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The Monthly Magazine of the League of California Cities速

San Rafael Makes Sustainability a Priority p.9 Elk Grove Rain Garden Plaza Showcases Water Conservation p.17 Product Stewardship Saves Money, Creates Jobs & Reduces Waste p.16

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Thank you to all of the 2014 League Partners

Platinum ($15,000+) 1,2

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1,2 BUILDING AMERICA®

Gold ($10,000+) California Apartment Association Hanson Bridgett LLP1,2 JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Lewis Investment Company2 Liebert Cassidy Whitmore1 Meyers Nave1,2

Silver ($5,000+) AMR2 Charles Abbott Associates2 California & Nevada IBEW/ NECA Labor-Management Cooperation Trust California Grocers Association2 California Restaurant Association DW Development2

Dart Container Corp.2 ecoATM Goldfarb & Lipman LLP Greenwaste Recovery Inc.2 Interwest Consulting Group Inc. Kronick Moskovitz Tiedemann & Girard1 Merlone Geier2

Advanced Disposal2 Alvarez-Glasman & Colvin2 Amador Valley Industries2 American Forest & Paper Association Atkins Best Way Disposal2 CMTC CalPortland2 Carpenter/Robbins Commercial Real Estate Inc. Cerrell Associates Colantuono & Levin2

CORE Public Affairs2 Desert Valley Medical Group Inc./Prime Healthcare2 E&J Gallo2 Edgewood Partners Insurance Center Fortis Quay Inc. Fulbright & Jaworski GDQ Law2 Garaventa Enterprises2 Geo-Logic Associates2 Hill International2

Accretive Realtors2 AndersonPenna Partners Inc.2 Architects Orange2 Ashwood Construction Athens Services2 Avery Associates2 Berliner Cohen Blue Line Transfer Inc.2 Bowlby Group Inc.2 CARE2 CR&R2 California Consulting2 California Debt and Investment Advisory Commission California Hotel & Lodging Association

Renne Sloan Holtzman Sakai LLP1,2 Republic Services Inc.2 Sherwin-Williams Young Homes2

NBS Northrop Grumman The Olson Company2 Prometheus Real Estate Group Inc.2 San Manuel Band of Mission Indians2 Schiff Hardin LLP

Bronze ($3,000+)

California Refuse Recycling Council Calimesa Chamber of Commerce2 City Ventures2 Civil Engineering Associates2 Classic Communities2 Climatec2 Cost Control Associates Inc. Cunningham Davis2 Desert Valleys Builders2 Diamond Hills Auto2 DiMare Van Vleck & Brown LLC Dokken Engineering2

Holliday Rock Company Jefferies LLC Library Systems & Services LLC Marin Sanitary Service2 Michael & Robinson LLP Molycorp2 Bob Murray & Associates PARS/Phase II2 Pacific Rail2 Piper Jaffray2 Psomas2

Basic ($1,000+)

Emanuels Jones and Associates Fard Engineers2 Fresno Police Officers Association GHD Inc.2 Gresham Savage Nolan & Tilden PC Innisfree Ventures2 J.R. Roberts/Deacon Inc. Jamboree Housing Corporation Jones Hall2 Jones & Mayer Kasdan Simonds Riley & Vaughan LLP LaBarge Industries2

Join the Partners Program Today! Contact Mike Egan | (916) 658-8271 | egan@cacities.org

ServPro2 Tribal Alliance of Sovereign Indian Nations2 US Bank Union Bank2 Vavrinek Trine Day & Company LLP Western Tropical Development2 Willdan James Ramos2 Recology2 Robson Homes LLC2 San Bernardino County Safety Employees2 San Bernardino Police Officers Association Santa Ynez Band of Mission Indians2 Schneider Electric2 Stradling Yocca Carlson & Rauth SummerHill Homes2 Urban Futures2

Livermore Sanitation2 Marchetti Construction Inc.2 Morley Brothers LLC2 Kevin Mullin for Assembly2 Murphy Rearson Bradley & Feeny Napa Recycling2 Potential Industries Rabobank2 Rancho San Gorgonio2 Riverside Construction2 San Mateo County Association of Realtors2 Santa Monica Police Officers Association Severn Trent Environmental2 Seifel Consulting Inc.

Sobrato Organization2 Specialty Solid Waste & Recycling2 Studio T SQ2 Swinerton Management Townsend Public Affairs Inc.2 TREH Development2 Tripepi Smith & Associates2 Van Scoyoc Associates2 Vali Cooper & Associates Inc. Waste Management2 West Builders2

Partial list as of 6/1/2014

1 – Institute for Local Government supporter 2 – CITIPAC supporter


CONTENTS 2 Calendar of League Events 3 Executive Director’s Message Why Home Rule Is the Birthright of California’s Cities

By Chris McKenzie

Local control, or home rule, provides  the foundation for city governance. This article examines the state’s history and the Legislature’s tradition of meddling in local affairs.

6 City Forum

2014 Annual Conference & Expo Offers New Sessions and Exciting Additions

Beacon Award-Winner 9 

San Rafael Makes Sustainability a Priority

7 News from the Institute for Local Government

Be a Beacon: The Power Of Recognition  The Beacon Award program, a catalyst for innovative and effective solutions, addresses climate change at the local level and informs the community about these activities.

Saving with U.S. Communities is fast, easy and free.

Product Stewardship 16 

Saves Money, Creates Jobs and Reduces Waste

By Heidi Sanborn and Gretchen Olsen

 he law that established CaliforT nia’s landmark waste hierarchy of “reduce, reuse and recycle” led to collaborative efforts and the concept of product stewardship.

By Anna Swanson

The 2014 League of California Cities Annual Conference & Expo includes many new features and opportunities for attendees.

By Karalee Browne

San Rafael has focused on sustainable land use by preserving open space, encouraging mixed-use infill development and adopting green building requirements. Now its community is actively reducing greenhouse gas emissions, conserving energy and more.

Piece of cake

California Cities Helen Putnam 17  Award for Excellence

Elk Grove Rain Garden Plaza Showcases Water Conservation

 public project demonstrates A sustainable stormwater management practices and offers an educational, inviting space.

Job Opportunities 20 

SAVINGS EFFICIENCY VALUE In just two minutes, register and become one of the 55,000 agencies already saving. With U.S. Communities, you can have your cake and eat it too.

League of California Cities Annual Conference & Expo Grand Prize WIN $3,000 TO BE USED ON ANY CONTRACT THROUGH U.S. COMMUNITIES Visit Expo Booth 622

Professional Services 26  Directory

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On the Record

 over Photo: City of San Rafael C by Yvonne Hunter

If you could change one thing about the way the Legislature functions, what would it be?

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President José Cisneros Treasurer San Francisco

1400 K Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200 Fax (916) 658-8240

Second Vice President Katherine Miller Council Member Stockton

Immediate Past President Bill Bogaard Mayor Pasadena

Executive Director Chris McKenzie

For a complete list of the League board of directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

leaguevents

Magazine Staff Editor in Chief Jude Hudson, Hudson + Associates (916) 658-8234 email: editor@westerncity.com

JULY

Managing Editor Eva Spiegel (916) 658-8228 email: espiegel@cacities.org

17 – 18

Board of Directors’ Meeting, Monterey The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

Advertising Sales Manager Pam Maxwell-Blodgett (916) 658-8256 email: maxwellp@cacities.org

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Administrative Assistant Anita Lopez (916) 658-8223 email: alopez@cacities.org

Police Civil Liability Issues Under State and Federal Law, Webinar This webinar will provide an important and timely overview of police civil liability issues for cities and police officers, including common claims and effective defenses. In addition to the threshold element of duty, the webinar will cover claims for improper detention, arrest, search and use of force.

Contributors Dan Carrigg Yvonne Hunter Lorraine Okabe Melissa Kuehne Jason Rhine Anna Swanson

SEPTEMBER 3

Policy Committee Meetings, JW Marriott Los Angeles The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors.

Associate Editors Jim Carnes Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker

Legal Advocacy Committee Meeting, JW Marriott Los Angeles The committee reviews and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of significant statewide interest to California cities.

Design Taber Creative Group Advertising Design ImagePoint Design

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For photo credits, see page 21. Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

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Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2014 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume XC, No. 7.

League of California Cities 2014 Annual Conference & Expo, Los Angeles Convention Center This conference offers dozens of educational sessions, numerous professional development opportunities, hundreds of exhibits and a chance to participate in the League’s policy-making activities at the Annual Business Meeting.

Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org/events. For the latest information on League conferences and events, follow us on Twitter @CaCitiesLearn. For legislative and policy updates and more, follow @CaCities. Follow Western City @WesternCityMag. Join us on Facebook. www.facebook.com/westerncity www.facebook.com/LeagueofCaCities

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First Vice President Tony Ferrara Mayor Arroyo Grande

League of California Cities

Did You Miss the June Issue? Read it online at www.westerncity.com www.cacities.org


Executive Director’s Message by Chris McKenzie

Why Home Rule Is the

Birthright of California’s Cities

O

ur federal system of government was designed with a touch of genius, particularly with regard to the sometimes elegant — and at other times unclear — allocation of authority among the federal, state and local levels of government. The U.S. Constitution addresses the balance of power between the federal and state governments, and substantial authority is retained for the states in the 10th Amendment, which reads: “[t]he powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people.” Similarly, the constitutions of the 50 states define the balance of power between the states and their local governments. Each state does it differently, but the evolution of the constitutional framework for this relationship affects the capacity of cities today to govern their own affairs without unnecessary legislative interference.

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Cities Preceded Statehood When California became a state in 1850, municipal governments had already long existed. Many were led by local officials called alcaldes, whose positions were a holdover from Mexico’s rule of California, which formally ended in February 1848. Alcaldes embodied the role of mayor, judge and sheriff, at times presiding over regions that today are more akin to counties in size. In other cases, according to The Constitutions of California and the United States with Related Documents, town councils consisted “of not more than six magistrates (alcaldes), 12 councilmen (regidores) and two clerks (sindicas) … The Americans, after the occupation of California in 1846, revived the alcalde system. Wherever a group of Americans collected, they proceeded to elect an American alcalde who served as an adjuster of disputes and an administrator of the few local regulations.” Farther to the north where there was less residual Mexican government influence at

the local level (and fewer people until the Gold Rush), cities like San Francisco established a type of legislative assembly more commonly found in the eastern states to adopt local laws that functioned for a period of time. However, in June 1849 American military Governor Bennett Riley called the first California constitutional convention and declared these local assemblies illegal.

New State Meddles in Municipal Affairs The 48 delegates to the first constitutional convention in 1849 were born in 22 different states and nations, including Ireland, Spain, France, Scotland and Switzerland. Only seven were born in California, and all seven had Spanish surnames. The 48 delegates brought with them many governmental traditions and constitutional models. The first state Constitution they produced in 1849 gave the new Legislature the exclusive power to establish cities and to enlarge or restrict city powers.

continued

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Why Home Rule Is the Birthright of California’s Cities, continued

Under the new Constitution, municipal corporations did not come into existence without formal incorporation approval from the Legislature and governor, which required extraordinary effort and influence. Shortly after the first Legislature met in December 1849, bills were introduced for the incorporation of Sacramento (where voters had approved a city charter two months earlier) and Los Angeles. Governor Peter H. Burnett initially vetoed both bills; he wanted restrictions on the new cities’ taxation powers and a uniform procedure for cities’ incorporation. The Legislature overrode these vetoes a short time later, but the governor ultimately got his wish. The Legislature passed a uniform law for the incorporation of cities (settlements with more than 2,000 residents) and a separate one for towns. Soon after that the Legislature approved the incorporation of Sonoma, Los Angeles and Santa Barbara under the new general

law but also passed special incorporation laws for Benicia, San Diego, San Jose, Monterey and San Francisco. The Legislature’s early dominance over cities quickly led to abuses and calls for reforms. For example, the Legislature actually appointed special commissions much like receivers to manage the municipal property and funds of Sacramento, San Jose and San Francisco. The commissioners had the extraordinary ability to disallow or nullify claims against these cities by private individuals. In addition, legislation directed cities to finance the construction of railroads or pay special claims of parties that provided “political inducements” to the Legislature.

All Cities Granted Constitutional Home-Rule Power in 1879 State meddling in city affairs during those first 30 years caused growing resentment throughout California among both city

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leaders and private creditors whose claims were scaled down or disallowed. Their outrage resulted in pressure for a second constitutional convention. The Legislature tried on three occasions to call a second constitutional convention (in 1859, 1860 and 1873), but it wasn’t until 1877 — at the height of a national depression — that the voters approved calling a constitutional convention. The proposed revisions to the Constitution restricted the Legislature’s power to make gifts of public funds and use tax funds for nonpublic institutions except orphanages and homes for the aging. They also directed the Legislature to regulate the sale of corporate stock, limit the amounts charged by telegraph and gas companies and to impose other limitations on private businesses. The convention delegates also were determined to liberate municipal corporations from the legislative micromanagement that existed during the first 30 years of statehood. Relying extensively on Missouri’s state Constitution, which was the first to include “home-rule” authorization for cities, the delegates incorporated those provisions almost verbatim, banned special legislation, prohibited special act incorporations and granted voters the power to adopt “freeholder” charters in cities with at least 100,000 people. In addition to these changes, the most significant home-rule element in the 1879 amendments appeared in Article XI, section 11 (now section 7), which provides a general grant of inherent home-rule power to every city — with or without a charter — to “make or enforce within its limits all local, police, sanitary and other ordinances or regulations not in conflict with the general laws.” The California Supreme Court declared later in People v. Hoge (1880) that the drafters’ intent was to emancipate municipal governments from the authority and control formerly exercised over them by the Legislature. This amendment finally freed cities from seeking specific state legislation to authorize their legislative acts on traditional municipal matters. Because the state Constitution empowered them to act without the Legislature’s prior

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The Legislature’s early dominance over cities quickly led to abuses and calls for reforms. permission, cities instead simply had to inquire whether a proposed ordinance “conflicted” with a general state law. Years later the California Court of Appeals described the effect of this amendment: “[t]he Constitution has, by direct grant, vested in them [cities] plenary power to provide and enforce such … regulations as they determine shall be necessary for the health, peace, comfort and happiness of their inhabitants, provided such regulations do not conflict with the general law.” Over the past 135 years this significant grant of plenary home-rule authority to all cities (charter and noncharter cities) has been the subject of many California courts’ opinions. What constitutes a “conflict” between a city ordinance and a general state law has at times been a moving target depending on the home-rule views of the individual justices on the California Supreme Court, but the basic analysis is fundamentally unchanged — as demonstrated by the recent case of City of Riverside v. Inland Empire Patients Health and Wellness Center, Inc. In that 2013 opinion upholding the validity of an ordinance of a charter city to ban medical marijuana dispensaries and cultivation, the California Supreme Court said a city’s traditional land-use authority arises from its inherent police power under Article XI, section 7, and not from a statutory authorization by the Legislature. Further, without a clear indication of legislative intent to pre-empt, the court said it will conclude there is not a conflict. Moreover, a local regulation is not in conflict with a general state law unless it duplicates, contradicts or enters an area fully occupied by general law, either expressly or by legislative implication.

Additional Home-Rule Authority Over “Municipal Affairs” Granted In 1896 and again in 1914 California voters amended the Constitution to expand cities’ home-rule powers to enact ordinances on matters concerning “municipal affairs” independent of general laws in what is now section 5 of the state Constitution’s Article XI. This additional grant of plenary authority to “charter cities” over municipal affairs includes but is not limited to their police force, conduct of city elections, compensation of city officials and employees, procedures for initiative and referendum, city contracts and financing public improvements. This grant of plenary authority gives charter cities independence from the state except on matters of “statewide concern” (such as traffic and vehicle regulation, eminent domain and so on).

The Rest of the Story Much legal and political history remains to be written about the home-rule powers of California cities. While city attorneys know the California Supreme Court has not always been consistent in its treatment of these grants of inherent and plenary powers to cities in the state Constitution, the court’s recent decisions in cases dealing with medical marijuana and prevailing wages on city-financed projects demonstrate the continued vitality of these constitutional grants. Cities would be wise to use this authority regularly and refrain from waiting for legislative authorization to act. As indicated earlier, in the absence of a conflict with a general state law, a city council has the same power to enact a city ordinance without state legislative authorization as it does with it. Why would cities fail to use such a fundamental attribute of home rule? ■

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Looking for Footnotes? For a fully footnoted version, read this article online at www.westerncity.com.

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2014 Annual Conference & Expo Offers New Sessions and Exciting Additions by Anna Swanson City officials express their enthusiasm at the 2013 League of California Cities Annual Conference & Expo.

The 2014 League of California Cities Annual Conference & Expo will be held at the Los Angeles Convention Center, Wednesday, Sept. 3 through Friday, Sept. 5. The conference will include numerous new features. If you haven’t yet registered for the conference, sign up online now at www.cacities.org/AC.

Keynote Speakers Political theorist and author Benjamin R. Barber will open the conference with a thought-provoking discussion titled “If Mayors Ruled the World,” which examines the benefits of collaborating and establishing support networks among city officials. You will leave the keynote address on Wednesday feeling inspired and ready to take advantage of the opportunities that this sessionpacked conference offers. On Thursday, join keynote speaker Michael Pritchard to hear his talk on “TEAM: Together, Everyone and Anyone Matters.” Pritchard will address how collaboration, cooperation and connectivity comprise the building blocks of a thriving community and workforce.

Tours Provide Insights Into City’s Watershed, Transit and Emergency Operations Issues Three unique tours will be offered from 9:00 a.m. to noon on Wednesday, Sept. 3, prior to the Opening General Session, to explore three completely different aspects of the City of Los Angeles. “Explore the Historic Los Angeles River” allows attendees to examine some of the river’s key restoration sites in a guided van and walking tour and experience a whole new side of Los Angeles. “Blast Off With the Space Shuttle Endeavour” gives participants a look at the story behind the California Science Center. This tour (which is nearly sold out) also provides an opportunity to experience firsthand how more Angelenos get around by using the city’s light-rail system. The walking tour “Be Prepared at the Emergency Operations Center” showcases how LA’s first responders work around the clock using the latest technology to ensure that the city is prepared for — and defended against — natural and manmade disasters. Tours have limited space available. Register online at www.cacities.org/AC.

Pre-Conference Sessions This year’s conference registration will include the option of AB 1234 training for attendees. State law requires elected and appointed officials to receive training in specified ethics laws and principles every two years. Newly elected and appointed officials must receive this training within one year of becoming a public servant. This lively two-hour session offers real-life examples and practical advice on avoiding potential pitfalls associated with holding local office. Prior to the Opening General Session, a number of sessions will be offered on topics such as sustainability and customer service. Look for more information on these sessions next month in Western City’s annual conference preview.

Leadership Tracks Your colleagues have developed leadership tracks to guarantee that sessions are tailored to the needs of various League professional departments. These tracks include content designed for city attorneys, fire chiefs and human resources professionals. In addition, the League Partners also offer a leadership track. Attendees are welcome to attend any professional track of interest, and no additional registration is required.

Stay Tuned for More Information These new features will complement the many traditional aspects that city officials and staff value and anticipate at the 2014 League of California Cities Annual Conference & Expo. Register online for the conference at www.cacities.org/AC, and watch for more details in the August issue of Western City. ■

Anna Swanson is conference marketing coordinator for the League and can be reached at aswanson@cacities.org.

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League of California Cities

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News from the Institute for Local Government

BE A BEACON: The Power of Recognition From an early age, we learn that every choice has a consequence. We also learn that not all consequences are negative — hard work and perseverance can pay off with good grades, winning scores and successful careers. For the 59 cities and counties in California that have chosen to participate in the Beacon Award: Local Leadership Toward Solving Climate Change, the consequences of their choices and actions have proved quite positive for them and the communities they serve. Since its inception in 2010 the Beacon Award program has served as a catalyst for innovative and effective solutions addressing climate change at the local level and for informing the community about these activities. The program honors local governments’ voluntary efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, save energy and adopt policies and programs that promote sustainability. In addition to the annual awards ceremony, online feature videos and articles in Western City, the Beacon Award program provides participating local agencies with support services, webinars and small group discussions at conferences and online. The program offers a unique opportunity to recognize the hard work of elected officials, staff and community members by celebrating local sustainability efforts.

Making Measurement Meaningful The Beacon Award program rewards teamwork and makes the sometimes unglamorous process of data collection meaningful. Participants in the program receive valuable support and encouragement from Institute for Local Government (ILG) staff and its energy utility

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partners. The team helps local agencies collect and organize data in an effort to understand how sustainability practices influence local efforts to conserve energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To participate in the Beacon Award program, a city or county must sign up, and its city council or board of supervisors must pass a resolution endorsing its participation. Typically, a participating community already has a climate action plan and greenhouse gas inventory in place or is implementing sustainability activities. The Beacon Award program focuses on three areas of accomplishment: greenhouse gas emissions reduction, energy efficiency and 10 best practices. Within each area, a community can earn Beacon Spotlight awards — silver, gold and platinum — based on its level of achievement. To win a Beacon Award, participating agencies are required to complete specific activities related to energy savings, greenhouse gas reduction and sustainability best practices. “It helps create a framework to build upon past work and to measure future progress through a straightforward process,” says Chula Vista Mayor Cheryl Cox. “The Beacon Award program is an opportunity to exchange ideas and lessons learned.”

Sharing Models of Innovation Local agencies participating in the Beacon Award program benefit from the innovation of other participants by learning best practices via webinars, conference sessions and informal information exchanges. ILG’s updated Sustainability Best Practices Framework (www.ca-ilg.org/sustainability-best-practices-framework) incorporates

the activities of Beacon participants. As a result, the framework offers cities and counties a variety of activities and programs that differ in complexity and can be easily adapted to fit the unique needs and circumstances of individual communities.

Celebrating Success The City of San Rafael was recognized with the first-ever Beacon Award at the League of California Cities 2013 Annual Conference & Expo (for more about San Rafael’s work, see page 9). Thirty-three other Beacon participants received Spotlight Awards for demonstrated achievements in energy efficiency, greenhouse gas reduction and sustainability best practice activities. Who will be honored this year? Will it be your community? ■

About the Beacon Award The Beacon Award program is sponsored by the Institute for Local Government and the Statewide Energy Efficiency Collaborative (SEEC). It is funded by California utility customers and administered by Southern California Gas Company, San Diego Gas & Electric Company, Pacific Gas and Electric Company and Southern California Edison under the auspices of the California Public Utilities Commission. For additional stories and more information about how to participate in the Beacon Award program visit www.ca-ilg.org/Bea conAward. For information about SEEC, visit http://californiaseec.org.

Western City, July 2014

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Beacon Award-Winn

Sustainabilit by Karalee Browne

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League of California Cities


ner San Rafael Makes

ty a Priority In 2010 the City of San Rafael became the first participant in the sustainability recognition program known as the Beacon Award: Local Leadership Toward Solving Climate Change. Three years later San Rafael won the first Beacon Award. The League recognized San Rafael’s silver-level accomplishments at the 2013 League of California Cities Annual Conference & Expo. The city’s achievements included: • Agency greenhouse gas reductions of 19.2 percent (2005 to 2010); • Community greenhouse gas reductions of 8.1 percent (2005 to 2010); • Agency electricity savings of 5 percent; • Outstanding efforts to promote energy efficiency in the community; and • Participation in 35 activities in the Institute for Local Government’s 10 Sustainability Best Practice Areas.

The Formula for Success San Rafael’s sustainability efforts are rooted in environmental protection and began in the early 1980s when it was first recognized as a Tree City USA, which is part of a national urban forestry program. Today the city has more than 54,000 street trees and adds 40 street trees a year to its green canopy. San Rafael has built a strong track record over the years in sustainable land use by preserving hillsides as open space, restoring and expanding wetlands, encouraging mixed-use infill development and adopting green building requirements. To answer the question of how the City of San Rafael won the first-ever Beacon Award, one must look to its culture and willingness to consider and apply innovative solutions to a range of community concerns. The city’s elected officials, staff and residents foster a relationship based on mutual respect and cooperation. Its components include open communication between elected officials and the continued Karalee Browne is a program coordinator for the Institute for Local Government’s Sustainability program and can be reached at kbrowne@ca-ilg.org.

the Beacon Award Program Celebrates local achievements A statewide program sponsored by the Institute for Local Government and the Statewide Energy Efficiency Collaborative, the Beacon Award program recognizes California cities and counties that are voluntarily working to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, save energy and adopt policies and programs that promote sustainability. The program features two types of awards: The Beacon Award recognizes an agency’s comprehensive approach to addressing climate change. To win a silver, gold or platinum Beacon Award, participating agencies must complete specific, measurable achievements in six areas. The Beacon Spotlight Award recognizes the accomplishments of cities and counties participating in the program as they work to complete the requirements necessary to win a Beacon Award. Cities and counties are honored with silver, gold and/or platinum Beacon Spotlight Awards for undertaking sustainability activities in 10 best practice areas and for achieving measurable energy and greenhouse gas reductions. To learn more about the Beacon Award program, see page 7; for additional program information and details on San Rafael’s activities, visit www.ca-ilg.org/BeaconAward.

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Beacon Award-Winner San Rafael Makes Sustainability a Priority, continued

community, ongoing education and high expectations. San Rafael epitomizes community-based planning. Engaged residents and businesses work with city staff and elected officials to examine constraints and opportunities as well as the short-term gains and long-term impacts of decision-making. The leaders focus on the big picture but take an incremental approach, partnering with the community to minimize the risks and costs associated with innovation. As a result, the community has a clear vision and a comprehensive strategy, which recognizes that one solution or approach can provide numerous benefits and address multiple problems. The city’s leadership on conservation and environmental issues has attracted open-minded, forward-thinking residents who respect the environment and are committed to participating in efforts to preserve it.

San Rafael’s transit center provides a hub for commuters and reduces the number of vehicles on the roads, thus reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


San Rafael’s full-time sustainability coordinator, located in the City Manager’s Office, supports a network of committees, teams and partners that help prioritize and implement the sustainability initiatives. The coordinator assists in facilitating three teams: 1. The Employee Green Team includes staff from each city department. It meets monthly and develops activities to encourage staff or influence city operations to be more sustainable in the areas of waste reduction, recycling, water conservation, energy conservation and purchasing; 2. The Employee Commute Program Committee encourages staff to reduce single-occupant commutes by carpooling, biking and using transit; and

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3. The City Council Subcommittee on Sustainability includes two council members who help set policy direction and prioritize staff time and projects related to the city’s adopted Climate Action Plan. The efforts of these teams culminate at the Climate Action Plan Update Forum, a quarterly public meeting to update community members about and share resources toward implementing the city’s Climate Action Plan. These groups and meetings are carefully designed to be fun, interactive and substantive to keep the participants on track and motivated.

The Role of the Climate Action Plan “The danger of plans is that they often sit on the shelf,” says Kate Colin, a San Rafael City Council member. “We are always asking ourselves, ‘Where do we want to take our community?’” San Rafael adopted its Climate Action Plan in 2009. The goals are to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 25 percent by 2020 and to achieve an ambitious 80 percent reduction by 2050. The city has made steady progress toward meeting its goals. continued

The community is San Rafael’s secret ingredient in its sustainability formula.

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Beacon Award-Winner San Rafael Makes Sustainability a Priority, continued

Between 2005 and 2010, the city reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 8.1 percent or 30,329 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalents. (A carbon dioxide equivalent is a term that translates different types of greenhouse gases into carbon dioxide, based on their climate-warming potential.) While the economic downturn and state policies contributed to these reductions, a significant drop resulted from local efforts to conserve energy and water, reduce vehicle miles traveled and divert waste from landfills. To implement its Climate Action Plan, San Rafael relies on three guiding principles: 1. Maintain a steady pace. Whether resources are abundant or limited, San Rafael identifies a few achievable goals to implement each year from its long-term sustainability strategy. As a result, the city’s sustainability efforts remain consistent and achievable;

2. Borrow and share expertise and resources. From funding proposals to ordinance development, the city both shares and borrows expertise to help move projects forward. It relies on city staff and the community to take ownership of sustainability objectives and programs, thus expanding its expertise and resources; and 3. Cultivate and complement community-based programs. The city approaches sustainability as a communitywide effort — with its residents, businesses and local government all serving as equal and important partners. By following these guiding principles, San Rafael has achieved a number of remarkable milestones. The following examples illustrate the accomplishments that helped contribute to San Rafael’s success in the Beacon Award program.

These examples also describe the city’s plans to preserve its assets and create a more economically and environmentally sustainable community.

Converting Waste to Energy To complement its long-standing curbside recycling program, San Rafael implemented a curbside composting program in 2010. The city adopted a zero waste goal and strategic plan in 2011. The strategic plan includes a recycling and reuse ordinance that requires a minimum of 70 percent of construction and demolition waste be recycled rather than disposed in a landfill. This, in part, has resulted in waste being only 2 percent of the city’s total greenhouse gas emissions. The city is now partnering with its waste hauler, Marin Sanitary Service, and wastewater service provider, the Central Marin Sanitation Agency, on a

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League of California Cities

The Marin Sanitary Service’s pigs played an important role in San Rafael’s composting program in past years. Today they serve as mascots for the Recycling & Resource Recovery Center.

www.cacities.org


food waste-to-energy project. Pigs and peacocks have been on-site at the Recycling & Resource Recovery Center for years, naturally composting the extra food scraps brought into the facility, but now there’s a new machine in town. In 2014 the sanitation agency unveiled its new “big blue machine,” which processes 50 tons of commercial and residential food waste from the city’s restaurants and businesses, thus keeping it out of the landfill. The processed food is sent to the sewage treatment plant, where it is converted into biogas for use by the wastewater treatment plant. This allows the agency to use less natural gas at the plant, which results in a reduction of 1,723 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalents and a savings of approximately $350,000 per year. “Direct engagement is the key,” says Kim Scheibly, municipal contract and

communications manager for Marin Sanitary Service. “We really work with our customers to help them understand what they are becoming a part of.”

Focusing on Energy Efficiency From 2011 to 2013 San Rafael converted its traffic signals and 740 streetlights to light-emitting diodes (LEDs), which use approximately half of the electricity of the previous lights. The streetlight retrofit alone reduces energy usage by 189,500 kilowatt hours (kWh) each year, which saves the city approximately $24,000 annually. San Rafael funded the project through a no-interest loan from Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) and is paying it back over approximately five and a half years with the savings generated by the project.

“The danger of plans is that they often sit on the shelf,” says Kate Colin, a San Rafael City Council member.“We are always asking ourselves, ‘Where do we want to take our community?’ ”

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Beacon Award-Winner San Rafael Makes Sustainability a Priority, continued

The city replaced a chiller unit of its heating and air conditioning system at San Rafael City Hall in 2013. In addition to securing zero-interest on-bill financing, the city received a $10,000 rebate from PG&E for the project. It is expected to reduce energy use by 68,291 kWh and save 361 metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions annually.

Providing Renewable Energy Community choice aggregation programs offer a way for cities and counties to provide residents and businesses with electricity purchased from a third-party provider and delivered through existing distribution and transmission systems. San Rafael joined the Marin Energy Authority, California’s first community choice aggregation program, in 2010. As a result, 50 percent of the electricity for agency facilities (and most of the community) comes from renewable energy sources. The city plans to subscribe in the future to the authority’s Deep Green Program, which will provide 100 percent renewable energy for all San Rafael agency buildings and operations. San Rafael is currently leading an effort to help agencies in Marin, Napa and Sonoma

counties obtain discounts on purchasing solar photovoltaic arrays for municipal facilities through the Solar Sustainable Energy and Economic Development (SEED) Fund group-purchasing program. The program provides funding and technical assistance to participating agencies to help install solar at a discounted rate. Agencies that successfully complete projects will then return a portion of the savings back to the fund for development of future renewable energy initiatives. “Our short- and long-term goals are wedded,” says Cory Bytof, San Rafael’s Volunteer and Sustainability Program coordinator. “We are trying to create a cultural shift in the region by partnering with neighboring cities that may not have the opportunities or resources. It’s just a more efficient way of doing things.”

Adopting Green Building Standards This is not the first time San Rafael has promoted sustainable policies throughout the region. In 2007 San Rafael led a countywide effort to adopt green building standards for both new construction and remodeling projects. The model ordinance was considered one of California’s most rigorous at the time. Three years later

the new California Green Building Standards Code (CALGreen) was adopted, creating similar requirements throughout the state. True to its history of leadership, San Rafael adopted the voluntary option of the CALGreen Code, which requires more stringent green building measures that reduce the use of water and energy as well as the volume of waste going to landfills.

Addressing Emissions related to transportation Like many other California cities, San Rafael has an ongoing issue with traffic congestion. More than 60 percent of the city’s community greenhouse gas emissions and 40 percent of the agency’s emissions come from private vehicles driving on local roads and state Highway 101, which runs through the city. To address the emissions that the city government generates, it launched a creative employee commute campaign, offered an alternative four-day work schedule for some city employees and began encouraging employee carpools, ridesharing and bicycling to work. Since 2005 the city has seen a reduction of employee commuterelated vehicle miles traveled and has cut greenhouse gas emissions by 37 percent (or 499 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent.) In another effort to address greenhouse gas emissions from transportation, San Rafael is planning for two stations of the new Sonoma Marin Area Rail Transit (SMART) line that will be located in the city’s major employment areas. The SMART train, to be completed in 2016, is expected to reduce community greenhouse gas emissions by 180 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent. As a complement to the SMART stations, San Rafael is partnering with several transit agencies and other local jurisdictions to leverage transportation grants to develop bicycle and pedestrian paths into and throughout the city. When complete, the SMART project will include one of the longest, continuous bicycle and pedestrian pathway systems in the nation. continued on page 24

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


As part of the city’s innovative sustainability efforts, the San Rafael Fire Department’s Engine 51 uses solar panels on its roof to help provide power for the vehicle. Firefighter and Paramedic Nicholas Gonzalez-Pomo, left, and Fire Engineer Garrett Northern perform routine maintenance.

The city has made improvements to encourage biking and walking and adopted its Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan in 2011.

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Western City, July 2014

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Product Stewardship Saves Money, Creates Jobs and Reduces Waste by Heidi Sanborn and Gretchen Olsen Twenty-five years ago California passed a groundbreaking law, the Integrated Waste Management Act of 1989 (AB 939, Chapter 1095, Statutes of 1989), which required cities and counties to develop policies and programs to achieve a waste diversion rate of 50 percent or the maximum amount feasible by the year 2000. The law also established California’s landmark waste hierarchy of “reduce, reuse and recycle.” While working to achieve the law’s goals, local governments discovered two things: Recycling programs alone had not succeeded in adequately reducing the amount of waste generated, and the costs of managing waste were beyond their budgets. This led to collaborative efforts among local governments, the recycling industry and individuals to seek more

effective ways to achieve the law’s goals, which in turn led to the concept — and ultimately implementation — of product stewardship.

Reducing Waste and Costs Extended producer responsibility (EPR), or product stewardship, offers one policy strategy to reduce and reuse. EPR places

Consumers can now drop off unused paint at hundreds of retail locations statewide, making paint recycling much more convenient.

primary responsibility with the producer of a product, because only the producer can change product design and incorporate recycling costs into the price of the product. However, in the bigger picture, products are often designed to be disposable instead of recyclable or repairable and are overpackaged. Many products contain toxins, such as mercury in fluorescent lighting, or are dangerous like hypodermic needles, making them difficult and expensive to handle. If costs of managing hazardous products can be reduced for local government, the money could be better spent on other programs. This would move California closer to its 75 percent reduction goal for solid waste and help meet the 100 percent disposal ban on household hazardous wastes. continued on page 22

Heidi Sanborn is executive director of the California Product Stewardship Council (CPSC) and can be reached at Heidi@calpsc.org. Gretchen Olsen is the solid waste manager for the City of Stockton and can be reached at gretchen.olsen@stocktongov.com. For more information about CPSC, visit www.calPSC.org.

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


The rain garden includes a boardwalk and colorful elements to captivate visitors. More than 1,000 local elementary-school students hand-painted the ceramic tiles.

Elk Grove Rain Garden Plaza Showcases Water Conservation

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ome to nearly 160,000 residents in south Sacramento County, the City of Elk Grove has more than doubled in size since its incorporation in July 2000. Like many cities with growing populations, Elk Grove was increasingly concerned about preserving small urban open spaces, protecting water quality and promoting a healthy watershed. Recognizing that stormwater is a resource rather than a nuisance, the city developed a public project to demonstrate sustainable stormwater management practices. The project’s overarching goal was to use a small open space to: • Build community awareness about water conservation and watershed stewardship; and • Highlight what individuals can do to reduce pollutants flowing into the local creeks. The City of Elk Grove partnered with the Cosumnes Community Services District and an engineering firm to design and engineer a small lot adjacent to city hall with an educational emphasis on a sustainable approach to stormwater management. continued

The City of Elk Grove won the 2013 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence in the Planning and Environmental Quality category. For more about the award program, visit www.helenputnam.org.

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Western City, July 2014

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Elk Grove Rain Garden Plaza Showcases Water Conservation, continued

Making Water Conservation Educational and Fun The Rain Garden Plaza features a quarteracre rain garden with a dry well to enhance groundwater recharge, a paved plaza area composed primarily of pervious pavers that allow water to pass through, and a shaded picnic area that serves as a quiet community gathering place. The site uses California native droughtresistant plants to encourage sustainable landscaping, attract butterflies, birds and bees and promote water conservation. Fitness equipment is stationed on synthetic lawn that allows water to permeate the soil below. Fact-filled, colorful interpretive signs illustrate and provide information on various stormwater management techniques. An interactive sculpture, decorated with tiles painted by local schoolchildren, showcases different types of pervious and impervious surfaces. The Rain Garden Plaza demonstrates several ways that stormwater moves through natural terrain. The low-impact development features slow the flow of stormwater and allow it to be absorbed by native

plants before making its way toward the lowest point of the site, the rain garden. This design mimics the natural processes that occur in undeveloped watersheds and serves as a model of how residential and commercial development projects can be designed to conserve water. “The plaza was built to educate the public by showcasing various innovative stormwater management techniques and sustainable landscaping practices used to promote water conservation and groundwater recharge, create wildlife habitat, improve water quality and protect downstream aquatic resources,” says Darren Wilson, engineering services manager for Elk Grove. “By applying these techniques and practices at their own residences and businesses, people can contribute through reducing their carbon footprint.” The plaza’s design replaces typical roof downspouts with decorative waterharvesting rain chains that hang from the shade structure’s roof. The rain chains capture runoff and convey it to a rain barrel to hold water for future irrigation.

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During its first rainy season in late 2012 and early 2013, the Rain Garden Plaza retained all water on-site from storms with one inch or less of rainfall during a 24hour period. And 100 percent of the site runoff is treated in the stormwater quality features, avoiding costly underground mechanical devices.

Building a Sense of Community Ownership The community has embraced the Rain Garden Plaza, and the public was involved with the development of the project from its inception, including the overall organic design and public art displays. More than 1,000 local elementary-school students from 32 classes and 14 schools handpainted tiles to help accent the plaza with a message about water quality and aquatic resource protection. Volunteers planted much of the landscaping as part of a community volunteer day, which helped to create a sense of community ownership. Throughout the year visitors can be seen watching the hummingbirds and butterflies that frequent the garden and its numerous native flowering plants. Employees from nearby businesses often use the fitness equipment and eat lunch under the shade structure. Residents, students and community groups are regularly seen walking the boardwalk, enjoying the interactive art sculpture, viewing the water-harvesting technologies on display and discovering new facts about stormwater pollution prevention from the colorful interpretive signs and educational tours. continued on page 26

More Resources Online For more information and links to related resources, read the online version of this article at www. westerncity.com.

©2014 Public Agency Retirement Services (PARS). All rights reserved.

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


The Rain Garden Plaza serves as a model of how residential and commercial development projects can be designed to conserve water.

A young visitor tries out the interactive sculpture, which demonstrates how water moves on various surfaces. below An educational tour helps people understand the impact of water conservation and stormwater management.

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Western City, July 2014

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Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City magazine, it will be posted at no additional charge on our website. For rates and deadlines, visit www.westerncity. com and click on the Advertise link.

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Display Advertising Call Pam Maxwell-Blodgett at (800) 262-1801 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information, or email admanager@westerncity.com. Website Job Postings Display ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away. To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.westerncity.com or contact Anita Lopez, administrative assistant; email: alopez@cacities.org; phone: (916) 658-8223.

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CITY ENGINEER/ PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR Annual Salary Range $96,213 to $114,883 The City of Chowchilla, is seeking an experienced City Engineer/Public Works Director. The position is responsible for the operation of a full service Public Works department, and the statutory duties of the City Engineer. The typical candidate will possess a B.S. in Civil Engineering, hold a P.E. in California; possess at least five years of progressive management expertise in public works management combined with municipal civil engineering. Applications/resumes accepted until August 14, 2014, and are available at City’s website www.ci.chowchilla.ca.us or by calling 559-665-8615 x112. EOE

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League of California Cities

Police Captain, City of East Palo Alto, CA The City of East Palo Alto is located in the heart of the Silicon Valley and is uniquely positioned to maximize its potential as a significant city in the San Francisco Bay Area region. The city of 29,000 is home to a broad multiethnic population. East Palo Alto is now seeking a Police Captain to work in conjunction with the Chief of Police to enhance the Department’s tradition of community oriented policing. The City is seeking a highly energetic, motivated individual with strong leadership and management skills. Candidates must possess at least seven years of police experience, five of which must be equivalent to Lieutenant or a higher level, and demonstrated advanced supervisory experience. A Bachelor’s Degree in Public Administration, Criminal Justice, Police Administration, Police Science, or a related field is required; a Master’s Degree is preferred. All candidates must possess POST Advanced, Supervisory, and Management certifications, as well as a CPR certification. Fluency in the Spanish language is highly desired. The salary range for the Police Captain is $128,531-$156,230 annually, DOQ. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Joel Bryden at (916) 784-9080 with questions. Brochure available. Closing date August 15, 2014. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

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Assistant City Managers City of Palo Alto, CA The birthplace and heart of Silicon Valley, Palo Alto is a global leader in technology, medicine/health, and green innovation. The City is home to 66,000 residents, 7,000 businesses and Stanford University. An award-winning municipality recognized for being innovative and well-managed, Palo Alto employs 1,036 staff and is supported by a proposed FY 2015 budget of just over $527 million ($470 million operating and a $57.5 CIP). Palo Alto is a complex, full service City providing all utilities, including regional services, and unique programs to an engaged, informed citizenry. This dynamic city is seeking to fill two Assistant City Manager positions. Ideal candidates will be high energy local government professionals who thrive in environments that demand innovation, continuous improvement and high levels of accountability, creativity, and responsiveness. Both positions will oversee assigned departments and specific responsibilities will be determined based on the experience and interests of the candidates selected. Extensive knowledge of municipal government operations and best practices, plus a minimum of three (3) years of senior management experience are required. A Bachelor’s degree is also required and a Master’s degree is strongly preferred. Salary in the low $200’s and is currently under review. Salary is supplemented by a competitive benefits package. The new Assistant City Managers are expected to begin serving by September, however, some flexibility is possible. Visit www.tbcrecruiting.com for detailed recruitment brochure and selection activity schedule. Teri Black • 310.377.2612 Carolyn Seeley • 949.487.7606

Now open . . . Assistant City Manager City of Fremont

Community Development Director City of Fullerton

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CITY MANAGER

City of Banning, California Annual Salary Range $185,000 – $235,000 DOQ with excellent benefits. The City of Banning, located in Riverside County, population 30,325, is seeking a strong leader with excellent communication and interpersonal skills. This is a career opportunity for someone who has the ability to implement the goals established by the City Council and its diverse community. The ideal candidate for the City of Banning must be a public executive with a record of demonstrated leadership in successfully guiding a municipal city under a Council/Manager form of government, and must possess outstanding judgment, management, and communication skills with the verifiable ability to excel in strategic planning and decision making. A typical candidate will have a Bachelor’s degree in Public or Business Administration or equivalent. A Master’s degree is desirable. Candidates should have ten years of executive management experience as a City Manager, Assistant or Deputy City Manager in a comparable or larger full service City. Closing date is Thursday, July 31, 2014. Apply online at www.ci.banning.ca.us. A completed job application and supplemental questionnaire is required. Contact Rita Chapparosa, Deputy Human Resources Director at (951) 922-3147 should you have any questions.

Public Works Director

Town of Hillsborough

Community Development Director

City of Manhattan Beach

Public Works Director City of Goleta

Photo/art credits Cover and pages 8–15, 24–25: Yvonne Hunter

Page 16: photos, courtesy of California Product

Page 3: Morphart Creation/Shutterstock.com

Stewardship Council; paint drip graphic, Sarunyu

Page 5: Antonio Abrignani/Shutterstock.com Page 6: photo, Jeremy Sykes, courtesy of League of California Cities; background texture, PinkPueblo/ Shutterstock.com

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_foto/Shutterstock.com Pages 17–19 and 26: Courtesy of City of Elk Grove and League of California Cities Pages 22–23: Lunarus/Shutterstock.com

Western City, July 2014

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Product Stewardship Saves Money, Creates Jobs and Reduces Waste, continued from page 16

EPR aims to reduce waste at the source by encouraging better product design and requiring those who make and sell products to share responsibility for how the products are disposed of at the end of their useful life. Product stewardship

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policy is used widely around the world for a broad variety of products, including hazardous products like pesticides and nonhazardous items such as packaging. Although the concept is gaining traction, legislative efforts to address EPR have been limited in terms of success. O

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Assistant City Manager, City of Sanger, CA The City of Sanger (approximate population 25,000) is an ethnically and culturally diverse community that is proud of its history and its contribution to the economy and livelihood of California. The City is seeking an Assistant City Manager to work closely with the City Manager to bring energy and enthusiasm toward advancing revenue generation strategies, economic and business development, marketing and branding approaches, and community policing. The City is looking for a candidate who is results-oriented, while respecting the need to be attentive to an appropriate level of detail; exhibits strong interpersonal skills; excellent in communicating, both orally and in writing; a creative problem solver; demonstrates organization and administrative skills; displays a high degree of political sophistication, but remains apolitical; and possesses a strong sense of personal and professional ethics and integrity. A finance background and labor relations experience will be beneficial to the new ACM. A Bachelor’s Degree in public or business administration, or a related field is required along with four years of relevant management experience in a municipal setting. The salary for the ACM is $95,000-$115,000 annually; placement within this range is DOQ. Apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Contact Joel Bryden at (916) 784-9080 with questions. Brochure available. Closing date July 25, 2014. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Fire Chief City of Pasadena, CA Located in the foothills of the San Gabriel mountains northeast of Los Angeles, the City of Pasadena (pop. 140,000) is recognized as one of the top 100 places to live in the U.S. Pasadena enjoys incredible ethnic and cultural diversity within a community that has effectively blended the charm of its historic roots with the excitement of thoughtful modern development. The Fire Department is supported by approximately 180 full-time employees and a proposed FY2014-15 budget of approximately $41 million. The City is desirous of attracting collaborative and innovative leaders who possess the energy and capacity to serve a dynamic community known for its desirable residential and commercial offerings as well as world renowned special events. The ideal candidate will be a contemporary thinker with an impressive history of mentoring and developing others. Five years of increasingly responsible fire service management experience and a Bachelor’s degree are required. Current salary range $173,788 - $212,015. Salary is supplemented by a competitive benefits package. To be considered, use the “Apply Now” feature at www.tbcrecruiting.com. This recruitment will close at midnight on Sunday, August 10, 2014. Teri Black • 310.377.2612 Carolyn Seeley • 949.487.7606

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League of California Cities

California has enacted EPR legislation that addresses mercury thermostats (2008), carpet and paint (2010) and mattresses (2013). In addition, EPR reduces the cost for local governments of managing hazardous waste and landfill disposal. Local governments operating household hazardous waste programs for paint management have realized some significant cost savings as a direct result of the legislation (AB 1343, Chapter 420, Statutes of 2010) that set standards for these programs. The law also played a central role in the launch of PaintCare, a nonprofit organization that operates a stewardship program. Local governments cite these significant savings: • Kern County saves approximately $157,000 per year; • Mendocino County saves nearly $70,000 per year; and • Santa Clara County saves more than $350,000 per year. California now offers many more convenient recycling locations for paint, with 535 new retail take-back locations added statewide since October 2012. This is in addition to the government-run household hazardous waste programs. Focus groups conducted with the general public indicated that people didn’t recycle paint because it was too inconvenient to wait for an event or take the time to bring it to household hazardous waste facilities. The PaintCare program addresses this main barrier to recycling paint.

Creating Jobs Additional benefits include the creation of new California jobs. A recent report from the National Resources Defense Council indicates that California will likely create more than 110,000 new jobs by achieving the 75 percent recycling goal. For example, the PaintCare stewardship program employs five staff in California to maintain and expand the program. Paint recyclers that make

www.cacities.org


old paint into remanufactured paint have seen significant growth. According to Jerry Noel, president of Visions Paint Recycling Inc. in Sacramento, “The passage of the paint stewardship law resulted in our company adding 23 jobs, spending $250,000 on equipment and expanding operations to occupy a once-vacant building of 60,000 square feet.” Product stewardship is not just good for the environment — it’s good for California’s economy too.

The Future of Product Stewardship EPR advocates contend that the current cradle-to-grave system of solid waste disposal gives producers no feedback on end-of-life costs and that it would be preferable to create a cradle-to-cradle system where producers are part of the end-of-life management system and receive the right market signals to drive design changes. Encouraging communication among the producers, distributors, retailers, haulers and local governments — essentially everyone in the product chain — can result in recycling systems that cost less per unit and are more convenient for the public to use. The progression toward product stewardship has had bumps along the way, and all stakeholders have learned lessons since the first few programs began. However, product stewardship programs play a central role in California’s efforts to achieve its statewide goals of reducing waste, creating jobs and providing economically sustainable and convenient recycling programs for the public. ■

More Resources Online For more information and links to related resources, read the online version of this article at www. westerncity.com.

www.westerncity.com

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Library Director City of Redwood City, CA Located in the Silicon Valley on the San Francisco Peninsula, Redwood City is home to 78,244 residents and many major high tech companies including Oracle and Electronic Arts. The Redwood City Library system is recognized as five-star by the Library Journal Index of Public Library Service, making it the top-rated library in the state and one of the most highly rated among mid-size and large library systems in the nation. The ideal candidate will bring a contemporary and forward thinking approach to library services and offer a history of introducing innovative and non-traditional strategies that meet the needs of a complex community. He/she will be an effective manager of people and display the traits of a strong leader. Previous experience serving a diverse population is highly preferred. Five (5) years of increasingly responsible experience in professional public library administration, a Bachelor’s degree, and a Master of Library Science degree from an accredited college or university are required. The salary range for this position is $158,316 - $195,072 and is supplemented by an attractive benefits package. This recruitment will close at midnight Sunday, July 20, 2014. Visit our website for detailed brochure and to apply online – www.tbcrecruiting.com. Teri Black • 310.377.2612 Carolyn Seeley • 949.487.7606

Deputy Fire Chief Southern Marin Fire Protection District, CA The Southern Marin Fire Protection District is an independent special district established by the Marin County Board of Supervisors in July of 1999. At this time, the District covers 11.5 square miles, a population of approximately 28,700, and over 14,100 homes and commercial properties. The District is currently in discussion with the City of Mill Valley, the Tiburon Fire Protection District, and the County of Marin to explore shared services at various levels. Should these discussions result in a shared services JPA, the advertised position would likely be a Deputy Chief within the new organization. If there is no JPA, the advertised position would assume the role of Fire Chief for the Southern Marin Fire Protection District. A Bachelor’s Degree in a field related to administration or management is required. The typical candidate will possess ten years of fire service experience with four years as a Chief Officer. Candidates must possess or have the ability to acquire a valid California driver’s license and California Chief Officer Certification, or equivalent. The salary for the advertised position is open and negotiable, DOQ. Apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Contact Joel Bryden at (916) 784-9080 with questions. Brochure available. Closing date July 25, 2014. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Western City, July 2014

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Beacon Award-Winner San Rafael Makes Sustainability a Priority, continued from page 14

The city has made improvements to encourage biking and walking and adopted its Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan in 2011. With full implementation of the Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan, San Rafael expects an estimated reduction of greenhouse gas emissions of 1,269 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalents J

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Engineering Services Manager City of Los Altos, CA Located on the San Francisco Peninsula in the Silicon Valley, the City of Los Altos is home to a population of 29,431. Los Altos is known for its distinctive community oriented character that is influenced by the Bay Area’s desirable cultural, recreational and business attractions. The Public Works Department is organized among three divisions – Engineering, Transportation and Maintenance. The Engineering Services Manager serves as the City Engineer and is responsible for all the activities of the division, including overseeing the City’s capital improvement program. Los Altos has a robust CIP currently consisting of 46 active projects. The ideal candidate will be a creative problem solver with the ability to manage a multitude of priorities simultaneously. He/she will be a skilled engineer and an exceptional manager of people with the capacity to assist the Public Works Director in the leadership of an extremely active department. Five (5) years of increasingly responsible experience in a similar setting, a Bachelor’s degree and registration as a Civil Engineer in California are required. A Master’s degree is desirable. Salary range $115,200 - $140,388. Compensation also includes competitive benefits package. This recruitment will close at midnight on Sunday, July 13, 2014. For detailed brochure and to apply online, visit www.tbcrecruiting.com. Teri Black • 310.377.2612 Carolyn Seeley • 949.487.7606

Community-based organizations, such as Sustainable San Rafael, advocate for sustainability programs and collaborate with the city on educational activities and initiatives. The city leverages and supports community-based programs, such as Resilient Neighborhoods, a carbon reduction and community-building program challenge that addresses climate change through neighborhood eco-teams. The program, run entirely by community volunteers and interns, encourages teams or families to sign up and pledge to take easy, everyday actions to reduce energy and carbon emissions. While the program is offered throughout the county, San Rafael offers direct support by providing interns and administrative resources. More than 50 households participate, representing 150-plus residents. This program has helped reduce greenhouse emissions from the residential sector by 493,000 pounds of carbon dioxide equivalents each year. San Rafael Vice-Mayor Damon Connolly sums up the city’s approach concisely: “You must truly involve the community. Much of the desire, ideas and momentum come from them. They are such a big part of everything we do.”

City Manager, City of Goleta, CA The City of Goleta is a city rich with history, from its earliest settlers to its significant impact on the railroad industry during the beginning of the 20th century. With a current population just over 30,000, residents enjoy several distinct neighborhoods, each with its own character. The City is seeking a City Manager to oversee 54 employees and a total budget of $43 million. The City Manager serves as the City’s Chief Executive Officer and is responsible for providing direct support to the City Council in developing and executing policy. The City is seeking a proven leader who is open, accessible, and highly communicative with the Council, staff, and public. Candidates should possess excellent communication skills. High moral and ethical standards, honesty, and reliability should govern the new Manager’s approach to city management. Candidates should possess a broad range of experience as it relates to local government. A Bachelor’s degree in Public Administration, Business Administration, or a related field is required. A Master’s degree is highly desirable. The salary range for the City Manager is open and DOQ. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Contact Bob Murray at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date July 25, 2014. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

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San Rafael’s community is key to its sustainability programs.

www.cacities.org


“When I tell people on our teams that our city has a Climate Action Plan and that we, the residents, account for more than half of the city’s carbon emissions, they are shocked at first,” says Tamra Peters, director of Resilient Neighborhoods. “But when they reduce their own household carbon emissions and see their efforts add to the city’s overall reduction, they understand that we are all in this together and they have just done their part. It’s empowering.” “Climate change is a challenge so big that we can solve it only by acting together,” says Bill Carney, president of Sustainable San Rafael. “Local government provides a forum for citizens to help create communitywide programs that can start to make a difference. These actions show higher levels of government that we’re serious about reducing greenhouse gases.” ■

More Resources Online For more information and links to related resources, read the online version of this article at www. westerncity.com.

To complement its long-standing curbside recycling program, San Rafael implemented a curbside composting program in 2010.

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Court Information Technology Manager – Business Applications Superior Court of California County of San Mateo

The new Court IT Manager – Business Applications will be an experienced and innovative leader (five direct reports) and successful project manager, and will have the opportunity to significantly impact the deployment of a new, vendordeveloped case management platform being installed throughout the court. Technical expertise is required as well as the ability to communicate and build relationships with all divisions and levels throughout the court. Bachelor’s degree in Information Sciences or related field and three years experience at the supervisor/manager level or an equivalent combination of experience and education that would provide the required knowledge, skills and abilities required. Salary range is $90,571 to $112,869 DOQ with excellent benefits.

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Call Phil McKenney at (866) 912-1919 for more information. A detailed brochure is available at www.peckhamandmckenney.com. Filing deadline is August 4, 2014

Public Works Director City of Redwood City, CA Redwood City is home to 78,244 residents and is considered one of the most tech-savvy communities in the world. Located in the Silicon Valley, this dynamic community has an attractive blend of residential, commercial and industrial elements that stretch from the San Francisco Bay to the hills of the San Francisco Peninsula. The Public Works Department consists of the Fleet, Facilities & Custodial Maintenance; Right-of-Way Maintenance; Wastewater Management Services; and Water Utility Services. The Department is supported by 95.39 FTE and an annual operating budget of $66.9 million (FY2014-15 proposed). The ideal candidate will be an exceptional leader and mentor. A collaborative and action-oriented manager, he/she will play a key role in aligning department goals with organizational priorities. Five (5) years of increasingly responsible experience in a comparable setting and a Bachelor’s degree in a related field are required. The salary range for this position is $159,876 - $201,216 and is supplemented by an attractive benefits package. This recruitment will close at midnight Sunday, July 20, 2014. Visit our website for detailed brochure and to apply online – www.tbcrecruiting.com. Teri Black • 310.377.2612 Carolyn Seeley • 949.487.7606

www.westerncity.com

Western City, July 2014

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Elk Grove Rain Garden Plaza Showcases Water Conservation, continued from page 18

Rain Garden Plaza Provides A Model for Sustainability

Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency.

“The Rain Garden Plaza offers a superb example of an educational plaza that showcases sustainable stormwater management practices that protect the environment, especially our sensitive aquatic ecosystem,” says Barbara Washburn, ecotoxicology program lead at the Office of Environmental Health Hazard

The plaza has become a destination for many stormwater professionals and a site for educational tours. It serves as a model — for the community, state agencies and other local municipalities — of low-impact development techniques and sustainable stormwater practices that promote healthy watersheds.

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“The Rain Garden Plaza is truly a marriage of conservation and education,” says Mayor Gary Davis of Elk Grove. “It demonstrates that low-impact development practices can create a place of beauty and relaxation and that habitat can coexist with nature-driven stormwater management.” Contact: Darren Wilson, engineering services manager, City of Elk Grove; phone: (916) 627-3446; email: dwilson@elkgrovecity.org. ■

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The Rain Garden Plaza makes learning fun for visitors of all ages.

Administrative Services Director City of Los Altos, CA The City of Los Altos (pop. 29,431) is located in the Silicon Valley just 40 miles south of San Francisco. The City is known for its distinctive community oriented character that is influenced by the Bay Area’s desirable cultural, recreational and business attractions. City operations and services are supported by 130 employees and a FY2013-14 budget of $40 million ($30 million General Fund). The Administrative Services Department consists of Finance, Human Resources and Information Technology. The ideal candidate will possess an impressive background in municipal finance coupled with a general understanding of all city operations. He/she will be highly collaborative and have a history of fostering a team oriented working environment. A strong commitment to customer service will also be expected. Five (5) years of progressively responsible municipal finance experience and a Bachelor’s degree are required. A Master’s degree and/or certification as a CPA is desirable. Salary range $99,622 - $182,700. Compensation also includes competitive benefits package. This recruitment will close at midnight on Sunday, July 20, 2014. For detailed brochure and to apply online, visit www.tbcrecruiting.com. Teri Black • 310.377.2612 Carolyn Seeley • 949.487.7606

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www.bobmurrayassoc.com

west coast headquarters 1677 Eureka Road, Suite 202 Roseville, CA 95661 phone 916•784•9080

east coast 2910 Kerry Forest Parkway D4-242 Tallahassee, FL 32309 phone 850•391•0000

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William Avery & Associates, Inc. Labor Relations / Executive Search / Human Resources Consulting 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

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Peckham&McKenney “All About Fit” www.peckhamandmckenney.com Roseville, CA

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Executive Recruitment for Senior Level Positions

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If you could change one thing about the way the Legislature functions, what would it be? Read more “On the Record” at www.westerncity.com.

Sue Chan Council Member Fremont

John Valdivia Council Member San Bernardino

Lena Tam Council Member Alameda

www.westerncity.com

Improve their awareness of issues facing cities that impact the people we represent — who are also their constituents.

Lower the voting threshold to a simple majority for local fees and taxes.

If they came from local government, I’d like them to remember their local government roots.

Art Bishop Mayor Apple Valley

Diana Souza Council Member San Leandro

Corey Warshaw Council Member West Covina

They need to listen to local leaders, local governments and local agencies.

If they hand down a mandate, it must have a funding stream attached and should include the ability to review the mandate in hindsight.

Be more responsive to cities. Government starts at the local level. If they are not listening to cities, they’re not hearing their individual constituents.

Western City, July 2014

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Western City July Issue