__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

J U LY 2 0 2 0 |

The Monthly Magazine of the League of California Cities

Greening the Concrete Jungle: Daly City Partners With Residents p.10 Building Just and Equitable Communities p.3

 The Environment, Energy, and Equity: How Cities Are Moving Forward in Today’s Economy p.7

www.westerncity.com


Representing California public agencies for over sixty years.

Coastal Construction Election Law Eminent Domain Environment & Natural Resources

Housing Authorities Housing Successors Joint Powers Authorities Labor & Employment Litigation

Municipal & Public Agency Law Public Finance Real Estate School Districts Special Districts

Successor Agencies Telecommunications Transportation Waste Management Water Districts

888.479.4529


CONTENTS President’s Message 3 

10 2019 Helen Putnam Award

By John F. Dunbar

 he impacts of the killing of George T Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer and the injustices his death exemplifies are being felt on our streets, in our businesses, and in every city and town in California, across the country, and throughout the world.

 Greening the Concrete Jungle: Daly City Partners With Residents

 Building Just and Equitable Communities

for Excellence

4 Calendar of League Events #LocalWorks 5 

Affordable Housing: More Than a Mandate in San Marcos How San Marcos Leveraged Affordable Housing for Smart Growth

In an area that lacked basic infrastructure, two mixed-use affordable housing developments brought improvements including new streets, drainage, and lighting. A complex mix of federal, state, and city funding, matched with private-sector loans, covered the costs.

The Environment, Energy, 7  and Equity: How Cities Are Moving Forward in Today’s Economy

By Karalee Browne

 ities are grappling with tough C decisions about how to balance the essential needs of their communities with projects that were planned to address energy, equity, and the environment. Despite immediate and looming budget shortfalls, many cities are moving forward with Climate Action Plans.

Effective tools for the timely financing of community-based projects.

 roject Green Space is a robust P urban forestry and green infrastructure program convened by the city and driven by residents. The program empowers community members to actively reshape the future of their neighborhoods by adopting new trees and planting and maintaining rain gardens.

13 How Cities Can Build Resiliency and Fight Climate Change With Healthy Soil

By Wendy Sommer

 Seventeen cities in Alameda County are employing carbon farming, which increases the ability of soil and plants to pull carbon from the atmosphere and store it deep in the soil. Carbon farming also increases water-holding capacity, reduces erosion, creates healthier plants, and increases forage production; it’s an essential part of a resiliency strategy.

Job Opportunities 15  Professional Services 20  Directory

 over photo: Daly City youth C volunteers plant native trees as part of Project Green Space activities.

CSCDA enables local government and eligible private entities access to efficiently finance, locallyapproved projects that provide a public benefit. Since 1988, CSCDA has issued more than $60 billion in tax-exempt bonds for affordable housing, healthcare, infrastructure, schools, and other fundamental services. CSCDA is a joint powers authority created by:

(800) 531-7476 www.cscda.org


“We need to act swiftly to protect members of our communities who have disproportionately suffered from racism and injustice for generations.�


President’s Message by John F. Dunbar

Building Just and Equitable Communities While cities continued to manage the public health crisis and economic recovery from COVID-19, our collective attention suddenly shifted, when a widely viewed cellphone video exposed the painful realities of systemic racism in our institutions and our communities.

As many have said, it is time to listen. City leaders must listen to the voices of those in our communities, many of whom share personal stories about the bias and unfair treatment they have endured. We must hear their words and turn them into positive action to protect everyone’s civil rights.

The impacts of the killing of George Floyd while handcuffed in police custody and the injustices his death exemplifies are being felt on our streets, in our businesses, and in every city and town in California, across the country, and throughout the world.

Prior to and since Mr. Floyd’s death on May 25, 2020, many cities in California have taken concrete action to build just and equitable communities — drafting resolutions against racism and discrimination, creating community task forces, reevaluating police policies and procedures, and investing in youth employment and health initiatives in disadvantaged communities.

Not long after the nation shared a moment of silence to remember the more than 100,000 people who died from COVID-19, we witnessed powerful moments of silence in Mr. Floyd’s memory. We should not, however, expect or tolerate silence going forward. We must stand up against the brutal treatment of Mr. Floyd and of far too many others at the hands of police. People of every race, ethnicity, gender, and age expressed the pain, frustration, and anger resulting from the broken trust between law enforcement and the diverse communities they swore an oath to protect and serve. Protests erupted around the globe demanding justice and equity in the treatment of all people, regardless of color. During many of the demonstrations, we witnessed signs of hope and solidarity, as community leaders, law enforcement, demonstrators, and others stood together — and sometimes knelt together — united for racial equity and justice. We have an urgent call and a duty to end the injustice and unfairness that exist in any of our city departments and the extension of this inequity that manifests in the patrolling of our streets. Working with law enforcement leadership, we must evaluate and reimagine how we police our cities and make appropriate reforms to our law enforcement system. This should involve a thorough and thoughtful analysis of hiring, training, operations, oversight, and disciplinary procedures to ensure the civil rights of every person are protected. We need to act swiftly to protect members of our communities who have disproportionately suffered from racism and injustice for generations.

www.westerncity.com

We can and should prioritize our municipal resources on the broader challenges associated with access to jobs, housing affordability, and the availability of public health and social services. Resources already are available to begin the healing and to dismantle the barriers to equity, inclusivity, and fairness. As a start, everyone can explore the National League of Cities’ program, entitled Race, Equity, and Leadership (REAL). The League of California Cities is committed to supporting city leaders to secure the resources necessary to create an environment where all residents are protected and treated equitably by the institutions created to serve them. It is a tremendous privilege and responsibility to be a community leader, as residents look to their local leadership for answers, for guidance, and for justice. We are proud of California city leaders who every day display dedication to the health, safety, and success of our communities, especially during these most challenging times. Working together, we can and will overcome the coronavirus pandemic and its aftermath, and we can and will direct societal change that will ensure respect, equity, and justice for every member of our communities. ■

Western City, July 2020

3


President John F. Dunbar Mayor Yountville

1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200; Fax (916) 658-8240

Magazine Staff Editor in Chief Jill Oviatt (916) 658-8228; email: joviatt@cacities.org Managing Editor Jude Lemons, Citrus 3 Communications (916) 658-8234; email: editor@westerncity.com Contributing Editor Kayla Woods (916) 658-8213; email: kwoods@cacities.org Business and Creative Manager Amanda Cadelago (916) 658-8226; email: acadelago@cacities.org Advertising Sales Cici Trino Association Outsource Services, Inc. (916) 961-9999; email: cicit@aosinc.biz Administrative Assistant Savannah Cobbs (916) 658-8223; email: scobbs@cacities.org Contributors Derek Dolfie Kristine Guerreo Melissa Kuehne Erica Manuel

First Vice President Cheryl Viegas Walker Council Member El Centro

Second Vice President Cindy Silva Council Member Walnut Creek

Immediate Past President Jan Arbuckle Council Member Grass Valley

Executive Director Carolyn Coleman

For a complete list of the League board of directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

leaguevents JULY 2

Mayors and Council Members Executive Forum, Part 3 The forum’s sessions keep elected officials up to date on key issues.

OCTOBER 7–9

League of California Cities Annual Conference & Expo, Long Beach The conference offers dozens of educational sessions, numerous professional development activities, hundreds of exhibits, and a chance to participate in the League’s policymaking activities.

8

Board of Directors Meeting, Long Beach The League board reviews, discusses, and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

December

Associate Editors Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker

4

Advertising Design ImagePoint Design

Board of Directors Meeting, La Jolla The League board reviews, discusses, and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

For photo credits, see page 18.

9–10

Design Taber Creative Group

Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

NT RI

9–10

Municipal Finance Institute, Monterey This conference provides essential information for city officials and staff involved in fiscal planning for municipalities.

9–11

City Clerks New Law & Elections Seminar, Monterey The seminar covers laws affecting elections as well as other aspects of clerks’ responsibilities.

ED US IN

G

P

Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2020 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume XCVI, No. 7.

Fire Chiefs Leadership Seminar, Monterey This seminar features a variety of sessions for fire chiefs on timely topics important to fire service professionals and offers attendees networking opportunities with their fellow California fire personnel.

Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org. W

R

0

GY

10

%

IND EN

E

Supplied by Community Energy

FSC ® is an independent, not-for-profit organization that promotes environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial and economically viable forest management worldwide. Products with the FSC label are independently certified to ensure that they come from forests managed to meet the needs of present and future generations.

4

For legislative and policy updates and more, follow @CaCities. Follow Western City @WesternCityMag. Join us on Facebook. www.facebook.com/westerncity www.facebook.com/LeagueofCaCities Visit us on LinkedIn at Western City Magazine.

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Affordable Housing: More Than a Mandate in San Marcos

How San Marcos Leveraged Affordable Housing for Smart Growth As one of San Diego County’s fastest growing cities, the City of San Marcos is working to ensure that its housing inventory includes options for all income levels. It’s more than a notion; it’s a state mandate. The State of California requires San Marcos and all California cities to plan for housing needs across the socioeconomic spectrum. At face value, affordable housing might just seem like a box that must be checked. But San Marcos has found ways to leverage the affordable housing mandate into a catalyst for smart growth. “Our approach is to make this mandate work for our growth strategy, not against it,” said San Marcos Communications Manager Robin Rockey. For example, the Promenade at Creekside and Eastgate mixed-use affordable housing developments recently added 147 new apartments restricted for families of extremely low-, very low-, and low-income. By approving and funding these projects, San Marcos was working to meet the requirements of the state’s Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA) — but the city was also strategically using the developments to bring some much-needed improvements to the community.

Affordable Housing Developments Spur Capital Improvements Both mixed-use housing developments sit on the east end of the San Marcos Creek District, an area that lacked basic infrastructure. When the developments were built, that infrastructure came in the form of new streets, drainage, and lighting. The costs were covered by a complex mix of federal, state, and city funding matched with private-sector loans. (The city funding came from its Successor Housing Agency.) Typically, an arrangement like this would take years to orchestrate — making it a big benefit to the city.

The Promenade at Creekside was a catalyst for infrastructure improvements. “We’re now launching our city’s biggest capital improvement project in that area, and we have a running head start thanks to these affordable housing developments,” said Rockey. In a similar example, San Marcos authorized funding for the Autumn Terrace mixed-use affordable housing development in 2008. The development added 100 new apartments restricted as affordable housing, along with a new city street, which has resulted in faster emergency response times in the area. “Police, ambulances, and fire crews now have a cut-through along Tiger Way, which allows them to get to residents faster. That street exists thanks to the affordable housing development that was built there,” Rockey said. About 3,200 of San Marcos’ approximately 30,400 homes are dedicated to affordable housing. The city regularly updates the housing element of its General Plan, which also helps San Marcos qualify for state and federal grants. That grant money helped the city fund some major community assets, including Richmar Park.

Benefits for Working Families Affordable housing also gives working families a safe, reliable place to live. “I think many people don’t realize that the residents who qualify for affordable housing are often professionals who work in our community,” Rockey said. For example, San Marcos’ median income for a family of four is $86,300 — which means a family earning that amount could qualify for affordable housing at the moderate-income level. Most families qualify at a lower level, closer to $64,200. That salary range covers many local professions, such as medical technician or entry-level teacher. This is especially true for families who rely on only one income. San Marcos wants to ensure that all its residents have access to quality housing options. “San Marcos is a wonderful place to live, work, and raise a family,” said San Marcos Mayor Rebecca Jones. “Our forwardthinking approach to affordable housing helps residents from all walks of life continue to thrive in our community.” ■

The Eastgate development combines retail and restaurant space with affordable housing units. www.westerncity.com

Western City, July 2020

5


Thank you to all of our 2020 League Partners Platinum ($15,000+) 1,2

1,2

2

2

1,2

2

1,2

2

2

2

1

1,2

1,2

2

2

2

2

BUILDING AMERICA®

Gold ($10,000+) Anaergia Charter Communications ENGIE Services Inc.2 Hanson Bridgett LLP1,2 ALADS2 AMR2 Charles Abbott Associates2 Californians for Energy Independence Capitol Public Finance Group2 Clear Channel

Kronick Moskovitz Tiedemann & Girard1 LECET Southwest Lewis Investment Company2 COX Communications Crown Castle Dart Container Corp.2 EMS Management2 Fascination Ranch2 Garaventa Enterprises2 Goldfarb & Lipman LLP

Meyers Nave1,2 Morongo Band of Mission Indians2 James Ramos2

San Manuel Band of Mission Indians2 Western States Petroleum Association

Verizon Ygrene2 Young Homes2

Silver ($5,000+) Joe A. Gonsalves & Son2 Greenwaste Recovery Inc.2 Greystar2 Harris & Associates2 Keenan & Associates Mid Valley Disposal2 Mt. Diablo Recycling2

NorCal NECA Northrop Grumman Redflex Republic Services Inc.2 ServPro Southern California Gas Company State Farm Insurance

Stradling Yocca Carlson & Rauth Trane1 Transtech Engineers Tribal Alliance of Sovereign Indian Nations Tripepi Smith & Associates1,2 Zanker Green Waste2

Bronze ($3,000+) ABM2 Accela2 Advanced Disposal2 Aircon Energy Alvarez-Glasman & Colvin2 Amador Valley Industries2 Association For Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs2 Athens Services2 Atkinson, Andelson, Loya, Ruud & Romo

Avenal Finance2 Avery Associates2 Best Way Disposal2 Boulevard2 Brookfield Norcal Builders Inc2 Cerrell2 DW Development2 Desert Valley Medical Group Inc./ Prime Healthcare2 Dublin Crossing2 E&J Gallo2

Fieldman Rolapp & Associates Genentech2 Geo-Logic Associates2 Griswold LaSalle Cobb Dowd & Gin LLP2 Hill International2 IVAR2 Kosmont Companies2 Lozano Smith2 Marin Sanitary Service2

Basic ($1,000+) Associated Builders & Contractors2 CARE2 CR&R2 California Apartment Association2 California-Cambodia Sister State Inc.2 California Contract Cities Association2 California Debt and Investment Advisory Commission California Real Estate2 California Refuse Recycling Council California Waste Solutions2

Carpenter/Robbins Commercial Real Estate Inc.2 City National Bank2 Civil Engineering Associates2 Classic Communities2 Contra Costa Association of Realtors2 Contra Costa Building & Construction Trades Council2 Cost Control Associates Inc. Cunningham Davis2 Der Manouel Insurance Group2 Desert Valleys Builders Dividend Finance2 Dokken Engineering2 EMS Management LLC2

East Bay Sanitary Company Inc2 Emanuels Jones and Associates Fard Engineers2 Fresno Police Officers Association GHD Inc.2 Giacalone Design Services2 Gilton Solid Waste2 Gray Bowen Scott2 Gridley Galleria2 Griffin Structures2 HR Green Highridge Costa Housing Partners Hospital Council of Northern California Innisfree Ventures2 J.R. Roberts/Deacon Inc.2

Join the Partners Program Today! Contact Mike Egan | (916) 658-8271 | egan@cacities.org

Matarango Inc.2 The Mejorando Group Bob Murray & Associates NHA Advisors PARS2 Peters Engineering2 Ponderosa Homes II Inc.2 Prime Healthcare2 Psomas2 Quality Management Group Inc. Rutan & Tucker LLP

SCI Consulting Group SGI Construction Management2 San Bernardino County Safety Employees2 Santa Ynez Band of Mission Indians2 Smart Cities Prevail TREH Development2 Willdan Woodard & Curran Accretive Realtors2

Jamboree Housing Corporation Jones Hall2 Jones & Mayer Kasdan Lippsmith Weber Turner LLP Livermore Sanitation2 Madaffer Enterprises1,2 Marchetti Construction Inc.2 Mechanics Bank2 Napa Recycling2 Nimitz Group2 Orange County Realtors Phillips 662 Pinewave Development Group Inc2 Pleasanton Garbage Services Inc.2 Recology2

Retail Strategies Riverside Construction2 Rutan & Tucker2 San Jose POA San Mateo County Association of Realtors2 Santa Monica POA Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians2 Specialty Solid Waste & Recycling2 Swinerton Management2 Townsend Public Affairs Inc.2 Transwestern Vali Cooper & Associates Inc.2 Van Scoyoc Associates2 West Builders2

1 – Institute for Local Government supporter 2 – CITIPAC supporter Partial list as of 06/11/2020


A wind turbine generates clean power near the agricultural fields of the Salinas Valley.

The Environment, Energy, and Equity: How Cities Are Moving Forward in Today’s Economy by Karalee Browne

2020 was supposed to be a big year for climate action. Instead, cities find themselves needing to divert attention and resources to address the COVID-19 crisis and respond to the call for racial equity following the death of George Floyd. Events in recent months have illuminated the direct correlation between health and the environment. The negative impacts of pervasive inequities in disadvantaged communities and communities of color are now abundantly clear. Local governments are faced with tough decisions about how to proceed with policies and projects that address energy, equity, and the environment, in conjunction with the new realities of COVID-induced budget shortfalls.

The financial impacts of the COVID-19 crisis are staggering, especially for cities with tourism-based economies. Due to a decrease in revenues associated with tourism, sales tax, and parking, the City of Santa Monica projects a $224 million deficit through the next two fiscal years. On May 5, 2020, the council voted to pass a restructuring plan, which resulted in the consolidation of numerous departments, the streamlining of administrative functions, and the elimination of more

than 400 positions — including staff for its sustainability program, which has helped define the city as an innovative leader for decades. Sustainability staffers in cities throughout California are still reeling from the news. “It was shocking to see Santa Monica, a leader in the field, take such dramatic actions,” says Tiffany Wise-West, sustainability and climate manager for the City of Santa Cruz. “There is still much uncertainty for my colleagues across the state.” Santa Cruz recently committed to a “health in all policies” approach to infuse equity, public health, and sustainability into decisionmaking and policymaking, and Wise-West was invited to join the city’s recovery team. She is looking for opportunities to advance sustainability as part of the recovery process. continued

Karalee Browne is director of the Sustainable Communities Program of the Institute for Local Government and can be reached at kbrowne@ca-ilg.org.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, July 2020

7


The Environment, Energy, and Equity: How Cities Are Moving Forward in Today’s Economy, continued

The City of Santa Cruz is also exploring all possible options to reduce costs. For example, Santa Cruz hopes to see near-term cost savings from a newly launched project with an energy service company. The project will include “deep” (beyond the basics) energy efficiency retrofits, rate changes, electrical load-shifting, renewable energy projects, and peak shaving (the process of leveling out big spikes or dips in energy usage by commercial/industrial customers so that it is more consistent and easier to accommodate). An energy management dashboard will improve the project’s analytical capability to demonstrate energy and cost savings. The dashboard will also make the project data more visible to city staff and energy managers. In 2020, the city will also move forward with three photovoltaic solar power purchase agreements and energy efficiency projects funded by utility customers’ on-bill financing.

• Sales, Use and Transactions Tax • Business License Tax • Economic Development • Cannabis Regulation • Transient Occupancy Tax • Short Term Rental Services • Rental Unit Registration

Lean on us for custom solutions to help your agency during these difficult times. 888.861.0220 hdlcompanies.com solutions@hdlcompanies.com

8

League of California Cities

The cities of Colton and West Hollywood are also moving forward with energy efficiency projects in an effort to save every penny possible.

Climate Action Planning San Mateo County and the 20 cities in the county participate in a regional climate action planning effort that uses a set of standardized tools and methodologies (the Regionally Integrated Climate Action Planning Suite) to create a higher level of consistency, increased collaboration, and resource sharing. In an informal poll of the participants conducted in May 2020, 22 percent of the city staffers surveyed anticipated no change to their climate and energy initiatives, 28 percent responded that their activities paused because of budget implications, and 56 percent responded that actions slowed because staff moved to other initiatives related to COVID-19. The last category includes the City of Half Moon Bay, which withdrew its Request for Proposals seeking a consultant to develop its Climate Action Plan and associated outreach. The cities of East Palo Alto and San Carlos also put Climate Action Plan updates on hold pending budget restrictions and questions about community engagement. Despite immediate and looming budget shortfalls, many cities are moving forward with Climate Action Plans, including the cities of Oxnard, Pittsburg, Paramount, Santa Cruz, and Watsonville. The City of West Hollywood is also continuing its Climate Action Plan work, but without the assistance of consultants. Oceanside, Culver City, Salinas, and Ventura are moving

forward with General Plan updates, which will have associated Climate Action Plans if grant money is available. The City of Arcata had many climate planning and implementation initiatives on the horizon, but some stalled due to the city’s COVID-19 response. Thanks to state grant funding, Arcata will continue efforts on its Local Coastal Plan, associated sea level-rise component, and required safety element update. The city had to put its Climate Action Plan on hold, however, along with several energy initiatives that include making energy upgrades in city facilities, installing electric charging stations, and phasing in new electric vehicles to the city’s fleet. Arcata’s Community Development Director David Loya says although some of the city’s initiatives aren’t moving forward due to budget constraints, it is critical that cities use this time to strategize and emerge with a changed sense of priorities. “Climate change poses a huge threat to humanity. While the COVID-19 threat is immediate and the climate threat may seem existential by comparison, there are many parallels. The inequality highlighted by the current crisis is nothing compared with the equity challenges we face in the future.”

San Francisco Focuses on Resilience and Economic Recovery Resilience, equity, and the economy are at the forefront in San Francisco. On

A wind farm and solar panels in Southern California help reduce greenhouse gas emissions.


Cities are grappling with tough decisions about how to balance the essential needs of their communities with projects that were planned to address energy, equity, and the environment. April 2, 2020, San Francisco Mayor London Breed and County Board of Supervisors President Norman Yee announced the creation of the COVID-19 Economic Recovery Task Force, co-chaired by San Francisco Assessor-Recorder Carmen Chu, San Francisco Treasurer José Cisneros, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Rodney Fong, and San Francisco Labor Council Executive Director Rudy Gonzalez. The task force is charged with guiding the city’s efforts through the COVID-19 recovery to sustain and revive local businesses and employment, mitigate the economic hardships already affecting the most vulnerable San Franciscans, and build a resilient and equitable future. On April 24, 2020, the task force conducted its first virtual meeting to report on the sobering impacts of the crisis and related forecasts. The task force will meet once a month for six months, and its efforts will culminate in a final report in September 2020 that will serve as the city’s roadmap for economic recovery. San Francisco’s Chief Resilience Officer and Director of the Office of Resilience and Capital Planning Brian Strong says that the city’s nimble response was possible only because it has a long history of planning for climate resilience. “We have the benefit of having thought about resilience in advance, though it was in the context of fire, earthquakes, and floods. It’s no longer a question of focusing on climate or the economy — we really need to do both,” he says.

Navigating a Series of Challenges: ILG Can Help The economic and environmental impacts of the COVID-19 crisis will weigh heavily on California cities for months and years to come. The Institute for Local Government (ILG) can be an important and strategic resource for local government www.westerncity.com

Energy-efficiency measures and electric vehicles play key roles in efforts to slow climate change. leaders working to address sustainability after COVID-19. As the nonprofit training and education affiliate of the League, ILG remains committed to helping local jurisdictions build capacity in this area, while also sharing best practices in sustainability and celebrating the unwavering efforts of hard-working local elected officials and city staff. ILG offers technical assistance and guidance about solutions and options to consider and resources that may be available to support city programs and projects. ILG is committed to helping local government leaders navigate the complexity of their important roles. In response to the

Rubberized Asphalt Concrete

unprecedented impacts local governments are facing due to the COVID-19 crisis, ILG developed a curated list of practical actions local governments can pursue immediately to continue their commitment to sustainability and build resilience to future disasters and public health crises. These best practices illustrate ways in which local governments can address and balance economic development, climate action, and equity with the health and safety concerns of their communities. To access this resource, visit www.ca-ilg.org/ covid-sustainability-best-practices. ■

Follow the path to a better road! The superior solution for your paving and spray application needs: •Cost Effective •Long-Lasting •Durable •Sustainable •Less Maintenance

Grants and NO COST Training for California Public Agencies For More Information Contact Theron Roschen, P.E. at Interwest Consulting Group interwestgrp.com | troschen@interwestgrp.com | 916.303.2780 To learn more, please visit calrecycle.ca.gov/tires/rac

Western City, July 2020

9


Greening the Concrete Jungle: Daly City Partners With Residents As the largest city in San Mateo County, Daly City (pop. 109,142) is truly a concrete jungle. Major highways that connect San Francisco to Silicon Valley crisscross the city, spewing vehicle emissions and particulate matter into dense neighborhoods where residents experience high levels of pollution. The urban canopy covers less than 5 percent of the city’s land surface, and only three species represent almost half of the trees in Daly City, two of which are suffering from disease. Decades of tree removal, often to make way for both front yard and backyard paving, has increased impervious surfaces citywide. Now the highly urbanized population faces a new climate reality dominated by drought, rising temperatures, and limited but more intense storm events. This pattern destabilizes the landscape by overwhelming the city’s aging sewer system, flooding low-lying areas, and accelerating erosion of developed coastal bluffs and hillsides. The decimated urban forest simply cannot counter these impacts, leaving the city’s predominantly lower-income population completely exposed.

Grant Funds Launch the Project In 2016, city leaders created Project Green Space with a $25,000 grant from Cities of Service, a nonprofit organization that helps mayors build stronger cities by changing the way local government and citizens work together. Project Green Space has grown into a robust urban forestry and green infrastructure program that is convened by the city and driven by residents through impact volunteering, a strategy that engages volunteers to identify and solve public problems alongside municipal government. The program empowers citizens to actively reshape the future of their neighborhoods by adopting new trees and planting and maintaining rain gardens. “Project Green Space has emerged as one of the city’s most prominent public engagement programs, allowing staff to partner directly with residents to solve civic problems together — a very effective method for producing cost-effective results,” says City Manager Shawnna Maltbie.

Daly City won the Award for Excellence in the Planning and Environmental Quality category of the 2019 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program. For more about the award program, visit www.helenputnam.org.

10

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Project Green Space volunteers transform the city’s landscape by planting endangered, unusual, and California native species.

Providing Information and Inspiration The city published the Drought-Tolerant Tree Guide for Daly City, an e-book featuring over 70 tree species uniquely suited to the changing local climate, with low water needs, large mature canopies to maximize carbon sequestration, and low impacts to sidewalks. “Project Green Space encourages the use of unusual, endangered, and California native species, so that the trees and gardens we plant today will become stunning landmarks in our city at maturity,” says Stephen Stolte, assistant to the city manager and founder of Project Green Space. “One main goal was to cultivate a landscape that generates a sense of awe, knowing how rare that feeling is in the rush of urban life and how natural features like large trees can bring nature back into our daily lives.” Daly City is in one of the world’s five Mediterranean climate regions, which are global hot spots of horticultural diversity. Project Green Space gardens showcase that diversity in the hope that residents will be inspired to do the same at home. “Growing up in a city without much green space creates an educational barrier in communicating the project’s benefits. That’s why we spent so much time educating our residents, with a www.westerncity.com

special focus on youth, through face-to-face interactions, educational materials in multiple languages to reach all of Daly City’s diverse residents, and signage on all of our trees and gardens,” says Raphaelle Ortiz, an AmeriCorps Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA) member who helped implement Project Green Space in some of the city’s hard-to-reach communities. The city formed partnerships with over 20 local entities, including the faith community, the Boys & Girls Club, local elementary schools, high school environmental clubs, service organizations, homeowners’ associations, the Boy Scouts, and community groups. These partners helped spread the word about volunteer opportunities and amplified marketing messages from the city. They also became some of the city’s most dedicated volunteers. “Some of our most memorable projects were large scale and involved hundreds of youths, like the campus forestation project at John F. Kennedy Elementary School, where both community members and hundreds of students planted over 30 native trees. Using native species was important because the school borders a protected natural area,” says Brian Gerrity, an AmeriCorps VISTA member who spent a year at City Hall. continued Western City, July 2020

11


Greening the Concrete Jungle: Daly City Partners With Residents, continued

After four years, over 750 citizen volunteers have grown the urban forest by 10 percent with over 800 trees planted, 11 rain gardens installed, and a mini park constructed on a vacant parcel planted with 100 percent native California species. The trees alone mitigate more than 200,000 gallons of stormwater over a five-year period, because trees have the ability to: • Reduce the volume of stormwater that enters storm drains by capturing and storing rainfall both in their canopies and through roots. • Help stormwater seep into the soil instead of quickly flowing over surfaces into storm drains, which helps replenish groundwater. • Assist in slowing the movement of stormwater and preventing the impacts of flooding. • Help remove pollutants from stormwater, which is a major concern in cities. When rain falls on pavement, roofs, and other impervious surfaces and travels long distances, it picks up pollutants along the way. Trees and vegetation can take up those pollutants and break them down before they contaminate waterways. The rain gardens also provide a haven for California’s beleaguered pollinators and other insects. Emerging research shows that even small pollinator gardens in urban areas significantly boost pollinator abundance, and Project Green Space is actively working to create a network of gardens with native plants in bloom every season. Establishing new green spaces in cities is not without challenges, and this is why community ownership of projects is vital. “Having clean, attractive surroundings is important to me. I offer my time keeping the gardens free of litter for the satisfaction of knowing our community can enjoy the plantings without the blight of litter. We can all do something to better our environment,” says Terry Marie Counce, a dedicated caretaker of the rain gardens and cofounder of the Top of the Hill Improvement Association.

Decades of tree removal, often to make way for both front yard and backyard paving, has increased impervious surfaces citywide. gardens and street trees as community trees, transforming new installations into green community assets, not just stormwater infrastructure created by the city. Along the way, residents have become acquainted and built community. Daly City’s built environment lacks meeting places like cafes and plazas. When people do not have the opportunities to meet each other, neighborhood-based social networks are less resilient. “The feedback we consistently receive from our residents at all our volunteer events is that they value most the connections they make with other people through Project Green Space,” says Stolte. “Daly City residents demonstrate that resilience is built from within communities and set the example that all people can actively adapt to the new climate reality by working together,” says Daly City Mayor Glenn Sylvester. The city and its residents look forward to keeping the momentum going long into the future. Contact: Stephen Stolte, assistant to the city manager, City Manager’s Office; phone: (650) 991-8126; email: sstolte@dalycity.org. ■

At its core, Project Green Space cultivates a sense of community stewardship of green spaces by treating rain gardens as community

Volunteers gather to work on Project Green Space gardens during the city’s Make a Difference Day.

12

League of California Cities

Resident volunteers plant the Mission Street garden, left, and return to weed it after the plants matured, right.

www.cacities.org


Compost plays a key role in carbon farming.

How Cities Can Build Resiliency and Fight Climate Change With Healthy Soil by Wendy Sommer While the coronavirus pandemic and months-long shelter in place measures temporarily lowered emissions around the world, this reduction in pollution only underscored the need for greater resiliency in our economies and environment. Before the pandemic hit, Eric Holthaus, a meteorologist and writer covering climate change, heard the news that the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere had reached heights never seen in human existence. He said, “We don’t know a planet like this.” In Alameda County, the seventh most populous county in California and one of the most diverse, residents are feeling the effects of climate change. These impacts include stronger heat waves, declining air quality as a result of warmer temperatures and wildfires, more frequent summer droughts, and stress on local water systems. A growing number of cities have declared a climate emergency, including most recently the island City of Alameda, one of the county’s communities most vulnerable to the sea level rise.

Cities at the Forefront of Fighting Climate Change Alameda County cities have a long history of taking action to preserve natural resources and protect the environment. All cities are working to meet state greenhouse gas emission goals, and some are reaching even further for carbon neutrality by 2045. The cities are incorporating bold initiatives in their Climate Action Plans to reduce their contribution to climate change, such as curbing car emissions by promoting public transportation and biking, advancing energy efficiency programs, and building more sustainable housing. These actions are necessary, but cooling our planet also requires removing the carbon dioxide that is already in the atmosphere. In a tide of sobering news, one silver lining is right underneath our feet.

The Compost Connection Through its sustainable landscaping and gardening program, StopWaste has long

promoted the benefits of compost as a way to reduce organic waste while creating healthy soils and saving water. Now scientists are recognizing compost as a tool to fight climate change.

What Is Carbon Farming? Carbon farming refers to practices — including the application of compost — to increase the ability of soil and plants to pull carbon from the atmosphere and store it deep in the soil. Identified by the State of California as one of its six pillars to fight climate change, carbon farming also increases the soil's water-holding capacity, reduces erosion, creates healthier plants, increases forage production, and reduces costs for supplemental feed. Carbon farming is one of the most costeffective carbon capture strategies available, as climate change causes drought and landslides and threatens agriculture. Healthy soils are also a critical part of any resilience strategy. continued

Wendy Sommer is executive director of StopWaste, a public agency working to reduce waste in communities throughout Alameda County; she can be reached at wsommer@stopwaste.org.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, July 2020

13


How Cities Can Build Resiliency and Fight Climate Change With Healthy Soil, continued

Workers apply a thin layer of compost to a section of StopWaste's 1,600-acre rangeland. Over the next three years, researchers will measure the amount of carbon stored in the soil after compost applications.

Scientists are recognizing compost as a tool to fight climate change. Compost Is Put to the Test StopWaste, a public agency working to reduce waste in communities throughout Alameda County, and its partners recently started testing this method by applying a thin layer of compost on a 12-acre section of rangeland on its 1,600acre property in the Altamont Hills east of Livermore. This effort is part of a Carbon Farm Plan developed by the Alameda County Resource Conservation District. StopWaste anticipates that in 2021, the project will have removed over 18 metric tons of carbon dioxide from the air, the equivalent of 300 tree seedlings grown for 10 years. Over the 30-year lifetime of the project, anticipated carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emission reductions will total nearly 1,700 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent, or the emissions from over 700,000 gallons of gasoline, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture and California Department of Food and Agriculture’s COMET-Farm tool, a whole farm and ranch carbon and greenhouse gas accounting system. Local governments are positioned to fight climate change. With planning, cities can apply carbon farming in a variety of public landscapes. For example, StopWaste is working with cities in Alameda County to identify areas of public landscapes available for implementing carbon

14

League of California Cities

farming practices and measuring carbon sequestration as part of municipalities’ Climate Action Plans. One of these cities, Dublin, was once an agricultural farmland 35 miles east of San Francisco and is now one of the fastest-growing cities in California. The city aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030 and is one of the first cities to include compost application (on its parks and cityscapes) in the draft update of its Climate Action Plan. “Climate action is happening everywhere, but we saw carbon farming as a new opportunity in Dublin,” said Andrew

Russell, Dublin’s public works director. “We knew that including it as a measure in our Climate Action Plan, rather than simply leaving it as a suggestion or reference, would raise the stakes. The majority of the measures in the city’s updated Climate Action Plan look at ways to reduce emissions. It’s exciting to have a measure like carbon farming that actually removes existing carbon dioxide from the environment.” “Our approach is to evaluate areas of the city where we want to improve existing conditions from both an environmental and economical perspective by integrating compost to fight climate change and continued on page 16

Scientists collect soil samples from StopWaste rangeland property in the Altamont hills as part of the Carbon Farm Plan to measure carbon sequestration in the soil after composting.


J

O

B

O

P

P

O

R T

U

N

I

T

I

E

S

Display Advertising

Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City

Call Cici Trino, Association Outsource Services, at (916) 961-9999 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information, or email cicit@aosinc.biz.

Website Job Postings Display ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away. To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.westerncity.com or contact Savannah Cobbs, Western City administrative assistant; email: scobbs@ cacities.org; phone: (916) 658-8223.

magazine, it will be posted at no additional charge on our website.

Current opportunities . . .

For rates and deadlines, visit www.westerncity. com and click on the Advertise link.

Chief Building Official Chief Communications Officer City of Mountain View

Director of Planning & Inspections

Please visit www.tbcrecruiting.com for details. Suzanne Mason • Teri Black • Tina White tel 424.296.3111 • info@tbcrecruiting.com

City of Big Bear Lake Nestled in the heart of the San Bernardino National Forest at an elevation of 6,752’, the City of Big Bear Lake offers residents and visitors the enjoyment of a beautiful alpine lake, two mountain ski resorts and four seasons of outdoor recreational opportunities. Southern California’s premier mountain resort community is located just two hours from Los Angeles and Palm Springs. The City of Big Bear Lake is currently seeking a Director of Planning & Inspections. The successful candidate will be responsible for the management of the Planning & Inspections Department. The annual salary range is $130,270–$158,870 DOQ. A detailed recruitment brochure and contact information are available at www.citybigbearlake.com.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, July 2020

15


How Cities Can Build Resiliency and Fight Climate Change With Healthy Soil, continued from page 14

improve the health of soil and plants,” said Dean McDonald, Dublin’s public works maintenance superintendent. Similar to other cities, Dublin’s parks and sports fields are spread with turf, where native soil has been compacted and topsoil has potentially been removed. The majority of sports fields are irrigated with recycled water that provides added nutrients to the turf. However, Schaefer Ranch Park is irrigated with potable water because of its location on the edge of town, and fertilizer must be applied twice a year. The city is planning to apply a layer of compost to Schaefer Ranch Park’s turf to improve soil health with the hope that this will reduce the need for fertilizer application in the future.

J

O

City leaders are also looking to update first generation bioretention areas with compost to improve the health of the plants and soil to enhance stormwater pollutant removal and help mitigate flooding.

of compost, help city trees, and apply compost in the landscape and around trees at their own homes, increasing opportunities for carbon dioxide removal throughout Dublin.

In addition, compost can be used to address an issue caused, in part, by the use of recycled water. The environmental benefits of irrigating with recycled water are great; however, due to the high salinity levels of recycled water, several of the city’s trees (redwoods and camphor) are unhealthy or dying. Given the benefits compost can provide, Dublin’s city leaders are looking to engage residents in an annual volunteer event to help apply a compost blanket around the base of the trees to improve their health. In this way, residents can learn about the benefits

Creating a Carbon Farming Network

B

O

P

P

O

R T

U

N

I

StopWaste is encouraging residents interested in climate action to become carbon farmers at home by using compost in their gardens instead of fertilizers and pesticides. The agency is also working with the growing number of urban farms throughout Alameda County to conduct soil tests and measure carbon in areas with and without carbon farming practices. These efforts will rely on healthy soil, which starts with healthy compost. As statewide legislation drives more organics

T

I

E

S

City of Orange Cove, California

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS

Annual salary range: $90,000 – $110,000 The Director of Public Works must have 5 years of experience in administering public works functions and a BA in Civil Engineering or related field. Director will plan, organize, direct, coordinate and evaluates the activities of the Public Works Department which is comprised of the Water/Wastewater, Parks/Recreation, Animal Control, Streets, oversees the provision of departmental services to City residents; prepares, implements and evaluates capital improvement program and long-range infrastructure development plans; prepares and manages departmental budget; ensures compliance with regulatory requirements; provides technical assistance and liaison with City staff, developers, other agencies. Annual salary range is $90,000 – $110,000. Please fill out an employment application and email a copy of your resume to jvb@ cityoforangecove.com. The Director of Public Works job description and employment application can be found on our website under Employment Opportunities. Position Open until filled.

CITY MANAGER Annual salary $140,000

The City of Orange Cove is now accepting applications for the position of City Manager. Orange Cove is an agricultural community located in Fresno County about 34 miles east of the City of Fresno, CA. Qualified candidates should have prior experience as a City Administrator/Manager, Assistant/Deputy City Administrator/ Manager, Department Director, or similar capacity. A bachelor’s degree in public or business administration or a related field is required and at least five (5) years of progressive management responsibility in municipal government is highly desirable. The City Council highly regards California experience and will also consider all viable out-of-state candidates provided the type and level of experience is in alignment with the City’s needs. Bi-lingual candidates are encouraged to apply. Annual Salary: $140,000. Qualified candidates should submit a resume and cover letter electronically to the Orange Cove City Clerk, June V. Bracamontes at jvb@cityoforangecove.com. Recruitment is open until the position is filled.

Qualified candidates should submit a resume and cover letter electronically to the Orange Cove City Clerk, June V. Bracamontes at jvb@cityoforangecove.com. Recruitments are open until the positions are filled. http://cityoforangecove.com/job-center/

16

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


to commercial composting facilities, the risk of contamination could increase. Cities can play a major role in getting ahead of this through public outreach and a well-planned roll out. Helping businesses and residents to properly compost is also important in reducing the amount of food that ends up in landfills releasing methane gases, which are 84 times more potent than carbon dioxide.

The StopWaste property hosts multiple uses, including leases for grazing and wind power generation.

landscapes, or residential gardens, it’s important to incentivize carbon farming practices and prioritize them in Climate Action Plans.

StopWaste encourages cities that have the opportunity to sequester carbon in the soil to do so. Whether on rangeland or agricultural land in rural counties, urban

J

O

More Information Online For additional information and links to related resources, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

It’s not too late to make this planet one we want to know. ■

B

O

P

P

O

R T

U

N

I

T

I

E

S

City of Healdsburg, CA – City Manager The City of Healdsburg is located 65 miles north of San Francisco on Highway 101 in the heart of Sonoma County wine country and nestled among three lush valleys. The City’s approximate 12,500 residents enjoy a lively, appealing downtown experience centered around the Spanish-style Healdsburg Plaza—a shopping, dining, and art gallery hub for visitors and residents. The City of Healdsburg seeks a City Manager that is an experienced administrator, a forward-thinking visionary who is capable of handling economic development while ensuring the long-term financial stability of the City. Exceptional interpersonal skills are essential for a candidate’s success in this search. Candidates must possess ten (10) years of increasingly responsible experience in municipal government, including five (5) years of administrative and management responsibility. A Bachelor’s degree in management, business, public administration, or closely related field. A Master’s Degree is highly desirable. The salary for the City Manager is dependent upon qualifications and experience. Contact: Mr. Gary Phillips, (916) 784-9080 – Filing Deadline: July 19, 2020

City of Jurupa Valley, CA Assistant City Manager

City of Jurupa Valley, CA Public Works Director/ City Engineer

City of San Diego, CA Chief Building Official

If you are interested in these outstanding opportunities, visit our website to apply online.

www.bobmurrayassoc.com

#TeamBMA sincerely thanks all essential workers for their service during the COVID-19 pandemic. BMA Half Page Color Ad - Jul 2020.indd 1

www.westerncity.com

6/15/2020 1:58:53 PM

Western City, July 2020

17


J

O

B

O

P

P

O

R T

U

N

I

T

I

E

S

DIRECTOR OF TOURISM MANAGEMENT City of Big Bear Lake

Coming Next Month

Camp Achieve in the City of Richmond provides high quality summer programs with academics, enrichment, and recreation for 300 children between the ages of 6 and 12.

The City of Big Bear Lake is located in the heart of the San Bernardino National Forest at an elevation of 6,752’. The City is a popular tourist destination that offers visitors and residents the enjoyment of a beautiful alpine lake, two mountain ski resorts and four seasons of outdoor recreational opportunities. Southern California’s premier mountain resort community is located approximately two hours from the major metropolitan areas of Los Angeles, Palm Springs and San Diego. The City of Big Bear Lake is currently seeking a Director of Tourism Management. The successful candidate for this position will be responsible for the management of the City’s Tourism Management Department. The annual salary range is $130,270 – $158,870 DOQ, including an excellent benefit package. A detailed recruitment brochure, application materials and contact information are available at www.citybigbearlake.com.

www.westerncity.com

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE

City of La Verne, California $129,851 – $157,835 annually

With a budget of over $56 million and a recent AA+ S&P rating, La Verne is a full-service city of 30,000 residents and small town charm in the San Gabriel Valley. La Verne seeks a Director of Finance to perform complex management and technical duties, with responsibility for maintaining fiscal stability and safeguarding City assets; provide financial advice to the City Manager and City Council; supervise assigned personnel, and assure that Department activities comply with applicable regulations and policies. Submit a letter of interest and résumé to hr@cityoflaverne.org. For more information, see https:// www.governmentjobs.com/ careers/cityoflaverne

18

League of California Cities

New Opportunities! Community Development Director — City of Jurupa Valley, CA Community Services Director — City of San Marino, CA Health Department Director — Benton County, OR County Administrator — Contra Costa County, CA Chief Administrative Officer — Butte County, CA Finance Director — City of Santa Barbara, CA Town Manager — Town of Chino Valley, AZ City Manager — City of Rocklin, CA Please visit our website to learn more about all of our active recruitments.

Peckham & McKenney www.peckhamandmckenney.com

Photo/art credits

Cover: Courtesy of Daly City

Pages 10–12: Courtesy of Daly City

Page 5: Courtesy of the City of San Marcos

Pages 13–14 and 18: Courtesy of StopWaste

Page 7: Pgiam Page 8: 4kodiak Page 9: Left, onurdongel; right, 3alexd

www.cacities.org


SAFETY & RETURN

MADE EASY Keeping Funds Safe Across America Did you know that thousands of government finance officers use Insured Cash Sweep® and CDARS® to keep taxpayer dollars safe? With Insured Cash Sweep, or ICS®, and CDARS, your organization can access FDIC insurance beyond $250,000 on large deposits placed into demand deposit accounts, money market deposit accounts, and CDs—by working directly with one bank. And, deposits placed through ICS and CDARS have the potential to earn a rate comparable to prime money market mutual funds1 with protection that is backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government. Ask your bank if it offers ICS and CDARS, or find one of the thousands that do.

www.ICSandCDARS.com [1] Deposits placed using ICS and CDARS earn interest at rates set by the depositor’s relationship institution that places the funds. Rates will vary. Placement of funds through the ICS or CDARS service is subject to the terms, conditions, and disclosures in the service agreements, including the Deposit Placement Agreement (“DPA”). Limits apply and customer eligibility criteria may apply. In the ICS savings option, program withdrawals are limited to six per month. Although funds are placed at destination banks in amounts that do not exceed the FDIC standard maximum deposit insurance amount (“SMDIA”), a depositor’s balances at the relationship institution that places the funds may exceed the SMDIA (e.g., before ICS or CDARS settlement for a deposit or after ICS or CDARS settlement for a withdrawal) or be ineligible for FDIC insurance (if the relationship institution is not a bank). As stated in the DPA, the depositor is responsible for making any necessary arrangements to protect such balances consistent with applicable law. If the depositor is subject to restrictions on placement of its funds, the depositor is responsible for determining whether its use of ICS or CDARS satisfies those restrictions. ICS, Insured Cash Sweep, and CDARS are registered service marks of Promontory Interfinancial Network, LLC. 0420


P

R

O

F

E

S

S

I

O

N

A

L

S

E

R V

I

C

E

S

D

I

R

E

C

T O

R Y

Specializes in Executive Search

Sherrill Uyeda Cindy Krebs 1 Centerpointe Drive, Suite 440 La Palma, CA 90623 T: (562) 901-0769 F: (562) 901-3082 www.allianceRC.com http://twitter.com/Alliancerc facebook/Alliance Resource Consulting LLC

William Avery & Associates, Inc. Labor Relations / Executive Search / Human Resources Consulting 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

SPECIALISTS IN CLASSIFICATION, JOB EVALUATION AND COMPENSATION

Bobbi C. Peckham • Phil McKenney

Peckham&McKenney www.peckhamandmckenney.com

Roseville, CA

866.912.1919

5663 Balboa Ave., #399, San Diego, CA 92111-2705 915 L Street, #C-102, Sacramento, CA 95814 Brentwood Village, 149 S. Barrington Ave., #726, Los Angeles, CA 90049-2950 1-888-522-7772 • www.compensationconsulting.com Offices in various major cities

Contact: Allan Crecelius or Sandra Comrie

12707 High Bluff Dr., Ste 200 San Diego, CA 92130 Tel 858.259.3800 fax 858.792.7465 acrecelius@rewardstrategy.com

Exceeding clients’ expectations since 1987. Classification | Compensation Special Surveys | Performance Management

20

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


P

R

O

F

E

S

S

I

O

N

A

L

S

E

R V

I

C

E

S

WRITTEN TESTS Over 70 stock tests available for jobs in public agencies.

D

I

R

E

C

T O

R Y

Building Partnerships

Building & Fire Life Safety Planning | Public Works | Engineering

Toll Free (877) 22-EXAMS exams@donnoe.com www.donnoe.com

Construction Management Post-Disaster Development Recovery 4LEAFINC.COM

HF&H   CONSULTANTS, LLC 

POWERFUL SOLUTIONS, PROVEN RESULTS

Managing Tomorrow’s Resources Today 

Sales Tax

Property Tax

Business Tax

Economic Development

Cannabis Consulting

Software

Lodging Tax and Short Term Rentals

888.861.0220 | hdlcompanies.com

HELPING LOCAL GOVERNMENT LEADERS

managementpartners.com Budget Strategies ∙ Service Sharing Organization Analysis ∙ Performance Management Process Improvement ∙ Strategic Planning Executive Recruitment ∙ Facilitation/Team Building

E XPERIENCE , T ALENT , COMMITMENT TO PUBLIC SERVICE San Jose ∙ Orange County ∙ Cincinnati ∙ 408-437-5400

Helping local governments have successful   recycling, solid waste, water, wastewater, and  stormwater services for more than 30 Years 

 SB 1383 Compliance   Financial/Rates   Stormwater Funding   Management   Regulatory Compliance   Litigation Support  www.hfh‐consultants.com   Walnut Creek  (925) 977‐6960 

Irvine (949) 251‐8628 

matrix consulting group 1650 S. AMPHLETT BLVD., SUITE 213 SAN MATEO, CA 94402 650.858.0507 • www.matrixcg.net Offices in CA, AZ, IL, MA, NC, OR & TX

Management and operations studies Feasibility studies User fees and cost allocation Police • Fire • Public Works • Utilities Parks & Recreation • Administration Planning & Building

Your Public Agency Investment Solution CalTRUST provides CA public agencies, efficient, convenient, and professionally managed investment solutions.

CALTRUST.ORG │ (888) 225-8787

Sponsored by the League of California Cities

www.westerncity.com

Western City, July 2020

21


Profile for Western City Magazine

Western City July 2020  

Advertisement