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S E P T E M B E R 2 011 |

The Monthly Magazine of the League of California Cities

League of California Cities

Annual Conference & Exposition Conference & Expo Highlights p.20 Strategies for a More Effective Council p.32 Involving Youth in Sustainability Efforts p.16

www.westerncity.com


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CONTENTS 2

Calendar of League Events

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Executive Director’s Message

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By Rebecca Inman

Get Ready for the Big “Trickle Down”

A look at how the conference will give you fresh ideas to better meet the needs of your city and its residents. Exposition Exhibitors 28

By Chris McKenzie A major change in the role of the federal government is beginning, and it will have dramatic consequences for state and local governments.

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City Forum

League-Sponsored Financial Solutions for California Cities Provide Significant Savings By Dan Harrison These services offer convenient investment and favorable returns, low-cost financing and discounted purchasing.

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News from the Institute for Local Government

Annual Conference Sessions Focus on Harnessing Community Resources to Address Current Challenges Learn how to leverage the power of volunteers and more.

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Sustainable Cities

Involving Youth In Your Agency’s Sustainability Activities By Yvonne Hunter, Terry Amsler and Steve Sanders Youth participation provides local officials with valuable input.

League of California Cities 2011 Annual Conference & Expo Highlights

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Strategies for Creating A More Collaborative, Effective Council Tips on problem-solving, conducting public meetings and more.

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California Cities Helen Putnam Award for Excellence

Los Gatos Recognizes Youth-Friendly Local Businesses

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Job Opportunities

51

Professional Services Directory


President Jim Ridenour Mayor Modesto

1400 K Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200 Fax (916) 658-8240

First Vice President Michael Kasperzak Vice Mayor Mountain View

Second Vice President Bill Bogaard Mayor Pasadena

Immediate Past President Judy Mitchell Council Member Rolling Hills Estates

Executive Director Chris McKenzie

For a complete list of the League board of directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

leaguevents

Magazine Staff Editor in Chief Jude Hudson (916) 658-8234 e-mail: <editor@westerncity.com>

September

Managing Editor Eva Spiegel (916) 658-8228 e-mail: <espiegel@cacities.org>

21 – 23

League of California Cities Annual Conference & Expo, San Francisco This conference offers dozens of educational sessions, numerous professional development opportunities, hundreds of exhibits and a chance to participate in the League’s policy-making activities at the Annual Business Meeting.

Advertising Sales Manager Pam Maxwell-Blodgett (916) 658-8256 e-mail: <maxwellp@cacities.org> Classified/Website Advertising and Subscriptions Sara Rounds (916) 658-8223 e-mail: <info@westerncity.com> Contributors Christal Love Sussan Nasirian Tracy Petrillo Kelly Plag

21 Policy Committee Meetings, San Francisco The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors.

22 Legal Advocacy Committee Meeting, San Francisco The committee reviews cases and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of significant statewide interest to California cities.

Associate Editors Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker Design Pat Davis Design Group, Inc.

23 Board of Directors Meeting, San Francisco The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

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Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2011 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume LXXXVII, No. 9.

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League of California Cities

november

15 – 16 (tentative) Legislative Briefings Webinar Learn about the latest legislative developments affecting cities.

30 – December 2 City Clerks New Law & Elections Seminar, Long Beach This seminar covers laws affecting elections as well as many aspects of the clerk’s responsibilities.

30 – December 2 Municipal Finance Institute, Long Beach This conference provides essential information for city officials and staff involved in fiscal planning for municipalities.

Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org/events. For the latest information on League conferences and events follow us on Twitter @CaCitiesLearn. For legislative and policy updates and more, follow @CaCities. Join us on Facebook! www.facebook.com/westerncity www.facebook.com/LeagueofCaCities www.cacities.org


Executive Director’s Message by Chris McKenzie

Get Ready for the Big

“Trickle Down” A major change in the role of the federal government is beginning to occur, and it will have dramatic consequences for state and local governments and the people they serve. continued

www.westerncity.com

Western City, September 2011

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Get Ready for the Big “Trickle Down,” continued

Spending cuts and water have at least one thing in common — they both run downhill. A great deal of attention in Washington, D.C., this summer was focused on extending the federal debt limit. What may be unclear to some is that the debt limit deal, assuming it will be implemented as passed, will require some major federal spending cuts im-

mediately and over the near term that will fundamentally change the federal government’s commitment to defense and domestic spending. The deal also contains an enforcement mechanism that guarantees continued uncertainty over the next few months (and maybe years) about the federal government’s commitment to fund state and local services. A

There is strong evidence that in the months ahead the House of Representatives will demand

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are vital to cities. major change in the role of the federal government is beginning to occur, and it will have dramatic consequences for state and local governments and the people they serve. What’s Coming

Under the debt limit deal, 10-year discretionary spending caps of nearly $1 trillion would be implemented to reduce the deficit. These cuts would be balanced between defense and non-defense spending. In addition, a bipartisan Congressional committee would then identify an additional $1.5 trillion in deficit reduction, which could include changing federal entitlement programs (Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security) and eliminating tax loopholes.

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The committee’s work must be implemented by Dec. 23, 2011. If the committee fails to do its work, the failure will trigger spending reductions in 2013, divided evenly between domestic and defense spending but protecting Social Security, Medicare beneficiaries and programs that serve low-income people. States have a particular interest in the omission of Medicaid (health care for the poor) spending from the automatic cuts if the committee fails to do its work, but some state officials point out that it could still be trimmed if the committee does its work as designed. continued on page 6 www.cacities.org


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Get Ready for the Big “Trickle Down,” continued from page 4

In announcing the debt limit deal, President Obama said it makes substantial reductions in the base defense budget (something that will be noticed by cities with military bases) of $350 billion initially and will reduce domestic discretionary spending to the lowest level since the Eisenhower administration. While cuts in funding for states could cause even deeper cuts in state-administered health and human services programs (for example, in-home care for seniors, hospital care, etc.), cities may be facing not only the end of the federal job stimulus funding but also deep cuts to programs that make the difference between manageable and unmanageable public safety and environmental services. Commenting on the proposed debt limit deal, U.S. Conference of Mayors

Executive Director Tom Cochran told the New York Times “the proposed cuts were ‘devastating’ to cities” and would “mean fewer cops, fewer firefighters and less money for job creation projects, housing and elderly care.”

The loss of

More Devils in the Details

on our state

As the most aggressive of the two chambers, the House of Representatives has recently witnessed approval of proposals in its Appropriations Committee the week of July 11 that offer a glimpse of what may lie ahead for cities. According to the National League of Cities, the House Appropriations Committee approved a FY 2012 Commerce, Justice and Science Appropriations bill that would eliminate the Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) Office and virtually all its programs, including both hiring and

federal funding will only increase the pressure government to violate California’s Constitution and take local funds.

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technical assistance grants. In addition, the bill would make drastic cuts to Byrne Justice Assistance Grants (JAG), the Second Chance Act, and Juvenile Justice Grants. In all, the spending bill cuts more than $1.1 billion from state and local government programs. Second, the House Appropriations Committee also approved the FY 2012 Interior-Environment appropriations bill, which provides funding for the U.S. Department of the Interior and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). As approved, the bill would slash both the Clean Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Funds (SRF), by a combined $967 million less than the enacted FY 2011 levels. The bill provides $689 million for the Clean Water SRF and $829 million for the Drinking Water SRF, setting those programs back to FY 2009 levels. In addition, the bill includes level funding for the Superfund Program ($1.2 billion) and reduces funding for the Brownfields Program by two-thirds ($60 million).

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Increasing Pressure to Take Local Funds

Will these specific cuts or some close to them occur? That remains to be seen, but there is strong evidence that in the months ahead the House of Representatives will demand deep spending cuts in domestic programs that are vital to cities. Our ability to shield these programs (or other important programs like Community Development Block Grants) from the deficit budget ax will shift the impact to other domestic programs. If those programs fund important state services, the loss of federal funding will only increase the pressure on our state government to violate California’s Constitution and take local funds for the state budget. If that happens, we must remain vigilant and demand they respect the Constitution. Water and spending cuts at the federal and state levels do run downhill. n

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League-Sponsored

Financial Solutions for California

Significant Among the many Leaguesponsored services used widely by California cities are three services provided by other organizations. The League helped create each of these organizations to offer value to local governments, and it continues to be involved in their governance and administration. They are: • CalTRUST (Investment Trust of California) — a joint powers authority that provides a convenient way for local agencies to pool their assets for investment; • California Communities (California Statewide Communities Development Authority or CSCDA) — a joint powers financing authority that offers local governments and private entities access to low-cost, tax-exempt financing for projects that provide local public benefit; and • U.S. Communities — a national nonprofit corporation that allows local agencies to piggyback on competitively

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bid contracts and secure very deep discounts by taking advantage of public agencies’ enormous collective purchasing power nationwide. These services provide cities value in two ways. The first and most important is through convenient investment and favorable returns, low-cost financing and discounted purchasing. The second is related to the fees the League receives from these services. These fees allow cities working together to accomplish through the League what would otherwise be unaffordable, while keeping League dues affordable. It would require a 55 percent membership dues increase on cities for the League to replace the revenue it receives from these three programs. Here’s a brief introduction to each of these services.

About CalTRUST

CalTRUST is an innovative partnership. The California State Association of Counties (CSAC) Finance Corporation

www.cacities.org


Cities Provide

Savings and the League created CalTRUST to provide a convenient method for local agencies to pool their assets for investment. The California Government Code specifically authorizes local agencies to directly invest in joint investment pools, such as CalTRUST. Participating is easy. Local agencies can invest with CalTRUST directly, without the need for a city council action to join the joint powers authority (JPA). Any California local agency may participate in CalTRUST. Local treasurers and investment officers govern CalTRUST. As a JPA, CalTRUST is governed by a board of trustees made up of local treasurers, finance directors and investment officers. The board of trustees sets overall policy for CalTRUST; it also selects and supervises the activities of the investment manager and other agents. Wells Capital Management serves as the investment advisor for the program. CalTRUST offers options. Local agencies have access to three types of accounts: 1. Money market (rated AAA/Aaa); 2. Short term (rated AA/S1+); and 3. Medium term.

by Dan Harrison

Local agencies may select account options that match their investment time horizon and cash flow needs. They can easily reallocate among accounts as those needs change. Each of the accounts seeks to attain a high level of current income and preserve principal by investing only in high-quality, fixed-income securities. All CalTRUST accounts comply with the limits and restrictions placed on local investments by California statutes; no leverage is permitted in any of the CalTRUST accounts. CalTRUST is flexible and transparent. There are no account maximums or limits on the number of accounts. Unlimited transactions are possible in the money market and short-term accounts, and monthly transactions are possible in the medium-term account. The daily mark to market, or fair value accounting, of portfolios means no hidden surprises. Twenty-four-hour secure online access to account information reflects all activity through the prior day, including all asset holdings. For more information visit www.caltrust.org.

About California Communities

California Communities has a track record of ensuring that the diverse interests and broad needs of more than 500 local government members and their communities are met through a variety of innovative public agency and private activity bond programs. With more than $47 billion in tax-exempt debt issued since 1988, California Communities has both earned a trusted name and developed the breadth of experience necessary to operate in the California marketplace. Local Government Projects. California Communities has funded more than $11.7 billion for 1,456 local agency participants, including: â&#x20AC;˘ Total Road Improvement Program (TRIP), which leverages gas tax revenue (this is a new service); continued

Dan Harrison is director of administrative services for the League and can be reached at <dharrison@cacities.org>. www.westerncity.com

Western City, September 2011

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Financial Solutions for California Cities, continued

• Tax and revenue anticipation notes — $9 billion;

$36 billion for 1,775 local communityapproved efforts, including:

• Water/wastewater systems — $481 million;

• Affordable housing — more than 54,000 very low- and low-income affordable housing units for 464 multifamily and 118 senior housing projects;

• CaLease lease obligations — $123 million; • Pension obligation bonds — $414 million; • Statewide Community Infrastructure Program — $149 million; and • Vehicle license fee and property tax securitizations — $1.5 billion. Public Benefit Projects. California Communities is known for financing high-quality public benefit projects. It has issued more than

• Manufacturing — 125 projects creating an estimated 10,000 new manufacturing jobs in California; • Hospitals/medical facilities — 645 projects; and • Solid waste disposal and alternative energy — 19 projects. Read the annual Community Benefit Report and more at www.cacommunities.org.

About U.S. Communities

U.S. Communities is the leading national government purchasing cooperative. It provides world-class government procurement resources and solutions to local and state government agencies, school districts (K-12), higher education and nonprofits looking for the best overall government pricing from suppliers. The program offers: • No User Fees — there are no costs or fees to participate;
 continued on page 13

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Financial Solutions for California Cities, continued from page 10

• Best Overall Government Pricing From Suppliers — by combining the potential cooperative purchasing power of up to 90,000 public agencies, California cities are able to access the best overall pricing;


through U.S. Communities. In addition, using these services will help keep the League strong and reduce its reliance on membership dues. n

• Quality Brands — U.S. Communities offers thousands of the best brands in a wide variety of categories, services and solutions;
 • Integrity and Experience — unlike other government cooperative purchasing organizations, U.S. Communities national government purchasing cooperative was founded by five national sponsors and more than 70 state, city and regional organizations; and • Oversight by Public Purchasing Professionals — third-party audits on contracts ensure that program pricing commitments are met, with benchmark analyses against other suppliers and retailers to guarantee participants the best overall value. A majority of California cities already use one or more of the U.S. Communities contracts. However, there is more money to be saved on the products and services cities use every day. The new office-supplies contract that features locally owned office suppliers with national discount pricing is especially attractive. Other offerings include furniture, auto supplies, food, rental equipment, tools, cleaning supplies, office equipment and much more.

Keenan & Associates introduces Futuris, a comprehensive program that provides all your GASB 43 and 45 compliance needs from a single source. For more information please contact Steve Gedestad at 800.338.5247 901 Calle Amanecer, Suite 200, San Clemente, CA 92673 www.keenan.com License No. 0451271

Innovative Solutions. Enduring Principles.

Registering to participate with U.S. Communities government purchasing cooperative is quick, easy and free. Learn more about this one-of-a-kind joint purchasing program by visiting www.uscommunities.org. Beyond the Financial Benefits

The League encourages cities to use these services. CalTRUST fits well into the investment strategy of many cities, most cities will find it helpful to rely on California Communities financing from time to time, and every city can secure high-quality products at lower cost

www.westerncity.com

Western City, September 2011

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Join These Leading Communities

Achieving Local Sustainability Learn more at: www.ca-ilg.org/BeaconAward (Applications accepted continuously)

Mark Wheetley, Council Member, Arcata “Arcata is proud to be part of the Beacon Award program. We welcome the opportunity to participate in this program. There are a lot of transferable lessons that can come from our experience to share with other communities.”

Arcata

Michael Sweeney, Mayor, Hayward “We all have a lot to learn from one another. The Beacon Award program is a tremendous step forward in making sure good practices and success stories are shared. There is nothing like an award program to encourage people to go the next step.”

Carl Morehouse, Council Member, Ventura “We were pleased to step forward and go for the Beacon Award. It’s reflective our community culture and our own goals to save energy. We encourage other cities throughout the state to jump in with us and get involved.”

Hayward

Ginger Coleman, Council Member, Apple Valley

Ventura

“We are the first city in San Bernardino County to adopt a climate action plan. There are a lot of things city staff are working very hard on to bring sustainability to the community. It’s nice to have this type of recognition program so cities can showcase what they are doing.”

Apple Valley

Greg Cox, Supervisor, San Diego County “San Diego County is excited about participating in the Beacon Award program. I encourage all counties and cities to join the program and strive for the platinum award level. We’ve done a lot in San Diego County and I know we will learn from the other participants.”

San Diego County

C U RRE N T BE ACO N AWARD PARTI CI PANTS (as of August 17, 2011)

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Hayward Arcata Livermore Apple Valley Manhattan Beach Benicia Palo Alto Citrus Heights Palm Springs Chula Vista Pleasanton Davis League of California Cities San Carlos El Cerrito

San Rafael San Ramon Santa Barbara Santa Clarita San Diego County Santa Cruz Simi Valley

Sonoma County South Gate Taft Tulare Ventura Woodland Yolo County

www.ca-ilg.org This Program is funded by California utility ratepayers and administered by Southern California Gas Company, San Diego Gas & Electric Company, Pacific Gas & Electric Company and www.cacities.org Southern California Edison, under the auspices of the California Public Utilities Commission.


News from the Institute for Local Government

Annual Conference Sessions Focus on Harnessing Community Resources to Address Current Challenges Facing numerous challenges, often with fewer dollars, California’s cities are finding ways to draw on the full resources of their communities to meet local needs. This includes creating unique multi-sector partnerships, harnessing the power of volunteers and engaging a diverse range of city residents. Come hear from local officials and community leaders spearheading these innovative efforts at two concurrent sessions, organized by the Institute for Local Government (ILG), at the League of California Cities 2011 Annual Conference & Expo in San Francisco. Cities are home to an increasing number of recent immigrants and their families. Despite these changing demographics, newer residents are often not as fully integrated into the community or as likely to participate in local public engagement opportunities as other community members. Also, the relationships between newer and older residents may not be optimal, and this can hinder a city’s efforts to address and solve problems together. How can local agencies more effectively involve their immigrant residents in the civic and political life of their community? Plan to attend “Approaches to Immigrant Integration in California Cities: Opportunities for Local Officials,” 8:00–9:30 a.m., Thursday, Sept. 22. At this interactive session you will learn how to build relationships between foreign-born and native-born populations, promote inclusive public engagement and support citizenship and participation by eligible legal residents. Find additional resources on immigrant engagement and integration online at www.ca-ilg.org/immigrantengagement. The second ILG session will offer participants best practices that support the strategic use of volunteers to augment city services in challenging economic times. Make a note to attend “Turning Civic Passions Into Action: Volunteers as Strategic Resources for Cities,” 3:15–4:45 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 22. Topics include the different roles that volunteers can play, the importance of city

leadership and overall strategy required for success, approaches to building service partnerships with community organizations, and information on funding sources to support these programs.

New Public Engagement Assessment Tool For Local Officials While local agencies are increasingly engaging the public, few practical tools exist to measure the success of these approaches. Recognizing this, ILG has created Assessing Public Engagement Effectiveness: Rapid Review Worksheets (online at www.ca-ilg.org/ rapidreview) to help local officials gauge the relative success of these processes and improve future activities. By using these worksheets, a local agency that has sponsored, organized and/ or convened a public engagement process or activity can collect information from both participants and local officials. Although the goal is to assess the relative success of the process just completed and to guide improvements to future engagement activities, these Rapid Review Worksheets can also be useful in the planning stage. An early review of the questions in the worksheets can help guide planning and design of the engagement process as well as ensure that the design and purposes of the process match up with what the agency plans to evaluate. Evaluating local agency-sponsored public engagement enables local officials and others to gauge participant satisfaction, identify lessons learned and make refinements and improvements in future efforts. Find additional information and resources related to public engagement for local officials at www.ca-ilg.org/engagement. n

Western City, September 2011

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Involving Youth in Your Agency’s Sustainability Activities by Yvonne Hunter, Terry Amsler and Steve Sanders

Local agencies use a variety of methods to involve young people in local government. Many cities and counties have active youth commissions or youth councils. As local agencies embrace sustainability goals, new opportunities emerge to engage young people. Whether the sustainability activities involve energy efficiency, planning for a more bike-friendly downtown, responding to climate change or updating a General Plan, local agencies throughout California can benefit by including youth as part of the process. Yvonne Hunter is program director of the Institute for Local Government’s Climate Change Program and can be reached at <yhunter@ ca-ilg.org>. Terry Amsler is program director of ILG’s Public Engagement and Collaborative Governance Program and can be reached at <tamsler@ca-ilg.org>. Steve Sanders is program director of ILG’s Land Use and Healthy Neighborhoods programs and can be reached at <ssanders@ca-ilg.org>. To learn more about ILG, visit www.ca-ilg.org.

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Increasing numbers of cities and counties are developing climate action plans, as well as incorporating sustainability policies into their General Plans. Many also include policies to address climate change and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in General Plan updates. The City of Indio asked its young residents for ideas on the design of a new teen center.

Youth, Planning and Climate Change

Asking youth for their input allows the local agency to benefit from the fresh perspectives of young residents who have the most at stake in their community’s longterm future. Youth involvement can also help local agencies more cost-effectively target the resources serving them. Such participation also gives young people opportunities to identify and address issues or challenges that directly affect their lives and the well-being of their communities. And exposing young people to local government and the roles and responsibilities of staff and elected officials may lead them to consider careers in local government. Involving young people also offers the potential to add to the community’s awareness and support for the sustainability effort under way. Consider, for example, how news about a sustainability program or policy can “go viral” when the young people involved share information about their participation and excitement using social media, such as Twitter or Facebook.

www.westerncity.com

The scientific consensus is that climate change will have a direct and indirect impact on Californians, including young people who may be more affected as the consequences of climate change become increasingly pronounced over their lifetimes. Young people hear and learn about climate change from a variety of sources and have varying degrees of understanding of the science, impacts and ways to address climate change.

Virtually all of the strategies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions also promote local sustainability and provide opportunities to engage youth. For example, making communities more walkable and bicycle friendly can reduce greenhouse gas emissions by decreasing vehicle use. Input from youth can help improve the effectiveness of these policies, because young people frequently walk and bike to their destinations. San Mateo County leaders organized a “Shared Vision 2025” process consisting of 10 public forums in 2007 to get broad public input in plotting a course for continued

The Indio Teen Center is not only fun but also solarpowered by this array of panels on its roof.

Western City, September 2011

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Involving Youth in Your Agency’s Sustainability Activities, continued

the next 15 years of development in the county. As part of a series of community meetings designed to reach a wide cross section of residents, organizers specifically targeted groups of people who were typically less likely to attend public meetings, such as teens. About 125 teens from

throughout the county gathered at a youth town hall meeting and worked in small groups, with each electing a spokesperson to report the goals their group identified. continued on page 46

The 2010 Indio Youth Advisory Council (YAC) played an important role in the design of the solar-powered local teen center. back row (l to r): Jerry Zendejas, YAC advisor; Ritchie Chicas, YAC mayor; John Huang, YAC treasurer; Ruben Torres, YAC member; and Edmundo Amparan, YAC member. front row (l to r): Rosalva Campos, YAC advisor; Karen Jaramillo, YAC secretary; Elizabeth Giron, YAC mayor pro tem; Anelise Saenz, YAC member; Soleil Rubalcava, YAC advisor; and David Ortega, YAC advisor.

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League of California Cities

More Resources Online Read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com for additional resources, ideas and activities to help your agency involve youth in sustainability activities. The online version of this article includes information to help educate young people about sustainability, including energy, climate change, air quality and water conservation. It provides an annotated bibliography of youth and sustainability resources that includes key items from the Institute for Local Government’s sustainability and public engagement programs, as well as information about local, state and national youth-related sustainability resources offered by public, private and nonprofit groups.

www.cacities.org


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Aleshire & Wynder, LLP1,2 American Fidelity Assurance Company Best, Best & Krieger LLP1,2 Burrtec Waste Industries, Inc.2 CalPortland Company2 Cardiac Science2 Chevron Global Water FATHOM HdL Companies Honeywell Building Solutions IBM Johnson Controls Kaiser Permanente Keenan & Associates2 MuniServices Northern California Carpenters Regional Council PG&E Corporation2 Richards, Watson & Gershon1,2 SDG&E/Southern California Gas Company/The Sempra Energy Utilities2 Siemens2 Southern California Edison2 State Farm Insurance Willdan2

Gold 

Bank of America Burke, Williams & Sorensen, LLP1,2 DW Development2 Hanson Bridgett1,2 Liebert Cassidy Whitmore1 Loeb & Loeb, LLP2 Macerich Management Company2 Renne Sloan Holtzman Sakai, LLP1,2 Union Pacific Railroad

Silver 

Bureau Veritas North America, Inc. Comcast DART Container Corporation2 Garaventa Enterprises/ S.E.G. Trucking2 ITRON, Inc. Interwest Consulting Group, Inc. Kronick Moskovitz Tiedemann & Girard1 The Lewis Group of Companies2 Meyers Nave1,2 Republic Services, Inc.2 Starbucks Tribal Alliance of Sovereign Indian Nations2 Union Bank Vulcan2 Wells Fargo

Bronze 

California & Nevada IBEW/NECA LaborManagement Cooperation Trust

California Water Service Company Hill International2 Molycorp Minerals2 Morley Brothers, LLC2 Morongo Band of Mission Indians2 Pacific Development Group, Inc.2 PARS PERC Water Corp. Piper Jaffray Prime Healthcare Services, Inc.2 Prometheus Real Estate Group, Inc.2 Janice Rutherford2 San Manuel Band of Mission Indians2 Saris Regis and Regis Homes2 Trane Inc. TY LIN International2 Young Homes2

Basic 

Charles Abbott Associates, Inc.2 Amador Valley Industries, LLC2 Avery & Associates2 Berliner-Cohen Best Way Disposal2 Blue Line Transfer Inc.2 Bob Murray & Associates C+S Engineerings, Inc. Califia, LLC dba River Islands @ Lathrop2 California Grocers Association California Hotel & Lodging Association City National Bank City Ventures

ÂŹ*OTUJUVUFGPS-PDBM(PWFSONFOUTVQQPSUFSÂŹ$*5*1"$TVQQPSUFS +PJOUIF1BSUOFST1SPHSBN5PEBZ $POUBDU.JLF&HBO]  ]FHBO!DBDJUJFTPSH

Classic Communities2 Cost Control Associates, Inc. Ecology Auto Parts2 Fresno Police Officers Association General Mills2 Gonzalez Goodale Architects Harris & Associates Inland Valleys Association of Realtors2 Issues Mobilization Political Action Committee2 Jones Hall, A Professional Law Corporation2 Kinsell, Newcomb & De Dios, Inc. Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP2 Library Systems & Services, LLC Lilburn Corporation2 Livermore Sanitation, Inc.2 Marchetti Construction, Inc.2 Premier Medical Transportation, Inc.2 Robson Homes LLC2 Santa Monica Police Officersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Association South Bay Recycling, LLC2 Southern Califronia Concrete Producers Southwest Water Company2 Specialty Solid Waste and Recycling2 SummerHill Homes LLC2 Swinerton Management & Consulting2 The Sobrato Organization2 Transtech2 Partial list as of 8/1/2011


2011ANNUAL CONFERENCE & EXPOSITION League of California Cities 2011 Annual Conference & Expo Highlights by Rebecca Inman

Sept. 21–23, Moscone West Convention Center, San Francisco

The League of California Cities 2011 Annual Conference & Expo will be held Sept. 21-23 at the Moscone West Convention Center in San Francisco, with the theme of “Cities Standing Strong for Cities.” Today’s economic environment makes it imperative for California’s cities to reduce inefficiencies, streamline operations, cut services and “build it better” with smaller budgets. At the Expo, more than 215 exhibiting companies and 45 first-time exhibitors will showcase products and services to help cities accomplish more for less. Visit the Expo show floor and meet vendors face to face, learn about new product applications, discover free services, and develop new sources or compare and qualify suppliers. Attending the League’s 2011 Annual Conference & Expo will give you fresh ideas on how to better meet the needs of your city and residents with cost-saving services, products and practical tools for making tough decisions — ideas that you can put to work immediately upon returning to your city.

opposite page, top to bottom City officials applaud a panel of speakers following a thought-provoking session; fire chiefs share a light-hearted moment while discussing common challenges; and Mayor Tony Cartagena of Walnut, Mayor Joseph Cho of Cerritos and Council Member Lois Gaston of Duarte do a little networking between sessions.

Rebecca Inman is senior expo and marketing manager for the League and can be reached at <rinman@cacities.org>.

20

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Expo Highlights Grand Prize Giveaway

Three Grand Prizes will be given away during the League’s Annual Conference & Expo. Two lucky cities will each win an automated external defibrillator (approximate value $1,500 each) offered by Cardiac Science Corporation, and one fortunate city will win an electric vehicle charging station (approximate value $5,000) plus $1,000 toward its installation, compliments of Coulomb Technologies, Inc. You must be present to win, and awards will be presented at the Annual Business Meeting on Friday afternoon. This promotion is not intended as an endorsement of any product or service.

View Award-Winning City Projects And More in the Partners’ Village

Stroll the Partners’ Village area of the Expo and visit the Helen Putnam Award winners’ exhibits. The California Cities Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program, sponsored by the League Partners, recognizes and promotes outstanding efforts and innovative solutions by city governments to: • Improve the quality of life in local communities; • Implement efficiencies in service delivery and operations; and • Provide services responsive to the local community. continued

www.westerncity.com

Western City, September 2011

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League of California Cities 2011 Annual Conference & Expo Highlights, continued

The Annual Conference & Expo offer a wide range of professional development opportunities and chances to hear from experts on the most challenging issues facing California’s cities today. City officials network and share ideas between sessions and at department meetings, division breakfasts and diversity group events. Visit the Expo floor to learn about products and services that can help your city save money, increase efficiency and better serve your residents.

The Helen Putnam Award program features 10 categories: 1. Community Services and Economic Development; 2. Enhancing Public Trust, Ethics and Community Involvement; 3. Health and Wellness Programs; 4. Housing Programs and Innovations; 5. Internal Administration; 6. League Partners Award for Excellence in City-Business Relations;

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League of California Cities

(714) 446-1400

8. Public Safety; 9. Public Works, Infrastructure and Transportation; and 10. Ruth Vreeland Award for Engaging Youth in City Government. In addition, one city may receive the President’s Advocacy Award. This prestigious award honors a distinguished program, chosen from the 10 Helen Putnam Award winners, that best advocates for the League’s annual strategic priorities. As in past years, a Cities Counties Schools (CCS) Partnership Award will be given www.cacities.org


to the city whose project demonstrates a culture of collaboration among local jurisdictions. The CCS Partnership is a joint effort of the League, California State Association of Counties and California School Boards Association. Don’t Miss the League Partner Speaker Theatre The League Partner Speaker Theatre, also located in the Partners’ Village, offers sessions that highlight successful examples of public-private partnerships. Hear case studies of innovative projects and programs that have worked in California cities. Learn from elected officials, city staff and industry experts who have found creative solutions to some of the most challenging problems facing cities. Sessions include: • Smarter Cities — Driving Sustainable Growth and Prosperity Through the Strategic Use of Technology (presented by IBM); • The Effects of Health Care Reform on Section 125 Plans (presented by American Fidelity Assurance Company); • Helping Communities Thrive Through the Healthy Eating Active Living Campaign (presented by Kaiser Permanente); and • Leveraging Smart Metering to Improve Operational Efficiencies, Manage Energy, Conserve Water and Reduce Costs (presented by Itron Water). Come Prepared

Visit the annual conference page on the League website at www.cacities.org/ac to help plan your schedule. Walk the Expo show floor and bring home solutions that you can put to work in your city right away.

Networking Opportunities The annual conference offers a variety of ways to connect with your colleagues from throughout the state to discuss continued

www.westerncity.com

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League of California Cities 2011 Annual Conference & Expo Highlights, continued

common concerns, share solutions and exchange ideas. Networking events at the conference include gatherings hosted by the League’s diversity groups, professional departments and regional divisions.

Diversity Groups

The League is committed to promoting involvement for all that reflects the diversity of California’s cities. The board of directors has recognized the following diversity groups: African-American Caucus; Asian Pacific Islander Caucus; the Gay Lesbian Bisexual & Transgender

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Local Officials Caucus; Latino Caucus; and Women’s Caucus (new in 2011). Be sure to sign up to join one or more of the League’s caucuses and attend their networking events at the conference, which are open to all attendees. Municipal Departments

The League’s professional departments are an integral and important part of the organization, serving as a catalyst for educational events and networking. The 11 departments are: 1. City Attorneys; 2. City Managers; 3. City Clerks; 4. Community Services; 5. Fire Chiefs; 6. Fiscal Officers;

WE KNOW POLICY MATTERS California Lutheran University’s Master of Public Policy and Administration Program prepares students for leadership and service in the public and nonprofit sectors. This convenient evening program develops students for employment as managers and policy experts committed to effective, ethical and socially relevant service to the community. For more information, or to RSVP for an upcoming information session, please call 1-800-CLU-GRAD or e-mail clugrad@callutheran.edu. “The academic rigor and course work were demanding but manageable, mainly because of the availability of professors, their willingness to help, and their genuine interest in student success.” Saul Aguilar III, MPPA Graduate Strategic Labor Initiatives Specialist

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24

League of California Cities

In addition to learning about helpful products and services at the Expo, city officials exchange ideas with colleagues.

www.cacities.org


7. Mayors and Council Members; 8. Personnel and Employee Relations; 9. Planning and Community Development; 10. Police Chiefs; and 11. Public Works Officers. The professional departments play an essential role in forming League policy and assisting with conference program development; they are also represented on the board of directors. Department Business Meetings will be held at 2:00 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 21. Regional Divisions

The League’s regional divisions function as its grassroots advocacy teams. They offer a great way for city officials to get involved in activities that support the

“Pervious concrete has the advantage of meeting multiple design requirements for storm water runoff management in Santa Barbara County.” — Cathleen Garnand, Civil Engineering Associate, County of Santa Barbara Water Resources Division

“We needed a material for the ADA compliant areas of the parking lot that would facilitate wheelchair access, accept code required striping and still allow the storm water to percolate.” — Brian Dougherty, FAIA, Dougherty + Dougherty Architects LLP

sccpconcrete.com

continued

The Nation’s Top-Ranked Public Finance Firm Building on a 100-year history in public finance which includes the financing of such iconic projects as the Golden Gate Bridge and Carnegie Hall, Orrick’s public finance lawyers have handled thousands of transactions of every type, including: Health Care, Public Power, Higher Education, School Finance, Housing, Securitizations, Indian Tribal Finance, Swaps and other Hedges, Infrastructure, Transportation, Nonprofit Corporations, Water and Wastewater, Pension Bonds, OPEB Bonds and Public Private Partnerships. Orrick also is a leader in helping municipal market participants with post-issuance compliance and enforcement issues, such as Continuing Disclosure, SEC Investigations, Rebate, Defaults/Workouts, IRS Audits and Bankruptcies. For more information about our public finance practice, please contact publicfinance@orrick.com.

Friendly vendors answer questions on the Expo floor, and Cupertino Vice Mayor Gilbert Wong heads to a networking event with Fremont Council Member Suzanne Chan. www.westerncity.com

orrick, herrington & sutcliffe llp los angeles new york orange county portland sacramento san francisco seattle silicon valley washington dc

Western City, September 2011

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League of California Cities 2011 Annual Conference & Expo Highlights, continued

quality of life in their communities. The divisions provide the League board of directors with a diverse range of perspectives from members throughout the state. Divisions are staffed locally by the League’s regional public affairs managers. Each division will host a networking breakfast on Friday, Sept. 23. Contact your regional public affairs manager for more information and costs. Brown Act Requirements and League Conferences

The Brown Act permits the attendance of a majority of the members of a legislative body at a conference or similar gathering open to the public that addresses issues of general interest to the public or to public agencies of the type represented by the legislative body. However, a majority of the members cannot discuss among themselves, other than as part of the scheduled program, business of a specific

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League of California Cities

nature that is within the local agency’s subject matter jurisdiction.

Attending the League’s

Institute for Local Government

& Expo will give you fresh

The Institute for Local Government is the 501(c)(3) research affiliate of the California State Association of Counties and the League of California Cities. Its mission is to promote good government at the local level. ILG will not offer a luncheon symposium at the annual conference in 2011, but is sponsoring two sessions: “Approaches to Immigrant Integration in California Cities: Opportunities for Local Officials,” 8:00-9:30 a.m., Thursday, Sept. 22; and “Turning Civic Passions Into Action: Volunteers as Strategic Resources for Cities,” 3:15-4:45 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 22. See page 15 for more information.

meet the needs of your city

2011 Annual Conference ideas on how to better and residents with costsaving services, products and practical tools for making tough decisions — ideas that you can put to work immediately upon returning to your city.

www.cacities.org


Mayors and

Council Members Academy Elected officials derive multiple benefits from participating in a training certificate program offered by the League: the Mayors and Council Members Academy. Geared to the needs of local elected officials, it comprises educational programs and community activities that build the knowledge and skills that are critically important for elected office-holders. The Mayors and Council Members Academyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s three levels include Leadership, Advanced Leadership and Leadership in Action. Elected officials may participate in all three levels at the same time.

Looking for Savings? PARS has 3 ways to help: 1. Early Retirement Incentives - facilitate downsizing 2. 115 OPEB Trust - reduce liabilities by pre-funding for GASB 45 3. FICA Alternative - savings of 79% for part-time employee plan

Visit with PARS in booth 530 at this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s League of Cities Conference in San Francisco! 800.540.6369 x 116 mbarker@pars.org

www.pars.org Š 2011 Public Agency Retirement Services (PARS). All rights reserved.

Social Media Action Center Are you ready to participate online? Do you or your city have a social media presence and active conversation? Join us in this hands-on, action area at the conference, where youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find friendly support staff who will answer your questions in a â&#x20AC;&#x153;no-pressureâ&#x20AC;? setting. Learn how to create an online identity and use social media tools effectively, or discover how to make the tools youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re using now work even better for you. n

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.AVIGATINGĂĽCHALLENGESĂĽANDĂĽENHANCINGĂĽ COMMUNITIESĂĽĂĽITSĂĽWHATĂĽWEĂĽDO &ORĂĽMOREĂĽTHANĂĽHALFĂĽAĂĽCENTURY ĂĽ#ALIFORNIAĂĽ CITIESĂĽHAVEĂĽTRUSTEDĂĽTHEĂĽLEGALĂĽGUIDANCEĂĽ ANDĂĽMULTIDISCIPLINARYĂĽEXPERTISEĂĽOFĂĽ+-4'ĂĽ ATTORNEYSĂĽTOĂĽHELPĂĽTHEIRĂĽCOMMUNITIESĂĽTHRIVEĂĽ

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Communications & Social Media Outreach Specialist Emily Cole assists a city official at the Social Media Action Center. www.westerncity.com

WWWKMTGCOMĂ&#x2013;Ă&#x2013; 3ACRAMENTOĂ&#x2013;Ă&#x2013;\Ă&#x2013;Ă&#x2013;"AKERSĂ&#x2DC;ELDĂ&#x2013;Ă&#x2013;\Ă&#x2013;Ă&#x2013;2OSEVILLEĂ&#x2013;Ă&#x2013;\Ă&#x2013;Ă&#x2013;3ANĂ&#x2013;,UISĂ&#x2013;/BISPOĂ&#x2013;Ă&#x2013;\Ă&#x2013;Ă&#x2013;Ă&#x2013;7ALNUTĂ&#x2013;#REEKĂ&#x2013; Ă&#x2013;

Western City, September 2011

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Exposition Exhibitors League Partners appear in bold. AAA Flag & Banner ACS, A Xerox Company AECOM AP Wireless Infrastructure Partners AT&T2 Adams Ashby Group AIRCON ENERGY Alamo Capital American Fidelity Assurance Company2 Ameron Pole Products Asphalt Zipper Association of California Water Agencies (ACWA) Atkins Avery Associates2 BSA Architects - Bull Stockwell Allen

Badger Meter, Inc. Bay Area Environmental Training Center Best Best & Krieger, LLP1 BigBelly Solar Blackboard Connect for Government Blais & Associates Bob Murray & Associates Bureau Veritas Burke, Williams & Sorensen, LLP1 Buxton CH2M HILL CMB Regional Centers CPS HR Consulting CRW Systems, Inc. CSAC Excess Insurance Authority CSG Consultants, Inc. California Building Officials California Communities/ U.S. Communities

1–Institute for Local Government Partner 2–CITIPAC supporter. List current as of Aug. 18, 2011. Visit www.cacities.org/AC for more information.

California Consulting, LLC California Contract Cities Association California Dental Association California Department of General Services - Statewide Travel Program California Department of General Services/Cal-Card California Department of Housing & Community Development California Fuel Cell Partnership California Joint Powers Insurance Authority California Prison Industry Authority California Product Stewardship Council CalPERS CalTRUST Cardiac Science Corporation Carl Warren & Company Carollo Engineers Charles Abbott Associates2

Technology that thinks like you do.

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Chevron Energy Solutions CirclePoint CivicPlus Clarke Clean Energy CleanStreet Climatec Building Technologies Group Coast2Coast Diagnostics Comcate, Inc. Coplogic, Inc. Coulomb Technologies, Inc. Credit Bureau Associates Crown Disposal-South Bay Recycling2 DRI Energy DYK/Natgun, Division of DN Tanks Dapeer, Rosenblit & Litvak, LLP Dart Container Corp. David Taussig & Associates, Inc. Davis Instruments Corporation De La Rosa & Co. Digital Ally, Inc.

DriWater Inc. Dunn-Edwards Corporation eCivis Edge Development Emergency Services Consulting International Empower Electronics, Inc. EnLink Geoenergy Services, Inc. Erler & Kalinowski, Inc. Field Paoli Architects First Investors Corporation Gallagher Asphalt Corporation George Hills Company, Inc. Global Water FATHOM2 Goldfarb & Lipman LLP Goodman Ball Inc. GovDeals, Inc. Graphic Solutions Grasshopper Company Griffin Structures HdL Companies

HF&H Consultants, LLC HMC+Beverly Prior Architects HR Green Harris & Associates Honeywell Building Solutions Honor Life Recognition HydroPoint Data Systems IBM ING IPD Icount.com In God We Trust-America, Inc. Independent Cities Risk Management Authority Information Display Company Innovative Claim Solutions Itron, Inc. JT2 Integrated Resources Jamboree Housing Corporation Johnson Controls continued

Committed to ... helping Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s communities realize their vision.

TOW N O F W I N D S O R

Windsor Town Council (from left to right: Steve Allen, Robin Goble, Cheryl Scholar, Sam Salmon, Debora Fudge) Windsor has a beautiful mixed-use traditional downtown - that was built less than 10 years ago! Meyers Nave was instrumental in helping the Town Council realize its vision. Mixed-use was an old idea, but modern zoning precluded much of the design we sought. Meyers Nave helped us work through the labyrinth and achieve truly spectacular results. Meyers Nave has represented the Town since itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s incorporation in 1992. From tricky personnel issues to the latest in Redevelopment Agency concerns, Meyers Nave has provided outstanding counsel & legal advice/direction. I have developed personal working relationships with the Town Attorneys that give me a strong sense of trust and confidence. Mayor Steve Allen - Town of Windsor OAKLAND LOS ANGELES

www.westerncity.com

SACRAMENTO SAN FRANCISCO

SANTA ROSA FRESNO

WWW.MEYERSNAVE.COM 800.464.3559

Western City, September 2011

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Exposition Exhibitors, continued

Jones & Mayer Jones Hall, A Professional Law Corporation2 Jones Lang LaSalle Kaiser Permanente Keenan & Associates2 Keyser Marston Associates, Inc. Kibel Green Kingsun Optoelectronic Co., Ltd. LINC Housing LPA, Inc. LSA Associates, Inc. Lake Traffic Solutions Laserfiche Leavitt Insurance Services of Los Angeles Leotek Electonics USA Corp. Library Systems & Services Liebert Cassidy Whitmore1 Lincoln Institute of Land Policy MCE Corporation

MD Risk Management Solutions, LLC MGT of America Material and Contract Services Matrix Consulting Group Merriwether + Williams Ins. Svcs. Inc. Meyers Nave1, 2 MINDMIXER MuniLink, League of California Cities MuniServices NBS NECA & IBEW of California National Public Employer Labor Relations Association (NPELRA) Next 10 Nextdoor.com, Inc. Northern California Carpenters Regional Council Omni-Means, Ltd. One Work Place Otto Environmental Systems North America, Inc.

1–Institute for Local Government Partner 2–CITIPAC supporter. List current as of Aug. 18, 2011. Visit www.cacities.org/AC for more information.

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League of California Cities

PACE PARS PARSAC PC Scale Tower PERC Water Pacific Conflict Management Pacific Gas and Electric Company Paragon Partners Ltd. Parkeon Parkmobile USA, Inc. PetData Phillips HADCO Piper Jaffray Public Financial Management, Inc. Public Restroom Company QPCS, LLC Q-STAR Technology Quad Knopf Quincy Engineering, Inc. RBF Consulting RJM Design Group, Inc.

www.cacities.org


RKA Consulting Group Radarsign, LLC Ralph Andersen and Associates Recologyâ&#x201E;˘2 RedFlex Traffic Systems Republic ITS Republic Services2 Responsible Hospitality Institute Ropers, Majeski, Kohn & Bentley Safeguard Properties Schaefer Systems International, Inc. Schneider Electric SCS Engineers SSA Landscape Architects, Inc. Severn Trent Services Sharp Electronics Corporation Siemens Sierra Display, Inc. SmartCitiesPrevail.org Smartcover by Hadronex Softmaster

www.westerncity.com

SolarCity Solid Terrain Modeling, Inc. Southern CA Concrete Producers Southern California Edison SouthWest Water Company2 Sportsplex USA Stantec Sternberg Lighting Stone & Youngberg, LLC Streetline, Inc. StreetSmart Technology, LLC Sustainable City Network Swinerton Management & Consulting2 SyTech Solutions TCPN (The Cooperative Purchasing Network) T-Mobile TNT Fireworks The Pin Center The United States Conference of Mayors Toter, Inc. Traffic Logix

TRAMUTOLA Transtech Engineers, Inc.2 Tribal Alliance of Sovereign Indian Nations2 Trustmark Voluntary Benefit Solutions U-Haul International USA North USAgain, LLC U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services United Water Services University of La Verne Vali Cooper & Associates, Inc. Vanir Construction Management, Inc. VenTek International VenueTech Management Group Veolia Water North America WLC Architects Waste Management West Coast Arborists, Inc. Westpac (LED) Lighting, Inc. Willdan2 Winzler & Kelly n

Western City, September 2011

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Strategies for Creating a More

Collaborative, Effective Council This article is a service of the Institute for Local Government (ILG), whose mission is to promote good government at the local level. Learn more about ILGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Public Engagement and Collaborative Governance Program at www.ca-ilg.org/engagement.

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Running local government successfully is hard work. City officials know that it requires serious commitment, time and knowledge on the part of local officials and staff as well as community members. Local policy-making is also a collaborative activity. The current economic and political challenges facing California exert tremendous pressure on mayors and council members to work together collaboratively and effectively. Issues that affect the future well-being of their cities also spur local officials to have conversations and collaborate with members of the public about the kind of community they envision for themselves and their children. The need for collaboration — between individual council members, among councils as a whole and between local officials and the community — prompted the League to ask the Institute for Local Government (ILG) to conduct an Advanced Leadership Workshop on this topic during the League’s Legislative Action Days in May 2011. Nearly 40 mayors and council members participated in this interactive, highly rated session titled “Creating More Collaborative Councils: Strategies for Effective Communication, Meeting Management and Public Engagement.” The workshop explored key issues related to the work of elected local officials and provided participants with the skills and strategies to more effectively: • Communicate and problem-solve with colleagues; • Maintain collaborative relationships with fellow council members; • Preside over and participate in city council meetings; • Interact with and respond to members of the public; and • Design effective and inclusive processes for engaging the public. This article presents some of the workshop’s highlights. continued

www.westerncity.com

Western City, September 2011

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Strategies for Creating a More Collaborative, Effective Council, continued

Communication and Problem-Solving On any given day, we all may do a better or worse job in effectively communicating information with others in our work, civic and family lives. The quality of communication with others can present a challenge for local elected officials, who work largely in the public sphere and must deal with multiple audiences, limited time and a broad range of content. The issue of communicating with council colleagues is no exception. Proponents of effective communication suggest a few simple rules to help us keep our speaking and listening skills well honed, thus supporting our goals and relationships. Be attentive. Whether with an individual colleague or in council chambers before a packed house, paying attention to the speaker, the subject at hand and (as appropriate) the interpersonal dynamics involved will make you a more effective communicator and help you to be perceived as a respectful, effective colleague and public servant. Ask clarifying questions. This shows a desire to better understand the speaker and demonstrates both attentiveness and an interest in learning more. Typically this is a better communication choice than a quick emotional retort or an immediate explanation of your own views. Asking clarifying questions helps increase the likelihood of a more productive conversation or exchange. Let people know you are listening. Two very simple ways to do this include paraphrasing and using a perception check. Paraphrasing is repeating the essence of the speaker’s remark, thus conveying that you’ve heard the substantive content of what he or she has said; for example, “So you’re saying that you believe this would kill all the fish in the stream — is that right?” A perception check involves acknowledging the emotional content of a speaker’s comment; for example, “I can hear that you’re very worried about the safety of neighborhood residents if we remove that stoplight,” or “I want you

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League of California Cities

to know that I hear how angry you are about this and how important the issue is to you.” Both paraphrasing and a perception check can be important communication tools for council members. Neither suggests you are necessarily agreeing with the speaker or expressing your own opinion on the issue at hand.

Distinctions Between Values, Interests and Positions Your conversations with other individual council members or residents often concern topics that they (and perhaps you) feel very strongly about. It may seem there is no way to even begin to have a useful discussion about such topics. However, understanding the distinction between a value, an interest and a position can be helpful when tackling this type of situation. Consider these examples: • “Children are our community’s most important resource.” This is a value; • “I want a park and open space where our children can play.” This is an interest; and • “I want a park and skateboarding area at the corner of Palm and Main with the city contributing all the funds.” This is a position. Listen for and ask about values and interests that underlie speakers’ expressed positions. People can more readily understand each other’s values and interests than they can accept different positions. Typically there are more ways to satisfy interests than to bridge conflicting positions. A conversation about values or interests can often reduce or clarify differences. The following basic principles of collaborative problem-solving (or “principled negotiation”), developed by Roger Fisher and William Ury and presented in their book Getting to Yes, also offer helpful guidelines for working through a knotty issue with a colleague or guiding group discussions. Separate the people from the problem. It’s not unusual for emotions to cloud problem-solving when people feel strongly about an issue. However, it is

far more effective to attack the problem together, not each other. It’s also a much better way to preserve an important working relationship. Focus on interests, not positions. Taking a hard negotiating position can obscure what is really wanted. A conversation about interests, which tend to be broader than positions, creates more opportunities for coming up with an idea that appeals to all participants. Discussing interests rather than focusing on positions means that there’s a lot more to talk about and improves the chances of success. Invent options for mutual gain. In the typical back and forth of “making your case” there is often little opportunity to jointly think about and creatively invent new ideas that may be in the interests of both (or all) negotiators. However, this

www.cacities.org


type of creative thinking probably won’t occur unless it’s given a time and a place to happen, and making time for this step is especially important when addressing polarized local issues. Insist on using objective criteria. This is perhaps the hardest problem-solving guideline to follow — but perhaps the most important — in what is often a challenging political environment. Working to creatively solve a problem or reach an accord can be advanced if the participants can agree on some sort of common standard or a result that they think makes sense.

Civility and Council Member Behavior Much media attention has focused lately on the question of civility in public dis-

www.westerncity.com

The quality of communication with others can present a challenge for local elected officials, who work largely in the public sphere and must deal with multiple audiences, limited time and a broad range of content. course, and many city councils are grappling with the challenge of how to ensure civility among council members in their own deliberations. Highlighting the current interest in this topic, the New Jersey State League of Municipalities recently published an article titled “The Need for Civility in Local Government Dialogue” (www.njslom.org/need_for_civility.html). The ar-

ticle presents author John C. Gillespie’s 10 commandments of public civility, which include these admonishments: • Thou shalt not allow legitimate critique of policy and practice to become a personal attack aimed at the person who devised the policy or implements the practice; continued on page 37

Western City, September 2011

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Strategies for Creating a More Collaborative, Effective Council, continued from page 35

• Thou shalt not rudely interrupt a colleague midsentence nor “speak over” a colleague while he or she is speaking; • Thou shalt not pretend something is much more important than it really is simply to score points with an audience; and • Thou shalt always recognize that your colleagues were also elected, just as you were, and deserve the same level of respect for having run and won. Gillespie’s 10 commandments serve as useful guidelines for councils striving to improve the tone of discussions. Another helpful resource, the Institute for Local Government’s Promoting Civility at Public Meetings: Concepts and Practices (www. ca-ilg.org/civility), examines civility in conceptual and ethical terms and offers practical strategies for achieving greater civility in public discourse. A growing number of cities are creating handbooks that help council members (and the public) better understand city government and council members’ roles and responsibilities. In addition, cities are adopting ground rules for council meetings that extend beyond procedural rules

www.westerncity.com

and address expectations and guidelines for council member conduct. One example of such rules comes from the City of Davis: Council members should actively pay attention while others are talking. Council members should be aware that side conversations, note writing and nonverbal expressions made by council members can be distracting to the meeting. Be aware that other council members, staff and the public in attendance can hear and see these actions. The City of Hayward’s Council Member Handbook includes the following: Council members shall accord the utmost courtesy to each other, to city employees and to the public appearing before the council and shall refrain at all times from rude and derogatory remarks, reflections as to integrity, abusive comments and statements as to motives and personalities.

Public engagement offers ways for residents to better understand the issues and challenges impacting their community, grapple with practical problems and real trade-offs, and see local agency challenges as their own.

Other sections of Hayward’s handbook address sanctions for violating the various rules of procedure. continued

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Strategies for Creating a More Collaborative, Effective Council, continued

Beyond Robert’s Rules of Order Whether you serve on a board, council, commission or other governing body, it is helpful to understand how to conduct public meetings. To simplify the rules of parliamentary procedure for those who participate in public meetings, Judge David Rosenberg created a video titled “Rosenberg’s Rules of Order: Simple Parliamentary Procedures for the 21st Century.” Prior to becoming a Yolo County Superior Court judge, Rosenberg served as mayor and council member for the City of Davis and as a Yolo County supervisor. (The video is based on a two-part article written by Rosenberg and originally published in Western City magazine in 2003. A newly revised pocket guide of Rosenberg’s Rules will be available later this year.)

As part of the Institute for Local Government’s service to local officials, the video and accompanying downloadable

documents are available at www.ca-ilg. org/rosenbergrules. Test your knowledge of parliamentary procedure rules of order by taking the quiz on page 42.

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League of California Cities

The ability to effectively involve the public in decision-making is an essential skill for local officials. Many local agencies are facing serious challenges on issues ranging from budgeting and fiscal policy to climate change and public safety. Public engagement comprises a broad range of methods to inform members of the public about decisions that affect them and to invite their participation in the process. Such methods include but are not limited to public information and outreach efforts, public consultation and public deliberation (for more information, visit www.ca-ilg.org/PEbasics). Successful public engagement can help local agencies manage challenges by contributing to the following outcomes: • Better identification of the public’s values, ideas and recommendations. Well-executed public engagement can provide more nuanced views about an issue from a broader spectrum of residents than a simple “yes” or “no” election.

www.cacities.org


• Residents who are more fully informed about issues and local agencies. Public engagement presents opportunities for residents to better understand the issues and challenges impacting their community, grapple with practical problems and real tradeoffs, and see local agency challenges as their own.

Cities are adopting ground rules for council meetings that extend beyond procedural rules and address expectations and guidelines for council member conduct.

• Improved local agency decisionmaking and actions with better results. Members of the public provide rich sources of information regarding their community history and needs. This information can inform local agency decision-making and potentially produce superior results. • Enhanced community buy-in and support. Involving members of the community in a meaningful way can build a sense of ownership and greater support for the local agency decision. It can also reduce contentiousness.

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• Faster project implementation with less need to revisit issues again. Mutually agreed-upon decisions are less likely to continually reappear as issues of concern both for local agencies and community members. • More trust — in each other and in local government. Open dialogue, shared interests and mutual problemsolving can bring disparate groups of people together, potentially resulting in increased trust in the others’ ability to solve problems and make good decisions.

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• Increased community participation and leadership development. Positive experiences with public engagement can lead to better informed residents who are more likely to participate in other community activities and have the confidence and skills to become future local government leaders. For links to additional public engagement and collaborative governance resources, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com. continued on page 42

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Members of the Los Gatos Youth Commission present a certificate to Jim Johnson, owner of JJ Magoo’s Pizza, recognizing his business as its first Youth-Friendly Business of the Year.

Los Gatos Recognizes Youth-Friendly Local Businesses The Town of Los Gatos (pop. 30,497) is located in the southwestern portion of Santa Clara County, nestled at the foot of the Santa Cruz Mountains. While Los Gatos is closely tied to Silicon Valley and its fast-paced economy, it has a small-town feel and strives to maintain its image as a familyfriendly community.

In keeping with its family-friendly values, the Los Gatos Town Council formed the Los Gatos Youth Commission in 2005 to give teens a voice in the community and to act as an advisory board to the town council on youth-related issues. The youth commission comprises 15 students from grades 8–12, with five alternates, and provides valuable input and leadership on important local issues. One of the issues the commission recently addressed was the perception among local teens that there were not enough stores catering to teens in downtown Los Gatos. The youth commission conducted its own survey showing that teens were going out of town to spend their money — dollars that would remain in

the community if there were more businesses serving teens. This survey coincided with the town’s “Shop Local” campaign to help residents learn about the benefits of shopping locally. When the town council denied a chain clothing store’s application for a conditional use permit in the downtown area, some youth commission members interpreted that decision as an indication that the community did not support teens. This perception arose out of a misunderstanding of the policy reasons underlying the council’s decision. The situation presented an opportunity to educate the youth commissioners about the planning and land use processes that guide downtown business continued on page 43

The Town of Los Gatos won the Ruth Vreeland Award for Engaging Youth in City Government in the 2010 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program. For more information about the award program, visit www.cacities.org/helenputnam.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, September 2011

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Strategies for Creating a More Collaborative, Effective Council, continued from page 39

Rosenberg’s Parliamentary Procedure Quiz Circle the correct response for each item. Answers appear on page 45.

1. You are a city council member. At a council meeting, you can’t hear the discussion due to noise made by the heating system. You should raise your hand and, when recognized, say, “Point of order — I can’t hear what’s being discussed.”

True

False

2. A vote on hotly contested Agenda Item 5 has passed by a vote of 3 to 2. You were one of the two council members who voted against the item. Later in the meeting you ask for reconsideration of Agenda Item 5, because you have thought of something you believe will convince one of the majority votes to change his or her mind. The mayor rules you “Out of order” and refuses to allow a vote on reconsideration. The mayor’s ruling is:

Correct

Incorrect

3. It’s 11:00 p.m. by the time the city council reaches Agenda Item 25. The mayor asks for a show of hands to indicate how many members of the public wish to speak on the item, and 32 people raise their hands. The mayor announces that she will limit each speaker to two minutes each. Can the mayor properly do so?

Yes

No

4. Joe makes a motion to hold a council retreat in May, and Mary seconds the motion. Sally then moves an amendment to have the retreat in June, and Fred seconds the motion. Esteban then moves a substitute motion to have no retreat this year, and Fred seconds the motion. The mayor announces that discussion will begin on the motion to amend. Is this the correct ruling?

Yes

No

5. On a highly controversial agenda item in a meeting attended by many members of the public, the audience becomes engaged in the discussion and members of the audience applaud in support or hiss in opposition following the remarks of the first speaker who addresses the city council. The mayor states that no vocal expressions of support or opposition will be tolerated at the meeting and asks the public not to applaud or hiss after speakers conclude their remarks. May the mayor do so?

Yes

No

6. A member of the city council continually interrupts other council members while they are speaking on agenda items. The mayor refuses to stop the offending council member from interrupting. As a member of the city council, you have the right to make a motion to challenge the mayor’s ruling and have your motion voted on by the council.

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League of California Cities

False

7. After a very long discussion and debate on a motion you made to approve a street repair schedule, which was duly seconded, you want to move ahead with voting on the item, so you say, “I call for the question.” The mayor responds, “OK, let’s proceed with the vote on the pending motion to approve the proposed street repair schedule.” Did the mayor handle your call for the question properly?

Yes

No

8. If the maker of a pending motion accepts a proposed change and incorporates the change into her motion, and the person who seconded the motion also accepts the change, this is called a “friendly amendment.”

True

False

9. Sam moves and receives a second on a motion to create a seven-member Police Oversight Commission. Mariko moves and receives a second on a motion to make the commission 15 members. Helen moves and receives a second on a motion to create an ombudsman position in lieu of the commission. The mayor schedules discussion and a vote on the third motion (Helen’s), which passes. The mayor should then schedule discussion and a vote on the second motion (Mariko’s motion).

True

False

10. In the middle of a meeting the mayor recognizes Maria, a council member, who moves to adjourn the meeting. Frank seconds her motion. The mayor calls for discussion prior to the vote. Maria raises a point of order and says that the motion should be voted on immediately. Who is correct? n

The mayor

Maria

www.cacities.org


Los Gatos Recognizes Youth-Friendly Local Businesses, continued from page 41

approvals. It also motivated the youth commission to see what could be done to highlight and support existing businesses popular with teens in Los Gatos.

Developing a Recognition Program The youth commission borrowed an idea from a program in Alaska that solicits community nominations of youth-friendly businesses and provides recognition. By forging a partnership with the Los Gatos Chamber of Commerce, the commission created a youth-friendly business program tailored to the local community. The program’s criteria reflect local values. Under the program, any business can be recognized as youth friendly if it supports young people by: • Hiring youth;

• Providing goods or services appropriate for youth; • Creating a respectful business environment for youth; or • Supporting youth causes or activities. Nominated businesses are initially screened by a subcommittee of the youth commission and then referred to the full commission for review. Businesses recognized as youth friendly receive a congratulatory letter and a window decal for display. Marketing and promotional materials for the Los Gatos Chamber of Commerce and the town also highlight the business. Research and planning for the recognition program were conducted by the commission during its 2008–09 and 2009–10 terms. The commission launched the program with a press announcement on

Los Gatos teens found a way to acknowledge and support local youth-friendly businesses.

The program has also produced some unexpected benefits.

continued on page 50

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Western City, September 2011

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Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City magazine, it will be posted at no additional charge on our website. For rates and deadlines, visit www.westerncity.com and click on the “Advertise” link.

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Display and Classified Advertising

Website Job Postings

Call Pam Maxwell-Blodgett at (800) 2621801 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information. Or e-mail: <admanager@westerncity.com>.

Display and classified ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away.

Call Sara Rounds at (916) 658-8223 for classified advertisements. Columntype classified ads are $18 per line with a five-line minimum (approximately 35 characters per line). You must call to confirm receipt.

To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.western city.com or e-mail <info@westerncity. com> for more information.

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Police Chief

City of San Luis Obispo, CA 5IF$BMJGPSOJB$FOUSBM$PBTUDPNNVOJUZPG4BO-VJT0CJTQP QPQ  JTTFFLJOHBOFX1PMJDF $IJFG5IF4BO-VJT0CJTQP1PMJDF%FQBSUNFOU 4-01% JTTVQQPSUFECZTXPSOBOEOPO TXPSOTUBGG4-01%JTPSHBOJ[FEBDSPTTUXP#VSFBVTo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mUTQBDLBHFUIBU JODMVEFT$BM1&34!SFUJSFNFOU5IJTSFDSVJUNFOUXJMMDMPTFKVTUQSJPSUPmidnight POSunday, October 9, 2011.'PSEFUBJMFECSPDIVSFBOEUPBQQMZPOMJOF WJTJU www.tbcrecruiting.com

Western City magazine makes it easier to get a handle on the issues affecting your city. Our website gives you a way to easily locate recent articles that address:

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Western City, September 2011

45


Involving Youth in Your Agencyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sustainability Activities, continued from page 18

The Manhattan Beach City Council asked its Environmental Task Force to develop recommendations to address a range of environmental challenges, including climate change and the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To ensure that young people would be represented, two

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CITY OF DIXON 4HECHARMING DIVERSEANDWARMCOMMUNITYOF$IXON WITHAPOPULATIONOFOVER RESIDENTSOFFERSA UNIQUECOMBINATIONOFANOUTSTANDINGLOCATION SAFEENVIRONMENT EXCELLENTSCHOOLSANDFRIENDLYPEOPLE 4HE#ITYCURRENTLYSEEKSAPROGRESSIVEANDENGAGING#ITY-ANAGER 4HE NEW #ITY -ANAGER WILL LEAD AN ORGANIZATION THAT IS COMMITTED TO ENHANCINGTHEQUALITYOFLIFEFORTHERESIDENTSOF$IXON4HE#ITYCURRENTLY HASAWORKFORCEOF&4%SANDA'ENERAL &UND BUDGET OF APPROXIMATELY  MILLION 4HE KEY CHALLENGES RELATE TO INFRASTRUCTURE AND WATERWASTEWATER CONCERNS ECONOMIC William Avery & Associates Management Consultants VIBRANCY AND MANAGING THE lNANCIAL CONSTRAINTSFACEDBYALLMUNICIPALITIESTODAY 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A

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Director of Economic and Community Development, City of Daly City, CA The City of Daly City, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gatewayâ&#x20AC;? to the San Francisco Peninsula, stretches from the Pacific Ocean to San Francisco Bay and is strategically located minutes from downtown San Francisco and SF International Airport. One of the most ethnically diverse cities in the nation, Daly City is the most populous city in San Mateo County with 105,000+ residents. Exciting new commercial, housing and redevelopment opportunities are helping to transform the community as it approaches the centennial celebration of its incorporation. The Director of Economic and Community Development must be an innovative, resultsoriented team player with the ability to communicate effectively with subordinates, policy makers, the community and across other departments. The Director actively participates in the development and implementation of programs and projects which preserve, maintain and develop the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s neighborhoods and commercial areas. The Director manages a $5.5 million operating budget with a staff of 28 employees in five divisions. Applicants with a Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in Business Administration, Planning, Economics, Marketing, Public Administration or a field of study relevant to the requirements of the position and a minimum of seven years of professional experience, managing an economic development program desirably in a City Manager form of municipal government are encouraged to compete. A Masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree in any of the above fields and experience in Economic Development and/or commercial development marketing and private sector development are also desirable. The salary range for this position is $160,628 to $195,234 annually, supplemented by an excellent benefits package including 3%@60 CalPERS retirement. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply on line at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Bob Murray at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date September 30, 2011.

phone 916 U784U9080 fax 916U784U1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

46

League of California Cities

Virtually all of the strategies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions also promote local sustainability and provide opportunities to engage youth. mendations that were approved by the city council, including green building and water conservation measures. In developing its climate action plan, the City of San Carlos held two community forums where residents helped prioritize possible actions that the city could take to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions. Seventy-five teens and preteens participated in one forum, which included discussions and exercises that educated them about climate change and allowed them to share their ideas about which actions the city should adopt. In Fremont about 150 residents â&#x20AC;&#x201D; one third of them youth â&#x20AC;&#x201D; attended a community event to prioritize the recommendations of a green task force. They also signed pledges to reduce their own greenhouse gas emissions.

www.cacities.org


The Energy Saving Adventures program operates out of two teen centers in Lakeside and Spring Valley and teaches about energy efficiency. Participants learn through field trips and a variety of activities, including visiting a landfill, left, and demonstrating wind power principles, right.

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Positive Messages About Climate Change Are the Best Approach Some researchers have noted the potential for increased anxiety among youth due to climate change and its future impacts. Educating young people about how they and their community can address climate change through policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions as well as through individual behaviors, such as recycling and using less energy, is a more positive and effective approach than repetitive â&#x20AC;&#x153;doom and gloomâ&#x20AC;? messages about the future impacts of climate change.

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City of Newport Beach, CA In El Dorado County the youth commission helped write a green resolution and supported its successful passage. The resolution sets goals to reduce the environmental footprint of county residents in areas including waste and energy usage reduction, planning, construction and air quality.

Youth and Energy Investing in energy efficiency and promoting energy conservation saves resources and money while reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Involving youth in energy-related policies and continued

www.westerncity.com

5IF$JUZPG/FXQPSU#FBDI POFPG$BMJGPSOJBTNPTUEFTJSBCMFDPNNVOJUJFT JTTFFLJOH BOFX'JSF$IJFG4FSWJOHBQFSNBOFOUQPQVMBUJPOPG BOEBTVNNFSEBZUJNF QPQVMBUJPOUIBUDBOHSPXUP  UIF/FXQPSU#FBDI'JSF%FQBSUNFOUJTTVQQPSUFE CZTUBGG TXPSO PWFSTFBTPOBMTUBGGXIJDIMBSHFMZDPOTJTUTPG-JGFHVBSET BOE ':CVEHFUPGNJMMJPO5IF%FQBSUNFOUTUBGGTFJHIUmSFTUBUJPOTXJUIJO TRVBSFNJMFTBOESFTQPOETUP DBMMTGPSTFSWJDFBOOVBMMZ 5IFJEFBMDBOEJEBUFXJMMPGGFSBCBMBODFPGDPNNBOEMFWFMPQFSBUJPOTBOEBENJOJTUSBUJWF FYQFSJFODF"TBTUSPOH JODMVTJWFBOEDPOmEFOUMFBEFS IFTIFXJMMQPTTFTTBUSBDLSFDPSE PGFTUBCMJTIJOHIJHITUBOEBSETPGQSPGFTTJPOBMJTNBOEBDDPVOUBCJMJUZ'JWF  ZFBSTPG JODSFBTJOHMZSFTQPOTJCMFTVQFSWJTPSZNBOBHFNFOUFYQFSJFODFJODMVEJOHBUMFBTUUISFF   ZFBSTPGNBOBHFNFOUFYQFSJFODFBMPOHXJUIB#BDIFMPSTEFHSFFBSFTUSPOHMZQSFGFSSFE 4BMBSZXJMMCF%02&#FOFmUTQBDLBHFJODMVEFT!$BM1&34SFUJSFNFOU5IJT SFDSVJUNFOUXJMMDMPTFKVTUQSJPSUPmidnightPOSunday, September 25, 2011'PS SFDSVJUNFOUCSPDIVSFBOEUPBQQMZPOMJOF WJTJUwww.tbcrecruiting.com

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Involving Youth in Your Agency’s Sustainability Activities, continued

programs benefits not only the youth but the community as well, as the following examples illustrate. The San Diego County Department of Parks and Recreation, in partnership with San Diego Gas & Electric Co., offers a

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program called Energy Saving Adventures at its two teen centers in Lakeside and Spring Valley. The program teaches teens about the practices and principles of energy efficiency through classroom and recreation center activities, field trips, outdoor adventures and school and

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Chief of Police COME TO REDWOOD CITY! A premier municipal organization, Redwood City is recruiting for a strategic leader with a strong commitment to public service and excellence, and a vision for the Police Department. The new Chief will work collaboratively with stakeholders to address the needs of our dynamic and culturally diverse community. Excellent communication skills, a well-rounded law enforcement background, and the ability to effectively engage staff and take the organization to the next level of excellence are required. The salary range is up to $194,976 annually with a survey-based adjustment likely in September.

The filing deadline is September 12, 2011. To find out more about this exciting career opportunity, visit http://www.redwoodcity.org/hr/listings.html or contact Gary Rogers at 650-464-2265. EOE.

Assistant Finance Director The City of Clovis is situated in the midst of California’s agriculturally rich San Joaquin Valley. Dedicated to promoting planned growth while retaining its unique western atmosphere, the City’s population has more than doubled since 1985, reaching the current level of over 96,000, and encompassing over 23 square miles.

Annual Salary: $99,804-$121,308

Final Filing Date: 09/13/2011

Additional Information: Please visit our website at www.cityofclovis.com

48

League of California Cities

Reporting to the Department Director, the incumbent is responsible for providing advice and consultation on financial and accounting matters and for the efficient operation of the Department. The Assistant Finance Director supervises other managerial employees, making assignments, setting priorities, training and reviewing work. Qualifications: Five years of professional-level experience performing complex accounting and financial analysis and auditing for a municipality with at least three years of supervisory experience and a Bachelor’s Degree from an accredited college or university with a major in accounting, business/public administration or closely related field. Certified Public Accountant or Certified Public Finance Officer or equivalent experience is required.

The scientific consensus is that climate change will have a direct and indirect impact on Californians, including young people who may be more affected as the consequences of climate change become increasingly pronounced over their lifetimes. community events. The Energy Saving Adventures program is designed to inspire San Diego youth to practice and promote energy-saving initiatives in their own homes and communities. The City of Indio’s Youth Advisory Council and other young Indio residents were asked to share ideas about how to design a new teen center. The resulting center (pictured on page 17) is not only fun but also solar-powered, thanks to the climate- and energy-conscious youth who were involved in its planning.

www.cacities.org


Does Your Agency Have a Story to Tell? Does your agency involve young people in activities related to sustainability? Do you have a story to tell? For more information about how to share your agencyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story with colleagues statewide, e-mail <sustainability@ca-ilg.org>.

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City of Roseville, CA San Diego-area students learn about recycling through the Energy Saving Adventures program.

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Santa Claritaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second annual art contest encourages middle- and high-school students to tell the city how they and their families are combating escalating gas prices by using the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s buses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Go ! Green and Dump the Pump!â&#x20AC;? is part of the Santa Clarita Transit Go Green Art Contest, which accepts traditional art, graphic design or photography entries. The city displays the winning artwork at its Transit Maintenance Facility.

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Looking to Our Future The saying, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are only borrowing the planet from our children,â&#x20AC;? speaks volumes about the importance of engaging youth in local agenciesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; sustainability activities. In addition to the experiences and values that the young people gain from participating, youth engagement in local sustainability activities provides local officials with perspectives and input to improve both the planning and implementation of these efforts. The future belongs to our youth, and it is their future to help plan. n

DEPUTY CITY MANAGER â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Salary DOQ* OR

DIRECTOR OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES* $109,824 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; $ 133,812 Annually + Benefits including city-paid 2.5% @ 55 CalPERS, cell phone stipend, 9 hour days ~ 36 hr work week ~ Monday thru Thursday. Last week of December off with pay.

!

Victorville is seeking a highly qualified applicant with a desire to take a cutting-edge approach to contemporary issues under a newly appointed City Manager. This position oversees a comprehensive, municipal operation, ! consisting of Finance, Information Technology, and Human Resources Divisions. !Requirements: Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree and five years of progressively responsible supervisory and administrative experience which involved accounting, data processing, and Human Resources functions. Masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree or CPA license is desirable.

!

Original application must be received in the City Manager's Office by 10/20/11, 12:00 noon. To request an application, contact City Manager's Office (760) 955-5029. For more information, visit our website at www.ci.victorville.ca.us .

!"#$%&"'$(")'*+,+'$"-+%%".("/+%%(01"

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Western City, September 2011

49


Los Gatos Recognizes Youth-Friendly Local Businesses, continued from page 43

Program Generates Positive Results

March 30, 2010. During the commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next meeting 45 businesses were nominated, and almost all of them were approved. Youth Commissioner Nicky Robinson says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our goal was to be inclusive during our selection process, as opposed to looking for reasons not to include certain stores.â&#x20AC;? J

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The youth commission selected JJ Magooâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizza as the first Youth-Friendly Business of the Year. The owner, Jim Johnson, was pleasantly surprised to be selected as the

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New Opportunities . . .

City Manager City of San Leandro

Police Chief City of Fresno

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CITY OF LAGUNA HILLS, CA

Community Development Director $133,740 to $162,552 Annually

The City of Laguna Hills (pop. 30,344) is located in beautiful south Orange County mid-way between San Diego and Los Angeles and minutes from the Orange County coastline. Laguna Hills is a contract city with a $42.3 million biennial budget. The City is financially strong with a good mix of residential, commercial, and light industry. The position is appointed by and reports directly to the City Manager. The Director oversees the day-to-day operations of Planning, Building & Safety, and Code Enforcement. The Director also plays an integral role in the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic development efforts and is a key member of the management team. This is a â&#x20AC;&#x153;hands onâ&#x20AC;? Department Head position. This is an exciting time for development in Laguna Hills with several commercial properties poised for redevelopment, including the Laguna Hills Mall.

first business to be awarded that honor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I designed my restaurant to be youth friendly because Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a parent and I really enjoy kids,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve coached and supported Little League for almost 20 years in Los Gatos, and I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s those connections Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve made in the community that helped me win this award.â&#x20AC;? The program has also produced some unexpected benefits. Part of the youth commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program-related activities involve following up with owners whose businesses are nominated but not ultimately selected. These discussions have created opportunities for the youth commissioners to better understand not only how the business supports youth but also the challenges associated with serving a young clientele. Such dialogue enhances the relationship between business owners and the young people they serve and helps build a stronger sense of community. The Youth-Friendly Business program has generated appreciation among business owners who view the recognition as an important distinction in the community. According to Jessica von Borck, who serves as economic vitality manager for Los Gatos, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Businesses can tap into the significant market represented by our young people, and the youth can ensure that they have welcoming places to patronize. The synergy created by this program contributes to the overall economic vitality of our town.â&#x20AC;? Los Gatos Town Council Member Diane McNutt applauds the commission for successfully implementing the program. She says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Los Gatos Youth Commission has demonstrated leadership and creativity by developing a program that enhances the relationship between our business community and our youth. The Town of Los Gatos appreciates our young citizens taking the initiative to make a positive change in the community.â&#x20AC;? Contact: Steve Walpole, sergeant, Los Gatos Police Department; phone: (408) 354-6851; e-mail: <swalpole@losgatosca.gov>. n

For more information, visit our website at www.ci.laguna-hills.ca.us. Please email your cover letter and resume to the City Manager at clh@ci.laguna-hills.ca.us. Filing Deadline: Friday, October 14, 2011

50

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


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September 2011  

Annual Conference Issue

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