belgium and the Czech Republic, a quarter in the U.K., 14 per cent in the U.S., nine per cent in China (now the world’s largest beer consumer), and seven per cent in Australia. More ominously, under best-case scenarios of deep and rapid emission reductions, beer consumption in Ireland, Belgium and the Czech Republic would still fall between nine and 13 per cent, with similar drops in Canada and Germany. Climate is also challenging the quality and yield of hops. Most U.S. hops are grown in Washington, Oregon and Idaho, states increasingly threatened by drought. But the problem isn’t restricted to North America: in 2017, Europe experienced one of the worst hop crops in decades; with supply falling far short of demand, prices soared. Producers everywhere may be searching for a new hops-growing Shangrila, but moving large-scale production isn’t easy—especially in the midst of a craft-beer

revolution that puts increased pressure on supply for boutique, geographically restricted strains. Dr. Joshua Fisher, a climate scientist at NASA, believes we’ve reached a tipping point for hops in the Pacific Northwest with respect to summer rainfall and accepted norms in plant growth. Ongoing increases in hop usage will make weather dependency even higher in the future. The same can be said for wine-making grapes—with both the plants in general, and varietals in particular, having similarly specific climate demands. Currently, all grapes grow between the 30th and 50th parallels on either side of the equator, but global warming is shifting this range. In the Northern Hemisphere, grapegrowing is creeping northward into the Netherlands and Scandinavia, which are already making decent wine, as well as into novel terroirs such as India, China, and Tibet. Climate change has forced the wine industry to evolve more in the past two decades than over the previous 500 years, with examples like the 2017 California wildfires that destroyed 101, 000 hectares in Napa, and extreme freezes in France than have caused major crop failures in regions such as Burgundy. By 2069, it’s projected, the area may be too warm to produce “Burgundy” at all, relying instead on grapes more like North American pinot, or simply producing blends. As more winemakers utilize blends to compensate for bad years, reliance on manmade production technologies may bring an end to the concept of vintages. Already scientists are experimenting with making wine in a lab from molecular constituents that will obviate the need for grapes. Cork is a limited resource that may also soon see its end: the oak tree from whose bark it derives grows only in southern Europe and North Africa, where climates are rapidly changing. Given wine’s resilience through the vicissitudes of human history, we can assume that it will still be around in 50 years, even as it becomes harder to produce. Already wineries are following the craft-beer model of focusing equally on the experiential side of drinking, setting up tasting rooms in urban centres and experimenting with virtual-reality tours and tastings that will eliminate the need to visit wine country. Climate change may not eliminate wine and beer, but you can bet things are going to get a little weird. Leslie Anthony is a science/environment writer and author who holds a doctorate in connecting the dots. n


The Outsider 35

RISKY BUSINESS Pique columnist Vince Shuley is reading Bruce Tremper’s seminal textbook while spending time on the beautiful beaches of Queensland’s Gold Coast. PHOTO SUBMITTED

A 2019 avalanche education challenge: Read this book

W

hen I took my Avalanche Skills Training (AST) Level 2 back in 2016, one of the included pieces of course material was (and I believe still is) Staying Alive in Avalanche Terrain by Bruce Tremper. I learned a lot about avalanches on that four-day course (if you’re interested in reading more about

Vince Shuley

By

my impressions, Google “The Outsider” headlines: “Some lessons learned from the AST 2” and “Debating the direction of continuing avalanche education” on the old Whistler Question website), but I found the accompanying textbook was used more as a reference rather than required reading. I promised myself I would come back later and read through those 320 pages cover to cover, but like many of tasks on my to-do list, I procrastinated. At the start of each winter, I’d try to re-motivate myself by placing the book on my kitchen table as a reminder. That’s never worked, so I tried leaving it on my nightstand in hopes that I’d start reading before bed instead of the latest nerd adventure by Ernest Cline. The thing is, avalanche theory can at times be tedious—and dare I say it—boring. I’d fall asleep before I scarcely made a dent in the first couple of chapters. Then my girlfriend and I issued each other a challenge. I was flying home to

Australia for a week to see family and had a few dozen hours of long-haul flights and connections on my hands. We made a pact that by the time I returned, we’d have finished (or come close to finishing) this book once and for all. I’m currently halfway through my mini-vacation and am on chapter six of 10 as I write this overlooking the beautiful beaches of Queensland’s Gold Coast, so I consider myself on schedule. To motivate you to pick up this book and finally get the holistic avalanche education you deserve to complement your practical experience in the field, here are a few takeaways from Staying Alive in Avalanche Terrain that reinforced information that hadn’t been drummed into me from courses or days in the backcountry yet. Note: the following points should not be taken out of context—they need to be considered as part of an holistic assessment of risk when making decisions. This article is no substitute for reading Staying Alive in Avalanche Terrain.

ACCURATELY MEASURING SLOPE ANGLE

The three sides of the avalanche “triangle” are snowpack, weather and terrain. Snowpack and weather are never under your control (though you must always observe them) but terrain is 100 per cent decided by you and your party, and is therefore the answer to the risk-management equation. We are taught early on that the vast majority of avalanches occur between the slope angles of 33 and 45 degrees with the “sweet spot” occurring at 38 degrees. Most of us think we are pretty good at estimating

(or guestimating) slope angle. Few of us actually are, save ski guides and avalanche professionals, but if we want to make an educated decision about skiing a slope in the danger range of 33 to 45 degrees, we need to know how close to 38 degrees the slope actually is and avoid those slopes like the plague. That means picking up an inclinometer and making sure we are using it properly, i.e. measuring average-slope steepness rather than terrain undulations. Inclinometers are not expensive and are integrated into some compasses, which should be another mandatory tool in your backcountry kit.

WIND IS EVERYTHING

The first thing we check on weather reports for skiing is the amount of recent snowfall, but wind can deposit snow 10 times more rapidly than snow falling from the sky. I previously thought that the stronger the wind, the worse the potential for wind slabs, but in actual fact, pretty much all the winds of concern are between 25 to 80 kilometres/ hour. Anything over 80 km/hr (in dry conditions) usually means snowflakes are cast into giant plumes and evaporate before hitting the ground. I’m getting into the habit of monitoring wind speed, direction and duration as part of my daily weather-watch routine. When I’m in the backcountry, I also keep a constant eye on ridgetops to infer which direction the wind has been blowing and where the leeward wind slabs are likely to form. I’ve learned that ridge wind is rarely the same as wind in mountain valleys,

which can come into play when skiing at or below treeline.

MANAGING CONSEQUENCE

We try our best to assess whether or not a slope will slide, but we should be equally concerned about what happens after it slides, potentially with ourselves or one of our friends. Terrain traps are introduced early in the AST 1, but are we actually assessing every consequence before dropping in to that sweet line we scoped earlier? The more obvious consequences are cliffs and gullies. Some of the less obvious ones are abrupt transitions to flat (can bury a victim much deeper), trees in the avalanche run-out zone (can cause fatal trauma) or a not-always-visible crevasse in the avalanche track (both of the above consequences). Islands of safety are your friends. A possible escape route should always be on your radar in case of a slide. Tremper has written an excellent resource for avalanche safety with this book. It perfectly bridges the knowledge gaps both before and after people decide to take their AST 2 course. But it won’t do you any good gathering dust on your shelf. Forget the 10-year challenge in 2019. Challenge yourself to read this book—cover to cover— instead. There are three copies at the Whistler Public Library; all were in use as I wrote this. Vince Shuley is interested in staying alive in avalanche terrain. For questions, comments or suggestions for The Outsider email vince@ vinceshuley.com or Instagram @whis_vince. n

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 24, 2019 | 35


STO RY

36 Feature

By Braden Dupuis

I

t didn’t come to him in a dream, or in the bathtub, but a quiet revelation in the theatre of the Maury Young Arts Centre. “During the election, not having to campaign gave me the opportunity to listen,” says Mayor Jack Crompton, when asked how he conceived of the Resort Municipality of Whistler’s (RMOW) new portfolio approach, which will see each elected councillor focus on a specific area of interest (while still voting generally on all municipal issues). Watching Whistler’s 20 candidates for council at the all-candidates meetings, listening to them passionately 36 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

state the case for their potential pet projects, Crompton drew a connection to the ministerial systems used by the provincial and federal governments. “I was struck by the insight, experience and knowledge of the people putting their names up for council,” he says, pointing to Councillor Jen Ford, who was in contact with provincial ministers about childcare during the campaign, as one example. With the portfolios, Crompton hopes to “connect the dots” between various boards and committees, strengthen one-on-one relationships with provincial and federal counterparts, and provide a “champion” for

each distinct area of municipal interest. “The primary job of a councillor is to work with the rest of council to provide direction through resolutions and bylaws. That will not change,” Crompton says. “The portfolio role is additive. It is not something that is intended to silo that person’s efforts. It is intended to make them a greater resource to the rest of council and to the RMOW as a whole.” Pique caught up with all six municipal councillors as they settle into their elected roles to discuss their new portfolios, and how they plan to tackle them.


Feature STO R Y

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t was as if everyone in the room knew what the mayor was about to say before he said it. When Crompton announced in his inaugural address that Arthur De Jong would be assigned the Environment portfolio, a low chuckle rose up through the crowd—not one of derision, but agreement. With his decades of experience spearheading environmental initiatives for Whistler Blackcomb, De Jong was the obvious choice to head the file. Throughout the campaign, De Jong spoke of the “five Ws”—a catch-all phrase for Whistler’s environmental reality: water, weather, wildfire, wilderness and waste. He’ll need to keep a wary eye on all five if he wants to make progress on what he fondly refers to as “the red file.” “When we were at our (council) retreat (in November), staff presented a number of key indicators, and most reds showed up in my file, which was concerning,” De Jong says with a laugh, referring to the colour-coded circles the RMOW uses to track its progress on key initiatives. “But it certainly spoke to what we need to put more focus on.” Red indicators be damned, De Jong will not be deterred. “We’ve got to get action on the ground, and that’s the lesson to me, in that we want to get moving on a number of agenda items, and immediately,” De Jong says. “Being new, I get the reality check on the budgets … (but) let’s hope in a year’s time we can talk about a number of things that we’ve gotten done.” Whistler’s Community Energy and Climate Action Plan is solid, but it needs a champion—a designated climate-action coordinator position to really push the action items, De Jong says. (Editor’s Note: That was something former Coun. Sue Maxwell had pushed for during the previous term, critical of the RMOW for dragging its feet on certain environmental initiatives.) While money for the position will likely be included in the 2019 municipal budget, it will be challenging to make progress in the meantime, he adds. “That being said, I’d like to see a climate-action committee formed very quickly here, which would be community-inclusive,” De Jong says. “There is money in the municipal budget for a waste-reduction committee, and so my question to community environmental leaders like Claire (Ruddy, of AWARE) is can we integrate the two? “But nonetheless, we need to get wheels on both.” Looking at Whistler’s $1.4-million wildfire budget, De Jong sees it a respectable number in comparison to other communities—but weighted against the overall value of Whistler, the budget looks small. “From an economic perspective, we’re trying to protect over $16 billion worth of assets, so I really do feel that, in the future, we need to get more into that budget,” he says. “So again, at this point it’s more questions of how do we get more funding, how are we more efficient with the money that we do have, and how do we optimize the momentum that we have on the community side with respect to volunteering, and the work that Heather (Beresford, RMOW environmental stewardship manager) and Scott (Rogers, FireSmart coordinator) have done?” Once the waste-reduction committee is in place, De Jong says he’d like to get traction on reducing and banning specific plastics, as well as look at the composting habits of local businesses. “I hear there’s a lot of inefficiency with a number of

Arthur De Jong Environment

“We’ve got to get action on the ground, and that’s the lesson to me, in that we want to get moving on a number of agenda items, and immediately ... ” businesses with composting, so that’s a large input into the landfill … so how do we optimize the programs that are already in place, like composting?” he says. While there is a bevy of environmental groups working in Whistler (Get Bear Smart, AWARE, the Whistler Naturalists, the Coast to Cascades Grizzly Bear Initiative, to name a few), the groups are mostly weighted towards natural ecosystems, De Jong says. “That’s great, and let’s keep that going, and build on it, but when I look at that and when I look at energy

conservation and waste, other than AWARE, we just don’t have the collective focus that we have on natural ecosystems,” he says. “Clearly waste and energy conservation, greenhouse gases (GHG), need a much stronger and immediate focus here.” Looking at Whistler’s GHG emission levels, the proverbial elephant in the room is transportation— the resort relies on millions of people travelling here by airplane, who then drive or bus up the Sea to Sky Highway. While there’s not much to be done about that in the short term, there is room to challenge people to change their own behaviours locally in the meantime. “The lever that I’m trying to push is behavioural change in the community with the single-occupant driving, and I don’t have the answer to that,” De Jong says, adding that his own personal challenge for 2019 is to reduce his driving by 30 per cent. “It will be the question that I pose to these incoming committees: how do we drive deeper with our community on making a collective commitment to driving less, particularly as a single-occupant vehicle?” De Jong can be reached at 604-935-8225 or adejong@whistler.ca.

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 24, 2019 | 37


Feature ST ORY

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oun. Jen Ford was still on the campaign trail in early October when she received word from some local moms that their childcare provider would soon be closing on Mondays. And if some early-childhood educators weren’t hired, the program would have to be closed indefinitely. “That was like, ‘Oh no, this can’t happen.’ It felt like a crisis; ‘What are we going to do? Who are we going to talk to?’” Ford says. Fresh off of the Union of BC Municipalities Convention (UBCM) in Whistler a month earlier, Ford had a fresh line of contact with the provincial government. “I met with not only the minister for childcare but a lot of her staff (at UBCM), and so I had those connections that I was able to call and just say, ‘Hey, this is our current reality, what can we do?’” she says. “We were able to find a couple of people; My understanding is that they have kept that program open,

“I would love to see a really stable healthcare workforce (so) that people feel confident they can get a GP, they can find childcare for their family, (and) have mental-health services available ... “ and that some of the funding programs that that particular childcare centre wasn’t eligible for before, they now are. “But it’s a work in progress.” In her new role overseeing Whistler’s Social Services and Regional Cooperation portfolio, Ford will likely find herself fielding similar concerns and chasing the same ministers. “A lot of the research that I had done with childcare throughout the province, I had been really, really close to it both personally and professionally, so (the portfolio) felt like a natural fit on that,” she says. “(But) it’s quite a wide spectrum of social services.” While things like healthcare, and the challenges faced by industry professionals, don’t fall under the municipal mandate, it helps to have someone on the local level paying attention to what the issues are, Ford says. “It’s nice to have a close connection with how it’s

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Social Services and Regional Cooperation affecting our community, and being able to advocate in that respect,” she says. On her portfolio, Ford says she’s taking a “sponge”like approach. “I’m learning as much as I possibly can, (and) I’m meeting with everyone that I can, to understand the state of where we’re at right now, and looking for opportunities to not only hit the low-hanging fruit but make a plan for the next four years,” she says. “I would love to see a really stable healthcare workforce (so) that people feel confident they can get a GP, they can find childcare for their family, (and) have mental-health services available, because those are the issues that really hit people close to home.” But it’s also about learning where she can be most effective, Ford adds, “and not going after things that maybe are already being taken care of in a neighbouring

community, or learning from our neighbours to see what their best practices are and understanding how we can best advocate with the province.” With most social services in Whistler being outside of the municipal purview, the regional cooperation aspect of Ford’s portfolio seems a necessary add-on. Her experience sitting on the board of the SquamishLillooet Regional District, and more recently as a director at large with the Union of BC Municipalities, should serve her well in that regard. “It’s exciting,” she says. “It’s a great council. I’m really excited to be working with the six other members. I just feel really hopeful, and it’s a great environment right now.” Contact Ford at 604-935-8226 or jford@whistler.ca

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38 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


Feature STO R Y

Duane Jackson Housing B

eing assigned the Housing portfolio—the file overseeing one of the community’s most pressing issues—must come with a certain amount of pressure. Thankfully for Coun. Duane Jackson, assuming the file means he also inherits the work of the Mayor’s Task Force on Resident Housing (struck by then-Mayor Nancy Wilhelm-Morden in 2016 to address the crisis). Jackson says he spent the first few months just getting caught up on work already underway. “It takes a little bit of time, as you can imagine,” he says. “We’ve had one WHA (Whistler Housing Authority) meeting, so (I’m) getting up to speed on those current projects, which are great to see.” Currently underway on the WHA front are three builds: 1020 Legacy Way in Cheakamus Crossing (24 units, 53 beds) and 8350 Bear Paw Trail in Rainbow

(20 units, 39 beds) will be ready in summer 2019, while 1330 Cloudburst Dr. in Cheakamus (45 units, 103 beds) is expected to be open in 2020. In terms of the development of Cheakamus Crossing Phase 2, Jackson says council is reviewing plans, and the new iteration of the Whistler 2020 Development Corp. is set to meet shortly. At an open house in October, the RMOW revealed it was eyeing at least 550 units for Cheakamus Phase 2, with a move-in date as early as spring 2021. Former WDC president Eric Martin has offered to come back in an interim role, Jackson says, while the rest of the board is currently made up of Jackson, Neil Chrystal, Marla Zucht, Nancy Wilhelm-Morden and Crompton. “In the meantime, while we’ve been getting up to speed on council, RMOW staff have been working with Matthew

Carter, the project manager that was working with the advisory group, to advance all of the necessary analysis of Parcel A (in Cheakamus) from an environmental and geotechnical and forestry road (standpoint). “So we’re doing all the due diligence to make sure we’re in a position to consider a project and what that project may be.” Jackson says the public will likely hear more at a council meeting in the coming weeks, once the board has its first meeting and confirms its next steps. Also waiting in the wings are the controversial employee housing proposals from private developers, which have drawn the ire of neighbours in three out of the five proposed builds. Jackson says he expects staff to bring another report to council in the next month. During the campaign, Jackson discussed the housing issue from an aerial, big-picture perspective; if you alleviate pressure in one area, it will logically free things up elsewhere, he believes. Getting moving on Cheakamus Phase 2 would go a long way to greasing the wheels of the housing continuum, Jackson reasons. “If you’re thinking about things moving around, the WHA has a long ownership waitlist, and the WDC is going to be looking at opportunities to maybe advance some of those plans to deliver a range of housing types sooner than was previously anticipated,” he says. “If that’s a possibility, then inevitably that might create vacancies elsewhere in the community, but you’ve got to take the time to build it.” A new 200-bed staff building, courtesy of Vail Resorts, will also help in that regard, though no formal rezoning application has been dropped off at municipal hall to date. Unlike its predecessor, the new WDC is tasked with looking at the potential of all legacy lands in Whistler— an exciting prospect for those planning Whistler’s housing future. “I think once we get past our immediate goal of making sure that we’re able to progress something this year, or advance something this year, then we start looking at the medium-term opportunities,” Jackson says. “And then beyond that you see the potential for the strategic planning to look at the longer-term opportunities, and that’s something I think we can spend more time at. We just can’t do it all at once.” You can reach Jackson at 604-935-8228 or djackson@whistler.ca.

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Feature STO R Y While she hasn’t fielded too many meetings from local artists since assuming the portfolio, she’s got a good sense of the challenges they face. “Money is always a challenge. Space is a challenge for artists that have media that takes up space— sculptors, potters, even painters need a certain amount of space and light,” she says, noting that getting publicity, or being able to showcase their work can also be a challenge. “They need a venue, and actually, Arts Whistler has done a really great job with the Maury Young Arts Centre showcasing different artists.” The RMOW will look to revive its Public Art Committee as a way of further engaging artists, Jewett says. “We’ll certainly be talking about more pieces of art out in the community, and seeing who those artists will

Cathy Jewett

Arts, Natural History, Traditions and Heritage

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oun. Cathy Jewett was a fresh-faced 19-year-old spending her first Christmas in Whistler when she ended up having dinner seated next to local legend Myrtle Philip, one of Whistler’s original pioneers. She couldn’t have asked for a better firsthand history lesson. “I asked her to tell me what it was like coming up to Whistler … I think her horse’s name was Prince, and it was a long haul up the trail from Squamish, because of course there was no roads, no railroad—nothing, “ Jewett recalls. “So a boat to Newport or Squamish, and then a packhorse from there, so it was pretty amazing to have had that opportunity to have sat next to her and had a meal with her.” Stories like those—and the people who tell them—are at the heart of Jewett’s new portfolio: the wide-reaching Arts, Natural History, Traditions and Heritage file.

In approaching the file, Jewett says she turned to Whistler’s Official Community Plan. “I’ve looked at the three key components of that and thought, for me to feel like I am moving this along and doing what I hope to do, which is very communitybased, generally speaking, (I need to) look at the three main topics and the vision, which are community, environment and tourism,” she says. “With the community, (it’s about) ‘enriching community life,’ to use some words from the (Whistler) 2020 vision. So how can we, with arts, culture and heritage, enrich life for the people that live here?” Through her decades of volunteer experience, Jewett has often found herself working directly with the arts community, whether at the Audain Art Museum or through her work as chair of the Parent Advisory Committee.

“With the community, (it’s about) ‘enriching community life,’ to use some words from the (Whistler) 2020 vision. So how can we, with arts culture and heritage, enrich life for the people that live here?” be I think will be very interesting,” she says. In terms of heritage and natural history, Jewett’s file will encompass two big projects in the coming years: landing geopark status in Whistler (see related story on page 15) and finding the Whistler Museum a new home. The museum board has previously eyed Lot 21, a plot of land in Florence Petersen Park next to the Whistler Public Library, for the museum’s new home. “We haven’t got anything concrete, but we’re working together to find a solution for their location,” Jewett says. “The old part of Whistler is really in me, and I hope that we can get the museum a home and start letting people know what those stories are.” You can reach Jewett at 604-935-8227 or cjewett@whistler.ca.

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Feature ST ORY

W

hen he was first elected in 2011, Coun. John Grills was part of a council tasked with revitalizing Whistler’s economy. The results of that effort—record visitation and the virtual elimination of shoulder seasons—have been well documented. “I think our timing was really good … We got blessed with some good weather conditions, and the key people knocked on our door—Ironman and Michael Audain— and a number of things like that really changed the atmosphere in the community,” Grills says. “I think when the community saw that council working and rolling up their sleeves, working with the staff, and getting things done … there was confidence back in the community.” The third-term councillor is now tasked with keeping the momentum going through the Tourism Economy portfolio. To do so, he’ll rely on existing relationships such as the Economic Partnership Initiative and partnerships like those with Tourism Whistler. “Tourism Whistler has always adjusted when there’s been changes to our visitation numbers, and when they see changes in certain international markets, they try and figure out why, and if it looks like it’s not a good investment going down the road, they put their money somewhere else. We’re seeing that today, and we’ve seen that for decades,” Grills says. “And I think that’s always been recognized as a really key tool that Whistler has compared to other resorts like ourselves.”

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John Grills Tourism Economy

While some bemoan the busier state of Whistler these days, Grills, a former restaurant owner, wants to see current business levels maintained. “My background is as an entrepreneur. I know what it’s like to have large disruptions to your business twice a year in spring and fall, and it’s havoc, it’s expensive,” Grills says, noting that with all the discussion around affordability, employers being able to provide a regular paycheque to their workers is a positive. “I think that’s something that our businesses deliver now, because we’ve got quite a steady volume through the year. Certainly, there’s still fluctuations, but the short seasons are a lot shorter than they used to be. “I think we just maintain it at this level and then work from there. I don’t like really going backwards on stuff.” While anecdotally, there have been rumblings of an

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expected economic downturn for months, Grills says he isn’t worried yet. “I think we’ve got a good base here. I think we’ll have to do some adjustments to some of our marketing and some of our pricing, possibly, to make sure that we stay at this level, but the most important thing is that we sit down on a regular basis and monitor it,” he says. “The goal always for any councillor or mayor is that you want to leave the community in a better place than when you start. I’ve been able to do that for two terms. I certainly would like to do that for the third term. “If there are some bumps along the way, we’ll just do whatever we can to minimize them, and react to them.” Grills can be reached at 604-935-8230 or jgrills@whistler.ca.

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Feature STO R Y

“These things, I think some people in the community want a public execution. I just want a public accounting of how it all goes.”

Ralph Forsyth Finance and Audit

C

oun. Ralph Forsyth is taking a sensible view of his own Finance and Audit portfolio. “For me, the approach is always to find value for the taxpayer in everything that we do,” he says. “I suppose the biggest thing is the financing of it—how are we financing these projects, and is now the right time?” In short, Forsyth wants to see transparency on municipal project finances, such as the $6-million Gateway Loop project (the finances of which are expected to be detailed at an upcoming council meeting). “These things, I think some people in the community want a public execution. I just want a public accounting of how it all goes,” he says. “The staff work hard and I think they do a good job, I just want to have an understanding of how these things happen.” When it was first announced, Forsyth’s portfolio

was dubbed Infrastructure and Community Investment before being renamed to Audit and Finance. Aside from some potential maintenance for the nearly25-year-old Meadow Park Sports Centre, Forsyth says his approach to the municipal books will be one of frugality. “There’s nothing big that I want to see built, that’s for sure,” he says, noting that the municipality must also be aware of when the best time to invest is. “I remember years ago we were going to do a renovation of city hall, and people went crazy because it was going to cost like $2 million or something like that. Well, guess what? If we tried to do a renovation of municipal hall now, it would be $20 million,” he says. (Editor’s Note: Back in 2007, the RMOW proposed a budget of $5.7 million for the renovation of municipal hall. Eight months later, that projected costs had ballooned to nearly $16 million.)

“So I want to make sure that if we’re going to do things that we’re going to stick to our guns and do them, so that we’re not stuck having to pay a lot later. But there’s no shiny new stuff that I want to see.” That being said, the 2019 budget—which Whistlerites will get to see in draft form for the first time at an open house in February—will no doubt include some bigticket infrastructure items. On Jan. 7, the RMOW issued a Request for Proposals for water main replacement in White Gold (similar to a multi-million dollar project completed in Alpine in 2017). Other infrastructure projects planned for 2019 include a significant rebuild of the Spruce Grove Sewer lift station; major relining of the trunk sewer between Alta Lake Road and Function Junction; the Meadow Park cardio room expansion, and; three new washroom buildings in Whistler Village In 2018, property taxes went up 2.25 per cent, solid waste user fees went up 4.5-per-cent and sewer parcel taxes 1.1-per-cent, while there was no increase to water rates. Any proposed tax changes for 2019 will be revealed at the February budget open house. You can reach Forsyth at 604-935-8229 or rforsyth@whistler.ca. n

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44 Travel

AND

Adventure

V

A tale of two seaside cities Part 1:

alparaiso’s hills are alive with the sight of art. When you wander the steep streets of Valparaiso, Chile you might wonder if you have stepped inside a Dr. Seuss-ian landscape. The gritty port city is a series of cerros, or hills, that required architectural creativity to trounce topography. It is a curious concoction of brightly coloured, centuries’-old mansions tilting against dilapidated colonial-era apartment buildings; crooked stairways leading up to a saturatedblue sky; and creaky funicular lifts, which the World Monument Fund declared an endangered historical treasure. The twisty promenades provide panoramic views over a glittering sea, hence Valparaiso’s moniker, the Jewel of the Pacific. Valpo, as it’s affectionately called by locals, is also known as the South American capital of street art; graffiti artists and muralists come from around the world to leave their marks on walls here, making for a unique and vibrant art walk.

Valpo

story and photos By Virginia Aulin

44 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


Travel & A D V E N T U R E EST.2006 My husband and I decide to start at the hill-top house of Nobel-Prize winning poet, political activist and diplomat Pablo Neruda. We are fit, so we felt we could handle the 2.5-kilometre hike uphill from the port. But we take a taxi because we aren’t sure how to get there even after consulting a map, and we aren’t sure which funiculars are operational should we need a lift. Valpo once had 30 ascensores, constructed more than 100 years ago. Today only a handful work. As soon as we arrive at La Sebastiana (named for its original owner, whom Neruda dubbed a poet in wood) on Cerro Bellavista, we know it will live up to the hype. The narrow, multi-storied home echoes the city’s eccentricities. Best of all, unlike the historic houses of many writers—where you can only peer at old typewriters from the doorway or, worse, through smudged windows—you can roam freely here. An excellent audio guide provides colourful commentary on the quirky objects that fill each of the house’s five floors: vividly coloured glass, nautical knickknacks, antique maps, a stuffed flamingo in a globe hanging from the ceiling. One floor hosts a bar with vibrant pink walls and a bathroom that only the brave used, since a lattice door provided little privacy. Apparently, Neruda only drank wine and whisky but had cocktails on offer to liven up his frequent fetes. He always spent New Year’s Eve here to watch the fireworks over the harbour. There is an antique Parisian carousel horse in the round living room along with a round fireplace that Neruda designed, and an old leather chair he called “the cloud” because it offered him a good view of the tilting streets to the sea. On the top floor, Neruda’s study is filled with books, his old desk and even some of his green pens (he wrote in green because it is the colour of hope). The amazing 180-degree view should have been distracting. But given his prolificacy, it was clearly an inspiration instead. Most touching, for me, is the bedroom. In the closet, there are pairs of his wife’s shoes and an elegant long white coat. Her brush and powders still sit on the dressing table. Matilde was Neruda’s third wife—and the love of his life. She never returned to the house after

he died. Instead, she lived out her days at their house in Santiago, which Neruda named La Chascona, Chilean slang for untamed hair, after Matilde’s red locks. It’s reminiscent of how he described Valparaiso: “…how absurd you are. You haven’t combed your hair, you’ve never had time to get dressed, life has always surprised you.” Ready for such surprises, we leave the house to meander circuitous streets lined with rainbow-painted houses, flowering bushes flopping over fences and laundry flapping frantically on balcony clothes lines. Some streets feel lonely, though we are accompanied by friendly stray dogs and countless cats arrogantly whisking their tails against our legs as they slink by. On other streets, artists lean against overlooks, trying to capture the view on their sketchpads. It is impossible to go straight down. We turn a corner to find galleries featuring hip and provocative art (I buy an intriguing piece and talk to the artist on the phone to barter the price; later ,she emails me a long explanation of her inspiration), shops selling local fashions and courtyard cafés. We stop at one for succulent seafood. Best yet, it is a visual feast—the most spectacular street art I have ever seen. From vandalistic tags to fantastical scenes that have been created by collaborating artists. From tiny intricate paintings to three-storey-high murals in every hue of the Crayola 64 pack. It all started as a form of protest during the Pinochet dictatorship. Now, the local government promotes street art culture, and many businesses hire artists to paint their storefronts. Pay in Bellavista isn’t high since it’s such sought after space, but it’s an honour to display here. It is glorious, but gritty. Perhaps that’s why visual and literary artists have long loved living here. As for us, we adjourn to the “garden city” of Vina del Mar—a short bus ride away—for the evening. We are there to stroll glamourous boulevards lined with pretty palaces and walk the posh promenade. But that’s next week’s story. (By the way, if you didn’t know that Seuss was also a painter, check out his piece Cat Detective in the wrong part of town: drseussart.com/secretandarchive/catdetective-in-the-wrong-part-of-town.) n

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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 24, 2019 | 45


TH E SC O R E

46 Sports

TAKING FLIGHT Darcy Sharpe has a pair of upcoming high-level competitions.

PHOTO BY PHIL ELLSWORTH/ESPN IMAGES

Sharpe eager for World Champs WHISTLER-BASED SNOWBOARDER READY FOR COMPETITION IN ‘MELLOW’ SEASON Dan Falloon

sports@piquenewsmagazine.com

I

t’s been a “mellow” season for Whistler snowboarder Darcy Sharpe, but that’s been all right by him. Though the light schedule has given him the opportunity for his own riding, Sharpe is eager to get back into competitive action after forgoing the FIS World Cup schedule. The lone event for him so far this season was the Dew Tour in Colorado, where Sharpe took a sixth-place finish in slopestyle. He’s set to suit up at this week’s X Games, also in Colorado, before popping over to Park City, Utah, for FIS Snowboard World Championships after being named to Canada’s contingent last week. “It’s the only World Cup I feel like we sought after,” he said. “It’s probably the only high-level World Cup in snowboarding this year. It feels like a privilege and it’s exciting because of the way it showcases snowboarding to the everyday folks.” The 22-year-old, who was second in big air and fourth in slopestyle at the 2015 World Championships at Kreischberg, Austria, said he doesn’t take much from that experience heading into his second spin at the event. “A few years ago, it was a bit of a different scenario. The last time we

were in World Champs was during X Games, so we were missing a few hotshots on the scene,” he explained. “I really appreciated getting a podium at World Championships—I think it’s really cool— but it wasn’t really totally earned, per se, in the sense that not all of the top guys were there. “It’s a long time ago to take confidence from that, but I know that there was room for improvement and trying to just carry on the good vibes.” With a strong international lineup set to descend on Utah, Sharpe hopes to truly prove himself among the world’s best. “I’m excited to have (a World Championships) where there’s more of the heavy hitters and to have a good contest on our hands,” he said. When he returns from Utah, Sharpe will team with former teammate Charles Reid to film in the backcountry after primarily riding in resorts and parks this season. The duo will be filming in Whistler and possibly the Interior, but other than that, their attitude is to chase the snow, wherever that may be. “We’re going to try to make a short film that shows the transition, the difference and the desire to film in the backcountry from contest riding,” he said. “It’s something that we all want to do and only a few of us get the privilege to find crews and opportunities to get out into

46 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

the backcountry. “It also gives me lots of inspiration to do well in the few contests I have to make the most of it so I can have even more free time to go do that.” After narrowly missing the cut in a tight competition to go to the 2018 Winter Olympic Games in South Korea, Sharpe said it’s too early for him to focus on the next Games in Beijing in 2022 in particular. Instead, he’s going to continue to be the best snowboarder he can be and let whatever falls into place from there happen. Sharpe added that the message he takes from the 2018 Games comes not from his slim miss, but from his older sister Cassie’s triumph in the halfpipe ski event. “More so, my sister making it happen at the age she was, and then getting gold (is a driving factor),” he said. “People didn’t think that she would get to achieve that level, so I definitely

T HI S SEC T I O N

By

know it’s possible. My thanks goes to her for providing the inspiration to know it’s possible.” In more sombre news, Canada’s snowboarding team was rocked late last week with the revelation that Olympic silver medallist and five-time X Games champion Max Parrot had been diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma, a rare cancer with about 900 cases in Canada nationally, in December. Sharpe said he reached out to Parrot right away by text. “It’s really awful news,” Sharpe said. “It seems to be something that is curable, so we’re all very thankful to hear that. It’s definitely shocking and puts life into perspective. You can’t take it for granted. “He’s a fighter, so we all know that he’ll come out of it strong, but it’s definitely terrible news.” Sharpe added that he has seen the snowboarding community rally with support for Parrot. n

47 BIG WIN Natalie Corless takes youth ‘A’ singles victory 48 CENTURY CLUB Fairmont Chateau pros crack top 100 list 49 N ICK OF TIME Katrusiak opens season with ski-cross wins 50 NEW BEST Whistler moguls skier Sofiane Gagnon eighth in N.Y.


Sports T H E S C O R E Corless captures win YOUTH ‘A’ LUGER TOPS LARGE FIELD AT ST. MORITZ By

Dan Falloon

Nominating is easy

W

histler’s Natalie Corless had no issues with a bigger stage in Switzerland. The up-and-coming luger came up big, earning her first career win in FIL Junior World Cup action at St. Moritz, Switzerland on Jan. 17. The 15-year-old bested a field of nearly 40 sleds to secure the youth ‘A’ singles victory and second podium finish of the season. Corless had the lead after the first run and followed it up with the second-best second run en route to edging runner-up Yulianna Tunytska of Ukraine by 0.141 seconds and Elizaveta Yurchenko of Russia by 0.339 seconds. The only other Canadian in the race, Ava Luscombe, placed seventh. “It was definitely exciting,” she said from Switzerland on Jan. 19. “There were a lot more people here in this race. I went in the first run and stayed on top as people went down. It was pretty surprising.” Corless explained she was glad to be in the lead at the midpoint, but it also put her in the position of having something to lose. “I was excited, but at the same time, it adds a little bit of extra pressure. You’re on the top and want to have another good run like you did the first time,” she said. Corless harnessed her speed well, and was the only slider in the competition to hit a top speed of over 121 kilometres per hour in both runs. She likened her approach in some ways to how she slides at her home track here in Whistler. “There are a lot of different technical pieces the way the corners are, but it’s another pretty quick track, so that part is pretty similar,” she said. “We had to be a lot more flexible because the track here is meant for bobsleigh. We had to be ready for lots of schedule changes. The weather wasn’t always great; it got pretty cold. “If it gets really cold, the ice can get really hard, so you can have less grip on your sled.” Sliding with Caitlin Nash, Corless also won three youth ‘A’ doubles races in Park City, Utah, and Calgary in December. However, the fields were smaller, especially among European racers, so Corless was eager to gauge herself against that contingent on its home turf. “You want to see the times of the other athletes and see how you compare. On race day, you get to see it all come together and see where you really fit in,” she said. Next up for Corless will be Junior

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SWISS MISS Natalie Corless celebrates her youth ‘A’ World Cup gold medal won in St. Moritz on Jan. 17. PHOTO SUBMITTED

World Championships at Igls, Austria before heading to Winterberg, Germany for another race and Königssee for a training week. She’ll be hoping to podium again at the next World Cup race, but thrown in against older athletes at World Champs, will be looking to make some noise as a force to be reckoned with in coming years. In youth ‘A’ men’s singles action on Jan. 18, Colton Clarke and Devin Wardrope were the top Canadians in 12th and 13th, respectively. Whistler’s Garrett Reid was 18th and Thomas Fassnridge took 19th. Latvia’s Gints Berzins got past Russia’s Pavel Repilov and Slovakia’s Marian Skupek for the win. In the youth ‘A’ doubles event on Jan. 17, Wardrope and Fassnridge put up an eighth-place finish. Russian sleds took the top two spots, with Mikhail Karnaukhov and Iurii Chirva earning the win over Viacheslav Popov and Anton Osipenko and Germany’s Moritz Jaeger and Valentin Steudte. At the junior level, Canadians Makena Hodgson and Sam Judson were ninth and 13th, respectively, in the women’s race. Italy’s Verena Hofer took the win and shared the podium with runnerup Elina Vitola of Latvia and Anna Berreiter of Germany. No Canadian men participated in the junior race, which was won by Germany’s David Noesller over countryman Moritz Bollman and Italy’s Lukas Gufler. Canada finished in the middle of the road in the team event, with Hodgson, Clarke and the Wardrope-Fassnridge sled placing seventh of 12 entries. Germany bested Latvia and Italy for the crown. Full results are available online at www.fil-luge.org. n

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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 24, 2019 | 47


Sports T HE SCORE Fairmont Chateau Whistler golf pros crack top 100 O’ROURKE, ROURKE COMMITTED TO ONGOING GROWTH By

Dan Falloon

T

wo Fairmont Chateau Whistler Golf Club pros wrapped a banner 2018 season with accolades from the Professional Golf Association of British Columbia. Head professional and golf operations manager Padraic O’Rourke and assistant golf professional Jordan Rourke both cracked the list released by the organization on Jan. 8. The rundown is determined by the group’s Professional Development Program’s Order of Merit, which is “designed to recognize PGA of BC members who make outstanding contributions to the Association, their communities, the province’s golf industry and, mostly importantly, themselves,” according to a release.

Activities ranging from playing in competitions and continuing one’s education to participating in the PGA of BC annual buying show and volunteering help participants earn points. Over 400 pros earned points in 2018 and with nearly 700 registered professionals in the province, they’re not easy to earn. Rourke said it was an achievement just to crack the upper echelon. “It’s always a yearly goal for me personally to crack the top 100 because it’s an accomplishment and it shows that you are involved with the association throughout the year, looking to grow professionally and to network,” he said. Added O’Rourke: “It looks good on resumes. It’s good for your club members if your golf professionals are involved in education and events in order to crack in there and get enough points.”

PRO LEVEL Jordan Rourke and Padraic O’Rourke made the Professional Golf Association of British Columbia’s top 100 golf pros earlier this month. PHOTO SUBMITTED

Professionals from Nicklaus North Golf Course, Whistler Golf Club and Big Sky Golf Club also earned points, and O’Rourke said Whistler is spoiled to have a plethora of talent in the resort. “There are very good professionals at all the golf clubs here in Whistler. I don’t know, honestly, if it gives us a one-up, to be straight,” O’Rourke said. “It probably gives us a little bit of boasting on the first tee in April when we tee it up.” While Rourke wasn’t overly satisfied with his competitive season in 2018, he was pleased with what he and O’Rourke accomplished at their home club. “We grew the membership. Overall, it was a good season. Obviously, we had a lot of members as well as transient guests

that came through,” he said. “Being a golf professional is not just golfing and teaching, it’s managing and running the business. Overall, it was a successful year financially and for me personally, I think I developed more as a golf professional.” Both also placed an emphasis on continuing to learn more about the game and how to play as, like with most things these days, it is constantly changing with updates and developments. “It’s evolving every year with technology, so whether it’s education seminars or learning about the new teaching radars (for swings),” Rourke said. “New equipment comes out every year and it’s changing all the time, so it’s just staying current.” n

NOTICE The REAL ESTATE ASSOCIATION OF WHISTLER wishes to announce that applications are available now for the 2019 COMMUNITY GRANT PROGRAM

2019 COMMUNITY ENRICHMENT PROGRAM The Resort Municipality of Whistler will be accepting Community Enrichment Program (CEP) applications from community groups looking for financial assistance for 2019. The application period runs from Friday, January 25 until Friday February 15, 2019. The CEP provides funding to not-for-profit organizations or societies based within Whistler that are considered by Council to be contributing to the general interest and advantage of the municipality. The categories include ‘Environment’, ‘Community and Social Sevices’, ‘Recreation and Sport’ and ‘Arts and Culture’. Each interested community group will be required to complete a Grant Application Form and present to Council at a Committee of the Whole Meeting on March 12, 2019. All approved funding will be issued no later than April 30, 2019. Grant Application Forms will be available at www.whistler.ca/cep or at the reception desk of the Whistler Municipal Hall, 4325 Blackcomb Way, Whistler, B.C., Monday to Friday, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., excluding holidays.

Grants will be distributed mainly to registered charities and/or nonprofit organizations located in Whistler and Pemberton.

Please submit applications to:

REAW is encouraging those hoping to make lasting legacies in areas such as sports, outdoors, education, the arts to apply. Grant applications and more information are available upon request at info@whistlerlistings.com.

Deadline for submission is May 1, 2019.

ATTN: Lucy Wyn- Griffiths Legislative Services Department Resort Municipality of Whistler 4325 Blackcomb Way Whistler, BC V8E 0X5 Phone: 604-935-8117 Fax: 604-935-8109 Email: corporate@whistler.ca

Completed applications must be received by 4 p.m., February 15, 2019. No late applications will be accepted. Community organizations wanting to learn more about the CEP application and granting process are invited to contact the Legislative Services Department.

REAL ESTATE ASSOCIATION OF

WHISTLER

whistlerlistings.com

48 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

Resort Municipality of Whistler whistler.ca


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HEAD START Whistler’s Nick Katrusiak preps for a heat during Western Canadian Ski

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Cross Series action in Edmonton earlier this month.

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Katrusiak takes pair of wins in Alberta YOUNG SKI-CROSS RACER STRONG IN NEW AGE DIVISION By

W

Dan Falloon

histler ski-cross racer Nick Katrusiak made a quick splash in a new age category in the Western Canadian Ski Cross Series at Edmonton’s Sunridge Ski Area earlier this month. The Grade 9 student won back-to-back U16 races in his first-ever competition in the group. At a contest where he was unfamiliar with much of his competition, Katrusiak explained that he entered with minimal expectations and took “a little bit” of confidence with each passing heat he successfully completed. Once he made it to finals, Katrusiak had some jitters, but also put his situation into perspective. “I was feeling nervous, but I only had to pass one of the guys to make it onto the podium,” he said. “(To win) definitely gives me a lot of confidence.” On the second day, Katrusiak opted to repeat the no-holds-barred approach he took to Day 1. “(Going in), I figured I’d go all out and see how I do,” he said. “On the second day, I just thought I’d do the same thing. Even if I don’t do as well, I still have a medal.” Though it was short, Katrusiak enjoyed the course located on the banks of the North Saskatchewan River. He felt that the quick run may have given him an advantage over his competition, as he tends to excel in sprints as opposed to battles requiring more endurance. “(The course) wasn’t too exciting,

but it was good for the space they had,” he said. Katrusiak acknowledged that the quality of competition was diminished by the fact that Alberta’s top racers were at Canada Winter Games qualifiers instead of at Sunridge, but was still pumped to be atop the podium twice. There was additional excitement at the Jan. 12 races as a FIS-level competition was slated alongside the Western Canadian series and Katrusiak got to see some bigger, more experienced athletes in action. It also created a little more of an intimidating environment, he explained, as the older athletes brought tuning equipment to the hill. When they had cleared out in advance of the second day of racing, the atmosphere returned to being the more familiar, low-key vibe. Two of Katrusiak’s older teammates, Jack MacDonald and Jack Morrow, were shut out in U18 action on Jan. 12, though they had a better day on Jan. 13 as MacDonald took silver and Morrow bronze after the FIS-level racers had left. MacDonald’s younger brother Cameron also competed at the event. Two more Western Canadian Series races are on tap later this season, first in Fernie and then at Big White. Though he’s too young to compete, Katrusiak is also considering an opportunity to forerun at the National Ski Cross Championships at Banff’s Sunshine Village in April. As more of a grassroots offshoot of the Whistler Mountain Ski Club, the athletes complete regular Alpine race training but compete primarily, if not exclusively, in ski cross. n

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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 24, 2019 | 49


Sports T HE SCORE Gagnon takes career-best eighth SPORTS BRIEFS: PEIFFER THIRD IN FWT DEBUT; THOMPSON HITS PODIUM IN SWEDEN By

Dan Falloon

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histler moguls skier Sofiane Gagnon hit the top 10 for the first time ever in her young FIS World Cup career on Jan. 18. The 19-year-old took an eighth-place finish in Lake Placid, N.Y. with a score of 70.07. Australian Jakara Anthony (78.76) earned the victory ahead of France’s Perrine Laffont (74.94) and American Tess Johnson (72.22). Gagnon was one spot back of being top Canadian, which Chloe Dufour-Lapointe took with a seventh-place finish. Freestyle Whistler alumnus Maia Schwinghammer made the finals but did not complete her first attempt and finished 16th after qualifying in sixth, while Justine DufourLapointe took 19th. On the men’s side, it was the end of an era in moguls as Canadian Mikaël Kingsbury failed to podium for the first time in more than two years when he took a sixth-place finish at Lake Placid on Jan. 13, 2017. This time, Kingsbury took fifth with a

72.93 score while France’s Benjamin Cavet was victorious with an 84.83. Sweden’s Walter Wallberg (81.47) and Australia’s Matt Graham (80.94) hit the podium as well. Philippe Marquis also hit the top 10, placing eighth, while Pemberton’s Brenden Kelly was 22nd. Former Whistlerite Daichi Hara, representing Japan, took 11th.

PEIFFER HITS PODIUM IN FWT DEBUT

Whistler Freeride Club alumnus Tom Peiffer made an impression in his first-ever Freeride World Tour ski competition at Hakuba, Japan on Jan. 19. Peiffer scored 79.67 to land in third place in his debut, only behind winner Markus Eder of Italy (86.67) and runnerup Tanner Hall of the U.S. (81.00). Whistler’s Kye Petersen, competing as a wildcard entry, took 12th while Peiffer’s twin brother Liam was 14th.

SMART MEDALS AT WATERVILLE NORAM

Whistler slopestyler Luke Smart earned a podium appearance in North American   17. Cup action in New Hampshire on Jan.    

On a trip with Freestyle Whistler’s A Team, Smart finished third behind only Americans Deven Fagan and Tim Ryan. Other locals in action were: Chase Ujejski (16th); Kai Smart (25th); Anders Ujejski (31st); and Nick Suchy (39th). The next day, with more challenging weather, Chase Ujejski led the team with a fifth-place finish, followed by Suchy in 15th, Anders Ujejski in 17th, Luke Smart in 18th and Kai Smart in 37th. Former club member Skye Clarke excelled on the women’s side, taking seventh on Day 1 before winning the event on Day 2. Meanwhile, Freestyle Whistler alumni and current BC Team members excelled in Canada Cup moguls competition at Val St-Come, Que. In single moguls women’s action on Jan. 19, Maya Mikkelsen took second, while Jessica Linton and Cassidy Butterworth were fourth and sixth, respectively. As for the men, Sam Cordell led the local contingent in fourth while Josh Maga was 28th and Jackson Parsons took 40th. In dual moguls, Mikkelsen again took second while Linton popped onto the      

podium in third. Cordell, meanwhile, also took second for the men.

SEVEN WMSC ATHLETES QUALIFY FOR CANADA WINTER GAMES

A full half of the British Columbia alpine contingent for February’s Canada Winter Games will hail from the Whistler Mountain Ski Club (WMSC). Sara Stiel, Fiona McInnes and Jaden Dawson cracked the girls’ team while Chase Burns, David Wood, Matthias Shorter and Adam Usher were named to the boys’ team. As well, WMSC’s Drew Hetherington will coach alongside Fernie’s Montana Molyneux. The athletes were named to the team on the heels of excellent results at the U16 Teck Open at Sun Peaks from Jan. 10 to 13. Burns had a win in the Jan. 13 slalom after taking second in the Jan. 12 slalom while Wood earned second on Jan. 13. Shorter, meanwhile, was third in the Jan. 11 giant slalom and Usher took a best result of fourth in the Jan. 10 giant slalom. As for the women, Stiel had two podiums, finishing second in the Jan. 10

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• Be a Whistler Nordics Ski Club member • Have a valid trail pass • Wear a HEAD LAMP NEW THIS YEAR: Free Child Minding and Dinner donated by L’ecole La Passerelle for Whistler Nordics Youth Members while parents participate

Visit the club’s website for more details at whistlernordics.com 50 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


Sports T H E S C O R E giant slalom and third in the Jan. 12 slalom, while McInnes earned a secondplace finish in the Jan. 11 giant slalom. Dawson boasted back-to-back fourth-place finishes as her best, finishing just off the podium in both the Jan. 11 giant slalom and Jan. 12 slalom. Other local racers excelling at the festival included: John Nicolls (second in the Jan. 10 men’s giant slalom); Emeline Bennett (ninth in the Jan. 10 women’s giant slalom, seventh in the Jan. 11 giant slalom and ninth in the Jan. 13 slalom); Graham Seltzer (sixth in the Jan. 10 giant slalom and ninth in the Jan. 11 giant slalom); Sam Fuller (seventh in the Jan. 10 giant slalom and sixth in the Jan. 11 giant slalom); Hayden Harley (10th in the Jan. 10 giant slalom); Meagan Doiron (10th in the Jan. 12 slalom); and Duncan Ross (fifth in the Jan. 13 slalom). Meanwhile, local athletes also dominated at home in Teck U14 Coast Zone action on Jan. 12 and 13. Jack Thomas, Milan Novak and Alec Waldrum swept the men’s giant slalom podium on Jan. 12, while Evan Dennison (seventh), Keiran McRae (eighth) and Andrew Forsgren (10th) also hit the top 10. In the women’s event, Sarah-Elizabeth Whelan hit the podium in second while Alexa Brownlie, Jacqueline Smith, Viveka Deck Stang and Vanessa Young were lined up fourth through seventh in order. Sophia Cross, meanwhile, placed ninth. WMSC members took first and third in both slalom races the next day. In the ladies’ event, Erin Husken and Smith took gold and bronze, respectively, while Isabelle Bexton, Tatum Nash, Whelan and Deck Stang were five through eight, in order. As for the men, Felix Shorter topped the field while Thomas was third. Waldrum (fourth), Forrest Savoy (sixth) and Jasper Shea (10th) ended up in the top 10.

THOMPSON HITS PODIUM IN SWEDEN

Marielle Thompson continued her comeback season with another podium appearance in Idre Fjall, Sweden on Jan. 19. The 26-year-old ski-cross racer took a second-place result to Germany’s Heidi Zacher while edging Switzerland’s Fanny Smith in a photo finish. The day ended up being a long one, as strong winds postponed women’s qualifiers to race day, though the weather at that time was only marginally more cooperative. “The conditions were pretty challenging with a lot of wind and aggressive, slow snow, so we had to make some adjustments,” said Thompson. “But I skied really well in every heat and managed to be patient in the final where I was fourth going into the final straightaway.” Fellow Canadians Brittany Phelan and Kelsey Serwa battled it out in the small final, placing fifth and seventh, respectively. Meanwhile, India Sherret, Abby McEwen

and Thompson’s fellow Whistler Mountain Ski Club alumnus Mikayla Martin took 11th, 13th and 20th, in order. On the men’s side, Chris Del Bosco was the highest finisher in 20th, while Brady Leman and Kevin Drury ended up in 22nd and 28th, in order. The podium consisted of winner Alex Fiva of Switzerland ahead of France’s Bastien Midol in second and Austria’s Daniel Traxler in third. Thompson again made the big final on Jan. 20, but went home without a medal after a fourth-place finish. It was a strong day for Canada in general, though, as Phelan and Serwa finished second and third, respectively, behind only winner Fanny Smith of Switzerland. Their teammates each rose a spot from the previous day, as Sherret took 10th, McEwen 12th and Martin 19th. Thompson has made the big final in all five of her events this season and holds a narrow lead in the chase for her fourth FIS Crystal Globe. In the men’s event, Drury was the top Canadian in 16th, while Del Bosco was 20th for a second consecutive day. Leman also snuck into the top 30 in 29th. France’s Jean Frederic Chapuis earned the win over Traxler and Switzerland’s Romain Detraz.

GRENIER TAKES CAREER-BEST FOURTH

Canadian alpine racer Valerie Grenier was 0.3 seconds off of her first-ever Audi FIS World Cup podium in the super-G event at Cortina d’Ampezzo, Italy on Jan. 20. Still, the 22-year-old can celebrate a career-best fourth-place result as she finished behind only winner Mikaela Shiffrin of the United States, runner-up Tina Weirather of Liechtenstein and thirdplace finisher Tamara Tippler of Austria. Teammate Marie-Michele Gagnon ended the day in 21st. Neither Grenier nor Gagnon finished the Jan. 19 downhill, in which Austrians Ramona Siebenhofer and Nicole Schmidhofer took the top two spots ahead of third-place Ilka Stuhec of Slovakia. In the Jan. 18 downhill, Grenier and Gagnon were 34th and 40th, respectively. Siebenhofer also won ahead of Stuhec and Austria’s Stephanie Venier, in order. Canadian men, meanwhile, were in action in Wengen, Switzerland. Ben Thomsen posted Canada’s only finish in three events, earning a 13th-place finish in the Jan. 19 downhill, 1.39 seconds back of Austria’s Vincent Kriechmayr. Switzerland’s Beat Feuz and Norway’s Aleksander Aamodt Kilde were second and third, respectively. In the Jan. 18 alpine combined, meanwhile, Austrian Marco Schwartz topped two Frenchmen, Victor MuffatJeandet and Alexis Pinturault, respectively, while in the Jan. 20 slalom, France’s Clement Noel edged out Austrians Manuel Feller and Marcel Hirscher, in order. n

Wellness Talks Nesters Market and Pharmacy offers wellness talks at its Whistler location. Join RHN and Certified Plant Based Chef Sarah Uy, Carissa Beu, RHN and Post Partum Doula Dana Lemmon and Jasmin Wong each week for inspirational whole health ideas.

Designing Optimal Detoxification & Digestion Strategies

with Herbal Medicine

THURSDAY JANUARY 31, 10:30 A.M. with Mason, Senior Naturopathic Medical Intern The modern day lifestyle puts a lot of stress on our bodies, physically (toxins, pesticides, food), mentally (beliefs, traumas) and emotionally (cortisol, adrenaline). When the load of these stressors becomes to much we end up with problems downstream, especially in our digestive and detoxification systems. Come experience a straightforward yet detailed talk on aiding digestion and detoxification with herbal medicine. You’ll leave with a plan on how to design your individualized detox and digestion goals for 2019. Mason is a Senior Naturopathic Medical Intern for St Francis Herb Farm. He has a wide array of academic, clinical and personal experiences with botanical medicine. Mason’s paradigm on healing fits within a vitalistic perspective allowing Mason to assist others on their healing journey with botanical medicines or earth medicines as he likes to refer to them as.

Wellness Desk 604-932-3545 Ext 322

7019 Nesters Rd. Whistler, B.C.

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 24, 2019 | 51


52 Velocity Project

BOARD MEETING Explore vision boards as a way to cut and paste your way towards a clearer sense of your desires.

PHOTO SUBMITTED BY MELISSA DAROU

Picture it

T

o the publishers, art directors and editors who work so hard to put great magazines together, I’m sorry. I spent Sunday night deconstructing your work in the most primitive way. (Rip, tear, cut.) And I loved it.

By Lisa Richardson I didn’t think I could, when I first heard about vision boarding—a kind of personal insight tool that is basically gluing inspirational images torn out of magazines to a piece of posterboard. In fact, when Melissa Darou first told me about her longstanding practice, I stood on her foot and kept asking questions trying to wrap my brain around how it actually works. Where does the “vision” part come from? How is this anything more than a collage? How can this manifest anything into real life when my years of pinning inspirational quotes and images to Pinterest and Tumblr haven’t amounted to shit? Darou is a veteran communications professional who has just launched her own business. A writer, mother of three, former massage therapist, gardener and cook, she had nothing to prove or sell me, just 14 years experience with something she has found playful and effective and that she loves doing for herself or with friends. So she answered my questions,

and shared a host of spooky ways in which elements of her last vision boards had come true, but I couldn’t break her into revealing the secret to the trick, what makes it all tick. My bookshelves are lined with immaculate issues, season by season, of magazines. Multiple times a year, I submit my stories, plain lines of letters strung endlessly across a page, and those boring Word files are magically transformed by editors and art director, incredible photography and clever captions, pull-quotes and wonderful fonts into something quite visually arresting. I already believe in the magic of magazines. As they are. Ripping them apart, cutting the pieces and gluing them into some kind of Frankensteinian compilation feels deeply transgressive. Through January, Darou offered several New Year-vision boarding workshops in Pemberton, at Mount Currie Coffee Co. I signed up—a girl whose desperate desire to believe in magic was at risk of turning her into an inquisitor of magicians, shining the light into their eyes, trying to disprove their wizardry even as she’s longing to believe in it. Sometimes, I realized, the truth you seek won’t come from looking suspiciously up someone else’s sleeves. It’s in rolling up your own sleeves and stepping into the dark. The year was still fresh, still smelling like a newborn, I’d picked my word for the year, but hadn’t had much time

52 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

to think about it, or to scribble out goals or plans, having spend most of it stick-handling the flu, pinned on the couch under the sweaty body of a small stoic sufferer. A three-hour evening out, complete with snacks, in the company of friends, with a motherlode of magazines on offer, sounded like a good offering to the thus-far ignored Gods of 2019. “Having a clear vision means things are possible,” explained Darou. A vision board, she said, is a collage with intention. It’s a tool for insight, like journalling. But it’s also a tool for visualization. “It’s looser than goal setting, but more concrete than the idea of just manifesting or materializing things out of nothing.” Darou was introduced to the practice by her friend, writer Mary Caros, and she adopted it as an annual rite with friends— to celebrate her birthday, which is Jan. 1, and at retreats, brunch parties, a baby shower for her youngest child, for her 40th birthday celebration. Sometimes she does it alone, as a meditation. But more often, late nights, wine and chocolate are involved. “It’s fun building ritual into our lives, gathering together, supporting each other and sharing what we desire.” Darou’s kitchen table has been a port of call in a storm for friends, as they cut-and-paste their way through the processing of relationships ending or other Big Life Events, while Darou drinks beer and chats alongside them, or brews

up a midnight coffee to keep them going until the end. Those who understand vision boards acknowledge that deep soul work can take place through the practice, but it’s not without its fun. “It’s a playful way of accessing our truth,” says Darou. “Vision boards have the power to let us see what could be. It’s so easy to deny what we want, to rationalize things, to cut off things that we want because they seem impossible.” Part of the magic of the experience, for Darou, and for her teacher, Caros, is in doing it in community. Caros explained that, although she has been doing vision boards almost every year since 2002, she doesn’t do it alone. “I do them with a friend, or friends—their noticing of your board helps illuminate some of the themes and gives you clues to possible interpretation.” Agreed Darou, “It’s intimate to share with the ones who’ll call us on our selfimposed limitations and cheerlead us to live on edges.” Sharing the practice beyond her circle opens up beautiful possibilities—for Darou, as a facilitator, to help people to connect with purpose. And for the rest of us, that we might make more space for magic and mystery in our days, and gather together to welcome it forth. The Velocity Project: how to slow the f—k down and still achieve optimum productivity and life happiness. n


MEADOW PARK SPORTS CENTRE SWIM • SKATE • SWEAT • SQUASH

Meadow Park Sports Centre is located 4 km north of Whistler Village. OPEN DAILY: 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Last entry by 9:30 p.m.

GROUP FITNESS SCHEDULE THU 24

Circuit 7:308:30a.m.

NEW TIME!

FRI 25

Circuit 7:308:30a.m.

Sweat, NEW Circuit Strength TIME! 9-10a.m & Stretch (S3) 9-10a.m. Aqua Fit Shallow 9:30-10:30a.m.

NEW TIME!

NEW TIME!

SAT 26

Circuit 7:308:30a.m. Low Impact Circuit 9-10a.m.

SUN 27

Low NEW Impact TIME! Circuit 7:30-8:30a.m. Circuit NEW 9-10a.m. TIME!

NEW TIME!

NEW TIME!

Low Impact *Parent Zumba Aerobics & Baby 10:30-11:30a.m. 10:30-11:30a.m. Fit NOW INCLUDED! 10:30-11:30a.m. *Gentle Fit Zumba for Seniors 12:15-1p.m. 1-2p.m. *PWR! Moves 1:15-2:15p.m. 20/20/20 5:10-6:10p.m. *Spin 6-7p.m.

MON 28

Classes with * are registered or flexible registration (flex reg) programs and require registration of at least 5 people to start.

See exact schedule of classess at the sports centre or online at: whistler.ca/recreation

Low Impact Circuit 9-10a.m.

Boot Camp 5:10-6:10p.m.

WED 30

Total Body Conditioning 7:20-8:20a.m. Total NEW TIME! Body Conditioning 9-10a.m.

Aqua Fit DEEP 9:30-10:30a.m. *Parent & *Parent Baby Fit & Baby 10:30-11:30a.m. Yoga 10:30-11:30a.m. *Gentle Fit Zumba for Seniors 12:15-1 p.m. in the weight room 1-2p.m. *PWR! Moves 1:15-2:15p.m. Strong by Zumba 5:10-6:10p.m

Zumba *Pilates 6:20-7:20p.m. Mat Class 6:45-7:45p.m. Stretch & Restore Yoga 8-9 p.m.

Nia 10:3011:30a.m.

NEW!

NOW INCLUDED!

*Gentle Fit for Seniors in the weight room 1-2p.m. *PWR! Moves 1:15-2:15p.m. TRX Mixer 5:10-6:10p.m.

Zumba 6:20-7:20p.m. Revive Stretch & Roll 7:30-8:30p.m.

ARENA SCHEDULE THU 24

W&OT Drop-In Hockey

FRI 25

Drop-In Hockey 8:15-9:45a.m.

SAT 26

SUN 27

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 6:30-8p.m.

DISCO NIGHT Public Skate 6:30-8p.m.

8:15-9:45a.m. Drop-In Hockey 10-11:30a.m.

MON 28

TUE 29

Disco night is back at Meadow Park Sports Centre’s ice rink on Saturday, January 26. Tunes by DJ Ben Keating

*Spin 6-7p.m.

All other classes are included in the price of admission.

*Roll and Release 6:45-7:45p.m. Mind Body Stretch 8-9 p.m.

TUE 29

TRX & KB Conditioning 7-8a.m.

Skate like everybody’s watching.

WED 30

55+ Drop-In Hockey 8:15-9:45am

Drop-In Hockey 10-11:30am

Drop-In Hockey 8:15-9:45a.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3pm

Come dressed in your best costume and enter to win a one-month pass to Meadow Park Sports Centre.

whistler.ca/disco

Love the corduroy? Let’s save it together. Walking, running, and dog walking must be done elsewhere in Whistler while the Lost Lake Nordic Trails are open.

Public Skate 6:30-8p.m.

POOL SCHEDULE THU 24

FRI 25

SAT 26

SUN 27

MON 28

TUE 29

WED 30

LEISURE POOL 9a.m. - 9p.m. LAP POOL, HOT TUB, SAUNA, STEAM ROOM 6a.m. - 10p.m.

whistler.ca/recreation | whistler.ca/notices | 604-935-8371  @RMWhistler |  @rmwhistler |  @rmowhistler

whistler.ca/nordic


Epicurious? No Chinese restaurants in Whistler? No problem! WCHINESE IS A NEW DELIVERY SERVICE BRINGING CANADIAN-CHINESE CLASSICS RIGHT TO YOUR DOOR

W

histler’s Chinese food desert just got a little smaller. John Kwai, a former restaurateur in his native China, has launched WChinese, a delivery and pickup service based in Function Junction, offering a

Brandon Barrett

By

glimmer of hope to local Chinese-food junkies who would, until recently, have had to venture outside of Whistler to get their fix. “It’s hard to find a location here in Whistler,” said Kwai, which explains why he is running the kitchen out of a small office on Millar Creek Road that doubles as the homebase for his other company, shuttle service Whistler Van. “It’s almost impossible because the rent is so high and there are no locations

available. I think this is a good way to open a small restaurant first that only does delivery and to-go orders.” Whistler has been without a dedicated Chinese restaurant since Gold Leaf closed down in Marketplace several years ago, although the Spring Roll Lady, a.k.a. Michele Bush, currently offers a variety of Chinese meal options that are prepared beforehand or in the customer’s home. In a country that counts Chinese restaurants everywhere from the sprawling metropolis to the one-horse town, it’s curious why Whistler has been unable to sustain one for very long. Curious, that is, until you factor in, as Kwai mentioned, the high cost of commercial rent, a deathknell for the kind of low-cost, high-volume approach that most Chinese takeout restaurants employ, combined with a lack of affordable staff housing. Why, Kwai asked, would a chef take

the risk of relocating to Whistler when one of the world’s meccas for Asian food is only a two-and-a-half-hour drive away? “There are so many (Chinese) restaurants in Richmond, so if they are a good cook, they can find a job easily,” he said. “You don’t have to come to Whistler

restaurant. He added that there will also be a $9.99 lunch combo for locals. The key to his business, Kwai said, will simply be to listen to his client base. “I always say the customer is always right because the customer will tell you what you have to do,” he said. “If the

“I always say the customer is always right because the customer will tell you what you have to do.” - JOHN KWAI

and pay high rent.” The menu will stick to the longheld staples of Canadian-Chinese cuisine: chop suey, fried rice, sweet and sour pork, maybe a deep-fried prawn here and there. Kwai said the restaurant would also offer a number of “Marco Polo” specials: Classic Italian dishes he learned while working in the kitchen of a spaghetti

customer don’t like you, then you better close it down. If the customer likes you, you can expand. You always take care of the customer first because the customer decides, not you.” Kwai has kept his expectations realistic for his new venture. He said WChinese will be directed primarily at locals looking for fast, affordable Chinese Li e mu ve 6- ry F sic 9p rid m ay!

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MONGOLIEGRILL.COM 54 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

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Epicurious?

CHINESE TO GO WChinese is a new food delivery and pick-up service aimed at Whistler locals.

WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

fare—and he’ll be the first to admit he isn’t looking to make a fortune. “Honestly, we don’t need too much business. It’s lower overhead, and then (we will) try to give people whatever good food they want. We don’t care about the profit that much, honestly,” he said. “You never can be rich from opening a small restaurant.” At 62 years old, Kwai is approaching the legal age of retirement—but don’t

expect him to call it quits just yet. Ultimately, WChinese is a way to keep the entrepreneur busy into his later years. “I need something to do! Honestly, I’m bored,” he said with a hearty laugh. “In this country, I’m 65, maybe, when it’s time to retire—but I don’t think so. We’ll see. I’ll keep going until I cannot work anymore.” To learn more, and to place your order, visit wchinesefood.com. n

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AGRICULTURAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE ELECTORAL AREA C WHAT? The SLRD is looking for interested residents of Pemberton and Electoral Area C to serve on the SLRD Electoral Area C Agricultural Advisory Committee(AAC). WHO? Anyone with an interest or expertise in agriculture and related matters is welcome to apply. Applicants could: • be a landowner and/or permanent resident of Electoral Area C or Pemberton • have an interest in preserving the viability of farming in the Pemberton Valley and surrounding area • be from the farming and ranching community • possess a clear understanding and knowledge of topics affecting agricultural land • be available to commit to roughly 4 to 6 meetings per year, for a one year or two year term HOW? Application forms can be obtained on our website in the Agriculture Planning section in the Policies & Plans section under Planning & Development Services, or by contacting the SLRD office. Please submit your application by 5 PM on January 29, 2018. For additional information please contact Ana Koterniak, Planning and GIS Technician at: P:604-894-6371, ext.237, Email: akoterniak@ slrd.bc.ca Squamish-Lillooet Regional District Box 219,1350 Aster Street, Pemberton, BC, V0N2L0 www.slrd.bc.ca P: 604-894-6371 • Toll Free: 1800-298-7753 • F: 604-894-6526 Email:info@slrd.bc.ca

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SC EN E

56 Arts

WHISTLER’S WALL Desirée Patterson poses next to the installation she created for the

Crystal Lodge.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Whistler’s history on display in new installation CRYSTAL LODGE & SUITES COMMISSIONS ARTIST DESIRÉE PATTERSON TO CREATE PERMANENT PIECE Alyssa Noel

arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

T

here’s one piece in particular of the new art installation at the Crystal Lodge & Suites that stands out to Ian Lowe. “Me personally, what I found funny was when (artist) Desirée (Patterson) sourced a vintage 1985 mountain-bike tire that’s part of the wall. I looked at that thing and I know I rode on that rim,” Lowe says, with a laugh commenting on how mountain biking is very new to local history. As the general manager of the village hotel—and a long-time local— Lowe decided he wanted to use an empty wall space to showcase the resort’s history in the busy lobby. So, last spring, he contacted Patterson, a Vancouver photographic artist who called Whistler home for many years, to see if she could help. The resulting massive display— standing around 5.4 metres-by-3.3 metres—was installed around Christmas. It features a large, black frame connecting 16 different photos and artifacts— including the bike wheel, an ice axe,

glacier goggles and skis—to depict Whistler’s history from 1910 onwards. “I saw this consistency of this adventuresome spirit in all these people that pioneered coming up to Whistler and started the first fishing lodge all the way up to wanting the ski resorts to be developed,” Patterson says. “It seemed like the people that were attracted to come live there—or attracted to come ski and enjoy sports there—it just seemed there was this kindred spirit. That’s what I wanted to convey in the image I chose.” It was no easy feat to select those images, she adds. For that, Patterson spent hours at the Whistler Museum poring over photos and consulting with John Alexander, the collections manager there. “I spent so much time with them, selecting files, transferring files, learning about the chronological timeline— sifting through thousands of images,” she says. “Whistler is very rich in pictorial documentation. It was easy for me to get lost in all of these fantastic images … A big part of the passion of this project was fuelled when I started going through the archives. I have a huge love for Whistler because I lived there.” The pictures she chose include a

56 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

range of sports—from climbing to skiing and biking—as well as both men and women. “One thing I noticed in the archives was the amount of ladies that settled up here early,” Patterson says. “I saw so many (pictures of them) hiking up here in dresses.” Also in the mix is the beloved Toad Hall photo with freewheeling squatters decked out in ski equipment—and not much else. That image—along with the installation as a whole—has prompted questions from guests, Lowe says. (Also, because it’s displayed in public, the ski bums’ bathing suit bits are artistically covered up, he adds.) “That’s the most questioned,” Lowe says. “But they also wonder why there’s a 1940s car on a rail track. If someone digs into the story, that’s so fascinating.

T HI S SEC T I O N

By

There were no roads until the 1960s … All these stories behind the pictures have been what’s really fun.” For her part, Patterson says the project has been the most challenging of her career as an artist. Not only did she select the images but she was also tasked with designing the display. “I had to have trust and faith in the partnerships I had to create to realize the whole three-dimensional installation,” she says. “There were a lot of challenges in all areas. I feel like I look at it and I couldn’t be more proud of it. I’m happy with how everything came out.” The installation is on permanent display in the lobby of The Crystal Lodge & Suites. For more on Patterson’s work visit desireepatterson.com. n

58 N OTES FROM THE BACK ROW Oscar’s relevance 59 ARTS NEWS Calling all female musicians 60 M  USEUM MUSINGS What’s in a name? 61 PARTIAL RECALL Photos from the past week


Arts S C E N E

WHAT’S ON @ THE AUDAIN Art After Dark: Mindfulness Month Stamps & Stencils Friday, Jan 25 | 3:30 – 5:30pm Youth* | 6:30 – 8:30pm Adult Stamps and stencils are great tools for achieving crisp lines and consistency in visual journaling. Learn how to use them and make your own out of a variety of materials. *Youth programs 18 & under. Youth under 12 must be accompanied by an adult.

Art After Dark: Yoga @ the Audain Friday, Jan 25 | 6:30 – 8pm Instructor Laura Davies will lead you through flowing sessions that centre on the confluence of art and yoga. Space is limited so arrive early to secure a spot.

Australia Day Weekend: Dreamtime Didjeridu January 26 | 12:30pm, 1:30pm, 2:30pm, 3:30pm Shine’s world beat rhythms, percussion and unique vocal stylings take listeners on ecstatic dreamtime journeys into self discovery and inner transformation.

Family Studio Sunday

GO DEEP Pro skier Izzy Lynch will be part of a multimedia presentation called Local Lines as part

of this year’s Winterstoke Backcountry Festival on Friday, Jan. 25.

PHOTO BY ZOYA LYNCH

Winterstoke Backcountry Festival returns for fifth year ANNUAL EVENT CELEBRATES BACKCOUNTRY ADVENTURE WITH EVENTS AND CLINICS FROM JAN. 24 TO 27 By

O

Alyssa Noel

utdoor enthusiasts taking part in the Winterstoke Backcountry Festival might want to start downing caffeine now. Heading into its fifth year, from Jan. 24 to 27, the festival features panel discussions, an art show, a beer-filled après and, of course, clinics. “It’s a big day,” says Ross Berg, organizer of the festival, with a laugh. The one-day clinics range from beginner courses—including Split Board Intro, Ski Touring Intro, Snow Safety 101 and Women’s Intro Ski Touring—to more complex, intermediate multi-day clinics and advanced sessions on ski mountaineering and avalanche skills. “It’s been interesting to see the community as a whole get better at ski touring,” says Berg, a long-time local guide through Altus Mountain Guides. “The community every year is getting a little better, using the terrain in a better manner. It’s been fun to see that happen. I think these clinics help the community as a whole get better at being safe in the mountains. That’s been a big objective of mine.” While Berg oversees the clinics, Arc’teryx, the festival’s new partner, is helping with the indoor events for a second year. One event Berg particularly excited about, though, is Mountain Art at the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre on Saturday, Jan. 26. It will feature local artists live painting mountain-inspired pieces as well as food, beer and music.

Funds from an auction will go towards the Winterstoke Fund. “From my side, that’s important,” Berg says. “We’ve raised some funds (in past years) for youth programs. We’ve been looking at different groups (and talking to) the Lil’wat Nation about creating some programming for youth. I want that event to work so we can create some momentum.” The festival officially kicks off on Thursday, Jan. 24, with a panel discussion called Mountain Behaviour with various experts talking about risk management when travelling in the mountains. “It’s basically just getting industry professionals together and talking about the decision-making process in the mountains,” Berg says. “That’s a pretty dynamic discussion.” Another anticipated event is Friday’s Local Lines, which will feature proskiers Chad Sayers and Izzy Lynch with a multimedia presentation “to inspire and feed your next adventure” at the Maury Young Arts Centre. Overall, the goal of the weekend is to celebrate backcountry adventure and help people expand their knowledge on how to enjoy the mountains safely. “I saw a lot of people taking the AST 1 course and that’s it,” Berg says. “No one was educating themselves beyond this very basic avalanche course. I find that frustrating. There’s so much more to learn.” To see the full list of clinics and events and to sign up visit altusmountainguides. com/winterstoke/. n

Every Sunday | 12 – 4pm Join the Museum for a unique and engaging art experience. Throughout the month of January the theme will be ‘Pattern and Colour’. This week using only natural pigments create a painting which combines a limited pallet and pattern. Presented by:

All programming is free for members and with admission Open Daily 10am – 5pm NEW! Friday 10am – 9pm (Closed Tuesday)

4350 Blackcomb Way, Whistler audainartmuseum.com

A AD DE EL LE E C CA AM MP PB BE E LL LL F F II N NE E A A RT, RT, W WH H II SS T TL LE ER R

Mike Svob

&

Cameron Bird

A Joint Exhibition

Saturday, January 26, 5-7pm All are welcome at the Artist Reception.

Live music by Will Ross. Refreshments provided. WHISTLER’S CANADIAN ART DESTINATION AT THE SHOPS AT THE WESTIN

adelecampbell.com

604-938-0887

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 24, 2019 | 57


Notes FROM T HE BA C K R O W Gauging Oscar’s relevance T

he Oscar nominations came out this week. Not everyone loves the Oscars (the term “elitist circle-jerk” is trending suddenly) but if nothing else, they give us something to talk about. And stories, specifically whose get told and when, are actually one of the great things about Hollywood’s biggest night of the year. Hollywood likes to bet on the money horse—see the proliferation of sequels, popular literary adaptations, remakes and re-imaginings of recent years. (Idea recycling is not a new concept in Tinseltown; the first

BEST PICTURE Mahershala Ali (left) and Viggo Mortenson star in Green Book, which received a Best Picture nomination at this year’s Oscars.

Feet Banks

By

Hollywood sequel was 1916’s The Fall of a Nation. The first remake was 1903’s The Great Train Robbery—someone remade it the next year.) The good thing about the Oscars is that they help show Hollywood what the current money horses are—i.e. what stories should they keep telling? This is why seeing Black Panther in the race for Best Picture next to Spanishlanguage Roma is important. Just as Spike Lee getting his first Best Picture and Best Director nominations after 31 years of mostly outstanding films (and let the record show that Inside Job is a perfect heist flick) is important. Or why Yalitza Aparicio’s Best Actress nomination is important. Traditionally, these kinds of stories are told less frequently, or they’re not taken seriously when they are told—black stories, female-driven stories, Latino stories, LGBTQ stories, Asian stories. When these sorts of films are nominated, win Oscars, and make money, the suits in Hollywood are that much more likely to put a similar story onscreen next year. It’s like Jackie Dickinson from Whistler Community Services Society keeps telling

PHOTO COURTESY OF UNIVERSAL PICTURES

us: “Everyone in your community has a voice, but not everyone is heard.” And that goes all the way up to the Hollywood community. But this year, at the box office and the awards shows, a few more voices are being heard. There’s still plenty of work to do and yes, the Oscars are definitely a bit of a circle-jerk (I don’t watch them) but for now, they do still serve a purpose and I’ll be the first person to spend 15 minutes reading about the winners the next morning and seeing who was best dressed (my money’s on Emma Stone). Stone, as it turns out, is up for best supporting actress for her role in The Favourite, a Best Picture nominee screening this week at the Whistler Village 8. Set in 18th-century England, Stone plays a new servant to Queen Anne, who’s a bit of a wildcard even though she occupies the throne. And I’ll stop right there because if you don’t like period pieces, this is gonna be tough sell, even though it’s almost unanimously considered one of 2018’s best films (hence the nomination). Personally, I don’t like period pieces. Also screening, Green Book is another Best Picture contender. Viggo Mortenson

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58 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

with our Local Band

(Eastern Promises, Captain Fantastic) plays a tough guy/hustler from the neighbourhood who gets hired as the personal chauffeur for Mahershala Ali’s (Moonlight, Hidden Figures) prim, proper and genius classical pianist on a concert tour through the American Deep South. It’s like The Odd Couple meets a switcheroo Driving Miss Daisy, with a little bit of Planes, Trains and Automobiles tossed in for fun. It’s an appetizing premise that benefits from the incredible chemistry of its lead actors, and the fact that director Peter Farrelly (Dumb and Dumber, Kingpin) keeps the film very focused on his characters without making too many broad “can’t we all just get along?” statements about race relations in a larger context. Nice to see Farrelly finding success with dramatic material after establishing himself (alongside brother Bobby) as one of the best comedic directors of the past 25 years (2003’s Stuck On You remains the greatest conjoined-twin movie ever made). Not a ton happening on the small screen but The Bill Murray Stories: Life Lessons from a Mythical Man is a nice uplifting watch and FYRE: The Greatest Party That

Never Happened is a really nerve-wracking doc about the infamous luxury music festival that turned into “an elephant-sized clusterf$ck” and the dangers of believing everything you see on social media. FYRE is directed by the always brilliant Chris Smith (American Movie, Jim & Andy) and outlines how a hustler named Billy McFarland swindled thousands of people into thinking they could pay to party with supermodels at a luxurious, private-island music festival. A solid look into ambition gone sour, this flick never really shows how McFarland suckered his team of smart, experienced people into staying aboard his fraudulent dream/sinking ship. This film could be about dangerous charisma, and it’s not. (It could also be produced by McFarland himself as a sort of Plan C to make at least some bank on the scheme that landed him six years in prison. Smith has all the behindthe-scenes footage, even the most incriminating, and Fyre’s ad agency is listed as a producer. Watch the last scene and you tell me…) Both flicks are available on Netflix. n

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Arts N E WS VILLAGE 8 SHOW SCHEDULE FRIDAY, JANUARY 25TH – THURSDAY, JANUARY 31ST GREEN BOOK (PG) DAILY 3:40, 6:40; MATINEES SAT, SUN & TUES 12:40; LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:40

Fine Italian Cuisine

NEW MUSICAL CELEBRATION Participants of the 2018 International Women’s Day celebration pose for a photo at the Maury Young Arts Centre.

PHOTO BY ANGIE NOLAN

Calling all female musicians ALSO IN ARTS NEWS: AUDAIN ART MUSEUM HOSTS FIELD TRIP; KANDYPHLIP THROWS PRIDE PARTY By

Alyssa Noel

A

rts Whistler is seeking female musicians from the Sea to Sky corridor to perform as part of its International Women’s Day celebration on Friday, March 8. Applications are open now until Feb. 15. The show will feature a wide range of genres, abilities and ages— with last year’s youngest performer just 11 years old. While the event is meant to offer women a stage to showcase their talent, it also serves as a fundraiser for the Howe Sound Women’s Centre (HSWC) at the Maury Young Arts Centre. All performers are being asked to volunteer their time so funds can go towards the HSWC. Those selected will be able to play one to three songs smoothly and they will be notified by Feb. 18. Performances during the show— which runs from 5 to 10 p.m.—will be five-to-10-minute slots with quick turnover on the stage. On top of performing at the event, performers are asked to attend a dress/ tech rehearsal on March 7 from 5 until 10 p.m. in the theatre. Arts Whistler will provide the stage and sound support with performers bringing “your voice, your instrument and your awesome self,” according to Arts Whistler. For more information, get in touch with Susan Holden at sholden@ artswhistler.com.

ADVENTURE FROM THE AUDAIN

The Audain Art Museum is hosting

a special trip to the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at the University of British Columbia on Sunday, Jan. 27. The museum’s director and chief curator Dr. Curtis Collins will lead the tour, which will focus on the MOA’s current exhibit Marking the Infinite: Contemporary Women Artists from Aboriginal Australia. The show focuses on the work of nine Aboriginal women from across Australia. Participants will leave from the Audain at 8:30 a.m. by shuttle and return around 5:30 p.m. (Pick-up and drop-off can also be arranged in Squamish). Tickets are $85 available at https:// bit.ly/2ASYlFC.

PRIDE PARTY

Local party producers Kandyphlip are putting on a new event for the Whistler Pride and Ski Festival on Friday, Jan. 25—and they’re hoping Whistlerites of all sexual orientations get in on the fun. Called iKandy: A Night in Heaven, it will feature entirely local talent, including DJ Joni T. The event will be similar to the duo’s most recent party Celestial Refrain that took place at Garfinkel’s last month— incorporating “celestial visuals and local heavenly gogos.” “We know we will fill the venue just by the sheer number of visitors, but we would love to have as many locals there (as possible) to mingle with the globetrotters,” says Joey Cruz, one half of Kandyphlip, in an email. The party takes place at Aava Whistler Hotel’s CABN. Tickets are $20 at whistlerpride.com but locals can get $5 off with the promo code Joey5. n

WINTER

MENU

THE FAVOURITE (14A) DAILY 4:00, 7:00; MATINEES SAT, SUN & TUES 1:00; LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:45

THE KID WHO WOULD BE KING (PG) DAILY 3:55, 6:55; MATINEES SAT, SUN & TUES 12:55; LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:35

GLASS (PG) DAILY 3:50, 6:50; MATINEES SAT, SUN & TUES 12:50; LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:50

AQUAMAN (PG) DAILY 3:35, 6:35; MATINEES SAT, SUN & TUES 12:35; LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:40

BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY (PG)

A WHISTLER

ORIGINAL WELCOME PRIDE 2019

DAILY 3:45, 6:45; MATINEES SAT, SUN & TUES 12:45; LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:45

SPIDER-MAN: INTO THE SPIDER-VERSE (PG) DAILY 4:05, MATINEES SAT, SUN & TUES 1:05

THE UPSIDE (PG) DAILY 7:05; LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:55

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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 24, 2019 | 59


Museum Musings

Join us in celebrating 2019!

$25 per person

THE POINT OF IT ALL Harrop’s Point as seen from above the PGE tracks.

Cheese fondue Your choice of a sweet crepe Available from 3-10pm Sunday to Friday Offer ending Friday, February 1st

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in REBATES when you upgrade to a heat pump for heating AND cooling your home.

For more info visit: whistler.ca/rebate 60 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

PHILIP COLLECTION

What’s in a name? By

T

Allyn Pringle

he names of people, places and things sometimes change. At the beginning of the 20th century, Whistler Mountain was labelled on maps as London Mountain and, until the creation of the Resort Municipality of Whistler in 1975, this area was officially known as Alta Lake. Even Alta Lake was once called Summit Lake. Some name changes, such as that of Whistler Mountain, occur gradually, beginning as a nickname and then changing officially to reflect the popular name. Others change only partially, leaving enough of the previous name to ensure it is still easily recognizable. An example of this is The Point. Bert Harrop first came to Alta Lake in 1920 for a short stay at Rainbow Lodge. Like many before and after him, his first stay in the valley ended up lasting a few decades longer than expected. Helped by Alex Philip, the Harrops settled on a point of land on the west side of the lake, just south of Rainbow Lodge, which became known as Harrop’s Point. Bert had been trained as a cabinetmaker in England and he quickly put his skills to use at Alta Lake. Before winter arrived, he and Sewall Tapley had framed in a small house on the beach at Rainbow Lodge. Constructed on a raft of cedar logs and later secured to the shore of Harrop’s Point, this became Alta Lake’s first (and possibly only) floating cottage. This cottage was followed by a tearoom with a porch extending over the water. Harrop’s Tearoom became a gathering place for locals and visitors, presided over by Bert’s wife Agnes. The tearoom was known for more than simply a good meal; Agnes told fortunes by reading tea leaves. According to Pip Brock, whose family began visiting Alta Lake in the 1920s, Agnes “did it very well,

assisted by all the rampant local gossip! I used to have my cup read so I could see how I stood in the neighbourhood.” Bert continued building, constructing a cottage on his property to rent out to visitors and others for summer residents, including the Brock family. He also built a workshop for himself. As the snow fell in winter Bert crafted furniture in his workshop, some pieces of which survive today in the museum. Bert and Agnes sold Harrop’s Point in 1948 to Cathy and Ivan Collishaw who continued to run it under that name until they sold it in 1952. Loyd and Sharen Mansell then renamed the enterprise Bob’s Point and ran it for only a year before selling to their neighbour Dick Fairhurst, who had been operating Cypress Lodge for a few years before purchasing this property, adding three cabins and a tearoom to his business. Fairhurst’s mother Elizabeth Alice moved up from Vancouver to help run Cypress Lodge on Cypress Point. Under her, the tearoom became known for its “Hot Dog Friday Night” when a refrigerated rail car brought fresh food and meat on Fridays as well as Ma Fairhurst’s famed butter tarts. The tearoom and Bert’s cottages were demolished in 1962 and replaced with four new cabins, complete with Alta Lake’s first coloured bathroom fixtures. Cypress Point became a gathering place for the community, including the Alta Lake Sailing Club and its annual “Regretta.” The Fairhursts continued to operate Cypress Lodge until 1972 when it was sold to the Canadian Youth Hostel Association. For the next few decades, the property was known as the Youth Hostel until the hostel moved away from Alta Lake. Today, the buildings of Cypress Lodge host the Whistler Sailing Club and The Point Artist-Run Centre and is often referred to simply as The Point. n


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1. Lynx on the loose This curious lynx was captured taking a winter stroll down the Valley Trail last week. Photo by Steve Sykes. 2. Umbrella-less bar The Umbrella Bar atop Whistler Mountain remained closed on Monday, Jan. 21 after high winds tore the retractable roof off over the weekend. Photo by Megan Lalonde. 3. Wow Actor Owen Wilson, left, stopped by local skate and snowboard shop the Circle during a recent visit to Whistler. Photo by Annie Boulanger. 4. Happy Core-aversary Whistler Core owners Corinne and Bob Allison celebrate the climbing and fitness centre’s 12th anniversary on Monday, Jan. 21 with a Core member appreciation day—and cake, of course. Photo submitted. 5. Graduation day Carpentry Level 1 students at the Ts’zil Learning Ceremony in Mount Currie celebrated their graduation from the program with a ceremony on Thursday, Jan. 17. Photo by Natalie Langmann. 6. Sun run Members of local running group We Run Whistler headed south to Squamish to get some sun on their faces and dirt under their feet on Sunday, Jan. 19. Photo submitted.

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Unit 30 - 1040 Legacy Way | 604.905.1500 www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 24, 2019 | 61


N IG H TLIFE

62 Music

ON STAGE Riddim Fernandez, one of Whistler’s long-time DJs and producers, also works as a teacher. PHOTO SUBMITTED

Where the club and classroom meet LONG-TIME LOCAL RIDDIM FERNANDEZ TALKS ABOUT PULLING DOUBLE DUTY AS A HIGH-SCHOOL TEACHER AND PRODUCER/DJ Alyssa Noel

arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

R

iddim Fernandez was DJing on The Beach Stage at the Shambhala Music Festival a few years ago when he heard a group of five guys shouting in the crowd. Their enthusiasm wasn’t unusual for a festival, except that “I was playing a very mellow set,” Fernandez says. “I couldn’t see them because I was up on stage, so I asked the MC to go see if they were OK.” It turns out they were just fine. “He came back and said, ‘You taught them all math!’” Fernandez recalls with a laugh. The long-time Whistler DJ and producer lives a double life of sorts—with those two worlds colliding on occasion, as they did at the festival. During the day, he teaches physics and math at Whistler Secondary School (WSS), a position he’s held for the last eight years. But after hours, you can find him working on new music at home (he has around 130 tracks to his name) or DJing in Whistler clubs. “You have to be fairly rested (for teaching),” he says. “During the winter, I try not to play more than once a week so that I don’t lose sleep too much. I don’t have a TV at home, so I mostly make

music.” It took many years for Fernandez to arrive at two careers that might seem conflicting, but are actually complementary. Born in Barbados and raised in Toronto, he was first exposed to the drum and bass scene after he was dragged to a show in the late ‘90s. “This was in Toronto at a massive Halloween party,” he recalls. “Mix Master Mike from the Beastie Boys was playing with huge drum and bass guys. They were blending reggae, hip hop and jungle and I was like, ‘OK, I get it.’ It was a huge ‘a ha’ moment.” After that “I become a full-fledged raver,” he laughs. “It was never superdruggy or candy ravers with all their bracelets; it was taken a lot more seriously in the jungle and hip hop community. It was about personal style.” Meanwhile, Fernandez went to school and became an engineer, eventually moving to Vancouver for a job around 2000. He bounced from Montreal to Toronto, winding up in the Sea to Sky corridor. “I kind of got sick of working in the office,” Fernandez says of engineering. “A lot of my climbing friends were teachers and they got all summer off. I was pretty jealous.” After a stint volunteering at Don Ross Secondary School—coupled with experience teaching climbing—he

62 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

decided to follow in his friends’ footsteps, landing a job at WSS. Intertwined with that career trajectory, Fernandez began playing at festivals like Bass Coast and the aforementioned Shambhala, as well as at clubs around town. The two pursuits are not as different as people might think, he adds. “I think math and physics go into art,” he says. “People don’t realize it … A lot of the way synthesizers work, they produce a triangle wave. How it gets processed is really neat. It goes through different filters, effects and you can see the change.” Going forward, Fernandez is poised to move his music—which mixes reggae, hip hop and jungle—in a new direction. “I want to play live,” he says. “I want to take a step back from DJing and bring synths, guitar pedals and drum machines to play my music live. It’s scary.” Up next, though, he’s in the midst

T H I S SE C TI O N

By

of crafting a new EP, tentatively titled Broken as an homage to his current state after an accident on the mountain led to surgery on his tibia. “I made four tracks in the last four weeks,” he says. “I like to use illustrator as well to make my album covers. But I’ll try and do a nice Bandcamp page (for the EP).” While he might be laid up in recovery for the time being, Fernandez hopes to revive a reggae or dubstep night in town this season. “If anyone is interested, get in touch with me,” he says. That call-out fits with the rules he has for his classroom—and for the wider community: “Wherever you are, support your community,” he says. “Be a part of it. Get out and do stuff.” For more, visit beatport.com/release/ naughty-naughty/2284137 or find him on Facebook at facebook.com/Riddim. Fernandez. n

64 NIGHTLIFE LISTINGS Our guide to pubs, clubs and bars 67 HOROSCOPE More astrological musings from Rob Brezny 68 P IQUE’CAL Our guide to everything else 89 CROSSWORD Discover the answer to “Sharp retort”


Nightlife

THU.

24

JAN

Live Music

CLUB SHRED THURSDAYS The team at Whistler Blackcomb’s Club Shred are bringing the party back to Merlin’s Bar & Grill all season long! Rotating between Whistler local favorites Red Chair and Joni Toews (from Case Of The Mondays). d Merlin’s Bar & Grill d 7 pm-midnight

THE HAIRFARMERS Voted Whistler’s best band every year since 2001, The Hairfarmers combine uncanny vocals with innovative guitar and percussion covering all your favourite songs. A Whistler must-see! d Sidecut d 5:30-8:30 pm

KARAOKE NIGHT

BARS , C L U B S & P U B S MR. TWITCH

d Buffalo

Enjoy a musical journey of nostalgia curated by Mr. Twitch. Disco-funk-hip-hop-house and whatever else. Old-school vibes, remixes mash-ups and new stuff to keep you on your toes. Free. d Three Below d 9 pm-midnight

THE CURE LOUNGE SESSIONS

THURSDAY LOCALS’ NIGHT Come join our legendary locals’ night every Thursday, kicking off the night with a game of skate at 9 p.m. followed by DJ Praiz and friends throwing down some dope tracks. Prizes to be given away each week include concert tickets, snowboards, electric sunnies and skateboards! Email info@garfinkels.ca for guest list and VIP options. d Garfinkel’s d 9 pm-2 am

FRI.

25

JAN

Live Music

Bills d 7 pm

Enjoy lake views while DJ Smokey sets the tone with a blend of soulful house tracks. d Cure Lounge at Nita Lake Lodge d 5 pm

SAT.

26

JAN

Live Music

BROTHER TWANG

GEORGE

DJ WHITNESS

Matt Hoyles is a low-down, wailing bluesman, hailing from deepest, darkest New Zealand. d Crystal Lounge d 9 pm

RICHARD SAMUELS With several chart-topping hits, Samuels has a knack for touching his fans on a deep and intimate level by reflecting people’s lives in his music. d Mallard Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

RUCKUS DELUXE Ruckus Deluxe features former Cirque Du Soleil lead singer Chad Oliver and Grammy-nominated violinist Ian Cameron playing Celtic and classics on mandolin, fiddle and electric guitar. d Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub d 3:45 & 9 pm

Clubs/DJs #TBT WITH THE SOUNDS OF STACHE Stache has been on a nomadic musical adventure for almost a decade, travelling the to over 50 countries and sharing his passion for music with others. Drawing influences from all four corners of the globe, his appetite, understanding and energetic delivery will guarantee a funky smorgasbord of beats. Free. d Three Below d 9 pm-1 am

COCKTAIL DANCE PARTY Start your weekend early with a handcrafted cocktail. Then hit the dancefloor or rock our legendary dancing cage with help from DJ Peacefrog. d Buffalo Bills d 7 pm

LEVEL UP – HOUSE & TECHNO Featuring a rotating selection of DJs playing some of the best underground electronic dance music in house and techno, the “Level Up” nights are set to up your dance game. Hosted by DJ Miss KosmiK. d Moe Joe’s d 9:30 pm-2 am

SHUT UP AND PARTY Start your weekend off one night early and come get wild with Whistler’s loosest bar staff. With music from Fidel Cashflow and DJ Shearer. Email info@maxxfish.com for VIP and other special perks. d Maxx Fish d 9 pm

THROWBACK THURSDAYS WITH

THE HAIRFARMERS Voted Whistler’s best band every year since 2001, The Hairfarmers combine uncanny vocals with innovative guitar and percussion covering all your favourite songs. A Whistler must-see! d Merlin’s Bar & Grill d 3:30-7:30 pm d Longhorn Saloon d 9:30 pm-12:30 am

LIVE MUSIC Solo artists perform every week, except on the first Friday of every month when they swap out for a full band. No cover, no lineups. d Whistler Brewing Company d 6-9 pm

MARC CHARRON One man band on the run, songwriter, world traveller, original van lifer. d Mallard Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

MICHAEL BELANGER Finalist of Whistler’s Music Search 2018, Mike’s acoustic solo session will have you singing along to all the his handpicked cover songs. d Crystal Lounge d 9 pm

RUCKUS DELUXE Ruckus Deluxe features former Cirque Du Soleil lead singer Chad Oliver and Grammy-nominated violinist Ian Cameron playing Celtic and classics on mandolin, fiddle and electric guitar. d Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub d 3:45 & 9 pm

Clubs/DJs CHAMPAGNE FRIDAY Kick off your weekend at Garf’s. Get on the guest list and join the party: info@garfinkels.ca. d Garfinkel’s d 7:30 pm

FEEL GOOD FRIDAYS Start the weekend off right with music by B.C.’s finest party DJs mixing the best in hip hop, rap, R&B and party anthems. Whistler’s most energetic dancefloor. d Moe Joe’s d 9:30 pm

LADIES’ NIGHT We have a gift for all ladies. Enjoy a glass of champagne then hit the dancefloor and dance the night away with DJ Peacefrog. Info@buffalobills.ca for guestlist or table bookings.

64 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

27

JAN

Live Music

DEADLY LETHAL NINJA ASSASSIN LIVE AT PEMHO

LOCALS’ NIGHT

MATT HOYLES

SUN. ACOUSTIC SESSIONS

Live music by Whistler favourites Red Chair. d Tapley’s Pub d 9 pm

George earns points for originality in the type of music she plays. When she’s not working away on her original singersongwriter offerings, she likes to pick covers that are too new to be classics and too old to be contemporary hits. d Cranked Espresso Bar d 5:30-9 pm

Enjoy lake views while DJ Smokey sets the tone with a blend of soulful house tracks. d Cure Lounge at Nita Lake Lodge d 5 pm

Gather your pals and listen to some of Whistler’s best local musicians after treating yourself to our weekly, homestyle Sunday roast. d Three Below d 8 pm

DLNA comes to Pemberton to play the PemHo, playing covers such as Muse, Smashing Pumpkins, Royal Blood, Karnivool, Tool, Deftones and more. Entry is $5 on the door. d The Pemberton Hotel d 9 pm-1 am

Party at Whistler’s longest-running locals’ night. Specials all night long. For VIP table bookings or guest list, email info@garfinkels.com. d Garfinkel’s d 7:30 pm

THE CURE LOUNGE SESSIONS

Come wind down your ski day or ramp up your Saturday night festivities with the boys from Brother Twang. d FireRock Lounge d 9 pm-midnight

Come belt out your best covers at karaoke every Thursday night from 9 pm! d Black’s Pub & Restaurant d 9 pm

FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE

weekend party and best vibe. VIP champagne parades along with the hottest hip hop and remixes! For VIP and guest list email info@garfinkels.ca. d Garfinkel’s d 10 pm

Whitness is Cranked’s favourite DJ and they’re stoked to have her back in the house playing her funky beats. d Cranked Espresso Bar d 5:30-9 pm

THE HAIRFARMERS Voted Whistler’s best band every year since 2001, The Hairfarmers combine uncanny vocals with innovative guitar and percussion covering all your favourite songs. A Whistler must-see! d Dusty’s Bar and Grill d 3-6 pm

LIVE @ BLACK’S Every Friday and Saturday, party with local and touring musicians at Black’s Pub. d Black’s Pub & Restaurant d 9 pm

LIVE STREAMING OF TRIPLE J TOP 100 COUNTDOWN Celebrate a chill Australia Day at Crystal while we livestream Triple J Top 100 countdown. d Crystal Lounge d 9 pm

MICHAEL FABRO Michael Fabro is a Canadian acoustic pop-rock performance artist. With a focus on crowd-pleasing hits and infectious vocal hooks the young artist has fused multiple styles into dynamic live act. d Mallard Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

RUCKUS DELUXE Ruckus Deluxe features former Cirque Du Soleil lead singer Chad Oliver and Grammy-nominated violinist Ian Cameron playing Celtic and classics on mandolin, fiddle and electric guitar. d Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub d 3:45 & 9 pm

Clubs/DJs LADIES’ NIGHT It’s Whistler’s No. 1 stop for stag and stagette parties. DJ Turtle and friends mix up everything from hip hop, R&B, new rap, dance hall and Top 40 bangers. Email guestlist@ moejoes.com for VIP and group perks. d Moe Joe’s d 9:30 pm

SATURDAY NIGHT SHAKER With music from Fidel Cashflow and DJ C Stylez, two of Whistler’s hardest working and most loved DJs spinning the best in Top 40, mash-ups, electro, hip hop and party anthems that will keep your booty shakin’ all night long. Email info@maxxfish.com for VIP and other special perks. d Maxx Fish d 9 pm

SUPREME SATURDAY DJ Nikky from Vancouver brings the Whistler’s biggest

EVAN KENNEDY Evan creates a unique live performance mixing in lesserknown album songs with the songs of today. d Mallard Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

OPEN MIC JAM NIGHT An open stage invitation for all who can sing, perform or even just wanna jam out with our house band. Whistler’s longest-running jam night every Sunday at Crystal Lounge. All instruments provided. d Crystal Lounge d 9 pm

SUNDAY SESSIONS The best locals’ party in Whistler. d Tapley’s Pub d 9 pm

THE WHISKEY RICHARDS The Whiskey Richards are a group of Celtic gypsy punk rockers who have spent the better part of a decade carving a reputation for themselves as one hell of a good time. d Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub d 3:45 pm

Clubs/DJs GAMES NIGHT AT PANGEA Challenge your crew: Cards Against Humanity, Jenga, Settlers of Catan, HedBanz, and many more. Drinks and food specials all night long. d Pangea Pod Hotel d 4 pm

SEND IT SUNDAYS With music from T-Zen and DJ Shearer. Keep your weekend alive, and join us on Sunday nights for one of Whistler’s wildest industry nights. Email info@maxxfish.com for VIP plus special perks. d Maxx Fish d 9 pm

SOULFUL SUNDAYS Soul Club Whistler spinning that funky soul soundtrack. d Black’s Pub & Restaurant d 9 pm

THE SUNDAY GLOW PARTY Moe Joe’s is transformed into a psychedelic UV infused rave cathedral, as Fidel Cashflow, Zapps and La Dooda cook up an aural feast of house and electro beats. Arrive early to beat the line. d Moe Joe’s d 9 pm

MON.

28

JAN

Live Music

EVAN KENNEDY Evan creates a unique live performance mixing in lesserknown album songs with the songs of today. d Mallard Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm


Huge Thanks Whistler Community Services Society would like to acknowledge the ongoing support of Rob Katz and Elana Amsterdam to our mental health outreach programs. Thank you to Katz Amsterdam Charitable Trust for your generous donation of $100,000 in support of this community and the wellness of its residents.

WHISTLER COMMUNIT Y SERVICES SOCIE T Y

THANK YOU

We would like to thank all Whistler Blackcomb Employees & Volunteers for helping to deliver an experience of a lifetime for all of our Guests. We sincerely appreciate all your hard work on the mountains & behind the scenes.

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 24, 2019 | 65


Nightlife FVCK MONDAYS

black ohm tattoos

20

years tattooing Whistler and the world!

604 938 8878 located in function junction

VILLAGE OF LIONS BAY NOTICE OF DISPOSITION OF LAND

The wildest party in Whistler on a Monday night continues with music from Fidel Cashflow, Dan Darley, The Rogue Killers and DJ Shearer. Throwing down all the hottest tunes you know and love. Deep, tech, bass, house, trap, hip hop and more. Email info@maxxfish.com for VIP plus special perks. d Maxx Fish d 9 pm

• Description of the Land: That Part of District Lot 1815, Group 1, New Westminster District, Shown on Plan EPP69335, Parcel Identifier 030-190-011, as indicated in Schedule A attached to Road Closure Bylaw No. 517, 2017 (the “Land”), which may be viewed at www.lionsbay.ca. • Nature of the Proposed Disposition: Sale of the fee simple title to the Land for market value, subject to statutory or other legal encumbrances on the Land. • Process by Which the Land May be Acquired: The Land is to be listed with Thyra McKilligan of Re/Max Masters Realty, a licensed realtor in the Province of BC. For further information, please contact: admin@lionsbay.ca

Ryan is an up-and-coming acoustic artist looking for his breakthrough into the Whistler music scene. Come out and support Whistler’s new local talent. d Cranked Espresso Bar d 4:30-8 pm

THE WHISKEY RICHARDS The Whiskey Richards are a group of Celtic gypsy punk rockers who have spent the better part of a decade carving a reputation for themselves as one hell of a good time. d Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub d 3:45 & 9 pm

Clubs/DJs MEATY MONDAY Sport and beer what more do you need? How about a chance to win our famous Meat Raffle? Proceeds donated to charity. d Tapley’s Pub d 9 pm

MEXICAN MONDAY Feel the heat by our fireplace and pretend you are back on the beach. d FireRock Lounge d 5 pm

MONDAY MADNESS Fidel Cashflow, Dan Darley and Billy The Kid throw down all the hottest deep and dirty beats you know and love. Deep tech, bass, house, trap, plus more. d Maxx Fish d 9:30 pm

TRIVIA NIGHT The Crystal Lounge hosts trivia every Monday night! Bring your friends and test your knowledge for a night of fun, laughs, prizes and the chance to “burn your bill.” Conditions apply. d Crystal Lounge d 9 pm

AS OF FEBRUARY 1, 2019,

TUE.

29

778-894-3200 We’re installing a new digital phone system to help us provide better, more reliable, client-focused service to people in the Sea to Sky region. Squamish Mental Health and Substance Use Services provides a range of health care and support services to adults and older adults struggling with acute, chronic or recurring challenges. Squamish Mental Health & Substance Use Services

38075 2nd Avenue Squamish, BC V8B 0A2

www.vch.ca

Live Music

ANTONIO LAROSA d Mallard

“I Will Survive” won’t sing itself, so come over to Whistler’s longest-running karaoke night and belt out all your favourite hits. Arrive early to avoid disappointment. d Crystal Lounge d 9 pm

THE WHISKEY RICHARDS The Whiskey Richards are a group of Celtic gypsy punk rockers who have spent the better part of a decade carving a reputation for themselves as one hell of a good time. d Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub d 3:45 & 9 pm

Clubs/DJs ALLSORTS Bringing a wide variety of sounds to your Tuesday evening, ED:WIN will be playing “AllSorts” of music to get you dancing down at Three Below every Tuesday night while listening to hip hop, R&B, house, garage and disco! Free. d Three Below d 9 pm-1:30 am

BINGO Channel your inner granny and dominate bingo at the locals’ living room. d Tapley’s Pub d 8 pm

WED.

30

JAN

Live Music

ADAM BAILIE Adam Bailie is a breath of Canadian fresh air. As a contemporary singer-songwriter, Adam stands out as a cross between acoustic reggae and country soul music. His delivery of rhyme and rhythm is genuine and uniquely his own. d Crystal Lounge d 9 pm

INDUSTRY NIGHT

JAN

has a new phone number :

KARAOKE NIGHT

Grab your friends and come down to get up to perform on our open mic. d FireRock Lounge d 9 pm

Bills d 7:30 pm

RYAN LALLY

Pursuant to section 26 of the Community Charter, notice is hereby given that the Village of Lions Bay proposes to dispose of land in accordance with the following:

plays a crowd pleasing mix of jazz, R&B and pop classics. d Cranked Espresso Bar d 4:30-7:30 pm

LOCALS LIVE

MARTINI MONDAY d Buffalo

B AR S, C LU B S & P U B S

Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

BLACK ‘N’ BLUES Blues night with Sean Rose. d Black’s Pub & Restaurant d 8 pm

Live music from Neverland Nights. d Buffalo Bills d 6 pm

JAM NIGHT Jam Night with Kostaman and Friends every Wednesday night from 9 pm. d Black’s Pub & Restaurant d 9 pm

MATTHEW HOLLAND Matthew Holland shreds a wide range of acoustic hits and sings with an unforgettable raspiness in his voice. d Cranked Espresso Bar d 4:30-7:30 pm

MIKE BELL

CELLAR SESSIONS With live music from Neverland Nights and guests, playing all your rock, alternative and party jams all night long. Plus DJ sets from Fidel Cashflow. d Maxx Fish d 9 pm

DANIEL HUGHES Daniel Hughes is an up-and-coming acoustic artist that’s quickly turning into one of Whistler’s favourites to watch. He

d Mallard

Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

RUCKUS DELUXE Ruckus Deluxe features former Cirque Du Soleil lead singer Chad Oliver and Grammy-nominated violinist Ian Cameron playing Celtic and classics on mandolin, fiddle and electric guitar. d Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub d 3:45 & 9 pm

in your pants Pique Newsmagazine’s mobile site is your guide to everything in Whistler. Search over 167 restaurant listings, events, activities and more.

m.piquenewsmagazine.com 66 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY Week of  January 24th By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): We might initially be inclined to ridicule Stuart Kettell, a British man who spent four days pushing a Brussels sprout up 1,085-metre-high Mount Snowden with his nose. But perhaps our opinion would become more expansive once we knew that he engaged in this stunt to raise money for a charity that supports people with cancer. In any case, the coming weeks would be a favourable time for you, too, to engage in extravagant, extreme, or even outlandish behaviour on behalf of a good or holy cause. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The Taurus guitar wizard known as Buckethead is surely among the most imaginative and prolific musicians who has ever lived. Since producing his first album in late 2005, he has released 306 other albums that span a wide variety of musical genres—an average of 23 per year. I propose that we make him your patron saint for the next six weeks. While it’s unlikely you can achieve such a gaudy level of creative self-expression, you could very well exceed your previous personal best in your own sphere. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Novelist Sir Arthur Conan Doyle created Sherlock Holmes, a fictional character who personifies the power of logic and rational thinking. And yet Doyle was also a devout spiritualist who pursued interests in telepathy, the occult, and psychic phenomena. It’s no surprise that he was a Gemini, an astrological tribe renowned for its ability to embody apparent opposites. Sometimes that quality is a liability for you folks, and sometimes an asset. In the coming weeks, I believe it’ll be a highly useful skill. Your knack for holding paradoxical views and expressing seemingly contradictory powers will attract and generate good fortune. CANCER (June 21-July 22): In 2006, a 176-yearold tortoise named Harriet died in an Australian zoo owned by “Crocodile Hunter” and TV personality Steve Irwin. Harriet was far from her original home in the Galapagos Islands. By some accounts, evolutionary superstar Charles Darwin picked her up and carried her away during his visit there in 1835. I propose that you choose the long-lived tortoise as your power creature for the coming weeks. With her as inspiration, meditate on questions like these: 1. “What would I do differently if I knew I’d live to a very old age?” 2. “What influence that was important to me when I was young do I want to be important to me when I’m old?” 3. “In what specific ways can my future benefit from my past?” 4. “Is there a blessing or gift from an ancestor I have not yet claimed?” 5. “Is there anything I can do that I am not yet doing to remain in good health into my old age?” LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): John Lennon claimed that he generated the Beatles song’ “Because” by rendering Beethoven’s “Moonlight Sonata” backwards. Even if that’s true, I don’t think it detracts from the beauty of “Because.” May I suggest you adopt a comparable strategy for your own use in the coming weeks, Leo? What could you do in reverse so as to create an interesting novelty? What approach might you invert in order to instigate fresh ways of doing things? Is there an idea you could turn upside-down or inside-out, thereby awakening yourself to a new perspective? VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The Tsonga language is spoken by more than 15 million people in southern Africa. The literal meaning of the Tsonga phrase, malebvu ya nghala is “It’s a lion’s beard,” and its meaning is “something that’s not as scary as it looks.” According to my astrological analysis, this will be a useful concept for you to be alert to in the coming weeks. Don’t necessarily trust first impressions or initial apprehensions. Be open to probing deeper than your instincts might influence you to do. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The old Latin verb crescere meant “to come forth, spring up, grow, thrive, swell, increase in numbers or strength.” We see its presence in the modern English, French, and Italian word

“crescendo.” In accordance with astrological omens, I have selected crescere and its present participle crescentum to be your words of power for the next four weeks. May they help mobilize you to seize all emerging opportunities to come forth, spring up, grow, thrive, swell, and increase in numbers or strength. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): When animals hibernate, their metabolism slows down. They may grow more underfur or feathers, and some add extra fat. To conserve heat, they may huddle together with each other. In the coming weeks, I don’t think you’ll have to do what they do. But I do suspect it will be a good time to engage in behaviours that have a resemblance to hibernation: slowing down your mind and body; thinking deep thoughts and feeling deep feelings; seeking extra hugs and cuddles; getting lots of rich, warm, satisfying food and sleep. What else might appeal to your need to drop out of your fast-paced rhythm and supercharge your psychic batteries? SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): When people tell me they don’t have time to read the books I’ve written, I advise them to place the books under their pillows and soak up my words in their dreams. I don’t suggest that they actually eat the pages, although there is historical precedent for that. The Bible describes the prophet Ezekiel as literally chewing and swallowing a book. And there are accounts of 16th-century Austrian soldiers devouring books they acquired during their conquests, hoping to absorb the contents of the texts. But in accordance with current astrological omens, I suggest that in the next four weeks you acquire the wisdom stored in books by actually reading them or listening to them on audio recordings. In my astrological opinion, you really do need, for the sake of your psychospiritual health, to absorb writing that requires extended concentration. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Among the top “how to” search inquiries on Google are “how to buy Bitcoin,” “how to lose belly fat fast,” “how to cook spaghetti in a microwave,” and “how to make slime.” While I do think that the coming weeks will be prime time for you to formulate and launch many “how to” investigations, I will encourage you to put more important questions at the top of your priority list. “How to get richer quicker” would be a good one, as would “how to follow through on good beginnings” and “how to enhance your value” and “how to identify what resources and allies will be most important in 2019.” AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): A motivational speaker and author named Nick Vujicic was born without arms or legs, although he has two small, unusually shaped feet. These facts didn’t stop him from getting married, raising a family of four children, and writing eight books. One book is entitled Life Without Limits: Inspiration for a Ridiculously Good Life. He’s a positive guy who has faith in the possibility of miracles. In fact, he says he keeps a pair of shoes in his closet just in case God decides to bless him with a marvellous surprise. In accordance with current astrological omens, Aquarius, I suggest you make a similar gesture. Create or acquire a symbol of an amazing transformation you would love to attract into your life. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): About 11 per cent of the Filipino population is comprised of Muslims who call themselves the Bangsamoro. Many resist being part of the Philippines and want their own sovereign nation. They have a lot of experience struggling for independence, as they’ve spent 400 years rebelling against occupation by foreign powers, including Spain, the United States, and Japan. I admire their tenacity in seeking total freedom to be themselves and rule themselves. May they inspire your efforts to do the same on a personal level in the coming year.

Best Date Night EVER with

BLUESBERRY JAM SHOWBAND

VALENTINE’S DAY – THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14

MAURY YOUNG ARTS CENTRE | GALLERY BAR 7PM | SHOW 8PM | CASH BAR | 19+

Photo: Tea Cosy DP

Astrology

$15 $20 day of

BUY TICKETS: ARTSWHISTLER.COM/LIVE

WINTER LUNCH HOURS FRIDAY TO SUNDAY FROM NOON

Homework: Write yourself a nice long love letter full of praise and appreciation. Send a copy to me if you like: FreeWillAstrology.com.

In addition to this column, Rob Brezsny creates

EXPANDED AUDIO HOROSCOPES

in-depth weekly forecasts designed to inspire and uplift you. To buy access, phone 1-888-499-4425. Once you’ve chosen the Block of Time you like, call 1-888-682-8777 to hear Rob’s forecasts. And be sure to visit his Web site at www.freewillastrology.com

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 24, 2019 | 67


PiqueCal YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL EVENTS

O  NGOING & DAILY COMMUNITY

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

PRENATAL CLASSES

This program helps support women and their partners in making informed decisions about their prenatal and birth experience. To sign up, please call Bev Nolan-Newsome, certified childbirth educator, internationally certified lactation consultant and registered doula at 604-894-5389. > Ongoing > Whistler ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WHISTLER MUSEUM

Learn more about Whistler’s culture and history. Now open by donation. > Daily 11am-5pm, Thu until 9pm > Whistler Museum

THURSDAY JAN24 COMMUNITY 

BNI MOUNTAIN HIGH

BNI provides a positive and structured environment for the development and exchange of quality business referrals. It does so by helping you build personal relationships with dozens of other qualified business professionals. Register by emailing David Livesey at david_livesey@cooperators.ca. $20. > 6:45-8:30 am > The Venue COMMUNITY

WOMEN’S KARMA YOGA

Drop in for weekly yoga classes led by an all-female team of certified 200-hour yoga instructors. Includes mat use and childminding. All women, all ability levels welcome. This program is made possible by yoga instructors and childminders donating their time. Contact us to join the team. Free. 604-962-8711. > 9:30-10:30 am > Whistler Women’s Centre

THE CULTURAL CONNECTOR: A JOURNEY OF ADVENTURE AND DISCOVERY As you follow the Cultural Connector route, you’ll discover the stories that enrich Whistler’s culture, the venues that celebrate it and the milestones that we’ve achieved along the way. The pathway will lead you through beautiful surroundings and six cultural institutions: Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre, Whistler Museum, Whistler Public Library, Maury Young Arts Centre, Lost Lake PassivHaus, and Audain Art Museum. Free. > Ongoing > Maury Young Arts Centre

COMMUNITY

PARENT INFANT DROP-IN

An opportunity to develop a supportive social network with other parents of young babies. Free. > 11 am-12:30 pm > Whistler Public Library COMMUNITY

ROTARY CLUB OF WHISTLER MILLENNIUM

Join the Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium to learn about what the club is doing to support your local community. Lunch is available for $20. > 12:15 pm > Pan Pacific Mountain Side COMMUNITY

CHARITY SKI RACE

Show off your sweet skiing or boarding moves as you zoom down the GMC Race Course on Blackcomb Mountain to help raise money for Whistler Animals Galore. No race experience necessary. Skiers and snowboarders welcome. $5 donation recommended. > 1-3 pm > GMC Race Centre, Blackcomb Mountain

WOMEN’S SKI DAY 2019 JAN 26 WHISTLER OLYMPIC PARK

COMMUNITY 

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB

WHISTLER YOUTH BAND

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

COMMUNITY 

WALK AND TALK SERIES

WHISTLER FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP

The club meets every week and visitors are welcome. For a partner, please call Gill at 604-932-5791. > 1-5 pm > Whistler Racquet Club

Docents will provide visitors with an introduction to the Audain Art Museum and its permanent collection. Visitors will be encouraged to explore the galleries afterwards. These drop-in tours are free with the purchase of admission or museum membership. 604-962-0413. > 3 pm > Audain Art Museum COMMUNITY

LUNA PRESENTS THURSDAY NIGHT YOGA

Come shake your shanti in a 90-minute Hatha Flow yoga class. Get in the flow with an emphasis on breathing and movement. 18-to-35-year-olds only, free positive vibes for all in attendance! $3 for non-members, free for Luna members. > 5:30-7 pm > Maury Young Arts Centre COMMUNITY 

TECH SERIES: USEFUL APPS FOR YOUR SMARTPHONE OR TABLET

As of May 2017, there are over two million apps available! Join us to find out which ones might work for you. Registration opens on Tuesday, Jan. 2 email publicservices@whistlerlibrary.ca to claim your spot! > 6-8 pm > Whistler Public Library

� Vista Place

Photo: TOURISM WHISTLER / MIKE CRANE

FOR EVENTS IN BARS, CLUBS AND PUBS, PLEASE SEE PAGE 64 For a complete guide to events in Whistler, visit piquenewsmagazine.com/events

Let the trumpets sing! The Whistler Youth Band is a beginner band for youth ages 10 and up. Grab an instrument and make music with friends. > 6-7:30 pm > Myrtle Philip Community School

The Whistler monthly support group is organized by the North Shore Schizophrenia Society for family and friends of those with a mental-health challenge. Receive support from others who have been there. No registration is required. > 6:30 pm > Whistler Secondary School

FRIDAY JAN25 SPORTS

WHISTLER TRI CLUB SWIM SQUAD

Triathlon focused swim squads. Full details at whistlertriclub.com/training-sessions. Free to members for fall (includes entry into Meadow Park). Non-members $8 drop-in (includes entry into Meadow Park). > 6-7:15 am > Meadow Park Sports Centre COMMUNITY

WELCOME CENTRE MULTICULTURAL MEET UP

Come and say, “hi” if you are new to Canada and Whistler! Casual meet up, workshops, information about living in Canada. Check calendar at welcomewhistler.com for full

Now ng! Hiri

LIVE, WORK, PLAY

Residential, Office and Commercial Rental Spaces info@vistaplacebc.com 68 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

www.VistaPlacePemberton.com

OPEN 10-8

WE CUT & COLOUR • NOW HIRING OPEN UNTIL 8PM • SINCE 1994


PiqueCal COMMUNITY 

MULTI-DAY EVENT

WHISTLER PRIDE AND SKI FESTIVAL

JAN 20-JAN 27

Whistler is proud to host the 27th Annual Whistler Pride and Ski Festival, one of the biggest and best gay and lesbian ski weeks in North America. The LGBTQI pride week features a packed events schedule of skiing, snowboarding, parties, arts and culture and social events. For more information visit whistlerpride.com/events-whistler-pride-and-ski-festival. > Whistler 

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 

COMMUNITY

MIKE SVOB AND CAMERON BIRD EXHIBITION

MUSIC & WORDS

Showcasing new works between Jan. 26 and Feb. 6. Artists will be in attendance. > 5-7 pm > Adele Campbell Fine Art Gallery

This drop-in program is for kids two to four years and it focuses on early literacy through music, rhyme, stories and movement. Free. > 10 am > Whistler Public Library COMMUNITY

details. Contact info@welcomewhistler.com or 604-698-5960. > 9:30 am-noon > Whistler Public Library COMMUNITY 

MOUNTAIN SAFETY TALK

Mountain safety talk given by qualified mountain guide. Learn about mountain safety in-and-out of bounds and backcountry, basic avalanche awareness, mountain etiquette and rules, how to stay safe in treed runs and deep snow. For more email info@WelcomeWhistler.com. > 10:30 am > Whistler Public Library ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 

PRESCHOOL STORY TIME

Books, songs and rhymes for preschoolaged children, accompanied by a caregiver. Registration is not required. > 10:30-11 am > Whistler Public Library

skateboard mini-ramp (skateboards and helmets to borrow), free Wi-Fi, Xbox One, PS3 & PS4, guitars, board games, a projector and widescreen TVs. Free. 604-935-8187. > 3:30-11 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

SATURDAY JAN26 SPORTS

WOMEN’S SKI DAY 2019

Whistler Olympic Park invites all women to the third annual “Women’s Ski Day,” a full day of cross country ski fun, learning and connecting with like-minded women! For more, visit whistlersportlegacies.com/whistler-olympicpark/events/womens-ski-day-2019. > 8:30 am-3:30 pm > Whistler Olympic Park

WALK AND TALK SERIES

See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 3 & 7 pm > Audain Art Museum COMMUNITY

WHISTLER PRIDE SKIOUT AND MARCH

Local artists and artisans sell their goods at the Made in Whistler Market. Free admission. > 12-6 pm > Westin Resort & Spa

SUNDAY JAN27

FAMILY APRÈS

AWARE KIDS NATURE CLUB

Held on the last Sunday of every month, these free sessions are focused on encouraging learning through fun interactive activities. Open to all ages, but geared toward ages 5 to 11, all children must be accompanied by an adult. Free. > 10-11:30 am > Whistler Public Library

GAMES CAFE

WALK AND TALK SERIES

See Sunday’s listing for more info. > 4-8 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

GAMES CAFE

Come in and enjoy a massive selection of popular games. > 4-8 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

COMMUNITY 

A parent-directed hour with board games, crafts and a story corner with felt puppets. A drop-in program for families of all ages. Free. > 3:30-4:30 pm > Whistler Public Library

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM

For ages 13 to 18. We offer ping pong, a

For more information on featured events

Sea to Sky

Whistler knows how to après and now the whole family can celebrate a great day on the slopes with even more fun at Olympic Plaza. Parents can share stories about their day with a warm beverage while the kids participate in a variety of outdoor, winter activities and entertainment each week. > 3-6 pm > Whistler Olympic Plaza COMMUNITY 

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES

FAMILY TOGETHER TIME

Get your resume reviewed, learn about the local labour market, job search tips, and more. All services are free. For details, call 1-877-932-1611 or go to WhistlerESC.com. > 3-6 pm > Whistler Public Library COMMUNITY 

COMMUNITY 

COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY 

WHISTLER YOUTH CENTRE DROP-IN

See Friday’s listing for more info. > 6-10 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

Beginning from Mid Station on Whistler Mountain at 3:30 p.m., skiers in colourful and creative outfits hoist aloft the larger-than-life pride flag while skiing down the mountain to the village, where anyone is welcome to join in the march through the village in celebration of diversity and inclusivity. > 3:30-5:30 pm > Whistler Mountain

WHISTLER YOUTH CENTRE DROP-IN

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

MADE IN WHISTLER MARKET

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 

WORKBC EMPLOYMENT SERVICES DROP IN

COMMUNITY 

MONDAY JAN28 SPORTS

WHISTLER TRI CLUB SWIM SQUAD

See Friday’s listing for more info. > 6-7:15 am > Meadow Park Sports Centre

TUESDAY JAN29 COMMUNITY

CREATING COMMUNITY AND COHOUSING

Join us on our journey to creating REAL community through the cohousing model of building a neighbourhood community. Cohousing is not a commune, not a cooperative. For more information, visit our website at thecoastalvillage. ca or call Janey Harper at 778-840-1529. > 11:30 am-1:30 pm

Pique in your pants m.piquenewsmagazine.com

on your smart phone

Recycle? Yes or no?

Get the BC RECYCLEPEDIA App WE DON’T WANT YOUR NAME...

just your information!

1-800-222-8477 (TIPS) Visit us on facebook Sea to Sky Crime Stoppers

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PiqueCal COMMUNITY

GAMES CAFE

See Sunday’s listing for more info. > 4-8 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar

Resort Municipality of Whistler

Budget 2019 Community Information Meeting Monday, February 4, 4 to 7 p.m. (Presentation at 5 p.m.) Maury Young Arts Centre, 4335 Blackcomb Way Join members of Council and staff to learn about plans for our community this year, ask questions and share your ideas. Be in the know about your municipality, the budget that funds it, and priorities and projects for 2019. 4 to 5 p.m. 5 to 5:45 p.m. 5:45 to 7 p.m.

Gallery walk (displays and discussion) Comments and presentations by Mayor and Council, Chief Administrative Officer, and Staff Gallery walk (displays and discussion)

Find more information at whistler.ca/budget.

Resort Municipality of Whistler whistler.ca

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS The SLRD is looking for interested residents of Squamish and SLRD Electoral Area D to serve on the Squamish Valley Agricultural Plan Steering Committee (SVAPSC). The SVAPSC will guide and contribute to the development of a comprehensive Agricultural Plan for the Squamish Valley. Ideally, applicants should: • • • •

Be a land owner and/or permanent resident of Electoral Area D or Squamish; Be involved with or interested in agriculture and food systems; Have an interest in enhancing the productivity of foodlands in the Squamish area; Be available to commit to roughly 4-6 meetings between February 2019 and March 2020.

Please note you do not need to be a farmer - anyone who has an interest or expertise in agriculture, food systems, community economic development and related matters is welcome to apply. Application forms can be obtained on the SLRD website at www.slrd.bc.ca/SquamishValleyAgPlan or by contacting the SLRD office at 604-894-6371/1-800-298-7753, or dropping by the District of Squamish office at 37955 Second Avenue, Squamish, BC. Please submit your application by February 1, 2019. For additional information please contact: Claire Dewar, Senior Planner Squamish-Lillooet Regional District E-mail: cdewar@slrd.bc.ca

70 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

COMMUNITY COMMUNITY 

WE RUN WHISTLER: WEEKLY GROUP RUN

Group run for intermediate runners and above. Two distance options: approximately 5 km and 10 km. Check our Facebook page, facebook. com/groups/werunwhistler for weekly updates. Headlamps mandatory. #werunwhistler rain or shine… or snow! Free. > 5:55 pm > Lululemon

This project is funded in part by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and the Government of British Columbia through programs delivered by the Investment Agriculture Foundation of B.C., and is being led by the SLRD in partnership with the DoS and Squamish Food Policy Council.

FAMILY APRÈS

See Monday’s listing for more info. > 3-6 pm > Whistler Olympic Plaza COMMUNITY 

GAMES CAFE

See Sunday’s listing for more info. > 4-8 pm > Cranked Espresso Bar ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 

SPORTS

TENNIS LOCALS’ NIGHT

COMMUNITY BOOK CLUB

All levels are welcome to join in the locals’ night. Clinic for beginners and casual play for intermediate and advanced players. Free racket rental, snacks and beverage included! $20. 604-932-1991. > 6:30-8:30 pm > Whistler Racquet Club

Join Whistler Public Library and Armchair Books on the fourth Wednesday of every month for this community book club. Free and open to all. Pick up the book at the library or mention the book club to buy it for 15-per-cent off at Armchair Books. Free. > 7 pm > Whistler Public Library

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 

COMMUNITY 

ARMCHAIR TOURS WITH JUSTA JESKOVA AND STEVE STOREY

INTERACT CLUB OF WHISTLER

Join us for our first Armchair Tours presentation of 2019! Justa Jeskova and Steve Storey will present Azerbaijan: Land of Contrasts. > 7-9 pm > Whistler Public Library

Squamish Valley Agricultural Plan Steering Committee

and then use different media to create a fun craft. A great opportunity for parents to connect with other parents of young children! > 10:30-11:30 am > Whistler Public Library

SPORTS 

TUESDAY NIGHT: LUNA PRESENTS HOCKEY 101

Come experience Canada’s true national pasttime: hockey! We’ve got the coaches who will teach you the basics, the sticks, the skates, and some ice time on the village rink to play! Just wear your ski or snowboard gear and bring your “A” game! Chocolate fondue for all in attendance afterwards! $8 for Luna members, $10 for everyone else. 18-to-35-year-olds only. > 7-11 pm > Maury Young Arts Centre

Interact is a club for young people ages 12 to 18 who want to make a difference in their community, mentored by the Rotary Club of Whistler and Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium. The club includes students from Whistler Secondary School, Waldorf, Spring Creek and Myrtle Philip who want to join together to tackle the issues in their community they care most about. > 4-5 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre COMMUNITY 

MOUNTAIN SPIRIT WHISTLER TOASTMASTERS

Build communication, public speaking, and leadership skills with Mountain Spirit Whistler Toastmasters. Everyone welcome. > 5:30-7 pm > Pan Pacific Mountain Side ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 

COMMUNITY

WHISTLER SINGERS

Whistler’s community choir. No auditions and everyone welcome. 604-932-2979. > 7-9 pm > Myrtle Philip Community Centre

WEDNESDAY JAN30 SPORTS

INDOOR PICKLEBALL DROP-IN

Have fun with others learning the fastest growing sport in North America or simply play a game! All levels welcome. Free paddle rental. $8. 604-932-1991. > 10-11:30 am > Whistler Racquet Club ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 

BOOK & CRAFT CLUB

Drop in for this casual session, where preschool-aged children will enjoy a short story

THE RADICALS - MOVIE SCREENING W/MARIEFRANCE ROY The Radicals follows a group of snowboarders and surfers who drift from their sport into the world of activism. They journey across the West Coast of British Columbia, weaving a story of learning, inspiration and resistance. Featured Patagonia ambassador Marie-France Roy will join for a Q&A following the movie screening. Free. 604-932-2526. > 6-8 pm > Patagonia Store

in your pants Pique Newsmagazine’s mobile site is your guide to everything in Whistler. Search over 167 restaurant listings, events, activities and more.

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Beautiful Hot Blonde - Cherry Double D Delicious. Tight & pristine, extremely blessed, gorgeous girl. She loves to be watched, loves attention & wants to entertain you with her lust crusade. Duos & Stags. 24Hrs. 1-604- 902-1112. Clean, classy & discreet.

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Where locals look

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Monthly or seasonal rental accommodation that is available to local renters for less than 12 months, or where the rental price varies throughout the year.

CALL OR PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED WITH OUR ONLINE SERVICE FOR EITHER PRINT OR ONLINE...OR BOTH!

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Foxy, sexy, raven haired, olive skinned Mediterranean beauty available for sensual massage sessions. Enquire for further information, availability and rates text/call: (604)262-5183

The Bachelor Plan

STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! STAGS! DEALERS AND BIKINI CLAD CADDIES. ESCORTS MAKE ANY PARTY AMAZING!! STRIPPERS TOPLESS BLACKJACK DEALERS 6 0SEXY 4 -SKI9 INSTRUCTORS! 38-6456 For the Time of Your Life! MAKE ANY PARTY AMAZING!

Nightly and/or weekly rental accommodation, available to visitors over a short period of time.

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ses Party Hostes Ski Bunnies rs Topless Deale Strip Shows

LONG TERM RENTAL MANAGEMENT SERVICES Property Owners seeking Annual or Seasonal Rental Income from screened Tenants, please contact one of our 6 Rental Agents to discuss revenue, services & fees.

Our pretty promo hostesses will join you skiing, out for dinner or back at your place for a fun chalet party. These are real girls (not pros) who actually look like their photos.

LICENSED RENTAL AGENTS:

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Simon Westwood 604-967-1195 simon@WhistlerProperty.com

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Forrest Chittick 604-902-7178 forrest@WhistlerProperty.com Rosie Blaser 604-932-8864 rosie@WhistlerProperty.com

Get the added punch to make your business ad standout with a classified display ad.

on select stands and in Whistler hotel rooms.

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piquenewsmagazine.com

Winter 2019 Issue

Helene Huang 604-902-0608

Free ad design, colour options, incentives for ad frequency.

604-938-0202

Vista Place is a new, leading-edge residential and business rental complex minutes from downtown Pemberton and all the Sea-to-Sky Corridor has to offer. The development’s first phase, Vista Place I, will be completed in early 2019. Spacious contemporary apartments on the second storey feature stunning views - and have been designed with long-term livability in mind. Versatile secondfloor office spaces and groundfloor commercial spaces are ready to be customized to suit your small business vision. info@vistaplacebc.com https://vistaplacepemberton.com/

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online print only & online

INDUSTRIAL PARK (PEMBERTON)

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Duane Kercher 604-932-7849 duane@WhistlerProperty.com

Queen mattresses from $289.99 Bunk Beds from $699.99 Sofa beds from $1099.99

VIEW AVAILABLE RENTAL LISTINGS AT:

whistlerfurniture.ca

WhistlerProperty.com

NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 2-1020 Millar Creek Road

604.938.4285

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 24, 2019 | 71


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classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com MARKETPLACE

HOME SERVICES

HOME SERVICES

HOME SERVICES

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PETS

CONTRACTING/SURVEYING

CLEANING

MOVING AND STORAGE

MOVING AND STORAGE

VACATION RENTAL CLEANING & PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

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FRIEND US ON:

Open 10am-5pm, 7 days a week 1003 Lynham Road, Function Junction 604-932-1125 Recycle, Re-build and Re-invest in your community. All proceeds support 28 programs and services such as the food bank, outreach services, and counseling assistance offered by Whistler Community Services. www.mywcss.org Like us on Facebook @ Whistler Community Service Society

+ Central Location,

8 X 10 CONTAINERS

+ 20’ (one-trip) Shipping Containers

Dont forget to scoop the poop! It’s not fun to step in, or to see around town. Help keep Whistler clean and pick up after your dog.

WHISTLER’S #1 NEWS SOURCE

Ceiling, Walls and Doors + Pre-wired 20-Amp Service With Overhead Light, Duplex Plug and

Overhead Doors, Light, No Heat now available 1

2019-01-04

9:54 AM

fenced & gated access.

CONTACT

604.966.8080 8080Nesters@telus.net www.nestersstorage.ca

Serving Whistler for over 25 years

• Kitchen and Bath • Renovations & Repairs • Drywall • Painting • Finishing • Minor Electrical & Plumbing

NORTHLANDS

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Ray Wiebe 604.935.2432 Pat Wiebe 604.902.9300 raymondo99.69@gmail.com C

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604.932.1968

Open Monday through Friday 8:30 - 4:30 Saturday 10:00 -4:00 Sundays and Evenings by appointment only.

FREE STUFF

Phone 604-938-1126 email shawcarpet@shaw.ca

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE & SERVICES All-around Handyman Services

Family owned & operated

3-1365 Alpha Lake Road Whistler, B.C, V0N1B1

Outdoor storage for RV’s, Boats, Campers, Vehicles etc $2 per LFT. Call 604.935.9370 or email gphare@shaw.ca

Y

CARPET & FLOOR CENTRE

72 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

STORAGE

STORAGE SPACE

CM

SHAW Five level homemade server stand with slatted sliding wire racks. Can also be an excellent storage unit for storing boots, shoes etc... Call 604-938-0202 to arrange pick up.

Call Mike Walsh

604 698 0054

electronic monitoring

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4 HRS FREE TRUCK TIME

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160 +

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piquenewsmagazine.com/events

Pemberton Industrial Park 1944 Stone Cutter Place Owner Residence On-Site

Whistler Village

FOR SALE - MISC

Furniture, appliances, kitchen cabinets, doors, plumbing, tools, flooring, hardware, lumber, lighting and more!

WALSH STORAGE

5 Minutes North of

604-815-0057 Alpenlofts@gmail.com Alpenloftsvet.ca 106-40775 Tantalus Rd Squamish, BC

Re-Build-It Centre

We Added More Containers!

SPACE NOW AVAILABLE!

CALL SARA

January and February Book Your Appointment NOW!

USE A WALSH CUBE TRUCK FOR FREE TO MOVE YOUR POSSESSIONS TO WALSH STORAGE

8080 Nesters Road Whistler, BC

604.848.8987 sara@goldmedalcleaning.ca goldmedalcleaning.ca

DENTAL SERVICES

Shopping and Donation hours: 11am - 6pm, 7 days a week 8000 Nesters Road 604-932-1121

STORAGE

Housekeeping - daily, weekly monthly Move in/out & Construction Cleaning IICRC Professional carpet cleaning Caretaker Services

Open 7 Days A Week Dental Focus Months!

Come and visit Whistler’s funkiest thrift store and get (almost) everything you need for your EPIC season! Winter clothes, skis, boards, boots, bindings, goggles, toques and more! As well as all the usual stuff to make that rented closet feel like a palace. You may even find some hidden treasure you never knew needed.

8080 NESTERS

WALSH

RESTORATION

big or small we do it all! Call 604-902-MOVE www.alltimemoving.ca

Customized Services based on your needs

604-935-0994 snowburstwhistler@gmail.com


there's no better way to buy and sell than Pique's online marketplace. Services

Services

Community

HEALTH & WELLBEING

HEALTH & WELLBEING

NOTICES

SALON & SPA

SPORTS & ACTIVITIES

LEGAL/PUBLIC NOTICES

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

BLUE HIGHWAYS MASSAGE & SPA

LIL’WAT NATION JOB POSTING: HIGH SCHOOL SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHER

Yoga for You with Baby! massage clinic & spa

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE Serving Whistler for 25 years in: Deep Tissue Massage, Relaxation, Thai & Shiatsu, Therapeutic Massage, Reflexology, Aromatherapy & Hot Stone Massage Registered Therapists available on request

Registered Massage, Registered Counselling & Registered Chiropractic RMT specials on request

604-938-0777 #206 - 4368 MAIN ST. 2ND FLOOR, MARKET PAVILION

Parent & Baby Yoga @ Meadow Park Sports Centre Tuesdays 10:30-11:30am www.whistler.ca/recreation 604-935-PLAY (7529)

Community

NOTICES GENERAL NOTICES ROTARY CLUBS OF WHISTLER & PEMBERTON

Tuesdays at 7:15 a.m. BG Urban Grill: 604-905-5090 & Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. at the Pan Pacific, Mountainside. www.whistler-rotary.org

Spiritual Bliss experience the healing powers of the ila™ kundalini massage save $25 this january available monday-thursdays, january 1st - 31st. not valid with any other package or discount. certain conditions apply.

ask about our RMT locals rate locals discount available for all regular-priced spa treatments. ask our team for further details.

Pemberton Rotary Club at the Pemberton Community Centre, Wednesdays at 7:15am www.pembertonrotary.ca

U.S.

Exchange Rate

29% as recommended by:

@TheSpaAtNitaLakeLodge

2131 Lake Placid Road

604 966 5715 www.nitalakelodge.com/spa

M.Ed., RCC, SEP CREATE CHANGE Rational, Compassionate Psychotherapy

P: 604-935-0968 E: Greg@McdonnellCounselling.ca W: McdonnellCounselling.ca

A replacement draft of a Forest Stewardship Plan #422 for the Whistler area Cheakamus Community Forest K3V is available for review by the public, community stakeholders and commercial recreation operators from January 23rd to March 27th 2019. The copy of the draft replacement plan is available at the Whistler Public Library at 4329 Main Street during business hours or alternatively it is available through: http://www. cheakamuscommunityforest. com/ccf-projects/ A Forest Stewardship Plan addresses the Provincial Forest and Range Practices Act, Part 2: Division 1 and guides all primary forest activities within the Community Forest Tenure for the next 5 years. While the plan is technical in nature as it addresses the 11 forest values and objectives set by government for the area, the plan also includes the efforts since 2010 to balance forest management with the recreation and conservation priorities of the First Nations and resort community.

Comments to this draft plan must be received in writing by March 29th 2019 for their consideration by the statutory decision maker.

COUNSELLING

Youth, young adults, adults, family therapy and sport performance counselling.

Notice of Public Viewing-Forest Stewardship Plan

For those unable to adequately review this draft plan by these means you are asked to contact Tom Cole RPF 604-932-7616 or tomcole7616@gmail.com

located at Nita Lake Lodge above Loka Yoga free parking and village shuttle

PICK UP YOUR

Cheakamus Community Forest 4325 Blackcomb Way Whistler BC V0N 1B4 Attn: Heather Beresford – Environmental Manager

hberesford@whistler.ca

COPY TODAY

FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Position Type: Categories: Location:

Teaching Position High School Xet’olacw Community School, Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 FTE: 1 No. of Positions: 1 Reporting to: Education Director Salary: As per the Teaching Salary Grid Posting Date: January 23, 2019 Closing Date: Feb 6, 2019 Details: Xet’olacw Community School is a Lil’wat Nation school situated 35 minutes north of Whistler, BC in the Mount Currie Community. The School is a modern, dynamic institution with a strong First Nations curriculum as well as academics from N to 12. Work in a collaborative environment with High School Teachers and the Elementary Special Education Coordinator. Will be responsible to teach various High School subjects. Involvement and could lead to overseeing High School Smart Goals, receiving support from FNSA (First Nations Schools Association) Key Qualifications and Attributes: • Possession of / or ability to apply for a B.C. Teaching Certificate • Member of the Teacher Regular Branch • Must complete a Criminal Record Check • Completion or in the process of attaining a Masters in Special Education or a diploma in special education. • Experience and/or education in special needs • Experience with and appreciation of First Nations culture is preferred. • Experience and education in secondary English • Ability to work within a cooperative environment • Innovative and energetic • Positive thinking and ability to work as a team member • Ability to work in a collaborative culture • Skill in developing instructional strategies based on strengths and weaknesses of individual students • Background in relationship-based learning and discursive practices. • Corrective Reading experience an asset • Six Minute Solution experience an asset • Completion of an Educational Assistant program and/or experience as an Educational Assistant is an asset. Applications and Other Documents: Send cover letter and resume including references no later than 4:30 p.m. on February 6, 2019 Contact Information: Verna Stager Education Director Xet’olacw Community School P.O. Box 604 Mount Currie, B.C. V0N 2K0 Tel: 604 894-6131 Fax: (604) 894-5717 Preference will be given to Mount Currie Band Members. We thank for your interest; however, only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 24, 2019 | 73


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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

NOTICES

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

WHISTLER’S RE-IMAGINED ITALIAN RESTAURANT

PERSONAL MESSAGES Sea to Sky Healing Room - For Blessing/Prayer/Encouragement In the Community Church building, 7422 Dogwood Street, Pemberton. Every 1st and 3rd Wednesday: 4-6 PM

MEETING PLACE

Basalt Wine + Salumeria are currently looking to fill the roles of:

HOSTS LUNCH SERVERS LINE COOKS DISHWASHERS Please send your cover letter and resume to skeenan-naf@crystal-lodge.com Wages are very competitive (based on experience), great perks and benefits. Full and Part Time positions available. Come join the best team in Whistler!

Join an established management team at Il Caminetto - the newest Whistler restaurant to join the Toptable Group famiglia! The storied restaurant offers a modern taste of Italy to bring a fresh, contemporary style of dining to the mountain.

RESERVATIONS MANAGER Il Caminetto is seeking a full-time Reservations Manager. This individual will set the tone for the entire dining experience while overseeing the front desk team. The ideal candidate is well spoken, organized, confident, outgoing, and well-presented.

Welcome Centre at Whistler Public Library Information, support, community connections and ESL practice groups for newcomers and immigrants. Meet people, make connections, volunteer, build your communication skills in English. Multicultural Meet Up every Friday 9.30-12pm.604-6985960 info@welcomewhistler.com FB: WhistlerWelcomeCentre

QUALIFICATIONS • Minimum 2 years experience in a fine dining or comparable environment is required • Post Secondary education is an asset • Familiarity with OpenTable is an asset

We offer year round full time hours, competitive wages, gratuities, extended medical & dental, accommodations, potential for future growth within the company and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants. Please email your resume & cover letter to:

careers@ilcaminetto.ca

WHISTLER COMMUNITY LISTINGS Made in Whistler Market- Saturday's from 12-6p.m. on December 15th, 22nd, 23rd, 29th & 30th. Then every Saturday, January 2019 through March 2019. Free Admission at The Westin Resort & Spa in Whistler.

VOLUNTEERS Big Brothers, Big Sisters Sea to Sky Volunteer to Mentor- just 1hr/week - and make a difference in a child's life. Call 604-892-3125.

EDUCATION WHISTLER’S RE-IMAGINED ITALIAN RESTAURANT Project Manager. Qualifications are listed below. We’re looking for a reliable person to join our Pemberton office team.

Il Caminetto is the newest Whistler restaurant to join the Toptable Group Must be familiar with residential construction. famiglia! The storied restaurant offers a modern taste of Italy to bring a fresh, contemporary style of dining to the mountain.

This position is office based. Ideal for a carpenter looking to get off the tools or for an existing project manager. Must have experience with runFRONT-OF-HOUSE: BACK-OF-HOUSE: ning projects from start to finish, as a manager or builder.

Host or Hostess

Must have basic computer skills. Food Expeditor

Line Cooks

(2-3 years related experience)

Dishwashers Server Assistant Please respond with your resume to admin@fitzgeraldinc.ca We offer round and hours, competitive wages, The year second onefull will bepart-time for a Carpenter. Qualifications aregratuities, listed below. extended medical & dental, accommodations, potential for future growth within the company and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants.

We’re looking for a skilled carpenter to join our team.

PleaseOur email your resume & cover letter to: market is primarily Pemberton\Birken

careers@ilcaminetto.ca single and multi family.

custom and spec homes,

WE ARE HIRING:

FIRST AID AND SURVIVAL

Project Manager We’re looking for a reliable person to join our Pemberton office team. Must be familiar with residential construction. This position is office based. Ideal for a carpenter looking to get off the tools or for an existing project manager. Must have experience with running projects from start to finish, as a manager or builder. Must have basic computer skills.

Carpenter We’re looking for a skilled carpenter to join our team. Our market is primarily Pemberton\Birken custom and spec homes, single and multi family. Red Seal certification is an asset.

Please respond with your resume to admin@fitzgeraldinc.ca

Red seal certification is an asset.

Avalanche Skills Training Courses - Level 1+ & Level 2 Glacier Travel / Crevasse Rescue Courses Guided Backcountry Adventures (WB Passholder discounts available)

extremelycanadian.com

604-938-9656

WE ARE LOOKING TO HIRE:

Please respond with your resume to admin@fitzgeraldinc.ca

BUSSERS HOSTS

COMMUNITY LISTINGS ARTS & CULTURE

(FULL-TIME)

PREP COOK

(day shifts only, prep experience required)

DISHWASHERS Full-time and year round. We feature evening work only, staff meals, competitive wages and a great work environment. So if you’re looking for a change or some extra hours, come by and see us. Flexible schedules are available. REPLY IN PERSON WITH RESUME BETWEEN 3-5 AT QUATTRO 4319 Main St. in the Pinnacle Hote

74 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

Currently seeking:

JOURNEYMEN AND APPRENTICES in Pemberton, Whistler and Squamish We are looking for motivated employees eager to learn and grow with our company. Strong communication skills, hard work ethic with a knowledge of electrical code are all necessary attributes. Wages negotiable depending on experience and willingness to take on responsibilities. • Work Van  • Benefits • Consistent work right through the year • Low stress work environment and most pow days.  Email cover letters and resumes to: SB@NOBLEELECTRIC.CA WWW.NOBLEELECTRIC.CA

Arts Whistler - Full arts & culture listings. Comprehensive artist directory & programs, events & performances year-round. For info 604-935-8410 or visit www.artswhistler.com Pemberton Arts Council - Connect with other artists, writers, artisans, musicians & help make Pemberton a vibrant arts community. Call 604-452-0123 or visit www.pembertonartscouncil.com Pemberton Writers - Meet with other writers to review and critique monthly. Opportunities for writing in a comfortable and creative setting. Email crowley7@telus.net


there's no better way to buy and sell than Pique's online marketplace.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

COMMUNITY LISTINGS ARTS & CULTURE

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Sea to Sky Singers - Invites new & former members to join us for an exciting new term, the spring & fall terms culminate with a concert. Choir meets Tues, 7-9pm at Squamish Academy of Music, 2nd Ave. Veronica seatoskysingers@gmail.com or 604- 892-7819 www.seatoskysingers.net Whistler Community Band - Rehearsals on Tuesdays 7 - 8:15 pm CONTACT whistlerchorus@gmail.com FOR LOCATION Whistler Singers - Resumes September 11th, 2018 for the fall/winter sea- son. Rehearsals are Tuesdays from 7 to 9pm at Myrtle Philip School in the Toad Hall room. Everyone is welcome! Inquiries can be sent to whistlersingers@gmail.com For more info, visit: https://www.facebook.com/whistlersingers/

CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS Donate Used Clothing & Household Goods- To be distributed to local charities by Sharon 604-894-6656 for pick up. Playground Builders: Creating Play Building Hope - Playground Builders is a registered charity that builds playgrounds for children in war-torn areas. Learn more, volunteer or donate at www. playgroundbuilders.org Sea to Sky Community Services running dozens of programs in Whistler to help people through times of crisis and with everyday challenges. www.sscs.ca 1-877-892-2022 admin@sscs.ca Stewardship Pemberton Society and the One Mile Lake Nature CentreConnecting community, nature and people through education, cooperation, and community involvement. www.stewardshippemberton.com

EXCITING CAREER OPPORTUNITIES APPLY TODAY! Diamond Resorts Canada Ltd., Whistler, BC

Full Time Tour Receptionist $16 per hour Eligible successful candidates may receive*: • Extensive benefits package which may include; ski pass or wellness allowance, disability coverage, travel insurance and extended health and dental. • Discounted employee rates at any Diamond Resort International resort. • Full-time work year round and a FUN work environment. *eligibility and conditions based on DRCL policies and practices set out in general terms and conditions of employment.

We are currently interviewing:

Project Managers Site Supervisors Project Coordinator Carpenters Carpenters Helpers Labourers Level 2 First Aid Attendant Please submit resume to: info@evrfinehomes

Email your resume with the position you wish to apply for to: Jennifer.Sequeira@diamondresorts.com

Whistler’s Premier Estate Builder

Whistler Health Care Foundation raises funds for improving health care resources and services. New board members welcomed. Contact us at info@ whistlerhealthcarefoundation.org or call Karen at 604-906-1435.

SPORTS & RECREATION

The Beacon Pub and Eatery is currently looking for:

Alpine Club of Canada Whistler Section- Outdoor club focused on ski/split board touring, hiking, mountaineering and skills training. More info: accwhistler.ca Trip Schedule: accwhistler.ca/trips/

LINE COOKS DISHWASHERS

Griffin Squadron Squamish Air CadetsOpen to youth 12-18yrs at Don Ross Secondary School on Tues at 6:30pm. Pemberton Valley Snowmobile Club Meets first Thurs of each month Dec - April, 7pm at the Pemberton Comm. Centre. BCSF/Rutherford trail passes & liability insurance available for purchase. Contact 604-894-1155 for info.

Wages are very competitive (based on experience), great perks and benefits. Come join the best team in Whistler! Interested applicants please email your resume to skeenan-naf@Crystal-Lodge.com

Pemberton Valley Trails AssociationMeets the second Wed of each month. 7pm at the Pemberton Recreation Centre. Call 604-698-6158 Sea to Sky RC Flyers - Model Aeronautics Association of Canada Club active in the Sea to Sky Region flying model airplanes, helicopters and multirotors. Contact S2SRCFLY@telus.net Whistler Adaptive Sports Program Provides sports & recreation experiences for people with disabilities. Chelsey Walker at 604-905-4493 or info@whistleradaptive.com Whistler Martial Arts offers - Kishindo Karate for kids age 4 and up, Capoeira and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu for kids and adults. Also Kickboxing, Judo, Yoga and Bellyfit for adults. Call Cole 932-2226

Resort Municipality of Whistler

Employment Opportunities · Municipal Clerk · Capital Projects Supervisor, Facility Construction Management · Lifeguard/Swim Instructor · Program Leader - Myrtle Philip Community Centre

Resort Municipality of Whistler whistler.ca/careers

SOLID CONTRACTING is currently looking for

LABOURERS, CARPENTERS, FINISH CARPENTERS We offer full-time/flex-time positons in a positive, safe work environment. Salary based on experience. Send us your resume or call Solidcontracting@gmail.com 604-966-7062

solid-homes.com

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 24, 2019 | 75


book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday:

classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

COMMUNITY LISTINGS SPORTS & RECREATION

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Women's Karma Yoga - Thursdays, 9:30-10:30, ongoing by donation and childminding provided. Whistler Women's Centre: 1519 Spring Creek Drive. Dropin for weekly yoga classes led by an all female team of certified yoga instructors. All women, all ability levels welcome. hswc.ca | 604-962- 8711

FRAMERS WANTED!

Why work for us ... ? • 4 on 3 off or 5 on 2 off a week depending on your preference, weekends or mid-week days off available. Full-Time or Part-Time. • Diversify your Carpentry or Building Experience. • We specialize in Concrete Forming using modular handset and gang forms – a different experience than traditional plywood and snap-ties. • We also do framing, rebar, and residential construction projects. • We own our own Rough Terrain Crane, Skid Steer, and Forklift - we like to use machinery on site – it’s better than hand bombing and packing. • Mix of work between Pemberton and Whistler. • Pemberton team members have ride available to and from Whistler job sites. • Medical and Dental Benefits. • Potential for future growth within the company. • Competitive wages. • We care about you and your goals. • Looking for journeymen, lead hands and assistants. • If you have common sense, good work ethic, and like moving faster than a snail - we do too - join the team!

Please send resume to admin@thorworksconstruction.com Or call Brandon: (604) 902-8467 Or both.

YOUTH ACTIVITIES

ResortQuest Whistler is currently hiring: Breakfast Attendants - Part time/Full Time Group Sales Coordinator Temp Maintenance Room Inspector Benefits include - activity allowance, extended medical, RRSP match, opportunities for growth and more. To apply for this opportunity, please specify the position and email your resume and cover letter to: beth.fraser@resortquestwhistler.com We thank all applicants for their interest but only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

1st Whistler Scout Group - outdoor & adventure program for girls and boys aged 5-17. Times and locations vary. More info: http://1stwhistlerscoutgroup. webs.com. Contact scoutsatwhistler @gmail.com or 604-966-4050. Whistler Children's Chorus Rehearsal - Tuesdays at MILLENNIUM PLACE (4 5:30 pm) contact whistlerchorus@gmail. com Whistler/Pemberton Girl Guides Adventures for Girls age 5 & up. Sparks & Brownies (Gr K,1,2,3) Guides (Gr 4,5,6) Volunteers always welcome. coastmountaingirlguides@gmail.com Whistler Youth Centre - Drop - in: Fridays 3:30 - 11 PM & Saturdays 6 - 10 PM for ages 13 - 18. Located downstairs in the Maury Young Arts Centre (formerly Millenium Place). We offer: a Ping pong table, Pool table, Skateboard mini ramp w. skateboards and helmets to borrow, Free Wi-Fi, Xbox One, PS3 & PS4, Guitars, Board games, Projector and widescreen TV's. Facebook THEYC Crew, www. whistleryouthcentre.com or call 604-935-8187.

LEISURE GROUPS Duplicate Bridge Club- Whistler Racquet Club reconvenes in late fall. The club meets every week and visitors are welcome. For partner, please call Gill at 640-932-5791.

CREATIVE AND COLLABORATIVE? WORK WITH US! Are you all about delivering excep�onal client and event services, exercising your excellent communica�on skills, or perhaps you’re an engaging arts lover? Are you the amazing person we’re looking for to join our crea�ve team?

CLIENT & EVENT SERVICES COORDINATOR Full-�me posi�on

APPLY TODAY! artswhistler.com/careers

Apply to: getinvolved@artswhistler.com | Attn: Susan Holden MAURY YOUNG ARTS CENTRE | 604.935.8410

Knitty Gritty Knit Night- Held every Tues 6-8pm. Free evening open to everyone with a love for knitting/crocheting. Beginners welcome. For location and further details email knittygrittywhistler@ gmail.com or find us on facebook.

Delivery Driver Pique is looking for a delivery driver with a reliable vehicle to deliver Pique Newsmagazine in Whistler. Delivery is on Thursday mornings. Experience is not essential as a full route list and training will be provided.

We are hiring journeymen & apprentices for the following trades:

Plumbers, Gas Fitters, HVAC, Refrigeration, Skilled General Labour We are a seven-day-a-week service and repair company working from North Vancouver to Pemberton. We provide flexible steady employment, good wages, benefit package, service vehicle, cell phone and more. The successful candidate will be a professional tradesman both in appearance, skill and attitude that is able to work independently and as part of a team. Send resume in confidence to:

spearhead.plumbing@gmail.com www.spearheadplumbing.com

76 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

Please reply with name, phone number, and a resume to lprior@wplpmedia.com

WHISTLER GETS IT

Mountain Spirit Toastmasters- Builds communication, public speaking, and leadership skills . Wednesdays at the Pan Pacific Mountainside - Singing Pass Room, 5:30-7pm. Email contact 8376@toastmastersclubs.org www.whistler.toastmastersclubs.org Pemberton Women's Institute - Meets the third Mon of each month in the activity room at St. David's United Church at 7:30pm. New members welcome. Linda Ronayne at 604-894- 6580 Rotary Club of Whistler - Meets Tuesdays at 7:15 a.m at BG Bread Garden Urban Grill 604-905-5090 Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium - Meets every Thurs at 12:15pm at Pan Pacific Mountainside. 604-932-7782 Shades of Grey Painters Meets twice a week Tuesdays, Watercolour, 11.00am- 2.30pm @ The Rec, Pemberton. Thursdays, Acrylic, 1.00pm-3.30pm @ The Amenities Building, Pioneer Village, Pemberton. We are like- minded people that get together & paint. Gretchen is the painting coach. $5 to attend. Whistler Reads - Meets to discuss a new book every eight weeks. Go to bookbuffet. com & click on Whistler Reads for the latest book/event. Paula at 604-907-2804 or wr@bookbuffet.com


there's no better way to buy and sell than Pique's online marketplace.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

COMMUNITY LISTINGS COMMUNITY CENTRES

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

Maury Young Arts Centre - Whistler's community centre for arts, culture & inspiration. Performance theatre, art gallery, daycare, youth centre, meditation room, meeting facilities. www.artswhistler. com or 604-935-8410

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Pemberton & District Community Centre - Located at 7390 Cottonwood St. Fitness Centre, facility rentals, spray park, playground, children, youth, adult & seniors programs. For more info 604-894-2340 or pemrecinfo@slrd.bc.ca Whistler Blackcomb Foundation Social Services Centre - 1519 Spring Creek Dr. Features programs & services from WCSS, The Howe Sound Women's Centre, Sea to Sky Community Services & Zero Ceiling. Open Mon-Fri.

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Squamish Lil'wat Cultural Centre Explore First Nations Art Galleries, and Interactive Exhibits. Gift Shop & Cafe are in our admission free area. Open Tuesday's-Sunday's per week. 10am5p.m..

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Whistler Museum & Archives Society - Explore interactive exhibits, listen to local stories & discover Whistler's journey. Open daily 11am- 5pm,# 4333 21 Main St. www.whistlermuseum.org or 604-932-2019

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

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COME WORK FOR CANADA’S #1 EMPLOYER!

Fairmont was voted Canada’s Top-Rated Workplace for 2018 by Indeed.com

CURRENT CAREER OPPORTUNITIES Security Conference Services Manager Room Attendants Culinary Opportunities Summer Golf Opportunities Talent Acquisition Manager Director of Banquets Royal Service Agent Overnights Stewarding Night Cleaner Night Supervisor – Front Office

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Benefits | Meals | Leisure/Ski Pass Allowance

PROFESSIONAL NETWORKING BNI Mountain High- Meets at 6:458:30am every Thursday at The Venue. BNI provides a positive and structured environment for the development and exchange of quality business referrals. It does so by helping you build personal relationships with dozens of other qualified business professionals. Register by emailing blair@blairkaplan.ca.

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APPLY TODAY AT FAIRMONTCAREERS.COM

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Whistler Chamber of Commerce - Is the leading business association in Whistler that works to create a vibrant & successful economy. Learn more about the programs & services at www.whistlerchamber.com

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Women of Whistler - Group that provides opportunities for Whistler businesswomen to network, gain knowledge & share ideas in a friendly, relaxed environment. Learn more at www.womenofwhistler.com

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Mature Action Community [MAC]- Is the voice of Whistler's 55-Plus community. MAC identifies, and advocates for seniors programs and services to improve the quality of life for those wishing to age inplace; MAC also provides opportunities for social interaction. Visit www.whistlermac. org or e-mail info@whistlermac.org

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Pemberton Men's Shed - Weekly social meetings WED. 11-2 # in 23the Seniors/ youth Rec. bldg. beside library. Social meeting with BYO Bag lunch, card games and pool/snooker. Help out in YOUR community, operating the Pemberton Tool Library.

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HOT TUB SERVICE TECHNICIAN FULL TIME

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Dub Tubs - Quality Pool and Hot Tub Services is currently looking for a Full Time Service Technician; no previous technician experience necessary, as training is provided.

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Service Technician positions involve driving from home to home maintaining private property hot tubs. The selected candidate will have great customer service skills and the ability/maturity to work alone. Valid BC drivers licence and cell phone is required. Position available to begin immediately.

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Wage: $16.00-$18.00/hour Please send resume to info@dubtubs.com

ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY # 23 8 6 3Community 9 1 4 and 2 7Cohous5 Creating ingJoin 7 us 9 on 2 our 8 journey 5 3 4to creating 6 1 REAL community through the cohous- ing model 4 5 1 6 7 2 8 9 3 of building a neighbourhood community. 9 1 4 is2 NOT 8 7a com3 5 mune, 6 Cohousing NOT 7 6 3 Put 9 your 5 1 toe8 in4the water a2 cooperative. and coming 3 find 8 5out4more 6 1by 7 2 9to one of our weekly meetings or regular social 6 2 7 1 3 9 5 4 8 gatherings. For more information, visit our 5 3 at 9 http://thecoastalvillage.ca/ 7 4 8 6 1 2 website or 1 Ja4 ney 8 Harper 5 2 778-840-1529. 6 9 3 7 call

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Senior Citizen Organizations - Is an advocacy group devoted to improving the quality of life for all seniors. Ernie Bayer 604-576-9734 or ecbayer2@gmail.com

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9 6YOU 3 8LIVE 5 1 IN 4 PEMBERTON? DO 3 9 4 7 6 2 8 THEN WHY 2 8 COMMUTE 6 9 4 3 7 TO WHISTLER? 7 4 5 1 6

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4/11/2005

• Room Attendants

Apply to: jobs@pembertonvalleylodge.com

Competitive wages, health benefits, casual environment www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 24, 2019 | 77


book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday:

classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY Earthsave Whistler - Providing info & support to people who are interested in making healthier, greener, more peaceful food choices. earthsavewhistler.com Healthy Home, Healthy Planet - Expert in green cleaning offers tricks, info & advice on the best way to green clean your home or work space! Call France 604-698-7479. Free private presentation on request. www.healthylivingwhistler.com

Employment Insurance Information Session

We’re Hiring! Great Perks! Food & Beverage Banquet Chef - FT Front Office Manager 1st Cook - PT Pastry Assistant - PT Guest Services Agent Steward - FT (AM) & PT Shuttle Driver – BC class 4, Server Assistant Expo Unrestricted license required Host Room Attendant Barista - FT

Hotel

If you have received Employment Insurance benefits in the last 5 years you may be eligible for funding to go back to school or start your own business.

Visit us in Whistler to explore your Employment Insurance options

Whistler January 29, 3:00pm - 4:00pm 204 - 1200 Alpha Lake Road 604-932-1600 www.whistleresc.com

Ask about our staff housing opportunities

contact us today

careers@nitalakelodge.com www.nitalakelodge.com I @nitalakelodge

We are currently hiring Full Time Sales Representatives with personality! Please stop by our Whistler Village location with your resume to fill out an application and say Hi to Michelle or Tina.

The Employment Program of British Columbia is funded by the Government of Canada and the Province of British Columbia.

Staff Accommodation Available (4154 Village Green)

Roland’s Pub & Red Door Bistro Are Hiring

DISHWASHERS Start immediately!

Full and part time available, day and night shifts. Wage based on experience (minimum $14/hr), plus tips and staff meal each shift. Extended Medical & Dental benefits after 3 months full time employment. Staff discounts in Roland's Pub and Red Door Bistro.

Apply in person with resume to 2129 Lake Placid Road. 78 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

We offer competitive wages, a unique environment, seasonal bonuses, staff discounts and benefits. Ask about accommodation.

Come Grow Sport with us at our Whistler Olympic Legacy Venues We are recruiting for:

Whistler Athletes’ Centre (High Performance Training and Accommodation) Positions for this venue are currently filled

Whistler Sliding Centre (Bobsleigh, Luge & Skeleton) Track Worker

Whistler Olympic Park (Nordic Skiing, Snowshoeing and Outdoor Activities) Groomer Operator

Guest Activity Rep Snow Clearing Operator

Visit our website to view current postings and to apply: www.whistlersportlegacies.com/careers

Regional Recycling - Recycle beverage containers (full deposit paid) electronics, appliances, batteries, Lightbulbs, drop-off times are 9am-5pm on Nesters Rd. Pick up service 604- 932-3733 The Association of Whistler Area Residents for the Environment (AWARE) - Whistler's Natural Voice since 1989. Regular events, project and volunteer opportunities. www.awarewhistler.org info@awarewhistler.org

FAMILY RESOURCES Baby/Child Health Clinics - Free routine immunizations & newly licensed vaccines for purchase, growth & devel- opment assessments & plenty of age appropriate resources avail. By ap- pointment 604-932-3202

FAMILY RESOURCES Families Fighting Cancer In The Sea To Sky - We are a non profit partner with Sea to Sky Community Services. We provide financial and practical support to children and parents with dependants diagnosed with cancer. Please contact us on our confidential email: ffcseatosky@gmail. com, visit our Facebook Page or website www.familiesfightingcancer.ca Pemberton Parent Infant Drop-In Facilitated by Capri Mohammed, Public Health Nurse. Every Mon 11am- 12:30pm at Pemberton Public Library. Pemberton Strong Start Family DropIn- A play group for you and your under-5 child. Signal Hill Elementary, Mon, Tues, Wed & Fri, 9am-12pm. Thurs only 12pm3pm. Call 604-894- 6101 / 604-966- 8857 Whistler Public Library - Open MonThurs 10am-7pm, Fri 10am-6pm, Sat & Sun 11am-5pm. Music & Words, Mon 10am. Rhyme & Song, Tues 11am. Parent & Infant drop-in, Thurs 11am. Preschool Story Time, Fri 10am. Singing with the babies, Sat 11am. Call 604-935-8433

SOCIAL SERVICES Counselling Assistance Available WCSS subsidizes access to a private counselor for $35-$50/hr depending on financial need. Contact an outreach team member at 604-932-0113 www.mywcss.org ESL Volunteer Tutor Program Volunteer one-to-one tutoring for new im- migrants & Canadian citizens. For more information or to register, contact the Whistler Welcome Centre info@welcomewhistler.com or call 604.698.5960 Food Bank, Pemberton - Run by Sea to Sky Community Service. Open every second Monday. 604 894 6101 Healthy Pregnancy Outreach ProgramLearn how to prepare healthy affordable meals at this outreach program. Sea to Sky Community Services 604-894-6101 North Shore Schizophrenia Society Services for family, friends & community. Mental illness info, support & advocacy. Call Chris Dickenson at 604-966-7334


there's no better way to buy and sell than Pique's online marketplace.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

COMMUNITY LISTINGS SOCIAL SERVICES

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Pearl's Safe Home - Temporary shelter for women & children experiencing abuse in relationships. Locations in Whistler & Pemberton avail 24/7. All services are free. 1-877- 890-5711 or 604-892-5711 RMOW Rec Credit - If you are financially restricted, you may be eligible for a $127.60 municipal recreation credit. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 www.mywcss.org Support Counselling - For women regarding abuse & relationship issues. No charge. Call 604-894-6101 Victim Services - Assists victims, witnesses, family members or friends directly affected by any criminal act or traumatic event. Call 604-905-1969 Whistler for the Disabled - Provides info for people with disabilities on what to do & where to go. Visit www.whistlerforthedisabled.com Whistler Food Bank - Located in the Whistler Blackcomb Foundation Social Services Centre, 1519 Spring Creek Dr. Every Mon 10am-12pm. For emergencies call 604-935-7717 www.mywcss.org foodbank@mywcss.org Whistler Housing Authority - Long- term rental & ownership housing for Whistler residents. Visit www.whistlerhousing.ca Whistler Mental Health & Addiction Services - If you or someone you know needs help with a mental health issue or substance misuse or addiction problem, we can assist. Mon-Fri 9am- 5pm. 604698-6455 Whistler Multicultural Network Settlement information, social support and programs for newcomers and immigrants living/working in Whistler. 604-388-5511 www.whistlermulticulturalnetwork.com Whistler Opt Healthy Sexuality Clinic - Professional sexual health services at a reduced cost. Free HIV testing. Clinics at Whistler Health Care Ctr, 2nd floor on Tues 4:30-7:30pm. Winter hours Thurs. 5:00pm-7:00pm. Confidentiality assured. Whistler Women's Centre - Provides confidential support, resources, referrals and advocacy for women living in the Sea to Sky corridor. All services are free of charge and include access to emergency safe housing, child/youth counselling, play space and computer access. Drop-In Centre open Mon 12-230, Tue-Thu 12-5. 1519 Spring Creek Drive. You can also access our services at the Whistler Public Library on Mondays from 3-6 p.m. www.hswc.ca or call (604)962- 8711. 24 HR Crisis Line: 1-877-890- 5711 Whistler WorkBC Employment Services Centre - Provides free onestop employment services to job seekers and employers. Drop in services at the Pemberton Library Thursdays 1-5 PM, and at the Whistler Public Library on Mondays from 3-6 PM. For more information visit www.WhistlerESC.com or call us at 604-932-1600

SUPPORT GROUPS Concussion Support Group - Monthly group for people who've had postconcussion syndrome for at least six months. First Thursday of the month, 1112:30 at Whistler Health Care Centre. Run by Sea to Sky Community Services. 1 877 892 2022, ext 404, concussiongroup@sscs.ca Epilepsy Support Group- For individuals & families seeking guidance or support. Contact eswhistler@gmail.com

We are the Spa for you If you are looking for a new place to call home:

• We manifest positive energy • We have a long term and loyal team • We treat you fairly and look out for your wellness • You are listened to • We give you proper breaks and time to set up between services • We offer extended medical benefits • We have potential staff housing at affordable rates • You can enjoy $5.00 cafeteria meals • You have the opportunity to work for other Vida locations in slow season We are here for you. Vida Spa at the Fairmont Chateau Whistler is currently recruiting:

REGISTERED MASSAGE THERAPIST SPA PRACTITIONER ESTHETICIAN GUEST SERVICE AGENT To join our unique Vida family, email Bonnie@vidaspas.com Vida Spas - Vancouver & Whistler Live well. Live long. vidaspas.com

Thank You for applying. Only those considered will be contacted.

CONNECTIONS CONNECTION S we l lne s s

s tud i o

Currently Seeking...

RMT/ SPORTS MASSAGE THERAPIST/ HEALTH PRACTIONER P/T 1-2 days a week, preferably Fri & Sat but flexible with days/hrs Low Room rent or commission based rent. Own room, Electric Table, sheets, desk, online booking & laundry included. Bonus on-call work with Pemberton Valley Lodge. Also looking for a RMT Locum March 25-April 5th (Accommodations can be provided to the right person if pet friendly.)

Please inquire with email: info@therapypemberton.com

ESTIMATOR / PROJECT MANAGER (PEMBERTON) Wide Open Welding Ltd is looking for a full-time Estimator / Project Manager. The candidate will need to possess the following skill set: This is a multi-faceted position. The ideal candidate will be highly organized and detail oriented. Strong interpersonal skills, the ability to express ideas clearly in both written and oral communication and strong presentation skills. Must have the ability to analyze issues and determine priorities in an environment of tight and conflicting deadlines. Proficiency in planning, scheduling, execution and management of projects. An ability to read drawings and perform take-offs is a must. Our office is located in Pemberton and the job will entail travelling to and from job sites in the corridor to conduct site measurements, layouts and verifications. Candidate MUST have a commitment to excellence and the production of high quality end results.

Please email your resume to:

PLANNER – full time (Permanent) – 1 position ABOUT US

Located in southwestern BC, the Squamish-Lillooet Regional District (SLRD) is a local government federation consisting of four member municipalities (Lillooet, Pemberton, Squamish and Whistler) and four electoral areas. The region features some of the most spectacular forests, waterways, and mountains in the province and affords an endless range of opportunities for outdoor adventure. Headquartered in Pemberton, which is the approximate geographic centre of the region, the SLRD delivers a wide range of local, regional and sub-regional services to its residents.

ABOUT YOU

An accomplished planner, your experience demonstrates a solid understanding of the various facets of the profession. You are experienced in managing a wide range of planning projects and development applications. You can provide technical analysis of site and architectural plans and can perform complex project review. You’re also well versed in land use policy and have contributed to the creation and revision of zoning bylaws, official community plans and other planning policy documents, ideally in a regional setting. You are interested in working on agricultural planning and have a solid understanding of Agricultural Land Commission regulations and policies. You’ve worked with professional teams under tight deadlines and are able to skillfully navigate the political process. Writing complex policy reports and delivering public presentations comes easily to you. You require minimal supervision, possess a positive can-do attitude and are able to tackle various planning challenges with competency and flair. You possess a post-graduate degree in planning with a minimum of 5 years of progressive planning experience and are a full member of the Canadian Institute of Planners (or eligible for full membership). A full job description is available on the SLRD website: http://www.slrd.bc.ca/inside-slrd/employment If you are interested in this opportunity to apply your expertise and creativity, please submit a cover letter and resume via email by 5 p.m. Tuesday, January 29th to: Squamish-Lillooet Regional District Attention: Nathalie Klein Email: nklein@slrd.bc.ca Website: www.slrd.bc.ca We thank all applicants for their interest; however, only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

DOUG BUSH SURVEY SERVICES LTD. is looking for a

SURVEY FIELD TECHNICIAN With a two or three year college or technical school program in geomatics. Three years experience and proficient in the use of robotic survey instruments and GPS equipment for engineering and building construction layout, topographic site surveys, site improvement surveys and precise monitoring. Experience with AutoCAD Civil 3D also an asset to assist in office with computations and drawing preparation. Please call Ian @ 604-932-3314 or email @ ian@dbss.ca #18-1370 Alpha Lake Rd. Whistler BC V0N 1B1 Serving Squamish, Whistler and Pemberton

contactus@wideopenwelding.com www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 24, 2019 | 79


book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday:

classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

COMMUNITY LISTINGS SUPPORT GROUPS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Immigrant Peer Educators - Immigrants providing support and information for those who may be experiencing challenges adjusting to a new culture. 604-388-5511 info@whistlermulticulturalnetwork.com

The Sea to Sky corridor’s top civil construction company. We are currently recruiting professionally minded people to join our team.

SMART Recovery - (Self-Management and Recovery Training) A Cognitive-Behavioural group for individuals with substance abuse con- cerns. Pemberton Health Centre (Board Room) January 17th, 24th, 31st, and February 7th 2019 4:30-6:00pm **drop in welcome.

RELIGION

Required are:

Labourers Class 1 or Class 3 Truck Drivers Please send resume to: Email: info@whistlerexcavations.com Fax: 604-932-8748 Mail: Box 1145, Whistler, BC V0N 1B0. Drop off @ Suite 202, 1400 Alpha Lake Road, Whistler (Function Junction)

Jesus Rock Of Ages Ministry- A bible based church that holds services at Millennium Place's main floor theatre at 4:30pm. www.jesusrockofages.com Roman Catholic Church- Come celebrate mass at Our Lady of the Mountains, Whistler on Saturday 5pm, Sunday 9am, Tuesday 5:45pm, Wednesday 7pm, Thursday/Friday 5:45pm. St. Francis of Assisi, Pemberton on Sunday 12:30pm and Friday 9am. St. Christopher's, Mt. Currie on Sunday 11am. 604-905-4781

FUR & FEATHERS

www.whistlerexcavations.com Last modified by:

KP

Get Bear Smart Society - Learn more about coexisting with bears. To report a conflict, garbage or attractant issue call 604-905-BEAR (2327) www.bearsmart. com Pemberton Wildlife Association Advocates for the conservation of fish, wildlife & wilderness recreation. Also offering target shooting & archery facilities. www.pembertonwildlifeassociation.com

Kaze Sushi is looking for Experienced Sushi Chef

Please apply in person with resume at the Whistler restaurant from 5:30pm onwards Call or email Tom on 604-938-4565 or tokyotom111@hotmail.com

HOUSING AVAILABLE FOR FULL TIME EMPLOYEES, IT’S CHEAP!

Delish Cafe in Function Junction are expanding! We are currently hiring both part time & full time positions

Sandwich Ninjas & Bakers Must have a work hard - play hard attitude! Employee housing available for the right candidates. Send your resume to ian@whistlergrocery.com 80 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

HELP WANTED

MUST BE: SMART ☛ STRONG ☛ FUN ✱ Full Time - 5 shifts - 40hr a week ✱ Part Time - 2 / 4 shifts - 16+hr week Ski Pass or Season Bonus Provided Apply with resume | 8am-7pm Daily www.uppervillagemarket.com

WAG - Whistler Animals Galore - A shelter for lost, unwanted, and homeless cats and dogs. Let us help you find your purrfect match...adopt a shelter animal! For more info 604-935-8364 www.whistlerwag.com

EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Are you as passionate as me about skiing? If so, start working at 1 pm and finish around 7 pm. This is either a P/T or F/T job. If this is what you are looking for, then come and join our cleaning team this winter! Here is what we are looking for: reliable individuals with a good work ethic, who have an eye for detail and enjoy working independently as much as being a team player. You'll be working in nice recreational homes where quality work is appreciated! We provide training and wages vary with experience: $ 19.00 - 22.50 per hour. Use of your vehicle is a bonus and is compensated, but is not necessary. If you would like to join our team, send us your resume and contact information with a short cover letter telling us a bit about yourself. infocleaning@gmail.com EVENT SHIFTS AVAILABLE Whistler's best side-hustle! Pick your schedule and earn $17$28/hour. www.whistler-jobs.com Whistler Personnel Solutions Full Time The Pony Restaurant is currently seeking a server to join our team. The right individual will have experience in a similar fast paced environment, be able to offer flexible shifts, be a great team player, and have a good knowledge of local craft beers. To apply, please email your resume or drop off at the restaurant. We look forward to hearing from you events@thepony.ca www.theponyrestaurant.com


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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Temporary, Seasonal (Summer) Hiring now for start dates in May. Based out of Squamish, AmeriCan Adventures Group Leaders are paid to camp, road trip, explore and share Canada’s National Parks and cities with small groups of foreign passengers. Pay is 830$/week plus tips and commissions. Housing, company vehicle, commercial license reimbursement and paid training is provided. amadjobs@americanadventures.com www.americanadventures.com/workfor-us

CAREER ROLES & TEMP JOBS - Whistler Personnel Solutions NOW HIRING for Whistler’s top employers. Dream jobs & extra $$ available! www.whistler-jobs.com

Tandoori Grill Fine Indian Cuisine is hiring these positions:

DISHWASHER BARTENDER HOSTESS SERVERS WITH EXPERIENCE PREFERRED. Please email resume to tandooriwhistler2@yahoo.ca tandooriwhistler.com SKI PASS AVAILABLE

201-4368 Main Street, Whistler V8E 1B6

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

is now hiring for the following position:

Front Desk Agent Room Attendant Houseman Ski Concierge Full-time and Part-time *seasonal incentives available

Please email resume to hr@listelhotel.com Thank you for your interest. Only those applicants being considered for an interview will be contacted.

Sundial Boutique Hotel at 4340 Sundial Crescent, Whistler BC V0N 1B4 is currently hiring for a

Housekeeping Supervisor This position is FT year around. Wage is $21.75/hr + benefits. Job duties include: Supervising dept duties, inspection of work, administration, assist with recruiting, perform training and cleaning duties.

Pan Pacific Whistler is currently hiring for:

Relief Guest Experience Manager Guest Services Agent Breakfast Attendant (Part Time) Discover new opportunities to embark on a career in Hospitality with Pan Pacific Whistler, located at Whistler’s best address. We offer competitive wages, ski pass, and staff accommodation. To apply, please submit your cover letter and resume to careers.ppwhi@panpacific.com

Skill requirements: 1 year’s prior experience as a housekeeping supervisor”, tourism, administration and customer service. Please fax or email your resume with attention to “Human Resources Department” to:

604-932-7152 hr@sundialhotel.com

Whistler Premier Resorts, Whistler’s leading property management firm is currently recruiting! What We Offer You:

Competitve Wages Health & Wellness Benefits Full Time/Part Time Positions Supportive Team Environment

PICK UP YOUR COPY TODAY

MAINTENANCE WORKER

TOPTABLE RESTAURANTS & STAFF ACCOMMODATIONS - WHISTLER We are seeking a skilled maintenance worker in Whistler, BC. This individual will be responsible for the maintenance and general handy-work at our three restaurants and for staff accommodations. EXPERIENCE & QUALIFICATIONS: • Previous experience in a maintenance role • Basic knowledge of HVAC, plumbing, and electrical • Knowledge of general building systems and equipment • Experience with painting and carpentry

Current Career Opportunities:

BELLMAN . ROOM ATTENDANT APPLY TODAY AT PEOPLE@WHISTLERPREMIER.COM

We offer year round full and part-time hours, competitive wages, gratuities, extended medical & dental, accommodations, potential for future growth within the company and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants. Please email your resume & cover letter to:

careers@araxi.com

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 24, 2019 | 81


book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday:

classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Hilton Whistler Resort & Spa Hospitality

Integrity

Leadership

Teamwork

Ownership

Now

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SUPPORT TECHNICIAN (PART-TIME) RESERVATIONS COORDINATOR ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE COORDINATOR SERVERS (FULL-TIME ONLY) ~ AWESOME PEOPLE WORK HERE ~ Apply online on hr@hiltonwhistler.com or in person Monday to Friday from 9am to 4pm We thank all interested applicants, however only those selected for an interview will be contacted

LOVE YOUR JOB AND YOUR LIFE SPECIALIST, DATA MARKETING & ANALYTICS FULL TIME, YEAR ROUND

The Specialist of Data Marketing & Analytics is responsible for working within a variety of digital platforms to executive paid search, paid social and paid display & video advertising. This position also assists in optimizing campaigns on a real-time basis as needed and provides support with a wide variety of campaign analytics and reporting. With relevant marketing and data analytics experience, this position requires an individual who is data driven, with a targeted, audience-centric approach in the execution of Tourism Whistler’s paid marketing initiatives. For the complete job description and to apply, visit whistler.com/careers

SecurityPayable Systems Technician – Accounts / Office Facilitator BLACK Fire TUSK FIREand & SECURITY INC. Black Tusk Security Inc

WeBlack are looking to and fill aSecurity full-timeisAccounts / Office Facilitator role, Tusk Fire hiring forPayable the following positions: with an immediate start date in our Squamish office.

Whistler Farmers’ Market Manager Located at the base of Blackcomb Mountain, the Whistler Farmers’ Market hosts an average of 90 vendors showcasing fresh fruit, produce, artisan crafts and food products throughout the busy summer season. The Whistler Farmers’ Market Association has an exciting opportunity for qualified individuals to apply for the position of Whistler Farmers’ Market Manager. Responsible to the Board of Directors the Manager plays an integral role in the smooth operation and production of the Whistler Farmers’ Market. The position is responsible for the day-to-day operations of the market, working with vendors and stakeholders as well as working closely with the Board to ensure that its strategic plans for the organization are developed and implemented. It is an amazing opportunity to build on a well-established reputation & grow the market to the next level. We’re looking for an energetic, well organized, dedicated individual with excellent leadership, communication and interpersonal skills. If you are passionate about the Farmers’ Market and promoting local food producers and artisans, and have experience in managing events this position is for you. Qualified candidates will be self-motivated, possess excellent conflict and time management skills along with the ability to work independently and take initiative. The successful candidate must be comfortable working outdoors in all weather conditions and capable of handling some lifting and physical work. Previous experience managing a farmer’s market would be a definite asset. This is a year round part time contract position available for an immediate start for the 2019 Market season. The Manager’s position will be open to renewal on an on-going basis if satisfactory to all parties.. Please submit your application in confidence including resume and cover letter by email to WFM HR Chair at HR@whistlerfarmersmarket.org Application deadline is Thursday, January 31st 2019 We thank all applicants for their interest however, only those candidates considered for an interview will be contacted. 82 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

Security Systems Technician: JobPosition: Duties Full time Service/Installer working in and around Squamish/Whistler, •BCManage company finances, procedures duties area. The position offersoffice excellent hourlyand ratecoordinate with use administration of Company vehicle, • Develop systems to account for financial transactions by establishing a chart of accounts; lapdefine top, bookkeeping smart phonepolicies with full medical & dental benefits. and processes Knowledge and experience in the building industry an asset, •Qualifications: Prepare journal entries work with close CCTV,responsibilities Honeywell or DSC products desirable. Criminal •previous Handle month-end •records Remit and record sales tax GST/PST check, Clear driver’s abstract, basic hand tools required.

• Process credit card and cheque payments Guard / Office Assistant: •Alarm RecordResponse cash receipts and bank deposits Full time (Mon-Fri) •Position: Maintain general office flow office person required working in the whistler office. Clerical duties includeetc.) filing, data entry, and responding •head Uphold company assets (vehicles, withcollections, correct paperwork, insurance, maintenance torecords alarms throughout the Whistler area. Full medical & dental benefits and ride •sharing Communicate with customers via phone, email, mail or in person available. •Qualifications: Complete specialCriminal projects Record as required by management Check, Clear Driver’s Abstract, Security Licence for Alarm Response an asset. Candidate must be a Canadian Qualifications permanent resident or citizen. is hiring for the following positions: Fire and Security •Black ProvenTusk bookkeeping experience • Recognized ability to calculate, post and manage accounting figures and financial records Systemsdegree Technician: •Security University/College or certification in a related discipline considered 109-1330 Alpha Lakeworking Rd., Whistler, BC isV0N 1B1 an asset Position: Full time Service/Installer in and around Squamish/Whistler, (Education in Finance, Accounting or Bookkeeping) Whistler: 604.935.1140 | Squamish: 604.892.9793 area. The position excellent rate with use of Company vehicle, •BCComputer literate, withoffers strong data entryhourly skills and working knowledge of Vancouver: 1.877.657.1140 | effective www.BTFSI.com Office or relevant computer applications lapMicrosoft top, smart phone with full medical & dental benefits. •Qualifications: High degree of accuracy and attention to detail in the building industry an asset, Knowledge and experience •previous Capacitywork to communicate at alldesirable. levels of theCriminal company with CCTV,effectively Honeywellwith or individuals DSC products • Excellent time management skills with the ability to multitask and prioritize work records check, Clear driver’s abstract, basic hand tools required. • Motivated self-starter who is unafraid to take initiative and solve problems •Alarm Aptitude for improving systems and processes Response Guard / Office Assistant: Position: Full time (Mon-Fri) office person required working in the whistler Details Clerical duties include collections, and responding •head This office. is a full-time, year-round position;filing, Monday to Friday, data 8:30 entry, AM to 5:00 PM alarms throughout the Whistler area. Full & dental benefits and ride •toCompetitive wages based on qualifications andmedical experience available. •sharing Extended Benefits Package Qualifications: Criminal Record Check, Clear Driver’s Abstract, Security To apply, please forward a copy of your current resume to hr@btfsi.com, with reference Licence for AlarmWeResponse asset. Candidate be athose Canadian to the A/P position. thank all an interested applicants,must but only qualified will be permanent resident or citizen. contacted.

Security Systems Technician – Black Tusk Fire and Security Inc

109-1330 Alpha Lake Rd., Whistler, BC V0N 1B1 Whistler: 604.935.1140 | Squamish: 604.892.9793 Vancouver: 1.877.657.1140 | www.BTFSI.com


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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

WHISTLER BLACKCOMB Shuttle Driver Security Officer Engineering Admin Assistant

Love what you do! Because that’s what we’re all about. Whether you’re looking for a seasonal job or wanting to build an exciting career, we’ve got you covered.

Intermediate Maintenance

We are hiring for a variety of full time, part time and volunteer opportunities.

Guestroom Attendant

FEATURED ROLES:

The Four Seasons team is looking for these roles to start immediately.

SOUS CHEF, WIZARD GRILL LEAD COOK, STEEPS GRILL & WINE BAR ASSISTANT MANAGER, GLACIER CREEK F&B SHIPPER RECEIVER COOKS SNOW SCHOOL SALES HOST PRODUCT SALES & SERVICES HOST

$500 signing bonus available for all hires

Details: Please apply online via jobs.fourseasons.com Housing is available for successful candidates as well!

Please visit https://jobs.vailresortscareers.com/whistler to apply!

/

/

/

/

Strata Management firm is currently looking for an experienced

Building Manager

for a building in Whistler The ideal candidate will have well above average interpersonal skills, excellent command of English, good time management abilities, good computer skills and a positive can-do attitude. The Building Manager will familiarize him/herself with the building layout and operating systems, coordinate on site directives from the office, create a maintenance schedule in conjunction with the property manager, and attend to other tasks as necessary. The Building Manager will receive the support of the Strata Management team to ensure a successful transition. Thereafter, the Building Manager will be responsible for the day-today operation of the building including coordination and scheduling of trades and other service providers, ensuring that all service providers complete their work in a proper and timely manner, record keeping and planning and other tasks which may be assigned from time to time. The position requires some janitorial and maintenance services and skills. Skills required: - excellent command of English language and strong communication skills - strong people skills; willingness to work as part of a team - ability to work independently with little supervision - good knowledge of the Strata Property Act - exceptional organizational skills - strong maintenance skills - computer skills MUST HAVE EXPERIENCE AND A PROVEN TRACK RECORD. REFERENCES WILL BE REQUIRED AND CHECKED. THE SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATE MUST PASS A CRIMINAL RECORD CHECK. All interested parties are encouraged to send an email to the Property Manager, Alex Boatman, via email at alex@awmalliance.com , with your resumé attached and a brief introduction of yourself.

Here’s to the Journey At Westin, we recruit the brightest, most energetic people in pursuit of developing an exciting and rewarding career. Marriott International has 30 renowned hotel brands in 122 countries around the world, and we’re still growing. Opportunities abound! The next step in your career could lead to your greatest adventure.

• Housekeeping Coordinator

• Cooks

• People & Culture Generalist

• Room Attendant

• Sales Coordinator

• Casual Banquet Server

• House Attendant • Front Desk Agent

A great career has always been a great adventure. Email your resume to HR@westinwhistler.com or visit us in person Monday to Friday 9am - 5pm. www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 24, 2019 | 83


book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday:

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Let us take care of you! • • • •

Staff housing available Competitive wages Full time hours year around Free staff parking in Whistler Village

6 REASONS L: TO WORK AT SUNDIA Place to sleep + $ for activities es + more $ for activiti + convenience + security + Free Ski Pass

Come be our: • • • • •

G Guestt S Services i R Representative t ti Night Audit Representative Maintenance Representative Room Attendant Houseperson

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Whistler in e f li d o o g A =

Please fax or email your resume with attention to “Human Resources Department” to:

604-932-7152 hr@sundialhotel.com We thank you for your interest. Only candidates chosen for further consideration will be contacted.

Delta by Marriott Whistler Village Suites Is currently recruiting for the following positions:

- Room Attendant (Housekeeper) - Houseperson/Public Area Attendant - Shuttle Driver (seasonal, part-time, class 4* license required) - Reservations Coordinator (1 year maternity leave coverage) - Human Resources Coordinator

STAFF HOUSING AVAILABLE! Start your journey today with: competitive wages, growth opportunities, a positive team environment, medical benefits, play money (ski pass, etc), 100% provincial health care coverage. To Apply: either submit an application online at Marriott.com/careers or send your resume to annie.jolliffe@deltahotels.com

Certified Dental Assistant for busy family dental clinic

Located 20 minutes north of whistler in the beautiful pemberton valley.

Hours negotiable with competitive wage. Email “info@pembertonvalleydental.ca” or fax to 604-894-6934

Capilano Highway Services Company is seeking experienced personnel for the following positions:

· Loader/Bobcat Operators/ Plow and Sand Truck Drivers · Labour for Snow Removal We are an established company that provides a conducive working environment as well as competitive pay rates! Please reply in confidence to fax: 604-983-2433 or via email to: whistler@capilanohighways.ca We thank you for your interest, however only shortlisted applicants will be contacted.

84 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

The Pinnacle Hotel Whistler has the following positions available:

HOUSEMAN MAINTENANCE ROOM ATTENDANTS Please reply by email: parmstrong@pinnaclehotels.ca


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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub is hiring:

LINE COOK DISHWASHER Work at Whistler’s best location! Refine or jump-start your culinary career in our fast-paced and busy kitchen. We offer competitive wages, tips and a season ski pass. Please stop by the pub between 10am and 5pm with a copy of your resume. You can also submit your resume via email to careers@dubhlinngate.com

GROUP SALES & EVENTS COORDINATOR WHISTLER, BC

Toptable Group is seeking a Group Sales & Events Coordinator in Whistler, BC. This individual will be responsible for coordinating all group bookings and events at our Whistler restaurants; Araxi + The Cellar by Araxi, Bar Oso, and Il Caminetto. EXPERIENCE & QUALIFICATIONS: • Previous experience in sales and customer service is required • Previous restaurant experience is an asset

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

ARE YOU A FOODIE? #DELI #PRODUCE

We can offer you flexible schedules, great wages, fun and friendly environment working with other foodies. Join our Community Whistler IGA store. Text us your resume 604.209.8893 Email your to Nadinej@georgiamain.com

SQUAMISH NATION is looking for an

Administrative Coordinator PERM Full-Time position Squamish Valley Operations Location: Squamish, BC

We offer year round full time hours, competitive wages, gratuities, extended medical & dental, accommodations, potential for future growth within the company and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants. Please email your resume & cover letter to:

careers@araxi.com

View Full Posting on our website: http://www.squamish.net/jobs/ All applications must be completed using online application.

Howe Sound Women’s Centre is Hiring! Pearl’s Safe Home & Homeless Prevention Program Coordinator Child, Youth and Family Counsellor/Facilitator Human Resources Coordinator WE ARE HIRING:

For more information and to apply please visit www.hswc.ca

Foremen, Carpenters, Labourers, Apprentices (20cm rule applies) Please contact Marc@balmoralconstruction.com www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 24, 2019 | 85


book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday:

classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

We’re Hiring Cooks, Shift Managers, Servers, Hosts, Setters and Dishwashers Visit us at the restaurant anytime to apply in person or via email at apply.whistler@earls.ca

NESTERS MARKET & WELLNESS CENTRE

NOW HIRING AT OUR WHISTLER LOCATION If you are a student 15 years or older, we have flexible hours and we want you!

Grocery Clerks Produce Clerks Deli Clerks Meat Clerks E-mail or drop in your resume to: bruce_stewart@nestersmarket.com please cc ian_fairweather@nestersmarket.com or call us at 604-932-3545

Our outstanding team is looking to add individuals with a variety of skill sets and experience. Friendly, hard working candidates are invited to apply.

PERKS • Competitive wage – Depending on expereince • Access to medical and dental benefits for full time applicants • Percentage discount from store bought goods • Flexible and set schedule • Relative training

Line Cooks

(2-3 years experience)

$136.60/YEAR

Dishwashers

PEAK Peak Performance PERFORMANCE Physiotherapy & Massage Therapy PHYSIOTHERAPY AND MASSAGE 11-4154 Village Green (in the Crystal Lodge) Whistler, BC, V0N 1B4

Seeking a Part-Time or Full-Time

Front Desk Agent

Please send your resume to peakp@telus.net or drop off at reception to the attn: Erica. 86 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

52 ISSUES REGULAR MAIL WITHIN CANADA

Pastry Cooks

Please email your resume & cover letter to careers@araxi.com or present in person at Araxi between 3-5pm daily.

SUBSCRIPTIONS $76.70/YEAR

BACK-OF-HOUSE

We offer year round full and part-time hours, competitive wages, gratuities, extended medical & dental, accommodations, potential for future growth within the company and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants.

PIQUE NEWSMAGAZINE

COURIER WITHIN CANADA

EXCITING CAREER OPPORTUNITIES APPLY TODAY! Diamond Resorts Canada Ltd., Whistler, BC

Full & Part Time Housekeepers

$605.80/YEAR

COURIER WITHIN USA

Eligible successful candidates may receive*:

• Retention Bonus Program of up to $1,200 for eligible candidates. • Extensive benefits package which may include; ski pass or wellness allowance, disability coverage, travel insurance and extended health and dental. • Travel Allowance and discounted employee rates at any Diamond Resort International resort. • Full-time work year round and a FUN work environment. *eligibility and conditions based on DRCL policies and practices set out in general terms and conditions of employment.

Email your resume with the position you wish to apply for to: Madiha.Hassan@diamondresorts.com

PAY BY MASTERCARD, VISA OR AMEX TEL. 604-938-0202 FAX. 604-938-0201


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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS The Bearfoot Bistro, Whistler’s premier fine dining restaurant is growing its team.

Be part of the action to deliver exceptinal fine dining experience to guests in an award-winning and high volume dining room. We are hiring for the following positions:

Hostesses Dishwashers We offer year-round or seasonal employment, industry leading wages, medical services plan, staff meals, staff discounts and more...

Please send your resume to info@bearfootbistro.com or apply in person between 3-5pm. 4121 Village Green | Adjacent to Listel Hotel 604 932 3433 | bearfootbistro.com

Join our Adventure Service Team at the Whistler Village Inn and Suites! We provide our people with a caring and fun work environment and cater to lifestyles of adventure seekers. We are centrally located in the heart of Whistler Village and provide our employees with the opportunity to work flexible hours based on their adventure or family requirements.

WE OFFER

• A great work environment with opportunities for development and career advancement • Free coffee and tea service • Training for advancement • Use of facilities based on occupancy (Gym, Sauna, Hydro Spa and Pool) • Highly competitive compensation in Whistler • Employee accommodation discounts with Atlific Hotels and Resorts

• • • • •

Medical and Dental for full time employees Some staff discounts on local activities Staff housing based on availability Increments to pay scale based for longevity Flexible hours and work schedules based on your requirements • Bike Storage based on availability

CURRENTLY HIRING • Front Desk Agents

(Commission based incentives) • FT Night Auditor (Commission based incentives) • FT or PT Room Attendants (Commission based incentives) • FT Maintenance (Commission based incentives) Resumes can be submitted to karen@wvis.ca

We are seeking flexible, hardworking and hard playing

FULL-TIME BELLMEN Overnight Front Desk Supervisor Needed Free Ski Pass Health & Medical Signing Bonus of $500 Guaranteed Employee Housing

HOUSEKEEPERS/HOUSEMAN PART-TIME AND FULL-TIME HOURS AVAILABLE

Please apply if you can bring your smile and positive energy to our team and our guests!

Your next big adventure starts here.

Please email your resume to: roberto@aavawhistlerhotel.com Thank you for your interest. Only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted

Details: Please apply online via jobs.fourseasons.com www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 24, 2019 | 87


88 Call The Experts Want to advertise your service on this page? AUTOMOTIVE

Call Pique at (604) 938-0202, or email sales@piquenewsmagazine.com

BLINDS ETC.

BLINDS ETC.

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Visit fixautopemberton.com to schedule an appointment or call 604-894-6767

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• • • •

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Connie Griffiths

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604.698.8406

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Wood Energy Technology Transfer Inc.

604.932.5775 / 1.877.932.5775 blackcombchimney@yahoo.ca

MORTGAGES

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604.905.8483

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88 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

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Furniture · Home Décor · Vintage Signs 604-905-9565 | whistlerrustics@gmail.com

DOUGLAS J BUSH AScT, RSIS

THE RIGHT TOOLS. THE RIGHT PEOPLE. Surveying | Mapping | Engineering | Environmental | Landscape Architecture | Planning To learn more visit: www.mcelhanney.com

p: 604-932-3314 c: 604-935-9515 Engineering & construction layout Topographic & site improvement surveys Municipal, volumetric & hydrographic surveys GPS - global positioning systems www.dbss.ca // dougb@dbss.ca


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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 24, 2019 | 89


90 Maxed Out Welcome visitors—and here are some tips for a good time

N

ow that we’ve got Christmas and New Year celebrations out of the way, and we’re wrapping up the Reverend King’s week for those states south of us who deign to celebrate

By G.D. Maxwell

it, we are ramping up for the main event: winter’s tourist season. If this year comes close to matching the last several, they’ll come in droves and we’ll warmly welcome each and every one. As an astute observer of the human condition, I—and I’m not alone

WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

in this—have discerned a noticeable change in the makeup of winter visitors the past several seasons. Let’s call it the Epic™ Syndrome since it seems to be tied to Vail Resort’s Epic™ Pass. The Epic™ Pass is a brilliant marketing insight, coming as close as it does to making good on Dire Straits' refrain of money for nothin’, chicks for free. Well at least the first part. You buy a pass, you ski almost anywhere in the world. First day’s expensive; rest of the season’s free. It has joined with what we like to call the Canadian Peso to make Whistler a very attractive location for a ski vacation. It has also been, according to the U.S. State Department, one of the factors leading to a dramatic rise in the number of U.S. citizens holding passports. The last year for which statistics are available, 2017, was a record year: 21.4 million passports were issued. Twenty years earlier, only 6.3 million were sent out. Of course, some of that increase is probably due to the collective fear

90 | January 24, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

of terrorism that led to U.S. citizens needing passports to go almost anywhere early in 2007 and some of the spike has been labelled the Trump Effect—self explanatory. But, doubtless, much of it has been driven by the burning curiosity of Epic™ Pass holders wanting to ski Whistler Blackcomb. While Epic™ Pass holders come from all over the world, and I wouldn’t dream of slighting any of them, the bulk come from the U.S. I know that because few of them have Aussie accents and the ones from Mexico are quick to let us know they’re here because they’re afraid if they try to go to, for example, Vail, they might end up in detention awaiting deportation. Our gain. Because this is the first time so many have come here to ski, I feel compelled to share some local insight. Canada is, after all, a foreign country. Even though Americans believe we're alike, if perhaps colder, we really are different. For starters, we spell things differently. That’s probably not important to you if you’re on holiday but since it took me the better part of a decade to figure it out I thought I’d mention it. We’ve also legalized both cannabis and gay marriage. You can indulge in the latter while you’re here, if you’re so inclined. Our local government hasn’t yet come to grips with cannabis, however, so perhaps you’re better off getting friendly with some locals or cruising down to Vancouver on an off day ... if you’re so inclined. But being helpful and friendly— Canadian traits—I’d like to pass on some tips to make the most of your holiday. BLACK & BLUE ... are the colour (different spelling, eh?) of ski runs that aren’t green. “So what,” I hear you say. So what is this: Canada is a less litigious society than the U.S., partly because we have single-payer healthcare. Our blue runs are a great deal like black runs at many U.S. ski resorts I’ve visited. Many of our black and all of our double black runs simply don’t exist at most of them. If you’re comfortable skiing black runs at Vail, you might want to test the waters here. I’ve been stuck on a black run at Vail on a powder day because it wasn’t steep enough to keep sliding forward. That won’t happen here. Trust me. RENT SKIS. I don’t get it. Every day, I see people who have just spent thousands of dollars to fly here, rent a hotel room or condo, buy lift tickets, book themselves and their kids into ski school, drop a

wad in our local restaurants and then show up at the mountain with skis we set fire to at an Ullr rally years ago. Ski technology is changing so fast, anything older than about three years is almost antique. Sure, you can enjoy skiing on antiques—you can enjoy driving Model A Fords. But is that why you’re here? If you ski fewer than three weeks a year, you shouldn’t even own skis. Rent new gear; who knows, you may be better than you thought. WHITE PRIVILEGE. Lose the white ski suit. There used to be a hard and fast rule in fashion: no whites before Easter or after Labour Day. I don’t know why but it makes sense when it comes to skiwear. There’s the obvious visibility factor. White is what the 10th Mountain Division guys used to call camo. Generally, it’s a distinct advantage if other skiers can see you when you’re skiing. There’s also the drip factor. The mechanical equipment you ride is lubricated. Water dripping off it doesn’t show on dark colours. White, on the other hand, shows everything that comes into contact with it from sneezes to chipotle mayo dripping off your fish taco. And if you knew what the backside of your white pants looked like, trust me, you’d never wear them in public. PICNIC ON A GLACIER. Stuff a pack with some cheese, a little pâté, a baguette, fruit and a crisp bottle of white wine or maybe craft beer. Ski when the hordes head in to line up for Epic™ Burgers. Other than first thing in the morning, it’s the best time to ski. Then, find a nice, isolated spot with a view toward the Tantalus or up-valley toward Pemberton and enjoy a leisurely lunch. If that’s too much work, there are a couple of places in town that’ll fix you a nice box lunch to take with you. SKI WITH A STAFF. I don’t mean someone who works at the mountain. I mean a three-metre length of bamboo. It will aid your holiday skiing immensely. You’d be surprised how easily you’ll adjust to making turns using a motion not unlike that employed paddling a kayak and how much safer you’ll feel establishing a “defensive” zone two metres on either side of you. GO OFF. We all have off days, some of us more than others. There are a lot of fun activities on tap in Whistler and by coming here, you’ve agreed, whether you know it or not, to try at least one or two of them. Ask around. You need a day off. Preferably mid-week. Call it local’s appreciation day. Thank you. n


Welcome to the best place on earth Engel & Völkers Portfolio of Fine Homes

NORDIC ESTATES – TALUSWOOD

NICKLAUS NORTH

CREEKSIDE

VILLAGE

Immaculate & spacious 4 bed/3.5 bath, slope-side lodge style townhome. Outstanding revenue generator - $185,000 in 2018!!! Private & pristine with over 2,250 sq/ft of living space with big views of mountains and Alta Lake. $2,490,000

Gorgeous fully renovated unit with mountain views. 3 beds/3.5 baths, media room, hottub, 2 decks. Zoned for nightly rentals, small unique quiet complex in one of Whistler’s most prestigious neighbourhoods. $2,725,000

¼ share ownership guarentees 1 week every month in Creekside’s premier ski in / out development. At almost 700sf, this wheelchair accessible 1 bedroom offers a full kitchen, spacious living room, balcony with great sout-west views. $121,900

This stunning, one level unit, features open concept living with a cozy gas fireplace, 2 balconies, 1 parking and plenty of storage. Just steps from the pool and hot-tub, the Ski hill and Village. Zoned for long term or nightly rental! $1,049,000

Maggi Thornhill *prec

Janet Robson

Nick Swinburne *prec

Carleigh Hofman

3-2250 Nordic Drive

604-905-8199

24-8030 Nicklaus North Blvd

206D-2036 London Lane

604-938-2468

49-4325 Northlands Boulevard

604-932-8899

604-805-5358

NORDIC ESTATES

BENCHLANDS

ALTA VISTA

DOWNTOWN SQUAMISH

Ski home from Dave Murray run to your double garage doors. Great mountain views from the grand living room windows. 3660sq ft, 4br/2.5ba, Tulikivi wood stove w/cook oven, family room, heated steps; 2br suite. $2,899,000

Top floor end unit on sunny side of the building . Views of the slopes from the living room. Easy ski in ski out access. Flexible phase 1 zoning. Fully furnished and turn key ready for you! $749,000

Looking to build your future Whistler Chalet, this large lot offers unique building opportunity to capture the unique Alta Lake & Mountain vistas. $2,680,000 (GST Exempt)

Beautifully upgraded live/work unit. Spacious 2 bed & large den. New hardwood floors, new appliances, granite countertops, large master bedroom/ ensuite, & spacious second bathroom. Unit has a separate commercial work space. $737,000

Rob Boyd

Caronne Marino *prec

Kathy White

Angie Vazquez *prec

2621 Wolverine Crescent

603-4809 Spearhead Drive

604-935-9172

3108 Hillcrest Lane

604-905-8324

1308-1312 Main Street

604-616-6933

778-318-5900

ALPINE

SQUAMISH

WHISTLER VILLAGE

VILLAGE

RENTAL - Top to bottom reno on this gorgeous family home in Alpine. 3 Bed, 2.5 Bath, Chefs kitchen, Garage, Designer furnishings, close walking distance to Meadow Park, cafes, grocery stores, and bus routes. Available Feb-June! $7,900/month

8% RETURN! This is THE premium 2 bedroom unit on the top floor of Executive Suites. Net revenue in 2018 after all expenses was 8%! Email david@ davidwiebe.ca for a complete information package. $339,000

Rare opportunity to own a large ground floor commercial unit in the Village. 2823 SF with great exposure and on-street parking. Long Term lease with 3.1% Cap Rate. Property for sale only, not the business. By appointment only. $4,500,000

This stunning condo is the perfect place to rest after a long day on the mountain. Features; prime location, recently updated 2 bed/2 bath, hot tub, pool, shuttle and much more! $748,888 NEW PRICE

Jake Breuer

David Wiebe *prec

Jody Wright

Kerry Batt

8309 Valley Drive

412-40900 Tantalus Road

604-698-7259

4368 Main Street

604-966-8874

204-4200 Whistler Way

604-935-4680

Whistler Village Shop

Whistler Creekside Shop

Squamish Station Shop

36-4314 Main Street · Whistler BC V0N 1B4 · Phone +1 604-932-1875

325-2063 Lake Placid Road · Whistler BC V0N 1B2 · Phone +1 604-932-1875

150-1200 Hunter Place · Squamish BC V8B 0G8 · Phone +1 778-733-0611

whistler.evcanada.com

whistler.evcanada.com

whistler.evcanada.com

Engel & Völkers Whistler *PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION ©2018 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage is independently owned and operated. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified.

604-902-5422


#207 - 1411 Portage Road

$375,000

This top floor 2 bedroom unit is located on the main Boulevard into Pemberton and is walking distance to all amenities, dining. shopping., schools and transportation. Whistler is only a 25 minute drive for commuting. Mountains Edge is a unique concrete building which has an R2000 energy rating, keeping winter heating costs very low.

Patrick Saintsbury

2

604.935.9114

2103 Nordic Drive

$1,995,000

#2A - 3102 Panorama Ridge

$829,000

This 3 bed 2 bath townhouse is conveniently located within walking distance to the centre of Whistler village and the ski lifts. Perfect as a family home, staff housing or rental investment . The updated floors, kitchen, bathrooms and paint make it move in-ready! Matterport 3D Showcase: rem.ax\2a-3102

Richard Grenfell

604.902.4260

#22 - 2101 Whistler Road

3

$389,000

#333 - 4800 Spearhead Dr.

$889,000

One of the best slope-side locations on Blackcomb. This renovated one bedroom blends modern design with warm Whistler wood and stone, granite counter tops and heated floors in kitchen, entry and bath. It sleeps 4 comfortably with a king size bed and a queen size gel memory foam mattress sofabed. 3D Showcase: http://bit.ly/333AspensMatterport

Sally Warner*

604.905.6326

10 East Walkerville Road

1

$1,190,000

This wonderful family home has a great floor plan, log accents, beautiful maple floors, vaulted ceilings, large bedrooms and open spaces to enjoy family time together. It is well built and immaculately cared for. Located close to the valley trail system, just a few minutes walking distance to Lake Side & Wayside Parks. Matterport 3D Showcase: rem.ax\2103

Roomy studio townhome walking distance to the Creekside ski lift. This garden level home was redone with new kitchen, bathroom, flooring and cabinetry throughout. Great opportunity for the first time buyer.

This 4 bedroom home has all you can dream of! 3200+ square feet of spacious living with sauna, hot tub, media room and fitness room. The property showcases an open floor plan with vaulted ceilings and floor to ceiling windows. The living room is heated with wood stove, heated tile floors, a pellet stove in the music room. Matterport 3D Showcase: rem.ax\10ewr

Sherry Baker

Ted Morden

Ursula Morel*

4.5

604.932.1315

9096 Corduroy Run

$3,250,000

Stunning new contemporary home by Heritage West Homes offering 4600 square feet of living space with an open planned main floor of 3500 square feet and 1100 sq ft finished lower level to accommodate guests and family gatherings. 5 bedrooms and 4.5 bathrooms, a delightful chef’s kitchen with ample sunshine.

Ann Chiasson

5

604.932.7651

604.938.3606

#205B - 2036 London Lane

.5

$123,500

This quarter ownership one bedroom unit in Legends Lodge faces the ski slopes, so you can do your own weather & snow conditions check in the morning. Highlights include a gas fireplace, recently renovated kitchen & a pull out sofa. Swim in the outdoor pool or soak in hot tub after a great day on the slopes.

Bob Cameron*

604.935.2214

1

604.932.86629

5734 Alta Lake Road

1

$3,500,000

Situated on a quiet bay you will feel like you are in another world, far from the crowds. The views are from Mount Currie to Whistler Mountain and they will inspire you to kick back and enjoy the quite life. 5 bedrooms and 4 bathrooms gives you lots of space for friends and family. Come over to the West side you’ll love it.

Bruce Watt

604.905.0737

5

Price Reduced

1550 Tynebridge Lane

$1,158,000

#8 - 1444 Vine Road

$475,000

#101 - 7350 Crabapple Court

$389,900

Set on a quiet road in Spring Creek close to great shopping and the brew pubs in Funky Function Junction. Just a 5 min drive to Creekside ski lifts or 10 min to the Village. This modern neighborhood has all underground services and beautiful new homes surround.

This award winning complex boasts geothermal heating and cooling, has hot water on demand, and a propane fireplace all to lower your carbon footprint and energy bills. This unit also has exquisite mountain views, a large covered deck, hardwood flooring, and is freshly painted, ready to move in.

780 square foot 2 bedroom on the first floor of Orion, Pemberton’s newest condo development. Great views, carport, storage, efficient state of the art design and construction, Orion is due to complete in early 2020. Additional units may be available. Contact listing realtor to get a copy of the Developers Disclosure statement, and complete price list.

Chris Wetaski

Dana Friesen Smith

Darryl Bowie

604.938.2499

WHISTLER OFFICE 106 - 7015 Nesters Road, Whistler, BC V8E 0X1 604.932.2300 or Toll Free 1.888.689.0070 *PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

remax-whistler.com awarded best website 2018 by Luxuryrealestate.com

Property Management remaxseatoskypm.com

604.902.3878

2

604.220-5751

2

PEMBERTON OFFICE 1411 Portage Road, Pemberton, BC V0N 2L1 604.894.6616 or Toll Free 1.888.689.0070

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Pique Newsmagazine 2604  

Pique Newsmagazine for January 24, 2019

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Pique Newsmagazine for January 24, 2019

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