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June 26, 2014 Issue #384

Pr I n og si ram de !

All Northern. All Fun.

Journey with our Hearts and Hands

Ken Anderson and other master carvers come together for the Adäka Cultural Festival

Peter Mather’s photographic evolution

Nuit Blanche comes to Whitehorse

See Page 5

See Page 18

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See Page 3

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June 26, 2014

Jickling’s Jabberings with Peter Jickling

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Yukon First Nation Artists Featuring Carvings, Masks, Sculptures, Prints, Soapstone, Moose Hair Tuftings,

A

few days ago I met Cam Webber for an after-work drink at the Roadhouse. Cam is a gravedigger for the City of Whitehorse, and had already set up camp with a couple of colleagues under a patio umbrella when I traipsed in. The sun shone down uninhibited by clouds, warming both our bodies and spirits. We chatted about bear attacks, wolf encounters, the merits of Quebec City vs. Montreal, Oktoberfest, and our plans for the summer. I boringly reported a lack of summer itinerary. Time lazily drifted passed us. The sun, too, drifted — and to my surprise it descended below the edge of the umbrella, raining its rays upon us. Being outdoor workers, my table companions were prepared, each wearing shades; being myself, I was unprepared — no sunglasses on my person. Worse still, I was facing westish. Soon I was holding my hand perpendicular to my forehead in the manner made famous by

distance-gazing explorers. Still, it was squint-city, and I was having trouble seeing anything through the glare. East-facing Josie — surname a mystery — recognized my predicament and kindly handed me her specs. But these were no ordinary shades; on a colour scale they existed somewhere between phlox and orchid. Inevitably I went inside to relieve myself, and in my absence Cam started a campaign to let me keep her sunglasses. When I returned, he explained his reasons: “Josie’s got a face that fits a lot of different glasses, but you’ve got kind of a blockish head. Its not every day a pair of sunglasses fits a blockhead like you.” Thanks Cam. But in his insightful yet insulting way, he did have a point; they fit like a glove. Cam brokered the deal, but before it was made official he expressed serious concerns about my apathetic attitude towards sum-

mer living. “If Josie gives you her shades you have no excuse for not having a great summer. In fact, if you don’t make something of yourself by September I think you should have to give them back.” These seemed like reasonable terms to me, and Josie agreed to them non-verbally — by leaving the table, paying her bill, and exiting the bar without collecting her glasses from the bridge of my nose; they were mine. At their very best, the items you own have special meaning attached to them — an old watch your grandfather gave to you; a fishing rod with which you caught your first salmon; the Family Guy DVD you watched four night a week during college. Now I have a pair of sunglasses that reminds me Yukon summers are fleeting and should never be taken for granted. Now I have no excuse for living an uninspired existence during the sunlight season. Thank you Josie; I won’t let you, or your shades, down.

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June 26, 2014

Feels Like a Celebration The fourth annual Adäka Cultural Festival kicks off this weekend on the Whitehorse waterfront

Trolley Ticker

by Ken Bolton

2329 Riders & Counting

C

harlene Alexander barely pauses for breath as she lists the ways the annual Adäka Cultural Festival contributes to revitalizing First Nations’ art and culture in the Yukon. First, she says, it allows artists, performers and cultural sector workers “to come together once a year to share inspiration, to share ideas, to learn new skills, to inspire each other.” Alexander is a co-founder and executive producer of the fouryear-old festival, which runs this year from Friday, June 27 through Thursday, July 3 at the Kwanlin Dün Cultural Centre on the Whitehorse waterfront.

On the Cover

with Our Hearts and Hands. It’s a gathering of 13 master carvers from New Zealand, British Columbia (including Haida Gwaii), Alaska, the Northwest Territories, and the Yukon. “They’re going to come together and spend five days together, and we’ll see that cross-pollination,” she says. “If we look at some of their work two years from now, we will see how they were inspired by that experience.” After three decades creating and running festivals, including the Great Northern Art Festival in Inuvik, Alexander understands the dynamics and benefits of a big event of this kind. “Every year

Ken Anderson, master carver

Inside

Jickling’s Jabberings................ 2 Adäka Overview...................... 3 A Klondike Korner................... 4 Didee & Didoo........................ 4 Peter Mather Photographer....... 5 Florent Vollant at Adäka ........... 6 School Kids in Germany ............ 7 Looking for Yukon Love Online... 9 The Tramp of my Heart............10 Living with Wildlife.................11 Northern Feasts.....................14 Nuit Blanche.........................18 Aboriginal Summer Play Reading.. 19 Behind the Curtains................24 Au Naturel............................27 Wild Pursuits.........................28 From the Backcountry ............30 A Successful Spring.................31

PHOTO: Ruth Borgfjord Photography

Vision Quest performing with Warren Strand at last year’s fest

“It’s an opportunity for them to meet aboriginal artists from outside the Yukon, and there’s this exchange of ideas and inspiration there as well,” she continues. To emphasize her point, Alexander singles out one of this year’s keystone events, called Journey

we see people coming back, and they’ve stepped it up a notch, because they’ve had an opportunity to perform or present their work in a really professional environment, and to a really diverse audience.” That audience includes visitors

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Angela Code models the work of designer Jeneen Njootli during last year’s fashion show and Yukoners alike. “It’s an opportunity for visitors to learn about and experience firsthand the diverse aboriginal culture we have here in the Yukon,” Alexander says. “It’s also an opportunity for Yukoners to experience it.” “In the past there weren’t a lot of opportunities for non-aboriginal Yukoners to experience aboriginal culture, so it could possibly even break down some barriers.” Among many other things on offer are a diverse display of traditional dancing, an exhibit and explanation of 15 recently-commissioned dance regalia items, an evening of legends and stories, and a motivational speech by hockey great Theo Fleury. There are also presentations and workshops on everything from hoop dancing and bannock making, to basketry and traditional medicines. “I think we’ve got the right formula. It’s professional, but it’s very relaxed,” Alexander says. “You can just feel this really

great, happy atmosphere when you’re there. It really feels like a celebration. Wearing her other hat as executive director of the First Nations Culture and Tourism Association, Alexander sees the festival benefitting from a “huge and growing” interest in cultural tourism. “Our vision is to build the festival into a huge, iconic international festival, so there will be a lot of spin-off opportunities,” she says. “Already this year, I’ve met with a new Chinese tour company here in the Yukon. Their first tour is coming this summer, and we’re going to start talking for next year and developing tours specifically around the festival.” The full schedule for this year’s festival is online at adakafestival. ca. Ken Bolton is a freelance writer and former co-editor of What’s Up Yukon. Please email comments on his articles to editor@whatsupyukon.com.

WHITEHORSE’S

Events

Whitehorse Happenings............ 8 Community Happenings...........23 Highlights.............................25 Active Interests.....................26

www.whatsupyukon.com Drop Point: Mailboxes Etc Mailing Address:410-108 Elliott Street Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 6C4 Ph: 667-2910 Fax: 667-2913

Editorial Peter Jickling Team peter@whatsupyukon.com Meagan Deuling meagan@whatsupyukon.com

Sales Tammy Beese Team tammy@whatsupyukon.com Zvonko Jovanovic Zvonko@whatsupyukon.com

Graphic Lesley Ord Design Team Paulette Comeau Abi Posadas Accounts Keira Howard Receivable keira@whatsupyukon.com Weekly Magazine published by

Beese Entertainment Publishing We thank our advertisers and our friends at 135 distribution points for helping keep What’s Up Yukon FREE.

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June 26, 2014

A Klondike Korner with Dan Davidson

Front Street’s Elegant Showcase ficial residence and served several other functions. Between 1950 (after a fire that destroyed St. Mary’s Hospital) and 1963/ 1964, the Sisters of St. Anne used the upper floors of the building as a seniors’ residence, and then it lay idle until it was acquired by Parks Canada in 1973. The building was substantially damaged in the 1979 flood, when a metre of water swept through the main floor, adding to the seasonal stresses of freezing and thawing during its period

PHOTO: Dan Davidson

The Commissioner’s guests gather on the lawn for this year’s Tea

When it’s Stanley Cup season It’s almost like treason. Dougie never misses playoff And his TV is never off. He turns his TV right up When he watches the Stanley Cup. Dougie is glued to the screen An’ sometimes he even looks mean. When the other team score Dougie gets real sore. Sometimes Dougie cheer A’ sometimes he swear. Dougie hollers like a pup When he watches the Stanley Cup. Dougue like to win a bet But the puck goes in the wrong net. Dougie shouts and scream But I don’t like his team. Dougie will call us liars If we pull for the flyers. If his team loses in overtime It’s like they committed a crime. Next comes the season of baseball An’ Dougie watches it till fall.

Allan Benjamin , bination of the IODE and Parks Canada, which makes sure that the flower beds are all blooming for guests to see. This year’s event was held on June 7, but next year it is scheduled for June 13, the next Saturday, which is the Yukon’s actual birthday.

Old Crow, Yukon After 32 years teaching in rural Yukon schools, Dan Davidson retired from that profession but continues writing about life in Dawson City. Please send comments about his stories to dawson@whatsupyukon.com.

Will Your Insurance Company Cover Your Home?

Y M I L FU A

N

F

The residence was among the last of the showplace buildings Fuller designed for Dawson. It was built in 1901. Except for the addition of the sunroom at the rear of the second floor during the residency of George and Martha Black, the interior layout has remained much the same, while the exterior trims and facades have changed with the times. The distinctive wrap-around veranda was added in 1903. Originally rather fancy, it was restored to a plainer façade in 1908 after a fire in 1906. The current restoration of the ground floor matches what was in place when the Blacks lived there from 1912 to 1916. When they left, it ceased to be the of-

There have been an increasingly high number of spills from home-heating oil tanks resulting in very expensive clean-up costs. Cleanup costs can cost tens of thousands of dollars.

F

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Primary cause HUM Bugs (Hydrocarbon Utilizing Micro-organisms). This is the internal corrosion of steel in a home- heating fuel tank by bacteria present in water that accumulates in the tank.

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& A

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he Commissioner’s Residence sits on Front Street, just past St. Paul’s Anglican Church, in Dawson City. It is one of six buildings in town designed by Thomas Fuller II, who eventually followed in his father’s footsteps to become the Chief Dominion Architect of Canada. Five of these buildings — the Old Post Office, the Court House, the Territorial Administration Building (Dawson City Museum), the Telegraph Office (museum director’s residence) and the Commissioner’s Residence — still exist. The Dawson Public School burned in 1957 and the second replacement, now called the Robert Service School, turned 25-yearsold this May.

of inactivity. Parks Canada undertook a massive restoration project when the building was reopened to the public for tours in 1996, during the first of Dawson’s three big centennial year celebrations. Part of the project involved restoring the 1914-era goldenyellow colour to the building. This upset some residents at the time because they were used to seeing a nondescript colour. The building is open for tours during the summer. This year they run from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. daily. In the past there have been afternoon teas, at which a Parks Canada employee would play the role of Martha Black. The major public event of the season has been the Commissioner’s Tea, held for the last 39 years, and organized by a com-

Stanley Cup Playoffs

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June 26, 2014

The Evolution of Peter Mather’s Photography From photographer to photo-storyteller

PHOTO: courtesy of Peter Mather

by Jason Westover

p t

a photo-story entitled People of the Caribou. In it, he documents the life cycle of the Porcupine Caribou Herd, and the lifestyle of the Gwich’in people.

The idea was sitting in front of Mather for a long time; he had been a teacher in Old Crow. When he finished, he kept returning for 13 years to photograph

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A lone caribou in the Yukon wild

caribou, and to work on environmental issues, such as threats to caribou calving grounds. Mather started touring threatened calving areas in Alaska with a Gwich’in spokesman. He showed slideshows about protecting the calf line. “One day I was looking for a story to sink my teeth into, and the story about the Gwich’in was just sitting in front of me,” said Mather. He suspects it will take three years or more to tell a proper story. Ultimately, Mather wants

PHOTO: Peter Mather

Y

ukon photographer Peter Mather arrived in Old Crow last spring. He was here to finish a project he’d been working on for three years. For nearly 20 years Mather has been photographing the beauty and wonder of the Yukon; his photos are evidence of his love for the North. Mather was raised in the Yukon; the wilderness played a huge role in his upbringing, Mather recalls. “Our family was always planning a new adventure. My parents brought me up with the outdoor spirit. I lived half my childhood summers in a tent camping with my family.” Mather continued living adventurously. He saw a slideshow of images from the Peel River Watershed while attending university in 1994. The images were taken by Yukon adventurer and environmentalist Ken Madsen, and they inspired Mather. Under Madsen’s tutelage Mather began his journey into photography. Mather travelled the Yukon for 14 years creating distinct and alluring images of nature, but three years ago his perception of photography changed. He entered a new level when he got to work for National Geographic photojournalist Paul Nicklen. After he met Nicklen, Mather focused on photojournalism: “I would now take 4000 pictures but I would only process 40, and then I would only use five that showed emotion.” Still, photojournalism didn’t make his past work irrelevant. “They were beautiful images of nature, but were separated and unlinked,” Mather says of his previous images. “Perhaps the best way to describe them is that they were beautiful but didn’t tell a story.” The move to photojournalism sharpened Mather’s skills, and gave deeper weight and deeper meaning to his photos. Mather admits that now he has to work harder to tell the proper story. Despite the increased effort, he enjoys the change. He credits his photojournalistic perspective with better photos, increased sales, and a career jumpstart. Mather is currently working on

Peter Mather loves living in the Yukon

to make a book about these issues, partnering his photos with Gwich’in narration. Mather doesn’t intend to slow down after People of the Caribou. “There are a number of Yukon stories I want to work on, he says. “I’d like to do a story on the disappearing salmon of the Yukon Watershed. The salmon on the Takhini River used to turn the river red, but now they are nearly gone. I’d like to see the efforts to cover the salmon runs, and I’d like to tell that story.” Jason Westover is a performer based in Old Crow. Please send comments about his articles to oldcrow@whatsupyukon.com.


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June 26, 2014

Behind the Curtain with Ken Bolton

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Former Kashtin singer Florent Vollant will perform Saturday, June 28 at the Adäka Cultural Festival Proudly Owned & Operated by

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lorent Vollant’s first exposure to music was in his family’s cabin on a trapline in Labrador. After a successful caribou hunt, the family would celebrate with traditional songs and dances, in the Innu tradition of the makushan, or pow wow. “I was four or five years old the first time I remember the sound of the drum, and then I saw my family very happy and proud,” he says. “Now when I do music, I think it’s the kind of spirit I want to recreate.” When Vollant was seven, the family relocated to the Maliotenam reserve, on the north shore of the St. Lawrence River near Sept-îles, Québec. It’s been his home for 48 years. By the early 1980s, Vollant was playing guitar in a band with bassist Claude McKenzie. “We did it a few years as backup,” Vollant explains by phone in an accent heavily-flavoured by Innu-aimun and French. “But that band they had too many chiefs and not enough Indians, and then we split. It was too hard.” Not long after the break-up, a local club invited him and McKenzie to perform, but their fledgling folk-rock duo had no name. “The same day, I heard some elders talking about a tornado, and I heard the word “kashtin”. It’s not the kind of word that you heard a lot, but the elders told me it’s powerful,” Vollant explains. “When Claude asked me (about the band’s name), I said, ‘Tell them it’s called Kashtin.’” That was 1984. Little did Vollant or McKenzie know that five years later their Innu-language songs would hit the big time at home and abroad. The first of Kashtin’s three albums came out in 1989. It soon went double platinum in Canada, with hits such as “E Uassiuian”

and “Tshinanu”. Following a European tour the next year, Kashtin hit the Top 10 in France. After two more albums – Innu in 1991 (which included their biggest Canadian single, “Ishkuess”), and Akua Tuta in 1994 — the pair split, but they still perform occasional concerts together. Vollant understands Kashtin’s

home, where he has recorded traditional music with elders, as well as school groups and bands from the Maliotenam area, as well as Labrador. As a singer-songwriter, he has released three solo albums. He won a Juno award for Aboriginal Recording of the Year in 2001 for his Innu-language album of Christmas songs, Nipaiamianan. This summer he hopes to finish a fourth record called Puamuna (Innu for “Dreams”). His first album since Eku Mamu in 2009, it will include a reprise of Willie Dunn’s “Son of the Sun”, which Kashtin helped popularize on Innu. In the meantime, live performances keep Vollant busy. In just over a week this month alone, he sang at a major festival In Switzerland and at National Aboriginal Day celebrations in Vald’Or, Québec. “I just want to be on stage and share my music, share my heritage, and have a good time,” he says. In a way, this weekend’s appearance at the Adäka Cultural Festival marks a return to his roots on that Labrador trapline. “I’m a makushan-maker. That’s what I want to be. It means make people dream and sing and dance, and then we’re a part of the pride,” he says. “In my Innu family, when you can make people dance, you’re great.” Florent Vollant performs Saturday, June 28 in the Kwanlin Dün Cultural Centre longhouse. Diyet and Friends will open the show at 7:00 p.m. Tickets are $20 for adults, $10 for elders and youth.

Photo: www.oocities.org

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Florent Vollant (right) of Kashtin fame, performs at the Adäka Cultural Festival, June 28. role in bringing aboriginal music to widespread public attention. “We can be proud, I guess, me and Claude. We left very nice tracks,” he says. “If some young musicians want to follow it, it could be nice. But we don’t want another Kashtin, you know, we need something different.” Five years on the road also left Vollant ready for something different. “It was too strong for me, and it was hard for my family, too.” He decided to take a year or so off. “It was very quiet time for me, and at that time it was what I needed,” he says. “Then one day I was there just thinking I have some time, no rush, maybe I can build something, you know. And if I build something, it’s going to be a recording studio.” With help from some friends, he did build a studio near his

Ken Bolton is a freelance writer who telecommutes to work from his home southeast of Whitehorse. Please email comments on his articles to editor@whatsupyukon.com.

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June 26, 2014

Can I Come Along Again?

A student’s Germany visit, from a teacher’s point-of-view by Renate Schmidt

G

ermany is green and clean — there’s not much garbage, and there are recycling bins everywhere. The people are friendly. Being on a train is fun and comfortable, and riding in a first class compartment is better than flying. We went to a Catholic all-boy school in Mainz for a day, which was different from school at home. Classes were 45 minutes long, and during breaks students went downtown. English, Latin and French were core subjects, and all students spoke perfect English. I wished my German was that good. School is organized differently, and students’ relationships with teachers are more formal. The castles along the Rhine River were cool. Rheinfels was the best one because we didn’t need a guide to explore through the underground tunnels and towers. It was awesome when David scared Mrs. Schmidt by balancing on a wall 100 feet above the river. The Disney castle does exist; it’s called Neuschwanstein. King Ludwig created a fairy tale palace but was never able to really enjoy it. He mysteriously drowned out of the blue. At the Wartburg castle in Eisenach there’s an ink stain in one of the rooms. Apparently Satan appeared to Martin Luther while he was in hiding, and Luther threw an inkbottle at him. I loved Europa Park. It’s Europe’s biggest amusement park, and it’s set up like Europe, with different “countries”. Too bad we couldn’t get Mr Reid and Mrs Schmidt to go on a roller coaster. I’d never been to an opera or classical concert but it was actually cool and fun to dress-up and go for a fancy dinner concert in Salzburg. We cleaned-up pretty nice, I have to say. In Berlin we went to the Friedrichstadtpalast for a Moulin Rouge-ish musical show, and in Hamburg we went to Mamma Mia. I’m usually not a musical person, but we all danced and sang along — it was embarrassing but fun. My favourite part by far was watching a pro soccer game in a 60,000 person stadium. One of Mrs Schmidt’s and Mr Reid’s favourite activities was to sit on café patios in the sun and sip cappuccinos. The coffees were nice, but we weren’t into the Black Forest cake; it’s made with a gross cherry alcohol called Kirschwasser. Hiking in the Black Forest was fun. Mrs Schmidt led us through a meadow and ran into the angry farmer with a pitch fork who owned the land. A horse-drawn carriage ride to an island in the North Sea was crazy. No joke — it was a half-hour ride through metre-deep water. We biked along the North Sea too, which was flat and covered in cows and windmills. I liked the museums in Berlin. There was a cool Greek and Roman one called the Pergamon (on Museum Island). In Hamburg, there’s the Miniatur Wunderland which is literally a miniature wonderland. It’s the world’s largest model railway and city exhibit. In Mainz we went to the Gutenberg Museum and saw a demonstration of the original printing press from the 1500s — I remember learning about it in Grade 8. It was cool to see it live. Swimming in the Baltic Sea at Ruegen and meeting Berlin students in the youth hostel was fun. Germany seems to have a lot of thermal hot springs, pools, and water parks; bring a bathing suit.

Salzburg, Austria is Mozarttown. Even chocolates are named after him. We went down slides in an old salt mine. There’s a trippy trick waterpark that an archbishop built 500 years ago. Fountains spray from nowhere as you walk through it. It’s also neat to go up the Alps in the gondola. You hear so much about them, and snowboarding was awesome. Sorry Sima, but this was so much cooler and bigger — Mega sunburn though from the snow glare. We mostly loved German food, but it’s weird to eat buns for breakfast. Not a lot of scrambled eggs and toast; lots of cured meat and cheese. Munich is the beer capital of Germany so we went to the Paulaner brewery for a tasting. We tried champagne in the Kupferberg cellar in Mainz — it’s an old Roman fort. You always think of Germans as beer-people but they love wine, too. Mrs Schmidt says alcohol isn’t a big deal in Germany; at wine fests people use real glasses and mingle in the town square. The school in Mainz sells wine for fundraisers. We’d all heard about Hitler, but it was crazy to experience Germany’s WWII history. In Nürnberg, Hitler started to build a coliseum like the Roman one, but he ran out of time. The Nazi rally grounds are huge. The hardest part was visiting the concentration camp at Buchenwald. It was so real. It was hard to stay for long. A lot of the cities were destroyed in the war but everything is rebuilt now. There is a memorial in Berlin for the Holocaust that is a constant reminder that we need to cherish a common humanity no matter the race, religion, or belief. The Berlin Wall is another monument of recent history that

devastated many Germans. It came down in 1989. We got a small piece of the wall to bring home. While in Freiburg, in the Black Forest, we met Mrs Schmidt’s mom. She’s an author — what a cool lady. We also met Mrs Schmidt’s siblings and friends, who live all over Germany. We stayed at her sister Tina’s organic farm and slept in a hayloft. Mrs Schmidt sang us a lullaby to make sure we slept. Susanne and Ulrike are two of Mrs Schmidt’s friends from elementary school and they came along for part of the trip. We met two of Mrs Schmidt’s brothers — Eike and Teddy. Freiburg’s old town is all cobblestones with little gutters running through it. But the gutters aren’t dirty, they’re little streams. Everyday there’s a market in the square in front of the church, and vendors sell everything — fruit, bread, toys, and flowers. We got bratwursts at one stand; they’re better than hot dogs. A monk gave us a Middle Ages tour around old town. All cities have pedestrian zones — great for us because Mrs Schmidt and Mr Reid let us explore on our own. We got so much exercise. Climbing up the cathedral stairs to the top of the bell tower in Freiburg was exhausting but definitely worth it; it’s like being the Hunchback of Notre Dame. We biked for four days on trails through villages along the Rhine River. No matter how much we hated being pulled out of bed at 7:00 a.m. for breakfast, as soon as we were back in Whitehorse many of us were asking: “Can I come along next year again?” I wish you could. I wish all my

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students at Porter Creek Secondary School (PCSS) could come along. I love showing what Germany has to offer. When I started German classes at PCSS in 1997, all students seemed to know about Germany was Nazis and Hitler. Those who’ve never learned about Germany often think the language is harsh and the countryside is dreary. And no wonder. There are tons of Hollywood movies that showcase WWII, but very few that will take you through the magical landscape and castles of Bavaria. There are tons of black and white documentaries about post-war destruction, but few about the charming wine festivals in the Rhine River valley. But now you have experienced that Germany is green and lush, with houses decorated with flowers. Every region is distinct, the language is melodic and lyrical, and many well-known philosophers, writers, poets and composers are German. You created connections with young Germans that led to them visiting Whitehorse. You showed-

off our territory with Yukon River trips, skiing and Chilkoot hiking trips. There are many people to thank for the past fourteen years of Germany trips: former vice-principal John Reid, who chaperoned over the years; other staff members and administrators; family and friends; and parents of students who traveled. The biggest thank-you, however, goes out to you, my students. Without your curiosity, desire to learn German, to travel, to meet new people and experience a new culture, these trips would never have been possible. The next Germany trip is in August, and it will be my last. But as long as you are interested in learning German and experiencing this wonderful country and culture, the bond between PCSS and Germany will continue. Renate Schmidt is a German and Social Studies teacher at PCSS. Please send comments about her article to editor@whatsupyukon.com

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Whitehorse Events summer long Sat, Jun 28 The Steiner Recliners 7:30 PM Best Western Gold Rush Inn Sat, Jun 28 Yukon Jack 7:30 PM Jarvis until Sat, Jun 28 Frondescence Art Street Saloon Show Arts Underground Focus Gallery Sat, Jun 28 The amazing Blackberry exhibit featuring artists Elise Bousquet Wood 8:30 PM Paddy’s Place 333-9315 and Shelley MacDonald Sun, Jun 29 Sunday Blues Night With until Sat, Jun 28 Seasonal (Dis)order McNalley & Hamilton 7:30 PM Best Art Show Arts Underground In the Edge Western Gold Rush Inn Gallery, featuring: artists Michel Cignac Mon, Jun 30 Arts in the Park: The and Douglas Drake. Curated by Hildur Riverbends 12:00 PM LePage Park a Jónasson classic dawson city band made up of until Sun, Jul 13 Dahkha Khwaan preachers, teachers, miners and more Gallery 22 Original paintings by Colin Tue, Jul 1 Arts in the Park: CANADA Alexander. Dahkha Khwaan dancers art DAY – NO SHOW – THE PARK IS until Tue, Jul 15 Small Works on Paper DARK 12:00 PM LePage Park go check art show by Don Weir Baked Cafe An out the Canada Day celebrations! art display of 20 smaller pieces, selected Tue, Jul 1 Lorne Mt Canada Day from work done this past winter. Artwork Celebrations! 3:00 PM Lorne Mountain resulting from experimentation with new Community Centre 3pm Games and Fun paper created by Arches for oil paint. for everyone with MLVFD, 5 pm-7pm until Sun, Aug 31 Exhibit: Be Prepared Free Community BBQm 4.30 concert with MacBride Museum youth musicians and Ryan McNally until Sat, Sep 6 Exhibit: Jim Robb’s Tue, Jul 1 Ginger Jam 9:00 PM Yukon Colourful Five Percent Yukon Arts Inn fully electric jam with a PA system, Centre drum kit and guitars provided, and until Tue, Oct 7 Exhibition: La Caravane encourages the wearing of silly hats boréale des dix mots Centre De La Tue, Jul 1 Jam Night with Ben Mahony Francophonie 668-2663 9:00 PM Jarvis Street Saloon Bring an Mon, Jun - 30 Fri, Jul 4 Arts in the Park instrument or play his or play along. First Visual Artist: Suzanne Palecny 12:00 timers folkies and rockers and everyone PM LePage Park else is welcome. Sat, Jul 5 - Sun, Jul 6 Whitehorse Nuit Wed, Jul 2 Arts in the Park: Remy Blanche 7:00 PM Multiple Locations July Rodden 12:00 PM LePage Park 5th 7:00 p.m -- 7:00 a.m July 6th 2014 environmental songs and sing-alongs – A free, all-night pedestrian-accessible it’s fun! contemporary art show. Multiple Wed, Jul 2 Whitewater Wednesday 7:00 Locations: The Old Fire Hall, On the PM Epic Pizza goes till we are done! Wharf, Midnight Sun Coffee Roasters, Wed, Jul 2 Jamaoke With Jackie 8:00 YuKonstruct, United Church on Main PM Jarvis Street Saloon Street, l’AFY, and a private backyard on Wed, Jul 2 Johnny Rogers & the New Jarvis near the clay cliffs Music Jam 8:30 PM Paddy’s Place 3339315 Every Wednesday come check out the new tunes. Thu, Jul 3 Arts in the Park: Kim Beggs 12:00 PM LePage Park Continues to slowly build a body of work that gets Wed, Jun 25 Whitewater Wednesday 7:00 PM Epic Pizza goes till we are done! better and better with the passage of time Thu, Jul 3 Fiddle Night With Joe Wed, Jun 25 Arts in the Park: The Loutchan 7:00 PM 98 Hotel Muffdusters 7:00 PM LePage Park Band Thu, Jul 3 Jamaoke With Jackie 7:30 up for Sunstroke PM Jarvis Street Saloon Wed, Jun 25 Jamaoke With Jackie 8:00 Thu, Jul 3 Open mic with Marcus PM Jarvis Street Saloon Steiner 7:30 PM Best Western Gold Wed, Jun 25 Johnny Rogers & the New Rush Inn 867-668-4500 Music Jam 8:30 PM Paddy’s Place 333Fri, Jul 4 Arts in the Park: Doug 9315 Every Wednesday come check out Thorseth 12:00 PM LePage Park a great the new tunes. fingerstyle guitarist on 6-string, 12-string Thu, Jun 26 Adaka Cultural Festival and harp guitar Kwanlin Dun Cultural Centre Yukon First Fri, Jul 4 Sodapony 8:30 PM Paddy’s Nations Cultural Celebration. Take part Place 333-9315 Sodapony in crafts & workshops, Traditional Dance, Sat, Jul 5 Whitehorse: Fireweed Local Music, Yukon Foods and so much Farmers Market 10:00 AM Shipyards more. See 8 page program in What’s Up Park 393-2255 Enjoy Yukon Food, Crafts, Yukon June 26 Music and more every Thursday all Thu, Jun 26 Arts in the Park: El Motor summer long 12:00 PM LePage Park up forSt Jean Sat, Jul 5 Yukon Jack 7:30 PM Jarvis Baptiste Days and staying a few days Street Saloon extra Sat, Jul 5 Chris Culgin Band 8:30 PM Thu, Jun 26 Whitehorse: Fireweed Paddy’s Place 333-9315 Farmers Market 3:00 PM Shipyards Park 393-2255 Enjoy Yukon Food, Crafts, Music and more every Thursday all summer long Thu, Jun 26 Fiddle Night With Joe Loutchan 7:00 PM 98 Hotel Wed, Jun 25 Northern Voices ToastThu, Jun 26 Aboriginal Summer Play masters Meeting 7:00 AM Sport Yukon Readings: Thunderstick 7:30 PM The Guests are welcome! Old Fire Hall 867-393-2676 Readings Wed, Jun 25 Gwaandak Theatre’s showcase aboriginal playwrights. Aboriginal Summer Play Readings Thunderstick was written by Kenneth T. 7:30 PM The Old Fire Hall 393-2676 Get Williams ready to “Laugh your Mocs off” Thu, Jun 26 Jamaoke With Jackie 7:30 Wed, Jun 25 Aboriginal Summer Play PM Jarvis Street Saloon Readings: Salt Baby 7:30 PM The Thu, Jun 26 Open mic with Marcus Old Fire Hall 867-393-2676 Readings Steiner 7:30 PM Best Western Gold showcase aboriginal playwrights. Salt Rush Inn 867-668-4500 Baby was written by Falen Johnson. Fri, Jun 27 Arts in the Park: Thu, Jun 26 Adaka Cultural Festival Shagadelica 12:00 PM LePage Park Kwanlin Dun Cultural Centre Yukon First classic rock and more from this hip Nations Cultural Celebration. Take part collection of whitehorse musicians in crafts & workshops, Traditional Dance, Fri, Jun 27 Ryan McNally 7:30 PM Best Local Music, Yukon Foods and so much Western Gold Rush Inn more. See 8 page program in What’s Up Fri, Jun 27 The Midnight Sons with Yukon June 26 special guests 8:30 PM Paddy’s Place Thu, Jun 26 Whitehorse: Fireweed 333-9315 Farmers Market 3:00 PM Shipyards Sat, Jun 28 Whitehorse: Fireweed Park 393-2255 Enjoy Yukon Food, Crafts, Farmers Market 10:00 AM Shipyards Music and more every Thursday all Park 393-2255 Enjoy Yukon Food, Crafts, summer long Music and more every Thursday all

Art Shows

Live Music

Events

June 26, 2014

Enter Your Events On-line It’s Free. It’s Fast. It’s Easy. Thu, Jun 26 Community BBQ with MLA Jan Stick 4:30 PM Grey Mountain Primary School Thu, Jun 26 Salsa in the Park 5:00 PM Rotary Peace Park Every Thursday, join Salsa Yukon for a dance in the park. Thu, Jun 26 Aboriginal Summer Play Readings: Thunderstick 7:30 PM The Old Fire Hall 867-393-2676 Readings showcase aboriginal playwrights. Thunderstick was written by Kenneth T. Williams Thu, Jun 26 MacBride Museum lecture series: Whitehorse book talk 7:30 PM MacBride Museum 667-2709 Join Ione Christensen on a tour through historical Whitehorse via “Whitehorse: an Illustrated History”.The book is a compilation of stories and photographs. It explores different layers of Yukon’s capital city. Sat, Jun 28 Whitehorse: Fireweed Farmers Market 10 AM Shipyards Park 393-2255 Enjoy Yukon Food, Crafts, Music and more every Thursday all summer long Sat, Jun 28 swing dance 8:30 PM Jarvis Street Saloon 335-2300 Free swing dance lessons followed by dancing to a live band Mon, Jun 30 GO The Surrounding Game 6:00 PM Starbucks Chilkoot Centre Simple Game Deep Strategy. Beginners & Visitors Welcome. For more information email: tjbowlby@gmail.com Tue, Jul 1 Lorne Mt Canada Day Celebrations! 3:00 PM Lorne Mountain Community Centre 3pm Games and Fun for everyone with MLVFD, 5 pm-7pm Free Community BBQm 4.30 concert with youth musicians and Ryan McNally Wed, Jul 2 Artist Talk with Amelia Merhar, 6:00 PM Arts Underground Amelia makes cool, clever art by way of interactive and performance installations. Often musical, sometimes political, and always enjoyable, her work invites audience participation and offers a memorable experience, Wed, Jul 2 Northern Voices Toastmasters Meeting 7:00 AM Sport Yukon Guests are welcome! Wed, Jul 2 Jarvis Street Comedy 9:00 PM Jarvis Street Saloon Thu, Jul 3 Whitehorse: Fireweed Farmers Market 3:00 PM Shipyards Park 393-2255 Enjoy Yukon Food, Crafts, Music and more every Thursday all summer long Thu, Jul 3 Salsa in the Park 5:00 PM Rotary Peace Park Every Thursday, join Salsa Yukon for a dance in the park. Sat, Jul 5 Family Fun & Farmers Golf at Rivendell Farm 10 AM Rivendell Farm 867-393-8931 Sat, Jul 5 Whitehorse: Fireweed Farmers Market 10 AM Shipyards Park 393-2255 Enjoy Yukon Food, Crafts, Music and more every Thursday all summer long Sat, Jul 5 MANDRAGORA CIRCO 4:00 PM Yukon Arts Centre Coming all the way from Argentina, Mandragora Circo will be telling a story of love and comedy for all ages! There will be juggling, aerial acrobatics on tissue and trapeze and live music! Sat, Jul 5 swing dance 8:30 PM Jarvis Street Saloon 335-2300 Free swing dance lessons followed by dancing to a live band

Thu, Jun 26 Introduction to 3D Archery 1:00 PM Biathlon Range 668-2840 colin. hickman@yasc.caL earn archery on lifesize animals in the forest. Age 10 +10 persons per day max. Please book with us in advance. Thu, Jun 26 Free Summer Kids Programs Ages 9-12 2:00 PM Whitehorse Public Library Registration required. Space limited. For more information or to register call Amy at 6678900 or email amy.noseworthy@gov. yk.ca. Thu, Jun 26 Playgroup for parents 3:00 PM Lorne Mountain Community Centre Agnes 667-7083 Fri, Jun 27 Free Summer Kids Programs Ages 9-12 10:00 AM Whitehorse Public Library Registration required. Space limited. For more information or to register call Amy at 6678900 or email amy.noseworthy@gov. yk.ca. Fri, Jun 27 Young Explorer’s Preschool Program: birds 10:00 AM MacBride Museum 667-2709 A program for kids to explore the museum gallery with their parents. Adults need to come with their kids. Fri, Jun 27 Learning Lions Homeschoolers Get Together 3:00 PM Lorne Mountain Community Centre Agnes 667-7083 Fri, Jun 27 Real Raptors 5:00 PM Frank Slim Building The American Bald Eagle Foundation will display live birds of prey. Learn more about these raptors and the foundation. Sat, Jun 28 Drop-In 10:00 AM Heart Of Riverdale Sat, Jun 28 Real Raptors 9:30 AM Frank Slim Building The American Bald Eagle Foundation will display live birds of prey. Learn more about these raptors and the foundation. Mon, Jun 30 Free Summer Kids Programs Ages 4-5 10:30 AM Whitehorse Public Library Registration required. Space limited. For more information or to register call Amy at 6678900 or email amy.noseworthy@gov. yk.ca. Mon, Jun 30 GO The Surrounding Game 6:00 PM Starbucks Chilkoot Centre Simple Game Deep Strategy. Beginners & Visitors Welcome. For more information email: tjbowlby@gmail.com Tue, Jul 1 Free Summer Kids Programs Ages 6-8 2:00 PM Whitehorse Public Library Registration required. Space limited. For more information or to register call Amy at 667-8900 or email amy.noseworthy@gov.yk.ca. Tue, Jul 1 Lorne Mt Canada Day Celebrations! 3:00 PM Lorne Mountain Community Centre 3pm Games and Fun for everyone with MLVFD, 5 pm-7pm Free Community BBQm 4.30 concert with youth musicians and Ryan McNally Wed, Jul 2 Knee High Nature 10:30 AM Middle McIntyre Creek Activities and games are designed for kids. Head up College Drive and follow the signs. Wed, Jul 2 Free Summer Kids Programs Ages 6-8 2:00 PM Whitehorse Public Library Registration required. Space limited. For more information or to register call Amy at 667-8900 or email amy.noseworthy@gov.yk.ca. Wed, Jul 2 Kids Craft time 3:00 PM Lorne Mountain Community Centre Thu, Jul 3 Introduction to 3D Archery 1:00 PM Biathlon Range 668-2840 colin. hickman@yasc.ca Learn archery on lifesize animals in the forest. Age 10 +.10 Wed, Jun 25 Knitting Circle 1:00 PM persons per day max. Please book with Heart Of Riverdale us in advance. Wed, Jun 25 Free Summer Kids Programs Ages 6-8 2:00 PM Whitehorse Thu, Jul 3 Free Summer Kids Programs Ages 9-12 2:00 PM Whitehorse Public Public Library Registration required. Library Registration required. Space Space limited. For more information or to register call Amy at 667-8900 or email limited. For more information or to register call Amy at 667-8900 or email amy.noseworthy@gov.yk.ca. amy.noseworthy@gov.yk.ca. Thu, Jun 26 Adaka Cultural Festival Kwanlin Dun Cultural Centre Yukon First Thu, Jul 3 Playgroup for parents 3:00 PM Lorne Mountain Community Centre Nations Cultural Celebration. Take part in crafts & workshops, Traditional Dance, Agnes 667-7083 Fri, Jul 4 Free Summer Kids Programs Local Music, Yukon Foods and so much more. See 8 page program in What’s Up Ages 9-12 10:00 AM Whitehorse Public Library Registration required. Space Yukon June 26

Family

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limited. For more information or to register call Amy at 667-8900 or email amy.noseworthy@gov.yk.ca. Fri, Jul 4 Learning Lions Homeschoolers Get Together 3:00 PM Lorne Mountain Community Centre Agnes 667-7083 Sat, Jul 5 Drop-In 10:00 AM Heart Of Riverdale Sat, Jul 5 MANDRAGORA CIRCO 4:00 PM Yukon Arts Centre Coming all the way from Argentina, Mandragora Circo will be telling a story of love and comedy for all ages! There will be juggling, aerial acrobatics on tissue and trapeze and live music!

Workshops & Meetings Wed, Jun 25 Northern Voices Toastmasters Meeting 7:00 AM Sport Yukon Guests are welcome! Thu, Jun 26 Tr’ondek Hwech’in Chief and Council Meeting in Whitehorse 6:00 PM Yukon Inn 867-993-3400 TH citizens living in Whitehorse are welcome to come say hello to your elected representatives. There will be food, and you will hear about current business. Mon, Jun 30 Skookum Jim Friendship Centre AGM 6:00 PM Skookum Jim Friendship Centre Agenda, constitution amendments, annual audit, election of executive members. Wed, Jul 2 Northern Voices Toastmasters Meeting 7:00 AM Sport Yukon Guests are welcome!

Alcoholics Anonymous Wednesday

The Joy Of Living group (OM, NS) 12:00 noon Maryhouse 504 Cook St. Porter Creek Step meeting (CM) 8:00 PM Our Lady of Victory No Puffin (CM, NS) 8:00 PM Big Book Study Maryhouse 504 Cook St.

Thursday

The Joy Of Living group (OM, NS) 12:00 noon Maryhouse 504 Cook St. Happy Destiny Young Peoples Group 6:00 PM B.Y.T.E. Polar Group (OM) 7:30 PM Seventh Day Adventists Church (PC)

Friday

The Joy Of Living group (OM, NS) 12:00 noon Maryhouse 504 Cook St. Yukon Unity Group Meeting 1:30 PM #4 Hospital Road Whitehorse Group (CM, NS) 8:00 PM Maryhouse 504 Cook St.

Saturday

Detox Meeting (OM, NS) 1:00 PM DETOX Bldg 6118-6th Women’s Meeting (CM, NS) 2:30 PM Whitehorse General Hospital (across from emergency) Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting (OM, NS) 7:00 PM Hospital boardroom

Sunday

Sunshine Group (OM, NS) 1:00 PM DETOX Bldg 6118-6th Marble Group (OM, NS) 7:00 PM Hospital boardroom

Monday

The Joy Of Living group (OM, NS) 12:00 noon Maryhouse 504 Cook St. New Beginnings Group (OM, NS) 8:00 PM Maryhouse 504 Cook St.

Tuesday

The Joy Of Living group (OM, NS) 12:00 noon Maryhouse 504 Cook St. Ugly Duckling Group (OM, NS) 8:00 PM Maryhouse 504 Cook St. Juste Pour Aujourd’hui (OM, NS) 7:00 PM 4141B 4th Ave.

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y search turned up 52 profiles. I went through them all and divided them into three categories. The first group was profiles of definite interest. These included apparent close matches to my interests and values. The second group was where matches weren’t as close, but in which no red flags popped up. The third group was profiles I would definitely avoid: those with lingerie shots, narratives containing many careless typos, descriptions of heavy drinking, and obvious value conflicts. Frankly, I was a bit disappointed. While the last group (mismatches) was small, so was the first group: profiles of definite interest. I went back and reviewed my criteria. Was I being too picky? I knew I couldn’t compromise on no smoking and no drugs; to do so would go against my principles in so many ways. I had limited my search to Yukon and I guess the dating site felt a bit guilty about turning up such a small list because it kept offering me profiles from B.C. and Alaska, too. But I figured I’d stick with Yukon for the time being. I went back over the age criteria. What’s a good bracket? I had entered my age plus or minus 15 years. If I were 20 that would

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Yukon L ve Online In the previous three weeks, this unattached Yukon man described his foray into online dating, and provided some suggestions for improving one’s online profile. So how did it all work out?

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June 26, 2014

mean looking at people 5 to 35, but a 15-year age difference doesn’t seem nearly as freaky now that I’m in my 50s. Even so, I felt uncomfortable with going any wider than a 15 year difference. I was hoping to find someone as close to my age as possible. One thing I hadn’t appreciated at first was the selection criteria of “Intent.” Some profiles carried the note that their owners were “not looking for any type of relationship.”

Does that mean “dating but nothing serious” could possibly lead to “dating and something serious”, which in turn could lead to a “relationship” under the right conditions, with the right person? I would think that would be the normal progression. But was I presuming too much? This was harder than I thought. If only we could just sit down and talk to each other over coffee or walk along the river together. I started in on the small group

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Photo: Thinkstock So why are they on this site? Others were looking only for friendship, which I do understand. Most others indicated they were looking to “date but nothing serious”, “looking for a relationship”, or “actively seeking a relationship”. The distinction between the last two was blurry to me; I indicated that I was “looking for a relationship.” Some of the “date but nothing serious” women said in their narratives they desired serious relationships.

of closest-matching profiles. If you think it’s difficult to list yourself online as a woman, well, it’s not any easier for a sensitive guy to expose his vulnerabilities to strangers. Next week, I’ll talk about how things unfolded as I contacted complete strangers online.

Charles Green is looking for love. Please send comments about his articles to editor@ whatsupyukon.com.

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June 26, 2014

The Tramp of My Heart Thoughts on Chaplin by Ryan Dorward

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ctor and filmmaker Charlie Chaplin had the soul of a poet and the heart of a clown. He lived by his own moral code and sometimes his common decency led to his downfall. He made true enemies when he refused to play quietly; and his comic genius led him to places he didn’t know existed. His character, the Tramp, was a man who could find true love; who went to the ends of the earth to win over the girl. He taught us all to fall in love at first sight, and to follow our hearts.

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In The Great Dictator (1940) he reclaimed his trademark moustache from Hitler. He spoke, clearly and precisely and hit the heart of a devastated world embroiled in World War II. He took a stand, in no uncertain terms, to give humour back to a bleak world. We sure could have used someone like that after September 11, 2001. Why the US government perceived this man a threat is still beyond understanding. As Allan Ginsberg put it, “Why was he driven from the shores with a rose in his teeth?” In The Gold Rush (1925) he told the tale of the lost prospector in the Klondike, waiting out hallucinations caused by starvation in a land where even the Tramp couldn’t escape the barrel of a gun. The movie has a classic scene where the Tramp entertains Big Jim with a Thanksgiving feast of candle wax with a pinch of salt for an appetizer, and the entree is shoelace spaghetti served with shoe steak. Just as the hallucinations begin to prompt cannibalistic instincts, a bear enters the cabin. After the Tramp shoots the bear he displays some phenomenal knife sharpening skills as they feast before heading out to seek their riches.

LOOKING FOR CLARITY? GET SOME GUIDANCE WITH TAROT CARD READINGS ASTROLOGICAL CHARTS & FORECASTS

Ellen E. Brian

For a complete selection of services www.ellenbrian.wix.com/littlestar 667-6030

Schopenhauer

said happiness state — but I disagree .

... Charlie Chaplin

Now Selling Frozen Bait and Angling Licenses Wake up and smell the great outdoors!

107 Industrial Road • 867-667-6102

Open 7 days a week!

is a negative

to view security cameras, making sure the workers keep working. Companies look to enhance profits at any cost to the worker. The great invention in Chaplin’s movie is called The Billows Feeding Machine. “Increase your production and decrease your overhead,” is its motto. It features an autocooled soup dispenser, a food pusher, and a rotating corn holder that only needs the tip of a tongue to tell it to switch speeds. To top it all off, they have a padded napkin to wipe off any excess food debris. At least the boss has the decency to declare this invention “just not practical.” In short, Chaplin’s legacy encourages one to take time for the good things in life: to laugh, to do things that create laughter, and to love — even if one has to go to the restaurant at the end PHOTO: wikipedia.com of the universe to do According to its prelude, Mod- so. And finally, to refrain from takern Times (1936) is “a story of in- ing life too seriously. As Chaplin said, “Schopenhauer dustry, of individual enterprise — humanity crusading in the pursuit said happiness is a negative state — but I disagree.” of happiness.” Chaplin’s humour is exemplified in the opening scene where Ryan Dorward is a Whitehorsehe shows sheep being herded, juxbased writer and musician. taposed against men running off Email comments about his to a day of fruitful labour at the article to factory. Meanwhile, the day starts editor@whatsupyukon.com. with the boss-man sitting down


Living with

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June 26, 2014

Wildlife 9

GCDS We’ve got the right stuff...

CANADA DAY celebrations

Hello Everybody, We invite you to share your photos of Yukon wildlife. Email your high-resolution images with a description of what’s going on and what camera equipment you used to Editor@WhatsUpYukon.com

Canada flags and souvenirs, picnic accessories, colourful decorations, camping supplies and more. Happy Canada Day!

Your One Stop Summer Shop!

Yukon Inn Plaza 393-3984

MON-THUR & SAT 9:30 - 6, FRI 9:30-9, SUN 10-6

Haven in the Willows Vacation Rental Haines Junction, Yukon

Luxurious amenities. Serene surroundings. Stunning views of the majestic St. Elias Mountain Range! Sleeps up to 6 people

Daily, Weekly, Monthly stays available

To book this property visit:

www.haveninthewillows.com or call 1-867-334-2808

PHOTO: Cindy Billingham

W

e noticed a grizzly sitting on the beach when we were out

www.mackay.ca

Why I chose MacKay LLP Why I chose MacKay LLP

They think like business owners

on Kluane Lake in our small zodiac. The bear was far from

Congden Creek campground, where we were camping at the time. We headed back to shore, and noticed the bear wandering down

the beach toward us. We pulled up on shore close to our camp-

site, and the curious bear came to sniff around. Maybe he wanted

to see how our fish catch was. He soon lost interest in the zodiac

because we hadn’t caught any fish. After a few sniffs he continued on his way.

Assurance | Taxation | Advisory

Phone: 867-667-7651 Gary Matthews Fax: 867-668-3797

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1100—1177 WestYukon Hastings Street 119–7565 – 132 Street Whitehorse Y1A 2J9 Vancouver, BC V3W V6E 4T5 Surrey, BC 1K5

Windows&Walls Interior Designs

Taken with a simple Canon E0S digital.

Elements Esthetics offers Full AVEDA Spa services, Hair... Massage... Facials... Spa Treatments... It’s Time To Be Pampered! Full Service Professional Hair Styling

With Aveda Hair Stylist Rebecca Laforge

Relaxation, therapeutic and prenatal Massage with RMT Omni-Joe

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Appointment Alerts, Share the Love for Prizes

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Hunter Douglas Blinds Drapery Curtain Rods Fabrics Free Colour Consultations

Drop by our showroom! 6098 6th Avenue Suite B

FREE In-Store OR Home Consultations Phone 668-6089 or 334-3320


12

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June 26, 2014

Haines Alaska

Tap Into Your Inner Explorer... Your Adventure Starts Here

www.haines.ak.us

Smoked Salmon, Halibut, and black cod Locally Made Gifts • WE SHIP TO CANADA OPEN DAILY / dejondelights.com / 907-766-2505

420 Main St. 907-766-2441 www.oleruds.com

HAINES - Just up from the cruise ship dock in Ft. Seward SkAGWAY - 326 3rd Ave, across from the Golden North Hotel

Your Source in Haines for Hunting, Fishing & Clothing For 43 years

Second Nature A very eclectic nature store

Wild Edibles, Teas, Foraging, Survival, Herbal, Field Guides, Brewing Supplies, Raw Honey, Vintage & Much More 121 Second Ave N, Haines, Alaska 1½ blocks up from Main St

907-766-2992 ● www.kingporcini.com

“The Store that Helps People Enjoy Nature’s Bounty”

Main & Second Ave. • (907) 766-2352

Captain’s Choice MOTEL

OCEANSIDE R.V. PARK Panoramic view of the Lynn Canal, 1 block from Downtown. Individual Full Service RV Sites

A Pleasant Touch of Luxury

Good Sam Park • Water • Electrical • Sewer • Cable TV • Laundry • Showers • WiFi

Haines, Alaska’s

FLIGHT SERVICE Throughout SOUTHEAST ALASKA Reservations In Alaska: 907-789-3331 www.flyalaskaseaplanes.com email: info@flyalaskaseaplanes.com

SCHEDULED SERVICE TO Haines, Skagway, Sitka, Hoonah, Kake, Juneau, Gustavus, Angoon, Tenakee, Pelican, Elfin Cove and Excursion Inlet

Panoramic view of Lynn Canal. Captain’s Choice Inc. Rental Cars Courtesy transfers upon request. Located within 1 block of dining & shopping. Tours and Charters available at the front desk. Continental Breakfast. Laundomat. WIFI for Fee

Relax in the Captain’s Lounge

FOR RESERVATIONS P.O. Box 392 Haines, Alaska 99827 (907) 766-3111 Toll free 1-800-478-2345 Fax (907) 766-3332 Website:www.capchoice.com E-mail:captain@aptalaska.net

puppet capitol of Alaska and home of Local Multi-media Artist

TRESHAM GREGG brings you his New Fantasy Puppet Show

FUR NORTH  PUPPET SHOW

at

newest, most comfortable lodging! • • • • • • • •

HAINES, ALASKA

F P

UNIQUELY ALASKAN  ARTS 2nd and Willard Downtown Haines, AK

OPEN YEAR ROUND

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June to September Mon - Wed - Fri 4pm

1 mile from the golf course

907-766-2437

CANAL MARINE & AUTO Service and repair IF MAN made it WE can fix it. * Mechanic on duty * Next to harbor

Front Street, Haines, Ak

For only $5 admission Children under 3 FREE www.northwestsupernatural.com

907-766-2540

www.northwes

907-76


13

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June 26, 2014

HAINES ALASKA

Our Yukon Neighbours are always welcome in Haines Alaska June 28, July 5, 12, 19, 26

logging show, live music, horseshoe tournament, fun-run, kids’ stage, amusement rides, Alaska vendors, food and entertainment, live animals, puppet shows and MORE! Contact SE Alaska State Fair at 907-766-2476 or Email: director@seakfair.org or www.seakfair.org

Haines Alaska Farmers Market Purchase locally grown/made produce, food, arts and crafts. Visit with friends and locals.

August 2, 2014

Markets are held Saturdays under Paysons Pavilion.

Haines Hustle

July 4, 2014

5K, 10K and trail half marathon. Contact SE Alaska State Fair at (907) 766-2476 or Email: director@seakfair.org orwww.seakfair.org

Independence Day Celebration & Music Festival Mt. Ripinsky run, a parade, BBQ, mud volleyball, pie eating contest and much more. In the evening enjoy the Independence Day Music Festival at the Fort Seward Parade Grounds followed by fireworks. Contact Haines Chamber of Commerce at 907-766-2202 www.haines chamber.org.

August 9, 2014 Haines Century Ride, Fort Seward Parade Grounds Full Century Ride 100 miles, Part Century Ride 80 miles and Beginner Century Ride 20 miles. Registration is $35, starting and finish line is at Fort Seward Parade Grounds. For information or to register for event contact the Haines Convention & Visitors Bureau 907-766-2234 or visit

July 18-19, 2014 The Mad Adventure of Mr. Toad

www.hainescenturyride.com.

presented by the Summer Youth Theater Conservatory Chilkat Center for the Arts, times TBA

August 29, 2014 21st Annual Mardi Gras Party

July 31- August 3, 2014

Saturday evening at the Fogcutter, Harbor and Pioneer Bars. Costume prizes, Cajun music and refreshments.

45th Annual Southeast Alaska State Fair Four fun-filled days at the end of July. Includes a parade, exhibits,

33 Mile Roadhouse

Small Batch Spirits

Cabin Rentals-Restaurant-Fuel Station

Life’s too short for bad coffee serving espresso, specialty drinks, handcrafted treats, light breakfasts, and sandwiches. Vegetarians welcome. Open year round. 25 Portage St. in historic Fort Seward 907 766 2928

Salmon Run

CAMPGROUND & CABINS

• • • • •

Home Cooking & Baking Access to Hiking, fishing & Jeeping Close to the Kroschel Wildlife Park Gas, Propane, & Diesel Disc Golf Course & Beautiful Scenery

Open 7 days a week 33 Mile 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM on Haines Hwy Call 907-767-5510

Try Our

Famous Burgers

including the “Super 33 Mile Burger”

Buckshot & Bobby Pins The most unique boutique in the North!

Made in Southeast Alaska

www.portchilkootdistillery.com

The Sea Wolf Gallery Carving studio of Haines multimedia artist, Tresham Gregg at the Fort Seward Parade Field Unique images in woodcarving, silk screen prints, jewelry and puppets.

Canadian currency always welcome!

221 MAIN STREET

907-766-2450

FIREWEED RESTAURANT Fresh-made food. Beer & Wine.

(907) 766-2540 seawolf@tresham.com

tresham.com

Pick Up Your

LUNCH: Wed. – Sat. 11:30 – 3:00 DINNER: Tues. – Sat. 4:30 – 9:00 Beautiful forested setting overlooking the Lutak Inlet

Electrical hookups, dry sites, & cozy cabins Shower & laundry facilities; mini-market; WiFi Fishing licenses, fish freezer, rv/boat storage Caravans and groups welcome, pet friendly Minutes from Chilkoot Lake and boat launch 6.5 mi. from town, 1.8 mi. from Ferry Terminal

6.5 Mile Lutak Rd, Haines, Alaska (907) 766 3100 info@salmonruncampground.com salmonruncampground.com

766-3838 Dine In or Take Out in Fort Seward, Blacksmith Rd,. just up from cruise ship dock.

Hotel Halsingland

& Commander’s Room Restaurant

Former Commanding Officer’s Quarters of Fort Seward Serving unique & creative dishes inspired by the freshest ingredients

800-542-6363 www.hotelhalsingland.com reservations@hotelhalsingland.com

Year roUnd every other week at:

Alaska Rod Alaska Seaplanes Summers at:

Haines Visitor Centre For a full event listings for Haines alaska Check out our new website:

www.whatsupyukon..com


14

Grillisn’t isn’tcomplete completewithout withoutour the Meat DELI The grill Call ahead for Pre Spiced or Marinated steaks Or try our Smokies, Bratworst, Chicken, or Ribs

667-7583

WWW.WHATSUPYUKON.COM

June 26, 2014

Feasting on the Forest

Miche Genest finds delicacies all around us by Meagan Deuling

203 Hanson Hanson Street, Monday – Saturday 203 Street,Whitehorse Whitehorse Open - Open Tuesday-Saturday

!

from beginners to the Yukon’s Best weekly at Epic Pizza in Riverdale 7:00 PM until we’re done!

For Your Next Special Occasion…

... and so much mor more PHOTOS: Meagan Deuling

Michele Genest making meringues

CUSTOM Cakes, Cookies, Cupcakes and more! Call Hope Hartley 667-4680

Try Our Pulled Pork

OPEN Tues & Thurs 4-10 Wed & Fri 4-12 Sat 4:30 - 10 38c Lewes Blvd. Whitehorse, Yukon 867.456.4792

Fresh Dough Made Daily Nightly Food Specials in our large dining area www.facebook.com/garlicninja

M

iche Genest is up early, squeezing wild-rosepetal-infused egg whites into small twists on parchmentpaper-lined baking pans. She’s making meringues in preparation for the launch of her second cookbook, The Boreal Feast: a culinary journey through the North. The meringues are dainty, pink floral-shaped cookies; she says you can smell the rose petals more than you can taste them. She pulls a mason jar out of the pantry, it’s half-full of dried pink petals. She says she’s seen wild roses in bloom already this year, even though the lupins are still flowering. The time frame for picking spruce tips just passed — “everything happens so fast,” she says, in reference to harvest seasons. She says she picks a lot of things from around here, as she pulls more jars from the pantry — smoked Labrador tea and yarrow. Once you know what to look for, you’ll see them everywhere, she says. The Boreal Feast is filled with

beautiful photographs by Cathie Archbould, and with drawings by Laurel Perry. It’s a food-season directorate, and it’s written like a personal travel journal — Genest ventured to Sweden, Norway, and Finland to document how those Northerners feast — and of course, it’s a recipe book. But Genest says her intent for her second cookbook goes beyond those things. “We have a magnificent feast all around us, that’s what we celebrate with.” Genest wants people to use the book as an inspiration to familiarize themselves with their surroundings in the North. She wants readers to “go out, learn about plants and animals, come home, and cook with them.” She wants her book to help people live in the forest, to make it their home. Genest says her book is about conservation — when people use the land on which they live as an ingredient list, it creates a connection. She started learning about her surroundings by picking berries,

because they’re the easiest. Now she’s learning more about herbs. “I experiment once I know a plant’s not poisonous,” she says. Genest acknowledges that the ingredients in her book won’t be found across Canada, but some are — like rhubarb and juniper berries. In Ontario, wild leeks could be a substitute in the Pumpkin Seed and Wild Onion Pesto recipe in her book. As she prepares to whip another batch of egg whites, for more meringue, Genest advises making sure the eggs are at room temperature, and that cream of tartar is your friend — it stiffens the beaten whites. The meringues are listed in the “Spring” section of the new cookbook, under the feast “Tea on the Tarahue”. In the book, Genest explains the Tarahue is a restored sternwheeler in Atlin, which is the setting of an annual tea hosted by the Atlin Historical Society. That formal tea inspired Genest to create recipes that people could use cont’d on page 15...

Your Dining Fine Guide

We Do Gluten Free • Gluten Free Sandwiches • Gluten Free Pastas • Gluten Free Desserts

Friday Nights

live local music • 6-9 PM free appies • 5-6 PM

Inside the

Frank Slims Building at Shi pyards Park 1 1 to 4 daily We’ll be at Sunstroke music festival June 20-21 Adaka cultural festival June 27-July 3rd Atlin music Festival July 11-13

Fast, Fresh & Always Delicious Vegan & Gluten Free Options!

201 Wood Street

Whitehorse, YT 393-9700


15

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June 26, 2014

Feasting on the Forest ... cont’d

LATE NIGHT

Here to make you happy ’til late.

Night owls, insomniacs and midnight snackers, unite!

Watch your favourite games on our large screen TV TM‡

Whitehorse • 2241 2nd Avenue Whitehorse, Yukon Territories Y1A 5W1

867.667.4992

† Registered trademark of Boston Pizza Royalties Limited Partnership, used under license. * Trademark of Boston Pizza International Inc. © Boston Pizza International Inc. 2013. ‡Trademark of AIRMILES International Trading B.V. Used under license by LoyaltyOne, Inc. and Boston Pizza International Inc. © Boston Pizza International Inc.

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BBQ Bacon Roller

Pulled Pork Roller

Birch syrup, rose petals and smoked Labrador tea are found in The Boreal Feast recipes to make their own tea feast, at home. Her version of the Northern tea feast includes roasted strawberry bruschetta, and potted smoked salmon with toast fingers. Genest wasn’t trained as a chef, but her mom taught her what food should taste like. Genest will be cooking for the launch all day. She has to make morel mushroom mayonnaise — she

picked the morels two years ago near Carmacks — Arctic char river pate, and potted smoked salmon. She wants to keep writing, too. She wants to write a book about when she was in Greece, in her twenties. She learned about cooking then, too. She will also keep cooking — she wants to learn how to bake bread, and about sauces. She wishes someone would

teach a cake decorating course in Whitehorse, and she wants to learn how to properly filet a fish. She slides three trays of dainty meringues in the oven and says writing and cooking are perfect complements.

We’re Open 7 days a week 11am - 9pm 2230-2nd Avenue

ADD

1

SOFTDRINK $ or FRIES

each

Meagan Deuling is a Whitehorse-based writer and assistant editor at What’s Up Yukon.

Rose petal meringues

Wines by Design EXCEPTIONAL W INES MADE BY YOU

EN PRIMEUR

S PA I N CABERNET SAUVIGNON This richly built wine is fermented on GenuWine Winery Dried Grape Skins which adds intricate layers of luscious black currants and cherries followed by black pepper, French and American oak. 4230 - 4th Ave. Whitehorse Yukon across from McDonald’s • Phone 633-3536

C AT C H T H E

Six Mile River Resort

F L AV O R WAV E !

Come Stay With Us in Beautiful Tagish Fully licenced SLOW FOOD RESTAURANT Come relax and enjoy your stay... fast food is 1.5 hr away

*LICENCED RESTAURANT * CABINS RENTAL * RV PARKING * BIG FISH YUKON CHARTERS RESERVATION RECOMMENDED.

Saturday, June 28 Canada Day Celebration Party

Dancing and fun with the Canucks Reservation are required, Special Menu 5 PM - 9PM, Cover Charge $10

Live Music throughout the Summer Call or e-mail for your reservations

Kevin Barr & company Live in July Whitehorse locations: 212 Main Street 867-393-5000 2190 2nd Ave. 867-668-6889 Canada Game Centre, 200 Hamilton Blvd. 867-456-7690

R a te d #

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Call 867-399-4121 Email: info@sixmileriverresort.com

www.sixmileriverresort.com


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June 26, 2014

DAWSON CITY

june 27-29 BOTANY DAYS

TUESDAY, jULY 1 CANADA DAY PARADE!

TUESDAY, jULY 1

1-4PM Yukon Gold Panning Championships

On Front St. at Tombstone Territorial Park All ages and skill levels welcome! Friends of the Dempster invite 10:30 Bike Rodeo / Float Participants 1-2pm- Registration you to come enjoy a weekend of 2-4pm-Competitions Want to join the parade? hikes and talks all about botany! 4pm-Awards Ceremony Come down to the Rec Centre Contact: tombstonecentre@gmail.com (4th & King) to decorate your bicycles. 1-4PM Moosehide Fundraiser Decorations for bicycles supplied. On Front St. YUKON RIVER QUEST Wear red & white! Come enjoy food and games Come cheer on the competitors all in support of the biennal in this endurance paddling race 11AM Parade Start / Route Moosehide Gathering from Whitehorse to Dawson City. The Parade will follow: Fourth Ave & King to Front. 2-5PM Live Music @ The Gazebo! Front to Princess. 2:30PM Canada Day FREE Cake Princess to Fifth. at the Visitors Information Centre 8-10:30AM Sourdough Pancake Breakfast Parade ends at Victory Gardens At St. Mary’s Hall $8 3-5PM Canada Day Fun Swim (Dawson City Museum) Come take a dip $2 Sponsored by St. Paul’s Church Made with Sourdough brought After Flag Raising Ceremony 3:30PM Greatest Klondiker Canadian over the Chilkoot in 1898 Parade at Victory Gardens. FREE at the Palace Grand Theatre.

TUESDAY, jULY 1

9AM Birdwatching Walk

See & hear local birds on a 2 hr walk along the river and 9th Ave trail with the Yukon Bird Club. Meet at the Pancake Breakfast (Fifth & King)

27 au 29 juin JOURS BOTANIQUE

12PM Country Picnic, BBQ & Games

Interpreters showcase the legacy of real Canuck Gold Rush personalities.

At the Dawson City Museum

8:00PM Brandon Isaak

LIVE at the Palace Grand

mardi, le 1 juillet PARADE DE LA FÊTE DU CANADA

le 1 juillet (Cont.)

13-17h Championnats d’Orpaillage du Yukon

Venez explorer le monde botanique du Parc Territorriale Tombstone 10h30 Participants de Rodéo a Vélo avec des randonnées et des ou de Char Allégorique activités toute la fin de semaine! Vous voulez participer dans la parade? Venez au Centre de Loisirs (Fourth & King) YUKON RIVER QUEST avant la parade pour décorez vos Venez encourager les participants bicyclettes ou votre char allégorique. 13-16h à la ligne d’arrivée dans cette course Toutes décorations pour bicyclettes d’endurance pataugeoire de sont fournies. Whitehorse à Dawson! Portez du rouge et blanc!

mardi, le 1 juillet 8-10h30 Déjeuner Aux Crêpes

À la salle St. Mary’s $8

9h Observations d’Oiseaux

Venez faire une randonnée de 2 heures pour observer des oiseaux. La promenade suit la rivière et la piste 9e Ave. Les guides font parti du Club d’Ornithologie du Yukon. Point de rencontre à l’Église St-Mary (Fifth & King)

11h Route de Parade

La parade suivera: 4e et King jusqu’a Front Front jusqu’a Princess. Princess jusqu’a 5e et ce termine au Musée de Dawson City. Cérémonie du Lever du Drapeau Au Musée de Dawson City (Après la parade)

Midi Pique Nique de Campagne et BBQ Au Musée de Dawson City

À Front St. Vous êtes inviter à participer ou simplement encourager! 13-14h- Enregistrement 14h-17h- Compétitions diverses 17h- Présentations de trophées

Moosehide Fundraiser

À Front St. Venez profiter de nourritures et des jeux tout à l'appui du Moosehide Gathering.

14-17h Musique au Gazebo! 14h30 Gâteaux GRATUIT!

au Centre d’Informations Touristique

15-17h Baignade à la Piscine Venez vous baignez! $2

15h30 ‘Greatest Klondiker Canadian”

Parc Canada vous invite à déterminer la personnalitée qui a plus influencer la Ruée vers l’Or. GRATUIT

20h Brandon Isaak

LIVE at the Palace Grand


17

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Photo: mbponline.com

June 26, 2014

JULY 17- DCMF KICKOFF CONCERT- COMO MAMAS Dawson City Music Festival soulfully kicks off with the Como Mamas, Thursday, July 17. Hailing from Como, Mississippi, these lifelong gospel singers bring powerful, spirited and soothing acapella vocals to the Palace Grand Theatre stage. Book your tickets before it’s too late! Visit www.dcmf.com for the entire lineup and to get your tickets today!

COME VISIT US:

Bonanza Gold RV Park

Spacious comfortable rooms, with fridge, microwave, coffee maker and wi-fi. Only 1.5 km from the town centre. Come let our friendly staff serve you.

UPCOMING EVENTS

June 27-29 Botany Days (Tombstone Parks) June 27-29 Yukon River Quest- FINISH LINE Canada Day (see opposing page) July 1 Silver Scoundrels (Live at the PG) July 4 Don Amero (Liva at the PG) July 5 Visit Dawsoncity.ca to see all our events!

Triple J Hotel

1-888-993-6789 www.bonanzagold.ca

We have the newest rooms in town with all the amenities to make your stay memorable. Enjoy a meal or a drink on our sunny deck.town. Open May-September (867)993-5323 www.triplejhotel.com

Diamond Tooth Gerties

Sourtoe Cocktail

Come visit Canada’s First and Friendliest Gambling Hall!

Cancan shows nightly- 8:30/10/12 Open 7 days a week from May-Sept. www.diamondtoothgerties.ca

Whitehouse Cabins

Revel in a Klondike experience in a room with a view overlooking the Yukon River! We offer a rustic setting within walking distance to town centre. Treat yourself to a luxurious stay with us! www.whitehousecabins.ca

Dänojà Zho Cultural Centre

The Sourdough Saloon is home to the world famous “SourToe Cocktail”. Come “kiss the toe” to join the club. “You can drink it fast, you can drink it slow, but your lips must touch the toe” www.sourtoecocktailclub.com

Downtown Hotel

Welcome to Canada’s Best Value Inn Dawson City. Combining newly renovated rooms and historic turn of the century atmosphere, we are located in the heart of Dawson City. Home of the “Sourtoe Cocktail” www.yukonhotels.com

Live at the Palace Grand

Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in cultural programs and guided tours.Our Gift Shop has the largest selection of handcrafted beaded slippers in the Yukon. This is the Gift Shop you have been looking for!

Experience the iconic Palace Grand Theatre through a diverse line up of live performances happening throughout the summer. Presented by KIAC in partnership with Parks Canada. www.kiac.ca

Eldorado Hotel

Klondike Kate's Cabins & Restaurant

Great location! All rooms with bath, hi-def tv, phone with voice mail, fridge, coffee maker & 250mb internet/day. Come dine in our restaurant, lounge or covered deck. (867)993-5451 www.eldoradohotel.ca

FO L LO W U S

Stay with us while in Dawson City! Enjoy the privacy of your own cabin were rustic elegance meets modern comfort! Enjoy delicious food at the restaurant either inside or on our great patio! www.klondikekates.ca

get the truth, then go


18

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June 26, 2014

12 Hours of Art Downtown Whitehorse becomes an artistic playground. A scene from Marie-Hélène Comeau’s mapping Inuvik project, 2013 Photos: courtesy Aimeé Dawn Robinson

by Angela Szymczuk

T

he first Whitehorse Nuit Blanche art festival starts on July 5, and runs into the wee hours of July 6. The event is modeled after the famous Nuit Blanche festivals that take place around the world. Whitehorse’s version will showcase five Yukon artists. There will be sculptures, video installations, origami, dance, music, and workshops. Downtown Whitehorse will be an art gallery from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. Gratis gourmet feast stations will be set up throughout downtown Whitehorse to complement the art. Aimeé Dawn Robinson and Monique Romeiko are the creative brains behind this first annual Nuit Blanche. “We take on the roles of coartistic directors, administrators, and collaborators.” Romeiko says. Sounds like a lot of work, but Romeiko couldn’t be more pleased. “We have had an amazing response including interest from a few politicians.” The selection process began in December and concluded at the end of January. Twenty-eight submissions were received, from which the five artists were selected. “This year, we went with Yukon-based artists, but we are hoping to host a Nuit Blanche next year, too. We have already

garnered some interest from international artists,” Romeiko says. Although there are five artists headlining the event, the work of several others will be exhibited throughout the festival at other locations. “There is a site map which will be issued to the public, so people can see where everything is taking place,” Romeiko says. “I am very happy with the five artists we have selected, as each exhibit offers something very different.” Marie- Hélène Comeau is one of the artists whose work will be shown this year. The Montreal native has lived in the Yukon since 1992, which is also when her interested in art piqued. “In the North there is so much opportunity. One of my goals was to express the North in different ways,” she says. Comeau was not exposed to art when she lived in Montreal with her family because of the confusion it sometimes represented. “My family was never quite sure how to interpret the art at

with art, this will be her first time participating in a Nuit Blanche festival. Comeau will be showcasing her exhibit As time Floats By at the L’AFY building. Her project is an artistic representation of sorrow. “I will be making little paper boats to represent people that I have lost in the Yukon, whether it be they are not living here anymore, or have passed away,” she says. “I will also be inviting viewers to participate and make boats in memory of their Yukon friends or relatives that they have lost.” The passing of a close friend inspired Comeau’s idea. Also, “Boats are what brought so many people here to the Yukon in the early 1900s. So I eau. m o thought that would C e n lè é arie-H be a way to also Raven, by M on canvas, c li represent the Yuy r c A kon in my project.” 2012 This is also the first time she will be doing a performance art galleries.” project. But she saw things in a difJoining Comeau is fellow Yuferent light when she moved to kon artist Kevin McLachlan, aka the Yukon. Comeau received her Koovy. McLachlan’s project is Bachelors in Fine Art in 1997, and about break dancing and hip-hop began to pursue art as a career. culture. Although she is very experienced “I want to demonstrate the

positive things that can come out of the dance form, and what it means to me and the other members of the crew,” he says. “We plan to do this through question and answer sessions, shows, cyphers (freestyle circles) workshops, movie screenings, graffiti, and more.” McLachlan has shown his work in public before, but has never performed for a large-scale art festival like Nuit Blanche. “I know if I wasn’t in it I would certainly be going around town to experience the many exciting events of the evening,” he says. His hip-hop art performance will be taking place at YuKonstruct, on Industrial Road. Performing and entertaining are in McLachlan’s future. He will continue with his hip hop dancing, and in the fall he will be heading to college in Ontario to study musical theatre. The festival will also feature work from Nicholas Mah, Michel Gignac, and Marten Berkman. Nuit Blanche takes place July 5 to 6 from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. in downtown Whitehorse. For more information about the event or the other artists visit www. facebook.com/WhitehorseNuitBlanche. Angela Szymczuk is a Whitehorse-based writer. Please send comments about her articles to editor@whatsupyukon.com.

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June 26, 2014

Aboriginal Summer Play Reading

Packs for STACEY’S Meat BBQ Season BUTCHER BLOCK

Get ready to laugh your moccasins off by Samantha Dawson

PORTER CREEK MALL

867-393-2565

Visit Kaska Artist Dennis Shorty in Ross

River

Book a workshop with this Carver & Painter!

PHOTO: Marjolene Gauthier

Director Melaina Sheldon (in orange) conveys her vision to the cast and crew of Salt Baby

A

play reading uses character and voice to tell a story. It’s not a full production with a set, costumes, and lighting. It exposes actors and plays, and gives the community a chance to see the play come to life. Melaina Sheldon is the director of Salt Baby, one of two readings being presented this year by Gwaandak Theatre and the Kwanlin Dun Cultural Centre on June 25 and 26 as part of the annual Aboriginal Summer Play Readings series. Her ancestry includes Tlingit of the Deisheetaan Clan, and she became involved with the readings five years ago. The first time Sheldon saw the play, at the 2013 Next Stage Festival in Toronto, she knew it needed to come to the Yukon. “This play was pure therapy — I laughed, I cried, I agreed. It hits right in the heart. Every kid in the Yukon should see this.” Salt Baby is a comedy by Falen Johnson about a young woman born and raised on a reserve, but looking for a place of her own in the city. She doesn’t fit in on the reserve due to her lighter skin. The play explores self-discovery and identity. It’s about “learning the difference between racism, ignorance and indifference,” says Sheldon. “It’s contemporary to a young First Nations woman, it’s a story that I can relate to, and a lot of my friends can relate to…when you start thinking about identity – [for example] blood quantum issues, working with the Canadian Government, there’s this internal struggle.” The story also looks at what it’s like to be an “urban native”, or not living in your community.

That, along with not feeling “Indian” enough, can weigh down on people, she says. “As young First Nations, we might not always discuss this.” The second play is Thunderstick by Kenneth T. Williams. The story follows two cousins from the same reserve. One’s a war photojournalist, and the other’s a reporter. They are reunited on a journalism assignment in Ottawa. Together they track down the biggest political story of the decade and share some hilarious moments. Williams’ work has been shown at previous summer readings and has been popular. Sheldon says working with the summer play readings has made her grow as both an actor and director. The environment is nonintimidating. “They make it very fluid, it’s not a big process and it’s more casual,” she says. And the event is growing. Every year, more people come out to the play reading auditions, and not just First Nations people. In earlier years, fewer than 10 people would show up for auditions. This year, more than 20 people tried out for a part in the readings. “It’s only growing bigger, it’s awesome to see the interest from the community,” Sheldon says. Christine Genier plays one of the characters in Salt Baby. She says the play readings are a great way to get your feet wet. “It’s the safest way to get into theatre,” she says, encouraging anyone who is interested to check Gwaandak Theatre out on any level — whether as a playwright, producer, or actor. “It’s a wonderful way to find out if it’s for you,” she added. Genier is also of mixed ancestry (she is a French and Southern

Tutchone Wolf Clan member of the Ta’an Kwäch’än Council). She got involved with the readings because the story of Salt Baby is near and dear to her heart. “It’s [being of mixed ancestry) not something that’s talked about a lot about, I’ve grown up looking like a big mixture. This play addresses a lot of that,” she says. Figuring out where you belong is never a simple answer: “the playwright takes a sensitive topic and writes about it with a lot of humour…you can talk about things that Aboriginal people have gone through,” she says. Both readings bring up important topics, but aren’t afraid to find humour them — something pervasive in First Nations culture, Genier says. “How do you deal with questions like how ‘Indian’ are you?” she says. One scene in particular stands out — when the main character in Salt Baby chats with a nonAboriginal man she is dating. She tries to explain the complication of being raised as a First Nations person without looking Aboriginal, or what people consider to be Aboriginal-looking. By shining a light on material like this, the Aboriginal Summer Play Readings series aims to empower Indigenous and Northern voices. The readings run June 25 and 26 at the Old Fire Hall starting at 7:30 p.m., both nights. There will be plenty of storytelling, tea, bannock and laughter. Admission is $8.

Call Ahead 867-969-2296 Or book an appointment online at

www.dennis-shorty.com

Dennis Shorty’s Fine Art Gallery and Studio located around the Corner from “The longest foot suspension bridge in North America”!

Liquor Corporation

Samantha Dawson is a Whitehorse-based writer. Please email comments about her articles to editor@ whatsupyukon.com.

We LoveLines

ght i e r F e n a u l K

! U O Y K N THA For delivering papers to Dawson City and Carmacks!


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June 26, 2014

June 2014

July 2014

Pat Moore Memorial Game Fish Derby

International Softball Tournament

June 26 - 29

June 27 - 29

For the past seven years, this derby has offered families, kids and eager anglers a chance to get out in the fresh ocean air and fish for cash prizes and gift certificates from local merchants. Large and small fish win prizes as do age groups and men and women categories. An avid fisherman, Pat Moore died from complications of Lou Gehrig disease or ALS. The derby was named in his honor and to salute his sportsmanship and devotion to sustaining fish populations in the Taiya Watershed, where he helped out in the local fish hatcheries and passed on his love of fishing to many people.

Annual event features teams from Alaska/ Yukon. Seventh Pasture ballpark.

- located beside the Pizza Station on 4th -

Fireworks and street dance on the 3rd. Parade, street fair & Ducky Derby, July 4th. Contact the Chamber of Commerce for information (907) 983-1898

Garden City Market

International Softball Tournament

Saturday June 28 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Eagles social room/deck

July 4, 5 & 6 2014. Contact Cindy OʼDaniel for information

Skagway Recreation Centre: Rock Wall Belay Classes Wednesdays W/ Tabitha McGillivray

Saturdays W/Jennifer Sasselli

6 - 7:30 Belay Instruction 7:30 - 8 Belay Check

11 - 12:30 Belay Instruction 12:30 - 1 Belay Check $5 Belay Check Fee. Sign up in lobby

Pick Up Your

There are TWO Gas Stations in Skagway

Self-serve Cardlock offers BEST Prices

July 3 & 4, 2014

Contact: Skagway Softball, 983-3021.

Contact: TAIYA INLET WATERSHED COUNCIL , PO BOX 826, Skagway, AK 99840 OFFICE: 907.983.2426

Corner Gas Station

Skagway Independence Day Celebration

Camper Need Propane? Call 253-973-9185

4th and Spring St. 907-983-3663 Make your reservations now for Canada Day Weekend!

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great Thai food and so much more!

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Alaska Sea Planes Skagway News Glacial Smoothies Broadway Bites You Say Tomato Westmark www.whatsupyukon.com

Wildlife cruise with whale watching, bus tour of Juneau and Mendenhall Glacier, free time for shopping, lunch and sightseeing. Continental breakfast and light dinner provided. Day cruise package from skagway or Haines $165

1-800-320-0146 • 907-766-3395 www.alaskafjordlines.com

Try our Famous thick

Milk Shakes! Your stop for Ice Cream, Milkshakes, Fine Chocolates & Candies, Fudge & Drinks. Located on 5th & Broadway (907) 983-3439 Hours 10-7 Mon-Sat, Sun 12-6pm.

FLIGHT SERVICE Throughout SOUTHEAST ALASKA Reservations In Alaska: 907-789-3331 www.flyalaskaseaplanes.com email: info@flyalaskaseaplanes.com

SCHEDULED SERVICE TO Haines, Skagway, Sitka, Hoonah, Kake, Juneau, Gustavus, Angoon, Tenakee, Pelican, Elfin Cove and Excursion Inlet

Famous for the Boston Shake, and the Peanut Butter Shake!!

Check Facebook for specials! www.konekompany.com

7th &  Broadway              907  -­‐  983  -­‐  2739              www.skagwaybrewing.com Bar  Open  Mon  -­‐  Fri:    10am      /      Sat  &  Sun:    11am Lunch:  11am  -­‐  5pm            Dinner:  5pm  -­‐  10pm

Friday, June 27th: 80s Dance Night Par-tay!

DJ Sway-­‐Z  kicks  off  @  9pm.  Costumes  Recommended! High  Bangs.  Neon  Spandex.  Stonewashed  Jeans.   Muscle  T’s.  Leg-­‐Warmers.  Mullets.  Canadian  Tuxedos.

New Dinner  Menu  Additions! Shrimp  Po’Boy,  Popcorn  Shrimp  &  Chips,   Vegan  Hemp  Burger,  Gluten  Free  Pastas

SKAGUAY NEWS DEPOT & BOOKS Broadway & Third Alaska/Yukon Books New & Used Titles Papers - Magazines – Maps Welcome Yukon Friends! 907-983-3354 • Open 9-6

Plan


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June 26, 2014

Upcoming Events For

June and July YAKUTANIA POINT Time: .................................. 1 hour roundtrip Distance: ................1.6 miles (2.6 km) roundtrip Rating: .................................................Easy Elevation Gain: .................... 20 feet (6 meters)

Even More Things To Do…. * Shop to your hearts content * Visit Skagway City Museum Summer Hours: Mo-Fr, 9am-5pm, Sa 10am-5pm, Su 10am-4pm * See the Days of 98 Show on Broadway * Take the Red Onion 15 minute Brothel Tour * Take a Walking Tour with a Klondike Gold Rush National Historic Park Ranger. * Visit Jewell Gardens and Glass Blowing

* Beginner Friendly Climbing Night Tuesdayʼs 6:30-8 p.m. This is for people that have been belay checked and want to practice their skills in a beginner environment! Gather your friends for a fun night out!

LOWER DEWEY LAKE Time: ............................. 1- 2 hours roundtrip Distance: .................................................... 0.9 miles (1.4 km) to lake and return roundtrip .......... 3.6 miles (5.8 km) around lake and return Rating: ......................................... Moderate Elevation Gain: ................ 500 feet (150 meters)

* See www.skagwayrecreation.org for Classes Schedule: Yoga, Spinning, Zumba and more

SMUGGLER’S COVE Time: ............................... 1-2 hours roundtrip Distance: ................... 2 miles (3.2 km) roundtrip Rating:........................................... Moderate Elevation Gain: ....................00 feet (30 meters)

CARDIO/WEIGHT ROOM, SHOWER ROOMS & ROCK WALL OPEN ALL DAY

* Take a walk out to the Gold Rush Cemetery * Count Seals on the ocean front * Take a Flightseeing Tour

ICY LAKE AND UPPER REID FALLS

* Ride the White Pass

Time: ..................................3 hours roundtrip Distance: ................... 6 miles (9.7 km) roundtrip Rating:........................................... Moderate Elevation Gain: ................ 850 feet (260 meters)

* Go Fishing * Rent a bike or take a bike tour

Plan A Trip To Skagway Just a 2 1/2 Hour Drive From Whitehorse

What’s Up Yukon special

STURGILL’S LANDING Time: ..................................4 hours roundtrip Distance: ................... miles (11.2 km) roundtrip Rating:........................................... Moderate Elevation Gain: .................500 feet (152 meters)

Only At the

444 4th St. Skagway (907)983-2200

BACK ALLEY ROCK Roman and Shipwreck Coin Jewelry SHOP

Mention this CARD FoR 1 FRee CUP oF CoFFee @

ROOMS as LOW as $81/night (TAX INCLUDED) FREE WIFI T-Shirts and Sweatshirts Available IN SIZES S-3XL

10% off Collector Pieces while supplies last

Located above the Station, Bar & Grill... Home of the best breakfast in Skagway! Kitchen Open Daily

Find us on Facebook & Tripadvisor

THE

N STATIO BAR & GRILL

Best Fish & Chips in Southeast Alaska! Prime Rib Every Saturday Night! 444 4th St. Skagway (907)983-2200

Ammonite necklace

Canadian Dollars @ PAR

We have the Brands you want!

Large selection of decor Seven Shades of Jade

Featuring Uggs, Levi, Skechers, The North Face, Toms, Nike, and Oakley

20,000 year old fossil Mammoth Ivory

Natural Gold Nuggets!

Gold Panning - Gold Guaranteed BEAD SALE $2 per strand *while quantities last

Down the Alley btwn 4th & 5th 907-983-2568

under the

|

1-800-664-2370 • www.klothesrush.com • 5th & Broadway Open: Monday-Saturday 9am-7pm, Sunday 10am-5pm

THE HISTORIC Built in 1897

THE WORLDS BEST SELLING BRANDS SALES ~ SERVICE ~ RENTALS ::HAINES:: 24 Portage Street, 907-766-2869 Mon - Fri 9 am - 5:30 pm, Sat 9 am - 4 pm ::SKAGWAY:: 5th and Broadway, 907-983-2851 DAILY: 9 am to 6 pm

www.cyclealaska.com

Yukoner rates! Rates $99/night & up includes free wifi and full hot breakfast Get your LOYALTY CARD for free stays and dinner specials

DUFF’S ANNUAL TENT EVENT SALE JUNE 28TH SATURDAY! All tents and sleeping bags on SALE! Contests to win gear, Free breakfast, Don’t miss it!

1-888-752-4929 www.skagwayinn.com

7:30pm

Thursday, July 3rd Street Dance

9:00pm

Trivia Trivia Trivia!

Gnat King Kong

Sunday Special

5th Ave, Skagway AK 907-983-3562 Monday-Saturday 9am-7pm, Sunday: 10am-5pm

(In-house only)

All day

Pizza & Beer or Bloody Mary $13

Mondays

Open 10am - 9pm Daily (Closed Sunday Night)

Thursday, June 26th

Fridays

Windy Valley Boys

7:30pm

Dance Night

9:30pm

Gluten Free Pizza & Gluten Free Beer UPCOMING EVENTS ON FACEBOOK PAGE


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June 26, 2014

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Community EVENTS Atlin

Wed, Jun 25 Ladies’ Lunch & Carpet Bowling 7:00 PM Atlin Rec Centre Wed, Jun 25 Board Games 7:00 PM Atlin Rec Centre Wed, Jul 2 Ladies’ Lunch & Carpet Bowling 7:00 PM Atlin Rec Centre Wed, Jul 2 Board Games 7:00 PM Atlin Rec Centre

Beaver Creek

Tue, Jul 1 Canada Day Parade and BBQ 11:45 AM Beaver Creek Information Centre Thu, Jul 3 Community Market 6:00 PM Beaver Creek Community Club locals sell homemade crafts and baked goods Monday- Saturday Public Swim 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM and 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM Beaver Creek Community Centre Pool Fridays Midnight Swim 10:00 PM to Midnight Beaver Creek Community Centre Pool Monday - Thursday Adult swim/ Aqua Fit 8:00 PM - 9:00 PM Beaver Creek Community Centre Pool

Carcross

Wed, Jun 25 Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program Lunch 12:00 PM The Old Daycare 821-4251 For more info:kathleen. cranfield@ctfn.ca Wed, Jun 25 Hiroshikai Judo 6:00 PM Ghùch Tlâ Community School 332-1031 Wed, Jun 25 Sewing Group 6:00 PM CTFN Capacity Building Thu, Jun 26 Sewing Group 6:00 PM CTFN Capacity Building Thu, Jun 26 Prenatal Classes for Mothers and Fathers to be 7:00 PM Ghùch Tlâ Community School With Kathleen Cranfield, Registered Midwife and CPNP coordinator Mon, Jun 30 C/TFN Carving Shed open 5:30 PM Carcross Carving Shed Keith Wolf Smarch will be in attendance to provide guidance/help with all manner of traditional artwork Tue, Jul 1 Elder’s Breakfast 10:00 AM The Old Daycare Tue, Jul 1 Sports Night 6:00 PM Ghùch Tlâ Community School Tue, Jul 1 Women’s Group 7:00 PM Carcross Community Campus 821-4251 Wed, Jul 2 Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program Lunch 12:00 PM The Old Daycare 821-4251 For more info:kathleen. cranfield@ctfn.ca Wed, Jul 2 Hiroshikai Judo 6:00 PM Ghùch Tlâ Community School 332-1031 Wed, Jul 2 Sewing Group 6:00 PM CTFN Capacity Building Thu, Jul 3 Carcross Dune Walk 2:00 PM Carcross Visitor Information Centre Where did all this sand come from? Environment Yukon biologist Bruce Bennett will walk you through this unique ecosystem,sharing the story of its origins. Please bring a water bottle and appropriate footwear Thu, Jul 3 Sewing Group 6:00 PM CTFN Capacity Building Thu, Jul 3 Prenatal Classes for Mothers and Fathers to be 7:00 PM Ghùch Tlâ Community School With Kathleen Cranfield, Registered Midwife and CPNP coordinator

Dawson City

until Fri, Jun 27 “New Works” Art Show 10:00 AM ODD Gallery Works by Sarah Crawley of Winnipeg, MB. Sat. & Sun. 1:00 PM. until Sat, July 12 Confluence at the SOVA Gallery:Nicole Rayburn, Which Witch Wed, Jun 25 Art Camp 1:00 PM KIAC Klondike Institute of Art & Culture For kids ages 6 – 9 Wed, Jun 25 Solstice Cyanotypes and More - Printing with the Sun! 11:00 AM KIAC Klondike Institute of Art & Culture Join visiting artist Rebecca Barfoot for a hands-on workshop designed to introduce participants to the blue magic of the cyanotype printing process, along with a creative exploration of mixed media. Wed, Jun 25 Zumba with Katie Pearse 5:30 PM Robert Service School 867-993-5370 Join the Zumba craze with this Latininspired workout! Wed, Jun 25 Kickboxing 6:30 PM Robert Service School Work up a sweat through basic kickboxing techniques and conditioning, geared to all ages!For info: contact Ben@brudif@gmail.com. Wed, Jun 25 Traditional Women’s Group 7:00 PM Community Support Centre 867-456-9537 Join women for sharing and learning Wed, Jun 25 CFYT Trivia 8:00 PM The Billy Goat A fundraiser for CFYT local radio. Thu, Jun 26 Art Camp 1:00 PM KIAC Klondike Institute of Art & Culture For kids ages 6 – 9 Thu, Jun 26 Toddler Painting 10:00 AM KIAC Klondike Institute of Art & Culture Come get messy and enjoy some creative play-time Thu, Jun 26 Super Seniors Weights 55+ 11:00 AM Dawson City Fitness Centre Thu, Jun 26 Solstice Cyanotypes and More - Printing with the Sun! 11:00 AM KIAC Klondike Institute of Art & Culture Join visiting artist Rebecca Barfoot for a hands-on workshop designed to introduce participants to the blue magic of the cyanotype printing process, along with a creative exploration of mixed media. Thu, Jun 26 Women & Weights (Ladies Only) 12:00 PM Dawson City Fitness Centre Thu, Jun 26 Youth Weights 4:00 PM Dawson City Fitness Centre Hosted with the Youth Centre Thu, Jun 26 Midnight Sun Yoga 5:30 PM KIAC Klondike Institute of Art & Culture For more info email yogawithjoanne@me.com. Thu, Jun 26 HIIT Like a Girl 7:00 PM Robert Service School 993-2520 For women only. Class combines cardio-kickboxing & high intensity interval training with ABC toning - that’s arms, but & core. Designed for all fitness levels Thu, Jun 26 Adults Drop In Soccer 8:00 PM Robert Service School Contact: Ian 993—5122 or Sonny– 993-5794. Fri, Jun 27 Botany Weeknd 0:00 Tombstone Territorial Park Free walks, talks and workshops. Fri, Jun 27 Solstice Cyanotypes and More - Printing with the Sun! 11:00 AM KIAC Klondike Institute of Art & Culture Join visiting artist Rebecca Barfoot for a hands-on workshop designed to introduce participants to the blue magic of the

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June 26, 2014

cyanotype printing process, along with a creative exploration of mixed media. Fri, Jun 27 Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in Youth Centre 3:00 PM Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in Youth Centre Fri, Jun 27 Zumba with Katie Pearse 5:30 PM Robert Service School 867-993-5370 Join the Zumba craze with this Latininspired workout! Fri, Jun 27 Live at the Palace Grand: a Klondike Home Companion 8:00 PM Palace Grand Theatre 867-993-5005 Local variety-style performances based on the live-radio broadcast show, A Prairie Home Companion. Sat, Jun 28 Botany Weeknd Tombstone Territorial Park Free walks, talks and workshops. Sat, Jun 28 Art Market 11:00 AM Community Shelter on Front Street Sat, Jun 28 KIAC Summer Art Market 11:00 AM Dawson City Community Events Shelter local Art for purchase Sat, Jun 28 Dawson City Farmers Market 11:00 AM on the waterfront, local farmers and artisans providing homegrown homemade products to the community. Sat, Jun 28 Solstice Cyanotypes and More - Printing with the Sun! 11:00 AM KIAC Klondike Institute of Art & Culture Join visiting artist Rebecca Barfoot for a hands-on workshop designed to introduce participants to the blue magic of the cyanotype printing process, along with a creative exploration of mixed media. Sat, Jun 28 Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in Youth Centre 3:00 PM Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in Youth Centre Sun, Jun 29 St. Paul’s Church Service 10:30 AM St Paul’s Church 867-993-5381 Sun, Jun 29 Adult co-ed basketball 4:00 PM Robert Service School All levels welcome. Contact: alexcampbell@gmail.com. Sun, Jun 29 Archery 6:00 PM Robert Service School Adult & All Ages Mon, Jun 30 Open Studios 5:00 PM KIAC Klondike Institute of Art & Culture visiting Artist Rachel Grant’s current work in SOVA’s 2D studio Mon, Jun 30 Zumba with Katie Pearse 5:30 PM Robert Service School 867-993-5370 Join the Zumba craze with this Latininspired workout! Mon, Jun 30 Dark Room Club 6:00 PM KIAC Klondike Institute of Art & Culture bekmiller1234@gmail.com please sign up in advance Mon, Jun 30 Kickboxing 6:30 PM Robert Service School Work up a sweat through basic kickboxing techniques and conditioning, geared to all ages!For info: contact Ben@brudif@gmail.com. Tue, Jul 1 Yukon Gold Panning Championships Riverside Park & Gazebo 867-993-5575 Tue, Jul 1 Canada Day Celebrations A Parade, pancake breakfast, free recreational activities throughout town…Fun for the whole family! See today’s centre for full schedule Tue, Jul 1 Art Camp 1:00 PM KIAC Klondike Institute of Art & Culture For kids ages 6 – 9 Tue, Jul 1 Super Seniors Weights 55+ 11:00 AM Dawson City Fitness Centre Tue, Jul 1 Women & Weights (Ladies Only) 12:00 PM Dawson City Fitness Centre Tue, Jul 1 Midnight Sun Yoga 5:30 PM KIAC Klondike Institute of Art & Culture For more info email yogawithjoanne@me.com. Tue, Jul 1 Step n Strong 7:00 PM Robert Service School 867993-2520 For more information email: getrealfit(at)me.com Tue, Jul 1 Live at the Palace Grand: Brandon Isaak 8:00 PM Palace Grand Theatre 867-993-5005 Brandon Isaak is a 2014 Maple Blues Award nominee. Tickets can be bought in Dawson City at the Visitors’ Information Centre, KIAC, the Westmark Hotel, and at the door. Tue, Jul 1 Adults Drop In Soccer 8:00 PM Robert Service School Contact: Ian 993—5122 or Sonny– 993-5794. Wed, Jul 2 Art Camp 1:00 PM KIAC Klondike Institute of Art & Culture For kids ages 6 – 9 Wed, Jul 2 Zumba with Katie Pearse 5:30 PM Robert Service School 867-993-5370 Join the Zumba craze with this Latininspired workout! Wed, Jul 2 Kickboxing 6:30 PM Robert Service School Work up a sweat through basic kickboxing techniques and conditioning, geared to all ages!For info: contact Ben@brudif@gmail.com. Wed, Jul 2 CFYT Trivia 8:00 PM The Billy Goat A fundraiser for CFYT local radio. Thu, Jul 3 Odd Gallery: Alison Judd LIVING WITH A LANDSLIDE 0:00 KIAC Klondike Institute of Art & Culture 867993-5005 Thu, Jul 3 Art Camp 1:00 PM KIAC Klondike Institute of Art & Culture For kids ages 6 – 9 Thu, Jul 3 Toddler Painting 10:00 AM KIAC Klondike Institute of Art & Culture A parented activity for kids aged 2-4. Come get messy and enjoy some creative play-time in the KIAC ballroom!! Thu, Jul 3 Super Seniors Weights 55+ 11:00 AM Dawson City Fitness Centre Thu, Jul 3 Women & Weights (Ladies Only) 12:00 PM Dawson City Fitness Centre Thu, Jul 3 Youth Weights 4:00 PM Dawson City Fitness Centre Hosted with the Youth Centre Thu, Jul 3 Midnight Sun Yoga 5:30 PM KIAC Klondike Institute of Art & Culture For more info email yogawithjoanne@me.com. Thu, Jul 3 HIIT Like a Girl 7:00 PM Robert Service School 9932520 For women only. Class combines cardio-kickboxing & high intensity interval training with ABC toning - that’s arms, but & core. Designed for all fitness levels Thu, Jul 3 YEU Local Y026 (Klondike) monthly meeting 7:00 PM YTG Property management building Thu, Jul 3 Adults Drop In Soccer 8:00 PM Robert Service School Contact: Ian 993—5122 or Sonny– 993-5794. Fri, Jul 4 Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in Youth Centre 3:00 PM Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in Youth Centre Fri, Jul 4 Zumba with Katie Pearse 5:30 PM Robert Service School 867-993-5370 Join the Zumba craze with this Latininspired workout! Fri, Jul 4 Live at the Palace Grand: the Silver Screen Scoundrels 8:00 PM Palace Grand Theatre 867-993-5005 Brandon Isaak and Keith Picot present a mix of music, laughter and authentic silent films in the Silver Screen Scoundrels.

Enter Your Events On-line It’s Free. It’s Fast. It’s Easy. Sat, Jul 5 Art Market 11:00 AM Community Shelter on Front Street Sat, Jul 5 KIAC Summer Art Market 11:00 AM Dawson City Community Events Shelter Dawson City Art for purchase Sat, Jul 5 Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in Youth Centre 3:00 PM Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in Youth Centre Sat, Jul 5 Live at the Palace Grand: Don Amero 8:00 PM Palace Grand Theatre 867-993-5005 Don’s music carries the depth of hardship and luminosity of hope.

Daily Tourist Tours - from the Visitor Center

9:30 AM Then & Now Walking Tour 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM S.S. Keno 9:30 AM S.S. Keno Tour in French 10:30 AM Hike with the Poetry of Robert Service 11:00 AM French Town Walking Tour 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM Doors Open - a different building each day 1:00 PM The Life and Poetry of Robert Service Program 1:00 PM What a RUSH! Walking Tour 2:30 PM Palace Grand Tour 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM Commissioner’s Residence 3:30 PM Greatest Klondiker Contest (except Fri/Sat) 3:30 PM French Commissioner’s Residence Tour 4:30 PM Free Viewing of “Encounters with the Sublime” Photography Exhibit by Salgado and Washburn at the Palace Grand 7:00 PM “Strange Things Done” Walking Tour

Faro

Wed, Jun 25 Faro Glee Club 1:00 PM Del Van Gorder School Wed, Jun 25 Parent & Tot Story Time 11:00 AM Faro Community Library For Babies to age 4. Stories & crafts will be provided Wed, Jun 25 Play Group 2:00 PM Faro Recreation Centre 9942375 farorecreation@faroyukon.ca Wed, Jun 25 Kids in Action Store 3:00 PM Del Van Gorder School Thu, Jun 26 Seniors Carpet Bowling 1:00 PM Faro Recreation Centre Thu, Jun 26 Fire Side Chat & Bocce Tournament 5:30 PM Campbell Region Interpretive Center Everyone welcome Thu, Jun 26 Zumba 7:00 PM Faro Recreation Centre Fri, Jun 27 Play Group 2:00 PM Faro Recreation Centre 9942375 farorecreation@faroyukon.ca Fri, Jun 27 Archery 3:00 PM Faro Recreation Centre 994-2375 farorecreation@faroyukon.ca Fri, Jun 27 Kids in the Kitchen Cooking Program 4:00 PM Faro Recreation Centre 994-2375 farorecreation@faroyukon.ca Fri, Jun 27 Seniors Fitness class 7:00 PM Faro Recreation Centre Sun, Jun 29 Faro Church of Apostles Mass 10:00 AM Church of Apostles Sun, Jun 29 Faro Bible Chapel Sunday Service 10:30 AM Faro Bible Chapel with Pastor Ted Baker 994-2442 Mon, Jun 30 Faro Glee Club 1:00 PM Del Van Gorder School Tue, Jul 1 Seniors Carpet Bowling 1:00 PM Faro Recreation Centre Tue, Jul 1 Faro Glee Club 1:00 PM Del Van Gorder School Tue, Jul 1 Archery 3:00 PM Faro Recreation Centre 994-2375 farorecreation@faroyukon.ca Tue, Jul 1 Faro Kettle Cafe 4:00 PM Faro Recreation Centre Hosted by the Faro Youth Group. Wed, Jul 2 Faro Glee Club 1:00 PM Del Van Gorder School Wed, Jul 2 Parent & Tot Story Time 11:00 AM Faro Community Library For Babies to age 4. Stories & crafts will be provided Wed, Jul 2 Play Group 2:00 PM Faro Recreation Centre 9942375 farorecreation@faroyukon.ca Wed, Jul 2 Kids in Action Store 3:00 PM Del Van Gorder School Thu, Jul 3 Seniors Carpet Bowling 1:00 PM Faro Recreation Centre Thu, Jul 3 Zumba 7:00 PM Faro Recreation Centre Fri, Jul 4 Play Group 2:00 PM Faro Recreation Centre 994-2375 farorecreation@faroyukon.ca Fri, Jul 4 Archery 3:00 PM Faro Recreation Centre 994-2375 farorecreation@faroyukon.ca Fri, Jul 4 Kids in the Kitchen Cooking Program 4:00 PM Faro Recreation Centre 994-2375 farorecreation@faroyukon.ca Fri, Jul 4 Seniors Fitness class 7:00 PM Faro Recreation Centre

Golden Horn Fridays

Golden Horn Judo Club 3:30 PM Golden Horn School judoyukon@gmail.com or Mike 668- 6952. Under 15 years

Sundays

Badminton 7:00 PM Golden Horn Elementary School Tracy 393-7641

Tuesdays

Yoga 6:00 PM Golden Horn Elementary School Terice 668-6631

Tuesdays

Badminton 7:30 PM Golden Horn Elementary School Tracy 393-7641

Haines Junction

Tue, Jun 24 Council of Yukon First Nations 34th Annual General Assembly Da Ku Cultural Centre 393-9224 Notice of Constitutional Amendments For additional details contact email: pearl.callaghan@cyfn.net Wed, Jun 25 Haines Junction Community Market 3:00 PM St Christopher’s Church Features produce, plants and baked goods. For more info: sprucecottagefarms@gmail.com Thu, Jun 26 Elders’ Tea & Fitness Lunch 11:00 AM Mun Ku Thu, Jun 26 Adult Soccer 7:30 PM St. Elias Community School Fri, Jun 27 Village Bakery Salmon Barbeque with music by Celtic Tide 6:30 PM Village Bakery and Deli 634-2867 King Salmon on the grill, and Celtic Tide will perform live music on the stage. Come early with your instrument to play at open mic Sun, Jun 29 St Christopher’s Church Service 10:30 AM St Christopher’s Church 634-2360 Licensed Lay Leader: Lynn De Brabandere

Mon, Jun 30 Fitness Classes - Pilates & Yoga 5:15 PM Da Ku Cultural Centre Tue, Jul 1 Southern Tutchone Classes 12:00 PM Da Ku Cultural Centre Tue, Jul 1 Takhini Family Game Night 7:00 PM Takhini Hall Wed, Jul 2 Haines Junction Community Market 3:00 PM St Christopher’s Church Features produce, plants and baked goods. For more info: sprucecottagefarms@gmail.com Thu, Jul 3 Elders’ Tea & Fitness Lunch 11:00 AM Mun Ku Thu, Jul 3 Adult Soccer 7:30 PM St. Elias Community School Fri, Jul 4 Village Bakery Salmon Barbeque with music by Barbara Chamberlin 6:30 PM Village Bakery and Deli 6342867 Reservations are recommended. Come early with your instrument to play at open mic!

Hamlet of Mt. Lorne

Wed, Jun 25 Kids Craft time 3:00 PM Lorne Mountain Community Centre Thu, Jun 26 Playgroup for parents 3:00 PM Lorne Mountain Community Centre Agnes 667-7083 Fri, Jun 27 Learning Lions - Homeschoolers Get Together 3:00 PM Lorne Mountain Community Centre Agnes 667-7083 Tue, Jul 1 Games and Fun 3:00 PM Lorne Mountain Community Centre watergames, monster parachute and flying balls, slackline, facepainting Tue, Jul 1 Lorne Mt Canada Day Celebrations! 3:00 PM Lorne Mountain Community Centre 3pm Games and Fun for everyone with MLVFD, 5 pm-7pm Free Community BBQm 4.30 concert with youth musicians and Ryan McNally Tue, Jul 1 Ryan McNally Trio 4:30 PM Lorne Mountain Community Centre Tue, Jul 1 Free Community BBQ 5:00 PM Lorne Mountain Community Centre potluck for your favorite salads and dessert Wed, Jul 2 Kids Craft time 3:00 PM Lorne Mountain Community Centre Thu, Jul 3 Playgroup for parents 3:00 PM Lorne Mountain Community Centre Agnes 667-7083 Fri, Jul 4 Learning Lions - Homeschoolers Get Together 3:00 PM Lorne Mountain Community Centre Agnes 667-7083

Marsh Lake

Fri, Jun 27 Dinner at the Jackalope 6:00 PM Marsh Lake Community Association Reservations welcome. Steak/Rib Nights - last Friday of each month Fri, Jun 27 Drop-in Basketball 7:30 PM Marsh Lake Community Association Sat, Jun 28 South of 6 10:00 AM Marsh Lake Community Association Sat, Jun 28 Tot Program 10:00 AM Marsh Lake Community Association Sun, Jun 29 Badminton Drop-in 11:30 AM Marsh Lake Community Association 660-4999 All welcome Tue, Jul 1 North of 60 Cafe 2:00 PM Marsh Lake Community Association Tue, Jul 1 South of 6 2:00 PM Marsh Lake Community Association Wed, Jul 2 Waste Mgnt Society Meeting 7:00 PM Marsh Lake Community Association Fri, Jul 4 Dinner at the Jackalope 6:00 PM Marsh Lake Community Association Reservations welcome. Steak/Rib Nights - last Friday of each month Fri, Jul 4 Drop-in Basketball 7:30 PM Marsh Lake Community Association Sat, Jul 5 South of 6 10:00 AM Marsh Lake Community Association Sat, Jul 5 Tot Program 10:00 AM Marsh Lake Community Association

Mayo

Sun, Jun 29 St. Mary’s Church Service 11:00 AM St Mary’s Church 667-7746

Old Crow

Thu, Jun 26 Adult Night at the Youth Centre 7:00 PM Old Crow Community Center Sun, Jun 29 St. Luke’s Church Service 11:00 AM St. Lukes Church 867-993-5381 Mon, Jun 30 Volleyball & Floor Hockey Night 7:00 PM Old Crow Community Center Saniz 966-3238 Thu, Jul 3 Adult Night at the Youth Centre 7:00 PM Old Crow Community Center

Tagish

Wed, Jun 25 Library and Treasures Thrift Shop 12:00 PM Tagish Community Centre Wed, Jun 25 Tagish Library 12:00 PM Tagish Community Centre 399-3418 Wed, Jun 25 Cruizers Concession Coffee & Chat 2:00 PM Tagish Community Centre Thu, Jun 26 Carpet Bowling 11:15 AM Tagish Community Centre 399-3407 Fri, Jun 27 Yoga with Geana Hadley 10:00 AM Tagish Community Centre Sat, Jun 28 Tagish Library 12:00 PM Tagish Community Centre 399-3418 Tue, Jul 1 Stay Get Fit 5:00 PM Tagish Community Centre 399-3407 Tue, Jul 1 Canada Day Celebration with the Canucks 5:00 PM Six MIle River Resort 867-399-4121 Dancing and Fun. Reservations Recommended. Special Menu Tue, Jul 1 Canada Day Celebrations Tagish Community Centre 11am - 2pm. Join us for a parade, food venues, games and activities for kids and adults alike, antique vehicle show, music with Fishhead Stew, and a baseball game. Wed, Jul 2 Library and Treasures Thrift Shop 12:00 PM Tagish Community Centre Wed, Jul 2 Tagish Library 12:00 PM Tagish Community Centre 399-3418 Wed, Jul 2 Cruizers Concession Coffee & Chat 2:00 PM Tagish Community Centre

Wed, Jul 2 Tagish Advisory Council meeting 7:00 PM Tagish Community Centre Agenda posted at tagish.ca Thu, Jul 3 Carpet Bowling 11:15 AM Tagish Community Centre 399-3407 Fri, Jul 4 Yoga with Geana Hadley 10:00 AM Tagish Community Centre Sat, Jul 5 Tagish Library 12:00 PM Tagish Community Centre 399-3418

Teslin

Wed, Jun 25 Card Games for Seniors 1:00 PM Teslin Seniors Complex Wed, Jun 25 Archery 3:30 PM Teslin School Thu, Jun 26 Youth Badminton 3:30 PM Teslin School Sun, Jun 29 Seniors Carpet Bowling 1:00 PM Teslin Rec Center Mon, Jun 30 Archery 3:30 PM Teslin School Mon, Jun 30 Teslin’s Biking Gang 6:00 PM Teslin Tlingit Council Administration Building Meet outside the TTC admin building. Join us for a weekly road bike ride! Tue, Jul 1 Youth Badminton 3:30 PM Teslin School Wed, Jul 2 Card Games for Seniors 1:00 PM Teslin Seniors Complex Wed, Jul 2 Archery 3:30 PM Teslin School Thu, Jul 3 Youth Badminton 3:30 PM Teslin School

Watson Lake

Wed, Jun 25 Swimming - Open to the Public 3:30 PM Watson Lake: Dennis Ball Swimming Pool Watson Lake Pool is open for the summer! Wed, Jun 25 Aquafit 6:30 PM Watson Lake: Dennis Ball Swimming Pool 867-536-8030 Watson Lake Pool is open for the summer! Thu, Jun 26 Senior/Elder Activities 10:00 AM Wye Lake Park Thu, Jun 26 Swimming - Open to the Public 3:30 PM Watson Lake: Dennis Ball Swimming Pool Watson Lake Pool is open for the summer! Thu, Jun 26 Watson Lake: Hot Yoga 6:30 PM Watson Lake Recreation Centre Thu, Jun 26 Girls Night Youth group 7:00 PM Watson Lake Recreation Centre Thu, Jun 26 Watson Lake: Zumba 8:00 PM Watson Lake Recreation Centre Fri, Jun 27 Swimming - Open to the Public 3:30 PM Watson Lake: Dennis Ball Swimming Pool Watson Lake Pool is open for the summer! Fri, Jun 27 Aquafit 6:30 PM Watson Lake: Dennis Ball Swimming Pool 867-536-8030 Watson Lake Pool is open for the summer! Sat, Jun 28 Swimming - Open to the Public 1:00 PM Watson Lake: Dennis Ball Swimming Pool 867-536-8030 Watson Lake Pool is open for the summer! Sat, Jun 28 Watson Lake Farmer’s Market 3:00 PM Wye Lake Park Celebrate Summer with Arts in the Park at the Gazebo, Crafters, Bakers, Artists and Gardeners every Saturday. Sat, Jun 28 Watson Lake: Hot Yoga 6:30 PM Watson Lake Recreation Centre Sat, Jun 28 Saturday Night Social 7:00 PM Watson Lake Recreation Centre Sat, Jun 28 Ladies Time Out Breakfast 8:30 AM Andrea’s Hotel Cynthia Armstrong 536-7239 Sun, Jun 29 St. John’s Church Service 10:00 AM St. John’s Church Service (867) 536-2932 Mon, Jun 30 Swimming - Open to the Public 3:30 PM Watson Lake: Dennis Ball Swimming Pool Watson Lake Pool is open for the summer! Mon, Jun 30 Aquafit 6:30 PM Watson Lake: Dennis Ball Swimming Pool 867-536-8030 Watson Lake Pool is open for the summer! Tue, Jul 1 Swimming - Open to the Public 3:30 PM Watson Lake: Dennis Ball Swimming Pool Watson Lake Pool is open for the summer! Tue, Jul 1 Youth Night 7:00 PM Watson Lake Recreation Centre Wed, Jul 2 Swimming - Open to the Public 3:30 PM Watson Lake: Dennis Ball Swimming Pool Watson Lake Pool is open for the summer! Wed, Jul 2 Aquafit 6:30 PM Watson Lake: Dennis Ball Swimming Pool 867-536-8030 Watson Lake Pool is open for the summer! Thu, Jul 3 Senior/Elder Activities 10:00 AM Wye Lake Park Thu, Jul 3 Swimming - Open to the Public 3:30 PM Watson Lake: Dennis Ball Swimming Pool Watson Lake Pool is open for the summer! Thu, Jul 3 Watson Lake: Hot Yoga 6:30 PM Watson Lake Recreation Centre Thu, Jul 3 Girls Night Youth group 7:00 PM Watson Lake Recreation Centre Thu, Jul 3 Watson Lake: Zumba 8:00 PM Watson Lake Recreation Centre Fri, Jul 4 Swimming - Open to the Public 3:30 PM Watson Lake: Dennis Ball Swimming Pool Watson Lake Pool is open for the summer! Fri, Jul 4 Aquafit 6:30 PM Watson Lake: Dennis Ball Swimming Pool 867-536-8030 Watson Lake Pool is open for the summer! Sat, Jul 5 Swimming - Open to the Public 1:00 PM Watson Lake: Dennis Ball Swimming Pool 867-5368030 Watson Lake Pool is open for the summer! Sat, Jul 5 Watson Lake Farmer’s Market 3:00 PM Wye Lake Park Celebrate Summer with Arts in the Park at the Gazebo, Crafters, Bakers, Artists and Gardeners every Saturday. Sat, Jul 5 Watson Lake: Hot Yoga 6:30 PM Watson Lake Recreation Centre Sat, Jul 5 Saturday Night Social 7:00 PM Watson Lake Recreation Centre Sat, Jul 5 Ladies Time Out Breakfast 8:30 AM Andrea’s Hotel Cynthia Armstrong 536-7239

www.whatsupyukon.com

Enjoy your meal in comfort Full menu available Open Tuesday thru Saturday at 4pm


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June 26, 2014

Behind the Curtain with Ken Bolton

Nakai Theatre’s artistic director sees stage design — and architecture — through a unique lens

A

high-school excursion to a Toronto production of Peter Shaffer’s play, Equus, is what triggered David Skelton’s fascination with theatrical design. “The set and the costumes were just so evocative, so simple, so full of meaning, and just so functional. Scene starts, scene ends, move, move, move, quickly, quickly,” Nakai Theatre’s artistic director recalls. “I remember thinking, ‘There is a visual theatre language happening there.’ So much is inherently expressed in the visual presentation.” As an undergrad at Trent University in Peterborough, Ontario, Skelton served two seasons as a “production slave” in a summerstock company in nearby Barrie. Soon after, he talked his way into a job with the Trent-based Magic Circus Theatre. He laughingly recounts how the artistic director asked him at the job interview what he wanted to do. “I said, ‘I’d like to write the plays.’ He said, ‘Well, no, you can’t do that, because Samuel Beckett has that taken.’ So I said, ‘Well then, I’d like to direct the plays.’ ‘Well, no. I’ve got that taken.’ “Then I pointed over to the designer and said, ‘Hell, I would even do what he’s doing.’ And he said, ‘OK, consider that you’re his assistant.’” His two summers with Magic Circus included “a pretty crappy” English-language version of Oedipus Rex in several ancient amphi-

theatres in rural Greece, aimed at the tourist crowd. The venture was less than a triumph. “It would be unfair to say nobody came, but not a lot of people came.” Still, his work on six plays – four as assistant, two as designer – yielded a design portfolio he could show legendary critic-turneddirector, Urjo Kareda at Toronto’s Tarragon Theatre. Following Kareda’s suggestion that he get some formal training, Skelton headed west and completed a master’s degree in theatre design at University of Alberta in 1987. He remained in Edmonton for the next dozen years, working as a freelance designer there and in other Canadian cities. By 1999, he felt he had hit a plateau and decided to change locale. “I said, ‘Well, Vancouver is bigger, and it might be the same, so I went there and found out that Vancouver is bigger, and it’s not at all the same,” he says. “The live theatre that is there, they’re not interested in hiring anybody. Or they weren’t interested in hiring me, so that was disappointing.” In 2001, Nakai’s former artistic director, Michael Clark, invited him to design a production of 60 Below, by Whitehorse playwrights Patti Flather and Leonard Linklater. Then it was back to Peterborough, where he met his wife Colleen and continued working as a designer-for-hire in Toronto. Along the way, he also directed three plays for De-ba-jeh-mu-jig The-

atre Group on Manitoulin Island. In 2004, he returned to design Nakai’s set for The Drawer Boy. After a stint as designer-inresidence, he succeeded Clark as artistic director eight years ago. “Going from any artistic freelance endeavour to being an artistic director is a big jump, because you’re not doing your art; you’re an administrator.” Instead of being involved in the “beautiful little details” that concern designers and directors, the AD’s role “requires a much broader kind of vision, and a level of pragmatism that doesn’t always exist in artists,” he says. It also requires an ability to step back and resist micromanaging productions. “If I’m hiring a director, I go with their choices, because it’s their vision I want,” he says. “It’s such a profound insult to the director if you have an artistic director hanging over their shoulder and asking for changes.” At this point, an ill-advised question causes an unexpected turn in the conversation. After being asked if this handsoff protocol sometimes forces him to bite his tongue, Skelton leaves a brief pause before answering lightly: “I have seizures where I bite my tongue, so my tongue is pretty used to it. My tongue is like leather.” Skelton is not shy about discussing his epilepsy. He even jokes that a career in theatre is not an ideal choice for someone with his condition. “Epilepsy is brought on by alcohol, by not enough sleep, not good

eating, and stress in general. And that’s what theatre does to you.” On the flip side, he claims his work has actually benefitted from his epilepsy. “It has changed my esthetic, and that’s in no way exaggerating,” he says. “The relationship of space and texture and scale and colour is all influenced by things that I’ve perceived during a seizure.” Skelton is proud of initiatives such as the annual Pivot Theatre Festival, which introduces cuttingedge performances to Yukon audiences, and the company’s nurturing of new local playwrights. Still, there a few options he might explore if, or when, the Nakai gig came to a close. One would be to create a small company to work on long-term touring projects, supplemented by freelance design work. If not theatre, “I think architecture could be fun, and landscape architecture specifically.” For Skelton, the language of

PHOTO: Ruth Borgfjord

Nakai Theatre’s artistic director, David Skelton each clearly echoes the other. “They are about space and texture and meaning. The space has a relationship to the person who is wandering through it. It’s an emotional space, and you pick and choose.” This series profiles people in the Yukon arts scene whose jobs normally don’t put them into the spotlight. Ken Bolton is a freelance writer who lives southeast of Whitehorse. Please email comments about Ken’s articles to editor@whatsupyukon.com.

Free

Registration ($50 value) for June 1-30, 2014 Only!* *Contact Kumon Math and Reading Centre of Nasutlin at 393-3151 for more information.

Discover Yukon’s wildlife and wilderness

Da on w s on k u Y C it y , H ea rt o f the Klondike

Nature lovers of all ages are invited to take part in the Wild Discoveries summer interpretive program. Join wildlife viewing biologists and nature interpreters for dozens of free events across the territory. For a full listing of walks, talks and wildlife viewing activities, visit the Environment Yukon website.

Join us for a summer of Wild Discoveries. For more information visit:

www.env.gov.yk.ca/events June 27 A Klondike Home Companion featuring Jon Ostrander, The Handsome Devils and Blackberry Wood with hosts The Kings of Dawson City JulY 1 Brandon Isaak Shows begin at 8pm | Tickets Adults $20/$25 Kids $10/$15 Advance tickets: ViSiTor informATion CenTre, front & King Streets, 9am-5pm KiAC, 2nd Ave & Princess Street, 9am-5pm, mon-fri WeSTmArK HoTel, 5th Ave (betwen Princess & Harper) 9am-6pm PAlACe GrAnd THeATre, 2nd Avenue & King Street, 7-8pm, Perfomance nights only WAlK uP SAleS AT THe THeATre Are WelCome! Presented KIAC in Partnership with Parks Canada

Major Sponsors

2

SKAGUAY NEWS DEPOT & BOOKS

HELLO YUKON FRIENDS & VISITORS Stop in at the little independent bookstore on Broadway!

SUMMERTIME HOURS Open 9-6 daily

3rd & Broadway ¥  907-983-3354

www.kiac.ca

NEW & USED BOOKS ¥ NEWS ¥ MAGS ¥ MAPS ¥ COLOR COPIES


Highlights

a d a n CA Fête du

Day

Parc Shipyards park

let 1er êjtue idlu Canada, i d r a M eau de la f phones, Gât nco és fra it! activit ge. Gratu la il u q ma

1th es y l u J y viti a TuedsadDay Cake,eacptiainting! Cana ch and fac ee! n All Fr in Fre

STORE STORE & OFFICE HOURS:

TUES & WED, 11 A.M. - 5 P.M. THURS & FRI, 11 A.M. - 6 P.M. SAT, 11 A.M. - 4 P.M.

Featured this week,

Boys and Girls Club of Whitehorse

Free Drop-In Youth Centre

by Michelle Genest

for kids ages 11 to 18

393-2255

Wednesday to Saturday, 3 to 9 pm. Supper served daily at 6:00

yukonmadestore@yukonfood.com

HeaRt of

Klondike Institute of Art and Culture

Knitting Circles Wednesdays, 1pm - 3pm 2nd Tuesday of the month beginning May 13

ALISON JUDD

Riverdale

YUKON MADE

BOREAL GOURMET COOKBOOK

afy.yk.ca

25

WWW.WHATSUPYUKON.COM

June 26, 2014

www.fireweedmarket.yukonfood.com

Riverdale Community Book Club First Tuesday of the month

– Living with a Landslide – July 3 – August 1, 2014

Artist Talk & Opening Reception: Thursday July 3rd at 7:30 pm Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday, 10 am – 5 pm Saturday & Sunday 1 – 5 pm Located on the corner of 2nd and Princess

NICOLE RAYBURN

June 19 – July 12, 2014 The Confluence Gallery is located in the SOVA building on the corner of 3rd Ave. and Queen St.

Family Drop-in Saturdays Drop-in 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM

LIVE AT THE PALACE GRAND

(Except Holiday Weekends)

Audiences will have the opportunity to experience live music, authentic Gold Rush era entertainment, vaudeville, film and more in the iconic Palace Grand Theatre.

Heart of Riverdale

Like our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/liveatthepg for more info.

www.theheartofriverdale.com

Tel: (867) 993-5005 Fax: (867) 993-5838 Website: www.kiac.ca

38 A Lewes Blvd

Shows all summer long, starting June 22!

EXPERIENCE

100+ Friendly Huskies as a ‘Rookie for a Day’

PLUS, enjoy one of our rich ‘Taste

of the Y ukon’ meals

Exhibi� ons CURRENT Exhibitions:

>> in the Yukon Art Society Gallery: THE SEVEN TEXTILE ARTISTS “How Does it Felt”

Last Chance to See!

Exhibi�on closes December 1st, 2012

>> in the Hougen Heritage Gallery: YUKON ARCHIVES Archival Gold: Favourites from the Vault Exhibi�on closes January 26, 2013

Open Studio Sessions

Focus Gallery: Frondescence

>> Ceramic Open Studio Sessions << Sundays from 2:30 to 6pm $5 per hour >> Acrylic Pain�ng Open Studio << with Neil Graham every first and third Wednesday of each month 7 to 9pm $10 per 2 hour session

Elise Bousquet and Shelley MacDonald Runs: Jun 6-28

Edge Gallery Seasonal [Dis]order

To register call: 867-667-4080 Email: recep�on@artsunderground.ca

Book your family & friends on a special dog sled adventure!

For more information: 668-3647 or info@muktuk.com

Kwanlin Dün Cultural Centre

Douglas Drake and Michel Gignac Curated by Hildur Jónasson under the mentorship of Dr. Curtis Collins Runs: Jun 6-28

Hougen Heritage Gallery: What’s in a Name?

Photos of Yukon communities with stories explaining the meanings of their names Runs: Mar-Jun

OPEN STUDIO SESSIONS Ceramic Open Studio (14+) Every Sunday except long weekends From 2:30-6 pm $5/hr paid to Studio Tech Programs Arts Underground / Yukon Art Society 867-667-4080 ext 22

Welcome to the 18th Summer Festival Season! Thurs, June 26

El Motor up forSt Jean Baptiste Days and staying a few days extra

Fri, June 27

Shagadelica Classic rock and more from this hip collection of Whitehorse musicians Visual Artist

June 30- July 4 Suzanne Palecny

Wed June 25

Carole Mullen Dancers Award winning scottish dancing 7:00 PM The MuffDusters up for sunstroke and staying over a few days

Thu, June 26

ElMotor up for St Jean Baptiste Days and staying a few days extra

Fri, June 27

Shagadelica Classic rock and more from this hip collection of Whitehorse musicians

Mon, June 30

The Riverbends A classic dawson city band made up of preachers,teachers, miners and more

Tuesday, July 1

CANADA DAY - NO SHOW - THE PARK IS DARK Go check out the Canada Day celebrations!

Wed Noon, July 2

Remy Rodden Environmental songs and sing-alongs - it's fun!

Thurs, July 3

Kim Beggs Continues to slowly build a body of work that gets better and better with the passage of time

Fri, July 4

Doug Thorseth A great fingerstyle guitarist on 6-string, 12-string and harp guitar Visual Artist

June 30- July 4 Suzanne Palecny


26

WWW.WHATSUPYUKON.COM

Friends, Food & Drinks Wednesday-Whitewater Jam Friday- Live Local Artist Saturday- Steiner Saturday featuring The Recliners “you know all their songs”

OPEN Tues & Thurs 4-10 Wed & Fri 4-12 Sat 4:30 - 10

38c Lewes Blvd. Whitehorse, Yukon 867.456.4792 www.facebook.com/garlicninja

True Goldrush Atmosphere

Bar Open 9am to 11pm Off Sales 9am to 11pm Clean, Quiet, Comfortable Rooms 110 Wood Street, 667-2641 Whitehorse

Thursdays 7-11 PM Joe Loutchan World Renowned Fiddler

June 26, 2014

Active Interest Listings Wed, Jun 25 Yukon River Quest 12:00 PM Shipyards Park 333-5628 world’s longest annual canoe and kayak wilderness race Wed, Jun 25 Hand to Hand - Level 2&3 with Gael 6:00 PM Aikido Yukon Dojo Wed, Jun 25 Staff/Jo with Gael 7:00 PM Aikido Yukon Dojo Wed, Jun 25 Bhangra Dance Classes 7:00 PM Shipyards Park 336-3344 The objective of these free dance classes is to bring happiness and good health to life through dancing! Thu, Jun 26 Introduction to 3D Archery 1:00 PM Biathlon Range 668-2840 Learn archery on life-size animals in the forest. Age 10 +.NCCP certified instructors. Arrive on time to receive equipment & safety gear. Please book in advance. colin. hickman@yasc.ca Thu, Jun 26 Introduction to 3D Archery 4:30 PM Biathlon Range 668-2840 Learn archery on life-size animals in the forest. Activity suitable for youth 10 or older, and families. Thu, Jun 26 Savaté (French Kick Boxing) 6:00 PM Aikido Yukon Dojo 3354500 Fri, Jun 27 Hand to Hand - Level 1 (lunch class) with Gael 11:30 AM Aikido Yukon Dojo Fri, Jun 27 Golden Horn Judo 3:30 PM Golden Horn Elementary Sun, Jun 29 Ultimate Frisbee 5:30 PM Canada Games Centre 668-6517 Come out and play some frisbee. All levels are welcome. Sun, Jun 29 Badminton 7:00 PM Golden

Horn Elementary Tracy 393-7641 Mon, Jun 30 Hand to Hand - Level 1&2 with Gael 6:00 PM Aikido Yukon Dojo Mon, Jun 30 Sword/Bokken with Gael 7:00 PM Aikido Yukon Dojo Tue, Jul 1 Canada Day Volleyball Tournament 10:00 AM Rotary Peace Park Must have at least 2 female and 2 male players with up to 6 players per team. register on-line Tue, Jul 1 pick-up beach volleyball 12:00 PM Rotary Peace Park All are welcome with 3 courts, music playing and great nights of volleyball Tue, Jul 1 Introduction to 3D Archery 4:30 PM Biathlon Range 668-2840 Learn archery on life-size animals in the forest. Activity suitable for youth 10 or older, and families. NCCP certified instructors.Arrive on time to receive equipment and safety gear. Personal gear can be used upon inspection. Tue, Jul 1 Fun Run/Walk 6:00 PM F.H. Collins Secondary 633-5671 Run or walk a 2.5 km route, or a 5 km route. Tue, Jul 1 Yoga 6:00 PM Golden Horn Elementary Tracy 393-7641 Tue, Jul 1 NIA dance and fitness 6:30 PM Leaping Feats Creative Danceworks 3353442 NIA is a choreographed combination of martial arts, dance, and healing, set to great music. first class is free! Tue, Jul 1 Dirt Girls Group Ride 7:00 PM TBA Leaders: Meagan & Erika Trail: 24 Hours of Light course Tue, Jul 1 Badminton 7:00 PM Golden Horn Elementary Tracy 393-7641

Wellness Listings Mondays Ladies Night Tuesdays Jam Night with Ben Mahony Wednesday El Motor Thursday Jamoke With Jackie Friday The Muff Dusters with Meat the Veagans Saturday Yukon Jack

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OFF SALES WILL BE OPEN THROUGH THE HOLIDAYS

Whitehorse’s

Home of the Blues!

RCUS STEINER

w Thursday OPEN MIC WITH MA w Friday RYAN MCNALLY RS w SATURDAY THE STEINER RECLINE ht” WITH MCNALLY & w “Sunday Blues NNig- Th e music starts at 730 PATRICK HAMILTO

Band Hours 7:30 pm to 10:30 pm

Best Western Gold Rush Inn 411 Main Street, Whitehorse, 668-4500

Wed, Jun 25 Women & Children Lunch Date 11:30 AM Victoria Faulkner Women’s Centre Delicious Free Lunch for Women & Children Wed, Jun 25 Sally & Sisters Lunch 12:00 PM Whitehorse Food Bank 334-9317 Free Hot Lunch for Women Wed, Jun 25 FREE Lunch Time Yoga 12:00 PM Shanti Yoga 456-7123 Learn to breathe, stretch and relax! Donations Welcome. Use back entrance of Hawkins House No experience required all are welcome Thu, Jun 26 Self-Care Program Exercise & Activity 6:00 PM Second Opinions Society 667-2037 Topics will include relaxation techniques, healthy lifestyle choices, exercise and other self-care practices. Fri, Jun 27 Outdoor Games 1:00 PM Second Opinions Society 667-2037 Mon, Jun 30 Practical Skills Class 2:00 PM Second Opinions Society 667-2037 Join us for a class on a practical skill including resume building, budgeting, communication etc... Mon, Jun 30 Peer support training program 6:00 PM Second Opinions Society 667-2037 Mon, Jun 30 Peer Support Program: Self Care & Stress Management 6:00 PM Second Opinions Society 667-2037 This workshop focuses on identifying the impact that stress has on our physical and emotional selves and aims to provide participants with information about building a self-care plan. Tue, Jul 1 One On One Support 10:00 AM Second Opinions Society A support staff will be available for one on one sessions every Tuesday Tue, Jul 1 Wellness Support Group 2:00 PM Second Opinions Society Everyone is welcome to this afternoon support group for those looking for a place to share, learn and grow. Tue, Jul 1 Gardening 2:00 PM Second Opinions Society 667-2037 Come and join us for some time in the community garden.

Wed, Jul 2 Baked 1 miler 6:00 PM Spook Creek Station 633-5671 Start: on Millennium Trail at Spook Creek Finish line: Old Fire Hall on Millennium Trail (kitty corner to Baked) Wed, Jul 2 Hand to Hand - Level 2&3 with Gael 6:00 PM Aikido Yukon Dojo Wed, Jul 2 Staff/Jo with Gael 7:00 PM Aikido Yukon Dojo Wed, Jul 2 Bhangra Dance Classes 7:00 PM Shipyards Park 336-3344 The objective of these free dance classes is to bring happiness and good health to life through dancing! Thu, Jul 3 Introduction to 3D Archery 1:00 PM Biathlon Range 668-2840 Learn archery on life-size animals in the forest. Age 10 +. NCCP certified instructors.Arrive on time to receive equipment & safety gear. Please book in advance. colin.hickman@yasc.ca Thu, Jul 3 Introduction to 3D Archery 4:30 PM Biathlon Range 668-2840 Learn archery on life-size animals in the forest. Activity suitable for youth 10 or older, and families. Thu, Jul 3 Savaté (French Kick Boxing) 6:00 PM Aikido Yukon Dojo 335-4500 Thu, Jul 3 Trail Run 6:30 PM Miles Canyon Bridge shuttle (Leg 2 YRTM 10km moderate) Fri, Jul 4 Hand to Hand - Level 1 (lunch class) with Gael 11:30 AM Aikido Yukon Dojo Fri, Jul 4 Golden Horn Judo 3:30 PM Golden Horn Elementary

Enter Your Events On-line It’s Free. It’s Fast. It’s Easy. Or email them to: events@whatsupyukon.com

Tue, Jul 1 Yoga 6:00 PM Golden Horn Elementary Tracy 393-7641 Wed, Jul 2 One On One Support 1:00 PM Second Opinions Society A support staff will be available for one on one sessions every Tuesday Wed, Jul 2 Women & Children Lunch Date 11:30 AM Victoria Faulkner Women’s Centre Delicious Free Lunch for Women & Children Wed, Jul 2 Sally & Sisters Lunch 12:00 PM Whitehorse Food Bank 334-9317 Free Hot Lunch for Women Wed, Jul 2 FREE Lunch Time Yoga 12:00 PM Shanti Yoga 456-7123 Learn to breathe, stretch and relax! Donations Welcome. Use back entrance of Hawkins House No experience required all are welcome Wed, Jul 2 Gardening 2:00 PM Second Opinions Society 667-2037 Come and join us for some time in the community garden. Thu, Jul 3 Second Opinion Society Community Lunch 12:00 PM Second Opinions Society

Alcoholics Anonymous Wednesday

The Joy Of Living group (OM, NS) 12:00 noon Maryhouse 504 Cook St. Porter Creek Step meeting (CM) 8:00 PM Our Lady of Victory No Puffin (CM, NS) 8:00 PM Big Book Study Maryhouse 504 Cook St.

Yukon Unity Group Meeting 1:30 PM #4 Hospital Road Whitehorse Group (CM, NS) 9:00 PM Maryhouse 504 Cook St.

Saturday

Detox Meeting (OM, NS) 1:00 PM DETOX Bldg 6118-6th Women’s Meeting (CM, NS) 2:30 PM Whitehorse General Hospital (across from emergency) Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting (OM, NS) 7:00 PM Hospital boardroom

Sunday

Sunshine Group (OM, NS) 1:00 PM DETOX Bldg 6118-6th Marble Group (OM, NS) 7:00 PM Hospital boardroom

Monday

The Joy Of Living group (OM, NS) 12:00 noon Maryhouse 504 Cook St. New Beginnings Group (OM, NS) 8:00 PM Maryhouse 504 Cook St.

Thursday

The Joy Of Living group (OM, NS) 12:00 noon Maryhouse 504 Cook St. Happy Destiny Young Peoples Group 6:00 PM B.Y.T.E. Polar Group (OM) 7:30 PM Seventh Day Adventists Church (PC)

Friday

The Joy Of Living group (OM, NS) 12:00 noon Maryhouse 504 Cook St.

Check it out. It’s New. www.whatsupyukon.com

Tuesday

The Joy Of Living group (OM, NS) 12:00 noon Maryhouse 504 Cook St. Ugly Duckling Group (OM, NS) 8:00 PM Maryhouse 504 Cook St. Juste Pour Aujourd’hui (OM, NS) 7:00 PM 4141B 4th Ave.


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June 26, 2014

Au Naturel with Roy Jantzen

Let the Floral Show Begin The hills are covered in lupins

Y

esterday I was amputating their little arms; into a bag they went. If I worked fast, I could fill the bag in the hour. Delicate soft green nubs at the end of each branch were quickly added up in my Ziploc baggie. This micro-pruning of sorts was my first foray into spruce tip harvesting, among the early growth of a Whitehorse spring. This week there is so much more growing below those trees — so much more that is important. Have you seen the lupin? It’s on the front cover of Common Yukon Roadside Flowers available online, or at the Department of Environment. The guide is a great colour-coded resource to begin learning about the world at your feet. From this 36 page booklet I see that the lupin was once thought to devour the nutrients from the soil. This led to the Latin lupus, or wolf. In fact the lupin, like other members of the legume family, can “fix” atmospheric nitrogen into the soil. Do this: breathe deep, hold it, let it out, and repeat one more time. What did you just breathe into your lungs? Air? Oxygen? Carbon dioxide? In fact, 78 per cent of the gas that entered your body was nitrogen. Only 21 per cent was actually oxygen. Now a side question: other

Lupins help fertilize the soil with nitrogen

PHOTO: Thinkstock.com

than sunlight and water, what is the most important item for your garden? The answer is fertilizer. Fertilizer is composed of nitrogen, which is essential not just for gardens, but for the surrounding environment as well. Lupins happen to be one species that can utilize this 78 per cent of atmospheric nitrogen to enrich the soil. Lupins, among others, fertilize soil for other species, which we may harvest for food or use for building materials. They may keep a hillside from collapsing above our homes, or aid in purifying our drinking water. Lupins may benefit us on a micro level by supporting the pollinators that also fertilize our crops, or on a macro-level by helping regulate the climate surrounding us, such as when trees create heat islands or windbreaks. This week as I walk in the hills surrounding Whitehorse, I’ll likely see the first bell-like pink flowers of the low shrub kinnikinnick, and the white flowers of wild strawberry, foretelling of a great harvest to come, assuming the pollinators are healthy. In addition, I’ll see the culturally significant yellow-flowered soapberry bush (or soopolallie), known to have berries that can be whipped into an ice creamlike texture. And of course the light blue-

3173 - 3rd Ave

867-667-4275

Roy Jantzen is an environmental educator, natural history professor, and adventure and ecotourism specialist living in Whitehorse. Any comments or thoughts, contact natural@whatsupyukon.com

Did You Know? According to the book Plants of Coastal BC by Pojar and MacKinnon, the roots of the Nootka lupin were roasted or pit-cooked by coastal people. Grizzly bears also relish the same roots, and are known to excavate large areas to consume them.

2014 ANNUAL CUSTOMER APPRECIATION EVENT

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YUKON’S ELECTRICAL SPECIALIST Hours: Mon-Fri 8-5:30, Saturday 8:30-4

hued, showy Jacob’s ladder will help complete this cacophony of early season colours, complementing the new green leaves of the aspen and poplar. These and so many other species I barely know are important for sure, but important for what? I’ll open my booklet and begin finding out.

ONE DAY SALES EVENT! THURSDAY JUNE 26TH FROM 11:00 AM UNTIL 3:00 PM OVER $700 IN PRIZES GIFTS WITH PURCHASE BBQ FOOD & COFFEE


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June 26, 2014

Wild Pursuits with Bryce Bekar

Sign of the Times

Modern technology has changed what we wear

W

e were heading east to the steepest part of Mount Vanier, nearing the ridge. We could see dark clouds looming over the distant mountain range, slowly moving in our direction. It brought heavy rainfall as it moved across the valley like a wall. We were unconcerned — it was mid-summer and 18°C. The wind picked up as the storm gradually moved up the side of the mountain to where we sat watching, and waiting. We put on our rain gear, covered our packs, and braced for the weather. At the top of the mountain, when you only have what’s in your pack, you can’t run inside. After an hour of steady rain I was soaked, not from the rain but from wearing rubber gear at 18°C. When the weather passed, I took off my heavy, wet gear and found the temperature had dropped a few degrees. Wet and getting chilled, I hid behind a rock where the sun broke through the clouds and blocked the wind. The weather passed and luckily the temperature climbed back into the mid-teens. Heavy rubber gear is great at keeping the water out; unfortunately it also keeps the sweat in. Helly Hanson makes a great durable set of gear, but when you have to go back to your tent wet, it makes for an uncomfortable evening. Modern materials have bridged the gap between waterproof and lightweight; backpackers now have rain gear options that weigh as little as half a pound and can be tucked into its own pocket.

Along with that, it’s breathable. Not long ago it would be tough to believe gear like this could exist. Regarding breathability, there is one downfall I have experienced: when you sit, material that breaths can also let in a little water. These clothes are not designed to use on a long ATV ride but, when used properly they are great and can change a trip. Kuiu offers a Yukon series that is designed for mountaineers — the two-way stretch material is

tough, light, and breathable. The Yukon series is made for our harsh, continually changing climate. It weighs a little more than basic (modern) rain gear at 29.2 ounces for the jacket, and 25.8 ounces for the pants. By comparison, Chugash rain pants and jacket are 23 ounces each. All Kuiu products are made to be layered and provide ultimate comfort. Many other brands are out there. They use similar technologies to accomplish the same result: dry, lightweight and breath-

PHOTO: Bryce Bekar

When the weather turns for the worse, modern clothing can make a huge difference able clothing. Next time you walk into a backpacking or hunting store, ask to see these amazing lines of clothing. They come at a slightly higher cost, but are worth more than their weight in gold on a backpacking trip far from shelter. Next trip I won’t be in the same predicament.

33rd Yukon Legislative Assembly

33e Assemblée législative du Yukon

SELECT COMMITTEE REGARDING

COMITÉ SPÉCIAL D’EXAMEN

THE RISKS AND BENEFITS OF HYDRAULIC FRACTURING

Le comité spécial d’examen des risques et des avantages de la fracturation hydraulique a été établi par décret pris par l’Assemblée législative le 6 mai 2013 (motion n°433).

The Committee will be holding public hearings to receive the views and opinions of Yukon citizens.

Le comité organise des audiences publiques en vue de recueillir les opinions des citoyens yukonnais.

CALENDRIER DES AUDIENCES PUBLIQUES

Ross River

Monday, July 7, 1:00 p.m.

HOPE Centre

Ross River

Lundi 7 juillet 13 h

HOPE Centre

Faro

Monday, July 7, 7:30 p.m.

Recreation Centre Bell Avenue

Faro

Lundi 7 juillet 19 h 30

Recreation Centre Bell Avenue

Carmacks

Tuesday, July 8, 11:00 a.m.

Carmacks Recreation Centre River Drive

Carmacks

Mardi 8 juillet 11 h

Carmacks Recreation Centre River Drive

Pelly Crossing

Tuesday, July 8, 6:30 p.m.

Pelly Crossing Recreation Centre

Pelly Crossing

Mardi 8 juillet 18 h 30

Pelly Crossing Recreation Centre

Mayo

Wednesday, July 9 11:00 a.m.

Mayo Curling Lounge

Mayo

Mercredi 9 juillet 11 h

Mayo Curling Lounge

Individuals who would like to present their opinions to the Committee are encouraged to register at http://legassembly.gov.yk.ca/rbhf_public_hearings.html or by calling the Legislative Assembly Office at (867) 667-5494. The Committee is also accepting written submissions.

Email us at: romance@whatsupyukon.com

DES RISQUES ET DES AVANTAGES DE LA FRACTURATION HYDRAULIQUE

The Select Committee regarding the Risks and Benefits of Hydraulic Fracturing was established by Order of the Legislative Assembly on May 6, 2013 (Motion #433).

PUBLIC HEARINGS SCHEDULE

Do you have A Love Story To Share?

Bryce Bekar is member of the Wild Sheep Foundation as well as the Outdoor Writers of Canada and America. He believes that outdoor men and women are key in keeping our environment healthy for generations to come. Please email comments about his articles to wild@whatsupyukon.com.

Les personnes qui souhaitent faire connaître leur point de vue au comité sont invitées à s’inscrire en remplissant le formulaire en ligne, au http://legassembly.gov.yk.ca/rbhf_public_hearings.html, ou en téléphonant au bureau de l’Assemblée législative, au 867-667-5494. Le comité accepte aussi les commentaires écrits.

The Committee will be holding additional public hearings in Haines Junction, jointly in Carcross and Tagish, and Whitehorse.

Le comité tiendra des audiences publiques additionnelles à Haines Junction, Carcross et Tagish conjointement, et Whitehorse.

For more information: Website: http://www.legassembly.gov.yk.ca/rbhf.html Email: rbhf@gov.yk.ca

Pour de plus amples renseignements : Site web : http://www.legassembly.gov.yk.ca/fr/rbhf Email: rbhf@gov.yk.ca


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June 26, 2014

From the Back Country with Jozien Keijzer

The art of bus travel Great Sand Hills, Saskatchewan

A

t 3:45 a.m. we hear the local bus driver over the loudspeaker: “Good morning. We will be arriving in Whitehorse shortly. The only restaurant open 24/7 is not...” I didn’t make arrangements to be picked up, but I am not worried. I live here. We get off the bus, an odd sort of newly made family, all a little dazed. Some are whisked away instantly without goodbyes while the driver looks after the remaining lost souls, making certain all have a place to go. On a Greyhound bus one is in good hands. As passengers we also look after each other. Travel is quite relaxing. However, to make it truly pleasurable is an art form. The less artistic ones probably don’t talk much, but in the end they still become part of the bus family. Mostly we are a talkative bunch, but each of us can be quiet for hours, because the choice to withdraw, compactly, into private space, is always available. Put your pillow against the window and hang back. My bus marathon started in earnest at Maple Creek, Saskatchewan. The bus terminal clerk, in the restored 1884-era hotel station, recognized my voice from the phone earlier in the week,

PHOTOS: Jozien Keijzer

A moose on the prairies before I went into the Great Sand Hills, a beautiful place on earth. Though it was almost May, snow heading toward Regina is what I most remember from that initial stretch towards Toronto. The artistry begins with a “Hi, where are you traveling to?” chirp from a woman sitting across the isle: it is my introduction to the people seated close by who come to know each other after being together for a few days. What we have in common is that we will be together for a few more. Behind me are the guys I call the soul mates, because they share a particularly exceptional humour. They met days before during a mutual row with the bus

driver. I hear this tale after my failed first attempt at sleep. As I begin a conversation with them and my own bus buddy on the dark night highway, the bus halts. I believe maybe a moose is crossing, but I’m wrong. The bus driver faces all four of us with a reprimand; the unspoken rule: “Here, bedtime begins at 10 p.m.” Most sleep surprisingly well on the bus — the art of travel. Some journey five days, and remain looking good, despite their rumpled clothes and inevitable smells. Bathroom stops are well used. Finally, arriving in Toronto at a

too-early hour, I walk six blocks in darkness to the YMCA to shower and swim. It’s free for first-timers. I travel by bus and stay in hostels for similar reasons. Hostels are clean, friendly, and comfortable — both are inexpensive. And then there is the sight seeing. Slow travel by land habituates one to destinations uniquely. I didn’t know how beautiful the Canadian Shield is; it is an endless mountaintop. My mountains around Mendenhall subdivision happen to be Precambrian granite, just like the shield. Scheduled smoke stops, in both directions, are at scenic locations where, smoker or not, all pour out.

With abundant wildlife along the way, we often notify each other of sightings. And the local bus driver even stops for photo opportunities. I traveled in May, winter everywhere, journeying down and back across a cold, often harsh, southern Canadian spring. Returning home, reaching Pink Mountain, I fully realize once again the best climate, beautiful as always, and warmer this spring, is our North. Jozien Keijzer is a visual artist, writer and avid hiker who lives in the Mendenhall Subdivision. Please email comments about her articles to wild@ whatsupyukon.com.

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(867) 668.2228 or 1.800.661.0407


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June 26, 2014

A Successful Spring by Elizabeth Kaye

A

s an Elder, I learned from my past Elders; as a Gwitchin, I live along with the season. Porcupine Caribou is our main source of food. We fry caribou meat in the morning. We eat caribou steaks, along with fried eggs and hot bannock, and then we begin our day. For lunch we add caribou meat to healthy vegetable soup mix. Supper is roasted caribou meat with other nutritious produce. When the men go out hunting, they eat pemmican, hot bannock, and hot tea for lunch. And, of course, we blend other food into our diet. My husband and I went to Crow Flat for a caribou in March. We were successful, and after leaving Crow Flat we moved up the Porcupine River to Blue Bluff. I did my beading while Joseph cut firewood. Then the river ice moved. Joseph got three young bull caribou. I dried the meat so we could enjoy it with family and friends during the bi-annual Gwitchin gathering. Spring was wonderful. All our plans fell into place, and we decided to move back to Old Crow, tired from all the work, but tired in a good way. On my last night before returning home I listened to nothing but geese, swans, the howling of wolves, and spring birds. I thanked the Good Lord for a wonderful, successful spring.

Photo: Jason Westover

Caribou meat drying in Elizabeth Kaye’s home Elizabeth Kaye is an Elder from Old Crow. Please email comments about her articles to oldcrow@whatsupyukon.com.

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June 26, 2014

CANADA DAY

2014

La Fête Du CANADA à Whitehorse

Program

ProgrammE

9 AM

9h

Déjeuner des Chevaliers de Colomb au parc Shipyards

10 AM Volleyball Tournament at Shipyards Park till 4 Pm (By Volleyball Yukon)

10 h

Début du tournoi de ballon volant au parc Shipyards

10 AM Parade Forms up on main St between 6th & 4th ave

11 h

Départ du défile; de la rue main, sur la 2ème avenue et la rue ogilvie en direction du parc

Knights of Columbus Pancake Breakfast at Shipyards Park until 11 am

11 AM Parade Starts: From 4th ave & main St to Shipyards Park via 2nd ave & ogilvie St With the Whitehorse Legion Colour Party and music of the midnight Sun Pipe Band

avec la garde d’honneur de la Légion et musique de la Fanfare midnight Sun Pipe Band Midi

NOON Raising of the Canadian Flag and Singing of our National Anthem

Cérémonie d’ouverture présidé par Son Honneur Doug Philips Commissaire du Yukon

Official Opening Ceremony by the Honourable Doug Philips Commissioner of Yukon

Présentations des Prixs du Commissaire

Presentation of the Commissioner’s Awards

Adresses par divers invités

Address by the Yukon mP, Yukon Senator, Yukon Premier and Whitehorse mayor

Cérémonie de Citoyenneté canadienne preside par Hon. ryan Leef, Député

Canadian Citizenship Reaffirmation Ceremony conducted by the Hon. ryan Leef

La coupe du gateau de la fête du Canada par le Commissaire, servi par L’aFY

Cutting of the Official Canada Day Cake by the Commissioner (Provided by L’aFY) 1 PM

La Lever du drapeau Canadien et notre hymne nationale

Main Stage Entertainment with special presentation by the adaka Cultural Festival. 2014 CaNaDa DaY PErFormErS: Diyet; Zipline; Carole mullin Dancers; Kaska Dene Drummers; Yukon Filipino association’s Dancers; ryan mcNally & his red Hot ramblers; Soir de Semaine; Brenda Berezan & the Free radicals and Fishead Stew. Entertainment from 1 to 6 Pm (Produced by Claire Ness)

1 PM

Beer Garden from 1 to 6 Pm (operated by the Whitehorse Legion)

3 PM

Rotary Club Great Canadian Yukon River Duck Race Food Court and various Activities from Noon until 6 Pm at Shipyards Park Displays by the Local Cadets

13 h

Spectacle musicale avec des artistes du Yukon et un spectacle du festival d’adaka. Se termine a 18 h

13 h

Service de bar tenu par la Légion de Whitehorse, se termine a 18 h

15 h

Grande course Canadienne de canards sur le fleuve Yukon par le Club rotary du Yukon Kioskes de nouriture et autre activitées pour les familles de midi a 18 h Expositions par les cadets Compétition pour les jeunes présenté par les pompiers de Whitehorse Compétition de BYTE au parc Second Heaven, débute a 11 h 30

Displays by various Local Community Volunteer organizations Firemen Skill Competition for kids presented by the Whitehorse Fire Department Children and Youth Activities throughout the day BYTE Skateboard Competition; registration 11:30 am at Second Heaven Skate Park

2014 CANADA DAY SPONSORS ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

This project is funded in part by the government of Canada Ce projet est financée en partie par le gouvernement du Canada

What's Up Yukon June 26, 2014, Issue #384  

Journey with our Hearts and Hands