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HEALTH & HAPPINESS

2018

26.01

YEAR IN REVIEW

January 3, 2019

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WHISTLER’S WEEKLY NEWSMAGAZINE

| www.piquenewsmagazine.com


LEADING REAL ESTATE EXPERTS SINCE

9218 PINETREE LANE

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With an original cabin, this elevated view lot is a fantastic building opportunity.

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EMERALD ESTATES

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2202 GONDOLA WAY - WHISTLER CREEK Bathrooms:

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CATHERINE AIRD MICHELLE CROWE KIM WILSON

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8 14 46 48 54 58 64 70 73

www.piquenewsmagazine.com Founding Publishers KATHY & BOB BARNETT

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Sports Editor

COVER STORY

Art Director

Week IN PIQUE Letters News Travel Sports Food Arts Music PiqueCal Classifieds

What a year it was Grab a coffee and get ready to relive 2018 in Pique’s look back at politics, policing and more in the Year in Review - By

Pique staff

COVER: Andy Anissimoff is a self-taught professional Canadian Artist. He moved to Whistler in 2003

before settling in Squamish, where he now runs a studio and art gallery. In a graphic composition, this style reduces the Black Tusk down to its distinctive shapes and surfaces. As the sun sets on 2018, only surfaces on a certain angle will receive light. Here’s to finding the light in 2019. “Surface Tusk,” - acrylic on canvas. Original available - By Andy Anissimoff || artinbc.com || @andy_anissimoff

DAN FALLOON - sports@piquenewsmagazine.com

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WE EKL Y FE A TURES

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Contributors

G.D. MAXWELL, COAST MOUNTAIN PHOTOGRAPHY, GLENDA BARTOSH, MICHAEL ALLEN, FEET BANKS, LESLIE ANTHONY, ALLEN BEST, ALISON TAYLOR, TOBIAS C. VAN VEEN, VINCE SHULEY, LISA RICHARDSON

President, Whistler Publishing LP SARAH STROTHER - sstrother@wplpmedia.com

Pique Newsmagazine (a publication of Whistler Publishing Limited Partnership, a division of Glacier Media) distributed to over 130 locations in Whistler and to over 200 locations from Vancouver to D’arcy. The entire contents of Pique Newsmagazine are copyright 2018 by Pique Newsmagazine (a publication of WPLP, a division of Glacier Media). No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the express written permission of the Publisher. In no event shall unsolicited material subject this publication to any claim or fees. Copyright in letters and other (unsolicited) materials submitted and accepted for publication remains with the author but the publisher and its licensees may freely reproduce them in print, electronic or other forms. Letters to the Editor must contain the author’s name, address and daytime telephone number. Maximum length is 250 words. We reserve the right to edit, condense or reject any contribution. Letters reflect the opinion of the writer and not that of Pique Newsmagazine. Pique Newsmagazine is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please contact (edit@piquenewsmagazine.com). If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the web site at mediacouncil.ca or call toll-free 1-844877-1163 for additional information. This organization replaces the BC Press council (and any mention of it).

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WATER DOWN WASTE

New municipal and hotel initiative aims to encourage visitors to ditch plastic water bottles and drink local tap water

HALFWAY THERE

Whistler halfpipe skier Simon d’Artois leads the FIS Crystal Globe chase at the midpoint of the World Cup campaign

SNOW WAY YOU WON’T LAUGH

Snowed In

Comedy Tour set for three nights in Whistler

GET READY FOR BLITZKRIEG BOP

Sore Points and Ramores to kick off Garf’s monthly Punk Night on Jan. 6

PIQUECAL

Catch a free screening of the film Crazy Rich Asians at the Whistler Public Library on Tuesday. Then, also at the library, on Wednesday Quest is hosting a lecture about the connection between music and mountain biking

48

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OPE NING

Remarks

One last toast …

H

ave you recovered yet? Here we are in the dark days following the brightness of the Christmas, New Year’s Day and other holidays and let’s face it, most of us are all feeling we overdid it just a bit. Too much chocolate, cheese and cannoli—not to mention all the

Clare Ogilvie

By

your skull, tormenting your head while tugging at the very fibres of your being. “Then there’s all that hydrochloric acid (more commonly known as paint thinner) gurgling in your stomach, and the formaldehyde (a byproduct of breaking down methanol) being released into your system. To deal with all these toxic invaders, your liver has sent out kamikaze troops called free radicals, who don’t know when to stop. So now, in trying to save yourself, you’ve got

they affecting us worse than ever, but for vital reasons —an evolutionary necessity, or just a leftover, meaningless scourge?” he ponders. I do know that for most of us, waking up a few times feeling as described above can boot us into overdrive on the New Year’s resolutions front. But beware! There is little doubt that setting up lofty goals and ambitions on this front will inevitably thrust us into the try, fail, repeat cycle that so many

edit@piquenewsmagazine.com

celebratory toasts made and clinked to as well … sigh. There’s a reason this time of year sees a host of New Year’s resolutions made around health. I felt a push toward my health resolutions after reading a bit about what my body has been going through in a recent Globe and Mail column (and I should clarify that I am practically a teetotaler and I’m still feeling a bit toxic). After a night of revelling, wrote Shaughnessy Bishop-Stall, you awake and find that “… while you slept, without truly resting, the cells that are your body became acutely inflamed, turning your organs rigid and therefore unable to absorb water and nutrients. In desperation, your system has sucked moisture from your brain, shrivelling it horribly. So now your shrunken mind is pulling at the membranes attached to

There is little doubt that setting up lofty goals and ambitions on this front will inevitably thrust us into the try, repeat, fail cycle... rogue killers roaming through your body, looking for fights wherever they can, causing all kinds of pain and nausea until your brain stops thinking of water and begs for mercy instead.” Now, that explains everything. Bishop-Stall has been asking why humans do this to themselves, and is there a hangover cure, as he travels around the world (to get some answers, you’ll need to get his book The Morning After and One Man’s Quest for a Cure). “The fact is, after all this time, I just don’t know: Are hangovers good or bad? Why do we keep on having them? Are

psychologists warn us of every January. It’s been 30 years since John Norcross and Dominic Vangarelli conducted a study of what happens to all that New Year’s resolution-making and discovered that most never make it. At one week’s time, they found, 77 per cent of those questioned were still hanging in but only 55 per cent were left standing at the end of a month. Two years later, only 19 per cent had actually succeeded. According to a Forbes magazine article this week, “Forty percent of Americans will take stock of their year and make a declarative statement of their intentions

for the year to come. “Eighty percent … will fail within 30 days. With only 8% of resolution makers actually seeing follow through.” But change may be on the horizon. According to an article in The Guardian this week, about $348 million has been lost by U.K. dance clubs in the last five years as partygoers look for a different experience than drinking and dancing. “A new breed of nightlife is taking their place, with food, games and even exercise trumping the hedonism of dancing to DJ mixes,” stated The Guardian. Said Stuart Forsyth, the event manager of Mint nightclub in Leeds, which will close in February after 20 years: “Kids now are more financially aware and more health aware than what we were going into the ‘90s and the (2000s). I know a lot of kids who will be going to the gym instead of staying up all night.” I’m not convinced that we will see this change here in Whistler, but as you head into 2019 I would argue that it never hurts to put health and well-being at the top of your list. But remember: Be patient, set specific realistic goals, make it manageable and short term, if you don’t hit your “perfect” goal within the specified time frame have a sub-goal that can be achieved more easily so you don’t get discouraged, and involved family and friends for encouragement. Happy New Year. n

55 ACRES OF LAND IN PEMBERTON

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davebrown@wrec.com www.davesellswhistler.com www.davesellswhistler.com / www.whistlerrealestateblog.ca Cell: 604 905 8438 / Toll Free: 1 800 667 2993 ext. 805 6 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

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Letters T O T HE ED I T O R The cost of doubling tourism There is much to comment on in Joel Barde’s summary of the federal government report, Unlocking the Potential of Canada’s Visitor Economy (which is consultant-speak for more tourists equals more revenue). First, the report said tourist numbers could be doubled by 2030. The only problem is it gives minimal attention to the fact that this huge increase would be attracted to the destinations to which the current tourists go: southern B.C., western Alberta, Toronto, Ottawa, Quebec and the quaint relic habitations of the Maritimes. To accommodate this doubling, it would be necessary to increase tourist accommodation. The report said there could be 180,000 new jobs—what about accommodation for them? To bring all this to pass, the spending on marketing under the Liberals has nearly doubled, but to achieve what? Encourage more visitors to the prairies and territories (and that’s not going to happen in winter). If more tourists do come, they will come for the same reasons the current lot come for. I also note the report favours the idea of tourism clusters. Clusters are not a new idea—like

businesses thrive through propinquity. In this regard, I look forward to Whistler Blackcomb’s support for Garibaldi at Squamish. Finally, how I wish the federal government was as enthusiastic for another great Canadian industry—energy. But I cannot see the government issuing a report about the desirability of doubling output in 10 years and creating thousands of jobs. Government shackles the energy industry by demanding that the carbon footprint upstream and downstream is taken into consideration. What about tourism? Is the arrival (and departure) of double the number of visitors going to be catered for by solar-powered aeroplanes and electric buses and cars?

Is the increase in emissions to be held against the industry? Furthermore, the provision of water, sewage, gas, electricity and roads to allow for the increase in visitors: is this being considered? To sum up, the government believes you can’t have increased revenues without increased visitor numbers, and is putting the best possible spin on the huge expansion and wilfully ignoring the very real attendant problems and minimizing the complexity of the proposal. Its approach to tourism stands in stark contrast to its approach to energy. The hypocrisy is breathtaking. Rod Tindall Whistler

BACK IN THE DAY

With the windstorm and power outage in parts of Whistler recently, plus some of the days with mild temperatures, I can only reflect in wonder on the Christmas Whistler experienced 50 years ago. One-and-a-half metres of snow on the ground in the valley and -5 to 10 Celsius daytime temperatures were the norm in the ‘60s—the night of Christmas Day half a century ago saw the temperature plunge to -30 C. Then the power went out. Rumour had it that the diesel railcar generators at the Mons siding had quit due to the failure to change the fuel to winter grade. It solidified, and that was it ... until after Dec. 27.

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8 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

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Letters T O T H E E D IT O R Those that did not flee back to the coast, such as our family at Alpine Village condos, huddled around fireplaces and hoped for the plumbing to survive. (We also heard that) the hot-water-heating system at the Cheakamus Inn burst, having failed to be drained. This may be somewhat apocryphal as there is no media record of events, just the 50-year-old memories of a longtime weekender resident.

Enjoy that wonderful snow while it’s still here! Brian W. Becker North Vancouver

Well, Happy Jack … I imagine you and council will now be just a little less critical of our neighbours east of us (that) have carried the Canadian economy in part for so many years. The industry that has provided the opportunity for our local Vancouver skiers and our many visitors to fly to Vancouver and take personal vehicles, taxis or buses up to Whistler. All or most of those vehicles over the years have run on petroleum products. I would have to think as well, if you were to survey your local taxpayer base in Whistler, (that) many of them have oil and gas industry stocks in their investment portfolios. That is not even to mention the number of property owners in Whistler that have built their own personal Shangri La or Taj Mahals using very large chunks of our B.C. forests that capture carbon emissions. (We need to) realize that we have maybe another 20 to 30 years at best of skiing on snow. After that all will be skiing down that mountain on rocks in the cold rain of winter at plus 1 Celsius or about 34 degrees Fahrenheit.

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If the mayor of Whistler, Jack Crompton, is serious about reducing carbon emissions rather than railing against Alberta, he should ban all overseas visitors who travel between continents to Whistler on a plane.

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REALITY CHECK

This stunning 2 bedroom/ 2 bath townhome features a fully renovated kitchen 2 beautiful bathrooms, heated porcelain floors in the entry and bathrooms, hickory hardwood flooring, a private hot tub and more. Ideal for a weekend getaway, Airbnb rental or a full time residence.

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“(We need to) realize that we have maybe another twenty to thirty years at best of skiing on snow. After that all will be skiing down that mountain on rocks in the cold rain of winter at plus 1 Celsius or about 34 degrees Fahrenheit.” What did happen, for certain, is that the following summer BC Hydro shipped a massive transformer by rail to Mons siding and slowly rolled it to Nesters where the Rainbow Substation was established. Lucky we were to have the main transmission lines running through the valley. Here’s wishing everybody a happy and cozy (time). It looks as if we will be this year, as, “it ain’t like it used to be.” Jan Pollak Alpine Meadows

15 STONERIDGE

Can there really be a more gratuitous, selfish, intensive and elitist method of spewing carbon into the atmosphere? Perhaps this should be extended to ban anyone travelling from outside the Lower Mainland, or even within the Lower Mainland, until such time as there is an electric locomotive that utilizes hydropower. I really believe Whistler residents and lodging providers should stop heating their homes and hotels with fossil fuels. Diesel-belching snowcats used to groom the hills should also be banned immediately. I mean, how much carbon is being emitted to groom slopes for latte-sipping, elitist skiers at one of the most expensive, carbon-emitting resorts in the world? All hypocrites should leave town as well, which would certainly alleviate the housing crisis. Michael Hannan  Alberta

sally@sallywarner.ca 106-7015 Nesters Rd, Whistler

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#415 Woodrun • Spacious 2 Bedroom, 2 Bathroom condo, sleeps up to six people, Ski-in Ski-out luxury, fully furnished, 1,064 sq. ft. • Swimming Pool, Hot Tub, Fitness room, BBQ area with picnic tables • Ski storage room, year-round reception desk, safe, underground parking • Zoned for nightly rental or full time living

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LOOK IN THE MIRROR

I have stayed in Whistler many times, often several visits per year, with our family. We have recommended Whistler to friends, family and business associates. I was dismayed to hear of Whistler’s attack on the natural-resources sector this past (month). Whistler enjoys a great economy because people fly and drive to Whistler from around the world. Flying has a huge impact as to fossilfuel consumption yet Whistler encourages it (with B.C.-taxpayer-funded tourism ads) and I find it the height of hypocrisy for your mayor to encourage first-class air travel to enjoy Whistler (which is as high a carbon footprint as

Pique Newsmagazine Pique Newsmagazine www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 3, 2019 | 9


Happy New Year!

8140 Muirfield Overlooking the 2nd hole of Nicklaus North Golf Course, features a 4 bedroom, 5 bath luxury post and beam home. Stunning views of Whistler and Blackcomb mountains with ample privacy for the owners. This home features vaulted ceilings, private hot tub, built-in BBQ, 2 car garage, and floor to ceiling river rock fireplace. Zoned for nightly rental or use for full time living.

$3,450,000 De live ring the Dream – Whistler

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Letters TO TH E ED I TO R almost anything humans can partake in) while concurrently threatening Canadian naturalresource producers due to oil production. I hope that you, as community members of Whistler, see this lack of logic and assist in informing your elected, but poorly informed, public officials of their folly. We all have a part to play in reducing fossil-fuel use and our carbon footprint, but

“We all have a part to play in reducing fossilfuel use and our carbon footprint ... “ - BRYAN SLUSARCHUK

the foolishness espoused by Whistler in the last (few weeks) has simply made the community look idiotic within an otherwise important debate and discussion. Bryan Slusarchuk Vancouver

SOIREE SUCCESS

The first annual Whistler Minor Hockey Association (WMHA) Drop the Puck Soiree and Auction was a great success on Dec. 13. Parents, coaches and friends ate, danced, chatted, laughed and bid on many amazing silent-auction items. Thanks you to all who attended and bid so generously. The event raised nearly $14,000 for WMHAsupported programs such as coach and player development, tournament fees and player scholarships. A big shout-out to the organizing committee: Michelle Gemmill, Jeremy Robb,

Alison Taylor-Robb, Caronne Marino and MC Kenny Gemmill. Thank you to Nicklaus North for the stunning venue and amazing service and to the Rutherford Creek Trio for the fabulous live music, as well as all our volunteers for your help throughout the evening. And finally a huge thank you to the Whistler community and all our silent auction donors for their generosity. We are so lucky to have such a supportive community. Happy Holidays. Anita Cote President, Whistler Minor Hockey Association

FREESTYLE VIKING THANK YOU

On behalf of Freestyle Whistler, we would like to give a big Tusen Takk Viking thank you to all our guests and volunteers who contributed to another amazing Ullr Gala on Dec. 1. We would like to thank our sponsors: Glass Vodka, Whistler Brewing Company, Coast Construction, Lonsdale Event Rentals, Mountain FM and Dr. Tom Moonen, Orthodontist. Our amazing DJ, DJ Peacefrog (Michel Chartrand), MC John Smart and auctioneer Ian MacNeil of Glass Vodka. Thank you also to Bearfoot Bistro, Audain Art Museum, Forged Axe Throwing, Coldfire Dancers and Dennis van Dongen for his amazing fire skills. The generosity of the community has been unbelievable in supporting our local club and getting us one step closer to building a National Training Centre for Freestyle Skiing in Whistler. Huge thank yous to all the local businesses and individuals who contributed to our live and silent auctions—you have all played a major role in our success and we are very grateful. For a full list of donors, please see our website, www.freestylewhistler.com. Jennifer Dunn and Julia Smart Ullr Gala Chairs n

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Conditions may vary and can change rapidly. Check for the most current conditions before heading out into the backcountry. Daily updates for the areas adjacent to Whistler Blackcomb are available at 604-938-7676, or surf to www.whistlerblackcomb.com/mountain-info/ snow-report#backcountry or go to www.avalanche.ca. AS OF WEDNESDAY, JAN. 2

The avalanche danger fluctuated with the arrival and departure of storms through the month of December, and it looks like this cadence will continue into the New Year. Well, at least into the early part of the January anyway. Yet another Pacific frontal system will have impacted the Whistler area to end the week with a bit of a break in the stormy pattern expected through the weekend. Heavy snowfall and strongto-extreme winds have been associated with every storm this winter season, so expect to see lingering storm slabs and newly formed wind slabs at the treeline and alpine elevation bands.

Recent storm snow has also buried a weak feathery layer of surface hoar. This is most likely to be found around 50 to 80 centimetres below the snow surface at the treeline elevation band below 2,000 metres in areas that are sheltered from the wind. It is best to assume this layer will be reactive through the weekend. With a dynamic weather pattern, snow and avalanche conditions may change quickly. Before heading into the backcountry— anytime you exit the ski area boundary—check the avalanche bulletin for daily updates. Wishing you a great start to the new year from all of us here at Avalanche Canada. n


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’ve been called an “old soul” for a decade or two now, but I’m still not 100-per-cent sure as to why. I’m not sure if it’s a euphemism for saying that I’m weird or eccentric (which is true and something I embrace) or perhaps crotchety (which can certainly be true at times). It might have to do with some of my entertainment tastes, but while I like

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movies and music from bygone eras, I’ll still rave over the latest blockbuster or groove down to some of the latest pop singles (OK, “groove down” … maybe I do know why some people think of me that way). I like to think of it more as having little patience for most modern nonsense (yeah, I see it) and my eagerness to make things by hand. It started early, when my very oldschool elementary-school teacher insisted that each student in our Grade 4 class learn to sew, and sew we did. We all made drawstring bags and I used mine for my gym clothes for years to come. The following Halloween, I

page. It’s certainly a satisfying process, but if back in the day, if we had to, say, set the type as well, how much more accomplished would we feel holding the weekly edition hot off the presses? That, in particular, is not something I’m yearning for, but the vague sense of victory, that the extra effort you put in is actually worth it, is. Once I was living on my own, I would try a few recipes I found online and in a homemade book of family favourites my mom curated, as I was about to leave home. Then a few months ago, with my stockpile of Air Miles being threatened by a new use-‘em-or-lose-‘em policy, I set out to finally earn a tangible benefit of my years of loyalty gassing up at Shell and selected a fresh pasta maker. It’s taken some trial and error getting it to work immaculately, from finding a surface in which to properly attach it, to getting the pieces of dough to stop from sticking to one another. In a world where you can heat a pizza pop in two-and-a-half minutes, there’s something to be said for standing at your counter, kneading your dough for four times longer than that. There’s the patience you need to let it rest for half an hour, and then the enthralling tedium of gradually flattening it down to the desired thickness.

Even if the holidays are over (or maybe especially because they are), perhaps an in-house potluck is in order.

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12 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

fashioned my own costume; for our hockey year-end wind-up, I sewed keepsakes for all my teammates. They weren’t particularly popular. From there, I eventually took up guitar and did some writing and performing. But most recently, this has manifested itself in taking some pride in cooking. I’d had some flirtations with the art form in high school, as I washed dishes for a small bistro that later had me do some prep and making the odd dessert. It was a gratifying experience to only be in Grade 10 and have something you prepared being delivered to a table for customers. With so many jobs putting people behind a desk or a counter, tapping away at screens all day, it can be difficult at times to maintain a sense of one’s own creation. At Pique, we get to have more direct input into the final product than those at other publications; we not only write the content but also place many of the stories on the

Once it’s cut, it’s ready to be boiled, and a timesaver emerges. It takes far less time to cook the fresh stuff than dried pasta, which can, let’s be honest, be a little flavourless and even a little rubbery at times. Of course, this is a bit of a privileged anecdote—given the living situations in Whistler and the corridor, even having all the clean cookware you need isn’t necessarily a given, let alone actually having the space to work with. If you have less-than-stellar roommates, there’s no guarantee any special ingredients you buy survives from purchase to feast. Or it can be difficult to get motivated to make something nice for just yourself. Even if the holidays are over (or maybe especially because they are), perhaps an in-house potluck is in order. Here’s to a happy, healthy, hands-on 2019. n


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14 News

WATER DOWN WASTE The Resort Municipality of Whistler and the Hotel Association of Whistler are collaborating to teach visitors all about Whistler’s tap water—and thus encourage guests to ditch the plastic bottles during their stay. PHOTO SUBMITTED

Municipality, hotels work together to promote tap water NEW INITIATIVE AIMS TO ENCOURAGE VISITORS TO DITCH PLASTIC WATER BOTTLES Megan Lalonde

mlalonde@piquenewsmagazine.com

A

new initiative between the Resort Municipality of Whistler (RMOW) and the Hotel Association of Whistler is targeting the resort’s nearly 3 million annual visitors as it continues working on its environmental initiatives. This partnership aims to reduce the use of disposable plastic water bottles in the resort by reassuring hotel guests that they can drink Whistler’s water straight from the tap. “What we noticed is that often guests check into a hotel, and as soon as they’re checked in and settled in they go to a local grocery store and they buy flats of water and bring them back to the hotel. That’s a clear indicator that people are not comfortable with the tap water. Of course, when the hotels go back to clean the rooms, they’re constantly removing empty plastic bottles,” said Saad Hasan, chair of the Hotel Association of Whistler. The new initiative “is primarily a communications effort,” explained Mayor Jack Crompton. “Letting guests know that Whistler’s water is from a glacier on Rainbow Mountain, so it literally flows from a glacier into our taps. Not all guests who visit our community come from places where you can drink water out of the taps, so our goal is to ensure that visitors and the community appreciate the

terrific water Whistler has.” He added, “We have some of the best tasting tap water in the world. British Columbia is water-rich, so why drink water from a bottle when you can drink wonderful glacier water right out of a tap?” While the hotel association was already interested in finding ways to limit plastic water bottles throughout its

During evening turn-down service, “typically in any other part of the world or in any other five-star hotel, you would have plastic bottled water on your bedside table. We don’t do that here,” said Mohit Girdhar, assistant director of rooms at the Four Seasons. Instead, the hotel staff places carafes, handmade in Squamish and filled with

“Not all guests who visit our community come from places where you can drink water out of the taps, so our goal is to ensure that visitors and the community appreciate the terrific water Whistler has.” - JACK CROMPTON

properties, working with the municipality to promote tap-water consumption also offers it a sense of legitimacy that guests—and international hotel brands— can trust, Hasan said. “In a hotel, when you are promoting it to hundreds of people travelling from all over the world, it was just good for the RMOW to reach out and provide assurances that the water is tested regularly, that it’s good drinking water, and hence it became a collaborative affair,” he explained. Many local hotels have already been encouraging their guests to choose tap water for years, Hasan added. At the Four Seasons Resort and Residences Whistler, avoiding plastic water bottles is anything but new.

14 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

Whistler’s tap water, on each nightstand, alongside a glass—something they’ve been doing for years, he explained. If guests question where the water is coming from, “our staff is fully briefed and trained to explain it’s Whistler tap water; it’s actually one of the best in the world to drink, and it’s very safe to

T HI S SEC T I O N

By

drink,” Girdhar added. The Four Seasons also has reuseable Swell water bottles available for sale throughout the property and located in some suites, intended for guests to fill up from the taps. The local initiative leaves it up to each hotel to independently decide the best way to communicate with their guests. Strategies will range from informing guests verbally upon check-in to in-room education, providing guests with reusable glass bottles and everything in between. The initiative was signed three months ago and will be funded by the hotels. It builds on the RMOW’s previous steps to reduce single-use water bottles, including eliminating the sale of bottled water at municipal properties, including Meadow Park Sports Centre and public parks in 2010. The municipality also maintains 20 public water fountains throughout the community, with even more slated for installation in 2019. For more information about Whistler’s drinking water, go to whistler. ca/drinkingwater. n

6 B RIEFS Whistler lights up for the holidays; WalkSafe this winter 1 20 N EW YEAR’S BABY Furry Creek couple has Sea to Sky’s first 22 B ANNER YEAR Lil’wat artist’s work to be featured in Pemberton 24 M OUNTAINS MATTER The hidden cost of melting glaciers


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KNOW-IT-ALL Vail Resorts’ new digital assistant can help out with basic questions, but it will likely be a while before it can handle more complex queries.

Meet Emma

PHOTO BY JOEL BARDE

VAIL RESORTS ROLLS OUT ITS ‘EPIC MOUNTAIN ASSISTANT’ By

G

Joel Barde

ot a question about Whistler Blackcomb? If so, Vail Resorts is hoping you might give its new digital assistant, Emma, a whirl. “I am the collective knowledge of every lift operator, groomer, snowmaker, ski-school instructor, ticket-counter attendant and ski patroller,” wrote Emma (or, more likely, a Vail Resorts communications worker), in a recent press release. How long is the wait at the Creekside Gondola? Where can I smoke a joint? How much new snow did we get last night? Those are just some examples of the types of questions that Emma will (eventually) be able to answer. But it’s important to keep in mind that Emma (so named because she’s an Epic Mountain Assistant) is still in “beta mode,” said Marc Riddell, communications director for Whistler Blackcomb. “Emma has to learn to get better,” said Riddell. “So the more questions that are thrown at it, the more that Emma’s going to learn, and the more intuitive it’s going to become by the time we roll out of beta at the end of this season.” The system uses artificial-intelligence technology and natural language processing to answer questions. To pose one, users are asked to send a text message to 77477, and they will receive a response, or be directed to a “live agent,” via text. “Right now Emma’s just a baby, and these are baby steps,” said Riddell. “But eventually ... it’s going to be able to answer guest questions about the resort, about their vacation, about lifts, things to purchase—all that sort of stuff.”

With Siri and Amazon’s Alexa gaining traction, digital assistants are becoming increasingly popular. Following the astonishing trajectory of mobile phones, research firm Ovum predicts that there will be as many voice-activated assistants on the planet as there are people by 2021. (For now, Emma is just offered in text form—but Riddell said a voicecomponent may come at a later date.) The first-generation technology is being launched in eight different Vail properties—including Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Park City, Whistler Blackcomb, Heavenly, Northstar and Tahoe—after a soft rollout at Keystone earlier this winter. According to Riddell, the experience at Keystone went well, with people asking questions about ticket prices or on-mountain dining options. “It’s quite amazing how quickly it learns,” said Riddell, adding that there is potential for future generations to be integrated with things like Facebook messenger or Alexa. Riddell said that Emma will serve as a handy tool for people, especially those who are brand new to the resort. “For those times when you are coming to a resort, and you don’t know the lay of the land or what’s available to you on-mountain, we want to make it as easy for you as possible,” said Riddell. “We don’t want you to pop your skis off and head into Guest Services and ask questions if you’re unfamiliar with things. “We really want this to be a good point of contact for you, so you’re able to enjoy what you’re doing and are provided with the most accurate information about the mountain.” n www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 3, 2019 | 15


News WHIST L ER Festive lighting or the Stairway to Heaven? BRIEFS: THE ART OF WHISTLER SNOW CLEARING; WALK SAFE THIS WINTER By

Braden Dupuis

D

uring a recent chat with Mountain FM’s morning show, Whistler Mayor Jack Crompton got into comparing the festive-lights programs of Whistler and Squamish. “Even the morning show at Mountain FM agrees that Whistler’s is far, far superior,” Crompton joked. “And I am convinced it’s because we’re more committed.” Does the new mayor take pride in Whistler’s festive lighting? “Did Led Zeppelin take pride in having the better light show?” he said. “Of course.” Wait… did the mayor just compare Whistler’s festive lighting to a Led Zeppelin concert? “I cannot answer that question, but the festive-lights program is one of the highlights of the Whistler winter experience, and it adds to the ambience in the village over the winter season,”

Crompton said. As in previous years, Whistler’s holiday light show boasts between 4,000 and 5,000 strings of lights, each one seven metres long and holding 70 LED bulbs. In total, the village contains between

(RMOW) village hosts often receive comments from visitors about how beautiful the lights are. My mother in law comments on them,” Crompton said. “They really bring winter to life, whether there’s snow or not.”

“Did Led Zeppelin take pride in having the better light show? Of course.” - JACK CROMPTON

280,000 and 350,000 bulbs—the trees in front of Araxi alone hold 7,000 bulbs each. Each string uses about 4.8 watts per hour, with 5,000 strings costing about $2.40 an hour. “The Resort Municipality of Whistler’s

CURE

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Up until a few weeks ago, Whistler’s snow-clearing strategy didn’t get much of a workout to start the season—bad news for powder hounds, marginally good news for municipal penny pinchers. “The RMOW fully staffs snow

clearing during late fall and winter months, so in general there’s not a lot of overtime that is paid out,” Crompton said. “From November 1 to December 10 this year the RMOW paid $3,199.50 less in overtime than it did in the same period last year.” The annual budget for snow clearing in 2018 was about $1.16 million. Once the snow starts to fall, municipal crews have a set strategy to work from bright—or in this case, dark—and early. “Primary routes including transit and school bus routes, subdivisions, main access to the highway and Whistler Village and the day lots are cleared first, starting at 4:30 in the morning,” Crompton explained. “Secondary routes are cleared starting from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m., and then maintenance of private roads such as those through strata complexes is the responsibility of private strata

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News WHIST L ER _______________________________________________________ councils.” Depending on the conditions, some areas can turn problematic more quickly than others, but crews are well versed in the municipal road systems. “During the winter, crews are available round the clock whenever necessary,” Crompton said. “Obviously there are locations around Whistler that are more challenging than others. Many of our staff have been around for a long time, so they understand the challenge well and are aware of how to respond.”

dressed, mostly invisible pedestrians on the side of the highway are an annual issue in Whistler. Residents and visitors are reminded to always carry a light or a reflector (which can be picked up at municipal hall for free), and avoid walking on the highway when possible. “One of the key messages to our public is that oftentimes when you’re on the highway, you’re only 20 or 30 feet (six to nine metres) away from a Valley Trail that can get you home safely,” Crompton said. “So use the Valley Trail whenever possible. Stay off the highway.”

WALK SAFE THIS WINTER

STEP CODE IN EFFECT JAN. 1

< FROM PAGE 16

One of Crompton’s first official duties as mayor since the Oct. 20 election has been presenting to all the new recruits at the Whistler Experience Program sessions. “One of my personal key messages has been around staying off the highways as a pedestrian,” he said. “It’s near and dear to my heart having run a taxi company in the past, and (having) experienced the reality of people dying on the highway.” With very few streetlights, darkly

As of Jan. 1, 2019, Whistler officially moved to Step 3 of B.C.’s new Energy Step Code (ESC), which lays out an incremental and consistent set of regulations that will lead to more energy efficient buildings. The ESC now applies to all part 9 residential buildings (including single-family, duplex and smaller, multi-family buildings). “Specifically, Step 3 of the ESC will apply to all new part 9 residential buildings, Step 4 of the ESC will apply

LIGHT ‘EM UP Whistler’s annual Christmas light display is a favourite of visitors and locals alike.

FILE PHOTO BY MIKE CRANE/COURTESY OF THE RESORT MUNICIPALITY OF WHISTLER

to all new part 9 residential buildings on properties applying for rezoning to increase density or permit additional uses,” Crompton said. “The implementation of the step code will increase the performance of buildings and decrease our community’s overall use of energy. One

of the aspects I appreciate is the clarity that it provides for contractors.” Whistler council passed its ESC bylaw—built after months of engagement with stakeholders—on July 10. Find more info at www.whistler.ca/ stepcode. n

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News WHIST L ER It’s a girl! SEA TO SKY WELCOMES NEW YEAR’S BABY By

Joel Barde

T

he Sea to Sky corridor’s first baby of the New Year was born in a home-assisted birth in Furry Creek with help from two midwives and a volunteer nurse. And while welcoming the new baby into the family will always be memorable, newborn Lillianna Skye Dasse Rivait is making her social media debut thanks to a cheeky photo captured by her father Nathan. “As soon as she was placed in (mom) Larissa’s (Dasse) arms and cleaned up a little bit, and her face was visible, that was the first picture I took, and she made the finger—and she was kind of smiling about it too!” chuckled Rivait. The image, he adds, is now “all over Facebook … It was really funny.” Lillianna Skye, born at 8:38 a.m., weighed in at seven pounds 12 ounces (3.5 kilograms), and is 21 inches (53 centimetres) long. Rivait said that his fiancée, Dasse, was

NEW YEAR’S GIFT Mom Larissa Dasse holds newborn Lillianna Skye Dasse Rivait.

PHOTO BY DAVE BUZZARD

actually scheduled to give birth back on Dec. 26 and tried “every natural thing you could possibly think of” to induce birth. He credits an acupuncture and acupressure treatment on Dec. 30 with doing the trick, as within six hours, baby Lillianna Skye was “pushing and pushing,” struggling to come out. “I would suggest it for anyone that’s in the last days of pregnancy … it works,” said Rivait. Having the child at home was a wonderful experience, said Rivait, adding that he is grateful for the diligent work of the midwives who made it possible. “To be at home—in the comfort of our own home—was just great,” he said. “It was amazing. I would suggest it to anybody.” Lillianna Skye was not, however, the first baby to be born in the province. That distinction goes to Dominik Soswa, who was born at Royal Columbian Hospital in New Westminster at 12:01 a.m. About 42,000 babies are expected to be born in B.C. this year. n

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Recent upgrades include attractive eating bar & kitchen backsplash, interior paint & carpeting throughout & furnishings. Ski-in from Mt Morrisey. Soaring windows & direct access to both a spacious sundeck with spectacular mountain views & to a unique, park-like backyard. Spacious laundry/hobby room plus a one bedroom suite with separate entry.

Liz Forster

Liz Forster

250.682.2289

250.682.2289 QUARTER OWNERSHIP

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sunpeaksresort.com

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$76,900 gst applicable 1404 A The Residences, Sun Peaks, BC

BEDS: 2 BATHS: 2.5 1,328 SQ. FT. MLS# 148475

BEDS: 1 BATHS: 1 799 SQ.FT MLS# 148473

Ski-out to all 3 mountains & ski-in via the Lookout Ridge skier overpass, across the 15th fairway, directly to your backyard hot tub. Nordic trailhead is just across the street. Fully furnished, 3 level townhouse with private tandem garage. Open living area features kitchen with inviting eating bar, granite countertops, stainless appliances. sunpeakscollection.com

Quarter ownership. This top floor, fully furnished, luxurious apartment offers true ski-in/out convenience, prime location in the heart of the village & use of hotel amenities such as pools, hot tubs, gym & sauna. Includes full kitchen, inviting living area with fireplace, air-conditioning, private deck & in suite laundry.

Liz Forster

Liz Forster

250.682.2289

PHASES 1 & 2 SOLD OUT

PHASE 3

C OM I N G S O O N

coming soon

2 & 3 bedroom condo, townhouse & commercial development

SKI -IN / S K I - O U T C O N D O S B E S I D E T H E N E W O R I E N T C H A I RL I FT EXC E P T I O N A L V I E W S RE G I S TE R TO DAY F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N

ELEVATIONSUNPEAKS.COM SUNPEAKS Elevation at Sun Peaks is a development of A&T Project Developments Inc. The developer reserves the right to modify or change plans, specifications, features and prices without notice. Materials may be substituted with equivalent or better at the developer’s sole discretion. All dimensions and sizes are approximate and are based on architectural measurements. This is not an offering for sale and such offer can only be made by Disclosure Statement E.&O.E.

P E A KSW E ST.C A The developer reserves the right to modify or change plans, specifications, features and prices without notice. Materials may be substituted with equivalent or better at the developer’s sole discretion. All dimensions and sizes are approximate and are based on architectural measurements. This is not an offering for sale and such offer can only be made by Disclosure Statement E.&O.E.

LOCAL EXPERTISE, GLOBAL CONNECTIONS.

250.682.2289

For more information contact:

Sotheby’s International Realty Canada, Sun Peaks

t. 250.578.7773 tf. 1.877.578.5774

sunpeaks@sothebysrealty.ca #9 - 3250 Village Way, Sun Peaks, BC Open 7 days a week 9 til 6

SOTHEBYSREALTY.CA

Sotheby’s International Realty Canada, Independently Owned and Operated. E.&O.E.: This information is from sources which we deem reliable, but must be verified by prospective purchasers and may be subject to change or withdrawal.


News PEMBERT ON & T H E V A L L E Y

BANNER YEAR Lil’wat Nation artist Levi Nelson’s work is featured on new banners that will line Portage Road .

Lil’wat artist’s work to be displayed prominently in Pemberton

BRAD KASSELMAN/ WWW.COASTPHOTO.COM

MAYOR RICHMAN HOPES PROJECT WILL STIMULATE CONVERSATION ABOUT THE ‘SHARED LAND THAT WE LIVE ON’ By Joel

I

Barde

n the spirit of reconciliation and ongoing efforts to enhance the downtown core, the Village of Pemberton (VOP) will display the artwork of Lil’wat Nation artist Levi Nelson on banners along Portage Road. The brightly coloured pieces— entitled Medicine Man Summoning the Spirits and Creatures of Land & Water— were created in the Woodland Cree style, an art movement originated by Ojibwe artist Norval Morrisseau in eastern Canada. They will include the Ucwalmícwts place name for the Pemberton area: “Nkwukwma.” According to the Village, workers will begin installing the banners on Wednesday, Jan. 2. And in the spring, the VOP will incorporate more of Nelson’s work, installing several banner wraps on utility boxes. “He’s very, very talented,” said Richman. “Just the beautification of having (Nelson’s) work in the Village is going to be great.” Richman added that he hopes the prominently displayed artwork will help stimulate conversation and open up a dialogue on “the shared land that we live on.” That message resonates with Nelson,

who is currently in his third year at the Emily Carr University of Art + Design and recently won the coveted IDEA Art Award, landing his artwork on the walls of Vancouver General Hospital and UBC Hospital. He said he submitted eight paintings for the project—including two that combine cowboy and Lil’wat Nation iconography and were created specifically for the project—and was then forced to reflect when the selection committee chose the Woodland-Cree style paintings. “I was a little apprehensive about it, and I wasn’t sure how people would take it,” said Nelson, noting that perhaps there might be an expectation that the art should more closely reflect the artistic tradition of Lil’wat Nation. In the end, Nelson discussed the issue with his professors at Emily Carr, who shared that today’s Aboriginal art scene is increasingly cross-cultural. “You’ll have people on the Northwest Coast going to powwows and dancing in women’s fancy dance style, or you’ll have artists like me, borrowing and practicing from eastern Canadian art,” said Nelson. “I think that is where we are at in contemporary Aboriginal art … the cross-cultural practicing of each other’s expressions.” In the end, the artwork on the banners does reflect the Pemberton area,

22 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

said Nelson, noting that the area looked far different before European settlement. “So Pemberton and Mount Currie (was) basically this marshland,” he said. “That’s what inspired me to paint Creatures of Land & Water—the moose, loons and salmon” that lived there. Nelson said that while he has felt supported and had a positive experience with Pemberton residents growing up, he’s been troubled by “angry comments from (some) about people from Mount Currie who may have alcohol addictions and are wandering the Village or in local parks.” The roadblocks in the ‘90s “kind of divided the communities, and it’s been kind of rocky ever since,” reflected Nelson. He sees his work as contributing to the ongoing efforts to further reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians across the country. It’s important for smaller communities like Pemberton to “open up and welcome” Indigenous communities as part of the effort, he explained. When asked what obstacles need to be overcome to further reconciliation, Richman said that it’s important to address “ignorance” around the legacy of colonialism and residential schools. “I know that’s a word that scares people—but it’s not meant to insult,”

said Richman. “It’s meant to say that our community is still very much uninformed at times as to what our shared past is, and what some of the impacts of colonialism have been on our First Nations neighbours. “It’s not a matter of blame. It’s a matter of acknowledging that these things were done in our country and area and they still have lasting damage in communities.” Asked if that sentiment resonates, Nelson said he feels it is spot on. “Ignorance is the right word,” said Nelson. “Because when you don’t know about something—and you don’t know about the history or the tragedy of what happened to Aboriginal people during assimilation—you … wonder what happened to people,” he said. “I hear it a lot, ‘well, why are they like that? Like they get all this free money … why don’t they make their lives better?’ “It’s a lot bigger than that, there is a large percentage of Aboriginal people who are dealing with post-traumatic stress that’s been handed down from generation to generation by way of alcoholism and even abuse.” Nelson said that he hopes that his artwork will serve as an “optical representation” of relationship building—which he sees as vital and still in its early days. n


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O U T O F R AN G E

24 Dispatches

HOUSE AND HOME SFU terrestrial ecology professor David Hik says that melting glaciers in the southwest Yukon may contribute to the rising mortality rate of the collared pika, a species that is listed as a “species of special concern” under the Species at Risk act. WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

The hidden costs of melting glaciers RETREAT OF GLACIERS POWERFUL ILLUSTRATION OF CLIMATE CHANGE Joel Barde

jbarde@piquenewsmagazine.com

W

hile most accept that the world is warming, policymakers have been slow to respond. Many blame the incremental nature of climate change: It can be difficult to clearly illustrate the harm in easily grasped ways. Yet according to two Simon Fraser University (SFU) professors, the impacts come into sharp focus when you look in the right places: namely, glaciers. Like the melting ice caps, the retreat of the world’s glaciers (which by some accounts are melting at an accelerating rate) serve as powerful illustrations of climate change. SFU terrestrial ecology professor David Hik is alarmed at what is occurring in the Yukon. He recalls travelling into icefields in the area 30 years ago and it was like “going back to the ice age.” “It was kind of time travel, but into a previous time,” recalled Hik. “And now … it’s time travel, but it’s time travel into the future because we are seeing this massive loss of huge volumes of ice from the largest sub-polar ice fields in the world.” The loss, he explained, has been documented through comparing aerial photographs taken over the years. “An analysis from (topographical) maps from (roughly) 1957 to 2010,

showed about 22 per cent of the glacier area in the Yukon has been lost,” said Hik, whose current research is focused on the southwestern area of the Yukon. The retreat of glaciers is having profound consequences on river systems in the area, he added. Hik noted that Slims River (known as A’ąy Chù by the local Indigenous population)—which once connected the Kaskawulsh Glacier and Kluane Lake (Lhù’ààn Mân)—effectively dried up in 2016, and melt water from the glacier now drains south towards the Pacific Ocean. This has caused lake levels to drop by two metres. “It’s (affected) the spawning areas for lake trout and salmon that migrate up into the river, and it’s had a huge impact on the communities around the lake, especially the First Nation communities, in terms of how safe it is to travel on ice in winter or get boats to the lake in the summer,” explained Hik. The consequences to the wider ecosystem are also profound. Hik highlighted the plight of the collared pika, which is currently listed as a “species of special concern” under the Species at Risk Act, as an example. “What happens, when the snow disappears, is that (the) space under the snow that provides some insulation for colder temperatures is not there anymore, and so we see (this contributing to) mortality of populations,” he said. “It’s species that are typically well-suited to

24 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

the cold that may, in fact, do very poorly as things warm up.” Global warming is also impacting alpine plants, the pika’s source of food. Yet while some plant life species are suffering, others “seem to be thriving” and are actually growing taller than before, said Hik. “This is particularly true for woody shrubs, like salix (willow) and birch—the dwarf shrubs you see at the tree line,” he said. “We’ve documented how they are moving up the slope, and this is true around the northern hemisphere and on mountains around the world.” John Clague, a professor of environmental earth sciences focused on glaciers, views his work as complementary to Hik’s. Clague is currently working on a research project centred in the foothills of the Patagonian Andes and Tierra del Fuego. What’s happening to glaciers in the Andes could have a profound impact on farming in the Pampas, a 750,000 square-kilometre area known as the “breadbasket” of Argentina, he explained.

T HI S SEC T I O N

By

“It’s very dependent on glacier and snowmelt to provide water for food production,” said Clague. “Most people think of it as a temperature-related phenomenon, that farms are less productive if you have a warmer climate, but water is just as critical as temperature.” Clague said there are similarities between what’s occurring in Argentina and what is likely to occur in Canada’s prairies, an area that is similarly fed by glacial runoff. “They’re both breadbasket areas for feeding their own populations and feeding a lot of people around the world,” he said. Clague noted that food production is just one thing that would be affected by global warming—and society will increasingly need to adapt to the challenges of climate change. “For me, it’s a closed case,” he said. “We’re having an impact on climate change. We just need to think about what the world is going to be like with less ice.” n

5 M OUNTAIN NEWS A year in mountain news 2 26 SCIENCE MATTERS Misleading talking points need to stop 27 R ANGE ROVER A tour through Calgary’s arts and dining scene 28 FEATURE Looking back on the year that was


Dispatches O U T O F R A N G E Mountain News: Top stories of the year

very mountain town in 2018 struggled with the pinch in housing availability at prices affordable to those working in the hospitality and service industries. Many towns struggled to come up with meaningful climate-action plans. Several in Canada as well as Colorado grappled with rules for marijuana legalization, while a few Colorado towns worked through refinements of rules governing legalization. Here are two other stories with common themes in 2018. They will almost surely be themes going forward in 2019.

ALTERRA IN 2019

In retrospect, of course somebody would come along to challenge Vail Resorts at its own game. Largely under the direction of chief executive Rob Katz, the company had crafted the Epic Pass to create customer loyalty, improve the annual revenue stream, even as it created geographic diversity. California hurting for snow? Well, use your Epic Pass in Colorado. Or Whistler. And last year, as Colorado limped along, Whistler—in its first year as a Vail Resorts property—came on line like gangbusters. The new monster on the block was hatched by KSL Capital Partners and the Chicago-based Crown family, owners of the Aspen Skiing Co. Early in 2018 the unnamed company became Alterra, and then later gained its first chief executive, Rusty Gregory, the long-time boss at California’s Mammoth Mountain. As the 2018-19 ski season began, it had 14 major resorts. Vail Resorts didn’t sit idle, adding Crested Butte to its lineup, putting it at 10 major resorts and three urban ski areas. David Perry, the No. 2 at Alterra, downplayed the competition with Vail Resorts in an interview early in 2018. There was plenty of money for both companies to make, he suggested. But if that suggests friendly oligopolies, others see a fierce competition shaping up. What’s interesting is that skiing is not really a growing sport. Participation levels have grown little since the 1980s. Yet the rise in the stock price of Vail Resorts testifies there’s money to be made. Stock prices started out at $16 per share at the initial public offering in 1997. Even in 2014, it stood at US$77 a share. But by September, it had leaped to US$294 a share—before tumbling at year’s end to US$210 per share. Perhaps a reflection of the new competition from Alterra? The two ski and mountain resort giants have headquarters in Colorado, Alterra in

THINKING ABOUT WILDFIRES

The 416 Fire between Durango and Silverton flared on June 1, producing lots of smoke and crippling the summer tourism economies of the two mountain towns in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado. It was the second big fire near Durango after many decades of almost no fires. Wildfire was a big story again in 2018 in most ski towns. Some had smoky skies, others had fires nearby, and almost every mountain resort town from Whistler to Ketchum to Aspen was thinking about how to make itself less vulnerable. Then came the Camp Fire inferno that killed 85 people in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada during November, the most destructive fire in California history. Experts predict many more will come in decades ahead, as aging forests become more susceptible to wildfire. Too, ill-advised fire suppression has only delayed the inevitable. And again, climate change figures into the story. Scientists predict much larger fires for the next several decades, the result of drought but also more directly because of warming temperatures. The fire north of Durango may have been started by embers from a coalpowered narrow-gauge chugging up the Animas River Canyon. But drought made the vegetation more combustible. The moisture content of lumber sold in Durango was higher than that of many standing trees. National drought maps even into 2019 show the Four Corners region bathed in deep burgundy, the most intense drought in the United States. Then on July 3, smoke engulfed Colorado’s Roaring Fork Valley, even threatening the power supply to Aspen. In Colorado’s Summit County, fire also flared near Silverthorne, at the foot of the Gore Range. It produced a scare, forcing hundreds of residents to evacuate homes. Thanks to efforts to create fire buffers between homes and forest, damages were relatively light. Will it be enough for the next year? Maybe. But what may matter most is that nearly all the houses and other buildings in Summit County are located within what has been called the wildland-urban interface. Having wilderness out your backyard can be wonderful, but there can be consequences. This is a story that will only get bigger in decades ahead in places like Ketchum and Park City, Steamboat Springs and Whistler. n

2018

E

Thank You to all our clients who voted our lawyers as

Best Of Whistler every year between 2007 and 2017. Even though Pique Newsmagazine has retired our category, we’ll continue to provide our clients with top-rated legal services.

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Lower Downtown Denver and Vail Resorts 25 minutes away in a suburb of Boulder. The National Ski Areas Association is about 25 minutes from each.

2016

Allen Best

2013

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Science Matters WE KNOW PEMBERTON INSIDE & OUT BLOCK A PEMBERTON MEADOWS RD. PEMBERTON MEADOWS

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Only 20 minutes from the Village of Pemberton, this is an excellent parcel of land that boarders on the Lillooet River on the northern end. It is well treed for privacy and offers great mountain views. Lot Size:

60 Acres

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PEMBERTON

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PEMBERTON

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PEMBERTON

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Bathrooms:

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DANIELLE MENZEL danielle@wrec.com 604 698 5128

* Denotes Personal Real Estate Corporation

604 894 5166 | WHISTLERREALESTATE.CA 26 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

Will the world act on climate change before it’s too late?

W

hen our children and grandchildren and those of us still here in 20 years look back to this time, will we say it was when the world finally got serious about the climate crisis? Or will we mark a tragic time when political and business leaders prioritized short-term economic gain over the future of humanity? Listening to Canada’s minister of environment and climate change respond on the radio to the recent

David Suzuki

By

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report, Global Warming of 1.5°C, didn’t raise my hopes. Despite outlining good policies such as pricing carbon pollution and phasing out coal power, the government representative who should know the most about climate issues repeated numerous debunked and false talking points.  She floated the excuse for inaction I’ve been hearing for at least 30 years: “We aren’t going to get off fossil fuels overnight.” She skirted around a question about the climate impacts of burning the increasing amounts of bitumen government plans to ship to foreign markets. She touted Canada’s biggest fossil fuel venture, a $40-billion, foreign-owned liquefied natural gas project, as a “climate solution” because it could replace coal power. That’s despite research and advice from scientists about how the project impedes meeting our climate targets, the substantial and underreported release of the potent greenhouse gas methane from LNG and fracking, and the fact that LNG is as likely to slow renewable energy development as to replace coal-fired power. She also repeated the tired refrain of politicians from across the spectrum, that economic considerations are as important as environmental ones—equating the relatively new, human-created, outdated economic system with the timeless natural systems on which our health, well-being and survival depend. It could be worse. The U.S. president’s response to the IPCC report was, “I want to look at who drew it. You know, which group drew it. I can give you reports that are fabulous and I can give you reports that aren’t so good.” Beyond its inarticulate nature, the comment displays a profound lack of understanding of climate change, the IPCC and the work of climate scientists worldwide whose research informs its reports.

Listening to these politicians could lead people to think global warming isn’t an urgent challenge or that the science and its well-known, already observable effects are up for debate. The only issues we should be debating are the best ways to confront the crisis. The IPCC special report, prepared by 91 researchers from 40 countries and based on more than 6,000 scientific resources, is clear: “Limiting global warming to 1.5ºC would require rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society.” Temperatures have already risen close to 1 C. The report warns we have about 12 years to act decisively if we are to avoid a dramatic increase in impacts we’re already experiencing: extreme weather events, droughts, floods, rising sea levels, diminishing polar ice and subsequent feedback loops that accelerate warming, and ecosystem collapse among them. Those who argue the economy is too important to stop developing and expanding fossil fuel infrastructure—from oilsands to pipelines to deep sea drilling to fracking—ignore the mounting costs of climate disruption and the economic benefits of shifting to cleaner energy. A report by the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction found climate-related disaster losses cost US$2.2 trillion over the past two decades, up from US$895 billion over the previous two decades. (It only accounts for official reports and insurance stats, so likely only represents a fraction of the true costs.) Meanwhile, worldwide employment and opportunities in the clean energy sector continue to grow. The IPCC report lays out numerous solutions, including “shifting to low- or zero-emission power generation, such as renewables; changing food systems, such as diet changes away from land-intensive animal products; electrifying transport and developing ‘green infrastructure’, such as building green roofs, or improving energy efficiency by smart urban planning, which will change the layout of many cities.” Will we and our elected leaders heed these dire warnings and start facilitating and implementing solutions at the pace required to forestall disaster? Or will we continue to abuse this small planet that gives us life until it’s too late? It’s time to decide—and to hold all politicians to account. David Suzuki is a scientist, broadcaster, author and co-founder of the David Suzuki Foundation. Written with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington. n


Range Rover 27

MORE THAN JUST A STOP OVER These days, getting stuck in Calgary by weather on a ski trip is a good thing.

PHOTO BT LESLIE ANTHONY

Ski town Calgary

B

een to Calgary in the winter? It can be a trying place November to March when anything—and everything—can happen. Temperatures going up and down like a toilet seat, snow and ice retreating and advancing like the Pleistocene, unplowed streets. I won’t regale

By Leslie Anthony you with my weather-related horror stor … er, experiences … of Calgary during this season, but I was generally inconvenienced only because I was transiting from the airport to the mountains. Once they built a bypass west on the Trans-Canada Highway and you didn’t have to drive through the city along dreaded 16th Avenue, it was easy to avoid a place where you wouldn’t want to ever get stuck. But I’m here to dispel my own myths: Calgary has come of age. Not only is the city a legitimate mountain gateway town, à la Denver, providing access to a Rocky Mountain front range ski empire—Kananaskis Country, Canmore, Banff and Lake Louise—but it’s a legitimate stopover, a place to spend a few days en route and actually enjoy yourself. There’s a lot going on that you wouldn’t expect. To start, the global food and beverage renaissance has made itself known with an abundance of cool new eating and

drinking options. Let’s start where I did, at the historic and thoroughly enchanting Deane House in Inglewood, a building with many former lives but now a long-time restaurant open for dinner, lunch and weekend brunch. In a series of carefully curated rooms each with its own character, the folks behind River Café— proprietor Sal Howell, chef Mattias Fong—celebrate Canadian cuisine with a serious dedication to the environment and sustainability. Evergreen-smoked Elbow River trout was amazing, but I almost fainted when I tasted woodgrilled bison with dried Saskatoon berries. Serious skier fare. Everyone knows Alberta grows some of the world’s best grains, so no surprise the province can finally lay claim to a burgeoning craft brewery scene—à la Vancouver a decade ago, with new breweries expected to reach 80 this year. Calgary’s Barley Belt alone includes more than 30 establishments, and stretches through the city north to south, some so close you can reach out and touch one from the other. I joined a group to visit Village Brewery (famous for its “Jagr Lagr” when Jaromir Jagr himself was briefly a Calgary Flame), neighbouring Born Colorado Brewing and Annex Ale Project (great IPA and salty Lebanese string cheese), before we all hopped on a surprisingly fun 16-passenger U-shaped bike and pedalled our way to Paddy’s

Barbecue & Brewery and Banded Peak, finishing up at Legend 7 Brewery with its “Seven Deadly Sin” line of beers. Little known fact: Calgary birthed the Caesar (invented in 1969 by Walter Chell at the Calgary Inn, now the downtown Westin), possibly the second most important drink in Canadian ski culture behind beer. Given the town’s profusion of blue-suits, there’s always been a solid cocktail scene in Cowtown. These days, however, old standards have given way to a vast experimental landscape of surprising ingredients and international flair. Places like Klein/Harris, Hayden Block, Proof, Raw Bar, and Gorilla Whale are doing things with gin, bourbon, sake and other spirits that can only be called culinary art. There are even new world-class attractions to boast of. The stunning new National Music Centre is worth a visit for its architecture alone, but what it contains only adds to the heady dazzle. Can visiting a museum be as exciting as a music festival? The sense of excitement in discovering new artists, hearing new beats, and celebrating with friends is the approach taken to developing exhibitions here. In addition, a 2,000piece collection representing the history of global music technology and the story of music in Canada is on display to the public and available to artists in residence. From an Elton John piano to a Stevie Wonder synthesizer to the Rolling

Stones’ infamous mobile recording unit—where it laid down memorable albums Sticky Fingers, Exile on Main Street, and Some Girls, and which was also used by bands like Led Zeppelin (albums II, III and IV), Deep Purple (“Smoke on the Water”), and The Who (“Won’t Get Fooled Again”). These days, I wouldn’t mind being stuck in Calgary at all by a winter storm— in fact, I was holed up downtown in late September when a freak 60-centimetre dump virtually shuttered the downtown core. But how about this: though I still don’t understand the old people in red vests and white cowboy hats (Alberta being the only province in Canada that seems to have a uniform and people dressing in provincial caricature), I also wouldn’t mind being stuck at its airport. I would immediately check into the Calgary Airport Marriott, one of the most modern, comfortable, upscale airport hotels imaginable. But you know, you don’t even have to stay there to appreciate the cuisine of its very cool Yakima Restaurant, a modern hot-spot for Aboriginal and Asian inspired cuisine and drinks. Want a hot tip for your next ski trip to the Rockies? Stay in Calgary, but go to the airport for dinner. Leslie Anthony is a Whistler-based author, editor, biologist and bon vivant who has never met a mountain he didn’t like. n

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 3, 2019 | 27


STO RY

28 Feature

28 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


Feature STO R Y

2018

YEAR IN REVIEW

WHISTLER

N

othing like an election year to get the rabblerousers riled. Or, in Whistler’s case, listening politely and respectfully sharing ideas (for the most part). Unfortunately, new Whistler Mayor Jack Crompton ran unopposed in the Oct. 20 election—depriving local voters of the sort of fiery, substantive debate that can turn a standard election into a barnburner—and while 20 brave souls stepped forward for six council seats, the campaign never heated up much beyond respectful dialogue—which is a good thing (if a tad boring, from our perspective). In the end, Whistlerites went the predictable route, electing three incumbents (Jen Ford, John Grills and Cathy Jewett), two former councillors (Duane Jackson and Ralph Forsyth) and Whistler Blackcomb environmental guru Arthur De Jong, who Crompton referred to on election night as “the most qualified rookie in the history of local government.” The new council was sworn in for a four-year term on Nov. 6. “What animates me, and what I hope will animate our community going forward, is a pursuit of depth; of roots; of permanence,” Crompton said in his inaugural address. “I believe in the next election someone will stand in front of this community and say, ‘My name is, and I was born here, and I want you to vote for me,’ ... I think that will be an exciting day.

By Braden Dupuis

“I am going to work very hard for that person to be able to call this home and raise a family here.” CHANGING OF THE GUARD While a new council is in place for 2019 and beyond, 2018 was very much the end of an era. After 17 combined years behind the council table, Mayor Nancy Wilhelm-Morden announced, in May, that she would not be seeking re-election come the fall. “It has been an absolute privilege to serve the community for the last seven years as the mayor. We’ve accomplished quite a number of amazing things over the course of that time,” Wilhelm-Morden told Pique at the time. “The top 10 (campaign promises) that I ran on in 2011 have been met, for the most part—of course there’s always more work to do, but it’s time for me to step aside and to spend some more time with my family and with my friends, and devote more time to my law practice as well.” Council was busy in Wilhelm-Morden’s final year, working on regional transit, a new smoking bylaw, updating the Official Community Plan, transportation, the artificial turf field (now known as the Andrée Vajda Janyk Sports Field), updating solid waste and water use bylaws and much more.

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 3, 2019 | 29


Feature

CHANGING OF THE GUARD Mayor Nancy WilhelmMorden opted not to run for re-election in 2018 after 17 years in local politics. Photo submitted.

FRESH START New

Mayor Jack Crompton gives his inaugural address at a Nov. 6 Whistler council meeting. Photo by Braden Dupuis. FIRE FIGHT A fire on the shores of Anderson Lake in May kicked off another disastrous B.C. wildfire season. Photo by Steven Turner.

But looking back through the pages of Pique, housing was far and away the most common theme of 2018. The biggest news story of the year, as voted by Pique readers, was Vail Resorts’ announcement in September that it will build a 200-bed staff housing building. The building is expected to be open for the 2020-2021 ski season. For council’s part, it moved ahead with recommendations from the Mayor’s Task Force on Resident Housing, such as new Whistler Housing Authority builds, private developer proposals for employee housing (much to the chagrin of some local residents—this story is one to follow in 2019), and developing Phase 2 of Cheakamus Crossing. The Resort Municipality of Whistler is targeting at least 550 new rental units in the Cheakamus neighbourhood, with a potential move-in date as early as spring 2021. In early November, council moved to form a new development corporation using similar terms and private-sector experience as the Whistler 2020 Development Corp. (WDC)—the board stepped down in June—to oversee housing projects throughout all of Whistler. “The WDC focused primarily on Cheakamus Crossing and Olympic housing. We want to consider 30 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

a mandate that would include all municipal land,” Crompton said, adding that former WDC chair Eric Martin has agreed to help manage the transition. “It will take some time to establish the corporation, but we’re asking municipal staff and contractors to carry on with the momentum they’ve built (on Cheakamus Crossing Phase 2), and the new corporation will be the beneficiary of all of that work.” In December, Whistler drew the ire of the oil industry with a letter asking oil companies to “pay their fair share” of climate costs. The initiative—passed by the previous council in September—was roundly criticized as hypocritical and tone-deaf. The industry outrage over the letter led CIBC to pull the oil and gas sector from its investment

conference in Whistler this month, along with anecdotal claims of lost business and potential boycotts from others. “I could have chosen a better venue. I certainly should have sent a better letter. As I’ve said, I regret making any guests feel unwelcome. We were tone deaf. We do, as a resort, depend on oil and gas,” Crompton said on Dec. 18. “So I don’t disagree with the charge that the letter was hypocritical. But as a friend said to me, this issue is just too large for us to wait until all of our hands are clean.” BURN ONE DOWN After some delays, one of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s big campaign promises finally came to fruition on Oct. 17 with the legalization of recreational cannabis. Whistler decision makers are taking the cautious approach in prohibiting cannabis stores in Whistler, allowing them to carefully consider all retail inquiries (of which there have been dozens) before deciding on the best way forward. Only time will tell if Whistlerites will be able to get their ganja at the local mom-and-pop pot shop before 2019 is out. Speaking of fires, B.C. outdid itself once more in 2018 with another disastrous wildfire season. More than 13,000 square kilometres burned, making it the worst wildfire season on record (beating out the previous record set in 2017). Along with fuel thinning and FireSmarting efforts, Whistler bolstered its response efforts with two new FireWatch cameras (capable of detecting smoke in the valley) and three new wildfire response vehicles. Though there were a few smoky weeks and anxiety to spare, Whistler again avoided the worst of it (knock on wood, again). Local officials were relieved to hear at the Union of BC Municipalities Convention, held in Whistler this past September, that the Resort Municipality Initiative program, which funnels provincial cash to tourism-based communities for marketing and programming, will remain an “ongoing” program for the foreseeable future, and again, in November, to learn a long-gestating application for an increase in Municipal and Regional District Tax (or hotel tax) from two per cent to three per cent had been approved. A bowling alley proposed for Whistler Village drew lots of attention in the spring—both from rolling enthusiasts anxious to hit the lanes and from the local bar and restaurant sector, who opposed the new competition en masse in a letter-writing campaign. A Sept. 18 public hearing for the facility was cancelled due to some “11th-hour” issues with the Liquor and Cannabis Regulation Branch, and the process is now on hold for the time being.


20th ANNIVERSARY!


Feature 2018 YEAR IN REVIEW

CRIME BY BRANDON BARRETT

I

f you’re a regular reader of the Police Briefs that grace the pages of Pique on a weekly basis, you can start to pick out some of the most common crimes in Whistler. Being the party town that we are, it should come as no surprise that the blotter is often filled with reports of public intoxication, drunk driving, and even the odd village brawl. This year was no exception to that rule: relatively minor offences still rule the day. But, in 2018, Whistler and the surrounding area was also home to a handful of headline-grabbing crimes that caught the attention of not just locals, but in some cases, an international audience as well. Whistler RCMP Staff Sgt. Paul Hayes said he believes it’s a trend indicative of the resort’s continued growth. “When you get larger in all respects, you tend to see the negative that comes along with that,” he said. “That’s just something we’re going to have to deal with in the years forward.” It certainly wasn’t all bad news, however. Survivors of sexual assault in the Sea to Sky now have another avenue to justice thanks to a pilot project that gives victims an option to report their assault anonymously to police through a certified third party. Bike theft, one of the most persistent offences in a town filled with high-end mountain bikes, took a significant dip this year, thanks in part to the continued success of the RCMP’s bait-bike program. Hayes credits the RCMP’s successes this year to a more visible role in the community. “Without the community’s input, we are going to stagnate in terms of our ability to reduce crime in certain areas,” he said. “I think, in the last year, because of some of the outreach we’ve been doing and some of the ways we’ve been trying to get the community involved with

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TRAGIC DISCOVERY The body of Alison Raspa was discovered in the partially frozen Alpha Lake in March, nearly four months after the

us, we’ve seen some real improvements in that regard, and I’m really proud of that.” Read on to hear more about the year that was in crime, in which we highlight some of the biggest headlines and trends in Whistler and Pemberton.

25-year-old Aussie native was first reported missing. Photo submitted. BIKE THEFT Reports of bike theft dropped 57 per cent in 2018, according to the Whistler RCMP. Police have

WHISTLER RCMP SEIZES THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS IN CASH AND DRUGS A search warrant executed at a village home last March netted Whistler police a trove of cash and drugs. On March 30, Whistler RCMP, suspecting drug trafficking at a residence on Main Street, arrested a 20-year-old U.K. man as well as a 24-year-old Australian man. Police reportedly found thousands of dollars in cash, a “significant amount” of cocaine and MDMA, along with marijuana plants, large quantities of marijuana in various forms, psilocybin, and drug paraphernalia, according to a police statement. BODY OF MISSING AUSTRALIAN ALISON RASPA FOUND IN ALPHA LAKE In what was one of the most tragic stories of the year, Whistler police, in March, recovered the body of an Australian woman who had been missing for months, confounding both police and the community. On the evening of March 16, members of the public notified police that they had spotted what they

helped ‘hundreds’ of local bike owners sign up for Garage 529, a bike registration and recovery database that began partnering with the Whistler detachment in 2017. Photo by David Buzzard / www.media-centre.ca.

believed to be human remains floating in Alpha Lake. Authorities later confirmed the body was that of 25-year-old Alison Raspa, who had gone missing nearly four months prior. A native of Perth, Australia, Raspa was last seen leaving Three Below Restaurant just after midnight on Nov. 23. Tracing her path to Alpha Lake that night led to more questions than answers. Investigators pieced together that she spoke with a friend on the Village Stroll after leaving the bar,

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32 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


Feature STO R Y before boarding a bus to Creekside, which was captured on CCTV footage. At approximately 1:15 a.m., she texted friends she was lost. Adding to the mystery was the fact that several of Raspa’s personal items were found in two different locations near the lake: her cellphone was recovered in Alpha Lake Park the morning after she was last seen, and her backpack, wallet and jacket were found at the intersection of Highway 99 and Lake Placid Road. Although there were puzzling elements to the case, police didn’t suspect that foul play was a factor. The results of a Coroners Service inquest into the cause of Raspa’s death, which could shed some further light on what happened that November night, are forthcoming. SEVERAL DUPED BY TAX SCAM IN WHISTLER AND PEMBERTON A handful of Whistler residents fell prey to a tax scam that was reportedly on the rise across the country this year. In April, a 30-year-old server lost nearly $10,000 after a caller posing as a Canada Revenue agent demanded immediate payment for back-taxes,

threatening jail time if she did not cooperate. The woman ended up transferring cash in $1,000 increments to the scammers through a Bitcoin machine in the Summit Lodge. Bitcoin payments are irreversible, and can only be refunded by the person receiving the funds. Less than two months later, the phone scam claimed another victim, this time in Pemberton. On June 5, an individual notified Pemberton RCMP that they had received a call from someone falsely threatening for back taxes owed. In this instance, the scammer asked the victim to purchase prepaid Apple or iTunes gift cards in large quantities—a tactic similar to the earlier ploy in April. The scammer then instructed the victim to peel off the security covers on the cards and provide them with serial numbers over the phone. The following month, on July 10, a person reported being defrauded out of $2,000 by a caller who, again, posed as a Canada Revenue agent and demanded payment using Bitcoin. The RCMP reports that there have been over 56,000 complaints to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre and a reported loss of more than $10 million since the police agency began tracking tax scams in 2014. BIKE THEFTS DROPPED SIGNIFICANTLY IN 2018 Reports of bike theft were down significantly this year, thanks in part to the continued success of Whistler RCMP’s bait-bike program. At press time, police reported a 57-per-cent drop in bike theft compared to 2017, valued at approximately $40,000. Police have taken a multi-pronged approach towards bike theft in the community. In 2017, Whistler RCMP began working with Garage 529, a bike registration and recovery service that asks users to register their bike’s serial number and upload photos of their bike. It also alerts other users in the area when a bike is stolen. The RCMP says it, along with volunteers at local events, have helped register “hundreds” of bike owners to the app.

Now ng! Hiri

Whistler RCMP’s bait-bike program has also paid dividends towards reducing theft and identifying repeat offenders. Partnering with local businesses, police strategically place a rotating fleet of bait bikes around the resort, which are monitored live through police dispatch. When a bait bike is stolen, police are able to pinpoint its exact location at a given time. Using that data, investigators analyzed the thefts and “discovered that the vast majority of high-value thefts” could be attributed to suspects travelling from the Lower Mainland to the resort to find and steal expensive bikes, police said. As a result, police were able to arrest and advance charges on several suspects this year. “The reason we’ve had some of those large successes in terms of recovering thousands of dollars worth of stolen goods, is because the members I have working for me here, I tell them that we don’t stop because the bad guy goes back to wherever they happen to live outside of Whistler. We continue to follow them,” Hayes said. “So, if our investigation leads us to another municipality, then that’s where we do the warrant and where we seize (the stolen goods).” ‘SOPHISTICATED’ MARIJUANA GROW OP BUSTED SOUTH OF PEMBERTON Pemberton police shut down a “sophisticated,” 5,000-plant marijuana grow-op outside of Pemberton in late September. On Friday, Sept. 28, Pemberton RCMP, in conjunction with RCMP Air Services, observed what appeared to be a large outdoor grow-op on the west slope of Lillooet Lake, south of Mount Currie. Officers attended the scene to find “what can only be described as a large, sophisticated outdoor growing operation,” police said. Approximately 5,000 plants in various stages of growth and around 100 pounds (45 kilograms) of dried marijuana ready for distribution were seized. Police would go on to arrest a 31-year-old Ottawa man, a 34-year-old Gibsons man, and a 37-year-old Whistler man at the scene. FORMER WHISTLER ARTIST ZUBE AYLWARD FOUND MURDERED The brutal murder of former Whistler artist Patrick “Zube” Aylward rocked the small town of Seton Portage, Whistler and beyond when his body was discovered on

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Feature ST ORY (HSWC) announced the details of a pilot project that the side of an isolated road this fall. The 71-year-old Aylward, perhaps best known as gives adults in the corridor aged 19 and over an avenue the designer of the whimsical Mushroom House in to anonymously report the details of their sexual Emerald Estates, was found dead on Highline Road on assault to a local reporting worker that specializes in “emotional, practical and other supports.” the afternoon of Oct. 13. The new option provides a buffer between Nearly three months later, and police have still released few details on the incident, other than to say the homicide was a targeted attack and there is no threat to the public. Speaking to Postmedia, Seton Portage volunteer Fire Chief Frank Richings said Aylward was the victim of a home invasion-style robbery, and that his wife, Pat, narrowly escaped the intruders before notifying police. Along with designing the 279-square-metre Mushroom House, which sold for $3.5 million in 2007, Aylward had built an ornate home near Anderson Lake, outside of Seton Portage. Aylward was also known to grow marijuana plants in the greenhouse on his Anderson Lake property; Richings estimated there were more than 100 plants, and it is unclear if the European artist had a license to grow them. The murder, as well as unconfirmed reports circulating of its grisly nature, sent shockwaves through the small, rural town. At press time, no arrests had been made, and police have remained tight-lipped on the MUSHROOM MAN MURDERED Former Whistler details of the case. artist Patrick “Zube” Aylward, designer of the “Investigators have not released any further whimsical Mushroom House in Emerald, was information with respect murdered in a targeted attack in Seton Portage in to the progress in their October. Police have yet to make any arrests and investigation,” said Cpl. have released few details about the case. File photo. survivors of Dan Moskaluk with the sexual assault and Southeast District, who is the police. When the lead communication a third-party officer on the case, in report (TPR) is made, anonymous information will December. The RCMP has set up a dedicated tip line for be entered into the police database, and the local the investigation into Aylward’s death, which can be detachment will contact any police jurisdictions where the information may be relevant. A dedicated reached at 1-877-987-8477. officer at the RCMP’s E Division will also examine the report for any recurring criminal patterns. SEXUAL ASSAULT SURVIVORS The new option does not replace a formal police NOW HAVE THIRD-PARTY investigation, and is intended as a last resort for REPORTING OPTION survivors who would not otherwise report their sexual Survivors of sexual assault in the Sea to Sky now have assault to police. Anyone who uses the TPR option can the option of reporting their sexual assault anonymously also apply to the Crime Victim Assistance Program to through a third party, a move that should help break access specialized support, such as trauma counselling. Shannon Cooley Herdman, sexual assault down barriers to justice. In November, the Howe Sound Women’s Centre prevention coordinator at the HSWC, believes third34 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

party reporting will increase disclosure rates in the Sea to Sky. “There is a little more choice in how you engage with the justice system,” she told Pique in November. “It may appeal to people who aren’t going to be in town long, whether they’re a seasonal worker or just a visitor. They may want to share the details of their sexual assault anonymously without getting committed to a longterm court or investigation process.” There were 19 policereported incidents of sexual assault in Whistler in 2017, the most recent data available. ASSAULT CHARGES STAYED IN CASE AGAINST WHISTLER COUNCILLOR Assault charges against former Whistler Councillor Steve Anderson were stayed by the Crown in November. The matter was wrapped up in Pemberton court on Nov. 20, and there are no future court appearances scheduled for Anderson. The charges—two counts of assault laid on Aug. 13— stemmed from an alleged incident in Pemberton on Aug. 2, though details remain scarce. Crown Counsel Joseph Marin declined to provide specific information on the case. “Crowns constantly revisit their charge approval standard at every step, and I concluded the charge approval standard was no longer met,” Marin told Pique, of why the charges were stayed. Reached by phone, Anderson also declined to provide specifics, but said it was unfortunate that a small incident took so long to work its way through the courts (partly because of changes to Crown counsel during the summer holidays). “It’s too bad it took so long for the Crown to realize there was nothing there,” Anderson said. “(It) should have never been brought forward in the first place, but such is life.” Anderson took a leave of absence from the council table after the charges, sitting out the last two months of his term and missing out on running for re-election on Oct. 20. “I would have liked to retain a seat on council, although unable to get traction on my proposals for the many issues we faced last term,” Anderson said. - With files from Braden Dupuis


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Feature ST ORY 2018 YEAR IN REVIEW

SPORTS BY DAN FALLOON

E

very four years, Whistler seems to get a second Christmas in February and March. And with the Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games in PyeongChang, South Korea, 2018 provided us with our long-awaited quadrennial present. With so many Sea-toSky locals starring at the Games, here’s an Olympicheavy look at the year that was, along with some of the other notable developments in the local sporting world.

GOLDEN GIRL Whistler halfpipe skier Cassie Sharpe, above, celebrates with her gold medal at the 2018 Winter Olympic Games in PyeongChang, South Korea on Feb. 20. Photo by David Jackson / Courtesy of the Canadian Olympic Committee.

FOUR FOR CANADA Whistler’s Mollie Jepsen, left, had a breakout Paralympics with four alpine skiing

CASSIE SHARPE

medals. Photo by Greg Kolz.

A Whistler resident by way of Comox, Sharpe couldn’t have done any better with the pressure on, entering finals as the top qualifier before she stomped both runs in the halfpipe ski final on Feb. 20. Sharpe’s winning score was ultimately a 95.80. She entered the Games on a roll, taking a win at Snowmass and third in superpipe at the X Games; Sharpe also capped the FIS World Cup campaign with a triumph in Tignes, France to claim the Crystal Globe.

Bormio, Italy, on the third-last day of 2017. Thompson then took 23rd in Alpine combined at the Olympics. He was also 23rd in the super-G and 35th in the downhill. Unfortunately, Thompson crashed in early-season training in the fall and is expected to miss the 2018-19 campaign. JACK CRAWFORD At the Games, the former Whistler Mountain Ski Club skier took 20th in Alpine combined, 25th in downhill and 29th in the giant slalom.

MOLLIE JEPSEN

MANNY OSBORNE-PARADIS

The Whistler Mountain Ski Club alumnus had a breakout year in 2018, winning the FIS Crystal Globe before capturing four medals at the Paralympics, including gold in the super combined. The 19-year-old was also invited to speak at Parliament Hill for Ottawa’s Canada Day celebrations. REID WATTS

A veteran of the Canadian ski team, Osborne-Paradis finished 14th in the downhill and 22nd in super-G at the Games. He followed it up with a season-best fifth in the super-G in Kvitfjell, Norway. Osborne-Paradis was injured in a crash while training for the Lake Louise World Cup race and is out indefinitely.

The 2010 legacy baby made his Olympic debut, taking 12th in the men’s luge in PyeongChang. To start the 2018-19 season, Watts took his first-ever World Cup medal here in Whistler during the team relay event on Dec. 1.

injury before the 2017-18 campaign, Thompson’s chances to defend her gold were highly in doubt. Through hard work, the resilient Thompson was healthy enough to start at the Games, but a crash in her first heat knocked her from contention. Thompson started 2018-19 with two wins in Austria, however, signalling that she’ll once again be a force to be reckoned with before long.

MARIELLE THOMPSON

BRODERICK THOMPSON

The 2014 Olympic ski-cross champion had a hard road to travel in her attempt to repeat. After suffering a knee

Marielle’s younger brother opened 2018 fresh off his career-best eighth-place in Alpine combined in

36 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

JANE CHANNELL In her first Olympics, the North Vancouver skeleton racer finished 10th. MERCEDES NICOLL In her fourth and final Games, Nicoll took 18th in the snowboard halfpipe competition. After announcing her retirement, Nicoll, who has been vocal about her own struggles, committed to supporting mental-health initiatives, such as jack.org.


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Feature ST ORY SIMON D’ARTOIS

JAKE ALLISON

The halfpipe skier had a heartbreaking result at the Olympics, finishing 13th in qualifiers and narrowly missing the 12-skier final. He did bounce back, however, taking a third-place finish in Tignes to cap the season.

The Whistler powerlifter won the 66-kilogram division at the Canadian Powerlifting Union Nationals in Calgary, emerging as the top junior lifter across all categories.

TEAL HARLE

BENITA PEIFFER

The Whistler resident via Campbell River finished just out of the medals in the slopestyle event, placing fifth with a score of 90. He also excelled on the World Cup circuit with a win at Mammoth, as well as a big-air bronze in Quebec City.

The local biathlete competed at the IBU Junior World Championships in Estonia in February, taking 11th in individual competition and 10th in the team relay.

OLIVIA MCNEILL AND BENJIE MCMASTER The Whistler Freeride Club pair qualified for the Freeride Junior World Championships at Kappl, Austria. McMaster took seventh in the men’s event while McNeill took ninth on the women’s side. McNeill qualified to return in 2019.

YUKI TSUBOTA In her second Games, Tsubota took sixth in the slopestyle event, with a 74.40. She capped 201718 and started 2018-19 with two third-place finishes: the former in slopestyle in Seiseralm, Italy and the latter in big air in Cardrona, New Zealand. LOGAN PEHOTA The Pemberton freeskier posted an incredible score of 98.00 en route to winning the first Freeride World Tour event of the season at Kicking Horse in February. Pehota finished 10th overall in 2018 and opted against returning for a fourth season in 2019. CAMERON ALEXANDER The Whistler Mountain Ski Club grad took a fifth-place finish in the super-G at the FIS Junior World Ski Championships in Switzerland to lead the local contingent, which also featured Riley Seger and Stefanie Fleckenstein.

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Feature STO R Y LUCAS CRUZ

The awards go to Canada’s top skier in each age category. WORLD SKI AND SNOWBOARD FESTIVAL Headlined by the return of the Saudan Couloir Ski Race Extreme, including a visit from legendary Swiss skier Sylvain Saudan himself, the shortened World Ski and Snowboard Festival got a boost of nostalgia in 2018. Stan Rey and Marie-Pier Prefontaine captured the men’s and women’s pro divisions, respectively. Elsewhere, Elena Gaskell and Evan McEachran won the big air event, while Max Parrot and Julia Marino won the boarderstyle competition.

A WIN FOR FINN Downhill phenom Finn Iles celebrated his 19th birthday by topping the Fox Air

JESSE MELAMED

DH at Crankworx Whistler. Photo by Scott Robarts/Crankworx.

The season got off to an early start for the Whistler Enduro World Series (EWS) star as he topped the Andes Pacifico stage race in Chile in February. He then kicked off the EWS season with a fifth-place finish, also in Chile, in what would be his best result of a campaign in which he missed the Whistler race due to injury. He still finished ninth overall.

HE’S THE MAN Victoria’s Brent McMahon beat the heat on a scorching day to win Subaru Ironman Canada in July. Photo by Dan Falloon.

BC WINTER GAMES Local athletes captured 20 medals at the Games in Kamloops this past February, with alpine skiers Kaila Lafreniere and Sara Stiel, biathlete Simon Long, snowboarder Juliette Pelchat and freestyle skier Daniel Gannon all earning gold medals along the way. WHISTLER CUP In its 26th year, the Mackenzie Investments Whistler Cup saw a repeat winner in the U16 category, as Switzerland went home with the crown for the second consecutive year. On the U14 side, Ontario 1 captured the Festival Cup. In terms of individual awards, Whistler Mountain Ski Club’s Sara Stiel won the U14 Nancy Greene Award while Canada 1’s Sarah Brown won the U16 award. As for the Dave Murray Award, Quebec’s Philippe Bergeron won the U14 trophy while John Daniel Profitt won the U16 award.

As an up-and-comer on the junior circuit, the Pemberton rider excelled at the first Crankworx of the year, winning the Air DH event. On the UCI World Cup tour, Cruz took a top result of fourth in Losinj, Croatia. He also won his category at nationals at Panorama. CHRISTINA CHAPPETTA Local ripper Christina Chappetta went international this year with a large Whistler contingent at her side as part of a deeper connection with the French resort of Les Deux Alpes. While there, she won her age category and placed second among women in the treacherous Mountain of Hell race. BC SUMMER GAMES Locals found success on the water in the Cowichan Valley during the July Games. Pemberton Canoe Association athlete Landon Drain took home three gold medals, while teammate Anna Beaudry also topped a race. SUBARU IRONMAN CANADA Victoria’s Brent McMahon beat the heat to win the annual triathlon, finishing nearly nine minutes ahead of runner-up Jeff Symonds of Vancouver. Ironman is slated to return to Whistler as part of its five-year deal with the resort in July 2019.

ANDRÉANE LANTHIER NADEAU

CRANKWORX

On the women’s side of the Enduro World Series, the Whistler resident missed the first half of the season with a wrist injury, but excelled after returning, finishing the season with back-to-back third-place finishes in Spain and Italy to finish in 11th overall.

In a historic moment for the annual mountain-bike festival, American Nicholi Rogatkin became the first rider to capture the Triple Crown of Slopestyle after battling back and forth with Canadian Brett Rheeder at Red Bull Joyride. In the overall tour standings, American Jill Kintner defended her title as Queen, while New Zealand’s Sam Blenkinsop won the King of Crankworx crown.

FINN ILES Iles’ first year at the elite level got off to a great start, as the Whistler downhill phenom took third in the Crankworx Rotorua Downhill in New Zealand on March 25. He also celebrated his 19th birthday at home during Crankworx with a Fox Air DH triumph. In the UCI overall standings, Iles finished 19th, posting a best result of fifth at Vallnord, Andorra in July.

MIKAYLA MARTIN In just her second year of ski-cross competition, the Whistler Mountain Ski Club alumnus won the FIS Junior World Ski Championships race in Cardrona, New Zealand on Aug. 27.

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Feature ST ORY 2018 YEAR IN REVIEW

ARTS & CULTURE

T

BY ALYSSA NOEL

his past year was instrumental in helping Whistler’s arts and culture scene continue its slow and steady journey to becoming an integral part of the resort’s four-season offerings. Overall, events, festivals and institutions largely grew and flourished—and are poised to return in 2019 stronger than ever. Here’s a look at some of the highlights.

Meanwhile, the year also kicked off with some good news for art-loving kids. The Audain Art Museum announced it would be offering free admission to visitors 18-years-old and younger—raising the age from 16. The Whistler Pride and Ski Festival, North America’s longest running LGBTQ ski festival, also returned to celebrate its 26th year with parties, comedy shows, music and, of course, skiing.

the Maury Young Arts Centre. The show was part of the Arts Whistler performance series and was a highlight for executive director Mo Douglas. “It was probably one of the rowdiest shows I’ve ever seen in that theatre,” she said. “Their enthusiasm was off the chart. It was the biggest meet-and-greet after a show. I have never seen so many 30-year-old men show up as their seven-year-old selves.” MARCH A whopping 40 musicians climbed onstage at the Maury Young Arts Centre to celebrate International Women’s Day this year. Dubbed Raising Our Voices, the event was a huge success. Alongside 22 performances, it also included a fundraiser for the Howe Sound Women’s Centre. Over at the Audain Art Museum, Dr. Curtis Collins was named as the new director. He replaced the organization’s inaugural director Suzanne Greening. With a PhD from the Department of Art History and Communications Studies at McGill University and experience as both a curator and director at other museums across Canada, Collins made the move from Edmonton where he served as an assistant professor at MacEwan University. “This position and this place feels like it’s the perfect fit for me at this time,” Collins said back in March. APRIL

JANUARY One of the first big art events of the year was a local favourite. Deep Winter sent six world-class snowsport photographers into the wilds of Whistler Blackcomb, with France’s Jeremy Bernard emerging as the winner, earning $5,000 and the title of King of Storms along the way. Washington’s Justin Kious came in second while third place went to Florian Breitenberger from Germany. 40 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

There was another shakeup at the Audain Art Museum in April. Chief curator Darrin Martens— ON SCREEN James Hart’s Dance Screen the first person to hold the position at the museum— was performed for the first time at a announced he had accepted a historic event at the Audain Art Museum job in Ontario. The museum in September. Photo by Todd Easterbrook. later announced in June that it had hired Kiriko Watanabe— who had worked as assistant FEBRUARY curator at the West Vancouver The Cypress Point Winter Carnival returned to the Museum, among other places—to replace him. Other major arts news for April was the return shores of Alta Lake in February with the theme, “Let Winter Prevail.” That line was gleaned from learning of the World Ski and Snowboard Festival. While the that, when it comes to the weather, Mother Nature is end-of-season blowout might happen every year, in gonna do what Mother Nature does. The festival’s fifth 2018 the fate of the festival was unclear after longtime year featured music, arts and outdoor activities at The producer Watermark Communications stepped down from organizing it the year prior. Point Artist-Run Centre. In the end, Whistler Blackcomb and Gibbons Another highlight of the month was longtime children’s entertainer Fred Penner performing at Whistler banded together to bring the festival to life


All photos by John Entwistle

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Feature

CHAMPION OF THE ARTS Longtime local filmmaker, actor and all-around talent Angie Nolan was named the Champion of Arts and Culture at the 2018 Whistler Excellence

for a shortened six-day event. “I can’t say that six days is where we’ll end up in the future,” said Marc Riddell, WB communications manager at the time of the announcement. “This is really a growth opportunity; it’s about getting back to what we do well as a company, focusing on those key components, and then looking at how we expand that.” The winners of the festival’s staple arts events, meanwhile, were Vancouver crew Jordan Ettinger and Boe and Charles Nasby for their film H.E.N.K. at the 72 Hour Filmmaker Showdown; French skateboard photographer Fred Mortange for the Pro Photographer Showdown; and The Burrrlapz from Fernie for Intersection. The jam-packed month of April wrapped up with the Whistler Excellence Awards, which included the Whistler Champion of Arts & Culture category. That honour went to filmmaker, actor, director, educator and all-around-talent Angie Nolan this year.

Awards, held in May. Photo by Joern Rohde / Courtesy of the Whistler Chamber of Commerce.

MAY Arts Whistler chose a pair of local icons to honour this year. In May, the organization hosted the exhibit Don and Isobel-The Life, The Legend, The Laughter, The Leathers, complete with the varied art of Isobel MacLaurin—as well as her handpainted coffin. The retrospective also highlighted the work of Don MacLaurin—who, among other things, helped preserve the Ancient Cedars, Musical Bumps and Lost Lake Park—who died in 2014. (Isobel is still very much alive and thriving, in case you’re wondering.) To that end, the Whistler Museum concurrently hosted their exhibit Don and Isobel: A Retrospective of Community Builders, while the Audain Art Museum held a “paint like Isobel” family night and the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre displayed a show called Inspired by Isobel-Student Works by Whistler Secondary School students. JUNE One of the highlights of summer in Whistler is catching an outdoor concert sprawled out on the lawn of Whistler Olympic Plaza. This year, the Resort Municipality of Whistler’s lineup for the annual Whistler Presents Summer Concert Series included everyone from the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra to Bedouin Soundclash, Hey Ocean! and Stars. JULY The summer season is jam-packed with festivals. In the resort, the Whistler Children’s Festival marked a major milestone, marking its 35th year—making it Whistler’s longest-running festival. Down at Alta Lake, The Flag Stop Theatre and Arts Festival drew crowds for three days of theatre, art, music and food—culminating in a production of All Relative, an original play written by Pique’s own Brandon Barrett. 42 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

traditionally rainy season, when locals regroup after a busy summer and prepare for the equally insane winter ahead. One highlight of that initiative was the return of the Hear and Now Festival, which featured three days of local musicians performing around the village. Also later that month, master carver James Hart and several Haida dancers travelled to the Audain Art Museum for The Dance of the Screen. The event brought to life Hart’s massive sculpture that greets visitors to the museum as they enter the permanent collection. The jaw-dropping First Nations performance marked the first time the elaborate piece had been danced and served as a fundraiser for the museum as well. OCTOBER

(The play went on to a two-night run at the Maury Young Arts Centre in September.) AUGUST Yogis descended upon Whistler once again for the Wanderlust Festival in August. The event featured food, music, wellness events and, of course, plenty of yoga. Shortly after, Whistler’s largest event, Crankworx, rolled in, bringing with it Dirt Diaries, the popular mountain-bike film competition that screens for free at Whistler Olympic Plaza. This year, Damien Vergez took home the top spot for his film, Mother Earth. Sad news also emerged when the Vibe Dance Centre announced that it would be closing the doors to its Function Junction location after eight years of teaching locals jazz, tap, lyrical, hip hop and other forms of dance. “This was a very difficult decision and it has been an emotional time for me as well as many others,” owner and choreographer Heather Stremlaw told Pique in an email. SEPTEMBER The sunny days might have lingered, but Fall for Arts rolled into town in September. The Arts Whistler initiative puts the resort’s arts offerings centre stage for the

The Whistler Writers Festival, once again, brought big literary names to town for its 17th year. The fall festival featured Peter Carey, Eden Robinson, Ian Hamilton and Ali Hassan for 2018. Another much-loved local event also returned for the first time since 2015. (The hiatus was in part due to the passing of its co-founder Chili Thom in 2016.) The Heavy Hitting HorrorFest—which is run by Pique film columnist Feet Banks—quickly sold out and, ultimately, wound up crowning Conrad Schapansky and Brad Chornoby with top honours for their film Uncle Daddy. Down at The Crystal Lounge, alt-country duo Fallow State took $1,000 and first place at Whistler’s Music Search. Helen Hamilton took home second and Mikkal Waters won the Dave Morris Award for Originality in Music. NOVEMBER Winter returned—well, kind of. The snow might’ve been a little late this year, but the Holiday Market (formerly called Bizarre Bazaar) rolled around right on time with a sold-out room full of vendors for holiday shoppers. Likewise, Bratz Biz youth artisans also sold their impressive wares for the crowd at the Whistler Conference Centre. DECEMBER While technically the Whistler Film Festival kicked off in November, we’re considering it a highlight of December as well. This year, there was an impressive list of buzzworthy offerings, but the film A Colony by director Geneviève Dulude-De Celles took the coveted Borsos Award for Best Canadian Feature Film.


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Feature ST ORY 2018 YEAR IN REVIEW

PEMBERTON

W

hile it may be known for its laidback lifestyle, 2018 was anything but quiet for the community of Pemberton. A long-considered boundary extension proposal was put to rest after Area C residents voiced loud opposition to the deal presented to them, and the Village of Pemberton (VOP) was awarded a major federal government grant that will be used to upgrade its aging downtown core. Council also saw a significant shakeup, with three new faces winning seats in the October election and Mike Richman regaining his mayor’s chair by acclamation. With no sign of things slowing down—and plenty more important decisions in store—2019 is poised to be another eventful year for the Spud Valley. BOUNDARY EXTENSION Do you want to join the VOP? That was the question on the minds of approximately 500 Squamish-Lillooet Regional District Area C residents this spring, as they considered a proposal that would have seen them included within VOP boundaries. The proposal would have grown the VOP to encompass the Miller Creek Independent Power Project (IPP), the Rutherford Independent Power Project, an area surrounding the Industrial Park, and an area along Highway 99 that lies between Harrow Road and Pemberton Farm Road East, adding just over 200 properties to the Village. There was, however, vocal opposition to the idea from the start, with many saying that the change would result in higher taxes with little in the way of additional services. According to calculations presented to Area C homeowners, the change would have carried a

BY JOEL BARDE potential tax impact of $577 a year for a $600,000 sample residential property, and $544 for “a typical Class 9 farmhouse.” Dan Huang, an independent planner charged with giving council and the public the information they needed to make an informed decision, led much of the discussion around the extension. In his final report, he acknowledged the extension was primarily about giving Area C residents more say in governance and land-use planning. “Unlike many boundary extensions, which involve the provision of new services (e.g. water, sewer) to lands beyond the municipality, the main goals of this boundary extension (are) to address the current issues around community identity, representation, land use planning control, and existing service delivery,” wrote Huang in his report. In the end, Area C residents voiced their overwhelming opposition to the proposal in a petition that collected 205 signatures against the boundary extension. Fewer than 10 residents either abstained or said they were in favour of the expansion plan. In an emailed statement to Pique in June, Alyssa Belter of Plenty Wild Farms said that her family strongly identified “with the farming community in Area C and think it is detrimental to have Pemberton Valley farmers divided between two different jurisdictions.” On the VOP’s side of things, the extension plan would have brought in an additional estimated $395,000 a year in tax revenues. But in the end, Huang ascertained that it would have also presented a significant liability for the VOP in the form of road upgrades. The “potential financial impacts to the Village of Pemberton for future road capital upgrades are significant,” he wrote. After council unanimously voted against the

NO THANKS Residents of SquamishLillooet Regional District Electoral Area C gathered in strong numbers on May 15 in oppositions to a proposed boundary extension that would have seen their properties incorporated into the Village of Pemberton. Photo by Joel Barde. DECISION MAKER Mike Richman faced a busy year as Pemberton’s mayor and was acclaimed to the position after running unopposed in October’s local election. Photo by Joel Barde. BIG ANNOUNCEMENT Pamela GoldsmithJones, MP for West Vancouver-Sunshine Coast-Sea to Sky Country, announced a $5.3-million grant to the Village of Pemberton in March. The money will be used to rejuvenate its downtown infrastructure. Photo by Joel Barde.

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44 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

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Feature STO R Y Pamela Goldsmith-Jones, West Vancouver-Sunshine Coast-Sea to Sky Country MP, announced that the VOP would receive more than $5.3 million in federal government money to spend on aging infrastructure and downtown

Mile One Eating House, raised concerns about a conflict of interest given Richman’s involvement in a new Frontier Street restaurant, Town Square. Richman led a group of investors who purchased the former Centennial Café this year, and in a letter to Pique, Jones suggested that that could present a conflict of interest given the importance of parking to businesses in the downtown core. After skipping discussions on parking configurations on Frontier Street and garnering a legal opinion on the matter, Richman eventually rejoined the discussions on the downtown-enhancement plan. “To be clear, I have never once taken a moment in my time serving here at this table, as a councillor or as a mayor, and looked to put my interests first, never once,” said Richman, when addressing the issue at a Nov. 27 council meeting. The Village also began work on an eight-hectare parcel of land, located off Pemberton Farm Road East, that would serve as the Village’s recreational grounds. Construction on a soccer field was completed in early October. The VOP also completed construction of the Friendship Trail Bridge, the pedestrian bridge that crosses along the south side of the Lillooet River highway bridge. The entrances, however, are currently barred off, as the Village’s plan for a transition section met with opposition from the landowners. NEW FACES AT THE COUNCIL TABLE

extension, Richman cited the road issue as the “deal breaker.” CAPITAL PROJECTS 2018 was a big year for the long-term development of Pemberton. On March 13,

revitalization. The money stems from the federal Gas Tax fund. Given Pemberton’s small tax base (a one-per-cent municipal tax increase results in about $13,400 in additional revenue) the grant was seen as momentous. “It will invigorate our downtown and make it more welcoming, and it takes us forward to make the village a more walkable, better connected, and safer community,” said Richman. Richman, however, would later step away from the project after Randy Jones, the former owner of

From developing rules and regulations around retail cannabis, to deliberating on what building variances to approve, Pemberton council had a busy year of decision making. Council also saw some significant turnover in October’s municipal election, with only Councillor Ted Craddock and Richman choosing to run again. While Richman won by acclamation, Craddock faced off against four other candidates: David MacKenzie, Leah Noble, Amica Antonelli, and Ryan Zant. Following a well-attended all-candidates meeting, Noble, Amica, and Zant were elected to serve the next four years. A total of 524 votes were cast in the Oct. 20 election—about 30 per cent of eligible voters. n

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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 3, 2019 | 45


46 Travel

AND

Adventure

The .

of

A stay at the Arana Sri Lanka Ecolodge and Yoga Center by Teresa Bergen

W

e set out through the dark Sri Lankan jungle at 4:45 a.m. My guide, Abe, strode purposefully ahead in his sarong and flip flops, smoking a cigarette, while I gasped to keep up. We climbed hundreds of tall, uneven stairs before coming to a flat stretch of train tracks, walking tie to tie. He spoke little English. Occasionally he swung his flashlight to illuminate something in the blackness. “Cow,” he’d say, and I’d realize a big-horned animal rested a metre from us. We left the railroad tracks to follow a narrow path through head-high grass. Eventually, the sky started to lighten. Abe stopped by a giant termite mound with holes as big as my forearm and hit it with his walking stick. “Cobra home,” he announced. Yep, the hooded serpents lay their eggs in termite mounds and anthills, their front doors opening onto the path we’d been treading in the dark. Fortunately, I didn’t faint right there. I made it to the top of the steep hill,

46 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

Nature Sri Lanka:

unbitten. Abe had perfectly timed our hike to reach Ella Rock just as the sky was turning pink and orange. About 20 young European backpackers and five wily dogs were already at the summit. We settled in to watch the sunrise over terraced tea estates in sweeping valleys, sharing our breakfast treats with the strays.

LIFE AT ARANA Arriving in the town of Ella on Sri Lanka’s famous hill-country train, a great mob of nature-loving Europeans spilled out, drawn by dramatic scenery and relatively cool temperatures. I headed for the Arana Sri Lanka Ecolodge and Yoga Center as my home base for three nights. The helpful staff arranged most of my activities during my visit, including the sunrise hike. The jungle retreat opened in December 2017 as a place for people to relax in nature. As German co-owner Anna Brandt describes it: “My vision was to create a place where people can relax and really meditate and find yourself

or get some help to manage your life better.” They offer four quiet rooms, vegetarian Sri Lankan food, local tours and private or small group yoga and meditation sessions. They plan to add a couple more rooms soon, Brandt said. Once you descend the unreal number of stairs to the ecolodge property, you may want to stay a while. The outdoor café serves hearty local breakfasts with fruit-stuffed crepes, curry, coconut sambal, fresh fruit and string hoppers, which look like coasters made from spaghetti. They even made fresh coconut milk for my coffee. My favourite part of staying at the Arana was sitting outside my room and watching the jungle. One afternoon, I looked up from my writing to see a pair of hornbills hanging out in a nearby tree. At night, I could see a bazillion stars shining in the jungle-dark sky.

YOGA Brandt is a yoga teacher and avid


Travel & A D V E N T U R E

Photos left to right: Top: Ella view; train and tea. Second Row: Ella Rock view; Ella rock sunrise; Amba estate cobra home; Ella rock Guide.

Whistler Cay Heights

PHOTOS BY TERESA BERGEN

seeker, always ready to try out a new spiritual practice. Guests might hear her playing her harmonium in the afternoon or chanting in the yoga hut early in the morning. She tailors small group and private lessons to interested guests. I asked her for a yoga session to help my creativity as a writer. She put her heart into preparing a special oneon-one kundalini class for me. It wasn’t easy—I’m used to hatha and some of the kundalini exercises seemed strange and challenging, if not impossible. After I muddled through the best I could, she led me in a lovely, relaxing yoga nidra meditation.

far below the road. Our destination: Amba Estate, growers of organic tea, pepper, cinnamon, coffee and cloves. I joined a tour with folks from Germany, Belgium and Slovenia. We were laughably uninformed, repeatedly failing our knowledgeable young guide’s tea trivia questions. As we tromped through the terraced plantation, I saw the now familiar sight of termite hills riddled with snake-sized holes. Our guide assured me that in keeping with their organic philosophy, Amba hires a local snake whisperer to catch the cobras and release them in the forest. The tour ended with a tea tasting of Amba’s finest blends.

TEA ESTATE TOUR

SOLO STAY

The Arana folks also set up a tea estate tour for me. My driver, a retired soldier, picked me up in his tuk tuk, a three-wheeled motorized taxi common in much of South and Southeast Asia. We set out through the rural areas outside Ella, taking in the views of vegetable- and tea-growing valleys

The Arana provided me with a comfortable jungle experience that welcomed a solo traveller. As Brandt told me, “It’s my wish to have a place where everyone can feel like home. And to have some connected feelings to the place.” They certainly succeed. n

6227 Eagle Drive, Whistler This home is located in the very desirable neighbourhood of Whistler Cay Heights, with views of Whistler, Blackcomb, Wedge mountain. Walking distance to the Village, Whistler Golf Course, Myrtle Phillip elementary school, Whistler Children's Centre/Daycare and easy access to the Valley trail. The home has a flexible layout that can provide the option of a 3 bedroom/3 bathroom home with a 1 bedroom/1 bathroom suite or the suite can be easily incorporated back into the main house. The house underwent an extensive renovation in 2013 with over 65% of it being new construction. The open concept living space is perfect for entertaining with it's high ceilings and indoor/outdoor fireplace. The kitchen has Jenn Air and Asko appliances. The home also has a Lutron lighting system, electronic blinds, whole house audio system and a mini-split HVAC system for an alternative heat source and air conditioning which can be controlled in each zone separately. Cooperating with realtors.

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TH E SC O R E

48 Sports

UP TOP Simon d’Artois competes at the FIS Freeski halfpipe World Cup event in Secret Garden.

PHOTO BY MATEUSZ KIELPINSKI

d’Artois entering 2019 with lead WHISTLER HALFPIPE SKIER IN CRYSTAL GLOBE CONTROL AFTER SECRET GARDEN VICTORY Dan Falloon

sports@piquenewsmagazine.com

W

ith only four dates on the calendar for the 2018-19 season, the FIS World Cup halfpipe campaign is more of a sprint than a marathon. That also means that at the midpoint of the season, Whistler skier Simon d’Artois holds the series lead as he seeks his first Crystal Globe. After winning at Secret Garden Ski Resort in China in December, paired with a sixth-place finish at Colorado’s Copper Mountain to open the season, the 26-year-old has a 10-point lead over New Zealand’s Nico Porteous, and a 20-point lead over brother Miguel Porteous. The season will resume Valentine’s Day weekend in Calgary and will wrap in early March at California’s Mammoth Mountain. The traditional closer at Tignes, France, is listed as cancelled on the FIS website. “I want to come out on top and maintain that first position and get that Crystal Globe,” d’Artois said. d’Artois’ performance in China was top-notch, as all of his three runs scored highly enough to win. He started with a 91.25 and only grew from there, scoring a 92 before wrapping with a 93.50 to run away with the victory over Nico Porteous’ 89.50. “I was working towards putting down three solid runs. That’s my goal for the rest of the season, at each

competition, I just want to make sure that I’m putting down three runs,” he said. “It gives me confidence in my skiing; and I’m just trying to maintain that and keep going. “I was just trying to work on some little specifics of my run as I progressed.

training block I got. We had a day off, then we had the qualifiers and finals all in one day because the weather was moving in. “I was there for three nights, pretty much.” d’Artois said the conditions at Secret

“I was just trying to work on some little specifics of my run as I progressed. I wanted to land one run at the start and then bring up my amplitude and clean up different aspects of my run...” - SIMON D’ARTOIS

I wanted to land one run at the start and then I just tried to bring up my amplitude and clean up different aspects of my run that I thought needed some work,” he added. After having two events in relatively close proximity in Colorado, d’Artois and his teammates had to endure a less-than-ideal slate until the medals were handed out. “It was definitely a whirlwind of a trip. I left Colorado on Sunday, the 16th (of December) and flew to L.A. that night. Then that morning, at 12:50 a.m., we had a flight to China,” he said. “We landed at 5 in the morning, took a shuttle up to the hill and then I skied for an hour. That was the only

48 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

Garden were “really good” and that helped him quickly gain comfort on the course. With China set to host the next Winter Olympics in 2022, and Secret Garden on tap as one of the venues, d’Artois observed some increasing interest in winter sports in the country.

T HI S SEC T I O N

By

“They’re definitely working to get more people interested in skiing and snowboarding,” he said. “The people there think it’s pretty cool.” d’Artois noted that while the Secret Garden resort was fairly empty while he was there, he added that it was still fairly new and he was also there during the week, and it seemed primed to fill up on the weekend. With political tension between China and Canada ongoing after Canadian authorities detained Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou and China responded by arresting three Canadian citizens, there was the prospect of some problems, though d’Artois didn’t feel at risk because of the high-level manoeuvring. “For the most part, we were removed from all that stuff that was going on,” he said. “But going through the airport on the way out, somebody mentioned it, and our coach, Trennon (Paynter) was pulled aside for a quick second because he had a battery that wasn’t allowed on the plane, so somebody made a joke.” n

49 Q UICK LEARNER Ski-cross racer Mikayla Martin on the rise 50 T OP SHOP TMC Freeriderz owner looks back after hitting milestone 52 R UN RONI RUN Remme takes career best at Semmering 52 T ENTH FOR THOMSEN Invermere skier Ben Thomsen shines


Sports T H E S C O R E Martin learning quickly on ski cross World Cup circuit WMSC ALUM HITS FIRST SMALL FINAL IN THIRD RACE By

E

Dan Falloon

ven after winning the FIS Junior World Championship in New Zealand this summer, Whistler Mountain Ski Club alumnus Mikayla Martin wasn’t expecting to get much FIS World Cup action outside of a start at Ontario’s Blue Mountain later this month. However, after turning heads at a team pre-season training camp in Saas-Fee, Switzerland, the ski-cross racer received some additional opportunities. She’s made the most of it recently, with two top-10 finishes in three tries. In a Christmas Eve interview, Martin said she had just finished wrapping the last of her presents—understandable, especially considering she had just come off the best finish of her young World Cup career, a sixthplace finish in Innichen, Italy on Dec. 22. “It has been a huge learning experience,” she said. “I didn’t really know what to expect. Going into the World Cup, I hadn’t raced against many of the athletes before, so I didn’t really have a gauge of where I would place or what I would do.” In her sixth-place finish, Martin acknowledged that she only even made it out of the quarterfinals by virtue of teammate India Sherret’s fall, but she’s sought to take what she can from the chances she has. “There was a lot of luck on my side that day. Unfortunately, one of my teammates crashed and that’s how I ended up getting into the small final. But it was a good opportunity for me to make it through the rounds and instead of getting one run of racing, I got three runs of racing,” she said. “I was lined up against the best in the world. Fanny (Smith of Switzerland) had been doing really well the last couple races and so in the small final, when I was beside Fanny, I thought to myself that I just have to ski the best I can and focus on my skiing instead of what the other racers are doing.” Through a trio of races, watching the best on the planet, the 21-year-old has taken in a lot of information and isn’t planning to rest on her laurels, especially as she’s only in her second full year of fulltime ski-cross competition. “I still have a lot to learn,” she said with a laugh. “It’s really cool being on the same team as (2014 Olympic champion) Marielle (Thompson) because she is one of

the best in the world, so to be able to watch her in training and what she’s working on, how she holds herself, is really quite cool. I’m learning a lot. “They are the best in the world, but they aren’t superhuman, so I have to believe that I can be up there one day as well.” Martin recalled receiving about a week’s notice after the Switzerland training camp that she would indeed be returning for further evaluation and possibly, some additional races. However, she noted that the coaching staff is taking a cautious approach with her and don’t want to overload her with too much, too fast. “I had asked them if there was a chance that I would get more than one World Cup start and they said probably not. They ‘don’t want to rush me,’ so when I did get the call that I would be going back to Europe, it came as a surprise,” she said. The coaches instructed her to book a flight she could easily change for the return trip, just in case they decided to send her home early, giving Martin additional motivation, though she also looked to minimize the pressure on herself. “I went over there with very low expectations, not sure if I would be sent home, not sure if I would qualify,” she said. “I went over there with very clear process goals to get experience such as to work on my technique. “There are certain things in my skiing that I wanted to take out of this camp. I was able to do that, and I was also able to throw down on race day, which was unexpected, especially in the qualifier (in Arosa, Switzerland, where she took third.)” With a lot of new experiences packed into one, Martin is pleased with how she acquitted herself overall, even after some early bumps. She added that she feels welcomed into the team and hopes to be part of it going forward. “I was trying to figure out how the team worked and, in my opinion, I wasn’t skiing that well for the first week. There was a bit of doubt in my mind that I would get sent home. At that point, I didn’t want to be sent home at all, so at first, it was a bit of a mind game getting used to a new team and where I fit in,” she said. “But after I figured that out, the team is incredible, outgoing, inclusive and I’m very lucky to be part of it.” World Cup racing is scheduled to resume later in January at Idre Fjall, Sweden. n

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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 3, 2019 | 49


Sports T HE SCORE TMC Freeriderz celebrates 25th anniversary OWNER LOOKS BACK ON STARTING THE SHOP AT JUST 16 By

Dan Falloon

A

s Yosuke Hamazaki led the way to his office above his TMC Freeriderz shop along Skier’s Approach, he commented that the space hadn’t really had an adult’s touch. Perhaps that’s because a quartercentury ago, at age 16, he made that space the inaugural headquarters of his shop, which is still going strong today. In fact, it was his dad’s storage space for his rental shop below, but became Hamazaki’s shop and de facto bedroom space after he fell in love with the sport after joining the local freestyle club a couple years prior. “I took everything from my dad’s storage and put it in my own personal bedroom. He gave me a chance to try

it, and then a following took place,” he said, noting his father came to Whistler in the 1970s as a ski instructor and was a hot-dog skiing pioneer alongside Wayne Wong. With freestyle skiing emerging as a discipline in the early 1990s, Hamazaki had the freedom to explore via retail in a similar way that he and his contemporaries were pushing boundaries on the mountain. However, with athletes coming from a wide variety of backgrounds, there was still a matter of finding that connection with customers. “We didn’t want to create what’s going on. We wanted that to happen organically with the customers. The customers were starting to tell us what their style was,” he said. “Some people were local: leather jackets, jeans, and that

FROM THEN TO NOW Yosuke Hamazaki celebrates 25 years of TMC Freeriderz at the

shop in December.

PHOTO BY DAN FALLOON

was the style. Another person would be the Euro style, where they would have neon-coloured baggy pants … or really tight pants. “It is, as a shop, difficult to cater to all those different groups of people.” Hamazaki made the foray into

designing clothing at age 19, and certainly made an appeal to some fringe fashionistas. “We made some wild pants. We made some snakeskin-style ski pants. We wanted to add flavour to what our sport was trying to become,” he said. “We

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Sports T H E S C O R E

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OLD SCHOOL The TMC Freeriderz store, circa 1998. would design the product, get a mother in North Vancouver to draw the patterns for us. I went to her house in one day, then drive to a pattern-cutter place on the other side of town, had to drive to a zipper place to get the zippers and end up at a factory.” Hamazaki sees parallels to the growth of freestyle and his own shop, as both have had to justify their existence and deal with the ebbs and flows of popularity. “In the shop, it was a very big challenge because it was a sport that we had to sell to each individual coming in. It wasn’t on TV, it wasn’t in the magazines yet,” he said. “When (people from other sports) want to try it, we were really accommodating, so I think that’s one thing that helped freeride skiing become what it is today.” At the time of his debut, other ski shops were starting to have small freestyle sections, but soon after, stores were opening based on Hamazaki’s blueprint, which created additional competition. All these years later, Hamazaki is looking to expand to Honolulu, Hawaii of all places. While it might seem like an odd place to open a winter sports store, he cited the success of Island Snow, a small snowboard shop that eventually became the world’s leading Burton dealer. It’s a way of accessing the Asian market, as many tourists vacation in Hawaii and tend to find excellent deals for equipment they’d use at home. “If we do this shop in Hawaii, it would basically be a stamp that says ‘Wow, freestyle is here,’” he said. In its infancy, TMC stood for The Mogul Corner, but to recognize the diverse array of freestyle disciplines, is now short for True Matrix Core, a saying from Hamazaki’s father with the message of believing in the path one chooses with the whole heart. Hamazaki also credits

PHOTO SUBMITTED

his father, who also owned a gift shop and a fur shop, with providing him the opportunity to forge his own way, but also a willingness to provide expertise to help him if needed. “He’d always let me make the mistakes, but he was adamant about teaching me what I should be doing,” Hamazaki said. “Usually, they weren’t personal mistakes. They were business mistakes, but I’d take it personally.” Despite some challenging years with lower snow or the Olympics drawing people to watch sports more than participate in them, Hamazaki always found a way through, whether it was turning into a flag shop during the Games or sticking it out with smaller companies as they weathered their own downturns in popularity. But deep down, he feels there will always be a place for freestyle, a lesson he took from skiing’s status when he first got involved. “It had the image of stretchy pants and through the ‘80s, the neon colours and all that. It was a fun time, but it kind of seemed like it was dying down,” he said. “In my heart, it doesn’t matter what’s going on in reality as long as you’re feeling like you’re part of something, you’re part of a community.” To perhaps highlight its entrenchment in the community, TMC recently finished fifth in Canada and tops in Whistler in Freeskier’s Top Shop contest (Comor and Whistler Village Sports also made the top 10). Hamazaki was grateful for the 2,000-plus votes, and looking back, is thrilled to have reached the milestone he has. “We don’t try to say we’re the first ski shop, but we are definitely the first freeride ski shop,” he said. “It sets into stone that after 25 years, we just kept on doing what we did through the rough times, we made it.” n

Whole30 – Resetting your health, habits and relationship with food in 30 days. THURSDAY JANUARY 10, 10:30 A.M. with Louise Hatton, Certified Whole 30 Coach Are your energy levels inconsistent or nonexistent? Do you have aches and pains that can’t be explained by over-use or injury? Do you have some sort of condition, like skin issues, digestive ailments, seasonal allergies, or chronic pain, that medication hasn’t helped? These symptoms are often directly related to the foods you eat—even the “healthy” stuff. Learn how you can change this in 30 days. Louise is a Whole30 Certified Coach and has a background in Community Health Sciences. She learned over time how to make the right food choices and find balance. Healthy eating is also about having a healthy relationship with food.

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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 3, 2019 | 51


Sports T HE SCORE Remme takes eighth in Semmering slalom SPORTS BRIEFS: THOMSEN TAKES 10TH AT BORMIO DOWNHILL By

C

Dan Falloon

anadian Roni Remme posted her first-ever top-10 Audi FIS World Cup finish in her final race of 2018. The Ontarian skied to an eighthplace finish in the slalom at Semmering, Austria, on Dec. 29, finishing 2.60 seconds back of American Mikaela Shiffrin, who earned the win. Slovakia’s Petra Vlhova (0.29 seconds back) and Switzerland’s Wendy Holdener (0.38 seconds back) shared the podium. Even with her best-ever result, Remme felt she could have placed higher. “I’m happy with the way today went,” Remme said in a release. “I really just wanted to go out there and push myself harder than I have been; I made a lot of mistakes, but I’m also really happy with some of my sections as well.” It was a strong day for Canada as Quebec’s Laurence St-Germain and Ontario’s Erin Mielzynski were back-toback in 10th and 11th, respectively.

In the previous day’s giant slalom, Quebec’s Mikaela Tommy was the top Canadian in 18th, 2.16 seconds back of champion Vlhova, who bested Germany’s Viktoria Rebensburg by 0.45

Italy on Dec. 28. The 31-year-old veteran and B.C. native finished 1.61 seconds back of winner Dominik Paris of Italy, who shared the top-three with countryman

“I really just wanted to go out there and push myself harder than I have been; I made a lot of mistakes but I’m also really happy with some of my sections as well.” - RONI REMME

seconds and France’s Tessa Worley by 0.60 seconds. Other Canadians were Valerie Grenier in 25th and Marie-Michele Gagnon in 29th.

THOMSEN 10TH AT BORMIO

Canada’s Ben Thomsen took a secondconsecutive 10th-place finish in FIS World Cup downhill action at Bormio,

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52 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

Christof Innerhofer in second and Switzerland’s Beat Feuz in third. Battling through icy conditions, Thomsen was pleased to have completed two runs well as the lone Canadian competing in the race. “I’m very happy with my result, but I’m still very hungry for more,” Thomsen said in a release. “I have some work to do on the top section of this course, but

it was really nice to see some challenging conditions again.” In the following day’s super-G, Ontario’s Dustin Cook was the top Canadian in 31st, 2.65 seconds back of Paris, who earned a second straight win. Austria’s Matthias Mayer, in second, and Norway’s Aleksander Aamodt Kilde, in third, shared the podium. The two other Canadians weren’t far behind Cook, as Whistler Mountain Ski Club alumnus Jack Crawford placed 35th while Thomsen was 36th on the day. In the previous race before Christmas, the night slalom at Madonna di Campiglio, Italy on Dec. 22, Canada’s Trevor Philp put up his best result of the season with a 12th-place showing, 1.37 seconds off the pace set by champion Daniel Yule of Switzerland. Austrians Marco Schwartz and Michael Matt were second and third, in order. Erik Read, meanwhile, ended up 17th. For full results from all races, check out www.fis-ski.com. n


NOTICE OF ASSENT VOTING

BRALORNE WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEM PUBLIC NOTICE is given to the electors within the Bralorne Sewer Service Area in Electoral Area A of the Squamish-Lillooet Regional District as defined on the map following, that assent voting will be held on the following question: Are you in favour of the Squamish-Lillooet Regional District adopting the following proposed bylaws: 1. Squamish-Lillooet Regional District Bralorne Wastewater Treatment System Loan Authorization Bylaw No. 1595-2018, which will permit the borrowing of up to $700,000 for the purpose of completing the construction of the new wastewater treatment system in the Bralorne Sewer Service Area (the associated estimated annual debt servicing costs will be $38,750 and recovered via tax requisition as set out below); and 2. Bralorne Sewer System Local Service Conversion and Establishment Bylaw No. 585, 1995, Amendment Bylaw No. 1594-2018, which will permit an increase of $38,750 to the maximum annual tax requisition amount, which is estimated to be $429.31 per parcel (and is in addition to the existing maximum annual tax requisition of $346.22 per parcel resulting in a total annual estimated tax requisition of $775.53 per parcel.)

VOTING DATES AND LOCATIONS ADVANCE VOTING #1: ADVANCE VOTING #2: GENERAL VOTING:

WEDNESDAY JANUARY 16, 2019 from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Gold Bridge Community Club, 699 Gun Lake Road, Gold Bridge MONDAY JANUARY 21, 2019 from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Pemberton & District Community Centre, 7390 Cottonwood St., Pemberton SATURDAY JANUARY 26, 2019 from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Gold Bridge Community Club, 699 Gun Lake Road, Gold Bridge

ELECTOR REGISTRATION There is no need to pre-register to vote as the registration of qualified electors will take place at the time of voting. You will be required to make a declaration that you meet the following requirements: • • • •

18 years of age or older on general voting day Canadian citizen Resident of BC for at least 6 months immediately before the day of registration Resident of OR registered owner of real property in the Bralorne Sewer Service Area for at least 30 days immediately before the day of registration, and • Not disqualified under the Local Government Act or any other enactment from voting in the assent voting and not otherwise disqualified by law. Resident electors must produce 2 pieces of identification (at least one with a signature). Picture identification is not necessary. The identification must prove both residency and identity. Non-resident property electors must produce 2 pieces of identification (at least one with a signature) to prove identity, provide proof that they are entitled to register in relation to the property (recent Land Title certificate, property tax bill or property assessment notice), and, if there is more than one owner, provide written consent from a majority of the property owners to one owner voting. (Please contact the SLRD ahead of time for the required consent form - it must be signed by a majority of the property owners. Unsigned or incomplete consent forms will not be accepted.) No one can vote in respect of property that is owned (in whole or in part) by a corporation.

MAIL BALLOT VOTING Qualified electors may vote by mail if they: • Have a physical disability, illness or injury that affects their ability to vote at another voting opportunity, OR • Expect to be absent from the SLRD on general voting day and at the times of all advance voting opportunities. REQUESTING A MAIL BALLOT PACKAGE: Up until 4:00 p.m. on Thursday January 24, 2019, you can request a mail ballot package by submitting the following information to the SLRD office by mail (Box 219, 1350 Aster Street, Pemberton, BC V0N 2L0), by fax (604-894-6526), or by email (kclark@slrd.bc.ca): 1. Your full name; 2. Your residential address; 3. The address of the property in relation to which you are voting (for non-resident property electors); 4. How you would like your mail ballot package to be delivered to you (your choice of the following delivery methods): (a) Pick up at SLRD office (1350 Aster Street in Pemberton); (b) Regular letter mail through Canada Post to your residential address; OR (c) Regular letter mail through Canada Post to an alternate address provided when requesting the mail ballot package; and 5. To ensure you receive the correct registration application form in your mail ballot package, you must indicate whether you are going to be registering as a resident elector or as a non-resident property elector. The SLRD will send out mail ballot packages by regular letter mail service through Canada Post (or have them ready for pick up at the SLRD office in Pemberton) starting on Wednesday January 16, 2019. To be counted, your mail ballot package must be received by the Chief Election Officer no later than 8:00 p.m. on January 26, 2019. Please refer to www.slrd.bc.ca/ for more detailed information about how, where and when to return your completed mail ballot package.

SYNOPSIS OF PROPOSED BYLAWS The intent of Squamish-Lillooet Regional District Bralorne Wastewater Treatment System Loan Authorization Bylaw No. 1595-2018 and Bralorne Sewer System Local Service Conversion and Establishment Bylaw No. 585, 1995, Amendment Bylaw No. 1594-2018 is to: • Borrow up to $700,000 which is required to complete the construction of the new wastewater treatment system in the Bralorne Sewer Service Area, with annual debt servicing costs estimated to be $38,750; and • Increase the maximum annual tax requisition amount by $38,750 so that the annual debt servicing costs associated with such borrowing can be requisitioned. The area that is the subject of the proposed bylaws is the Bralorne Sewer Service Area as identified in the map to the right. TAKE NOTICE that the above is a synopsis of the proposed bylaws and that this synopsis is not intended to be and is not to be understood as an interpretation of the bylaws. The full bylaws may be inspected at the SLRD office (1350 Aster Street, Pemberton, BC) during regular office hours, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday to Friday.

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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 3, 2019 | 53


54 Fork

IN T HE

Road

GOING NUCLEAR Researchers are studying the structure and properties of ‘nuclear

pasta’ to determine the effects it might have on observable neutron star properties.

ILLUSTRATION COURTESY OF M. E. CAPLAN AND C. J. HOROWITZ, REVIEWS OF MODERN PHYSICS, AMERICAN PHYSICAL SOCIETY

The best of food’s best… FROM A YEAR THAT’S BEST PAST

W

ow! 2018! What kind of a year was that? The Fear. The Fakeness. The Facebook. The Donald. The Kim. And The False Alert from Hawaii’s Emergency Management Agency that pretty much tied it all up with a bow: A warning issued to islanders

Glenda Bartosh

By

in my old home state to take cover because a ballistic missile was on its way—but it wasn’t. Sigh. No wonder we all took comfort in food—and tons of it—last year. Yes, folks, Canada has hit an all-time high for packin’ on the pounds. While hanging out in the Whistler bubble might make it hard to believe, we Canucks have doubled our obesity rate since the 1970s, lobbing ourselves, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, into the ignominious realm of countries with the top obesity rates. And we didn’t have spin bikes or FitBits back then. The Public Health Agency of Canada reports that, as of 2017, 60 per cent of young Canadians aged five to 17 were overweight or obese; that increases to 64 per cent in the 18-and-over category. As for obesity alone, the agency reports that 14 per cent of Canadian were obese in 1978, compared to 28 per cent today—a number expected to hit 35 per cent by 2025, which will cost Canadians billions in healthcare dollars.

But before I guilt you out more and send you running for comfort-food cover, here’s some fun from 2018—my picks for best food bits from a year that’s otherwise best past, if not pasta (add winking emoji), all of them from the wonderful world of science.

IT HASTA BE SUB-ATOMIC PASTA

First out of the starting gate, and a contender for what might be the most far-out food metaphor of all time, is the “nuclear pasta” concept cooked up by three imaginative astrophysicists. One of them is Matt Caplan from the McGill Space Institute in Montreal, who models neutron star crusts. I’m all for bringing astrophysics down to Earth in a really approachable way whenever possible, and that’s just what Matt and his colleagues did with their September 2018 article, “Elasticity of Nuclear Pasta.” It was first published by the American Physical Society, founded in 1899 at Columbia University and now representing 55,000-plus physicists worldwide. “Deep in the crusts of neutron stars, where matter is a trillion times denser than anything on earth, nuclear matter undergoes a phase transition. At depths of approximately one kilometer, directly above the neutron star core, nuclei start to touch. They rearrange and form exotic shapes, such as planar ‘lasagna’ and cylindrical ‘spaghetti’, which have been whimsically named ‘nuclear pasta’,” Matt explains on his McGill website. Matt studies the structure and properties of nuclear pasta to determine the effects it might have on observable

54 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

neutron star properties. To do this, he uses large-scale classical molecular dynamics simulations to simulate thousands to millions of nucleons. See the illustrations, above, to check out the nuclear lasagna, and more. What I really like are the antimatter expressions—antignocchi and antispaghetti. You’ll never see those at your favourite Italian resto! To smash this “pasta,” where the protons and neutrons have been shaped into flat sheets, clumps and more, you’d need a force 10 billion times greater than that needed to smash steel.

COOKING ON A WHOLE NEW LEVEL

Here’s the best one-liner ever for your New Year’s conversations around climate change, thanks to The Guardian’s ongoing Cities project: Climate change is producing conditions where human cells start to cook. In spring 2018, the 1 million-plus residents of Nawabshah, Pakistan suffered the hottest April on Earth, as temperatures reached just over 50 Celsius. Two years ago, Phalodi, India reached 51 C. Scientists warn that what used to be an urban anomaly (50 C and hotter) is now reality—a reality that’s halfway to water’s boiling point and 10 C above a healthy body temperature. Note that at 50 C, not only do human cells start to cook, but blood thickens, muscles lock around the lungs, and the brain is starved of oxygen.

HOW’S YOUR GUT MICROBIOME DOING?

That’s the question I asked my friend’s bright young son, Jack, as he loaded up his plate with turkey at a fabuloso feast

this holiday season. He immediately wanted to know what I meant, as you might, so here goes… Your gut’s microbiome made lots of headlines in 2018—with the added fascinating fact that a clear-thinking brain might even depend on it. The gut microbiome—just a newer name for all the microbes that live in your intestines—has been gaining increased scientific interest over the past decade or so. Now scientists are convinced it’s responsible for so much more than good digestion. Research shows that the health of your gut microbiome is linked to diseases such as Parkinson’s. Even your brain’s normal functioning depends on your gut microbiome’s health. I hate to say it, but that gives a twisted wisp of credibility to The Donald’s claim that his gut instincts are more reliable than his top advisers. Maintaining a healthy, diverse gut microbiome is far more complex than simply including probiotics like yogurt and kombucha in your diet. Apparently, their effects wear off very quickly. The simplest takeaway I can share is, eat your veggies—and a wide variety of them. Research shows it’s best to aim for 30-plus different veggies a week, and that includes herbs, seeds and spices in addition to the usual peas and carrots. On that vegged-out note, we can all carry on merrily using Michael Pollan’s timeless Eater’s Manifesto: Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants. Glenda Bartosh is an award-winning journalist who is munching on a carrot stick as she writes. n


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55+ Drop-In Hockey 8:15-9:45am

Drop-In Hockey 10-11:30am

Drop-In Hockey 8:15-9:45a.m.

Public Skate 12-3p.m.

Public Skate 12-3pm

Public Skate 12-3pm

This is the year you say “Yes” to you. All it takes is $5 Ring in the new year by trying a select number of classes for $5 at Meadow Park Sports Centre. See the full list in the Fall/Winter Recreation Guide under Adult Programs and Fitness at whistler.ca/recguide

Love the corduroy? Let’s save it together. Walking, running, and dog walking must be done elsewhere in Whistler while the Lost Lake Nordic Trails are open.

Public Skate 2-6p.m. Public Skate 6:30-8p.m.

Public Skate 6:30-8p.m.

POOL SCHEDULE THU 3

FRI 4

SAT 5

SUN 6

MON 7

TUE 8

WED 9

LEISURE POOL 9a.m. - 9p.m. LAP POOL, HOT TUB, SAUNA, STEAM ROOM 6a.m. - 10p.m.

whistler.ca/recreation | whistler.ca/notices | 604-935-8371  @RMWhistler |  @rmwhistler |  @rmowhistler

whistler.ca/nordic


Epicurious? Elevating cuisine with The Savoury Stoner PERSONAL CHEF MIKE QUIGLEY PREPARES CUSTOMIZABLE, CANNABIS-INFUSED DINNERS

M

ike Quigley’s first realization that edible cannabis could be so much more than just, well, edible, came nearly 20 years ago when a friend offered him a freshly baked espresso pot brownie. “I remember thinking there was a radical difference in flavour here from this

Brandon Barrett

By

exact same thing I’ve had before with the addition of one simple ingredient. It was really good,” he recalled. It was the first time the young cook would conceptualize marijuana in this way, as more than just a substance to get high from, but also as an ingredient with its own regionalized qualities and flavour profiles. Indica-dominant strains tend to pair nicely with more earthy flavours such as mushrooms, chocolate and yes, espresso. Sativas, meanwhile, have more floral notes, pairing well with fresh, vibrant ingredients.

“As I’ve come to understand, the cannabis grown in, say, Humboldt County, Calif. versus the cannabis grown in the Kashmir mountains of India, they’re very different,” he said. “You’re talking about moisture levels in the air, you’re talking about nutrient density in the soil, elevation, proximity to the ocean. Most people don’t understand that there is as much complexity to the flavour and the growth of cannabis as there is to grapes for wine.” It’s an education that would eventually come full circle, as the longtime Whistler chef has just launched his own cannabis culinary service, The Savoury Stoner, that offers personalized tasting dinners for up to 20, meal prep, and frozen-ready meals and treats, all prepared in the comfort of the client’s home. “Years of cooking, reading and experimenting have led me to this point,” Quigley explained. Now nearly three months out from legalization, Quigley has positioned himself on the ground floor of a

burgeoning cannabis industry that is only now beginning to explore the potential of edible marijuana. The Red-Seal chef, formerly of the Hilton, Westin, and most recently, Olives Community Market, wants to dispel the notion of edible pot as just “stoner food.” “I’m trying to stray away from the typical backyard, bush-league stoner making pot brownies and make this a more refined, accepted form of indulgence—as well as a food source,” he said. At the moment, The Savoury Stoner offers five different menus to choose from (although Quigley can also help craft a personalized menu of any kind); everything from a Pemberton Farm to Table-themed program, to an Italian Feast, and even a “Canna-pes” menu, which includes pulled barbecue pork jackfruit sliders, walnut and herb-stuffed cremini mushrooms, beef and mushroom tartar, and arancini balls smothered in the Quigley family’s famous tomato sauce—and, of course, cannabis-infused olive oil.

Quigley is strict about dosages, following Health Canada’s proposed guideline of not having more than 10 milligrams of THC per serving. “One of the biggest things I make sure of is that I don’t make my own extracts, I buy them professionally made. This results in a guaranteed dosage,” he noted. Quigley carefully curates each diner’s meal, first asking them their weight and past experience with cannabis to ensure that the THC dosage is appropriate for each course. “This is not me pumping out 50 plates with a swoosh of sauce, a dash of starch, a protein, and off you go,” he explained. “This is Suzy Q. who likes a glass of wine with dinner, so this course will have one milligram of THC in it. But her boyfriend, Johnny F., a huge stoner who smokes weed every day, he really wants to have a great experience, so we’re going to put 10 milligrams into every single thing he eats, so he’s going to leave feeling great and she’s going to leave feeling great.”

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ON HIGH Whistler chef Mike Quigley wants to challenge the perception of edible cannabis as just stoner food. PHOTO SUBMITTED

THC isn’t the sole focus of Quigley’s culinary experience, though. He prepares straight CBD dinners, which results in a nice, body sensation without the psychoactive, euphoric feeling of THC. He

also tries to cook with different parts of the cannabis plant whenever possible. “This is not just your typical dried flower that you would roll into a joint and smoke or something that you can make an extract out of. I’m talking about fresh-offthe-plant, still-wet leaves,” he said. “I’m not necessarily just trying to get people high. I’m trying to infuse cannabis into food because it’s a plant, it’s a flower, it’s juicable, it’s flavourful, it has medicinal health benefits, and it’s also very fun.” Given the anticipated growth in cannabis tourism—some experts predict Canada could eventually generate up to $2 billion in annual revenues from pot tourism—it would stand to reason that Whistler could be a major beneficiary. Despite his website only being live for about a week, Quigley said he has already garnered interest from a cross-section of Whistler society. “I’ve had some of the elite members of Whistler, if I can say that, call to inquire about it. Some of my friends are super engaged and want to be involved. I think I’ve had up to four different cooks who work in town … that want to do this and are interested in working with me,” he noted. “I’ve had the breadth of our (community) asking about it.” n

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SC EN E

58 Arts

Snowed In Comedy Tour set for three nights in Whistler ARJ BARKER RE-JOINS POPULAR SHOW AT THE GLC FROM JAN. 14 TO 16 Alyssa Noel

arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

A

rj Barker is a generous guy. During an interview to preview the upcoming Snowed In Comedy Tour over the phone from his home in Melbourne, Australia, the comedian comes up with a solid Canada pun then promptly volunteers it for the headline of this story. “These guys (on the tour) are just killer comedians,” he says. “So, this sounds corny and cliché, but you have to bring your A game—I don’t mean A like Canadian eh.” He pauses: “Arj Barker is prepared to bring his ‘eh’ game—you can use that.” Barker is no stranger to the tour— which first started in 2009 with a group of comedians who wanted to hit up ski resort towns to tell jokes at night and snowboard during the day. He attempts to join the rotating crew every few years for a leg of the tour. “It’s been a few years now since I was on it,” he adds. “It was 2017 when I popped out there last.” What keeps him coming back— despite the distance from his adopted country—is “mainly the love of the mountains and snowboarding but also to see those guys and have fun with those guys—but mainly the snowboarding, if

I’m honest,” he says. While he’s originally from the U.S. (though perhaps best known for his work on the TV show Flight of the Conchords) living down under also means a long journey to Canada for the tour. “Dan (Quinn) is kind enough to let me come out for a couple of weeks. I have a lot of work out here and it’s hard to be everywhere coming from a

PHOTO SUBMITTED

time. Last year, Debra DiGiovanni filled in last-minute for a comedian who had to drop out for personal reasons, but this year marks the first time women comics will be on the bill from the start. DiGiovanni will join them from Calgary to Vernon while Vancouver comedian Erica Sigurdson will be part of the lineup from Vernon to Saskatoon.

“One thing I want to say is these are topnotch comedians on the tour. They make me work much harder than I would coming out there to do my own show.” - ARJ BARKER

long way. I provide my own plane ticket to North America, so by the time you do that—I don’t do this tour to make money,” he says. During three nights in Whistler, he’ll be performing alongside Quinn, Paul Myrehaug and Pete Zedlacher. “One thing I want to say is these are top-notch comedians on the tour,” he says. “They make me work much harder than I would coming out there to do my own show.” For part of the tour—though not in Whistler—that high-end talent will include female comedians for the first

58 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

“The tour is super popular and the boys are wonderful,” DiGiovanni says. “But they got a lot of feedback that it’s nice to have a woman on the show …

T HI S SEC T I O N

By

FUNNY GUY Arj Barker is one of four comedians performing in Whistler as part of the Snowed In Comedy Tour from Jan. 14 to 16. Dan (Quinn) has been such a fan and supporter of mine throughout my career. I think when they needed someone I was the first choice.” That said, adding a female comic to the mix at a time when there’s a push for the entertainment industry to diversify isn’t a coincidence either, she says. “It was a little bit of both. They could’ve gotten any guy to fill it … Skiing, snowboarding, I don’t do any of those things. They could’ve asked a bunch of guys who were snowboarders already,” she says. For his part, Barker says it’s “high time.” “It’s 2019, let’s represent—I don’t want to say both genders because there’s (more than one)—but a couple of the biggies,” he says. “There’s great female comedians as well.” The Snowed In Comedy Tour stops in Whistler at the GLC from Jan. 14 to Jan. 16. Tickets are $30 at www. snowedincomedytour.com. n

60 N OTES FROM THE BACK ROW Interactive movie 61 ARTS NEWS New Arts-U session focuses on marketing 62 M  USEUM MUSINGS Year in review 63 PARTIAL RECALL Photos from the past week


Arts S C E N E

WHAT’S ON @ THE AUDAIN Art After Dark: Mindfulness Month Calligraphy Friday, Jan 4 | 3:30 – 5:30pm Youth* | 6:30 – 8:30pm Adult Join the Audain Art Museum throughout the month of January to explore the permanent collection through yoga, mindfulness and more. Learn several easy steps to create your own visual journal featuring calligraphy. Look at different styles, calligraphy brushes, ink and other tools as well as practice with tracing paper. *Youth under 12 must be accompanied by an adult

Free to members & with admission | All ages

Art After Dark: Mindfulness Month Yoga @ the Audain Friday, Jan 4 | 6:30 – 8pm Instructor Laura Davies will lead you through flowing sessions that centre on the confluence of art and yoga. Space is limited so arrive early to secure a spot.

FRONT AND CENTRE Banksy’s Bombing Middle England is on display at the Whistler store

Free to members & with admission | All ages

Jonathan+Olivia.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Family Studio Sunday

New Whistler streetwear store unveils Banksy art

Every Sunday | 12 – 4pm Join the Museum for a unique and engaging art experience. Throughout the month of January the theme will be ‘Pattern and Colour’. This week, using only natural pigments create a painting of an imagined landscape.

LARGE STENCIL-ON-CONCRETE PIECE ON PERMANENT DISPLAY AT JONATHAN+OLIVIA

W

Alyssa Noel

histler can be a weird and wonderful place. Need proof? Consider this: unbeknownst to many locals, earlier last year, owners of the new village store Jonathan+Olivia quietly installed a 136-kilogram concrete piece by the anonymous English street artist Banksy. The piece, called Bombing Middle England—which depicts older people bowling with bombs, similar to Cinders McLeod’s 1999 drawing Anarchic Granny—had long been in storage in Paris. “I got it organized with my wife to have shipped back,” says Nic Jones, who co-owns Jonathan+Olivia with his wife Jackie O’Brien Jones. “We’re in Whistler now. Let’s give Whistler a piece of crazy art that people can come and see. It’s a little tourist attraction.” The piece dates back to January 2003, when Jones was first joining a boutique and art collective in Paris called Surface to Air. The shop hosted a group show in its basement called Graffiti, Lies & Deviousness that marked Banksy’s first official exhibit. It was during that show that Banksy privately created Bombing Middle England, a two-metre by 60-centimetre stencil on concrete wall. “Fifteen years on, he’s a world-renowned artist,” Jones says. “He was cool and it was an interesting project to do—we all knew he would go on to be a deal, but we were working with other artists as well at the time who were equally as interesting and well known as him.” When Surface to Air eventually decided they needed a bigger space, the

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piece came with them, winding up in storage in Paris. “The piece is not authenticated by Banksy,” Jones adds. “Like all art he does, this is a peculiar piece because it’s not something that was on the street. It was kind of a gift from him to Surface to Air.” Meanwhile, in 2005 Jackie created Jonathan+Olivia in Vancouver before moving it to Toronto—where the couple started their family—then, in 2018, to Whistler. Located in Mountain Square, the shop features high-end streetwear and sneakers, creating an aesthetic that fits with Banksy’s graffiti. “It’s there to be viewed by the public,” Jones says. “It’ll never be authenticated for sale. It’s there for public viewing, which was the initial intention of Banksy. It was a gift to me and my business partners, not to make money off the back of it. This is why we got it.” The couple, who moved to the resort last July, are inviting Whistlerites to drop by and check the piece out. “We’re trying to be another part of the jigsaw,” Jones says. “That’s what we wanted to be here: part of the community and just get involved. We have a seven-year-old as well. It was a lifestyle change. We wanted to be able to offer our son a different way of going on … give him a bit of a healthy childhood. He’s out skiing, skating and mountain biking; he’s living the full Whistler experience.” As for the Banksy piece—don’t worry, it’s not going anywhere. “The fact that it weighs 300 pounds and is a seven-foot piece of concrete—to get it installed, it needed a crazy steel base to support it,” Jones says. “It’s not going anywhere for a long, long time.” n

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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 3, 2019 | 59


Notes FROM T HE BA C K R O W Choose your own adventure T

he texts started coming in Saturday morning: “Bandersnatch WTF!!!” and “Holy f@ck, have you seen the new Black Mirror?” And “A choose-your-ownadventure movie? Whaaaaaaaat?!!” And the hype is real. Set as a standalone offering from the dark-andawesome sci-fi series Black Mirror (Season 5 is due later this year), Bandersnatch is what Netflix is calling an “interactive film,” because options appear onscreen throughout the flick and you, the viewer, can guide the character through the narrative.

Feet Banks

By

PICK A PATH Bandersnatch, an “interactive film,” is available on Nextflix now. It starts simply enough—selecting one breakfast cereal over another, or choosing what tape to listen to on the bus—but the choices get much more severe as you push the film’s protagonist down different narrative paths. Set in 1984, the story revolves around a young video-game creator attempting to build a choose-your-own-adventurestyle game. Themes of destiny, parallel worlds, predetermination and free will percolate throughout the film, breaking the fourth wall between audience and entertainment on more than one occasion. Some critics are calling Bandersnatch a gimmick, claiming too many of the choices lead in the same direction and that act of choosing pulls viewers out of the story because we’re left wondering “what if” we’d selected the other option. It’s a valid point, but in this case, with this story, the anxiety about making the “wrong choice” fits the plot and themes of the narrative. Netflix and Black Mirror need to be commended for putting their talents and money into trying

COURTESY OF NETFLIX

something new and exciting amidst an entertainment spectrum dominated by remakes, reimaginings and moneychasing sequels. And with at least nine potential endings, Bandersnatch certainly has the “wormhole-marathon” qualities holiday binge-watchers can get into. (It also has one of the best LSD sequences ever filmed and a pretty good rant about Pac-Man). The choose-your-own-adventure concept is not brand new. Netflix has toyed with it on animated children’s shows (Puss in Boots: Trapped in an Epic Tale) and last January, Steven Soderbergh and HBO launched an interactive series called Mosiac that allowed viewers to use an app to determine what they watched, shifting character perspectives and deciding where their attention/viewing experience would focus. But there is a local connection here as well. Back in 2010, Whistler Creek Productions filmmaker Stuart Andrews

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created Mystery Line, a choose-your-ownadventure short for the Heavy Hitting HorrorFest, the first year it was held at the Fairmont. Screening his segments before the intermissions, each of the 1,100 audience members was able to “vote” via cellphone app in order to control the direction of the story. And it worked. The following year, HorrorFest favourites Luchagore Productions filmed a choose-your-own-adventure web series, shooting subsequent episodes only after fans had selected who would die next. So if this type of entertainment becomes the next big thing, let’s make sure to edit the Wikipedia entry: Whistler did it first. In the theatres this week, Escape Room opens. No press screening for this one, but it looks like a thriller/horror in the vein of Saw in which a group of young victims needs to solve puzzles to survive. With a largely unknown cast and a director in need of a hit after his last outing (Insidious: The Last Key), this

one looks like dumb fun. (For smart fun, here’s a shout-out to Escape! Whistler, which features four actual escape rooms right in Whistler Village and is a really kick-ass way to s pend an hour. Check them out.) And tying up the Best of the Year list from last week: Best Action goes to Black Panther, but there’s a pretty solid French revenge flick on iTunes about a young female ass-kicker on a warpath. It’s called Revenge. The Biggest Letdown of the year was Jennifer Lawrence in Red Sparrow, the Best Comedy was The Death of Stalin, and my nine-year-old kid says Ready Player One and Isle of Dogs were his two favourites. I missed almost all Oscar-bait flicks but for me, no question, the Best Film of 2018 was Mandy, an LSD-fuelled biker-cult nightmare revenge flick that perfectly utilized every ion of Nicolas Cage, including his ability to duel with a chainsaw. Happy New Year! ■

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Arts N E WS VILLAGE 8 SHOW SCHEDULE FRIDAY, JANUARY 4TH – THURSDAY, JANUARY 10TH ESCAPE ROOM (14A) DAILY 4:10, 7:10; MATINEES FRI, SAT, SUN, TUES 1:10; LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT, SUN, TUES 9:45

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Jan. 17.

PHOTO BY MIKE CRANE/ TOURISM WHISTLER

Museum Speaker Series kicks off ARTS NEWS: LIBRARY HOSTS FIRST FILM OF YEAR; BURSARY APPLICATIONS OPEN; NEW ARTS-U SESSION TACKLES MARKETING By

Alyssa Noel

T

he Whistler Museum is set to launch its Speaker Series for 2019. The first event takes place on Jan. 17 and features Michael Stein, who will talk about a canoe trip he took on the Liard River with Jim McConkey and other local figures in 1972. The presentation will include footage from the adventure. Tickets are $10 or $5 for museum or Club Shred members. Doors are 6:30 p.m. and the talk begins at 7 p.m.

LIBRARY MOVIE SCREENING

The Whistler Public Library is hosting its first film of the year with Crazy Rich Asians set to screen on Jan. 8 at 7 p.m. The popular rom-com, based on a book of the same name by Kevin Kwan, follows the main character Rachel Chu, who accompanies her boyfriend Nick to his best friend’s wedding in Singapore. Only, once she gets there, she’s surprised to learn his family is much wealthier than she expected, which causes several challenges. The screening is free.

STUDENT ART BURSARIES ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS

Applications are open for Arts Whistler’s Student Art Bursary program. The goal is to make the arts accessible to all children in the community—including Whistler, Pemberton and Mount Currie.

The bursaries are available for students who would like to further their studies in visual, performing, literary or media arts. The $100 to $200 bursaries can go towards tuition, accommodation and travel costs connected to studies. They will be evaluated on the financial need of the student or family; previous training, experience or accomplishments in the art they want to study; and credibility of the mentor artists, institution, school or program the student would like to attend. Applications will be accepted on a year-round basis. For more visit artswhistler.com/event/student-artbursary-applications.

NEW ARTS-U SESSION

Mark your calendars—Arts Whistler has unveiled the next session in its Arts-U series. On March 28, Squamish-based marketing expert Jess Robson is hosting Creating Self-Promotion That Gets You the Gig. It will tackle copywriting, marketing and self-promotion. The aim is to help performers “find the right words to express what (they) do,” while building their following and landing gigs. The event takes place on March 28 from 6 to 9 p.m. Early bird tickets are on sale now until March 1. They’re $25 for Arts Whistler members and $30 for nonmembers. For more, visit artswhistler. com/arts-u-workshop. n

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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 3, 2019 | 61


Museum Musings

REMEMBERING BRANDYWINE RESORT A Pacific Great Eastern Train passes over

Brandywine Falls.

MUSEUM ARCHIVE PHOTO

Whistler Museum: year in review By

T

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Email your pet photo with name & details to: tsweeney@wplpmedia.com 62 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

Brad Nichols

he past year has been one of great exhilaration, vision, and accomplishment for the Whistler Museum & Archives Society. Together with the board of trustees, staff, and volunteers, the museum continued to advance its mission to collect, preserve, document, and interpret the natural and human history of mountain life in Whistler, and broaden our program offerings. Last year, 2018, marked the busiest year in the museum’s history with over 12,800 exhibit visits and an additional 10,600 people partaking in the museum’s many events and programs. These programs included our long-running Valley of Dreams Walking Tour, which educates guests and locals alike on the pioneer history of the region, tales behind the development of the mountains, and the 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games. The tour is currently in its 22nd year, and runs daily throughout June, July, and August. The museum’s Discover Nature program was another highlight from the past year. This program, which runs in July and August, included a Discover Nature Station at Lost Lake Park and a nature-based walking tour. Our friendly interpreters used the touch-table items to engage participants and to encourage questions about the marvels of nature. Participants also had the opportunity to dig deeper into any of our items on display (or things not on display) to discover fun facts about some of Whistler’s local organisms. Other museum program highlights this year included Kids Après, Crafts in the Park (in partnership with Whistler Public Library), Nature 101 training seminars, our third-annual Mountain Bike

Heritage Week, Feeding the Spirit, and of course, our long-running Speaker Series. My personal favourite speakersseries event was with Julie Gallagher, who grew up at Brandywine Falls, and whose parents Ray and Ruth Gallagher ran a resort in the current location of Brandywine Provincial Park. After delivering a riveting talk on April 28, Julie offered to take staff and guests on a walk through Brandywine Falls the following day, describing where many lost structures were located, and even showed us a few remnants of the structures just off the main viewing area that I personally have walked past many times but would never had noticed if she had not pointed them out. One of the major accomplishments of the museum this year was the completion of Coast Mountain Gothic: A History of the Coast Mountain Gothic Arch Huts, a virtual exhibit with the support of the Virtual Museum of Canada. This exhibit explores the story, design, and construction of Coast Mountain Gothic Arch Huts, and the people and organizations who brought them to life. This was a major endeavour that took over two years to complete, and was also the museum’s first fully bilingual exhibit, with all interpretive text available in French. You can check out the exhibit on our website under exhibits: VMC-Coast Mountain Gothic. Given our lack of physical space in our current location, we are glad to have the opportunity to tell Whistler’s stories through our “Museum Musings” column every week—thanks to the Pique for allowing us to share 52 Whistler narratives in 2018 that would have otherwise been left untold. We are grateful to everyone who reads our column and attends our events. Thank you for your continued support, and we’ll see you in the new year. n


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1. New Year’s dunk Darren Veres celebrates the start of 2019 with a polar bear dunk in Alpha Lake on Jan. 1. Photo by Gerald Oskoboiny. 2. Christmas carollers About 40 locals, including Mountain Hosts, Village Hosts, Mountain Safety, and Mature Action Committee volunteers, among others, carol in the village on the winter solstice (Dec. 21) to brighten the dark night with some Christmas joy and spirit. Several hundred visitors passed by to listen or join in the carol singing. Photo submitted. 3. Green Lake glow The conditions were perfect for a Christmas Day walk on Green Lake. Photo by Whitney Sobool. 4. Christmas visits Tim, Jax and Finn Sternberg travelled from Byron Bay, Australia to spend the holidays with family in Whistler and enjoy a perfect Christmas winter wonderland at the Fairmont Chateau Whistler last week. Photo by Catherine Power-Chartrand. 5. Ice check Matthew Ogilvie Turner investigates the ice thickness ahead of a Christmas Day skate on Alta Lake in Rainbow Park. Photo by Clare Ogilvie. 6. Frosty hearts Love was in the air atop the Sea to Sky Gondola on Christmas Day. Photo by Kerilee Raven-Falloon. 7. Lost in the fog The Lost Lake Park cross-country ski trails led to a foggy but stunning view at sunset on Thursday, Dec. 27. Photo by Lou O’Brien. Li e mu ve 6- ry F sic 9p rid m ay!

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604 938 8878 located in function junction www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 3, 2019 | 63


N IG H TLIFE

64 Music

PUNK NIGHT Vancouver’s Sore Points are set to kick off Whistler’s first Punk Night of the year.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Vancouver bands to kick off Garf’s monthly Punk Night CATCH SORE POINTS AND THE RAMORES ON JAN. 6 Alyssa Noel

arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

H

ere’s a disclaimer to the crowd at the first monthly Punk Night at Garfinkel’s on Sunday, Jan. 6— you’re not seeing double. Shane Grass is set to kick off the evening with his band Sore Points before returning to the stage with the Ramores, a Ramones tribute band. “Both bands share two members,” he says. “We’ve never played on the same bill before. Both are pretty physically demanding, so it’ll be interesting. Sore Points will start and we’ll end with Ramores. For a party, a lot of people know the Ramones songs. A few drinks later into the night, it’ll be fun.” Joey Blitzkrieg from the old-school Vancouver punk band The Jolts first started The Ramores back in 1999. Over the years, several musicians have cycled through the lineup with the band playing sporadically, largely for special occasions. “The Ramores is a really fun band to be in,” Grass says. “We try to do everything we can (as close to) how the Ramones played live. The stage banter is the same, or similar, and we dress the part. We play

the same kind of gear. It’s a lot of fun. It’s a bit of a challenge; people don’t realize how hard those songs are to play.” To that end, honing their chops playing those well-loved punk songs has helped the band members in their

The songs have been flowing thanks, in part, to their collaborative approach, Grass says. They plan to put out a seven-inch in the summer and tour with The Spits, one of their favourite bands, in May.

“With other bands it’s very common for there to be a sole songwriter. We’re not afraid to be brutally honest with each other saying, ‘That’s not working, no offence taken.” - SHANE GRASS

various musical pursuits. “You can hear it in Sore Points a lot too,” Grass says. “We have spent a lot of time learning the ins and outs of so many Ramones’ songs. I don’t think any of us are getting tired of those songs. They’re such good songs.” While The Ramores only play the occasional gig, Sore Points have been busy over the last three years writing, recording and touring. “We set out to do more of a traditional-sounding band,” Grass says. “It’s stripped down and a throwback. I feel like we’re doing it in a modern kind of way.” Last year, they released their first fulllength, self-titled album with plans for more gritty, raw recordings underway.

64 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

“We like to keep writing new material all the time,” he says. “We don’t put out half of what we write. A lot we end up scrapping … It’s a very collaborative effort with this band. With other bands it’s very common for there to be a sole

T H I S SE C TI O N

By

66 69 70 98

songwriter. We’re not afraid to be brutally honest with each other saying, ‘That’s not working, no offence taken.’” While the trio—which, alongside Grass as the frontman and bassist, includes drummer Trevor Racz and guitarist Mitch Allen—might be comprised of seasoned Vancouver musicians, they don’t have much experience with Whistler crowds—yet. For his part, Grass says other musicians have told him whether or not the crowds show up, he’s sure to have crazy time. “I don’t really know what to expect,” he says. “I’ve never played there. I’ve only been up there a couple times in the last few years. I’m guessing it’ll be great.” The first in a series of monthly Punk Nights starts on Sunday, Jan. 6 at 9 p.m. It’s hosted by Vinyl Ritchie and admission will be free. n

NIGHTLIFE LISTINGS Our guide to pubs, clubs and bars HOROSCOPE More astrological musings from Rob Brezny PIQUE’CAL Our guide to everything else CROSSWORD Discover the answer to “Soothing herb”


Music & N I G H T L I F E Local singer-songwriter aims to encourage youth with new single SOFIA EVANGELINA STEPS AWAY FROM COMPETITIVE SKIING TO CHASE MUSICAL DREAMS By

Alyssa Noel

I

t turns out the lessons you learn from years on the slopes can translate to other life pursuits as well. That’s what 16-year-old Whistlerite Sofia Evangelina found when she was balancing competitive skiing and a music career. “One thing that will always be with me is my extreme sport athlete mentality,” she says. “Let’s say, focus. You are at the biggest competition of your life, you need a lasersharp focus right before you drop … Now I am applying the same focus, to everything else in life, and carrying it with me into the music business.” This season, Evangelina took a step back from skiing to focus more on music and acting—but “a skier once is a skier for life,” she adds. “It’s my first season of not competing. It’s a very, very strange sensation for someone who used to train every day of her life. Hours on the ski hill, then trampoline, come home tired, next day again. Next week, the same. Next year, the same. The music career involves a different kind of hard work. Business grinding, dance choreography, song writing, vocal… It’s almost more tiring. I need more endurance training now,” she says. But the young singer-songwriter reached a few milestones last year. First, she released her debut cover album, Butterfly, followed by an original single “This is Your Song,” with an accompanying video. The track, co-written and recorded with Bryant Olender in his studio in Vancouver, encourages young people to chase their dreams and find confidence within themselves. “Being a full-time athlete, changing schools and travelling the world, and sometimes training for a few weeks or months in Europe or the U.S., I got to hang out with many kids from different cultures, demographics and walks of life,” she says. “I’ve noticed that no matter where I went, all kids have the same or similar issues they are dealing with … They go through bullying and desperately need help. The bullies are sometimes the ones who need help or need to be heard.” The video, meanwhile, was recorded in L.A. after travelling to Mammoth Mountain for a World Cup competition.

MUSICAL MESSAGE Whistlerite Sophia Evangelina has a busy year ahead. PHOTO SUBMITTED

“We had time in between the World Cup in Mammoth, Calif. and the next competition in Calgary. Everyone was flying … but we were driving. So my mom who came from studying filmmaking in L.A., and I decided, since we are so close to L.A. why wouldn’t we drop by to say hello to friends and ‘test the waters’ for making music videos in the near future. In the one week we were there, we ended up filming five music videos. Don’t ask me how,” she says. On top of videos, Evangelina also has more songs on the way. “The next two singles that are coming out very soon—one is about to be released and the other one, one month later, we are working on a music video as we speak—are also co-written with my producer Bryant Olender,” she says. “After I got hooked on songwriting, I can’t stop. I have several songs in various stages of songwriting or production, they either were written entirely by myself or are a result of collaboration with some absolutely stunning song writers.” While a tour is also in the works, the details are still under wraps. “I’ll be able to tour different schools in the U.S. and Canada and share all my messages,” she says. “That will be a growing tour that with time, will expand to the U.K. and other countries in Europe. I’m very honoured and humbled to be a part of this mission.” For more information and to hear her music visit www.sofiaevangelina.com. n

GRAND OPENING JANUARY 5th Please join us from 4pm-7pm to celebrate the grand opening of the new Bogner Partner Store. To celebrate we will be having hourly giveaways, appetizers and mulled wine. We look forward to celebrating with you.

Fairmont Chateau Whistler 604.938.7733

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 3, 2019 | 65


Nightlife

BARS , C L U B S & P U B S Kick off your weekend at Garf’s. Get on the guest list and join the party: info@garfinkels.ca. d Garfinkel’s d 7:30 pm

FEEL GOOD FRIDAYS Start the weekend off right with music by B.C.’s finest party DJs mixing the best in hip hop, rap, R&B and party anthems. Whistler’s most energetic dance floor. d Moe Joe’s d 9:30 pm

FRIDAY NIGHT ALL LOVE NO CLUB Featuring DJ TyMetal. Start your weekend off right with TyMetal’s energizing vibes! d The Keg d 10 pm-2 am

LADIES’ NIGHT We have a gift for all ladies. Enjoy a glass of champagne then hit the dance floor and dance the night away with DJ Peacefrog. Info@buffalobills.ca for guestlist or table bookings. d Buffalo Bills d 7 pm

GEORGE

THE CURE LOUNGE SESSIONS Enjoy lake views on the patio while DJ Smokey sets the tone with a blend of soulful house tracks. d Cure Lounge at Nita Lake Lodge d 5 pm

Don’t miss singer-songwriter George at The Crystal Lounge on Thursday at 9 p.m.

THU.

03

JAN

Live Music

CLUB SHRED THURSDAYS The team at Whistler Blackcomb’s Club Shred are bringing the party back to Merlin’s Bar & Grill all season long! Rotating between Whistler local favorites Red Chair and Joni Toews (from Case Of The Mondays). d Merlin’s Bar & Grill d 7 pm-midnight

EVAN KENNEDY Evan creates a unique live performance mixing in lesserknown album songs with the songs of today. d Nutcracker d 4:30-6:30 pm

Clubs/DJs #TBT WITH THE SOUNDS OF STACHE Stache has been on a nomadic musical adventure for almost a decade, travelling to over 50 countries and sharing his passion for music with others. Drawing influences from all four corners of the globe, his appetite, understanding and energetic delivery will guarantee a funky smorgasbord of beats. Free. d Three Below d 9 pm-1 am

COCKTAIL DANCE PARTY Start your weekend early with a handcrafted cocktail. Then hit the dance floor or rock our legendary dancing cage with help from DJ Peacefrog. d Buffalo Bills d 7 pm

LEVEL UP – HOUSE & TECHNO

George is an acoustic/folk singer songwriter from Australia who pours her heart and soul into her songs. d Crystal Lounge d 9 pm

Featuring a rotating selection of DJs playing some of the best underground electronic dance music in House & Techno, the ‘Level Up’ nights are set to up your dance game. Hosted by DJ Miss KosmiK. d Moe Joe’s d 9:30 pm-2 am

THE HAIRFARMERS

SHUT UP AND PARTY

Voted Whistler’s best band every year since 2001, The Hairfarmers combine uncanny vocals with innovative guitar and percussion covering all your favourite songs. A Whistler must-see! d Sidecut d 5:30-8:30 pm

Start your weekend off one night early and come get wild with Whistler’s loosest bar staff. With music from Fidel Cashflow and DJ Shearer. Email info@maxxfish.com for VIP and other special perks. d Maxx Fish d 9 pm

GEORGE

KARAOKE NIGHT Come belt out your best covers at karaoke every Thursday night from 9 pm! d Black’s Pub & Restaurant d 9 pm

LOCALS’ NIGHT Party at Whistler’s longest-running locals’ night. Specials all night long. For VIP table bookings or guest list, email info@garfinkels.com. d Garfinkel’s d 7:30 pm

MARK WOODYARD Mark Woodyard is a multi-talented musician who uses looping machines, his voice and his guitar to create a truly unique and dance-inspiring sound. d Mallard Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

THE WHISKEYRICHARDS The WhistlerRichards are a group of Celtic Gypsy punk rockers who have spent the better part of a decade carving a reputation for themselves as “One hell of a good time.” d Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub d 3:45 & 9 pm

THROWBACK THURSDAYS WITH MR. TWITCH Enjoy a musical journey of nostalgia curated by Mr. Twitch. Disco-funk-hip-hop-house and whatever else. Old school-vibes, remixes, mash-ups and new stuff to keep you on your toes. Free. d Three Below d 9 pm-midnight

THURSDAY LOCALS’ NIGHT Come join our legendary locals’ night every Thursday, kicking off the night with a game of skate at 9 pm followed by DJ Praiz and friends throwing down some dope tracks. Prizes to be given away each week include concert tickets, snowboards, electric sunnies and skateboards! Email info@ garfinkels.ca for guest list and VIP options. d Garfinkel’s d 9 pm-2 am

THURSDAY NIGHT FUNK Featuring DJ Dakota and his one-of-a-kind funkadelic style. d The Keg d 10 pm-2 am

66 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

FRI.

04

JAN

Live Music

COLIN BULLOCK Colin Bullock melds folk, alt-country, blues and pop into a signature sound that is uniquely his own. d Mallard Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE Live music by Whistler favourites, Red Chair. d Tapley’s Pub d 9 pm

THE HAIRFARMERS Voted Whistler’s best band every year since 2001, The Hairfarmers combine uncanny vocals with innovative guitar and percussion covering all your favourite songs. A Whistler must-see! d Merlin’s Bar & Grill d 3:30-7:30 pm

JUAN DELCASTILLO AND THE GROOVE SECTION Juan DelCastillo and the Groove Section are back to entertain you with their soulful, folk and R&B vibe. You’ll be guaranteed to get your groove on. d Cranked Espresso Bar d 5:30-8:30 pm

LIVE @ BLACK’S Every Friday and Saturday, party with local and touring musicians at Black’s Pub. d Black’s Pub & Restaurant d 9 pm

LIVE MUSIC

SAT.

05

JAN

Live Music

BROTHER TWANG Come wind down your ski day or ramp up your Saturday night festivities with the boys from Brother Twang. d FireRock Lounge d 9 pm-midnight

GREG NEUFELD Armed with a guitar, stompbox and one of the best, soulful voices you will ever hear. d Mallard Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

THE HAIRFARMERS Voted Whistler’s best band every year since 2001, The Hairfarmers combine uncanny vocals with innovative guitar and percussion covering all your favourite songs. A Whistler must-see! d Dusty’s Bar and Grill d 3-6 pm

JENNA MAE Jenna is a local singer-songwriter and managed to fit in a live show at Cranked during her jam-packed schedule. She puts her own twist on playing acoustic covers and playing her own original tracks. d Cranked Espresso Bar d 5:30-8:30 pm

LIVE @ BLACK’S Every Friday and Saturday, party with local and touring musicians at Black’s Pub. d Black’s Pub & Restaurant d 9 pm

RUCKUS DELUXE

Solo artists perform every week, except on the first Friday of every month when they swap out for a full band. No cover, no lineups. d Whistler Brewing Company d 6-9 pm

Ruckus Deluxe features former Cirque Du Soleil lead singer Chad Oliver and Grammy nominated violinist Ian Cameron playing Celtic and classics on mandolin, fiddle and electric guitar. d Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub d 3:45 & 9 pm

MARC CHARRON

WILL ROSS

d Nutcracker d 4:30-6:30

pm

RUCKUS DELUXE Ruckus Deluxe features former Cirque Du Soleil lead singer Chad Oliver and Grammy nominated violinist Ian Cameron playing Celtic and classics on mandolin, fiddle and electric guitar. d Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub d 3:45 & 9 pm

Clubs/DJs CHAMPAGNE FRIDAY

d Nutcracker d 4:30-6:30

pm

Clubs/DJs LADIES’ NIGHT It’s Whistler’s No. 1 stop for stag and stagette parties. DJ Turtle and friends mix up everything from hip hop, R&B, new rap, dance hall and Top 40 bangers. Email guestlist@ moejoes.com for VIP and group perks. d Moe Joe’s d 9:30 pm


Nightlife

BARS , C L U B S & P U B S

SATURDAY NIGHT ALL LOVE NO CLUB

SOULFUL SUNDAYS

Featuring Tim Livingstone of Skiitour. Tim’s classic style is a fixture of the Whistler bar scene. d The Keg d 10 pm-2 am

SATURDAY NIGHT SHAKER With music from Fidel Cashflow and DJ C Stylez, two of Whistler’s hardest working and most loved DJs spinning the best in Top 40, mash-ups, electro, hip hop and party anthems that will keep your booty shakin’ all night long. Email info@maxxfish.com for VIP and other special perks. d Maxx Fish d 9 pm

SUPREME SATURDAY DJ Nikky from Vancouver brings Whistler’s biggest weekend party and best vibe. VIP champagne parades along with the hottest hip hop and remixes! For VIP and guest list, email info@garfinkels.ca. d Garfinkel’s d 10 pm

THE CURE LOUNGE SESSIONS Enjoy lake views on the patio while DJ Smokey sets the tone with a blend of soulful house tracks. d Cure Lounge at Nita Lake Lodge d 5 pm

SUN.

06

JAN

Live Music

THE HAIRFARMERS Voted Whistler’s best band every year since 2001, The Hairfarmers combine uncanny vocals with innovative guitar and percussion covering all your favourite songs. A Whistler must-see! d Garibaldi Lift Co. (GLC) d 3:30-6:30 pm

OPEN MIC JAM NIGHT An open stage invitation for all who can sing, perform or even just wanna jam out with our house band. Whistler’s longest-running jam night every Sunday at Crystal Lounge. All instruments provided. d Crystal Lounge d 9 pm

Soul Club Whistler spinning that funky soul soundtrack. d Black’s Pub & Restaurant d 9 pm

THE SUNDAY GLOW PARTY Moe Joe’s is transformed into a psychedelic UV infused rave cathedral, as Fidel Cashflow, Zapps and La Dooda cook up an aural feast of house and electro beats. Arrive early to beat the line. d Moe Joe’s d 9 pm

SUNDAY NIGHT THEORY WITH TYMETAL TyMetal’s unique blend of rock, funk and R&B is unmatched and will leave your ears craving more! The evolution of Sunday night is here. d The Keg d 10 pm-1 am

MON. Live Music

FVCK MONDAYS The wildest party in Whistler on a Monday night continues with music from Fidel Cashflow, Dan Darley, The Rogue Killers and DJ Shearer. Throwing down all the hottest tunes you know and love. Deep, tech, bass, house, trap, hip hop and more. Email info@maxxfish.com for VIP plus special perks. d Maxx Fish d 9 pm

MARTINI MONDAY d Buffalo

Bills

RED CHAIR Red Chair is a local Whistler rock band with an impressive and versatile set list. They have become a hometown favourite with their selection of bar classics, high-energy performances and great musicianship. d Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub d 3:45 pm

SUNDAY SESSIONS The best locals’ party in Whistler. d Tapley’s Pub d 9 pm

THE WHISKEYRICHARDS The WhistlerRichards are a group of Celtic Gypsy punk rockers who have spent the better part of a decade carving a reputation for themselves as “One hell of a good time.” d Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub d 3:45 pm

Clubs/DJs GAMES NIGHT AT PANGEA Challenge your crew: Cards Against Humanity, Jenga, Settlers of Catan, HedBanz, and many more. Drinks and food specials all night long. d Pangea Pod Hotel d 4 pm

SEND IT SUNDAYS

d 7:30

pm

PATRICK GAVIGAN Vancouver-based singer-songwriter, formerly of the 99.3 FM CFOX Seeds winning band theTURN. d Mallard Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

THE WHISKEYRICHARDS The WhistlerRichards are a group of Celtic Gypsy punk rockers who have spent the better part of a decade carving a reputation for themselves as “One hell of a good time.” d Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub d 3:45 & 9 pm

PATRICK GAVIGAN Vancouver-based singer-songwriter, formerly of the 99.3 FM CFOX Seeds winning band theTURN. d Mallard Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

07

JAN

Clubs/DJs MEATY MONDAY Sport and beer what more do you need? How about a chance to win our famous Meat Raffle? Proceeds donated to charity. d Tapley’s Pub d 9 pm

MEXICAN MONDAY Feel the heat by our fireplace and pretend you are back on the beach. d FireRock Lounge d 5 pm

MONDAY MADNESS Fidel Cashflow, Dan Darley and Billy The Kid throw down all the hottest deep and dirty beats you know and love. Deep tech, bass, house, trap, plus more. d Maxx Fish d 9:30 pm

MONDAY NIGHT FEATURING DJ GAINZ DJ Gainz has taken over Monday so come get your fix of the freshest tracks in town! d The Keg d 10 pm-2 am

TRIVIA NIGHT The Crystal Lounge hosts trivia every Monday night! Bring your friends and test your knowledge for a night of fun, laughs, prizes and the chance to “burn your bill.” Conditions apply. d Crystal Lounge d 9 pm

With music from T-Zen and DJ Shearer. Keep your weekend alive, and join us on Sunday nights for one of Whistler’s wildest industry nights. Email info@maxxfish.com for VIP plus special perks. d Maxx Fish d 9 pm

68 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

TUE.

08

JAN

Live Music

BLACK ‘N’ BLUES

CLUB SHRED THURSDAYS

CELLAR SESSIONS With live music from Neverland Nights and guests, playing all your rock, alternative and party jams all night long. Plus DJ sets from Fidel Cashflow. d Maxx Fish d 9 pm

KARAOKE NIGHT “I Will Survive” won’t sing itself, so come over to Whistler’s longest-running karaoke night and belt out all your favourite hits. Arrive early to avoid disappointment. d Crystal Lounge d 9 pm

LOCALS LIVE Grab your friends and come down to get up to perform on our open mic. d FireRock Lounge d 9 pm

MARC CHARRON Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

Clubs/DJs

The team at Whistler Blackcomb’s Club Shred are bringing the party back to Merlin’s Bar & Grill all season long! Rotating between Whistler local favorites Red Chair and Joni Toews (from Case Of The Mondays). d Merlin’s Bar & Grill d 7 pm-midnight

KARAOKE NIGHT Come belt out your best covers at karaoke every Thursday night from 9 pm! d Black’s Pub & Restaurant d 9 pm

LOCALS’ NIGHT Party at Whistler’s longest-running locals’ night. Specials all night long. For VIP table bookings or guest list, email info@garfinkels.com. d Garfinkel’s d 7:30 pm

RUCKUS DELUXE Ruckus Deluxe features former Cirque Du Soleil lead singer Chad Oliver and Grammy nominated violinist Ian Cameron playing Celtic and classics on mandolin, fiddle and electric guitar. d Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub d 3:45 & 9 pm

WILL ROSS

ALLSORTS

d Mallard

Bringing a wide variety of sounds to your Tuesday evening, ED:WIN will be playing “AllSorts” of music to get you dancing down at Three Below every Tuesday night. Listen to hip hop, R&B, house, garage and disco! Free. d Three Below d 9 pm-1:30 am

BINGO Channel your inner granny and dominate bingo at the locals’ living room. d Tapley’s Pub d 8 pm

TUESDAY NIGHT FEATURING. DJ DAKOTA Dakota brings his crowd-pleasing hip-hop vibes to Tuesday night. d The Keg d 10 pm-2 am

WED.

09

JAN

Live Music

INDUSTRY NIGHT Live music from Neverland Nights. d Buffalo Bills d 6 pm

JAM NIGHT Jam Night with Kostaman and Friends every Wednesday night from 9 pm. d Black’s Pub & Restaurant d 9 pm

MARC CHARRON d Mallard

10

JAN

Live Music

Blues night with Sean Rose. d Black’s Pub & Restaurant d 8 pm

d Mallard

THU.

Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

RUCKUS DELUXE Ruckus Deluxe features former Cirque Du Soleil lead singer Chad Oliver and Grammy nominated violinist Ian Cameron playing Celtic and classics on mandolin, fiddle and electric guitar. d Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub d 3:45 & 9 pm

Clubs/DJs WILDIN’ OUT WEDNESDAYS Featuring DJ Gainz the fastest up and coming DJ in town. d The Keg d 10 pm-2 am

Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

Clubs/DJs #TBT WITH THE SOUNDS OF STACHE Stache has been on a nomadic musical adventure for almost a decade, travelling to over 50 countries and sharing his passion for music with others. Drawing influences from all four corners of the globe, his appetite, understanding and energetic delivery will guarantee a funky smorgasbord of beats. Free. d Three Below d 9 pm-1 am

COCKTAIL DANCE PARTY Start your weekend early with a handcrafted cocktail. Then hit the dance floor or rock our legendary dancing cage with help from DJ Peacefrog. d Buffalo Bills d 7 pm

SHUT UP AND PARTY Start your weekend off one night early and come get wild with Whistler’s loosest bar staff. With music from Fidel Cashflow & DJ $hearer. Email info@maxxfish.com for VIP and other special perks. d Maxx Fish d 9 pm

THROWBACK THURSDAYS WITH MR. TWITCH Enjoy a musical journey of nostalgia curated by Mr. Twitch. Disco-funk-hip-hop-house and whatever else. Old schoolvibes, remixes, mash-ups and new stuff to keep you on your toes. Free. d Three Below d 9 pm-midnight

THURSDAY LOCALS’ NIGHT Come join our legendary locals’ night every Thursday, kicking off the night with a game of skate at 9 pm followed by DJ Praiz and friends throwing down some dope tracks. Prizes to be given away each week include concert tickets, snowboards, electric sunnies and skateboards! Email info@ garfinkels.ca for guest list and VIP options. d Garfinkel’s d 9 pm-2 am

THURSDAY NIGHT FUNK Featuring DJ Dakota and his one-of-a-kind funkadelic style. d The Keg d 10 pm-2 am


Astrology FREE WILL ASTROLOGY Week of January 3rd By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): No one has resisted the force of gravity with more focus than businessman Roger Babson (1875–1967). He wrote an essay entitled “Gravity—Our Enemy Number One,” and sought to develop anti-gravity technology. His Gravity Research Foundation gave awards to authentic scientists who advanced the understanding of gravity. If that organization still existed and offered prizes, I’m sure that researchers of the Aries persuasion would win them all in 2019. For your tribe, the coming months should feature lots of escapes from heaviness, including soaring flights and playful levity and lofty epiphanies. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The night parrots of Australia are so elusive that there was a nearly six-decade stretch when no human saw a single member of the species. But in 2013, after searching for 15 years, photographer John Young spotted one and recorded a 17-second video. Since then, more sightings have occurred. According to my astrological vision, your life in 2019 will feature experiences akin to the story of the night parrot’s reappearance. A major riddle will be at least partially solved. Hidden beauty will materialize. Long-secret phenomena will no longer be secret. A missing link will re-emerge. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Millions of years ago, Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, Antarctica, and North and South America were smooshed together. Earth had a single land mass, the supercontinent Pangea. Stretching across its breadth was a colossal feature, the Central Pangean Mountains. Eventually, though, Europe and America split apart, making room for the Atlantic Ocean and dividing the Central Pangean range. Today, the Scottish Highlands and the Appalachian Mountains are thousands of kilometres apart, but once upon a time they were joined. In 2019, Gemini, I propose that you look for metaphorical equivalents in your own life. What disparate parts of your world had the same origin? What elements that are now divided used to be together? Re-establish their connection. Get them back in touch with each other. Be a specialist in cultivating unity. CANCER (June 21-July 22): 2019 will be an excellent time to swim in unpolluted rivers, utter sacred oaths near beautiful fountains, and enjoy leisurely saunas that help purify your mind and body. You are also likely to attract cosmic favour if you cry more than usual, seek experiences that enhance your emotional intelligence, and ensure that your head respectfully consults with your heart before making decisions. Here’s another way to get on life’s good side: cultivate duties that consistently encourage you to act out of love and joy rather than out of guilt and obligation. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Here are four key questions I hope you’ll meditate on throughout 2019: 1. What is love? 2. What kind of love do you want to receive? 3. What kind of love do you want to give? 4. How could you transform yourself in order to give and receive more of the love you value most? To spur your efforts, I offer you these thoughts from teacher David R. Hawkins: “Love is misunderstood to be an emotion; actually, it is a state of awareness, a way of being in the world, a way of seeing oneself and others.” VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “Most living things begin in the absence of light,” writes Virgo author Nancy Holder. “The vine is rooted in the earth; the fawn takes form in the womb of the doe.” I’ll remind you that your original gestation also took place in the dark. And I foresee a metaphorically comparable process unfolding for you in 2019. You’ll undergo an incubation period that may feel cloaked and mysterious. That’s just as it should be: the best possible circumstances for the vital new part of your life that will be growing. So be patient. You’ll see the tangible results in 2020. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Many plants that modern Americans regard as weeds were regarded as tasty food by Native Americans. A prime example is the cattail, which grows wild in wetlands. Indigenous

people ate the rootstock, stem, leaves, and flower spike. I propose that we use this scenario to serve as a metaphor for some of your potential opportunities in 2019. Things you’ve regarded as useless or irrelevant or inconvenient could be revealed as assets. Be alert for the possibility of such shifts. Here’s advice from Ralph Waldo Emerson: “What is a weed? A plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered.” SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The slow, gradual, incremental approach will be your magic strategy in 2019. Being persistent and thorough as you take one step at a time will provide you with the power to accomplish wonders. Now and then, you may be tempted to seek dramatic breakthroughs or flashy leaps of faith; and there may indeed be one or two such events mixed in with your steady rhythms. But for the most part, your glory will come through tenacity. Now study this advice from mystic Meister Eckhart: “Wisdom consists in doing the next thing you have to do, doing it with your whole heart, and finding delight in doing it.” SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Sagittarian polymath Piet Hein wrote a poem in which he named the central riddle of his existence. “A bit beyond perception’s reach, / I sometimes believe I see / That life is two locked boxes / Each containing the other’s key.” I propose that we adopt this scenario to symbolize one of the central riddles of your existence. I’ll go further and speculate that in 2019 one of those boxes will open as if through a magical fluke, without a need for the key. This mysterious blessing won’t really be a magical fluke, but rather a stroke of well-deserved and hard-earned luck that is the result of the work you’ve been doing to transform and improve yourself. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): What themes and instruments do people least want to hear in a piece of music? Composer Dave Solder determined that the worst song ever made would contain bagpipes, cowboy music, tubas, advertising jingles, operatic rapping, and children crooning about holidays. Then he collaborated with other musicians to record such a song. I suspect that as you head into 2019, it’ll be helpful to imagine a metaphorically comparable monstrosity: a fantastic mess that sums up all the influences you’d like to avoid. With that as a vivid symbol, you’ll hopefully be inspired to avoid allowing any of it to sneak into your life in the coming months. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In Canada, it’s illegal to pretend to practice witchcraft. It’s fine to actually do witchcraft, however. With that as our inspiration, I advise you to be rigourous about embodying your authentic self in 2019. Make sure you never lapse into merely imitating who you are or who you used to be. Don’t fall into the trap of caring more about your image than about your actual output. Focus on standing up for what you really mean rather than what you imagine people expect from you. The coming months will be a time when you can summon pure and authoritative expressions of your kaleidoscopic soul. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In the 18th century, Benjamin Franklin was a Founding Father who played a key role in getting the United States up and running. He wasn’t happy that the fledgling nation chose the bald eagle as its animal symbol. The supposedly majestic raptor is lazy, he wrote. It doesn’t hunt for its own food, but steals grub obtained by smaller birds of prey. Furthermore, bald eagles are cowardly, Franklin believed. Even sparrows may intimidate them. With that as our theme, Pisces, I invite you to select a proper creature to be your symbolic ally in 2019. Since you will be building a new system and establishing a fresh power base, you shouldn’t pick a critter that’s merely glamourous. Choose one that excites your ambition and animates your willpower. Homework: I’d love to see your top New Year’s resolutions. Share by going to RealAstrology.com and clicking on “Email Rob.”

In addition to this column, Rob Brezsny creates

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PiqueCal YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL EVENTS FOR EVENTS IN BARS, CLUBS AND PUBS, PLEASE SEE PAGE 66 For a complete guide to events in Whistler, visit piquenewsmagazine.com/events

O  NGOING & DAILY ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

PRENATAL CLASSES

This program helps support women and their partners in making informed decisions about their prenatal and birth experience. To sign up, please call Bev Nolan-Newsome, certified childbirth educator, internationally certified lactation consultant and registered doula at 604-894-5389. > Ongoing > Whistler ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WHISTLER MUSEUM

Learn more about Whistler’s culture and history. Now open by donation. > Daily 11am-5pm, Thu until 9pm > Whistler Museum

THURSDAY JAN 3 COMMUNITY 

BNI MOUNTAIN HIGH

BNI provides a positive and structured environment for the development and exchange of quality business referrals. It does so by helping you build personal relationships with dozens of other qualified business professionals. Register by emailing David Livesey at david_livesey@cooperators.ca. $20. > 6:45-8:30 am > The Venue COMMUNITY

WOMEN’S KARMA YOGA

Drop-in for weekly yoga classes led by an all-female team of certified 200-hour yoga instructors. Includes mat use and childminding. All women, all ability levels welcome. This program is made possible by yoga instructors and childminders donating their time. Contact us to join the team. Free. 604-962-8711. > 9:30-10:30 am > Whistler Women’s Centre

THE CULTURAL CONNECTOR: A JOURNEY OF ADVENTURE AND DISCOVERY As you follow the Cultural Connector route, you’ll discover the stories that enrich Whistler’s culture, the venues that celebrate it and the milestones that we’ve achieved along the way. The pathway will lead you through beautiful surroundings and six cultural institutions: Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre, Whistler Museum, Whistler Public Library, Maury Young Arts Centre, Lost Lake PassivHaus, and Audain Art Museum. Free. > Ongoing > Maury Young Arts Centre

COMMUNITY

PARENT INFANT DROP-IN

An opportunity to develop a supportive social network with other parents of young babies. Speakers and a public health nurse are often in attendance. Free. > 11 am-12:30 pm > Whistler Public Library COMMUNITY

ROTARY CLUB OF WHISTLER MILLENNIUM

Join the Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium to learn about what the club is doing to support your local community and international projects. Lunch is available for $20. Everyone welcome. > 12:15 pm > Pan Pacific Mountain Side COMMUNITY 

DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB

The club meets every week and visitors are welcome. For a partner, please call Gill at 604-932-5791. > 1-5 pm > Whistler Racquet Club

WHISTLER TRI CLUB SWIM SQUAD JAN 4 MEADOW PARK SPORTS CENTRE

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

COMMUNITY 

SFU WRITER’S STUDIO WRITING CONSULTS

Need an expert opinion on your writing? The SFU Writer’s Studio offers free one-on-one, 45-minute consultations. Register at least one week prior to the consultation time required. Seven pages of poetry or a prose manuscript must be submitted one week prior to your scheduled appointment. For more information and to register, call the library at 604-935-8435. > 2, 3 & 4 pm > Whistler Public Library ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

FIRST NATIONS WINTER FEAST AND PERFORMANCE PROGRAM

The First Nations Winter Feast & Performance will feature a Northwest Coast-inspired menu, Indigenous World Winery wines and craft beer from local breweries. Performances will take place throughout the dinner service, featuring the SLCC’s Cultural Ambassadors and the Wells family from the Lil’wat Nation. For tickets visit slcc.ca/feast. > 5:45 pm > Squamish Lilwat Cultural Centre ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 

WALK AND TALK SERIES

Docents will provide visitors with an introduction to the Audain Art Museum and its permanent collection. Visitors will be encouraged to explore the galleries afterwards. These drop-in tours are free with the purchase of admission or museum membership. 604-962-0413. > 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

WHISTLER YOUTH BAND

Let the trumpets sing! The Whistler Youth Band is a beginner band for youth ages 10 and up. Grab an instrument and make music with friends. > 6-7:30 pm > Myrtle Philip Community School

SQUAMISH + PEMBERTON COMMUNITY 

COMMUNITY

LUNA PRESENTS THURSDAY NIGHT YOGA

Come shake your shanti in a 90-minute Hatha Flow yoga class. Get in the flow with an emphasis on breathing and movement. 18-to35-year-olds only, free positive vibes for all in attendance! $3 for non-members, free for Luna members. > 5:30-7 pm > Maury Young Arts Centre

WORKBC EMPLOYMENT SERVICES DROP IN

Drop-in to the Pemberton Public Library every Thursday afternoon and learn how WorkBC can assist you in your job search and career planning. All services are free. For details, call 1-877-932-1611. > 1-5 pm > Pemberton Library (Pemberton)

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PiqueCal COMMUNITY 

WHISTLER HOLIDAY EXPERIENCE

MULTI-DAY EVENT

JAN 3-JAN 6

A wide range of fun, indoor activities and entertainment for kids and parents to share in together during the holiday season. Kids and parents can spend hours trying out all the fun. There’s a miniputt course, table games, bouncy castles, crafts, entertainers and video games. It’s free and everyone is welcome. > Whistler Conference Centre 

FRIDAY JAN 4

skateboard mini-ramp (skateboards and helmets to borrow), free Wi-Fi, Xbox One, PS3 & PS4, guitars, board games, a projector and widescreen TVs. Free. 604-935-8187. > 3:30-11 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

SPORTS

WHISTLER TRI CLUB SWIM SQUAD

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Triathlon focused swim squads. Full details at whistlertriclub.com/training-sessions. Free to members for fall (includes entry into Meadow Park). Non-members $8 drop-in (includes entry into Meadow Park). > 6-7:15 am > Meadow Park Sports Centre COMMUNITY

WELCOME CENTRE MULTICULTURAL MEET UP

Come and say, “hi” if you are new to Canada and Whistler! Everyone and every age is welcome. Casual meet up, workshops, information about living in Canada. Check calendar at welcomewhistler.com for full details. Contact info@welcomewhistler.com or 604-698-5960. > 9:30 am-noon > Whistler Public Library

FIRST FRIDAY @ THE AUDAIN

Head to the Audain Art Museum on the first Friday of each month for an evening of casual, lively and informative programs that will provide opportunities for discussion, engagement and hands-on activities relating to both the Audain’s permanent collection and its changing exhibitions. A tour will take place at 5:30 pm. > first Friday of every month, 5-7 pm > Audain Art Museum

SATURDAY JAN 5 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 

MADE IN WHISTLER MARKET

Local artists and artisans sell their goods at the Made in Whistler Market. Free admission. > 12-6 pm > Westin Resort & Spa

COMMUNITY 

a warm beverage while the kids participate in a variety of outdoor, winter activities and entertainment each week. > 3-6 pm > Whistler Olympic Plaza

WHISTLER YOUTH CENTRE DROP-IN

See Friday’s listing for more info. > 6-10 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

SUNDAY JAN 6 COMMUNITY 

LEARN TO MEDITATE WITH SUSAN REIFER

In this two-hour session, you’ll learn practical foundations of meditation and mindfulness. Registration opens on Jan. 2 at 12:01 a.m. Email publicservices@whistlerlibrary.ca or call 604-935-8435 to claim a spot. > 2-4 pm > Whistler Public Library

Books, songs and rhymes for preschoolaged children, accompanied by a caregiver. Registration is not required. > 10:30-11 am > Whistler Public Library

COMMUNITY

FAMILY TOGETHER TIME

A parent-directed hour with board games, crafts and a story corner with felt puppets. A drop-in program for families of all ages. Free. > 3:30-4:30 pm > Whistler Public Library

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 

WALK AND TALK SERIES

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 3 & 7 pm > Audain Art Museum COMMUNITY 

WHISTLER YOUTH CENTRE DROP-IN

ART TALKS

Every month, the Whistler Contemporary Gallery will be featuring an artist from their diverse collection of contemporary artists. The gallery invites the public to come and explore the artistic process offering a fascinating insight from conception to completion. > 4 pm > Whistler Contemporary Gallery

For ages 13 to 18. We offer ping pong, a

IMMIGRANT SETTLEMENT SERVICES

Information and support to help immigrants and newcomers living and working in Whistler as they adjust to life in Canada. For more information or an appointment, call 604698-5960 or email info@welcomewhistler. com www.welcomewhistler.com FB: WhistlerWelcomeCentre. > 3-6 pm > Whistler Public Library COMMUNITY 

WORKBC EMPLOYMENT SERVICES DROP IN

Get your resume reviewed, learn about the local labour market, job search tips, and more. All services are free. For details, call 1-877-932-1611 or go to WhistlerESC.com. > 3-6 pm > Whistler Public Library

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 

WALK AND TALK SERIES

See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 3 pm > Audain Art Museum

COMMUNITY COMMUNITY 

FIRST NATIONS WINTER FEAST AND PERFORMANCE PROGRAM See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 5:45 pm > Squamish Lilwat Cultural Centre

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 

PRESCHOOL STORY TIME

COMMUNITY 

MONDAY JAN 7

GAMES NIGHT

Visit the Whistler Public Library for a free evening of board games, popcorn and Oreo cookies. Play strategy games such as Ticket To Ride, Settlers of Catan and Carcassonne or traditional favourites like Monopoly, Scrabble and Clue. Sponsored by The Friends of the Library. > 7-9 pm > Whistler Public Library

SQUAMISH + PEMBERTON

SPORTS

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WHISTLER TRI CLUB SWIM SQUAD

ACOUSTIC COFFEE HOUSE

The Acoustic Coffee House is back! Come join in with this afternoon of music. > 4-6 pm > Grimms Deli (Pemberton)

See Friday’s listing for more info. > 6-7:15 am > Meadow Park Sports Centre COMMUNITY 

FAMILY APRÈS

in your pants

Whistler knows how to après and now the whole family can celebrate a great day on the slopes with even more fun at Olympic Plaza. Parents can share stories about their day with

Pique Newsmagazine’s mobile site is your guide to everything in Whistler. Search over 167 restaurant listings, events, activities and more.

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Recycle? Yes or no?

Get the BC RECYCLEPEDIA App Find the Beaver and win a Steep Skiing or Snowboarding Clinic with Extremely Canadian. Discover both the best of Whistler Blackcomb’s insane steeps and the best of your skills, redefine your boundaries with Extremely Canadian!

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in REBATES when you upgrade to a heat pump for heating AND cooling your home.

FAMILY APRÈS

JAN 9 WHISTLER OLYMPIC PLAZA

TUESDAY JAN 8 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

RHYME & SONG

This program gives toddlers, parents and caregivers the opportunity to learn songs, rhymes and finger plays together. For more information, please come to the library, call 604-935-8436 or email youthservice@ whistlerlibary.ca. Free. > 10:30-11 am > Whistler Public Library COMMUNITY 

For more info visit: whistler.ca/rebate

THE MOUNTAIN VILLAGE SOCIAL GATHERING AND MEETING

What if housing wasn’t just a place to live, but rather, a way of life? The Coastal Village is connecting people who want to live in community with others who have similar values for the betterment of our health, happiness and well-being. Research shows that both men and women thrive in community. Free. 778-840-1529. > 5:30-8:30 pm > The Mountain Village COMMUNITY 

WE RUN WHISTLER: WEEKLY GROUP RUN

Group trail run for intermediate runners and above. Two distance options: approximately 5 km and 10 km. Check our Facebook page, facebook.com/groups/werunwhistler for weekly updates regarding location and to confirm run is on. #werunwhistler rain or shine! Free. > 5:55 pm > Lululemon

Resort Municipality of Whistler

Sister City YOUTH* Exchange Program in Karuizawa, Japan

Information Meeting about this year’s program: Monday, January 14th, 7pm Whistler Public Library *Available to youth residing in Whistler, currently in Grades 8 & 9

Information contact: snicoll-russell@whistler.ca

Resort Municipality of Whistler whistler.ca 72 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

COMMUNITY 

WHISTLER SINGERS

Whistler’s community choir - no auditions & everyone welcome. 604-932-2979. > 7-9 pm > Myrtle Philip Community Centre ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

FILM SCREENING: CRAZY RICH ASIANS

On the second Tuesday of each month, the library screens a hit movie, straight from Hollywood or fresh off the film festival circuit! Admission is free. No registration is required. > 7 pm > Whistler Public Library

WEDNESDAY JAN 9

Photo: TOURISM WHISTLER / MIKE CRANE

PiqueCal

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 

BOOK & CRAFT CLUB

Drop-in for this casual session, where preschool-aged children will enjoy a short story and then use different media to create a fun craft. A great opportunity for parents to connect with other parents of young children! > 10:30-11:30 am > Whistler Public Library ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES

See Thursday’s listing for more info. > 1 pm > Audain Art Museum COMMUNITY 

FAMILY APRÈS

See Monday’s listing for more info. > 3-6 pm > Whistler Olympic Plaza COMMUNITY 

INTERACT CLUB OF WHISTLER

Interact is a club for young people ages 12 to 18 who want to make a difference in their community, mentored by the Rotary Club of Whistler and Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium. The club includes students from Whistler Secondary School, Waldorf, Spring Creek and Myrtle Philip who want to join together to tackle the issues in their community they care most about. > 4-5 pm > Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre COMMUNITY 

MOUNTAIN SPIRIT WHISTLER TOASTMASTERS

Build communication, public speaking, and leadership skills with Mountain Spirit Whistler Toastmasters. Everyone welcome. > 5:30-7 pm > Pan Pacific Mountain Side COMMUNITY 

QUEST LECTURE: MUSIC & MOUNTAIN BIKING

Join Arts and Humanities tutor Jeff Warren for our January Quest Lecture: Music and Mountain Biking. > 7-8:30 pm > Whistler Public Library COMMUNITY

EVENING MEDITATION

Join us in the Fireplace Lounge to shake off the day with guided breathing and meditation practices. Registration opens on Jan. 2. Email publicservices@whistlerlibrary.ca to claim a spot! > 7-7:45 pm > Whistler Public Library


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Wiebe Construction Services Come and visit Whistler’s funkiest thrift store and get (almost) everything you need for your EPIC season! Winter clothes, skis, boards, boots, bindings, goggles, toques and more! As well as all the usual stuff to make that rented closet feel like a palace. You may even find some hidden treasure you never knew needed. Shopping and Donation hours: 11am - 6pm, 7 days a week 8000 Nesters Road 604-932-1121

Re-Build-It Centre Furniture, appliances, kitchen cabinets, doors, plumbing, tools, flooring, hardware, lumber, lighting and more!

Open 10am-5pm, 7 days a week 1003 Lynham Road, Function Junction 604-932-1125 Recycle, Re-build and Re-invest in your community. All proceeds support 28 programs and services such as the food bank, outreach services, and counseling assistance offered by Whistler Community Services. www.mywcss.org Like us on Facebook @ Whistler Community Service Society

Serving Whistler for over 25 years

• Kitchen and Bath • Renovations & Repairs • Drywall • Painting • Finishing • Minor Electrical & Plumbing

Ray Wiebe 604.935.2432 Pat Wiebe 604.902.9300 raymondo99.69@gmail.com

HOME SERVICES CONTRACTING/SURVEYING

Housekeeping - daily, weekly monthly Move in/out & Construction Cleaning IICRC Professional carpet cleaning Caretaker Services FRIEND US ON:

CALL SARA

604.848.8987 sara@goldmedalcleaning.ca goldmedalcleaning.ca

WHISTLER’S #1 NEWS SOURCE

MOVING AND STORAGE

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STORAGE STORAGE SPACE AVAILABLE

BEST PRICES IN WHISTLER FURNITURE, CARS, BOATS & MOTORCYCLES ETC STORAGE AVAILABLE

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+ 12 - 10’x8’ Containers now available

Open Monday through Friday 8:30 - 4:30 Saturday 10:00 -4:00 Sundays and Evenings by appointment only. piquenewsmagazine.com/events

VACATION RENTAL CLEANING & PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

8080 NESTERS

big or small we do it all! Call 604-902-MOVE www.alltimemoving.ca

+ Pre-wired 20-Amp Service With Overhead Light, Duplex Plug and Heater on Shelf

RESTORATION USE A WALSH CUBE TRUCK FOR FREE TO MOVE YOUR POSSESSIONS TO WALSH STORAGE

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CONTACT

604.966.8080 8080Nesters@telus.net www.nestersstorage.ca

3-1365 Alpha Lake Road Whistler, B.C, V0N1B1

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Phone 604-938-1126 email shawcarpet@shaw.ca

STORAGE

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604 698 0054

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electronic monitoring

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Outdoor storage for RV’s, Boats, Campers, Vehicles etc $2 per LFT.

• Full service cleaning

Call 604.935.9370 or email gphare@shaw.ca

• Residential & Commercial • Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning • Property Maintenance & Management We use tea tree oil based cleaning products. Insured & Bondable Criminal background checks on all staff

604-966-1437

CoastMountainCleaning@Gmail.com

74 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

WHISTLER’S

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PICK UP YOUR COPY TODAY!

Winter 2019 Issue on select stands and in Whistler hotel rooms


there's no better way to buy and sell than Pique's online marketplace.

HEALTH & WELLBEING

Services

HEALTH & WELLBEING

Services

Community

NOTICES

EDUCATION

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

SALON & SPA

PHYSICAL THERAPY

GENERAL NOTICES

FIRST AID AND SURVIVAL

CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS

BLUE HIGHWAYS MASSAGE & SPA

Sally John Physiotherapy ONE-ON-ONE PHYSICAL-THERAPY

REGISTERED PHYSIOTHERAPIST massage clinic & spa

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE Serving Whistler for 25 years in: Deep Tissue Massage, Relaxation, Thai & Shiatsu, Therapeutic Massage, Reflexology, Aromatherapy & Hot Stone Massage Registered Therapists available on request

Registered Massage, Registered Counselling & Registered Chiropractic RMT specials on request

604-938-0777

IN HOME PHYSIOTHERAPY AVAILABLE

CUSTOM-MADE ORTHOTICS at competitive prices for ski boots & shoes, including training shoes. 17 years of making orthotics

‘Sally John Physiotherapy’ 2997 Alpine Cresent (Alta Vista)

(604) 698-6661

www.sallyjohnphysiotherapy.com

COUNSELLING

Tuesdays at 7:15 a.m. BG Urban Grill: 604-905-5090 & Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. at the Pan Pacific, Mountainside. www.whistler-rotary.org Pemberton Rotary Club at the Pemberton Community Centre, Wednesdays at 7:15am www.pembertonrotary.ca

U.S.

Exchange Rate

31% as recommended by:

#206 - 4368 MAIN ST. 2ND FLOOR, MARKET PAVILION

SPORTS & ACTIVITIES

ask about our RMT locals rate

@TheSpaAtNitaLakeLodge

2131 Lake Placid Road

located at Nita Lake Lodge above Loka Yoga free parking and village shuttle

604 966 5715 www.nitalakelodge.com/spa

Resolve to be a better Skate Skier with us!

www.whistlerwag.com

Skate Skiing

PERSONAL MESSAGES

Introductory and Intermediate Skills Wednesdays 6-7:30pm

4 weeks = $131.25 Jan 9-30 and/or Feb 6-27 Ski equipment and Day Ticket not included www.whistler.ca/recreation 604-935-PLAY (7529)

www.whistlerwag.com

MASSAGE

Luxury Mobile Massage Private & Group Bookings

 THINGS. 604-388-4042  TO DO. www.deepflowhealing.co

Dont forget to scoop the poop! It’s not fun to step in, or to see around town. Help keep Whistler clean and pick up after your dog.

available monday-thursdays, january 1st - 31st. not valid with any other package or discount. certain conditions apply.

locals discount available for all regular-priced spa treatments. ask our team for further details.

Avalanche Skills Training Courses - Level 1+ & Level 2 Glacier Travel / Crevasse Rescue Courses Guided Backcountry Adventures (WB Passholder discounts available)

Sea to Sky Healing Room - For Blessing/Prayer/Encouragement In the Community Church building, 7422 Dogwood Street, Pemberton. Every 1st and 3rd Wednesday: 4-6 PM

MEETING PLACE Welcome Centre at Whistler Public Library Information, support, community connections and ESL practice groups for newcomers and immigrants. Meet people, make connections, volunteer, build your communication skills in English. Multicultural Meet Up every Friday 9.30-12pm.604-6985960 info@welcomewhistler.com FB: WhistlerWelcomeCentre

604-938-9656

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

VOLUNTEERS Big Brothers, Big Sisters Sea to Sky Volunteer to Mentor- just 1hr/week - and make a difference in a child's life. Call 604-892-3125.

Whistler Health Care Foundation raises funds for improving health care resources and services. New board members welcomed. Contact us at info@ whistlerhealthcarefoundation.org or call Karen at 604-906-1435.

SPORTS & RECREATION Alpine Club of Canada Whistler Section- Outdoor club focused on ski/split board touring, hiking, mountaineering and skills training. More info: accwhistler.ca Trip Schedule: accwhistler.ca/trips/

Arts Whistler - Full arts & culture listings. Comprehensive artist directory & programs, events & performances yearround. For info 604-935-8410 or visit www.artswhistler.com

Griffin Squadron Squamish Air Cadets- Open to youth 12-18yrs at Don Ross Secondary School on Tues at 6:30pm.

Pemberton Arts Council - Connect with other artists, writers, artisans, musicians & help make Pemberton a vibrant arts community. Call 604-452-0123 or visit www.pembertonartscouncil.com

Pemberton Valley Snowmobile Club Meets first Thurs of each month Dec - April, 7pm at the Pemberton Comm. Centre. BCSF/Rutherford trail passes & liability insurance available for purchase. Contact 604-894-1155 for info.

Pemberton Writers - Meet with other writers to review and critique monthly. Opportunities for writing in a comfortable and creative setting. Email crowley7@ telus.net

Pemberton Valley Trails AssociationMeets the second Wed of each month. 7pm at the Pemberton Recreation Centre. Call 604-698-6158

Sea to Sky Singers - Invites new & former members to join us for an exciting new term, the spring & fall terms culminate with a concert. Choir meets Tues, 7-9pm at Squamish Academy of Music, 2nd Ave. Veronica seatoskysingers@gmail.com or 604-892-7819 www.seatoskysingers.net Whistler Community Band - Rehearsals on Tuesdays 7 - 8:15 pm CONTACT whistlerchorus@gmail.com FOR LOCATION Whistler Singers - Resumes September 11th, 2018 for the fall/winter sea-son. Rehearsals are Tuesdays from 7 to 9pm at Myrtle Philip School in the Toad Hall room. Everyone is welcome! Inquiries can be sent to whistlersingers@gmail.com For more info, visit: https://www.facebook.com/whistlersingers/

WHISTLER COMMUNITY LISTINGS Made in Whistler Market- Saturday's from 12-6p.m. on December 15th, 22nd, 23rd, 29th & 30th. Then every Saturday, January 2019 through March 2019. Free Admission at The Westin Resort & Spa in Whistler.

Stewardship Pemberton Society and the One Mile Lake Nature CentreConnecting community, nature and people through education, cooperation, and community involvement. www. stewardshippemberton.com

extremelycanadian.com

ARTS & CULTURE

Spiritual Bliss experience the healing powers of the ila™ kundalini massage save $25 this january

Sea to Sky Community Services running dozens of programs in Whistler to help people through times of crisis and with everyday challenges. www.sscs.ca 1-877-892-2022 admin@sscs.ca

ROTARY CLUBS OF WHISTLER & PEMBERTON

Sea to Sky RC Flyers - Model Aeronautics Association of Canada Club active in the Sea to Sky Region flying model airplanes, helicopters and multirotors. Contact S2SRCFLY@telus.net Whistler Adaptive Sports Program Provides sports & recreation experiences for people with disabilities. Chelsey Walker at 604-905-4493 or info@ whistleradaptive.com Whistler Martial Arts offers - Kishindo Karate for kids age 4 and up, Capoeira and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu for kids and adults. Also Kickboxing, Judo, Yoga and Bellyfit for adults. Call Cole 932-2226 Women's Karma Yoga - Thursdays, 9:30-10:30, ongoing by donation and childminding provided. Whistler Women's Centre: 1519 Spring Creek Drive. Dropin for weekly yoga classes led by an all female team of certified yoga instructors. All women, all ability levels welcome. hswc.ca | 604-962-8711

CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS Donate Used Clothing & Household Goods- To be distributed to local charities by Sharon 604-894-6656 for pick up. Playground Builders: Creating Play Building Hope - Playground Builders is a registered charity that builds playgrounds for children in war-torn areas. Learn more, volunteer or donate at www. playgroundbuilders.org

YOUTH ACTIVITIES 1st Whistler Scout Group - outdoor & adventure program for girls and boys aged 5-17. Times and locations vary. More info: http://1stwhistlerscoutgroup. webs.com. Contact scoutsatwhistler @gmail.com or 604-966-4050.

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 3, 2019 | 75


book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday:

classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

DOUG BUSH SURVEY SERVICES LTD. is looking for a

SURVEY FIELD TECHNICIAN With a two or three year college or technical school program in geomatics. Three years experience and proficient in the use of robotic survey instruments and GPS equipment for engineering and building construction layout, topographic site surveys, site improvement surveys and precise monitoring. Experience with AutoCAD Civil 3D also an asset to assist in office with computations and drawing preparation. Please call Ian @ 604-932-3314 or email @ ian@dbss.ca #18-1370 Alpha Lake Rd. Whistler BC V0N 1B1

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COMMUNITY LISTINGS YOUTH ACTIVITIES Whistler Children's Chorus Rehearsal - Tuesdays at MILLENNIUM PLACE (4 5:30 pm) contact whistlerchorus@gmail. com Whistler/Pemberton Girl Guides Adventures for Girls age 5 & up. Sparks & Brownies (Gr K,1,2,3) Guides (Gr 4,5,6) Volunteers always welcome. coastmountaingirlguides@gmail.com Whistler Youth Centre - Drop - in: Fridays 3:30 - 11 PM & Saturdays 6 - 10 PM for ages 13 - 18. Located downstairs in the Maury Young Arts Centre (formerly Millenium Place). We offer: a Ping pong table, Pool table, Skateboard mini ramp w. skateboards and helmets to borrow, Free Wi-Fi, Xbox One, PS3 & PS4, Guitars, Board games, Projector and widescreen TV's. Facebook THEYC Crew, www.whistleryouthcentre.com or call 604-935-8187.

LEISURE GROUPS Duplicate Bridge ClubWhistler Racquet Club reconvenes in late fall. The club meets every week and visitors are welcome. For partner, please call Gill at 640-932-5791. Knitty Gritty Knit Night- Held every Tues 6-8pm. Free evening open to everyone with a love for knitting/crocheting. Beginners welcome. For location and further details email knittygrittywhistler@ gmail.com or find us on facebook. Mountain Spirit Toastmasters- Builds communication, public speaking, and leadership skills . Wednesdays at the Pan Pacific Mountainside - Singing Pass Room, 5:30-7pm. Email contact - 8376@ toastmastersclubs.org www.whistler. toastmastersclubs.org

GARIBALDI GRAPHICS

Kaze Sushi is looking for Experienced Sushi Chef

FUNCTION JUNCTION

PART TIME SALES ASSOCIATE Applicants must be friendly, professional and enjoy multi-tasking. Duties include customer service and performing a variety of print jobs. Flexible days and monthly bus pass provided if needed.

Please apply in person to 1200 Alpha Lake Road in Function

Please apply in person with resume at the Whistler restaurant from 5:30pm onwards Call or email Tom on 604-938-4565 or tokyotom111@hotmail.com

Pemberton Women's Institute - Meets the third Mon of each month in the activity room at St. David's United Church at 7:30pm. New members welcome. Linda Ronayne at 604-894-6580 Rotary Club of Whistler - Meets Tuesdays at 7:15 a.m at BG Bread Garden Urban Grill 604-905-5090 Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium - Meets every Thurs at 12:15pm at Pan Pacific Mountainside. 604-932-7782

Junction or email resume to whistler@garibaldigraphics.com Shades of Grey Painters Meets twice a week Tuesdays, Watercolour, 11.00am-2.30pm @ The Rec, Pemberton. Thursdays, Acrylic, 1.00pm-3.30pm @ The Amenities Building, Pioneer Village, Pemberton. We are like-minded people that get together & paint. Gretchen is the painting coach. $5 to attend.

Become part of a dynamic team and surround yourself with art. The Audain Art Museum is currently seeking:

Security Supervisor Guard Visitor Services Part time positions available For complete job descriptions please visit: audainartmuseum.com

To apply, please email your resume to info@audainartmuseum.com Photo: Tourism Whistler/ Justa Jeskova

76 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

We are hiring journeymen & apprentices for the following trades:

Plumbers, Gas Fitters, HVAC, Refrigeration, Skilled General Labour

Full time position available

We are a seven-day-a-week service and repair company working from North Vancouver to Pemberton. We provide flexible steady employment, good wages, benefit package, service vehicle, cell phone and more. The successful candidate will be a professional tradesman both in appearance, skill and attitude that is able to work independently and as part of a team. Send resume in confidence to:

spearhead.plumbing@gmail.com www.spearheadplumbing.com

Whistler Reads - Meets to discuss a new book every eight weeks. Go to bookbuffet.com & click on Whistler Reads for the latest book/event. Paula at 604907-2804 or wr@bookbuffet.com

COMMUNITY CENTRES Maury Young Arts Centre - Whistler's community centre for arts, culture & inspiration. Performance theatre, art gallery, daycare, youth centre, meditation room, meeting facilities. www.artswhistler. com or 604-935-8410


there's no better way to buy and sell than Pique's online marketplace.

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

COMMUNITY CENTRES

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Pemberton & District Community Centre - Located at 7390 Cottonwood St. Fitness Centre, facility rentals, spray park, playground, children, youth, adult & seniors programs. For more info 604894-2340 or pemrecinfo@slrd.bc.ca Whistler Blackcomb Foundation Social Services Centre - 1519 Spring Creek Dr. Features programs & services from WCSS, The Howe Sound Women's Centre, Sea to Sky Community Services & Zero Ceiling. Open Mon-Fri.

Requires

Front Desk Staff

MUSEUMS Squamish Lil'wat Cultural Centre Explore First Nations Art Galleries, and Interactive Exhibits. Gift Shop & Cafe are in our admission free area. Open Tuesday's-Sunday's per week. 10am5p.m..

Full Time and Part Time Positions Available We are looking for Candidates with: 1. A Strong Work Ethic 2. Dependability 3. Self-Motivation 4. Effective Communication Skills 5. Attention to Detail

Whistler Museum & Archives Society Explore interactive exhibits, listen to local stories & discover Whistler's journey. Open daily 11am-5pm, 4333 Main St. www.whistlermuseum.org or 604-9322019

Please send resumes to info@whistler-canada.com PROFESSIONAL NETWORKING BNI Mountain High- Meets at 6:458:30am every Thursday at The Venue. BNI provides a positive and structured environment for the development and exchange of quality business referrals. It does so by helping you build personal relationships with dozens of other qualified business professionals. Register by emailing blair@blairkaplan.ca. Whistler Chamber of Commerce - Is the leading business association in Whistler that works to create a vibrant & successful economy. Learn more about the programs & services at www. whistlerchamber.com

9. You must not use lifts or terrain if your ability is impaired through the use of alcohol or drugs.

Women of Whistler - Group that provides opportunities for Whistler businesswomen to network, gain knowledge & share ideas in a friendly, relaxed environment. Learn more at www.womenofwhistler.com

FOR SENIORS Mature Action Community [MAC]Is the voice of Whistler's 55-Plus community. MAC identifies, and advocates for seniors programs and services to improve the quality of life for those wishing to age in-place; MAC also provides opportunities for social interaction. Visit www.whistlermac.org or e-mail info@whistlermac.org Pemberton Men's Shed - Weekly social meetings WED. 11-2 in the Seniors/ youth Rec. bldg. beside library. Social meeting with BYO Bag lunch, card games and pool/snooker. Help out in YOUR community, operating the Pemberton Tool Library. Senior Citizen Organizations - Is an advocacy group devoted to improving the quality of life for all seniors. Ernie Bayer 604-576-9734 or ecbayer2@gmail.com

ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY Earthsave Whistler - Providing info & support to people who are interested in making healthier, greener, more peaceful food choices. earthsavewhistler.com

Sundial Boutique Hotel at 4340 Sundial Crescent, Whistler BC V0N 1B4 is currently hiring for a

Housekeeping Supervisor This position is FT year around. Wage is $21.75/hr + benefits. Job duties include: Supervising dept duties, inspection of work, administration, assist with recruiting, perform training and cleaning duties. Skill requirements: 1 year’s prior experience as a housekeeping supervisor”, tourism, administration and customer service. Please fax or email your resume with attention to “Human Resources Department” to:

604-932-7152 hr@sundialhotel.com

WEST ELECTRIC IS HIRING:

Office Administration / Bookkeeper Full time & year round role with some flexibility Key duties: Bookkeeping with Quickbooks Online All data entry • Manage Accounts payable Payroll • General administration duties Some experience in similar role is preferred, additional training will be provided. To apply please email your resume to jeff@westelectric.ca www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 3, 2019 | 77


book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday:

classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

COMMUNITY LISTINGS ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY Creating Community and CohousingJoin us on our journey to creating REAL community through the cohousing model of building a neighbourhood community. Cohousing is NOT a commune, NOT a cooperative. Put your toe in the water and find out more by coming to one of our weekly meetings or regular social gatherings. For more information, visit our website at http://thecoastalvillage.ca/ or call Janey Harper 778-840-1529. Healthy Home, Healthy Planet - Expert in green cleaning offers tricks, info & advice on the best way to green clean your home or work space! Call France 604-698-7479. Free private presentation on request. www.healthylivingwhistler. com Regional Recycling - Recycle beverage containers (full deposit paid) electronics, appliances, batteries, Lightbulbs, drop-off times are 9am-5pm on Nesters Rd. Pick up service 604-932-3733 The Association of Whistler Area Residents for the Environment (AWARE) - Whistler's Natural Voice since 1989. Regular events, project and volunteer opportunities. www.awarewhistler.org info@awarewhistler.org

FAMILY RESOURCES Baby/Child Health Clinics - Free routine immunizations & newly licensed vaccines for purchase, growth & development assessments & plenty of age appropriate resources avail. By appointment 604-932-3202 Families Fighting Cancer In The Sea To Sky - We are a non profit partner with Sea to Sky Community Services. We provide financial and practical support to children and parents with dependants diagnosed with cancer. Please contact us on our confidential email: ffcseatosky@gmail. com, visit our Facebook Page or website www.familiesfightingcancer.ca Pemberton Parent Infant Drop-In Facilitated by Capri Mohammed, Public Health Nurse. Every Mon 11am-12:30pm at Pemberton Public Library. Pemberton Strong Start Family DropIn- A play group for you and your under-5 child. Signal Hill Elementary, Mon, Tues, Wed & Fri, 9am-12pm. Thurs only 12pm3pm. Call 604-894-6101 / 604-966- 8857

WHISTLERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RE-IMAGINED ITALIAN RESTAURANT

Basalt Wine + Salumeria are currently looking to fill the roles of: Il Caminetto is the newest Whistler restaurant to join the Toptable Group famiglia! The storied restaurant offers a modern taste of Italy to bring a fresh, contemporary style of dining to the mountain.

FRONT-OF-HOUSE:

BACK-OF-HOUSE:

Host or Hostess

Line Cooks

Food Expeditor

(2-3 years related experience)

Server Assistant We offer year round full and part-time hours, competitive wages, gratuities, extended medical & dental, accommodations, potential for future growth within the company and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants. Please email your resume & cover letter to:

careers@ilcaminetto.ca

78 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

HOSTS EXPEDITERS LUNCH SERVERS Please send your cover letter and resume to skeenan-naf@crystal-lodge.com Wages are very competitive (based on experience), great perks and benefits. Come join the best team in Whistler!

Whistler Public Library - Open MonThurs 10am-7pm, Fri 10am-6pm, Sat & Sun 11am-5pm. Music & Words, Mon 10am. Rhyme & Song, Tues 11am. Parent & Infant drop-in, Thurs 11am. Preschool Story Time, Fri 10am. Singing with the babies, Sat 11am. Call 604-9358433

SOCIAL SERVICES Counselling Assistance Available WCSS subsidizes access to a private counselor for $35-$50/hr depending on financial need. Contact an outreach team member at 604-932-0113 www.mywcss. org ESL Volunteer Tutor Program - Volunteer one-to-one tutoring for new immigrants & Canadian citizens. For more information or to register, contact the Whistler Welcome Centre info@welcomewhistler.com or call 604.698.5960


there's no better way to buy and sell than Pique's online marketplace.

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

SOCIAL SERVICES

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Food Bank, Pemberton - Run by Sea to Sky Community Service. Open every second Monday. 604 894 6101 Healthy Pregnancy Outreach ProgramLearn how to prepare healthy affordable meals at this outreach program. Sea to Sky Community Services 604-894-6101 North Shore Schizophrenia Society Services for family, friends & community. Mental illness info, support & advocacy. Call Chris Dickenson at 604-966-7334

LOVE YOUR JOB AND YOUR LIFE WINTER SURVEYORS

ResortQuest Whistler is currently hiring: Breakfast Attendants - Part time/Full Time

PART TIME CONTRACT Pearl's Safe Home - Temporary shelter for women & children experiencing abuse in relationships. Locations in Whistler & Pemberton avail 24/7. All services are free. 1-877-890-5711 or 604-892-5711 RMOW Rec Credit - If you are financially restricted, you may be eligible for a $127.60 municipal recreation credit. Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113 www. mywcss.org Support Counselling - For women regarding abuse & relationship issues. No charge. Call 604-894-6101 Victim Services - Assists victims, witnesses, family members or friends directly affected by any criminal act or traumatic event. Call 604-905-1969

Room Attendants

Surveyors play a key role in gathering information about the guest experience in Whistler through conducting face-to-face intercept surveys (on iPad) with guests in a non-biased manner over the winter season.

Group Sales Coordinator Maintenance Tech Strata $18.75 - 8AM to 4:30PM

POSITION DETAILS • Contract through to late April 2019 • Compensation includes competitive wage and seasons pass • Part time position working three, six hour shifts per week • Shifts are usually the same time each week, between 9am and 6pm The ideal candidate has excellent interpersonal skills with particular emphasis on customer service and is someone who is comfortable approaching people. Surveyors do need to work independently with limited supervision and have a solid understanding of Whistler and the surrounding areas. To apply please send your cover letter and resume to Brandon Smith: bsmith@tourismwhistler.com

Houseman part-time NIght Audit - $20 per hour Benefits include - activity allowance, extended medical, RRSP match, opportunities for growth and more. To apply for this opportunity, please specify the position and email your resume and cover letter to: beth.fraser@resortquestwhistler.com We thank all applicants for their interest but only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

Whistler Food Bank - Located in the Whistler Blackcomb Foundation Social Services Centre, 1519 Spring Creek Dr. Every Mon 10am-12pm. For emergencies call 604-935-7717 www.mywcss.org foodbank@mywcss.org Whistler for the Disabled - Provides info for people with disabilities on what to do & where to go. Visit www. whistlerforthedisabled.com Whistler Housing Authority - Long-term rental & ownership housing for Whistler residents. Visit www.whistlerhousing.ca Whistler Mental Health & Addiction Services - If you or someone you know needs help with a mental health issue or substance misuse or addiction problem, we can assist. Mon-Fri 9am-5pm. 604698-6455 Whistler Multicultural Network Settlement information, social support and programs for newcomers and immigrants living/working in Whistler. 604-388-5511 www.whistlermulticulturalnetwork.com Whistler Opt Healthy Sexuality Clinic - Professional sexual health services at a reduced cost. Free HIV testing. Clinics at Whistler Health Care Ctr, 2nd floor on Tues 4:30-7:30pm. Winter hours Thurs. 5:00pm-7:00pm. Confidentiality assured. Whistler WorkBC Employment Services Centre - Provides free onestop employment services to job seekers and employers. Drop in services at the Pemberton Library Thursdays 1-5 PM, and at the Whistler Public Library on Mondays from 3-6 PM. For more information visit www.WhistlerESC.com or call us at 604-932-1600

We are looking for full & part-time sales people Canstar Restorations helps people by restoring buildings and possessions that have been damaged by fire or water. We are seeking cleaning and repair technicians. No experience necessary- we provide training! • Competitive salary • RRSP matching, health and dental, 4% vacation, sick days • Work in a variety of homes and businesses along the Sea-to-Sky • Amazing team and incredible culture • Opportunities for advancement and over-time

What we want: Outgoing, self-motivated, mature and responsible individuals who love to sell and help to create a positive store environment.

What you get: competitive wages and team orientated sales bonus as well as a ski pass for full-time employees. Apply in person at Ruby Tuesday located in the Town Plaza

604-905-6290

Email resume to careers@canstarrestorations.com

WE ARE LOOKING TO HIRE:

BUSSERS HOSTS PREP COOK

New Opportunities at the District of Squamish

(day shifts only, prep experience required)

Full-time and year round. We feature evening work only, staff meals, competitive wages and a great work environment. So if you’re looking for a change or some extra hours, come by and see us. Flexible schedules are available. REPLY IN PERSON WITH RESUME BETWEEN 3-5 AT QUATTRO 4319 Main St. in the Pinnacle Hote

.

Human Resources Manager . Truck Driver – Class 3 (Winter Night Shift) . Bylaw Noticing/Adjudication Clerk .

Financial Services Specialist

Visit squamish.ca/careers to find out more! www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 3, 2019 | 79


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classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

SOCIAL SERVICES

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS Photo Credit: Tourism Whistler / Justa Jeskova

We are currently interviewing:

Project Managers Site Supervisors Carpenters Carpenters Helpers Labourers Level 2 First Aid Attendant Please submit resume to: info@evrfinehomes

Whistler’s Premier Estate Builder

WHAT’S ON YOUR CAREER HORIZON CONSIDER SOMETHING NEW IN 2019 AND APPLY FOR A POSITION WITH TOURISM WHISTLER. We are recruiting for the following positions over the holiday period: FULL TIME, YEAR ROUND POSITIONS • Associate, Conference Sales Events • Maintenance Technician / Cleaner • Visitor Centre Agent (part time considered)

CONTRACT POSITIONS • Content Editor (full time, nine months) • Human Resources Contract (part time, six months)

Whistler Women's Centre - Provides confidential support, resources, referrals and advocacy for women living in the Sea to Sky corridor. All services are free of charge and include access to emergency safe housing, child/youth counselling, play space and computer access. DropIn Centre open Mon 12-230, Tue-Thu 12-5. 1519 Spring Creek Drive. You can also access our services at the Whistler Public Library on Mondays from 3-6 p.m. www.hswc.ca or call (604)962-8711. 24 HR Crisis Line: 1-877-890-5711

SUPPORT GROUPS Concussion Support Group - Monthly group for people who've had postconcussion syndrome for at least six months. First Thursday of the month, 11-12:30 at Whistler Health Care Centre. Run by Sea to Sky Community Services. 1 877 892 2022, ext 404, concussiongroup@sscs.ca Epilepsy Support GroupFor individuals & families seeking guidance or support. Contact eswhistler@gmail. com Immigrant Peer Educators Immigrants providing support and information for those who may be experiencing challenges adjusting to a new culture. 604-388-5511 info@ whistlermulticulturalnetwork.com

Learn more about these positions, and apply at whistler.com/careers. All applications received over the holiday period will be reviewed in early January.

HOUSING AVAILABLE FOR FULL TIME EMPLOYEES, IT’S CHEAP!

RELIGION Jesus Rock Of Ages Ministry- A bible based church that holds services at Millennium Place's main floor theatre at 4:30pm. www.jesusrockofages.com Roman Catholic ChurchCome celebrate mass at Our Lady of the Mountains, Whistler on Saturday 5pm, Sunday 9am, Tuesday 5:45pm, Wednesday 7pm, Thursday/Friday 5:45pm. St. Francis of Assisi, Pemberton on Sunday 12:30pm and Friday 9am. St. Christopher's, Mt. Currie on Sunday 11am. 604-905-4781

Basalt Wine + Salumeria are currently looking to fill the roles of: FUR & FEATHERS

Delish Cafe in Function Junction are expanding! We are currently hiring both part time & full time positions

Sandwich Ninjas & Bakers Must have a work hard - play hard attitude! Employee housing available for the right candidates. Send your resume to ian@whistlergrocery.com

SOLID CONTRACTING is currently looking for

CARPENTERS We offer full-time/flex-time positons in a positive, safe work environment. Salary based on experience. Send us your resume or call Solidcontracting@gmail.com 604-966-7062

solid-homes.com 80 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

LINE COOKS (part-time) DISHWASHERS (full-time and part-time) Please send your cover letter and resume to skeenan-naf@crystal-lodge.com Wages are very competitive (based on experience), great perks and benefits. Come join the best team in Whistler!

Get Bear Smart Society - Learn more about coexisting with bears. To report a conflict, garbage or attractant issue call 604-905-BEAR (2327) www.bearsmart. com Pemberton Wildlife Association Advocates for the conservation of fish, wildlife & wilderness recreation. Also offering target shooting & archery facilities. www.pembertonwildlifeassociation.com WAG - Whistler Animals Galore - A shelter for lost, unwanted, and homeless cats and dogs. Let us help you find your purrfect match...adopt a shelter animal! For more info 604-935-8364 www. whistlerwag.com

Pemberton Medical Clinic We are looking for an awesome

Full-time Office Assistant Proficiency with EMR or other electronic record system an asset. Candidate must have office admin experience with eye for detail, excellent problem solving and multi-tasking skills. We offer a positive work environment and competitive wage. Please email your resume with cover letter at pmcmoa@shaw.ca.

THINGS. TO DO.


there's no better way to buy and sell than Pique's online marketplace.

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

FARM FIELD LABOURER Weeding, irrigating, harvesting and processing fruits & vegetables. More than one season of agricultural experience required. Looking for hardworking individuals able to work in all types of outside conditions. Minimum 40hrs/wk over a minimum 5 days/wk. $13.85 / hr. Job Duration: 32 weeks March 14th , 2019 to November 6th, 2019 Applicants can mail, or email resumes to North Arm Farm PO BOX 165 Pemberton, BC V0N 2L0 Email: info@northarmfarm.com

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is hiring these positions:

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DISHWASHER BARTENDER # 21 HOSTESS SERVERS

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201-4368 Main Street, Whistler V8E 1B6

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5 9 7 6 Always stay in control. 7be able6to stop, or avoid You must other people or objects. 5 6 9 2

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CURRENT CAREER OPPORTUNITIES Night Supervisor - Front Office Guest Services Captain Room Attendants Culinary Opportunities Outlet Manager - Wildflower Fairmont Gold Supervisor Fairmont Gold Attendant Conference Services Manager Accounting Clerk - AP

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# 22

Benefits | Meals | Leisure/Ski Pass Allowance

APPLY TODAY AT FAIRMONTCAREERS.COM

Please email your resume to: kristen@elevatevacations.com

Please email resume to tandooriwhistler2@yahoo.ca tandooriwhistler.com SKI PASS AVAILABLE

Fairmont was voted Canada’s Top-Rated Workplace for 2018 by Indeed.com

Experience is preferred but not essential. Training will be given to all new staff.

WITH EXPERIENCE PREFERRED.

4

COME WORK FOR CANADA’S #1 EMPLOYER!

• $18 per hour • Pay Review After 3 Months • % Off Ski Pass (Full Time & Part Time) • Flexible Schedule • Fun Working Environment • No Slow Season • Applicants must be available weekends. • Have a valid Work Permit • Have a good eye for detail • Be able to work well under pressure MEDIUM • Have a good energy • Be a team player

Fine Indian Cuisine

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THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

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5 9 2 4 9 1 4 2 Whistler Premier Resorts, Whistler’s leading property management 4 5firm is currently recruiting! 8 3 8 1 What We 2 Offer You: 9 Competitve Wages 1 Health & Wellness 8 Benefits 7 Full Time/Part Time Positions 5 Supportive 4 Team Environment 6Current4Career Opportunities: 1 BELLMAN . ROOM ATTENDANT

# 23

MEDIUM

# 24

APPLY TODAY AT PEOPLE@WHISTLERPREMIER.COM

Resort Municipality of Whistler # 22

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· Building 4 5 Official 1 6 9 I7 3 8 2 9 2 6 · Solid 7 Waste 8 9 5Technician 3 2 6 4 1 3 5 1 2 6 Operations 7 3 5 4 Supervisor 8 1 9 6 9 7 · Facility 1 9 4 7 6 8 2 3 5 4 5 · Program Leader – Myrtle Philip Community2Centre 5 3 8 2 1 9 4 7 6 9 1 2 8 4 5 7 6 3 Resort 8 7Municipality 6 9 2 3 1of5Whistler 4 3 4 5 1 7 6 9 2 8 whistler.ca/careers

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4/11/2005

We are currently hiring Full Time Sales Representatives with personality! Please stop by our Whistler Village location with your resume to fill out an application and say Hi to Michelle or Tina.

Staff Accommodation Available (4154 Village Green) www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 3, 2019 | 81


book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday:

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Shuttle Driver Security Officer Engineering Admin Assistant Intermediate Maintenance Guestroom Attendant The Four Seasons team is looking for these roles to start immediately. $500 signing bonus available for all hires

Details: Please apply online via jobs.fourseasons.com Housing is available for successful candidates as well!

Email cover letter & resume to grace@summitlodge.com

Currently seeking:

Glacier Media Group is growing. Check our job board regularly for the latest openings:

R001408475

APPRENTICE’S AND JOURNEYMEN

www.glaciermedia.ca/careers

Email cover letters and resumes to: SB@NOBLEELECTRIC.CA WWW.NOBLEELECTRIC.CA

6 REASONS L: TO WORK AT SUNDIA

Let us take care of you! • • • •

Staff housing available Competitive wages Full time hours year around Free staff parking in Whistler Village

Place to sleep + $ for activities es + more $ for activiti + convenience + security + Free Ski Pass

Come be our: • • • • •

G Guestt S Services i R Representative t ti Night Audit Representative Maintenance Representative Room Attendant Houseperson

We are looking for motivated employees eager to learn and grow with our company. Strong communication skills, hard work ethic with a knowledge of electrical code are all necessary attributes.

Whistler = A good life in

Please fax or email your resume with attention to “Human Resources Department” to:

604-932-7152 hr@sundialhotel.com We thank you for your interest. Only candidates chosen for further consideration will be contacted. 82 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

FULL TIME and PART TIME POSITIONS WITH A COMMERCIAL CLEANING COMPANY • Starting wage of $20.00 per hour. • Flexible working hours • Must have a valid Driver’s License • Ski pass – Options with Whistler Experience Send resume to: teamcwhistler@telus.net Or call: 604 935 8715


there's no better way to buy and sell than Pique's online marketplace.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

We are seeking flexible, hardworking and hard playing

FULL-TIME BELLMEN The Awesome Grocery Store Family is looking for Cashiers & Clerks!

HOUSEKEEPERS/HOUSEMAN

No experience necessary – We are happy to show the ropes to the right person!

Please apply if you can bring your smile and positive energy to our team and our guests!

Must have a Work Hard – Play Hard attitude! Employee Housing available for the Right Candidates. Drop by the store in person or send over your resume to grocery@whistlergrocery.com We look forward to working with you!

PART-TIME AND FULL-TIME HOURS AVAILABLE

Your next big adventure starts here.

Please email your resume to: roberto@aavawhistlerhotel.com Thank you for your interest. Only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted

Sales Manager 18 month Maternity Leave Coverage

Responsibilities:

Actively developing new business and development of existing accounts Developing a Sales Action Plan to support the revenue goals Marketing and Advertising initiatives for hotel property

Qualifications:

2+ years in a Sales Manager position (preference for hotel-related experience) Diploma or certificate in Hospitality management is preferred

To apply, please email your resume and cover letter to hr@listelhotel.com

8. Whistler’s newest cocktail bar is opening soon! Join our kitchen team lead by the talented Chef Erin Stone. Looking for:

Line Cooks Prep Cooks Dishwashers Please email info@theravenroom.ca to apply.

Keep off closed trails and closed areas. is currently hiring for the following position:

LOADER OPERATOR

Snow clearing experience required Please send resume to

admin@tktcontracting.ca NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 3, 2019 | 83


book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday:

classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

The Beacon Pub and Eatery is currently looking for:

LINE COOKS

Here’s to the Journey At Westin, we recruit the brightest, most energetic people in pursuit of developing an exciting and rewarding career. Marriott International has 30 renowned hotel brands in 122 countries around the world, and we’re still growing. Opportunities abound! The next step in your career could lead to your greatest adventure.

Sales Coordinator F&B Supervisor Cooks

Interested applicants please email your resume to skeenan-naf@Crystal-Lodge.com

Room Attendants Front Desk Agent

Sous-Chef

Wages are very competitive (based on experience), great perks and benefits. Come join the best team in Whistler!

Casual Banquet Servers

A great career has always been a great adventure. Email your resume to HR@westinwhistler.com or visit us in person Monday to Friday 9am - 5pm.

www.whistlerwag.com

Looking for a dog to adopt? Look for WAG’s bright orange bandanas on dogs being walked by volunteers! These dogs are looking for their forever home. 604.935.8364 | www.whistlerwag.com

F/T CASHIER F/T SALES ASSOCIATES

Overnight Front Desk Supervisor Needed

Whistler Home Hardware has the immediate openings for the above mentioned positions. Previous retail experience in a similar role or working environment will be an asset. You need to have good communication skills, be willing to work in a team environment and be professional and courteous by nature. We offer a positive work environment, competitive wages and a benefits program. Please apply in person with your resume and references to: #1-1005 Alpha Lake Rd. in Function Junction

Signing Bonus of $500

Location: Function Junction 84 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

Free Ski Pass Health & Medical Guaranteed Employee Housing

Details: Please apply online via jobs.fourseasons.com


there's no better way to buy and sell than Pique's online marketplace.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

We’re Hiring!

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

Join our Adventure Service Team at the Whistler Village Inn and Suites! We provide our people with a caring and fun work environment and cater to lifestyles of adventure seekers. We are centrally located in the heart of Whistler Village and provide our employees with the opportunity to work flexible hours based on their adventure or family requirements.

WE OFFER

YOU CAN’T DO

THIS TOWN

FAQwhistler

WITHOUT IT

We’re Hiring Cooks, Shift Managers, Servers, Hosts, Setters and Dishwashers Visit us at the restaurant anytime to apply in person or via email at apply.whistler@earls.ca

• A great work environment with opportunities for development and career advancement • Free coffee and tea service • Training for advancement • Use of facilities based on occupancy (Gym, Sauna, Hydro Spa and Pool) • Highly competitive compensation in Whistler • Employee accommodation discounts with Atlific Hotels and Resorts

• • • • •

Medical and Dental for full time employees Some staff discounts on local activities Staff housing based on availability Increments to pay scale based for longevity Flexible hours and work schedules based on your requirements • Bike Storage based on availability

CURRENTLY HIRING • Front Desk Agents

(Commission based incentives) • FT Night Auditor (Commission based incentives) • FT or PT Room Attendants (Commission based incentives) • FT Maintenance (Commission based incentives) Resumes can be submitted to karen@wvis.ca

Hilton Whistler Resort & Spa Hospitality

Integrity

Leadership

Teamwork

Ownership

Now

RESERVATIONS COORDINATOR HOUSEKEEPER CULINARY STEWARD RESTAURANT & BAR STAFF ~ AWESOME PEOPLE WORK HERE ~ Apply online on hr@hiltonwhistler.com or in person Monday to Friday from 9am to 4pm We thank all interested applicants, however only those selected for an interview will be contacted

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 3, 2019 | 85


book your classified ad online by 4pm Tuesday:

classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

O&R Restaurants seeking full-time

EXECUTIVE SOUS CHEF, LINE COOK, BAKER, DISHWASHER, SERVER, BARTENDER We offer competitive pay, a social work environment, seasonal bonuses, food discounts when not working, meals with every shift, and a variety of F&B establishments to work. We’re looking forward to you joining our family!

Café Supervisor We are looking for a dynamic and eager leader for our café team at our 188-bed hostel in Whistler (Cheakamus Crossing). A great opportunity to grow your career! Very affordable subsidized accommodation available and great compensation package including benefits, discounts on food, beverage and activities. Salary range is $30,000-$34,000 based on experience. Visit our website for details or give us a call – apply today!

hihostels.ca/careers careers.pm@hihostels.ca 604-962-0025

Please send resume to aaron@labocca.com

Regional Sales Manager PSAV is currently looking for a Full Time Regional Sales Manager to join our team in beautiful Whistler! Based out of the Fairmont Whistler, the Regional Sales Manager will be responsible for holding sales individuals accountable for results based on quotas set by management, working with salespeople to prepare and present clear, compelling and persuasive sales proposals, and collaborating with the PSAV sales team and hotel partner sales team to build win/win strategies and relationships with current and future customers.

Interested? 86 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

Requirements:

• BS/BA degree preferred or equivalent combination of education/experience • Strong financial acumen • Hospitality Industry experience (with a preference for meetings/events experience) • 5+ years of sales leadership

Apply through our careers page at: https://jobs.psav.com/


there's no better way to buy and sell than Pique's online marketplace.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

WHISTLER BLACKCOMB

ALREADY WORKING IN WHISTLER? HAVE A HOLIDAY HOME HERE? WORK PART TIME AND GET YOUR SEASON’S PASS AND A DEPENDENT PASS FOR ONLY $40!!! Stop by the HR Cabin at Base 2 and we will interview on the spot. WHAT: Whistler Blackcomb Hiring Open House - bring your resume WHEN: Every Wednesday, 9am - 4pm WHERE: The Cabin, 4890 Glacier Drive

FULL & PART TIME POSITIONS AVAILABLE IN: FOOD & BEVERAGE, RETAIL RENTAL, LIFT OPERATIONS, SNOW SPORT INSTRUCTORS, SNOW SCHOOL SALES, PRODUCT SCANNING & SERVICES, LODGING Can’t make it? Apply online at: www.whistlerblackcomb.com/jobs

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 3, 2019 | 87


88 Call The Experts Want to advertise your service on this page? AUTOMOTIVE

Call Pique at (604) 938-0202, or email sales@piquenewsmagazine.com

BLINDS ETC.

BLINDS ETC.

FIX AUTO PEMBERTON • Certified Insurance Collision Repair Facility • Insurance & Private Auto Body Repair • Courtesy Vehicles on Site

Visit fixautopemberton.com to schedule an appointment or call 604-894-6767

SUNCREST WINDOW COVERINGS Custom Blinds • Shades • Draperies

Tel: 604-935-2101 Email: windowcov@shaw.ca www.whistlerwindowcoverings.ca

CARPET CLEANING

WINDOW COVERINGS

BLACK BEAR CARPET CLEANING LTD.

David Weldon david@summersnow.ca 604-938-3521

• Wood blinds • Sunscreens • Shades • Motorization

www.summersnow.ca

• SHUTTERS • DRAPERY

Connie Griffiths

BLINDS ETC.

Whistler’s Source for Blinds since 1989

• BLINDS • SHADES

• CARPETS • UPHOLSTERY

Custom Window Treatments Contact us today for a free quote or consultation info@suncrestwindowcoverings.com

604.698.8406

CARPET CLEANING

• TILES • CAR INTERIORS

100% ECO FRIENDLY CERTIFIED

Summer Snow Finishings Limited

www.blackbearcarpetcleaning.ca • 604 698 6610

PROUDLY SERVING WHISTLER FOR OVER 25 YEARS

CHIMNEY

FURNITURE

GLASS

WINDOW REPLACEMENT

BLACKCOMB CHIMNEY PATROL LTD.

TIRED OF THOSE OLD CONDENSATED, MOLDY WINDOWS AND DOORS?

Serving Whistler since 1986

Specialized in cleaning Chimneys, Furnace & Airducts, Dryer vents.

Wood Energy Technology Transfer Inc.

604.932.5775 / 1.877.932.5775 blackcombchimney@yahoo.ca

MORTGAGES

Take advantage of the benefits and savings you will receive from new windows and doors. Call Whistler Glass for your onsite consultation

604.932.1132

WHISTLER RUSTICS

SNOW REMOVAL

PAINT

MORTGAGE BROKER SERVICES

WedgeX offers

Residential & Commercial • First-time Home Buyers Non-residents • Pre-Approvals • Reverse Mortgages

Annie de la Chevrotiere | Mortgage Broker www.peaktopeaktmortgage.com annie@peaktopeakmc.com 1328 Main Street, Squamish, BC, V8B 0R2

604.905.8483

SURVEYING

Our paint team has over 25 years combined paint sales experience, and we can help you get things right the first time. Now offering In Home Paint Consultations! Pemberton Valley Rona. Let us help you love where you live.

SNOW

Book your in-home leen Consultation with Col ay! tod

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SURVEYING

BUNBURY & ASSOCIATES FREE ESTIMATES Serving the Sea to Sky Corridor Since 1963 www.bunbury-surveys.com WHISTLER OFFICE #204 -1085 Millar Creek Road Whistler, BC V0N 1B1 Phone: 604 932-3770 Fax: 604 932-4685 email: bunbury@telus.net

SQUAMISH OFFICE 207 - 38026 2nd Ave., P.O. Box 1512 Squamish, BC V8B 0B2 Phone: 604 892-3090 Fax: 604 892-5427 email: bunass@telus.net

88 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

REMOVAL serving Southern Whistler

CALL TODAY: 604-902-0838

drew@wedgex.ca

SURVEYING

DOUG BUSH SURVEY SERVICES LTD

LEGAL, ENGINEERING & CONSTRUCTION SURVEYS

PROFESSIONAL LAND SURVEYORS PAUL BUNBURY, BCLS - MARTIN JONES, BCLS

whistlerglass.com

Furniture · Home Décor · Vintage Signs 604-905-9565 | whistlerrustics@gmail.com

DOUGLAS J BUSH AScT, RSIS

THE RIGHT TOOLS. THE RIGHT PEOPLE. Surveying | Mapping | Engineering | Environmental | Landscape Architecture | Planning To learn more visit: www.mcelhanney.com

p: 604-932-3314 c: 604-935-9515 Engineering & construction layout Topographic & site improvement surveys Municipal, volumetric & hydrographic surveys GPS - global positioning systems www.dbss.ca // dougb@dbss.ca


Puzzles 89 ACROSS 1 6 11 16 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 32 34 36 37 39 41 43 44 45 47 50 51 52 56 57 59 60 61 63 64 65 66 67

68 69 70 72 73 75 76 77 79 80 82 83 86 87 88 92 93 95 96 97 98 100 101 102 103 104 106 107 109 110 111 112 113 115 117 118 119 121

Picasso’s name “The Castle” author Picnic places Part of a loaf Acrylic fiber Foreign Parting word Angel toppers Appraise Read intently Ms. LaBelle Qatar rulers Immeasurable time Aspiration Tilting-tower town Oscar nominee Chest-beater A Ryder Tasteless and showy Ushers in Time divs. Drive Well-read Hurries Take to jail (hyph.) Book jacket part Prodded Courtroom vow (2 wds.) Shoelace hole Boot upper Shrewder TV’s Hawkeye Jug Haulers Hebrew letter Writer -- Paretsky Attached

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123 126 127 129 130 131 133 135 137 139 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148

Brother’s girls Plant sci. Heredity factors “Moneytalks” group Housecat’s perch Hosp. staffer Keep occupied Minces Flowery scent Chicago’s airport Toxic gas Clear a diskette Summon Jots down Lowered oneself Titled ladies Kind of rat Like Georgia Brown

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18 19 20 31 33 35 38 39 40 42 44 46 47 48 49 50 51 53 54 55 58 59 60 62 64 65 69 70 71 74 75 76 78 80 81 82 83 84

Greek epic Work crew To be, to Brutus Switch positions Isaac Newton’s title Paper-folding art PBS “Science Guy” Lost cause Places of control Bends forward Stubborn sorts Kind of sheet Lasso Unrehearsed (hyph.) Encrypted Captured again Strikes out Indicators Frightening Shower feature Sycophant’s replies (var.) First-string teams Monk’s quarters Mud brick Winery supply Thaw Overlook Kind of job Yul’s film realm Tousle Manage for oneself Dump a lover Safari leader Small horse Polite address Tugs hard Broods over Column type

85 86 88 89 90 91 94 95 96 99 101 102 105 106 107 108 111 112

Bete -Oceans Fork parts Jeweler’s lens Organic compound Stun Come before Revenuers Earn, as interest Guys like Hamlet Witch-hunt locale Kublai and Genghis Industrious Ignited Tending to intimidate Troop formations Fortified wine Bassinets

114 116 117 118 119 120 122 123 124 125 126 128 130 132 134 136 138 140

Fond du --, Wisconsin Sold Gentle treatment Run a fever “Gladiator” extra Debussy music Watering places Less rude Raise spirits Wild time Yelp Cheat Rice wine Oriole abode Mr. Hurok Language suffix Moo Practical question

Last Weeks’ Answers

Solution, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com Answers page 81 Enter a digit from 1 through 9 in each cell, in such a way that: ▪ Each horizontal row contains each digit exactly once ▪ Each vertical column contains each digit exactly once ▪ Each 3x3 box contains each digit exactly once Solving a sudoku puzzle does not require any mathematics; simple logic suffices. Level of difficulty: MEDIUM

2 4 6 7

9 7

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5 8

8 6

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1 3

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2 5

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9 3 # 22

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 3, 2019 | 89


90 Maxed Out We are what we are

A

nother year come and gone. Good riddance, 2018. You left us all a bit poorer, more cynical, beset by the Four Horsemen of tribal politics, social warriorism, unending victimhood and proto-fascism taking root around the

By G.D. Maxwell world. Nice work. But hope springs eternal, 2019 is a new year and I can safely say, a mere nine hours into it as I write this, so far, so good. The Baboon-in-Chief hasn’t tweeted war on anyone other than Democrats, the PM didn’t immolate himself in the torchlight parade down Whistler Mountain, TFSA contribution limits went up for anyone

WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

with an extra $500 they don’t know what to do with and I haven’t gotten anyone upset with me ... so far. In an effort to keep that streak alive, I—and everyone else who writes an opinion column—will turn my attention to New Year’s resolutions. Fortunately, I have a short attention span. What was I writing about? Oh yeah, resolutions. I resolved years ago to not make New Year’s resolutions. I strongly urge you to adopt that policy. The first day, heck, the first week of a new year is no time to wallow in the bottomless pit of self improvement. If history has proven anything it is this: We are all probably as good right now as we’ll ever be, with the possible exception of the cotton-headed hangover many of you are suffering right now. I, of course, am perfectly clear-headed, Jan. 1 being a workday for me. If remnants of guilt force you to torture yourself into making resolutions, I’d like to suggest you spend a moment contemplating Eastern mysticism. There is much good to learn from ancient Eastern philosophy. I would even go so far as to say I personally discovered the path of

90 | January 3, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

true happiness hewing to the wise words of an Eastern philosopher. Specifically, E.C. Segar. Who? I hear you ask. Elzie Segar (1894-1938, which makes him sufficiently ancient for my purposes) lived a brief but notable life in Chicago and New York, both of which are east of here. Looking for a path to follow, he decided, at 18 years of age, to become a cartoonist, sent away for a correspondence course and created such forgettable comic strips as Barry the Boob and Looping the Loop. Nine years before his death, he hit the jackpot and became, quite unexpectedly, a wise Eastern philosopher. His creation? Popeye the Sailor Man. His key to happiness? “I yam what I yam and that’s all what I yam.” The Tao of Popeye, the shining pathway to a happy life, is revealed in that lesson and its, perhaps, even more important corollary: “You are what you are.” Few of us can always live the creed of self-acceptance. Fewer still can master the graceful acceptance of those around us, even those closest to us if current divorce rates are any indication. And that is why you shouldn’t make New Year’s resolutions. They fly in the face of acceptance of who and what you are. They scream from magazine covers, the pages of every single newspaper, social media, television, TED talks and those annoying ads inside transit buses, 10 Ways to a Better You! Now, there’s nothing wrong with wanting to be a better you. It is always worthwhile to want to nudge yourself a step or two towards whatever you consider better. But the pathway to better is never contained in those 10 suggestions. They’ll only make you feel worse about yourself and, if you’re not careful, lead you to the self-help section of your neighbourhood bookstore where volume after volume awaits your growing insecurities and will, without doubt, suck you further down the vortex of self-loathing. The only pathway to better is Popeye’s self-acceptance. And skiing. There are many reasons skiing—by which I also mean snowboarding—will slide you closer to happiness and, yes, even self-acceptance, all the while giving you an infinite outlet to pursue better. One is the paradox of skiing. No matter how badly you ski, assuming you’ve gotten past the stage of simply falling down every time you try to stand up, skiing is thrilling. Whether your personal envelope ends at green runs or includes double black diamonds, skiing is thrilling. Exhilarating. Life-affirming. And no matter how well you ski, you

can always chase better on skis. There is always another challenge, another line, another trick, another powder day that’ll make you feel more alive than you’ve ever felt. Simply put, skiing is a drug. The high you feel on your best ski days is compliments of oxytocin squirted out your posterior pituitary. It’s the same stuff that makes orgasm so pleasurable. I’m not making this up. Skiing will make you happier and won’t result in children you have to take care of for the next two decades ... and beyond. But skiing will only make you happier if you accept that it, too, is only what it is. And some of what it is can make you unhappy if you let it. Other skiers can make you unhappy. Some—perhaps an increasing number— are boorish and so totally self-absorbed; they are unaware of those around them. They’ll, for example, disembark a chairlift and clog up egress for everyone behind them, much as mall-dwellers will stop and look around at the top of an escalator. Duh. They’ll run into you, jump out in front of you without looking, get to the front of a chairlift line only to stop and wait for their friends 20 people back and ski side to side on a crowded run. If you have a chance, you can point out the error of their ways. They probably won’t hear you or if they do they likely won’t recognize what you’re saying is a flaw in their flawless character. The effort will, in most cases, be ineffective and lead you away from happiness. Whacking them a hard one with your poles, on the other hand, won’t change their behaviour either but will probably make you happier. Others will notice your whacking and congratulate you for it and that’ll make you feel even better. Mechanical difficulties associated with skiing can also make you unhappy. But it’s the price you pay for riding a lift to the top instead of skinning up. Crowds in the backcountry notwithstanding, the mountains would be pretty bare if we all had to skin up. Not that it would be a bad thing. Just sayin’. But lifts are complicated machinery operating in difficult environments. If you’ve tried to board the new gondola on Blackcomb you’ve probably noticed this relationship between complicated machinery, cold weather and enough mechanical difficulties the new gondy is now popularly referred to as the Breakdown Gondola instead of the Blackcomb Gondola. Hitting it with your poles won’t make you happier. Avoiding it until the bugs are worked out will. It is what it is as well. Don’t thank me; thank Popeye. n


Welcome to the best place on earth Engel & Völkers Portfolio of Fine Homes

NORDIC ESTATES – TALUSWOOD

PEMBERTON – NEW LISTING

BLACKCOMB BENCHLANDS

VILLAGE

Immaculate & spacious 4 bed/3.5 bath, slope-side lodge style townhome. Flexible phase 1 zoning allow owners flexible use of the property! Private & pristine with over 2,250 sq/ft of living space with big views of mountains and Alta Lake. $2,490,000

Well maintained 3 bed/2 bath, plus den townhouse (1549 sqft.). Open kitchen/dining & living area, 1 car garage, large laundry/storage. Private fenced backyard and BBQ deck with views of Mount Currie. Everything in walking distance. $579,000

Four Seasons Resort is about to get even better! Take advantage & enjoy the Whistler lifestyle now! Deluxe King Studio - sleeps 4. King bed, sofa bed, fireplace, oversized bath, private balcony, 5-star amenities & revenues! $429,000

This stunning condo is the perfect place to rest after a long day on the mountain. Features; prime location, recently updated 2 bed/2 bath, hot tub, pool, shuttle and much more! $799,000

Maggi Thornhill *prec

Brigitta Fuess

Katherine Currall

Kerry Batt

#3-2250 Nordic Drive

604-905-8199

#24-7408 Cottonwood St.

301-4591 Blackcomb Way

604-932-0751

#204-4200 Whistler Way

604-966-1364

604-902-5422

VILLAGE

NORDIC ESTATES – AT NATURES DOOR

ALTA VISTA

UNIVERSITY HIGHLANDS

Large Phase 2 studio in the village. Close to all amenities. Fabulous views of Blackcomb Mountain. Good revenues. Owner usage 28 days winter, 28 days summer. $225,000

Ski in Ski Out on the Dave Murray Downhill - rare full ownership opportunity - luxury ammenities

Looking to build your future Whistler Chalet? This large Lot offers unique building opportunity to capture the unique Alta Lake & Mountain vistas. $2,680,000 (GST Exempt)

Total privacy from this University Highlands stunning timberframe energy star built home. 4 bed & 4 bath. 11‘ to 14‘ ceilings, tall windows, engineered hardwood floors, Chef’s kitchen, geothermal heating & one bedroom suite. $1,998,000

Janet Robson

Carleigh Hofman

Kathy White

Angie Vazquez *prec

#301-4319 Main Street, Whistler

604-938-2468

#20-2300 Nordic Drive

3108 Hillcrest Lane

3345 Descartes Place

$2,595,000

604-805-5358

604-616-6933

778-318-5900

WHISTLER CAY HEIGHTS

SPRING CREEK

TALUSWOOD, WHISTLER

BENCHLANDS - POWDERHORN

Beautiful 4 Bed/3 Bath chalet with 2 Bed suite in popular Whistler Cay Heights, just minutes to Village, schools and gondolas. Resident restricted leasehold property. Call me for details. $2,275,000

Great location is only minutes to Creekside. New neighbourhood with underground services. Slightly sloping uphill lot is over 12,000 sq.ft. Buy now and start planning for an early spring start. $1,258,000

SKI-IN / SKI-OUT! 2 bedrooms 2 bathrooms, open and spacious living plan all on one level, 1000 sqft, private, oversized windows capturing mountain and tree top views. Nightly rentals permitted. No GST! www.30thebluffs.info. $1,300,000

Fantastic ski-in/ski-out location that is a mere 100 yards to Blackcomb Mtn. This turn key, nightly rentable, 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom, 792 sq/ft unit offers a very private setting with calming treed outlook. $899,000

Janet Brown

Laura Wetaski

David Wiebe *prec

Suzanne Wilson

6240 Piccolo Drive, Whistler

604-935-0700

1550 Tynebridge Lane

#30-2301 Taluswood Place

604 938 3798

#106-4821 Spearhead Drive

604-966-8874

Whistler Village Shop

Whistler Creekside Shop

Squamish Station Shop

36-4314 Main Street · Whistler BC V0N 1B4 · Phone +1 604-932-1875

325-2063 Lake Placid Road · Whistler BC V0N 1B2 · Phone +1 604-932-1875

150-1200 Hunter Place · Squamish BC V8B 0G8 · Phone +1 778-733-0611

whistler.evcanada.com

whistler.evcanada.com

whistler.evcanada.com

Engel & Völkers Whistler *PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION ©2018 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage is independently owned and operated. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified.

604 966 8454


Open House Sat 2 to 4pm

#5 - 7400 Arbutus Street

$639,000

#5 Woodbridge is a spacious end unit townhome, with lots of natural light that features 3 bedrooms & 2 bathrooms across its 1,400 sq/ft of living space. Conveniently located in close proximity to the many amenities of Pemberton Village as well as the Pemberton Community Centre. Matterport 3D Showcase: rem.ax\5wood

Ursula Morel*

3

604.932.8629

5734 Alta Lake Road

$3,500,000

9096 Corduroy Run Court

$3,250,000

Stunning new contemporary home by Heritage West Homes offering 4600 square feet of living space with a stunning main floor of 3500 square feet and 1100 sq ft finished lower level to accommodate guests and family gatherings. 5 bedrooms and 4.5 bathrooms, a delightful chef’s kitchen with ample sunshine.

Ann Chiasson

5

604.932.7651

1550 Tynebridge Lane

$1,258,000

#418A - 2036 London Lane

$125,000

Enjoy all of the benefits of luxury condo ownership at the base of Whistler Mtn. at a fraction of the cost. This 1 bed/1 bath quarter ownership property in Legends Lodge offers a recently updated kitchen, gas fireplace & pull-out sofa. Building amenities include: outdoor pool, 2 hot tubs, sauna, BBQ area, media room & kids play area.

Bob Cameron*

1

604.934.2214

1556 Fraser Road

$1,715,000

Situated on a quiet bay you will feel like you are in another world, far from the crowds. The views are from Mount Currie to Whistler Mountain and they will inspire you to kick back and enjoy the quite life. 5 bedrooms and 4 bathrooms gives you lots of space for friends and family. Come over to the West side you’ll love it.

Set on a quiet road in Spring Creek close to great shopping and the brew pubs in Funky Function Junction. Just a 5 min drive to Creekside ski lifts or 10 min to the Village. This modern neighborhood has all underground services and beautiful new homes surround.

Sun drenched 10 Acre Equestrian property minutes from the heart of Pemberton! This home is split into a fully renovated 2 bedroom upstairs dwelling with an enourmous deck that has just been refinished including a live edge bar for entertaining and taking in the breath taking views of Mount Currie.

Bruce Watt

Chris Wetaski

Dana Friesen Smith

5

604.905.0737

8349 Needles Drive

$2,489,000

Attention investors and Whistler restauranteurs!! This 12,000+ sq.ft. lot has everything you could need. The main house has 4 bedrooms with 2.5 bathrooms and a spacious 1 bedroom revenue suite. The property also boasts a 630 sq.ft. double garage and stand-alone commercial kitchen for commercial use or additional revenue

Dave Beattie*

6

604.905.8855

#40 - 4388 Northlands Blvd.

$800,000

604.938.2499

#238 - 4350 Lorimer Road

$699,000

604.932.7727

8556 Drifter Way

#6 - 4636 Blackcomb Way

4

$98,500

Adjacent to the Fairmont Chateau golf course, 1/10th interest in an immaculate 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom townhome boasts a spacious open layout , heated slate floors in bathroom. A cozy wood burning fireplace, large master bedroom with sitting area, and plenty of secure parking are among the many amenities. Matterport 3D Showcase: rem.ax\6gleneagle

This totally updated one bedroom and one bath condo is move in ready and zoned for unlimited nightly rentals or unlimited owner use. It features beautiful mountain views of Sproat and Rainbow, hot tub, underground parking, bike storage area, elevator access and a great location with easy access to shopping and amenities.

Dave Halliwell*

604.902.3878

1

$2,999,000

Dave Sharpe

2

604.902.2779

#68 - 2222 Brandywine Way

$1,349,000

The only 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom newly renovated townhome for sale in Whistler Village. This home is a mix of mountain and city with it’s new gorgeous design elements and fresh, new furniture. On the quiet side of the complex you can enjoy balmy late night evenings on one of 2 outdoor patios! Matterport 3D Showcase: bit.ly/40GRUB

This property is the king of views and privacy in Alpine. Sit on top of the world of Whistler, enjoying your hot tub on a cliff edge overlooking just about everything, Blackcomb & Whistler Mountain, Green Lake, Armchair, Wedge. Need a mortgage helper? Monthly revenues of $5,500.00 to help.

Large duplex in Bayshores waiting for your personal touches. Proven rental property ideal for staff housing or holding property. Vaulted ceiling in living room, open concept flexible floor plan. Generous sized bedrooms. Loads of natural sunlight in all rooms and featuring 2 large decks with amazing views. Currently tenanted.

Denise Brown*

Doug Treleaven

James Collingridge

604.935.2013

1

WHISTLER OFFICE 106 - 7015 Nesters Road, Whistler, BC V8E 0X1 604.932.2300 or Toll Free 1.888.689.0070 *PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

remax-whistler.com awarded best website 2018 by Luxuryrealestate.com

Property Management remaxseatoskypm.com

604.905.8626

8

604.902.0132

5

PEMBERTON OFFICE 1411 Portage Road, Pemberton, BC V0N 2L1 604.894.6616 or Toll Free 1.888.689.0070

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Pique Newsmagazine 2601  

Pique Newsmagazine for January 3, 2019

Pique Newsmagazine 2601  

Pique Newsmagazine for January 3, 2019

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