__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

DECEMBER 2020 |

The Monthly Magazine of the League of California Cities

The Evolution of Western City Magazine: Extending the Voice and Vision of California Cities p.2 Civility as a Tonic for What Ails Local Democracy p.11 Norwalk Offers Empathy and Critical Support to Teens in Crisis p.8


Representing California public agencies for over sixty years.

Coastal Construction Election Law Eminent Domain Environment & Natural Resources

Housing Authorities Housing Successors Joint Powers Authorities Labor & Employment Litigation

Municipal & Public Agency Law Public Finance Real Estate School Districts Special Districts

Successor Agencies Telecommunications Transportation Waste Management Water Districts

888.479.4529


CONTENTS Executive Director’s Message 2 

The Evolution of Western City Magazine: Extending the Voice and Vision of California Cities

By Carolyn Coleman

 he powerful foundation that Western T City has built over the last century positions the magazine perfectly to transform and evolve into a new version of itself that will inspire its audience in new ways.

4 Calendar of League Events #LocalWorks 5 

 Rancho Cucamonga: 2020 All-America City Winner One of 10 cities honored and  the only city in California to make the list

By Jill Oviatt

 he National Civic League recognized T Rancho Cucamonga for promoting inclusive civic engagement to address health and well-being in the community. The city’s ongoing efforts have created stronger connections among residents, businesses, nonprofits, and government leaders that have improved the quality of life.

Legal Notes 7 

 A Refresher on General Conflict-of-Interest Rules By Thomas D. Jex and Denise S. Bazzano

 his article provides newly elected T officials an overview of some of the key conflict-of-interest rules under the Political Reform Act — and a refresher for more seasoned council members.

California Cities Helen Putnam 8  Award for Excellence

 Norwalk Offers Empathy and Critical Support to Teens in Crisis

Effective tools for the timely financing of community-based projects.

 eveloped by a volunteer team of D recreation staff, the We Have Project offers a forum for dealing with challenging issues, including depression and anxiety, and links Norwalk teens and youth with professional resources.

Civility as a Tonic for What 11  Ails Local Democracy

By Erica L. Manuel

 Americans’ confidence in government is at an all-time low. Leaders in every level of government will need to do their part to address this trend, and local governments in particular can play a unique and important role to help stem eroding confidence in democratic institutions and principles.

Job Opportunities 16  Professional Services 20  Directory

 n the cover: A collage of Western O City covers since it was first published.

CSCDA enables local government and eligible private entities access to efficiently finance, locallyapproved projects that provide a public benefit. Since 1988, CSCDA has issued more than $60 billion in tax-exempt bonds for affordable housing, healthcare, infrastructure, schools, and other fundamental services. CSCDA is a joint powers authority created by:

(800) 531-7476 www.cscda.org


Executive Director’s Message by Carolyn Coleman

The Evolution of Western City Magazine:

Extending the Voice and Vision of California Cities

January 2021 will mark the beginning of a new era for Western City magazine. The 121-year-old publication will evolve into an alldigital experience at westerncity.com starting Jan. 1, 2021. Pacific Municipalities was launched in 1899 as “a monthly review of municipal problems and civic improvements� and rebranded as Western City magazine in 1932. With a circulation of nearly 10,000, Western City offers articles with practical ideas and information for city officials, as well as features and in-depth series on policy issues and trends. A lot has changed since the magazine launched more than a century ago and in order to continue to provide League members with valuable content and a high-quality reader experience, the League is streamlining the distribution channels and expanding the ways readers can interact with the Western City content.

2

League of California Cities

I am excited to be part of this new chapter of Western City magazine. The quality of the ideas, the vision, and the content remains at the heart of the editorial development, but how we deliver that quality must evolve with the digital age, providing not only relevant, but timely and increasingly engaging material. Printed issues of Western City magazine are currently mailed to elected city officials and city department heads as a complimentary service of League membership. The magazine is also mailed to California state legislators, key policy-makers, and opinion leaders, and a small group of paying subscribers. In the past decade, print advertising revenues in the U.S. have dropped from $20.6 billion in 2012 to $12.1 billion last year. Western City, which is heavily dependent on print ad revenues to cover its production costs, has also experienced the same trend in print ad advertising sales. By taking Western City to an online-only

www.cacities.org


The powerful foundation that Western City has built over the last century positions the magazine perfectly to transform and evolve into a more interactive version of itself that will inspire its audience in new ways.

format, the magazine will eliminate design, print, and mailing costs and be less reliant on print advertising to produce the valued content that city leaders turn to. While print advertising sales across the country have steadily trended downward, digital ad revenues have doubled since 2015, providing Western City an opportunity for digital ad revenue growth and a path to support expanded content and features on a digital-only platform. A digital-only format also reduces the carbon footprint associated with printing, mailing, and disposing of hard copies. Another reality that factored into our decision to transition to an online-only publication now was the decision by the magazine’s longtime Managing Editor Jude Hudson Lemons not to renew her contract with the League for 2021. Jude shepherded the production of Western City magazine over the last 24 years, and her love for the magazine, the League, and our members will be missed. The League’s Director of Communications and Marketing Jill Oviatt takes over as the magazine’s managing editor effective Dec. 1. The lead time required for online stories is also greatly decreased compared to printed magazine articles, allowing for more timely pieces that can better align with time-sensitive issues facing our cities.

The Western City website will offer fresh opportunities for interacting with content.

The powerful foundation that Western City has built over the last century positions the magazine perfectly to transform and evolve into a more interactive version of itself that will inspire its audience in new ways.

From the Mailbox to the Inbox While city officials have grown accustomed to finding Western City in their physical mailbox, starting in January, a link to the magazine will now arrive each month in city officials’ electronic mailbox, with a summary of what you’ll find in the issue. Diverse perspectives, legal analyses, insights from legislators and experts, features on local government policy, process, and fiscal issues, commentary by League leadership, and individual city success stories demonstrating how #LocalWorks in California — it will all be available at your fingertips, wherever you are. This evolution is a natural next step for Western City, extending its voice and vision, which will ultimately include increased video and social content. The League will continue to invest in this valuable resource for city officials to ensure it continues to reflect our cities of today and of tomorrow. ■


1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200; Fax (916) 658-8240

President Cheryl Viegas Walker Council Member El Centro

First Vice President Cindy Silva Council Member Walnut Creek

Second Vice President Ali Sajjad Taj Mayor Artesia

Immediate Past President John F. Dunbar Mayor Yountville

Magazine Staff

For a complete list of the League board of directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

Editor in Chief Jill Oviatt (916) 658-8228; email: joviatt@cacities.org

leaguevents

Managing Editor Jude Lemons, Citrus 3 Communications (916) 658-8234; email: editor@westerncity.com Contributing Editor Kayla Woods (916) 658-8213; email: kwoods@cacities.org Business and Creative Manager Amanda Cadelago (916) 658-8226; email: acadelago@cacities.org Advertising Sales Cici Trino Association Outsource Services, Inc. (916) 961-9999; email: cicit@aosinc.biz Administrative Assistant Savannah Cobbs (916) 658-8223; email: scobbs@cacities.org

Executive Director Carolyn Coleman

December 7, 9, and 11

Municipal Finance Institute, Virtual Event This conference provides essential information for city officials and staff involved in fiscal planning for municipalities.

10

Fire Chiefs Leadership Seminar, Virtual Event This virtual event features a department business meeting and a session of importance to city fire service professionals.

11

Contributors Melissa Kuehne Alison Leary Corrie Manning Jennifer Whiting

Board of Directors Meeting, Virtual Event The League board reviews, discusses, and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

Associate Editors Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker

17 and 18

City Clerks New Law & Elections Seminar, Virtual Event The seminar covers laws affecting elections as well as other aspects of clerks’ responsibilities.

Design Taber Creative Group Advertising Design ImagePoint Design For photo credits, see page 17. Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

NT RI

GY

R

0

W

21–22 & 28–29

New Mayors & Council Members Academy, Virtual Event This vitally important training prepares newly elected officials for the demands of office and introduces them to the legal constraints on city councils.

22

Legal Advocacy Committee Meeting, Virtual Event The committee reviews and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of significant statewide interest to California cities.

ED US IN

10

%

Policy Committee Meetings, Virtual Event The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors.

G

P

Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2020 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume XCVI, No. 12.

January 2021 14–15

IND EN

E

Supplied by Community Energy

®

FSC is an independent, not-for-profit organization that promotes environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial and economically viable forest management worldwide. Products with the FSC label are independently certified to ensure that they come from forests managed to meet the needs of present and future generations.

Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org. For legislative and policy updates and more, follow @CaCities. Follow Western City @WesternCityMag. Join us on Facebook. www.facebook.com/westerncity www.facebook.com/LeagueofCaCities Visit us on LinkedIn at Western City Magazine.

4

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Children play in Los Amigos Park, left, and residents discuss proposed improvements in Etiwanda Heights.

Rancho Cucamonga: 2020 All-America City Winner One of 10 cities honored and the only city in California to make the list

by Jill Oviatt Fostering civic engagement and involving residents in collectively solving local challenges is at the core of what city leaders strive to do. Each year, the National Civic League recognizes 10 communities that have excelled in engaging residents in innovative, inclusive, and effective efforts to successfully address local issues. In August, Rancho Cucamonga was honored with a 2020 All-America City Award from the National Civic League. The only city in California to receive this prestigious award, Rancho Cucamonga was recognized for promoting inclusive civic engagement to address health and well-being in the community. Through the city’s ongoing efforts, it has created stronger connections among residents, businesses, nonprofits, and government leaders that have improved the quality of life.

policies, and partnerships to better promote community health and equity. Through comprehensive outreach and engagement, Healthy RC has successfully converted unused spaces into parks designed by residents, reduced stigmas around mental health, and engaged residents in important land-use decisions. “As a city with a history of over 40 years of community planning and a long-standing commitment to improving the health, wellness, and equity of all our residents through Healthy RC, we are grateful for the recognition this brings to our many community partners and invested community members,” added Michael. “We know that without their efforts we would not be here today.”

Creating a Park Built for the Community, by the Community

“We are ecstatic to be recognized by the National Civic League and honored to be added to the list with the other current and prior prestigious All-America City Award recipients,” said Rancho Cucamonga Mayor L. Dennis Michael.

One challenge Rancho Cucamonga city leaders recognized was that residents in the southwest portion of the city — a predominantly Latino neighborhood — faced growing barriers to accessing healthy lifestyles as there were limited open spaces for recreation.

In 2008, the Rancho Cucamonga City Council established the Healthy RC initiative to interconnect planning, programs,

continued

Jill Oviatt is director of communications and marketing for the League and can be reached at joviatt@cacities.org. www.westerncity.com

Western City, December 2020

5


Rancho Cucamonga: 2020 All-America City Winner, continued

The city conducts quarterly community conversations on mental health, left, and residents celebrate at CommUNITY Paint Day.

A grant from the state Department of Parks and Recreation in 2011 enabled the city to design and build a 3.4-acre park. The city used a tailored approach to public engagement to ensure that residents who historically did not trust local government were involved in the design and planning process. To meet the needs of a majority bilingual population, all materials were translated into Spanish and design workshops were led by bilingual staff and held at various locations and times on multiple days to increase accessibility. Parents provided input on the layout of the park and emphasized the importance of safety and visibility. The city intentionally engaged Rancho Cucamonga children, and students from Los Amigos Elementary School helped create an art mural that was later used as the park’s logo. The park opened in 2017, and a year later, the city received an award of excellence in park planning and development from the California Parks and Recreation Society. Los Amigos Park — which includes a skate park, basketball court, playground, water misters, and outdoor fitness equipment — was truly built for the community, by the community.

Developing a Communitywide Culture to Reduce Mental Health Stigmas Within the first two weeks of the 2018 school year, four Rancho Cucamonga students tragically died by suicide. As a result of the communitywide trauma and grief, Healthy RC conducted a comprehensive quality-of-life survey that indicated 57 percent of respondents who acknowledged a need for help did not seek it. In addition, one in three teens reported that they had attempted to harm themselves.

To the city’s surprise, after staff presented the plan to the community, residents expressed disappointment with the lack of inclusion and wanted to participate in the planning process. Rancho Cucamonga set aside the preliminary concepts and engaged the community in creating a new plan. City staff began by bringing blank maps to community workshops, representing a clean slate. Together, residents and staff crafted a strategy to develop the quarry into desired neighborhoods and preserve the natural elements of the foothills. The city launched additional efforts, in both English and Spanish, that focused on meeting with residents in their communities. Nine pop-up outreach events engaged over 800 community members. Virtual workshops, surveys, and other digital engagement events were held to ensure that all residents had opportunities to receive information, ask questions, and provide feedback.

Healthy RC quickly formed a mental health subcommittee to destigmatize mental health challenges and remove barriers to accessing services. The subcommittee developed a bilingual “Your Mind Matters” digital and print campaign that targeted all segments of the community. The materials encourage residents to “Start the Conversation” and provide an extensive list of local mental health resources, including a 24-hour hotline.

The resulting Etiwanda Heights Neighborhood and Conservation Plan articulates a vision for extensive conservation of the foothills and complete, walkable neighborhoods that reflects the area’s rural history and provides a range of housing opportunities.

Healthy RC youth leaders used their personal experiences to develop mental health awareness videos and help their peers understand that mental health challenges impact everyone. Youth leaders also worked with city staff to create an annual teen summit to provide high school students with a platform to be heard, connect with mental health resources, and listen to motivational speakers.

Healthy RC began 12 years ago as a special project in which city staff reviewed local health statistics and compared the information with county data. Today, it is a comprehensive citywide initiative that fosters collaboration among municipal departments, community-based organizations, businesses, and residents.

Healthy RC hosts quarterly community conversations on mental health, providing small group settings to help encourage dialogue and facilitate support. And all five local school districts provide suicide prevention and mental health first aid training to staff and offer workshops for students and parents.

Involving Residents in Important Land-Use Decisions A local gravel mine that had long been an eyesore closed in 2015, and the land became available for development. Rancho

6

Cucamonga partnered with the county to annex the land and develop a plan to transform the mining site into healthy, walkable neighborhoods and preserve thousands of acres for conservation.

League of California Cities

Empowering Community Members to Help Solve Pressing Local Issues

“Rancho Cucamonga was chosen as an All-America City because its city leaders unite the community in collaboratively solving local problems and collectively working to improve quality of life,” said Doug Linkhart, president of the National Civic League. “The city’s civic engagement efforts show that they prioritize inclusion as they strive to make Rancho Cucamonga a stronger and healthier community.” Rancho Cucamonga is tackling some of the most pressing local health and equity issues, and its inclusive and innovative Healthy RC initiative will pay dividends for years to come. ■ www.cacities.org


A Refresher on General Conflict-of-Interest Rules by Thomas D. Jex and Denise S. Bazzano We all need a reminder now and again. This is especially true with respect to ethical responsibilities regarding conflicts of interest for local elected officials. Because many cities have new council members after the November election, this article provides newly elected officials an overview of some of the key conflict-ofinterest rules under the Political Reform Act — and a refresher for more seasoned council members. The general rule regarding conflicts under the Political Reform Act is that a public official is prohibited from making, participating in making, or attempting to use his or her position to influence a

governmental decision if it is reasonably foreseeable that the decision could have a material financial effect on the official, the official’s immediate family, or on specified financial interests of the official, which are distinguishable from the effect on the public generally. Although the laws related to conflicts of interest under the Political Reform Act are complex and require careful analysis of the facts and the applicable law, if you keep in mind the questions presented in this article and your financial interests (as well as those of your spouse and dependent children) when you are preparing for a meeting or conducting any duties as a

About Legal Notes This column is provided as general information and not as legal advice. The law is constantly evolving, and attorneys can and do disagree about what the law requires. Local agencies interested in determining how the law applies in a particular situation should consult their local agency attorneys.

public official, it may be easier for you to identify potential conflicts.

Do I Have a Financial Interest in the Decision? The following financial interests may trigger disqualification from participating in a particular governmental decision. If a public official has one or more of the listed financial interests, he or she should consult with agency counsel to determine whether or not to participate in the decision. continued on page 14

Thomas D. Jex and Denise S. Bazzano are partners in the law firm of Burke, Williams & Sorensen LLP and can be reached at TJex@bwslaw.com and DBazzano@bwslaw.com, respectively. www.westerncity.com

Western City, December 2020

7


Norwalk Offers Empathy and Critical Support to Teens in Crisis The rates of depression and anxiety among children in the United States have risen steadily in recent years. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the number of children aged 6–17 years who were diagnosed with anxiety or depression increased from 5.4 percent in 2003 to 8.4 percent in 2012. Approximately 11 percent of young people ages 12–17 were diagnosed with an anxiety disorder in 2019. Depression and anxiety are two of the most common risk factors for suicide, which is the second leading cause of death for teenagers in the United States today. In the City of Norwalk (pop. 105,717), located in Los Angeles County, 23.7 percent of the city’s residents are under the age of 18, and a substantial portion of that group is between the ages of 13 and 18. In the city’s Recreation and Park

Services Department, staff who interacted extensively with Norwalk youth expressed concerns that many young residents felt lost, misunderstood, and abandoned. A steadily increasing number of Norwalk teenagers were confiding in staff members about personal struggles related to bullying, mental health issues, and more.

Tragedy Spurs the We Have Project After a Norwalk teenager died by suicide in 2018, the recreation staff believed that immediate action was needed to help prevent similar tragedies. They sought a way to address risk factors and connect effectively with youths in crisis. To minimize the impact on the department’s fiscal resources, a team of recreation staff members volunteered their personal time and video equipment to develop a solution: the We Have Project.

To reach out to young people in the community, the team created a video that features a series of individual, informal testimonials from 12 recreation staffers who work extensively with Norwalk youth. The individual participants speak directly to the viewer and ask, “Have you ever …?” Each person provides a different scenario, including, “… Been told you weren’t good enough? Felt pressured to fit in? Been bullied because of your size or weight? Been made fun of because of the clothes you wear? Been cyberbullied because of your ethnicity? Been pressured to do something you didn’t want to so you would fit in and be cool?” The group answers in unison, “We have.” In a candid, authentic way, the staff members describe their personal struggles and difficult experiences. In telling their stories, they provide support, offer advice, and encourage youths to share their

The City of Norwalk won the award for Excellence in the Health and Wellness category of the 2020 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program. For more information about the award program, visit www.helenputnam.org.

8

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Norwalk youths participate in activities of the Teen Alliance Program, which connects them with volunteer opportunities and numerous resources.

concerns and challenges with others who can help. The We Have Project offers a forum for dealing with issues and provides professional resources for Norwalk teens and youth grappling with personal challenges every day. In their video testimonials, the staff members recognize that life can be hard and encourage young people, who may be struggling, to persevere and seek support. The video also emphasizes that professional resources may be needed to achieve desired outcomes in a manner that is safe and responsible; it includes information linking viewers to relevant resources. These include the National Suicide Prevention Hotline; the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender National Hotline; and Helpline Youth Counseling, based locally in Whittier. Empathy is a central element of the We Have Project. “You’re not alone” and “We’re here to help you” are key messages. “If you need someone to listen to you,” staff members say, “show up at the Norwalk Teen Center or join the Teen Alliance Program. We are here for you.” About 200 Norwalk teens participate in the Teen Alliance Program (TAP), which

www.westerncity.com

is designed to connect local youth with volunteer opportunities, resources for personal growth and development, and positive mentor-mentee relationships with city staff. The group meets monthly to discuss timely topics relevant to Norwalk teens today.

Video Profoundly Impacts Local Youth In October 2019, Norwalk Recreation and Parks staff debuted the We Have Project video at a TAP meeting that focused on mental health advocacy and began with a presentation from a motivational speaker about maintaining optimism in the face of mental health struggles and negative self-talk. (Helpline Youth Counseling, an organization dedicated to at-risk, lowincome youth in Southern California, helped secure the speaker at no cost to TAP, which has limited funds.) After the speaker concluded, the We Have Project video was shown and generated immediate, positive reactions from the audience, which also included a few parents. Recreation staff answered questions and encouraged the TAP members to share the video with their friends. In response, TAP members acted as ambassadors for the video and helped push it out to the community via social media. The

local high schools also received copies of the video to share with students and teachers. Following the debut of the We Have Project, the mother of a Teen Alliance Program member approached Recreation and Park Services staff with tears in her eyes. She told them that her son, who has special needs, struggled to feel accepted in many other social settings, and that she was astonished by the willingness of staff to create a video that encouraged selfcare and the development of supportive relationships with people of all ethnicities, genders, and abilities. In addition, she said, her second child was in midtransition and the inclusion of LGBTQ support information in the video “means more to me than you could ever know.” Norwalk Mayor Jennifer Perez was also emotionally moved by the video. “Norwalk Recreation and Parks staff have the unique challenge of providing services and support to a population that has felt misunderstood for generations,” she said. “They were able to provide an outlet for youth to feel heard, recognized, and valued — effectively changing an entire way of thinking for Norwalk teenagers. The positive environmental change, coupled with enhanced access to support continued Western City, December 2020

9


Norwalk Offers Empathy and Critical Support to Teens in Crisis, continued

services, has positively impacted the lives of numerous residents in a way that was previously unimaginable.” In the months following the video’s release, the Norwalk Teen Center received an influx of young visitors wanting to discuss issues related to home, work, and school. The center also received messages via social media outlets from teens seeking support. The video helped create a conduit for staff to connect local teens with community resources after one-on-one meetings. And staff also provides advice and a safe place to be heard for countless youths. Visitors to the Teen Center have reached out to staff about many issues, including suicidal ideation. Staff connects the individuals with social workers from the Norwalk Social Services Center for further support. And after watching the We Have Project video and realizing that Recreation and Park Services staff would care, empathize, and help, a local teenager reported

The We Have Project video features Norwalk Recreation and Park Services Department staff. physical abuse at home. Teen Center staff subsequently reported the incident and connected the teen with proper resources to prevent any further decline to the youth’s physical and mental health.

The Project Adapts and Continues During COVID-19 Pandemic In March 2020, following stay-at-home orders and pandemic public safety protocols,

Liebert Cassidy Whitmore

Trusted Advisors to California Cities for 40 Years.

Employment Law Labor Relations Retirement Wage and Hour Public Safety Public Records Act Litigation

staff adapted the We Have Project efforts, using an app to stay in touch with the TAP members and the youth community. Through the app, local teens stay connected with staff and can access motivational videos and other helpful resources. The Recreation and Park Services staff participate in Teen Talks, which are twice-weekly Zoom calls that host open discussions with local teens. The tone ranges from fun to serious, and discussion topics include coping with current events, the global pandemic, and college preparation. Recreation Leader James Pedroza was the original visionary of the We Have Program and its main contact person for local youth since the video’s debut. He has been “blown away” by the response from Norwalk teenagers. Pedroza said, “We do not know the struggles that these children face daily, but we do know the power of feeling understood. Just communicating to them that we care and empathize has changed some of their lives in unbelievable ways.” Recreation Supervisor Erin Burke has also noticed an impact. She said, “Although the recreation staff has been responding to these issues for years, they finally developed a way to proactively address them and help prevent future tragedies. Offering resources to address mental health issues in the early stages has created a positive impact that has rippled across the community at tremendous speed.” For a link to the video, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

our offices • Los Angeles • Sacramento • San Francisco • San Diego • Fresno •

WWW.LCWLEGAL.COM

10

League of California Cities

Contact: Erin Burke, recreation supervisor, Recreation and Park Services Dept., City of Norwalk; phone: (562) 929-5706; email: eburke@norwalkca.gov. ■ www.cacities.org


Civility as a Tonic for What Ails Local Democracy by Erica L. Manuel

Americans’ confidence in government is at an all-time low — sadly, that’s not new information. A September 2020 study from the Pew Research Center found that merely 20 percent of Americans trust the federal government. This is underscored by an article in The Atlantic, published earlier in 2020, highlighting a global study that provides shocking evidence of a major decline in support of democracy — not only in the United States, but also in many other countries. In fact, global confidence in democracy has reached a historic low. This does not bode well for our nation, our state, or our local communities. Leaders in every level of government will need to do their part to address this trend, and local governments in particular can play a unique and important role to help stem eroding confidence in democratic institutions and principles. Local government is consistently the entry point for civic engagement. This is why city and county leaders have a special opportunity to rebuild trust and confidence in local representative democracy. In the wake of contentious political races at the national and state levels, plagued by partisanship and divisiveness, civility among elected leaders — and even within our communities — is at an all-time low. Local elected officials can and should step up and lead by example to model unity and encourage public trust and

confidence. Cities statewide can view the recent election as the proverbial “reset button” and embrace changes to the composition of city councils to wipe the slate clean, maintain a focus on ethics, and begin repairing the trust that has been damaged. “Civility and ethics are inseparable,” says Arne Croce, a former city manager and nonprofit executive. “Treating everyone with dignity and respect is a foundational ethic.” While elections offer an opportunity for new beginnings, maintaining civility and good governance throughout transitions and uncertainty is not easy. California communities continue to grapple with health orders related to COVID-19, immense wildfire devastation, and sustained economic uncertainty. Local leaders are being tested now more than ever. A serious dose of civility in all levels of government — modeled by local leaders — will help all our communities emerge stronger after the dust settles. “Creating and maintaining civil and respectful relationships is not always easy,” says Rod Gould, former city manager and chair of the Institute for Local Government (ILG) Board of Directors. “But for our cities to thrive, particularly in these uncertain times, local leaders need to embrace the challenge — put in the work, develop the policies and protocols, and assume the best in each other.”

Local officials in California can demonstrate and encourage civility in the local governing culture in many ways. Model Civility. Civility can be challenging to achieve, but it is paramount. Respect is the watchword for how elected leaders should treat one another, the community they represent, and the staff that serves both. Admittedly, this can be tough in the face of deliberately offensive and spiteful rhetoric. Elected leaders must actively listen to all viewpoints and respect opinions and individuals with whom they differ. Separate the speaker from the problem. Be tough on the issues and gentle with the people, even on social media. This can start with valuing engagement, equity, and inclusion — working to ensure that all who wish to be involved in decisionmaking have the opportunity to speak and be heard. It also means promoting more intentional and authentic public engagement beyond simply holding public hearings. It requires that local leaders make it more comfortable and easier for people to engage with their governments on issues that matter most to them. This has become much more difficult since stayat-home orders were issued, but no less important. The cities of Arcata and San Diego offer two examples of jurisdictions that are shifting their approach to public engagement in light of COVID-19 and the call for greater equity. continued

Erica L. Manuel is CEO and executive director of the Institute for Local Government and can be reached at emanuel@ca-ilg.org.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, December 2020

11


Civility as a Tonic for What Ails Local Democracy, continued

Vigilant meeting management is also essential to ensure that speakers, staff, and leaders are not harassed or bullied.

Vigilant meeting management is also essential to ensure that speakers, staff, and leaders are not harassed or bullied. Public discussions about the pandemic, equity, social justice, and public safety are incredibly complex and risky. Knowing when to call a recess to allow emotions to cool can be critical. The hallmark of effective mayors and committee chairs is adhering closely to all laws regarding free speech without permitting anarchy to ensue, but still allowing the community and key stakeholders to feel heard and respected. Develop and Follow a Code of Conduct. The most effective and inclusive governing bodies set forth clearly how they will comport themselves during public meetings, and they place a premium on civility. These codes of conduct or governing guidelines are carefully developed, formally adopted, and made available at all public meetings. Such codes articulate the ground rules for how elected officials

Rubberized Asphalt Concrete

will behave and what is expected of the public in return. These rules are especially important during times of transition and help create and maintain a culture of civility that is easier to practice and reinforce. Periodically Take Stock. The most effective elected bodies hold a special meeting at least once a year not to legislate, but to discuss how they are operating with respect to their values, codes, and guidelines. This meeting can provide a chance to reflect on and assess what is working and what can be improved. It will allow for a consistent focus on respect, civility, and engagement, and how to ensure it in all interactions, both public and private. Maintain a Shared Understanding of Roles and Responsibilities. A clear understanding of the city manager’s role and the council’s expectations optimizes working relationships. This shared understanding is informed by local charter

and ordinance provisions that provide the overall framework for the relationship. The council should make time during retreats and/or study sessions to define, discuss, and refine their roles and responsibilities. Mutual understanding of clear roles among the city council and city management is essential for success, and having wellarticulated protocols helps avoid misunderstandings and increases civility. Encourage a Team Mentality. Allow time for council members and executive staff to get to know each other and familiarize themselves with each person’s approach to issues, decisionmaking, and so on. This can be accomplished at annual meetings or workshops throughout the year. Establishing clear ground rules or codes of conduct, as mentioned previously, can help quell acrimony before it becomes a problem. It’s important to remember that trust is built around understanding and respect, not necessarily agreement. Seek Out National, State, and Local Professional Development Opportunities. Elections provide opportunities to refocus on the nuts and bolts of governing and can help you gain valuable information and insights on key policy issues facing your city. City-hosted orientations for newly elected officials provide a good way to acclimate new members to the council’s norms and protocols as well as the budget and key policy issues, and help

Follow the path to a better road! The superior solution for your paving and spray application needs: •Cost Effective •Long-Lasting •Durable •Sustainable •Less Maintenance

Grants and NO COST Training for California Public Agencies For More Information Contact Theron Roschen, P.E. at Interwest Consulting Group interwestgrp.com | troschen@interwestgrp.com | 916.303.2780

Find More Resources Online The Institute for Local Government offers resources and training to help city officials operate more effectively as a team and better engage with each other, city staff, and the community. For more information, visit www.ca-ilg.org/leadership or contact Leadership and Governance Program Manager Melissa Kuehne at mkuehne@ca-ilg.org. For links to related resources, including Western City articles on civility, codes of ethics, and good governance, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

To learn more, please visit calrecycle.ca.gov/tires/rac

12

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


all council members to serve with a common foundation. Consider How Social Justice, Engagement, and Equity Can Be Integrated Into Your Leadership Principles. No city is exempt from discussions about social justice and equity. After the 2020 election cycle, city leaders have an opportunity to explore these issues as a group and work to fully understand the impacts on their city’s residents. By seeking clarity on these complex issues and committing to civility when discussing these challenging topics, councils can work together as a team to determine how best to explore them productively and respectfully. Some jurisdictions are actively exploring how best to embed the principles of equity and authentic engagement in their codes of conduct and apply an equity lens to their decisionmaking processes. Civil and productive discourse is a foundation of our democracy. Without it, our political institutions suffer

at every level. Civility is the antithesis of personal attacks, schoolyard insults, vicious innuendo, character assassination, and hate speech. Civility cannot be ordered or mandated. It is not a strategy or leadership fad. It is a value that must be practiced and reinforced daily as part of a larger governing culture. Croce says, “Incivility undermines democracy by fostering a lack of respect for differing opinions and the legitimacy of democratic institutions.” ILG has built a longstanding practice and a suite of resources and training around topics of effective leadership and good governance to help address some of these common challenges. Local government leaders often look for assistance in these areas, but don’t always know where to turn for help. “In my experience, California’s local elected officials and civic leaders want to serve their communities well and make

them better places to live, work, and visit. Most understand that they need a strong foundation of civility and good government, but they may not know how best to achieve it,” says Melissa Kuehne, ILG’s Leadership and Governance program manager. “At ILG, our objective is to help officials build that foundation, develop leadership skills, and increase public trust so they can achieve their goals.” Despite the challenging circumstances presented by COVID-19, partisan politics, and social media overload, local government leaders have the opportunity and the responsibility to enact change at the local level for the sake of their own communities. Most of us learned in elementary school how to treat one another with kindness and empathy. Now, as adults and leaders, we need to remember those critical life lessons to bring back civility to our halls of government and reverse the declining faith in democracy we’re witnessing today. ■

Civility is the antithesis of personal attacks, schoolyard insults, vicious innuendo, character assassination, and hate speech.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, December 2020

13


A Refresher on General Conflict-of-Interest Rules, continued from page 7

Business Investments. A public official has a financial interest in a business entity in which the official, their spouse, or the official’s dependent children — or anyone acting on their behalf — has invested $2,000 or more. Remember that if an official has an interest in a business entity, the official may also have an interest in parent, subsidiary, or otherwise related business entities. Business Employment or Management. A public official has a financial interest

in a business entity for which the official (but not the official’s spouse or dependent children) is a director, officer, partner, trustee, or employee or holds any position of management. Real Property. A public official has a financial interest in real property in which the official, their spouse, or the official’s dependent children — or anyone acting on their behalf — has invested $2,000 or more, and also in certain leasehold interests. If an official’s real property is

Public officials have a number of resources available to assist them in navigating the Political Reform Act and other ethical issues.

near the subject area of a decision (usually within 500–1,000 feet), the official should consult agency counsel. Sources of Income. A public official has a financial interest in any source, whether an individual or an organization, from whom the official has received (or from whom the official has been promised) $500 or more in income within 12 months prior to the decision about which the official is concerned. When thinking about sources of income, keep in mind that an official has a community property interest in the income of their spouse and thus the spouse’s income may also be a source of income for the official. Also keep in mind that if a public official, their spouse, or the official’s dependent children own 10 percent or more of a business, it may be considered to be receiving “pass-through” income from

with

BUILD BETTER BUILD SAFER BUILD The Laborers’ International Union of North America (LIUNA) partners with public and private entities, elected officials, community groups, and responsible contractors to safely build and maintain the infrastructure needs of communities throughout California while providing residents a career in the construction industry even in uncertain times.

PEOPLE

PROJECTS

855-532-3879

14

League of California Cities

PARTNERSHIPS

www.LiUNAbuildsCA.org

www.cacities.org


the business’s clients and as a result may be considered a source of income for the public official. Furthermore, if an official receives income from a business entity, the official may also have an interest in parent, subsidiary, or otherwise related business entities. It is important to note, however, that salary and reimbursement for expenses received from a governmental agency are not considered “income.” Sources of Gifts. A public official has a financial interest in any source of a gift, whether an individual or an organization, who has given or promised to the official, his or her spouse, or the official’s dependent children gifts that total $500 or more within 12 months prior to the governmental decision about which the official is concerned. The gift limit is adjusted biennially by the Fair Political Practices Commission (FPPC). Personal Financial Effect. A public official has a financial interest in their personal finances and those of their immediate family. After a financial interest is identified, the FPPC provides a four-step test to determine if a conflict of interest exists that requires the public official to disqualify themself from the governmental decision.

www.westerncity.com

Are There Any Exceptions That Would Allow Me to Participate? Not all conflicts of interest prevent a public official from lawfully participating in a decision. A public official is not disqualified from a decision if a significant segment of the public is affected and the effect on the public official’s financial interest is not unique compared to the effect on the significant segment. In other words, if the effect of the decision on the public official’s financial interests is not different from the effect on the public generally, the public official may participate in the decision. Additionally, in certain circumstances, a public official may be randomly selected to take part in a decision if a quorum cannot be reached because too many officials are disqualified. There are also limited exceptions that would, among other things, allow a public official to participate as a member of the public, off the dais during the period of public comment about a matter related to their personal interests, such as their residence or wholly owned business. All of these exceptions are interpreted narrowly, and you should consult your agency’s counsel to confirm that the exceptions apply in your case.

What Should I Do if I Have a Disqualifying Conflict of Interest? As soon as a public official has determined that they have a disqualifying conflict of interest, they are prohibited from making, participating in making, or attempting to use their position to influence a governmental decision. Generally, a public official is making, participating in making, or using his or her position to influence a decision anytime the official takes any action to influence the decision — including directing a decision, voting, providing information or a recommendation, or contacting or appearing before any other agency official. Certain officials (including city council members, planning commissioners, and members of boards of supervisors) have a mandated manner in which they must disqualify themselves from decisions made at a public meeting (including closed session decisions). In that case, immediately prior to the consideration of the matter, the public official would publicly identify the financial interest that causes the conflict with sufficient detail (short of identifying a residence street address, which is not required) so that the continued on page 17

Western City, December 2020

15


J

O

B

O

P

P

O

R T

U

N

I

T

I

E

S

Display Advertising

Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City

Call Cici Trino, Association Outsource Services, at (916) 961-9999 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information, or email cicit@aosinc.biz.

Website Job Postings Display ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away. To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.westerncity.com or contact Savannah Cobbs, Western City administrative assistant; email: scobbs@ cacities.org; phone: (916) 658-8223.

magazine, it will be posted at no additional charge on our website.

New Opportunities!

For rates and deadlines,

Chief Human Resources Officer, East Bay Regional Park District, CA Director of Public Works, City of American Canyon, CA Human Resources Director, City of Hayward, CA Assistant City Manager, City of Santa Rosa, CA Planning Director, City of Westlake Village, CA City Attorney, City of Burlingame, CA City Clerk, City of Mountain View, CA City Manager, City of South Gate, CA Town Attorney, Town of Timnath, CO Fire Chief, City of Piedmont, CA

visit www.westerncity. com and click on the Advertise link.

The California Municipal Revenue Sources Handbook FIFTH EDITION

Please visit our website to learn more about our active searches:

Peckham & McKenney www.peckhamandmckenney.com

An essential resource for any official involved in local government finance in California. The handbook includes: • • • • • •

Data and charts Relevant history and issues Legal references Definitions of terms Capital financing and cost recovery A detailed guidance for calculating an agency’s Gann Appropriations Limit

The California Municipal Revenue Sources Handbook FIFTH EDITION

CITY OF PITTSBURG Pittsburg has been a city in progress for nearly a century and a half. Located at the point where the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers meet, Pittsburg is a city of both progress and promise. The next Finance Director will take charge at an challenging time for the City and the community as a whole due to the continued impact of COVID-19. An engaging and dynamic leader will be expected to take charge and help secure and guide the City’s stability into the future. An ability FINANCE financial to help complete key projects, continue Avery & Associates DIRECTOR staff development, and ensure financial William Management Consultants stability will be core to the success of this role. High levels of technical finance skills in all matters of municipal finance will be 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 vital for success in this role. As a department head the Finance Director will be expected to be a highly collaborative leader and 408.399.4424 key source of advice and guidance on the executive team. Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net

Michael Coleman

PURCHASE YOUR COPY TODAY www.cacities.org/publications

16

League of California Cities

The successful candidate will be an effective and seasoned public www.averyassoc.net sector manager and administrator who creates and maintains an environment of mutual respect and transparency with an ability to develop consensus and credibility though strong relationships. A strong background in budget, finance and administration is essential in this role. Experience as a Finance Director, Assistant or Deputy Finance Director of a complex public sector organization is required. A BS/BA in a related field is essential. To be considered, please visit our website at www.averyassoc.net/current-searches/ for a detailed job announcement and how to apply on the Avery Associates Career Portal.

www.cacities.org


A Refresher on General Conflict-of-Interest Rules, continued from page 15

J public understands the conflict, recuse themself from discussing and voting on the matter, and leave the room until after the matter is concluded. If the item is on that portion of the agenda reserved for uncontested matters such as the consent calendar, the official does not need to leave the room.

If I Come to the Meeting Late or Early, Do I Still Need to Disclose a Conflict? The FPPC recently made changes to the disqualification requirements in Regulation 18707 to close a loophole to prevent certain specified public officials from leaving a meeting early or arriving late to avoid disclosing a conflict of interest. If a public official leaves a meeting in advance of the agenda item in which the official is disqualified or joins a meeting after consideration of an agency item in which the official is disqualified, the official must publicly identify the agenda item and the financial interest after arriving at or prior to leaving the meeting.

What if I’m Not Sure if I Have a Conflict of Interest? Public officials have a number of resources available to assist them in navigating the Political Reform Act and other ethical issues. The League and the Institute for Local Government offer free training and various publications online. The FPPC also offers both informal and formal advice, online training, and publications. Finally, your agency’s counsel can also assist you in understanding whether you have a conflict of interest and the disclosure requirements. ■

Looking for Footnotes? For a fully footnoted version, read this article online at www.westerncity.com.

www.westerncity.com

O

B

O

P

P

O

R T

U

N

I

T

I

E

S

City of Orange Cove, California has the following positions available:

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS

The Director of Public Works must have 5 years of experience in administering public works functions and a BA in Civil Engineering or related field. Director will plan, organize, direct, coordinate and evaluates the activities of the Public Works Department which is comprised of the Water/Wastewater, Parks/Recreation, Animal Control, Streets, oversees the provision of departmental services to City residents; prepares, implements and evaluates capital improvement program and long-range infrastructure development plans; prepares and manages departmental budget; ensures compliance with regulatory requirements; provides technical assistance and liaison with City staff, developers, other agencies. Annual salary range is $90,000 – $110,000. Please fill out an employment application and email a copy of your resume to jvb@cityoforangecove. com. The Director of Public Works job description and employment application can be found on our website under Employment Opportunities. Position Open until filled.

CITY MANAGER

The City of Orange Cove is now accepting applications for the position of City Manager. Orange Cove is an agricultural community located in Fresno County about 34 miles east of the City of Fresno, CA. Qualified candidates should have prior experience as a City Administrator/Manager, Assistant/Deputy City Administrator/Manager, Department Director, or similar capacity. A bachelor’s degree in public or business administration or a related field is required and at least five (5) years of progressive management responsibility in municipal government is highly desirable. The City Council highly regards California experience and will also consider all viable out-of-state candidates provided the type and level of experience is in alignment with the City’s needs. Bilingual candidates are encouraged to apply. Annual Salary: $140,000. Recruitment is open until the position is filled.

POLICE CHIEF

The City of Orange Cove is seeking a Police Chief knowledgeable of current practices in the management of municipal Police Departments; principles of supervision and has the ability to direct the City Police Department. Applicants must submit an original City of Orange Cove application; No late or faxed applications will be accepted. Postmarks are not accepted. Resumes and/or related certificates may accompany but do not substitute for City of Orange Cove application & required material. Starting Salary up to $120,000. Experience: Candidate must have a B.A. and extensive experience in a public law enforcement agency including both operational and administrative assignments, public agency budgeting, organization and planning. Send or email resume and application to Attention June V. Bracamontes, City Clerk, Orange Cove City Hall, 633 Sixth St. Orange Cove, CA 93646. Email jvb@cityoforangecove.com

Photo/art credits Pages 5–6: Courtesy of the City of Rancho Cucamonga Page 7: Imamember Pages 8–10: Courtesy of the City of Norwalk

Page 13: Both images, Stephen Coburn/Shutterstock.com Page 15: DNY59

Western City, December 2020

17


We’re gra Wishing you he City of Lomita, CA – Community & Economic Development Director The City of Lomita is an energetic and engaged community of approximately 20,000. Team Lomita is committed to providing a healthy, safe, and friendly small-town community where everyone can successfully live, work, and play, and is has established visions and plans for future growth and development to make that a reality. The City is now seeking a Community & Economic Development Director help build and implement that vision. A highly motivated, innovative, and results-driven individual is sought. The ideal candidate will be a strategic thinker and creative problem solver with the ability and confidence to build and lead a strong team in support of the City’s efforts to proactively identify and address issues on an array of topics related to Community and Economic Development. The position requires excellent communication skills and someone who is experienced in having interaction with the City Council, commissions, civic groups, and the general public, and is confident translating and conveying the City’s vision. The individual will quickly become a part of Team Lomita and be able to work well within a face paced, friendly environment. Candidates must possess a minimum of five (5) years of progressively responsible fulltime work-related experience, with at least two years of supervisory experience. A Bachelor’s degree from a recognized four-year college or university in a related field is required; a Master’s degree is desirable. The monthly salary range for the Community & Economic Development Director is $10,338 - $12,807; placement within this range is dependent upon qualifications. Contact: Ms. Carmen Valdez (916) 784-9080, Filing Deadline: December 22, 2020

City of Milpitas, CA – Finance Director Located at the southern tip of the San Francisco Bay, Milpitas is a progressive community that is an integral part of the Silicon Valley. With a diverse resident population of 80,430, the City of Milpitas sees each of the approximate 432 full-time equivalent employees as committed to accomplishing the community’s vision by providing fiscally sound, superior services. The City of Milpitas is seeking an experienced finance professional with significant leadership experience in a diverse and complex organization. It is expected that the new Director will be well-balanced in all areas of municipal finance, will have excellent oral, written, and presentation skills as well as political acumen. Experience with enterprise resource planning and related activities is desirable. Candidates must possess at least seven (7) years of professional experience in finance or an approved related field, at least three (3) years of which shall have been in a management capacity. A Bachelor’s degree in business or public administration, accounting, finance, economics, or a related discipline is required; a master’s degree is preferred. A CPA is desirable. The bi-weekly salary range for the Finance Director is $6,612.72 up to $9,257.07; placement within this range is dependent upon qualification and experience. Contact: Ms. Valerie Phillips (916) 784-9080 Filing Deadline: December 15, 2020


ateful for the opportunity to connect today and transform tomorrow. ealth & happiness through the holidays and into the coming new year.

City of Alameda, CA Police Chief

City of Roseville, CA Police Chief

City of Gridley, CA City Administrator

City of Sonoma, CA City Manager

Napa County, CA Assistant Auditor-Controller

City of South Pasadena, CA City Manager

If you are interested in these outstanding opportunities, visit our website to apply online.

www.bobmurrayassoc.com


P

R

O

F

E

S

S

I

O

N

A

L

S

E

R V

I

C

E

S

D

I

R

E

C

T O

R Y

Specializes in Executive Search

Sherrill Uyeda Cindy Krebs 1 Centerpointe Drive, Suite 440 La Palma, CA 90623 T: (562) 901-0769 F: (562) 901-3082 www.allianceRC.com http://twitter.com/Alliancerc facebook/Alliance Resource Consulting LLC

William Avery & Associates, Inc. Labor Relations / Executive Search / Human Resources Consulting 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

SPECIALISTS IN CLASSIFICATION, JOB EVALUATION AND COMPENSATION

Bobbi C. Peckham • Phil McKenney

Peckham&McKenney www.peckhamandmckenney.com

Roseville, CA

866.912.1919

5663 Balboa Ave., #399, San Diego, CA 92111-2705 915 L Street, #C-102, Sacramento, CA 95814 Brentwood Village, 149 S. Barrington Ave., #726, Los Angeles, CA 90049-2950 1-888-522-7772 • www.compensationconsulting.com Offices in various major cities

Contact: Allan Crecelius or Sandra Comrie

12707 High Bluff Dr., Ste 200 San Diego, CA 92130 Tel 858.259.3800 fax 858.792.7465 acrecelius@rewardstrategy.com

Exceeding clients’ expectations since 1987. Classification | Compensation Special Surveys | Performance Management

20

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


P

R

O

F

E

S

S

I

O

N

A

L

S

E

R V

I

C

E

S

WRITTEN TESTS Over 70 stock tests available for jobs in public agencies.

D

I

R

E

C

T O

R Y

Building Partnerships

Building & Fire Life Safety Planning | Public Works | Engineering

Toll Free (877) 22-EXAMS exams@donnoe.com www.donnoe.com

Construction Management Post-Disaster Development Recovery 4LEAFINC.COM

HF&H   CONSULTANTS, LLC 

POWERFUL SOLUTIONS, PROVEN RESULTS

Managing Tomorrow’s Resources Today 

Sales Tax

Property Tax

Business Tax

Economic Development

Cannabis Consulting

Software

Lodging Tax and Short Term Rentals

888.861.0220 | hdlcompanies.com

HELPING LOCAL GOVERNMENT LEADERS

managementpartners.com Budget Strategies ∙ Service Sharing Organization Analysis ∙ Performance Management Process Improvement ∙ Strategic Planning Executive Recruitment ∙ Facilitation/Team Building

E XPERIENCE , T ALENT , COMMITMENT TO PUBLIC SERVICE San Jose ∙ Orange County ∙ Cincinnati ∙ 408-437-5400

Helping local governments have successful   recycling, solid waste, water, wastewater, and  stormwater services for more than 30 Years 

 SB 1383 Compliance   Financial/Rates   Stormwater Funding   Management   Regulatory Compliance   Litigation Support  www.hfh‐consultants.com   Walnut Creek  (925) 977‐6960 

Irvine (949) 251‐8628 

matrix consulting group 1650 S. AMPHLETT BLVD., SUITE 213 SAN MATEO, CA 94402 650.858.0507 • www.matrixcg.net Offices in CA, AZ, IL, MA, NC, OR & TX

Management and operations studies Feasibility studies User fees and cost allocation Police • Fire • Public Works • Utilities Parks & Recreation • Administration Planning & Building

Your Public Agency Investment Solution CalTRUST provides CA public agencies, efficient, convenient, and professionally managed investment solutions.

CALTRUST.ORG │ (888) 225-8787

Sponsored by the League of California Cities

www.westerncity.com

Western City, December 2020

21


Profile for Western City Magazine

Western City December 20202  

Advertisement