algarve PLUS - May '24

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MORE UNDERFOOT THAN YOU EVER IMAGINED

PEOPLE PLACES INFORMATION ENTERTAINMENT PLUS
MAY 2024
FEATURES ALLSTORIES Tilesthatmakea statementTAURANTCHOICEASagrestreat OZII BranchingouttoLoulé AMILYWAYSpoilingyourmumHORSEPLAY RidinghighinGolegã CHARITYSTARTSHERE Helpinghandsarealwaysneeded 32 HIDDENGEMS AspecialfindinAljezurAL,SOL,SUL Anewbrand,anewmeaning TINGCHANGE Furniturelikeyou’veneverseenitDIVEINDEEP Timetothinkswimwear OURTROLLEY ShoppingforthebestpricesINPURSUITOF HAPPINESSAretreat...anewlife ANHEIRANDASPARE There’snothingnewaboutit CONTENTS 05/2024 47 38 REGULARS 07 UPFRONT:ALL THINGS NEW 10 INTHE NICKOF TIME 36 20QUESTIONS 43 WINE 46 COLLECTIONS 52 RECIPEOFTHE MONTH 55 YOUR HEALTH 68 PROPERTY NEED-T0-KNOWS 70 GARDENING 75 SHAPEUP 80 PHOTOGRAPHY 83 TECHNO 86 WHEREARE THEYNOW 89 ADVICETO EXPATS 91 MONEYMATTERS 93 GOING LEGAL 95 AGENDA 98 AND FINALLY... 18 27 95 67

Welcome

As soon as the sun comes out and the sky goes a brilliant shade of blue (and stays that way all day) every one is relaxed and smiling. Heavy cardigans are switched for lightweight overthe-shoulder sweatshirts, legs go on display, and lunch outside is on the menu. Just think, in another few weeks, breakfast and dinner, too, will be outdoor affairs. But then the climate is just one of the many reasons why so many holiday-makers end up being second home owners and then full-time residents. Years ago, my other half said he could only live in a major European city. It’s amazing how attitudes change. Do you remember in your previous chapter, making social arrangements weeks in advance, and dressing the part not only for dinner in a restaurant, but even for an evening at home with friends? Nowadays, so much is last-minute, rather than forward-planning, because life here is easy-going, social decisions can be made on the spot, and who needs to go smart when casual is the order of the day (and night)?

So here we are, agendas packed with activities for the month, places to go, people to see, events to enjoy. And, of course, the beaches. They are getting busy – umbrellas at the ready, sunbeds inviting, cafés serving up local treats. It is such a hard life!

Check out our Agenda pages for a hand-picked selection of what’s on, our visit pages to discover where to adventure, our foodie features for the best of tastes. This month we’re full of detail about what’s to come.

SUSI ROGOL-GOODKIND, EDITOR

+351 965 581 831 | susi@rogol-goodkind.com

CONTACTS

APT 1093, EC Olivas de St Ant (Loulé) 8101-904. Printed by Jorge Fernandes Ldª AlgarvePLUS is published monthly. 6,000 copies are made available through a hand-picked distribution network from Tavira to Porches, Almancil, the Golden Triangle, Loulé, São Brás and Santa Bárbara. Copyright 2024 All rights reserved. Reproduction of any written material or illustration in any form for any purpose other than short extracts for agreed review purposes, is strictly forbidden. AlgarvePLUS does not accept liability for loss or damage to any materials submitted for publication. Or claims made by advertisers. The views expressed by interviewees or contributors do not necessarily reflect those of the Editor or AlgarvePLUS. START OFF PLUS facebook.com/algarveplusmag instagram.com/algarveplusmagazine algarveplusmagazine.com ALGARVE PLUS l 05
MARTIN GOODKIND Publisher +351 963 146 398 martin@algarveplusmagazine.com KIM COLLEY Art Director +44 (0)7973 426196 dk.colley@btinternet.com
(COST OF CALLS AT YOUR MOBILE PROVIDER’S RATE)

How’s this for making a statement? Coyote XL, a mixed media on fibreglass sculpture by Auguste, stands at 230cm high (including his base). See him, and more of the work by this always astonishing artist, at ArtCatto in Loulé. artcatto.com

From an ancient design, beautiful handmade, hand-painted bowls – proof that the classics are also the contemporary. Made by Miguel Morales Morranio, 55cm diameter, and also in indigo blue and burnt sienna. Gorgeous. From CôrteReal Gallery in Paderne. cortrealarte.com

susi@rogol-goodkind.com NEW THINGS PLUS ALGARVE PLUS l 07
IF YOU HAVE ANYTHING YOU WOULD LIKE TO SHARE, EMAIL
FRONT COVER: Walk this way, the calçadas reminiscent of waves. More tiles on page 12 Bags of style, from one of Portugal’s top specialist artisan makers who focuses on timeless craftsmanship. Neat little clutch bag, crafted from all-natural glowing straw. €169, by Toino Abel in Coz, Alcobaça. toinoabel.com

WORLD COCKTAIL DAY

Celebrating world cocktail culture while thinking about preserving water. Get ready for the arrival of the best cocktail in the world, possibly at a bar near you.

Since 2009, ‘World Class’, in partnership with the Diageo Reserve Collection, has been committed to celebrating the finest elements of cocktail culture. Their mission is to inspire people to enjoy excellent drinks more responsibly and sustainably, whether at a bar, restaurant, or home. To achieve this, they organise an annual global competition to unearth the planet’s best bartender. This year’s very timely theme is WATER. Bartenders will be challenged to demonstrate their creativity in both using and conserving water. It’s worth noting that a significant amount of water is typically wasted in the form of ice cubes alone.

In June, the top Portuguese bartender will be chosen to represent Portugal in the global final competition, set to take place in Shanghai in September. We wish all the participating bartenders the best of luck!

Summer time is dressing up time, but of the laid back variety. This digitallyprinted Citric Bloom kaftan, crafted by Portuguese artists, is super light, in viscose ecovero and viscose, by Greenkiss. You’ll find it at Alquatro in Almancil. €185. alquatro.pt 289 395 732

A perfect Mother’s Day pressie, or something to treat yourself to, these scented ceramic flowers – there are also hearts and angel wings – are a delight. The fragrance lasts four to six months, depending on where they are placed, and each comes with a 10ml refill. €6–€14, from Ange Boutik in São Brás. angeboutik.com

Mouth-blown glass pieces, each with their own personality and in a choice of colours. Don’t settle for the ordinary when you can find something special. Glasses €17, carafe with glass €69. From Martina in Loulé. martina-loule.com

Water Jug Man by Carrol Boyes finds the perfect synthesis between functionality and design. It is made from durable stainless steel mirror polished to a cool gleam.

Height 33cm, capacity 1.5L. From Dunas Living in Almancil. €285. dunasliving.com

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REFLECTING THE ALGARVE

Inspired by ethnic art and everything that lives in the Ria Formosa, Amaré Amaré’s Truus and Jonathan (she a self-taught block printer, he a black and white film photographer) use locally sourced linen that is 100% organic and comes from a company that is passionate about circularity, and one of the true pioneers when it comes to producing sustainable linen here in Portugal. Truus adores the rustic look of linen, which is perfect for her irregular block prints. Take a look at the range online, where you can buy the wonderful table linens and also a selection of limited-edition analogue silver gelatine prints or open (unlimited) edition digital giclée prints that truly reflect the Algarve. amareamare.com

koziishop.com tavira - loulé - olhão - lagos FASHION & INTERIORS C M Y CM MY CY CMY K

UARTEIRA TO FERRAGUDO seems like an impossibly long walk when you look at it on the map. 60kms by car… but not an impossible distance to walk. If you’ve followed this column over the past few months you’ll know that I’ve been walking across the Algarve day by day.

I started in Vila Real de Santo António and the end goal is to reach Sagres. We reached Quarteira on a hot summer’s day with the delightful company of a couple from YouTube who had recently moved to Monchique. I arranged a full day for the next leg with a friend from Croatia who has an online mobility coaching business and was excited at the prospect of meeting me at 07h00 on a cold winter’s day near No Solo Agua on Vilamoura’s Falésia Beach.

It was threatening rain as we headed west along the recently crowned Most Beautiful Beach in the world! Thankfully, we were treated to a stunning sunrise and headed around the rocky coastal bits to Olhos de Água. I managed to persuade my walking buddy, Kat, to stop in at Al Gharb coffee roasters for a delicious coffee break. These guys know their stuff and after a rich flat white and a chocolate brownie we pressed on past a crazy contraption.

Kat explained that they lift you up and drop you 50 metres into a net. “Why would anyone want to do that?” I asked. “Because it’s fun,” she replied.

We walked on through Albufeira, heading down to the sand at Praia dos Pescadores. “Let’s go in there,” Kat gestured towards an office right off the beach with the words ‘Albufeira Digital Nomad’ emblazoned across the door.

We stopped at Al Gharb coffee roasters. They know their stuff! After a rich flat white and a chocolate brownie, we pressed on

In the nick of time

NICK ROBINSON IS ON THE ROAD AGAIN – OR RATHER ON THE WALK – THIS TIME HEADING THROUGH ALBUFEIRA TO GALÉ WITH COFFEE STOPS AND FABULOUS VIEWS ALONG THE WAY

Kat introduced me to Phoenix, who manages the place. It’s a free, local government-sponsored initiative for Digital Nomads and remote workers, and it’s becoming a lovely place with a group of cool, young people meeting every week for coffee on Sundays and often working there.

We trudged on across the sand reaching an elevator at the west end of the beach. It wasn’t operating so we did some steps straight up to the top and paused to pet the stray cats who are kept and fed by wellmeaning neighbours. The view is spectacular.

Kat and I rounded the bend, which overlooks the entrance to Albufeira’s newish marina. On our right is a new development of apartments, with the penthouse going for €4.5 million. Wow! It just goes to show that the luxury property market has expanded onto pockets all around the Algarve.

The coastline closed up as we descended into the rocky, cliffy sections from São Rafael Beach, and we hiked through ravines and small sandy paths to Praia Coelho. The long main road stretches out down to Galé beach as we marvelled at the new W hotel.

I had the pleasure of staying there last year and for some reason (unbeknownst to my wife and me) they upgraded us to a suite. It was possibly the most incredible hotel room I’ve ever seen, let alone slept in!

Funky Zimzala Café beckoned and we called in for a late lunch of gourmet burgers and beer for me and a hip vegan bowl for Kat. That was it, that was our walking tour from Quarteira to Galé and it was a full tiring but immensely fulfilling day. I heartily recommend you do it. But if not, go watch my video of the day on the Algarve Addicts channel on YouTube.

Next month I’ll walk you from Galé to Ferragudo with another interesting guest.

Find Nick on YouTube / Join Algarve Addicts Facebook Group / Discover more at algarveaddicts.com
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Pop Wall Silkscreen and Mixed Media on Paper | 60.9 cm x 91.4 cm Avenida José da Costa Mealha nº43 R/C 8100-500 Loulé Tel. (+351) 289 419 447 | info@artcatto.com www.artcatto.com

Wall stories

FORGED FROM THE ELEMENTS OF EARTH AND FIRE, TILES HAVE SERVED FOR CENTURIES AS GUARDIANS, PRESERVERS, DECORATORS AND TALE TELLERS OF BUILDINGS RANGING FROM THE HUMBLEST DWELLINGS TO THE MOST MAJESTIC PALACES

Words: CHRISTINA MORENO

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PORTUGAL’S UNIQUE interpretation of tiles, the renowned ‘azulejos’, have been crafted and admired continuously for over 500 years. The striking blue and white timeless pieces of ‘baked earth’ have not only gracefully adorned walls and floors but have also offered themselves as visual archives that continue to hold legends and tales of the rich cultural heritage of this country.

To this day tiles remain an iconic symbol, a treasured legacy of craftsmanship, artistry and cultural evolution. Although Lisbon, Porto and Viana do Castelo are the most popular places to admire this beautiful art form, there are plenty of charming azulejos waiting to be discovered right here in the Algarve.

If you’ve ever been exploring tile options for your home, you may have come across the term ‘zellige’. Originally from Morocco, zellige tiles are handmade with each piece individually chiselled and arranged in geometric patterns on a plaster base. Notably, zellige tiles abstain from depicting humans or animals, adhering to Islamic artistic tradition, while Portugal’s own traditional ‘azulejos’ (from the Arabic term meaning ‘small polished stone’) are hand-painted and also extend to include patterns, motifs and scenes of life, religion and history.

Undoubtedly, you’ve noticed the ubiquitous presence of the elegant blue and white tiles adorning both the interiors and exteriors of countless buildings, depicting stories and legends of Portugal’s rich history. In the European Middle Ages, the colour blue became a symbol of wealth and power because azulejos were used only by the rich who could afford them.

Did You Know? That in order to honour and protect the cultural legacy of Portuguese traditional tiles, it became illegal – since 2013 in Lisbon and since 2017 nationwide – to demolish façades and interiors covered with azulejos.

WHY TILES?

They are durable, timeless and made sustainably

They are 100% recyclable and reusable

They don’t retain dust, pollen, or germs

They are fireproof (inhibit flames) and don’t emit toxic gases or smoke when burned

They protect against pollution, heat, noise, rain, humidity and long term exposure to sun and ‘salty’ sea air

They are low-maintenance

They can add colour, beauty and (retro) charm to surfaces and buildings

Opposite page: Palace Fronteira, Lisbon. Below: A beautiful mix of colours and patterns.

Bottom: Igreja do Carmo, Porto
TRADITION PLUS

Top left, clockwise: Tile-fronted building in Lisbon; Department of Earth Sciences, Colégio de

Making tiles since 1741

Sant’Anna is one of the oldest – and still operating – tile factories in Portugal. Although over 90% of its production today is exported, this factory, which withstood Lisbon’s great earthquake in 1755, continues to use the same handcrafting techniques as it did when it first opened in 1741. The azulejos are baked and then glazed before being painted by the artists.

Did You Know? Following the devastating Lisbon earthquake in 1755 which left the city in ruins, it was quicker and more affordable to reconstruct and decorate using tiles featuring repetitive geometric patterns rather than commissioning original artworks for the interior and exterior of city buildings.

Tiles have been dated as far back as 3000 BCE and are thought to have originated from ceramic clay pottery which was very commonly used in ancient civilizations. Initially, they mainly served practical purposes such as for flooring and roofing in Egypt. Even then, natural motifs and geometric patterns were already emerging. The making, use and decoration of tiles gradually spread among civilizations like the Assyrians, Babylonians, Romans, and Greeks.

During the 12th and 13th centuries the Moors brought zellige tiles and glaze painting techniques to the Iberian Peninsula, leaving a lasting influence on the region’s artistic traditions. The Portuguese ‘azulejos’ as we know them today weren’t born until after the Christian conquest around two centuries later.

It is said that being charmed by tiles he saw on his visit to Spain in 1498, D. Manuel I of Portugal brought some back home to decorate his palace in Sintra. Soon after, the use of azulejos became a prominent choice for interiors and exteriors of public buildings, particularly churches but also for anyone wanting to gain status and show wealth.

Why blue and white?

In the 15th and 16th centuries, the golden age of Portuguese maritime exploration,

tiles were a reflection of the cultural fusion of Islamic, Moorish, Spanish and Italian influences. Tiles were predominantly geometrical patterns in the colours blue, yellow, green and white. That was until the Dutch – inspired by the elegance of Chinese porcelain – started making tiles exclusively in the same timeless blue and white using an Italian technique called Maiólica, a technique of painting over a layer of white enamel in wet clay.

Portugal, enchanted with the ‘fine tiles’, began importing them from the Netherlands. By the end of the 17th century and concerned with the huge amount of tile imports, the Portuguese started the ‘Ciclo dos Mestros’ (Cycle of Masters) movement whereby national renowned painters were hired to design original tiles inspired by the Dutch designs, which were then manufactured on a larger scale and in the unique Portuguese style that is famous today.

Did You Know? The azulejos that were painted with scenes from the bible and the discovery age offered a way that illiterate people could ‘read’.

Azulejo tiles have made it to former Portuguese colonies in South America,

Jesus, University of Coimbra; The church of São Lourenço in Almancil; intricately-detailed Portuguese tiles. Opposite page: Panel by Jorge Colaço (1922) in Lisbon’s Pavilhão Carlos Lopes, representing the 1385 battle of Aljubarrota between the Portuguese and Castillian armies

Goa, Macau and Africa. One such example is a fascinating UNESCO World Heritage site in Brazil. Celebrated for its stunning Portuguese tilework and dubbed the ‘City of Tiles’, São Luís boasts the largest collection of Portuguese architecture in Latin America. Most of the buildings are adorned in exquisite azulejo designs.

In the Algarve

If you really want to immerse yourself in the full splendour of the history and evolution of Portuguese tiles, then a visit to The National Tile Museum in Lisbon is a must at some point. In the meantime, as you wander the Algarve, there are plenty of azulejos scattered throughout many of its charming villages.

One of the best places to visit is the medieval town of Silves, which feels like an open air azulejo museum. The gorgeous town of Tavira is also a delightful destination for anyone interested in admiring this beautiful art form. And if you haven’t done so already, consider visiting the Bishop’s Palace (Paço Episcopal) across from the Sé Cathedral

in Vila Adentro, Faro; Estói Palace; and the church of São Lourenço in Almancil, each beautiful examples of the famous Portuguese artistry.

Despite its the humble exterior, inside the church of São Lourenço lies a remarkable Baroque-style interior squeezed into a small 100M² space. Decking its walls are precisely 8,590 azulejos, as meticulously specified in the original construction contract. The cherished azulejos were carted in by donkey from Lisbon via Faro to the Almancil area. The wood used for carving the altar came from the chestnut trees of Serra de Monchique, while its intricate gold plating, which had to be applied very slowly and delicately, with gold sheets imported from Brazil.

The story of this ‘must-see’ azulejo wonder began in 1722 when amidst a period of drought, the local community went to Saint Lourenço for help. Promising to build a temple should water miraculously appear, they dug another well and to their amazement were blessed with an

WANT TO MAKE YOUR OWN TILES?

If you are interested in learning hands-on about different techniques of creating traditional azulejos tiles, search around in your community events and calendars. Loulé Criativo is first choice for learning arts and crafts and runs classes in tile painting. Vila Vita Parc had tile workshops earlier last month. Monte da Ribeira in São Brás de Alportel offers sessions year round for a minimum group of four people. loulecriativo.pt

info@montedaribeira.com

abundance of water. Soon, the site began drawing crowds, not just for water but for the miraculous healing of illnesses that seemed to accompany it. Grateful visitors began making donations, which quickly accumulated, sparking the promised construction of the temple.

Commissioned by two brothers originally from Lisbon, renowned for their architectural gift, the church of São Lourenço, reminiscent of their other notable works like the Igreja de São Francisco and parts of the Sé Cathedral in Faro, began to take shape. Inside, the blue and white historical glazed ceramic puzzle pieces narrated the captivating tale of São Lourenço’s life as a healer, miracle worker, and ultimately, a martyr. If you haven’t been there already, we definitely recommend a visit.

Where artist and tile makers meet

From the late 20th century to the present day, there has been a renewed interest in azulejos as an important part of Portugal’s cultural heritage. Contemporary artists and artisans are actively contributing to this revival by re-working and re-thinking traditional techniques and combining them with modern aesthetics.

One such artist is Diogo Machado (also known as ‘Add Fuel’, addfuel.com/), a Portuguese visual and urban artist who ‘re-interprets the language of traditional tile design’ by blending two seemingly opposite visual expressions. You can find out more about other artists who work with tiles such as Joanna Vasconcelos (featured in our August 2023 issue) on the fascinating website for the tile factory Viúva Lamego, which offers an interesting perspective on ‘nurturing the partnership between authors and craftspeople’. viuvalamego.com/en/authors/ the-authors/

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NEW great TASTES

FERMENTO, Sagres

TDAVID CAMPUS IS THE CO-FOUNDER OF AUSTA, THE MUCH APPLAUDED FARM-TO-TABLE RESTAURANT IN ALMANCIL, AND THE STOMACH BEHIND @C.AMPO ON INSTAGRAM. WE ARE THRILLED THAT HE ’ S ON THE ALGARVEPLUS TEAM AND WILL BE SERVING UP HIS NEW FAVOURITE EATERIES. WHO BETTER THAN A RESTAURATEUR TO RATE OTHERS?

HE STORY of Fermento begins with the convergence of four talented individuals, each from Italy, and each bringing their unique expertise to the table. Cinzia Ziliati, a sommelier hailing from Bergamo, joins forces with Ilaria Rossi, a chef from Milano, alongside Alberto Coppola, the head chef from Padova, and Gianluca Grossi, a chef from Livorno.

Their paths crossed in Padova, where they honed their skills in the kitchens of Michelin-starred restaurants under the tutelage of culinary maestros like Massimiliano Alajmo.

Seeking a more laid back life by the sea, and inspired by the unique opportunity in the Algarve to do something that didn’t yet exist, they found themselves in the sunkissed enclave of Sagres and set out to create a dining experience that celebrated the region’s bounty and drew inspiration from their Italian roots, creating a menu that pays

homage to relaxed casual, farm-totable fare.

At Fermento, food is more than just sustenance – it’s an exercise in resilience and a statement in doing better for the land. From fresh pasta dishes to more complex dishes made up of ingredients sourced from local producers committed to regenerative and organic farming, every plate (designed to share) tells a story of passion and dedication. The menu evolves almost daily, and with the seasons, ensuring that guests are treated to the freshest ingredients the Algarve has to offer, and it’s not a rare sight to witness the chef greeting local fishermen arriving with their morning’s catch.

Fermento beckons you to unwind and adopt that relaxed, West Algarvian energy; each space exudes a sense of conviviality and charm.

The walls inside are adorned with fermentations and an extensive wine collection curated by Cinzia, the sommelier and host. Natural wine reigns supreme here, each bottle

FOOD

Italian influenced but thoroughly modern farm to table fare

sourced from her vast roster of winemakers in Portugal and beyond, with guest bottles from Italy, France and elsewhere, allowing drinkers to discover more about the context of the concept by comparison.

For non drinkers, a thirstquenching selection of home brewed kombucha’s taps into their penchant for fermenting and appear in seasonal flavours such as locally foraged prickly pear and Algarvian tangerine. Here, every sip and every bite is a celebration of the team’s unwavering dedication to their craft.

DECOR

Cosy and charming interior, and an outside sundrenched terrace PRICE

Small plates from €7; large plates from €15 €

In a world where good food and good company reign supreme, Fermento stands as a testament to the power of friendship, passion, and the joy of sharing a delicious meal. Whether you’re coming off the beach or eager to explore more about Portugal’s best produce, Fermento offers an unforgettable culinary journey that tantalizes the taste buds and nourishes the soul. Next time you find yourself in Sagres, be sure to embark on a culinary adventure at Fermento – where every dish tells a story, and every moment is to be savoured.

My Fermento favourites right now? If I had to choose, it would be their Tagliatelle with squid ink cuttlefish ragout and bagna causa. And the Spring salad of wild herbs and flowers fermented veggies, with loquat & almond mayo.

FERMENTO , R. de São Vicente, 8650-370 Sagres / T: 282 011 963 / IG: instagram.com/fermento.sagres /?hl=en Open: Saturday to Wednesday, Lunch 13h00–15h00; Dinner 18h30–21h00
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Spreading wings branching out

AS A FASHION AND STATEMENT STORE, WHICH CAN GENUINELY USE THE WORD ‘ UNIQUE ’ , KOZII OPENS A NEW BRANCH IN THE WALKING STREET IN LOULÉ THIS MONTH, BRINGING HER BRAND TO A FRESH AUDIENCE. ALREADY IN LAGOS, TAVIRA AND OLH Ã O, OWNER/DESIGNER/CREATIVE BRAIN, CECILIA TELO HAS A REAL STORY TO TELL

Words: SUSI ROGOL-GOODKIND

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KOZII first opened in 2015 with a distinct vision and has never faltered from the determination to be different.

And Cecilia Telo’s offering, her distinct platform, is quite unlike anything else, hence the word unique as key to the description.

In her own words: “The origin of Kozii is the journey. Not only in the purely geographical sense but in the most important and noble sense: that of the experience of the human. A journey is always a departure and a return to who we are, added by the knowledge of the difference. And it is from here that Kozii was born, from this delicate territory coupled with respect for what it is to be human.”

The two creators of the brand, Cecilia and her partner Nuno, are tireless travellers, both out of love and vocation. They decided to take years of experience in various parts of the world to build a brand of clothing and accessories that reflects not only an aesthetic but also what they believe in: a fairer world, sustainable and yes again – human.

It was in India that they found their source of inspiration, more precisely in the city of Jaipur, in the state of Rajasthan.

Through the use of millennial tissue stamping techniques – such as woodblock printing, the oldest, simplest and slowest of all printing methods –they have created a line of clothing that is contemporary and at the same time safeguards a tradition. The patterns that result from this are beautiful, both in their graphic simplicity and in their organic feel.

Each piece is created slowly and thoughtfully and with the end wearer in mind. The result is the delivery of exclusive collections of the highest quality.

The success has been growing and visible, which has enabled Kozii to rapidly expand its shops alobg with its vision of the world.

And speaking of shops, it is not by chance that Kozii has two in Tavira. What the brand does and believes fits well with the serene cosmopolitanism of a city where a certain ease can be sensed around the two banks of the Gilão river.

And customers who just can’t wait to see the latest collection can check it out from wherever they are, on the stylish Kozii website, and via its social media platforms. where you can made contact, and order.

“I am the daughter of a nomadic family,” says Cecilia. “I grew up with my family in Portugal, the US and Belgium. I then went to University in New Orleans, San Francisco and later Vancouver, studying Cultural and Art Anthropology.

In the meantime, my parents had moved to Mozambique, where, when visiting, I began designing garments from batiks with the local women as a hobby. After my graduation, I set off travelling around the world searching for new materials and techniques to make garments and accessories.

“Seeking to create collections and simultaneously empower local artisans to improve in their own crafts became a joint venture that, each year, ended in small handcrafted ranges I would later sell to shops in Europe.

For eight years, I produced pieces in Mexico, India, Thailand, Brazil and Guatemala. Later on, together with Nuno, who had a background in Environmental Management, we decided to have kids and settle in a beautiful place where we could feel at home. We chose Tavira, in the stunning Portuguese southern coast, and designed Kozii focusing both on who we were, what we believed in and on how we thought we could fit in Tavira.”

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Caring about the planet

Sustainablity is a buzzword today, but it has long been the root of Kozii’s strengths. “It happened organically,” Cecilia explains. “We focused on what we believe in – we couldn’t work in any other way. And then people started saying we were a sustainable brand. We didn’t think about it, we simply did what we thought we recognised as better.”

“Our main supplier has been with us since day one and their business operated more like a workshop... we’ve been growing together since 2015 and have a very healthy business relationship based on mutual respect. I am the designer, they have the techniques. I influence everything.”

Kozii produced its first collection in 2000. “I knew my way around and was aware of the vast possibilities and outstanding resources India has in the textile industry. It is actually unbeatable in regards to diversity of materials and crafts, producers’ willingness to experiment new things, an ocean of printing, weaving, and embroidery techniques, ancient or contemporary, you name it. India is the heaven for textile creativity, if you can find or create your space in it.

“I don’t have rules, my inspiration comes from the fabrics and techniques I have chosen, from the styles I have decided to develop, and a bit from looking around and seeing what’s being offered in fashion. I start with a few colours and grow from there... combining them together to see if it makes sense as a collection.”

Moving into home

Ten years on, with an enviable reputation for original thinking, Kozii introduced its first home range that adopts the same production principles as the clothing

From Lagos to Loulé, the picture remains constant, the determination to make a difference ever present. Below: the Loulé store before works started

line. New items are added to the firm favourites every year so the collection grows organically and reflects the colour range and print detail that Cecilia has focused on.

Now let’s talk Loulé. Why there? “We feel Kozii belongs there,” says Cecilia. “It has a lot of charm, a lot of culture and cultural events – theatre, festivals, music – it’s historical centre is beautiful and it breathes laid back cosmopolitanism. Every city has its own vibe and its own crowd, and Loulé just feels right. There was a bit of choice when we started looking around but it took us only two days to say yes to our new premises. We are very uncomplicated in our decisions; if we like it, we go for it.

“The building was in a very bad state so we needed to go for a full renovation. We are keeping the old shade wood doors and the floor, renovating the ceiling and the walls, installing new electrical works and plumbing. The shop had been a goldsmith’s and lain empty for over ten years. Our whole team got involved in the decisionmaking processes and Marta, an interior designer friend from Zayn Studio in Olhão, often gives valuable input into our ongoing decoration ventures. The all-new Kozii will have a big 80m2 including storage.”

All branches will carry the same collections as the others in the group, but as quantities are carefully and tightly controlled, you may find items in one branch that are not available in another – a perfect excuse to visit another Kozii. And also to see the latest fabric selection which includes the sustainable ecovera, and discover a new sense of style. And meet the team whose enthusiasm and creative thinking is a perfect fit with the Kozii ethos.

KOZII Rua 5 de Outubro, 16, Loule. T: 281 027 306 / 910 522 464 / info@koziishop.com / koziishop.com

ON 5 MAY WE CELEBRATE MOTHER’S DAY IN PORTUGAL, WHICH GIVES US THE PERFECT EXCUSE TO REALLY SPOIL THAT IMPORTANT LADY. HERE ARE SOME IDEAS THAT WILL PUT A SMILE ON HER FACE –OR YOURS, IF YOUR OWN KIDS ARE DOING THE SPOILING AND HAVE GOOD TASTE

Words: ISABEL ALVES

the word MUM’S

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ACOUPLE OF days of mother/daughter bonding is always a good idea and nothing connects women better than shopping. Destination? Avenida da Liberdade, of course, Lisbon’s Champs-Élysées, the town’s epicentre of all high fashion and luxury stores.

Before heading to the likes of Gucci, Saint Laurent and Dior – please don’t miss the amazing new Dior store at number 85 – it’s time to check in.

Heritage Avenida Liberdade Hotel (lisbonheritagehotels. com) is the right choice for a mother who deserves the world! Located at 28 Avenida da Liberdade, it is so central – think location, location, location – and from there you can literally walk everywhere.

It’s a boutique hotel with only 42 rooms – some with beautiful views over the old part of the city – that will make mother and daughter feel right at home. The beautiful blue traditional façade leads to a colourful lobby, decorated with a tropical touch and with a unique detail: the reception area is made of an ancient wooden and glass structure kept from the herbal store that used to be there before it turned into an hotel.

Because memories do matter

Just a short walk away from the hotel, there are two jewellery stores that not only sell beautiful pieces, but are classic temples of historic craftsmanship and excellence. If you are looking for a special gift that will survive generations, stop at Buccellati at Avenida da Liberdade 194. This Italian brand (born in Milan in 1919) is known for its unique ways of carving

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Opposite page: Mushroom magic at Black Trumpet. This page, top left: Food and art together at Cicero; right: A jewel from Van Cleef; below: the Heritage Hotel lobby

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stones into precious metals and of polishing them. The end result is a perfect jewel that will make mum feel the most loved being in the world.

Not very far another gem full of gems: the French Van Cleef & Arpels at 204B, founded in 1896 in Paris by the dutch diamond-cutter Alfred Van Cleef and his father-inlaw Salomon Arpels, is a luxury brand that always manages to balance the classic with the contemporary. To celebrate spring – and of course Mother’s Day – the collection Frivole is like a wearable garden: a bracelet with seven flowers in white gold, a ring with eight flowers in pink and white gold and enough sparkling diamonds to make a woman (mother or daughter) loose her breath (and head).

If you leave the jewellery store with a little bag in your hand with a box inside (hopefully you will), go back to the hotel and leave it stored safely in your comfortable room and then go out again to enjoy a nice meal with mum.

Food for thought

Lisbon has plenty of incredible restaurants to choose from but there are two recent ones that I am sure will turn the whole Lisbon mother/daughter tour into a remarkable experience.

The first one is Black Trumpet (Calçada Ribeiro Santos 31, blacktrumpet.pt).

As the name implies, this is heaven for mushroom lovers. In a cool atmosphere – the interior design project is immaculate, based on dark, earthy tones – the idea is to taste different kinds of mushroomy approaches, from the first cocktail to the dessert. Helped by experts, including local farmers who pride themselves on having the best product around, the menu has several unexpected options like the delicious Mush and Chips (yes, enoki mushrooms with fries) and Gnocchi (cheese, peas, white Port wine beurre blanc and, of course, mushrooms –cantharellus cibarius, in this case).

A walk around Estrela – the garden, right in front of the historic Basílica, is always welcoming with its old trees, families with children and locals walking the dogs – and

Campo de Ourique is a good way to get to know a ‘smaller’ Lisbon: traditional shops, residential atmosphere and human-size restaurants that don’t want to be trendy, just meaningful. Cícero Bistro (Rua Saraiva de Carvalho, 171, cicerobistrot.pt) is a good example of a place where you go to have a good meal, but that is so much more than that. It’s an art gallery and a cultural hub that connects Portugal, Brazil and France through art and talks about relevant subjects, including politics.

The whole concept of the restaurant evolves around Cícero Dias, a Brazilian artist who lived and worked in Lisbon and Paris. As soon as you arrive for dinner, you’ll be asked if you would like a tour of the restaurant’s art works. I highly recommend it.

You’ll learn about Cícero through his paintings (and his friendship with Picasso) but also about other Brazilian artists. Once you sit with a glass of Portuguese wine in hand and open the menu you’ll immediately notice that dishes are also art-inspired. The octopus carpaccio is spring on a plate and the Picasso is edible art, salmon being the main ingredient.

If either you or mum are art lovers, a dinner at Cícero Bistro is like travelling between countries with the plus that you’ll leave feeling culturally rich – and very well fed.

Back to Avenida da Liberdade and to the hotel for a well deserved rest, then make the day really unforgettable by going for a drink to Mona Verde (Rua Castilho, 14C, 8th floor) – or maybe go for lunch the next day and try some of the light suggestions like white fish ceviche or smoked beef tartar. They call it “a jungle rooftop restaurant for the curious, the wild and the free spirited”. With a glorious view over Lisbon and an atmosphere that will remind you of the north of Africa mixed with an Atlantic island, there is no better place to cheer to life and all the things that make family everything. And while you have an instagrammable cocktail in hand, make a vow to build more memories next Mother’s Day.

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Right: A cocktail on the ‘jungle’ rooftop terrace at Mona Verde.
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Below left: Campo de Ourique, a delightful area worth wandering; Below right: Precious metals and jewels from Buccallati
Philipp Keel, “Below the Surface, 2007”
PHILIPP KEEL BELOW THE SURFACE FROM 29.03

Golegã

KNOWN AS THE HORSE RIDING CAPITAL OF PORTUGAL, GOLEGÃ IS A CHARMING TOWN WITH DEEP EQUESTRIAN ROOTS. ITS ANNUAL 10-DAY NATIONAL HORSE FAIR WELCOMES OVER 100,000 HORSE ENTHUSIASTS FROM ACROSS THE WORLD

Words: KAYLA MEIRINHO

LOCATED JUST 100 kilometres northeast of Lisbon, Golegã is a popular destination for day trips from the capital, easily accessible by car or train. Golegã sits near the Portuguese Camino route and is beside the stunning Paul do Boquilobo Natural Reserve, making it a peaceful and rural retreat.

The town’s origin traces back to a 12th-century guesthouse opened by a Galician woman, leading to the village to be known as Venda da Golegã (Village of the Galician), and eventually Vila da Golegã. Over time, Golegã has been appreciated for its mix of equestrian and artistic endeavours.

Notable artists like Carlos Relvas – a pioneering photographer known for his innovative techniques in the late 19th century – and José Saramago – the Nobel Prize-winning author, whose literary works reflect the rich tapestry of Portuguese life – have called Golegã home.

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The history of Golegã is also tied to the Lusitano horse, a breed with ancient origins in the Iberian Peninsula and considered to be the oldest riding horse breed globally. This versatile horse has been used for a variety of tasks from agriculture, to bullfighting, to classical dressage.

Today, the Lusitano is celebrated worldwide for its prowess in equestrian sports and its elegant presence. Notable horse riders include Álvaro Domecq, a renowned Portuguese bullfighter and horse trainer known for his expertise in classical dressage, and Luís Valença, a masterful Portuguese equestrian and trainer celebrated for his contributions to classical riding and the development of the Lusitano breed.

In addition to its cultural heritage, local traditions and festivals showcase Golegã’s vibrant spirit, making it a must-visit destination for horse enthusiasts and culture seekers alike.

SELF-GUIDED WALKING TOUR

Staying in town and looking to keep everything walkable? Here’s a tour you can take yourself on, stopping along a variety of highlights and history in the area.

Carlos Relvas Studio House: Built in the late 19th century by wealthy farmer Carlos Relvas, this chalet-style studio and photography lab showcases the history of photography with works, equipment, books, and vintage furniture.

Pelourinho Palace: Originally a 16th-century city hall, the Pelourinho Palace served various purposes over the centuries, including a court, jail, post office, museum, and agricultural department.

Our Lady of Conception Church: The main church of Golegã, known as the Church of Nossa Senhora da Conceição, is the 16th-century Manueline-style by architect Diogo Boitaca (1510-1515). The church’s design includes asymmetrical features like the bell tower on the south side.

Pillory of Golegã: The Pillory is a simple 16th-century structure with a bell-shaped top. It was most likely constructed when Golegã was granted town status by D. João III in 1534.

Opposite page: Riders at the Horse Fair. This page: above: one-time resident of Golegã, author José Saramago; below: the Carlos Relvas Studio House

Mestre Martins Correia

Municipal Museum: This museum exhibits the works of Golegã-born artist Martins Correia, showcasing sculptures, paintings, drawings, and ceramics. The museum also features other notable artists like Bual, Ana Vidigal, and Artur Franco.

Municipal Typewriter Museum & Library: With a collection of over 400 typewriters produced in the 19th and 20th centuries, this museum showcases the technological evolution of typewriters alongside other interesting objects, such as advertising posters.

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Rural Museum: This museum showcases local ethnography and folklore of rural heritage with displays of agricultural tools and animal-drawn transport.

Largo do Arneiro: Also known as Marquês de Pombal Square, this square is the heart of Golegã Fair activities. Surrounded by typical Ribatejo houses, equestrian stores, and stud houses, it is like being in another world.

Equuspolis Cultural Centre: Housed in a modern building with a horse silhouette, the space features art exhibitions, an auditorium, an art gallery, a virtual equine space, a horse library, and beautiful gardens.

Hippos-Golegã: A High-Performance Equestrian Sports Centre that hosts competitions and events, with facilities including horse boxes and riding stables.

EVENTS

From 1-11 November this year, Golegã will host the Feira da Golegã, where you can watch as the streets come alive with horses, carriages, stalls, and entertainment. You can find everything from local treats, to children’s toys, to horse supplies, to antiques, artwork, and beyond. Whether you’re a horse enthusiast, a food lover, or simply seeking a taste of authentic Portuguese culture, you’ll get swept up in the excitement of the event, which incorporates the National Horse Fair, International Lusitano Horse Fair, and the São Martinho Fair– all of which are distinct fairs held concurrently in Golegã, each with its own unique focus and cherished traditions.

National Horse Fair: This fair is focused on celebrating the Portuguese equestrian culture and heritage, featuring exhibitions, competitions, and displays

related to horses, including various equestrian disciplines and traditions.

International Lusitano Horse Fair:

The International Lusitano Horse Fair is specifically dedicated to the Lusitano breed of horses, which is native to Portugal. This fair showcases Lusitano horses through breed competitions, demonstrations, and sales. It attracts breeders, riders, and enthusiasts of Lusitano horses from around the world.

São Martinho Fair: An age-old tradition celebrated in Portugal, held around 11 November to commemorate Saint Martin’s Day. This fair is more general and includes various cultural, culinary, and traditional activities beyond horse-related events. Visitors will find markets selling roasted chestnuts, jeropiga (a traditional Portuguese drink), and other seasonal goods.

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Top left, clockwise: Mestre Martins Correia Municipal Museum; the fascinating Typewriter Museum; riders and crowds of onlookers – and buyers – gather in the church square at the annual Horse Fair; pure bred Lusitano horses

need-to-knows

WHERE TO STAY

If you’re planning to visit during the town’s festivities (November), avoid disappointment by booking your accommodation well in advance – many months. Rest assured wherever you stay, each property is able to offer additional services or suggestions for horseriding, tours, cycling, and more.

Lusitanus Guests can enjoy a central location with horse stables on site, making it ideal for horse lovers or those wanting to be close to these majestic animals. Watching horses practise in the courtyard adds to the special experience of staying here. As well as Lusitanus being an amazing dressage school. The accommodation offers spacious rooms with a nice balcony. lodging-world. com/po/hotels/lusitanusin-golegã-92159841

Hotel Lusitano A contemporary boutique hotel with a focus on relaxation and luxury with a cosy ambiance. It features a spa with a Turkish bath and sauna, indoor pool with water jets, fitness centre and treatment rooms.

Capriola is the hotel’s elegant on-site restaurant. hotellusitano.com

Quinta dos Álamos

Located on a former agricultural farm offering one-three bedroom apartments that include a fully equipped kitchen and a fireplace. It has a peaceful ambiance with stunning countryside views. Guests can learn about agricultural activities, explore olive groves and seasonal crops, and interact with domestic animals like horses, cows, and chickens. quintadosalamos.pt

Convento Inn & Artist Residency Get ready for a one-of-a-kind experience set in a restored convent. This unique inn is filled with eclectic art, overlooking the river and the Chamusca Bridge. Guests can connect with nature and enjoy the tranquil surroundings. The hosts are incredibly generous, alongside delicious food and attentive service, making the stay magical. Artists residencies are ongoing. convento.pt

Galagana Charm House

Private accommodation located in the heart of Golegã is ideal for families, couples, or groups. There are five comfortable bedrooms and shared facilities like a lounge, terrace, and kitchen, providing convenience and comfort. galagana.com

WHERE TO EAT

Typical Winery Ass of the Mule This Portuguese restaurant in the centre of town offers a cheerful and upbeat atmosphere with rustic décor. Highlights include oven-roasted pork cheeks, fried fataça (river fish) with tomato rice, and different grilled options daily. Desserts like almond jam are recommended.

Taverna do Forcado A family-owned restaurant with a rich history of bullfighters. This traditional Portuguese eatery offers delicious meat and vegetarian options in a charming ambiance filled with family memorabilia on the walls. Paulo and

his wife warmly welcome guests and share a bit about local history.

Adega Ribatejana This bustling restaurant offers a lively tavern atmosphere and dishes like Adega steak and rice pudding. The restaurant is popular for its friendly staff, reasonable prices, and a wide selection of traditional Portuguese cuisine.

O Barrigas offers a buffet-style dining experience with a great variety of starters and desserts. It’s an excellent opportunity to try a range of dishes; vintage decorations add to its charm.

Queques da Villa An adorable coffee and sweets shop known for its quirky interior design. It’s a great place to unwind and enjoy delicious desserts like red velvet cupcakes with strawberry juice. In addition to desserts, the shop offers unique items for sale, including clothing and jewellery.

Capriola offers a fine dining experience in a calm atmosphere with attentive service and tasty meals. The service is friendly and efficient, and the food is praised for its fantastic flavours.

Top left, clockwise: Queques da Villa; O Barrigas; Quinta dos Álamos, Hotel Lusitano

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For those in need...

A NUMBER OF READERS HAVE BEEN ASKING ABOUT THE OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE TO THOSE WHO WANT TO GIVE TIME AND MONEY TO A CAUSE HERE THAT WILL TRULY BENEFIT PEOPLE IN NEED. SOMOS ESPERAN Ç A/LOVE FOR ALL OLH Ã O IS ONE INITIATIVE CERTAINLY WORTH CONSIDERING

BACK AT the beginning of the Pandemic, two people found a common cause to help those in need and at risk in Olhão: Patricia Guerreiro and Kevin Gould. In the postpandemic world, this need still exists and is growing, as costs of living and rents increase. Life for many is fragile.

Somos Esperança feeds about 40 people each weekday, as well as providing emergency food packages for weekends. And it does not stop there but goes far beyond the supply of food. A change of clothes, showers, furniture – the things that most of us take for granted are, for some, unimagined luxuries.

It’s all achieved with donations – of money, food, basic neccessities and helping hands. The volunteers are at the core of Somos Esperança, led by Patricia with her limitless energy.

Patricia is both the guardian and the mother figure to the charity’s ‘clients’, ably supported by her extended neighbourhood ‘family’ (and as a volunteer, while providing those helping hands in the kitchen, it’s possible to learn some Portuguese). Together they produce meals in the small kitchen at Somos Esperança, and they are all mouthwateringly good!

Kevin is the major benefactor for Somos Esperança, with his open heart to those in need, and with the publicity and outreach

to the ex-pat community that comes from his Cha Cha Cha restaurant. His guidance is invaluable. When his kitchen closed due to the pandemic, he chose to hand out meals to those in need. In the centre of town, near the market, Cha Cha Cha is an easy place to stop by and make a donation... or volunteer!

Now everything for Somos Esperança is centred in on Rua Almirante Reis in Olhão, away from the waterfront and more on the front line of where needs can be met. As in any urban environment, visitors and residents don’t always see the needs that lie behind their love for the beautiful town. But if you love Olhão, then it will love you back all the more for any help you can give to Somos Esperança.

TAKE PART

Lend your ‘Helping Hands’ To Somos Esperança

Rua Almirante Reis 145, 8700-365 Olhāo

T: Patricia Guerreiro 914 487 147

E: somosesperancaolhao@gmail.com

W: somosesperancaolhao.com

IG: @loveforall.olhao

FB: Associaçāo Somos Esperança

Since last November, a small group of advisors to the charity have been making the link between the ex-pat and tourist community and the charity. In April just gone, the first quarterly newsletter was published and went to those on the charity’s email list. And April also saw the start of Open House evenings.

Next month, on 21 June, a fundraising event will be staged at Sala Simba Gallery in Olhão, where two artists – Twotma from Paris/Lisbon and Richard Walker from London/Faro – will be on show (read more on our June Agenda pages). There will be music from local talent, providing a connection to the large French/Olhão community on the night of France’s FÊTE de La Musique, an annual country wide celebration of music. Then, in November, a wine tasting dinner is planned at Cha Cha Cha – be sure to book early.

The advisors have no end of creative ideas and projects in mind, including a plan to bring new life back to donated clothes for a fashion show line up. If you sew, then now’s the time to lend your fingers!

All of the charity’s initiatives need ‘helping hands’ to make a difference, a real difference, in the Olhão community. Somos Esperança may be small, but it is vitally important, and hopes to continue making that difference, alongside the local Freguesia and Câmara, with respect for those in need.

In our world, money is at the heart of everything, and donations, no matter what amount, are vital... every cêntimo counts!

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Hidden treasures

AMARIA IS ALJEZUR’S NEWEST ADDITION, DISCOVERED BY EMMA CAMPUS OF DESIGN ESCAPES PORTUGAL, WHO LOOKS EACH MONTH FOR A SPECIAL PLACE AWAY FROM THE MADDING CROWDS AND SHARES ITS SECRETS WITH US

LOCATED AT the southwestern tip of Portugal, Costa Vicentina stands as Europe’s final untamed coastline, a pristine haven nestled between Alentejo and the Algarve, where the tumultuous crash of waves serves to silence the noise of civilisation.

Protected by strict nature boundaries, this coastline of the westerly Algarve is gloriously underdeveloped and serene compared to the rest of the region. An extra drive from Faro airport than many of the easier-to-reach beachside spots, and the unpredictable weather due to its Atlantic facing stretches, mean that the majority of holiday makers put it aside.

But for the few who choose instead not to worry about the weather, but to embrace nature and all its elements, they risk it all for endless moments of solitude, even in high summer, and travellers’ rewards beyond all measure.

Escaping

On an abnormally sunny weekend in April, we set off with the windows down from Faro, watching the landscape change as we drove from East to West. Past the whitewashed towns of Carvoeiro

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A quiet mix of old and new, yesterday and tomorrow, add up to a place of calm and quiet that will enchant you

and Lagos, the motorway comes to an abrupt end, and winding roads continue through carpets of wildflowers sprung from undulating hills.

Eventually, as we turn off the tarmac and onto a gravel path, we spot a slither of cerulean sea ahead and glimpses of a gleaming farmhouse... our destination. The newlyopened clifftop guesthouse near to the surfers paradise of Aljezur – Amaria is where tranquillity and calm are coupled with character and simple style.

Walking up to a pristinely renovated barn and into a courtyard surrounded by swaths of Mediterranean grasses, we are greeted by owner Nuno (an ex city boy and surfer from Lisbon) and his girlfriend Phoebe (a stylist from London) who are excited to be open after almost seven years of the hotel project development.

The dream

Nuno discovered the site, once an old quinta, in 2016 and spent two years immersing himself in the local traditions, community, and way of life before he began to imagine realising his dream. Leaving behind his career forged in Lisbon’s CBD, and following his heart towards the sea, he undertook a remarkable and resilient transformation with a bid to create a place that is more than just a hotel – but somewhere that the old and the new converge, seamlessly blending the past, present, and future through vernacular architecture and an interior that feels homely and personal.

Inspired by their combined experiences of this unique location, they decided to share it with others seeking the same sense of tranquillity and connection with the outdoors that they had longed for when leaving their respective cities.

As the newest addition to the Aljezur area, the pair and Nuno’s family have created a place that offers a fresh and distinctive experience for travellers. The infinity pool, overlooking the azure expanse of the ocean, invites us to lose ourselves in its mesmerising depths. With chillier evenings in Spring, the wood-burning sauna provides a welcome respite, warming both body and soul.

The hotel’s collection of thoughtfully designed suites (there are just 12 including a two/three bedroom apartment), just like ours, each has its own vast sea view and promise utmost comfort and relaxation. We grab cocktails from the honesty bar and settle in to our terrace soak to our new surroundings.

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Thoughtful furnishings, glorious outside spaces, and that vast expanse of ocean make Amaria a place to truly appreciate

A new day

The next morning, we wake with the windows open and linen curtains billowing to the soothing symphony of ocean waves and birdsong, setting the tone for a day of serenity, before setting off on a morning hike along the Rota Vicentina footpath to explore local historic villages.

Breakfast back at Amaria is prepared by the hotel’s charming local team and Nuno’s mother in the refectory and as the day unfolds the energy of this coastal retreat envelops us. We hop in the car to explore wild and dramatic cliffbacked beaches for the day, hidden secrets recommended by Nuno. Watching from the dunes as wetsuit clad surfers catch the swell, we feel inspired (and brave!) enough to dip in and out of the icy cold ocean, the cold exposure invigorating our bones and sending dopamine levels high before drying off, book in hand, on the warm sand.

Back at the hotel, we sit crossed legged on the yoga deck for golden hour meditation and take turns in the teetering wooden sauna (I challenge you to find one with a better vista than this). As dusk sets in, we saunter from Amaria past gnarled old vines that Nuno is reviving to make his own wine, with a bottle he gave us and a small prepared picnic to the cliff edge to watch the sun sink below the horizon, the chaos of everyday life sinking out of sight with it as we ease into the feeling of rest and respite.

As we prepare to bid farewell to Amaria the next morning, we carry with us a sense of gratitude for the experiences shared and the memories made even in such a short time here, wishing we could stay longer, and even planning our dream of a permanent move to the West.

In this haven of peaceful, barefoot luxury, we found a renewed sense of self as we return to reality and running our own business. Though our time here may have been fleeting, the memories of this hidden gem will linger on, a testament to the magic of this Atlantic oasis.

Just don’t tell anyone about it...

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HIDEAWAY PLUS AMARIA Monte Novo, 8670-312 Odeceixe T: 910 333 555 / E: contact@amaria.pt / IG: @amariahotels / W: amaria.pt

20 questions...

IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR A NEW HOME, A SECOND HOME, OR AN EXTRA HOME, LARS ANDERS JENSEN WILL TELL YOU WHERE TO GO. IN PORTUGAL, HE REPRESENTS ILUMHOUSE, THE COMPANY THAT DELIVERS MADE-TOORDER WOODEN HOUSES OF THE HIGHEST QUALITY

1 Where are you from and when did you move to the Algarve? I’m originally from Denmark, then lived for 32 years in South Africa. My family moved to the Algarve in August 2020.

2 What brought you here, and to Tavira in particular? We had been to the Algarve a few times exploring the area and in the end we decided on Tavira mainly because our teenage son liked the international school there. The Algarve has amazing weather, beautiful coastline and beaches, lots of great golf courses, and Tavira in particular has a more local authentic feel and is less spoiled by mass tourism like in other parts of the Algarve.

3 What profession were you in – anything housing related? I had my own import business in

Johannesburg for 25 years and we were importing cash handling equipment – not housing related whatsoever. I recognised here that there is a demand for smart, sleekly designed modern and fully insulated houses that are made to order and can be completed within a short time period.

4 IlumHouse, what exactly is it and what does it offer? IlumHouse is a dynamic company in Latvia established five years ago by two young entrepreneurs who were looking for high quality wooden houses for themselves, but on finding nothing that met their expectations and wants, they started their own house design and manufacturing business. Today it is a highly successful manufacturer, busy expanding its global footprint. We were appointed the exclusive distributor for mainland Portugal and islands from 1 February 2024. In May – this month – our IlumHouse showhouse will be on display in Almancil and open to the public.

5 Is Latvia known in this field? Is the technology there really advanced? Yes, indeed. And as 54% of Latvia is forested, there is easy access to timber. All houses are built according to high industry standards and using certified materials only.

6 There are lots of wooden house show areas on the EN125, what makes IlumHouse different? Original sleek Scandi designs, opportunity to customize, highest quality, a ready-made solution perfected and delivered within two months.

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7 So yours are custom built and to any size?

Yes, clients can adjust any of the 15+ different house designs to their required dimensions and preferences.

8 What is the largest built so far? 140m²

9 And the smallest? 18m²

10 Are they delivered here as finished works, kitchen, bathrooms lighting, etc in place? Yes, IlumHouse has its own factory in Latvia and we can deliver a complete house on a truck or send it over in panels to be assembled on site.

11 How long is the construction period? It depends on the size, the complexity, and current order book but usually it would be between two and 12 months.

12 What are the company’s green credentials? The structure of each house is made of certified pine (C24). We protect houses against moisture, wind, vapour, rodents, and insects. Exterior and interior lining boards are painted in three layers and protected according to all industry standards. All materials used in the construction possess a European Certificate of Quality.

13 What permissions are needed to import one of your wooden homes into Portugal? No special import is required.

14 What is the starting price? From €32,500 + IVA.

15 How is the installation set up? The company’s own team comes over from Latvia to supervise and carry out any needed installation work.

16 Once in place, is a home moveable? Yes, if it is a tiny house or a house that consists of one module.

17 What about insulation – how is heat retained. And in summer, what about air-conditioning? We use Rockwool (150-250mm) as insulation in walls, floor, and roof to ensure a comfortable temperature throughout all seasons. We suggest to our clients that they install an air conditioner and use it as a heating method during winter and to cool temperatures during the summer months.

18 If there ever is a problem, will IlumHouse help solve it? Yes, of course and we offer a five-year warranty on each house.

19 How many houses have been built so far and in what countries can they be found? More than 240 houses since we started five years ago. They can be found across Europe and soon in the USA, too.

20 If one wanted to create a home-office, can designs be modified accordingly? Yes, and we will gladly customise the design to the customer’s requirements.

ILUMHOUSE PORTUGAL Contact T: 925 983 132 / E: ilumhouseportugal@gmail.com / W: ilumhouse.lv

sal sol sul

HERE ’ S A BRAND THAT HAS GROWN, IN ONE YEAR, FROM A SINGLE T-SHIRT MAKER TO A SPECIALIST PRODUCER WHOSE COLLECTION REPRESENTS THE VALUES OF SIMPLE LIVING, A COMMITMENT TO ETHICAL MATERIALS AND MANUFACTURING, AND A PASSION FOR LIFE IN PORTUGAL

Words: STEFF TOFT

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SThe message is simple, the graphics say it all and keep those sunshine thoughts alive

AL SOL SUL encapsulates all that Juliane and Felix Bennien love about the Algarve and their energy for life flows through their products. Like many, after visiting the Algarve over a number of years, they decided to take the plunge in 2020 and bought a small home in Olhão’s old town. The Covid lockdowns were an additional trigger to change. Being in the fortunate position that they could travel between Portugal and Germany meant that they were still able to experience the beauty of the Algarve, a haven away from their hectic lives in Berlin.

“We felt really privileged within these bumpy times that we could at least come to Portugal and spend time here. Portuguese people are so amazingly friendly,” she says. “They have such open hearts and are very kind. I was so grateful that we had this little refuge. I wanted something to express this joy that I feel about being able to do this.”

Julie is an interior designer and creative consultant who has been working with magazines, furniture producers, business and private clients for over 20 years. She is passionate about the nourishing quality of beauty, atmosphere and the ocean.

Felix is a branding, marketing and customer experience

specialist, mainly working for bluechip clients around the world. He is also a musician and artist.

During one of their visits, Julie was looking for a T-shirt that encapsulated all she loves about Olhão and Portugal’s South. “I couldn’t find anything,” she said, “so I decided to design one myself and see where it would take me.” Based on designs using sun umbrellas and flip flops, Julie created her own T-shirt. “I tried to find symbols that reflected the simple lifestyle we have here in Portugal –something that everyone, no matter where they come from, can understand.”

Where this T-shirt took her was into the production of a small range of ethically-responsible garments. Julie explained: “Other people saw and loved the energy and simplicity of the designs, wanting to know where they could find them. So, I made a few T-shirts, took them to the islands, and photographed them in different places, including on a string where the old ladies hung their linen and washing.”

Getting noticed

As more people stopped to appreciate and show interest in Sal Sol Sul, Felix took a leap of faith and registered the brand, feeling that it could become something much bigger than just a couple of T-shirts. “At this point, it was like the initial stages of a love affair,” he recalls. “In the beginning it’s scary,

but also exciting, and while you see the start of a journey, you don’t know what tomorrow brings but you know you’re excited.”

Julie and Felix approached a small boutique that they really liked, Zé e Maria, in Olhão, to ask the owners, who share Sal Sol Sul’s values of quality and simplicity, if they would consider stocking their products. It’s no surprise that the initial collection sold quickly, with requests for more. Sal Sol Sul decided to be bold and produce 50 different designs, approaching it with a simple mindset: if it worked, that would be great.

Personally, Sal Sol Sul is not just a love affair with Portugal, it’s a continuation of the love affair of Julie and Felix. With their backgrounds in design and marketing they are perfectly placed to create a brand. And Sal Sol Sul is the ideal combination of their skills, their enthusiasm, and their love for good design, which has provided them with the opportunity to create something beautiful.

“We saw this opportunity that we could do something together. We decided to try it out, but were intent on keeping the T-shirts sustainable, the numbers small, and the production in Portugal, where there is a great textile industry,” says Julie.

This decision coincided with the onset of Autumn and Sal Sol Sul had created energy around their brand which their customers loved. So how to keep that momentum going at a time of year when T-shirts were no longer needed? Julie took onboard the feedback from their early customers and designed the sweatshirt she wanted, which encapsulated all she loves about life here. “I bought a sweatshirt and had our logo embroidered on to it. It gave me an idea of what it would look like and provided a sample to take to producers to share our idea,” she explains.

It also meant that when they approached companies to produce their items, the potential makers understood exactly what they were looking for, in terms of design and production.

Finding the partners

Julie and Felix’s search for the right company to produce their collection resulted in a road trip around Portugal, finally settling on a small family run production company in Guimarães. “It was important they take on board that for us quality matters and it’s not just about fast fashion and sales. We want to offer a product to people that they will keep and appreciate, and that will remind them of their time in the Algarve.”

The sweatshirts produced for the winter collection have been as successful as the T-shirts; people still stop to ask them where they can find them. Julie enthused: “I had a couple asking about the sweatshirts over lunch, because we were wearing them. We told them the story of their creation, invited them to join us and find out more. This is what I love about the brand, we are creating a community of like-minded people.”

More people of varying nationalities are visiting Olhão and the Algarve. “There is a real change in the energy and vibe around the town. Increasingly, these people are looking for something special, whether that be their hotel, or restaurants they go to.” And Sal Sol Sul is certainly filling the demand for high quality reminders of holidays in Portugal.

Looking ahead

The business is beginning its second season and like many new companies faces the challenge of keeping the love, the energy and the initial excitement in the brand that comes at a time where the butterflies in your stomach get a little more silent. Felix explains: “Now you have to think twice because it’s about scaling up and taking greater risks. But we want to remain fun and grow organically.”

Besides developing a new range of products, Sal Sol Sul is expanding its network of retail outlets across Portugal, with shops in Lagos, Comporta and Aveiro joining the Sal Sol Sul family in summer; they are also in talks about supplying a premium hotel group.

When visiting the factory earlier this year to discuss the summer collection, Julie and Felix took small gifts for those people who make their products, “so that every time they work on producing our garments, they remember us and smile.”

We were intent on keeping the T-shirts sustainable, the numbers small, and the production in Portugal, where there is a great textile industry

“We are now discussing a much broader assortment for summer, including some bags and hats, alongside the T-shirts and sweatshirts,” Julie explains. “We are focusing on simple and subtle designs that every nationality understands and represent summer in the South, but also make sense when worn at home.”

It is hard to believe that Sal Sol Sul is only one year old, so much has been achieved in such a short time. Nothing about the brand is forced. As each opportunity presents itself, Felix and Julie respond, with an enthusiasm that is infectious and a desire to share products they love. This is not just another brand that intends to flood the market in a race for profitability: “We don’t want to produce thousands of T-shirts. It has been a tremendous journey so far, and it’s been fun. It’s not our goal to become big for the sake of it – if we can grow and still enjoy it then that makes it worth doing.”

Look out for Sal Sol Sul, given the success of the first year, it is easy to see how it will quickly become a recognisable brand across Portugal.

SAL SOL SUL / IG: sal.sol.sul / W: sal-sol-sul.com DESIGN PLUS ALGARVE PLUS l 40
Four Seasons Fairways, Avenida André Jordan 37, Quinta do Lago. www.amararestaurant.pt Reservations: 00 351 289 357 579 @amarafairways

Drink and drive

PORTUGAL IS FAMOUS WORLD WIDE FOR ITS WINES BUT THE DEMAND FOR NON-ALCOHOLIC OPTIONS IS ON THE INCREASE. HERE ’ S ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT WHO IS MAKING THEM, WHO IS DRINKING THEM, AND WHAT TO EXPECT, TASTE-WISE

ACCORDING TO many surveys, the consumption of alcoholic wines is decreasing, slightly, year by year, while the consumption of alcohol-free and reduced-alcohol drinks is on the increase, and significantly so.

Much of the change in consumer habits and tastes can be attributed to health, safety and nutritional requirements; medication, car driving, pregnancy, and dental treatments are just a few examples.

And there are several conditions for which the medication used makes alcohol consumption questionable.

One of them is the carbohydrate metabolism disorder and the astonishing rate of its spread. The connection between the increase in the number of people living with

‘sugar problems’ and the decrease in wine consumption is very simple. The oral drug Metformin, which is often used for insulin resistance, pre-diabetes, and type 2 diabetes, clearly states there could be adverse effects caused by the consumption of alcohol.

In addition, it is also important to mention that alcohol is not recommended for diabetics sufferers because the liver is not capable of ‘multi-tasking’, which means that alcohol blocks its necessary sugar production, and hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) will occur as a result. And this can cause severe symptoms.

I am convinced that the increase in the number of people living with disorders of carbohydrate metabolism will clearly affect the market for the consumption of alcoholic wines worldwide.

WINE PLUS ALGARVE PLUS l 43

It is important to clarify that, as a wine expert, I am naturally a fan of real wines – not de-alcoholized wines. The purpose of this article is not to convince readers to switch to non-alcoholic wines starting tomorrow. I have been dealing with the positive physiological effects of wine on health for many years and I fully support moderate wine consumption. I only recommend non-alcoholic wines to those who cannot drink alcohol for any reason.

Of course, non-alcoholic wines do not offer the taste complexity of real wines. But, for lovers of gastronomy who cannot drink alcohol, the existence of alcohol-free wines can be a ready salvation. It is much easier to create food-wine pairings with non-alcoholic wines than with iced tea or cola.

What is non-alcoholic wine?

The history of non-alcoholic wine began at the beginning of the 20th century. The German Maria Jung sold the wines of their family estate all over Germany, but she encountered resistance in a surprising number of places, where people approached refused the purchase citing the recommendation of the doctors. Upon returning home, Maria told her family about her failed business trip. His son Carl Jung (not to be confused with the Swiss psychiatrist of the same name) then decided to find a solution to the problem. The result: in 1908, he patented his distillation-based de-alcoholization process.

In 2021, the European Union created the legal background in its member states for the production of wines with reduced alcohol content. The amendment states that wine, champagne, and sparkling wine can undergo a full or partial de-alcoholization process.

This kind of wine also can be made from any type of grape: wineries typically use the varieties that appear in the alcoholic selection for these items as well. Although their smell always brings the wine character, their taste is less so, so for people used to alcoholic wines, the enjoyment value will never be the same. Non-alcoholic wine can be both sweet and dry. There is currently much more of the former on the market. The reason for this is that the mentioned loss of aroma is often tried to be remedied by adding sugar.

Non-alcoholic wine is therefore not the same as grape juice or children's sparkling wine, since it is made from fermented, alcoholic wine by extracting the alcohol. Alcohol-free wine is a wine with an alcohol content of less than 0.5% by volume. (If the alcohol content of the wine falls below 10 percent by volume as a result of alcohol reduction, the label must indicate "de-alcoholized wine".)

How the non-alcoholic wine is made?

Currently, two technologies are available for complete or partial alcohol removal.

1. During vacuum distillation, the alcohol is separated from the wine by heat treatment. Alcohol and water have different boiling points, and unwanted flavours can be eliminated in an airtight space. In very simple terms, the wine is heated until the alcohol evaporates from it. With this process, an alcohol content of up to zero percent can be achieved.

2. In membrane separation, different membranes separate alcohol molecules based on size. With one version of membrane separation, the so-called reverse osmosis, the alcohol content of wines can be reduced with much less loss of aroma. However, the procedure is expensive, and below 0.5% alcohol content, it can no longer be used economically.

In general, it can be said that the drinks made with the above procedures bring out the wine character quite well in

non-alcoholic wine in Portugal

José Maria da Fonseca was a pioneer in terms of creating the first Portuguese alcohol-free wines. They remove the alcohol through vacuum distillation at low temperatures that help maintain the natural aromas and flavours of the grape.

O%riginal arrived with a complete range of alcohol-free monovarietal wines available in red, white and rosé, full of aroma and taste typical of the grape varieties.

The Syrah red grape variety gave rise to the red and rosé, revealing smooth profiles with exuberant aromas that are easy to drink. The O%riginal non-alcoholic white is made from the Moscatel Galego grape which brings all its citrus and floral characteristics so typical of the variety, in a lime green colour, where the fruity and refreshing flavours stand out together with the smoothness of an easy white wine. jmf.pt/loja/

aroma, but as for the taste, there are very different opinions. Non-alcoholic wines are now produced almost everywhere in the world, although of varying quality. There are good ones and there are extremely bad ones.

The majority of Portuguese winemakers are not open to making alcohol-free wines yet. However, the demand for them is constantly increasing and it seems that this trend will continue in the future.

What to look for

The sugar content of de-alcoholized wines varies widely. There are many more sweet de-alcoholized wines than dry ones. The main reason for this is that during the removal of alcohol molecules, a significant loss of aroma often occurs, the result of which leaves the finished wine empty in taste. And this can be remedied by adding sugar.

However, if someone has a disorder of carbohydrate metabolism, then you need to find a de-alcoholized wine that really has minimal sugar content – always check label for calories, carbohydrates, sugar, and other ingredients.

The carbohydrates in these wines are quickly absorbed. That is why it is recommended to pair them with something that slows down the absorption of the wine (seeds, olives, fatty cheese, for example).

De-alcoholized wines should be treated in their place. If we try to compare them to the alcoholic wines we like, we can easily be disappointed. But, on the other hand, knowing we are doing the right thing for our health and well-being, then we may be in for a really pleasant surprise.

ALGARVE PLUS l 44
WINE PLUS

Midpoint paintings

SOMEWHERE BETWEEN FIGURATIVE AND ABSTRACT, THE PAINTINGS CREATED BY FRENCH ARTIST HERVÉ LENOUVEL INVITE THE VIEWER TO MAKE USE OF THEIR IMAGINATION.

THE SUBJECT MATTER, THE COLOURS, THE MATERIALS AND APPLICATION SUGGEST A LANDSCAPE BUT THE DETAILS NEED TO BE CAREFULLY PICKED OUT

ALGARVE PLUS l 46
PROMOTION PLUS

TAKING A journey to the beautiful Portuguese city of Santarém, it is the sort of place Hervé likes to inhabit. Placed on a high plateau above the River Tagus the view from the castle battlements is of a winding river stretching its way to the sea. Wide sandbanks and grassy pastures follow its contours. Every element will be contained in Hervé’s painting but the viewer takes responsibility for reconstructing the scene.

Further upstream a transition zone separates the mountains of the Centro de Portugal and the plains of the Alentejo. Streams – the Pônsul, Erges and Aravil – flow into the Tagus. Valleys with sharp slopes and huge boulders are impressive to illustrate. They contribute to the overall painting but not necessarily in the order or the colour scheme that nature intended!

Further onwards to a new location. Portugal’s ‘enchanted forest’, the Mata Nacional do Buçaco, a botanical feast of 105 hectares is completely surrounded by walls built by Carmelite monks in the 17th century. Filled with artistic potential there are native trees and other exotic specimens brought by Portuguese sailors from Brazil and India. Paved pathways, again built by the monks, twist and turn and vanish into the distance. Through perspective, Hervé can catch the sensation of walking in mysterious woodland where the variety of trees and shrubs exceed 250

species – but as he describes it: “Nature has been improvised by me. The landscape is my anchor but colour directs me on the canvas. Chromatic harmony is my aim while leaving sufficient space for the viewer’s imagination.”

Forests have a special appeal for Hervé. He was born in Brittany in the countryside near the Forest of Brocéliande. At an early age, he established a very close, almost spiritual relationship with nature, which has remained his main source of inspiration. At the beginning of his career as a painter he moved towards a figurative style. Later adopting a more instinctive approach he developed a form of pictorial writing that some critics rate as abstract. Whatever others say, in his soul he insists he is a figurative painter because his subjects are linked to the real world.

“I learned to paint like a craftsman learns to do his job,” he says. “I tried several types of painting such as watercolour and gouache before finally settling on oil paint, whose viscosity offers a sensuality that cannot be found in any other medium. Materials and technique are not as important as putting yourself into a painting, learning to know yourself, putting your personality onto the canvas. It’s the most interesting part of the job.”

He has exhibited in galleries in France, England, Canada and the USA. Examples of his latest paintings are on display at Galeria Côrte-Real located in the countryside near Paderne.

What sparks your creativity?

For me, inspiration is all-encompassing. It can stem from anything around me – nature’s beauty, shapes, colours, compositions, or even the smallest details that catch my eye. I draw from these moments to convey my emotions on canvas.

Do you have a personal enchanted forest? My enchanted forest is a tapestry of the natural world that envelops me – the forests, fields, waterways, sun, rain, wind, and the ever-changing seasons. Together, these elements shape the realm in which I dwell.

Favourite colours found in nature?

In terms of my palette, I freely explore colours that resonate with me, without feeling confined to natural representations. This approach sometimes lends my paintings a departure from reality. If certain colours in a landscape captivate me, I incorporate and adapt them to suit my creative vision.

Which time of year resonates with you the most? My preferred seasons are autumn and spring. Spring brings a sense of renewal and joy, while autumn signals the onset of a quieter period, marked by hibernation. In each of these seasons, life pulsates intensely: colours evolve, shapes take on new forms. They are both deeply inspiring worlds to me.

When do you prefer to paint?

I find mornings ideal for painting due to the quality of light and enhanced concentration. These hours tend to be most conducive to creative inspiration. Other parts of the day are reserved for preparing canvases and attending to administrative tasks.

ALGARVE PLUS l 47
CÔRTE-REAL is signposted from Boliqueime, Ferreiras and Paderne. OPEN: Thursday to Sunday, from 11.30 – 16.30 / 961 528 679 / corterealarte.com
about the artist
CLEVER PLUS
CREATING CHANGE

A LOVE FOR THE ECLECTIC WORLD OF OLD AND NEW INSPIRED ARCHITECT JOANA DIOGO TO CARVE HER UNIQUE NICHE IN THE FRONTIER OF FURNITURE RESTYLING. HERS IS A STORY OF INSPIRED THINKING

WORKING FROM her atelier near Belém’s Jerónimos Monastery in Lisbon, Joana

Diogo turns historic beauty into contemporary magic. The antique grand piano she restyled into an iconic centre piece for the renowned Bela Vista Hotel & Spa Relais & Chateaux in the Algarve is the perfect example of her passion for making relics fresh and relevant.

As a young girl growing up in Lisbon, she lived in a home that embraced everything eclectic and contemporary. “I was surrounded by watercolours, modern furniture, art books, fashion and DIY magazines, and music that ranged from classical to rock,” she says.

“My childhood bedroom was a magical place decorated with a country landscape mural made with collage trees, green carpets as grass, a sunset painting, clouds of cloth on curtains and handmade pieces of furniture - all created and hand painted by my super creative parents.”

She remembers how her bedroom evolved over time and how she loved to be a part of the transformation, especially of the furniture.

“I learned the power of small details and the surprising effect of materials. This upbringing inspired and influenced my life path.”

Her teenage dreams of being a ballet or jazz dancer, or even a

ALGARVE PLUS l 49
Opposite page: Joana’s very grand piano at home in the Bela Vista Hotel and Spa in Praia da Rocha. Below, decor inside and out. Bottom: Joana Diogo

Above: A completely different look from its original; even the handles are little works of art.

Left: A bedside table with a real difference.

Below: Making the mundane into the extraordinary

choreographer, were replaced with a desire to craft beautiful things and so, in 1998, she graduated in Architecture at Faculdade de Arquitectura da Universidade Técnica de Lisboa.

“Later, I did a Master in Construction at Instituto Superior Técnico em Lisboa, where I discovered my passion for the rehabilitation of old buildings,” she says. “The before-andafter of something with a history of its own has always fascinated me, but somehow the scale of a piece of furniture (rather than the one of a building) and the possibilities of its transformation appealed to me the most.”

So, the next step was to Florence, Italy, and the Istituto per l’Arte e il Restauro – Palazzo Spinelli, where the adventurous Joana took up her scholarship awarded by the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation for the study of wood restoration, marquetry and gilding.

“It was here that I truly had access to the artisan’s world and its specialised techniques. Later, I dedicated myself to the enhancement of this knowledge with masters from Ricardo Espírito Santo Foundation by studying decorative painting, restoration and conservation, as well as the practice of ancient decorative arts such as découpage, marbling, faux tortoise, stenciling, gilding and other decorative painting techniques.”

Meanwhile Joana had been working in project and construction management for an American company for some six years. When it merged with the Portuguese company, Brisa, she decided it was time to explore and develop her love for furniture restyling.

“I made several inspiring visits to decoration fairs in London, Paris and Buenos Aires, which reinforced my enthusiasm for furniture with a unique character,” she explains. “It was then that I recognised something important when thinking about my past and my upbringing: furniture restyling had been part of my DNA for a long time!”

A new chapter

And so, in January 2009 she created her own atelier –Habitat Improver – Furniture Restyle and Applied Arts. It first started “as a lovely garden office” in a family house outside Lisbon, but for the past seven years it has been housed in Lisbon’s Restelo-Belém, an area where you’ll find most of the fabric and wallpaper interior decorator showrooms.

“The versatility and eclectic visual approach of my atelier allows me to work with interior designers, national and international, private clients and to produce one-of-a-kind

A FEW OF MY FAVOURITE THINGS

Restyling clothes, accessories and bathing suits.

Table decorating for dinners with friends at home.

Dancing to good music.

Going to the beach.

Walking in nature.

Reading interior design magazines.

Learning new skills.

Staying at my “petit apartment” as I call it, in Quinta do Lago, on the Algarve – “an absolute heaven on earth”.

CLEVER PLUS

pieces to sell at curated shops and online,” says Joana.

“It’s been an incredible 15 years. The journey of creating the Atelier Habitat Improver has been one of constant learning, discovery, and, most importantly, seeing the positive impact restyling pieces has on people’s lives.”

She admits there were challenges along the way but says those were outweighed by the thrill of overcoming obstacles and bringing her vision to life.

“The Atelier Habitat Improver is built on the belief that everyone deserves to feel inspired and comfortable in their own home. It’s about enhancing what you have, to create a more beautiful and functional living environment.”

She is adamant that every restyling she does is handmade and bespoke, resulting in one-of-a-kind pieces with stories to tell, to be enjoyed for generations to come.

“My skill is executed with nothing less than an exacting attention to detail, elevating the pieces of furniture to items that become extraordinary and that make us dream, with renewed forms and refreshed meanings. This is Habitat Improver’s motto.”

She tells me that her ethos is giving new life to preloved and passed-down furniture pieces, re-purposing dated furniture to prolong its life and “bring a new soul, preparing for a new future”.

Believing that each and every project is special, Joana is loath to single out any specific work or projects over the years, but, besides the grand piano, she also mentions the bespoke sideboards she created for the hall and corridors of the elegant Hotel Estrela de Fátima.

“These were an example of new furniture, which I constructed and then applied finishes that you won’t find in factories, giving

the clients in question personalised and unique items,” she says.

Joana works with a variety of materials, mainly with fabric, wallpaper, tinfoil, leather, paints, silver/gold and copper leaves and bespoke handles and knobs, and applies skills such as découpage or cutting techniques that introduce a new tactile dimension and invite you to experience the pieces of furniture in a more distinct and vivid way.”

There’s no doubt Joana is getting it right. In 2023 she was selected as a Master Artisan in Furniture Decoration for the prestigious Homo Faber Guide by the Michelangelo Foundation, which is dedicated to the promotion of the métiers d’art, craftsmanship, design and creativity. The atelier won the badge of “Recommended by Homo Faber”.

It is also featured at the exclusive American art and design marketplace Wescover, at the French online art gallery Singulart and was selected as a member of The Interiors Index, curated by The World of Interiors decorated magazine by Conde Nast.“So, besides working with local clients, people from around the world can access my ready-to-ship, one-of-a-kind pieces (with the Restyled by Habitat Improver stamp), online.”

And then, of course, there’s the Lisbon atelier which is by appointment with Joana. With a passion for fostering a future haven for artisans to refine their skills, her dream is to collaborate with decorating brands and other creatives.

“Sustainability is the cornerstone of the atelier’s philosophy,” she says. “I aim to educate and inspire others to make conscious choices for a brighter planet. Ultimately, I aspire that my atelier Habitat Improver achieves international recognition, not just for the quality of my work, but for the positive impact it creates and for the joy it brings to people.”

ALGARVE PLUS l 51 I: Instagram.com/habitatimprover / E: Info@habitatimprover.com / T: +351 918545055 / W: habitatimprover.com

RECIPE of the month...

Baked polenta with feta, béchamel and za’atar tomatoes

NO, IT IS NOT A PIZZA, EVEN THOUGH IT LOOKS REMARKABLY LIKE ONE. IT CAME OUT OF OTTOLENGHI ’ S TEST KITCHEN AND IS HAPPY-LOOKING, WITH ITS YELLOWS AND REDS AND WONDERFULLY GOLDEN EDGES. SERVE IT WITH A CHICORY SALAD OR ANYTHING LEAFY AND GREEN

PREP TIME: 15 MINUTES COOK TIME: 1 HOUR 30 MINUTES SERVES 4–6

INGREDIENTS

 80g unsalted butter

 50g plain flour (or gluten-free if you prefer)

 750ml whole milk

 4 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed

 200g quick-cook polenta

 65g pecorino romano, roughly grated

 180g Greek feta, roughly crumbled

 5g oregano sprigs (try to use the softer sprigs)

For the za’atar tomatoes

 400g datterini or cherry tomatoes

 120ml olive oil

 1½ tbsp balsamic vinegar

 2 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed

 2 tbsp za’atar

 ½ tsp caster sugar

 5g parsley, roughly chopped

 5g oregano leaves, roughly chopped

 salt and black pepper

METHOD

1 Preheat the oven to 150°C fan.

2 Make the za’atar tomatoes. Put the tomatoes, oil, vinegar, garlic, ½ teaspoon of salt and a good grind of pepper into a baking dish, roughly 30cm x 20cm. Cover tightly with foil and bake for 40–45 minutes, stirring halfway through, or until the tomatoes have just burst but aren’t completely falling apart. Remove the foil, gently stir in the za’atar and sugar and leave to cool completely. Once cool, stir in the herbs (gently, so as not to break up the tomatoes).

3 Turn the heat up to 230°C fan. Line a large baking tray, roughly 40cm x 30cm, with baking parchment.

4 For the Béchamel, Put 40g of the butter into a medium saucepan over a medium-high heat. Once melted, add the flour and cook, whisking

continuously, for 30 seconds or until it smells like popcorn. Slowly pour in 350ml of the milk, whisking continuously to avoid any lumps, then add the garlic, ½ teaspoon of salt and plenty of pepper, turn the heat down to medium and cook for five minutes, stirring often, until quite thick and no longer floury-tasting. Set aside and cover with a piece of baking parchment, to stop a skin forming.

5 Meanwhile, prepare the polenta. First put the remaining 400ml of milk, 300ml of water, 20g of the butter, 1¼ teaspoons of salt and a good grind of pepper into a medium sauté or saucepan pan over a medium-high heat. Once it gently bubbles, turn the heat down to medium-low, slowly add the polenta, whisking continuously to incorporate, and cook for two minutes, to thicken.

Add the pecorino and the remaining 20g of butter and stir with a spatula until incorporated.

Quickly transfer to your prepared baking tray and spread out in a large oblong shape about 1cm thick and 38cm in length. Spoon over the béchamel and spread it so it covers the surface, leaving a 1½cm rim exposed around the edges.

Top evenly with the feta and the oregano sprigs and bake for 22 minutes, or until golden and bubbling on top and starting to brown around the edges. Leave to cool for 5–10 minutes.

6 Spoon half the za’atar tomatoes on the baked polenta, and the rest in a bowl alongside. Use a pizza cutter to cut into slabs and serve warm.

This great recipe is by Noor Murad and Yotam Ottolenghi from Ottolenghi Test Kitchen: Extra Good Things (Ebury Press, €30, FNAC). Mouthwatering photography by Elena Heatherwick adds extra extras!

ALGARVE PLUS l 53 MAKE IT PLUS
TIP Za’atar tomatoes / keep in a sealed container in the fridge for up to a week / Try spooning these onto bruschetta, or using them as a sauce for pasta

For Coffee Lovers

Café bean17, in the Mercado of Loulé , is a gem – not only because of the houseroasted espresso or cappuccino or the organic kombucha or the wonderful home-baked cakes, but also for the freshly roasted organic arabica coffee beans from Peru and Ethiopia that you can buy. And the new SAGE espressomachine and Eureka coffee-grinders are available at a discount in the bean17 roastery. Make an appointment to see them with Ilona in the café or email jmtromp@mac.com.

bean17coffee bean17coffeeandmore

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coffee and more

Cardiovascular diseases

CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (CVD s ) ARE THE LEADING CAUSE OF DEATH ACROSS THE WORLD. THIS MONTH, HERE IN PORTUGAL, THE ‘ MONTH OF THE HEART ’ CAMPAIGN WILL FOCUS ON CREATING AWARENESS AND UNDERSTANDING OF CVD s . DR LUCAS HAMANN OFFERS SPECIALISED CARDIOVASCULAR PREVENTION CONSULTATION AT THE FAMILY MEDICAL CENTRE

THE TERM “dying from old age” is still used occasionally and for some reason we tend to accept it: half a century ago, however, a phrase like that made sense as we couldn’t explain a death every time. But today things are different, and with the advance of medicine we now almost always recognise the reason for a death...and that reason is a medical one.

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In the 1950s, our life-expectancy was around 63 years; nowadays in Europe it is around 81 years. An incredible feat, mainly explained through ongoing advances in medical care and technology, prevention of diseases being the most important factor.

The figures

Accounting for almost half of deaths (45%) in Europe today are cardiovascular diseases, which include heart attack, stroke, heart failure and others, too. In comparison, cancer is the cause of one in every four deaths (24%).

the long run. And those risk factors are well known –arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, smoking, physical inactivity, diet, obesity and depression/anxiety.

Almost half of deaths (45%) in Europe today are from cardiovascular diseases

But it is important to be aware that over the past 25 years, there has been an increase of 34% in the absolute number of CVD cases and the figures are increasing.

The positive part of this rather sad reality is that an astonishing 80% of the deaths caused by CVD are actually preventable. And that means that with thorough and correct professional assessment and treatment of modifiable risk factors, we are able to potentially increase our lifespan.

Preventative measures

Increased cardiovascular risk starts developing at a very young age, and the longer we ignore the pertinent risk factors, the higher the probability of suffering a CVD in

These are silent killers; we don’t feel them, and sometimes we don’t even know we have them, only noticing a problem when the damage has already been done. CVDs attack slowly but constantly, damaging every organ in our body. However, through thorough examination and assessment, we can find them prematurely and, in good cases are able to reverse the damage done or halt its progression. Without question, the most efficient way to evaluate a CVD and establish the best and most effective way to deal with it, is to consult with a specialised doctor who takes a personalised and individual approach to each patient, and is able to assess every risk factor in detail and recommend the best course to take to achieve the most for an additional lifetime, free of cardiovascular disease.

Remember, we don’t die from old age, we die because we didn’t prevent it on time. At the Family Medical Centre, we have a highly-qualified team, dedicated to preventing and treating cardiovascular risk factors and diseases.

PASSIONATE ABOUT PROVIDING THE BEST HEALTHCARE

Dr Lucas Hamann is our Cardiology Resident who collaborates with a number of specialists and ensures you receive the best treatment and lifestyle advice.

OPEN compromise? Plaza Shopping Centre)
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diving into style

April 2013

born. Now an essential summer staple for both the Portuguese and international market, this brand is going from strength to strength and has introduced other lines, including active wear, accessories and collections for kids and teens. latitid.com

LATITID The name LATITID was conceived from the fusion of the words ‘latitude’ and ‘attitude’. The first collection, launched in was inspired by the city of Porto where the founders were all

BEYOND ITS BREATHTAKING LANDSCAPES AND RICH HISTORY LIES ANOTHER ASPECT THAT CAPTURES THE ESSENCE OF PORTUGUESE

LIFESTYLE: SWIMWEAR. FROM CHIC ONE-PIECE SWIMSUITS

ADORNED WITH INTRICATE LACEWORK TO SLEEK BIKINI SETS FEATURING BOLD GEOMETRIC PATTERNS, PORTUGUESE SWIMWEAR EMBODIES A PERFECT BALANCE OF STYLE AND FUNCTIONALITY

Words: PIPPA O'KEEFE

VOKE (above left) VOKE was founded by childhood friends in 2014 and is a by-product of their passion for design and the beach. Their comfortable swimwear is stylish yet sporty, resulting in super versatile garments. I feel a trip to the West Coast coming on. The brand is proud to use eco-friendly recycled fabric Econyl and tailors the quantities of products to the actual needs. vokeswimwear.com

TYPE (above right)

Type is a swimwear brand, created and manufactured in Portugal by a team committed to producing unique pieces with premium quality; its mission is to enhance the swimwear market in Portugal and eventually go global. All things bright and beautiful is the brand personality and this one-piece definitely personifies that. type.pt

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With its sun-kissed beaches, azure coastlines, and vibrant culture, Portugal has long been a destination synonymous with leisure and relaxation. The country’s swimwear continues to make waves in the sustainable fashion industry with many designers prioritising eco-friendly materials and production methods, striving to minimize their environmental footprint while still delivering exceptional quality and style.

CANTÊ (left) With the slogan “It’s always summer somewhere”, Mariana Delgado and Rita Soares, two former architects, created Cantê back in 2011 and have been a success story ever since. Their intricate designs and climate-conscious production processes such as reducing half the use of water in the dyeing process stage or using sustainable technological fabric, made of regenerated Nylon ECONYL, sets them apart from fast fashion competitors in the swimwear market. And their kid’s stuff is gorgeous. cantelisboa.com

CONSCIOUS THE LABEL (below) Conscious by name, conscious by nature. They design simple and timeless pieces using recycled fabrics mainly from ocean waste plastic. Each piece is ethically sewn in their Lisbon Atelier and sustainably packaged. They also give 1% of their sales to the Planet. And let’s face it, their two piece is a work of art. consciousthelabel.com

FASHION PLUS
ALGARVE Elegance Find us here: Rua Vale Formoso, 8100-267, Almancil or contact us on T: 960 116 396 E: donna@algarveelegance.com W: algarveelegance.com Algarve Elegance is the beauty within your home. Experience unique design by Donna Vinall.

Words: LUCY MAYER Off

YOU WOULD BE IF YOU DON ’ T TAKE THE OPPORTUNITY TO SHOP AROUND THE SUPERMARKETS FOR THE BEST QUALITY AND MOST GENEROUS PRICES. STICKING TO THE SAME STORE REGARDLESS OF WHAT OTHERS MIGHT OFFER MEANS YOU COULD BE MISSING OUT EVERY WEEK. WE CHECKED OUT SIX CHAINS ON THE SAME DAY

your
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ALDI is a discount supermarket chain that is recognisable across Europe and the world with 12,000 sites in countries such as Australia and the USA. Founded by brothers Theo and Karl Albrecht, in 1946, it has been in Portugal since 2006 and opened its biggest store in the Algarve to date in Albufeira in 2021. The supermarket’s 20th store in the region opened in March this year in Vila Do Bispo and more are planned.

STAR DEAL: Aldi has an ‘Opportunities of the week’ section, which includes offers and price drops on selected products. Certain ice creams prices were dropped by as much as 15% last month – perfect for summer planning. There are also promotions on everyday essentials like milk, vitamins and toiletries. Offers are updated and refreshed each week.

THE LIST:

Rustic loaf (family sized): €0.65

Pastel de nata: €0.39

2 fillets of salmon, 300g: €6.49

Tub of hummus, 200g: €1.29

Standard chicken: €2.45 per kg

Box of 6 eggs, M/L: €1.49

1L bottle of Sagres: €1.58

1L Mimosa Meio Gordo Milk: €0.98

750ml disinfectant: €1.99

Apolónia is a family-run chain which started life as a grocery store in 1983 in Almancil. It is nicknamed “the Waitrose of the Algarve” because of its highend produce and largely British clientele. Following its launch, Avelino Apolónia and his wife Célia opened further stores in Galé in 2008 and Lagoa in 2015. Sons Paulo and Eduardo joined the brand introducing in-store cafés and pharmacies and creating an online presence. Today, there are 400-plus employees, with stores that stock a large range of local and international favourites from staple to gourmet.

STAR DEAL: The supermarket has regular price drops via its website apolonia.com and also publishes recipes for dishes that can be created using Apolónia products. This includes Bacalhau à Brás with sweet potato, which can be completed in just 15 minutes. There is also a newsletter to sign up for which has information and invites to local events and exclusive products before they become readily available.

THE LIST:

Rustic loaf (family sized): €1.59

Pastel de nata: €0.79

2 fillets of salmon, 300g: €5.59 per unit.

Tub of Florentin Hummus, 200g: €4.79

Standard chicken: €16.95 per kg

Box of 6 M/L eggs: €2.35

1L bottle of Sagres: €2.29

1L Mimosa Meio Gordo Milk: €0.98

750ml disinfectant: €4.99

Continente has belonged to Sonae Distribuição, the largest retailer in Portugal, since 2008 and is instantly recognisable by its bright red branding depicting a giant ‘C’. Sonae Distribuição was launched in 1985 following the merger of two large retailers, Modelo and Continente. The chain operates three main store formats; general stores, Continente Bom Dia, which are smaller supermarkets in urban locations, designed for more frequent purchases, and Modelo stores, which are hypermarkets, so combine both a supermarket and department store. The chain says its mission is to “encourage a health diet and lifestyle while raising awareness for sustainable and responsible consumption.”

STAR DEAL: On the Continente Card App you can do everything with just one click: use coupons, deduct balance and pay for your purchases. If you spend more than €30, you get discount coupons giving you 15c a litre off petrol at Galp stations.

THE LIST:

A rustic loaf (family sized): €1.19

Pastel de nata: €0.70

2 fillets of salmon, 250g: €6.99

Tub of hummus, 200g: €2.24

Standard chicken: €2.49 per kg

Box of 6 M/L eggs: €2.06

1L bottle of Sagres: €1.83

1L Mimosa Meio Gordo Milk: €0.89

750ml disinfectant: €2.49

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The team behind Pingo Doce, the chain that belongs to the Portuguese company Jerónimo Martins and the Dutch-based Ahold Delhaize, say theirs is a story of “national pride.” With more than 30,000 employees and 400 stores across the county today, bosses say their mission is to make the chain the best in Portugal.

The name Pingo Doce – sweet drop – is easily recognisable thanks to its black and green branding. The chain markets itself to the everyday customer with its competitive prices, quality food and homewares; and regards employees as family.

Pingo Doce invests in a number of community projects – and has contributed to more than 1,400 local causes, supported by the Bairro Feliz Programme, which includes providing up to €1,000 for initiatives chosen by the community – like collecting blankets for the elderly and books for local libraries as part of the Happy Neighbourhoods scheme.

STAR DEAL: You can pick up a flyer at your local Pingo Doce store each week, which has numerous vouchers for savings, from fish to toiletries.

THE LIST:

Rustic loaf (family sized): €2.69

Pastel de nata: €0.79

2 fillets of salmon, 250g: €9.49

A tub of hummus, 180g: €1.55

Standard chicken: €2.99 per kg

Box of 6 M/L eggs: €1.84

1L bottle of Sagres: €1.74

1L Mimosa Meio Gordo Milk: €0.98

• 500ml disinfectant: €3.99

Intermarché is another retail chain that had its beginnings in France. Founded in 1969, this is its 55th year in business. The brand has been established in Portugal for over 30 years, with more than 260 outlets spread across more than 180 towns in 18 districts. Bosses say that they are the only Group that is directly managed by independent entrepreneurs, who are owners and fully responsible for the management of each store. The supermarket retailer says it is offering thousands of products via its brands to help shoppers navigate the cost-of-living crisis. This includes discounts on a kilo of minced steak and a fillet of wild fish every day.

STAR DEAL: The Intermarché Savings Card offers regular discounts on products, allows access to Extra Savings Programmes and benefits from the chains brands and partners.

THE LIST:

Rustic loaf (family sized): €1.19

Pastel de nata: €0.39

2 fillets of salmon, 300g: €7.49

Tub of hummus, 200g: €2.69

Standard chicken: €3.74 per kg

Box of 6 M/L eggs: €2.38

1L bottle of Sagres: €2.27

1L Mimosa Meio Gordo Milk: €0.89

1L of disinfectant: €4.48

Auchan describes itself as a “global, family group” which has supermarkets across Europe. It started life in France with the first store opening in Roubaix in the north in 1961. It was named after the Hauts Champs neighbourhood where it was located.

Auchan continued growing, but it was some 20 years before its first international store opened in Spain. It was there that the familiar sight of a robin nesting in the company’s ‘A’ became the symbol of the Auchan brand in 1983.

The chain finally hit Portugal in 1996 when it acquired Pão de Açúcar, the owner of the Jumbo stores. Today, Auchan says its mission is to make healthy, environment-friendly products.

STAR DEAL: Sign up to the MyCLUB Auchan card for regular invitations to cooking shows and tastings, tickets to events, and even weekends of pampering.

THE LIST:

Rustic loaf (family sized): €2.19

Pastel de nata: €0.39

2 fillets of salmon (x4): €11.89

Tub of hummus, 200g: €3.10

Standard chicken: €2.34 per kg

Box of 6 M/L eggs: €2.39

1L bottle of Sagres: €1.83

1L Mimosa Meio Gordo Milk: €0.89

750ml disinfectant: €3.89

Prices shown were all checked on the same day, but of course can, and will, vary on a regular basis. When doing comparisons, look at the quantities quoted, which vary, and allow for biologics. Take surroundings as well as brand names into consideration as these can understandably affect retail prices.

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FROM THE RUINS OF AN ABANDONED VILLAGE IN THE FOOTHILLS OF THE ALGARVE, WILD VIEW RETREAT FOUNDER, ANDREW FINLAY, HAS CREATED A HAVEN OF WELLNESS FOR GUESTS, AND A MUCHNEEDED DOSE OF HAPPINESS FOR HIMSELF

Words: SALLY DIXON

NEW START PLUS

In pursuit of

THERE’S A well-known African proverb: “It takes a village” (to raise a child), and for Andrew Finlay it took an actual village to rediscover his purpose in life and the path to happiness. Located in the protected Serra do Calderão mountains above São Brás de Alportel, the abandoned village of Corgas Bravas would prove to be the turning point of a new life for Andrew when he purchased the old Manor House and surrounding ruins in 2015.

Looking back

A former marine biologist, Andrew experienced tragedy when his friend and co-worker tragically drowned on a job in the Marshall Islands in 2008. “I was living my dream there,” he says. “I’d found my passion... saving the world. But it all changed with the death of my best friend when I was 30. It had a profound impact on me.”

This, coupled with an accident he had himself six months earlier which nearly led to a leg amputation, prompted Andrew to return to London in search of what he thought was ‘real’ life. As he puts it: “a steady office job, a wife, a two-up two-down, and a mortgage”.

Being back in London and joining the rat race at age 31 soon proved to be soul-destroying. Andrew was totally lost, working in a role with no purpose, and miserable with London life.

Feeling lonely, depressed, and drinking too much, he went on a wellness retreat, desperate to get some balance and perspective in his life.

Awakening an interest

A juice retreat in Turkey would be his first venture into a very different world. “I found it life-changing going on that first retreat. Spending a week of putting good things into my body, surrounded by lovely people with positive energy, sunshine, vitamin D, clean air. I felt ten years younger, and I felt the heaviness start to lift. I will always be eternally grateful for the door that juice

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retreat opened for me.”

But returning to London, the heaviness crept back in, and Andrew spent all his holidays going on retreats either as a guest or as a volunteer, craving the feeling of safety and wellbeing that the retreats gave him. “The penny dropped,” he says. “I needed to make that my life; I’d found my tribe, as the somewhat pretentious wellness phrase goes.”

During those times, volunteering on everything from a silent retreat in California, to retreats in Turkey and Portugal – Andrew slowly embarked on the road back to happiness. “Chopping up carrots or clearing out compost toilets in exchange for yoga classes, living on site, what stood out for me was the fact that guests were going away feeling awesome, but then heading straight back into the rat race like I did. I felt there was this amazing opportunity to inspire, educate and motivate guests to go away and implement some of these practices into their everyday life.”

With this in mind, Andrew decided to add to his qualifications in 2013 by enrolling parttime on a three-year diploma in nutritional

therapy at the College of Naturopathic Medicine (CNM). By year two, he’d left his office job and was still volunteering on retreats. It was then that an idea for a retreat business of his own began to bubble.

Having had first-hand experience of retreats, Andrew instinctively recognised what worked and what didn’t. “I knew that the staff needed their own private accommodation so that they could close the door, recharge their batteries, and give everything to the guests. A big house where you move the sofas out the way just wasn’t going to cut it; it was going to have to be a custom-made place. Here in Portugal, you can’t just build on a patch of grass, there must be urban foundations in place. Which is when it dawned on me that I would need a small village,” he laughs. Halfway through the diploma, he found that village.

Right time, right place

Originally built by a Portuguese army general in 1898, Corgas Bravas ticked all the boxes for Andrew, offering a remote location with incredible views, a short journey from a low-cost airline airport (Wild

View Retreat is 40 minutes from Faro), building foundations that could create enough space for staff, plus great communal areas for guests, and a dedicated team with guest nutritional speakers. His first viewing of the property in 2015 filled him with a renewed optimism for life.

Ironically, chance conversations in saunas (one on a retreat and the other at Andrew’s local gym in South London) that same year would lead to two serendipitous meetings with strangers. The first being a man who, on hearing Andrew’s retreat idea, confessed that he lived in Portugal and could provide access to a lawyer, an accountant, and a builder. “That meeting was a golden ticket for me,” recalls Andrew.

The second sauna heart-to-heart, with an Indian man, would lead to Andrew meeting and marrying his now wife, Erika. Full credit to Erika, a film set designer from Ecuador, for the gorgeous interiors at Wild View Retreat. Andrew laughs: “If it had been left up to me it would have looked like the inside of a B&Q!”

And so, in 2015 Andrew naively jumped into the unknown, bought the small village

/ wildviewretreat.com
WILD
VIEW RETREAT Corgas Bravas São Brás de
Alportel hello@wildviewretreat.com
Getting away from all that is familiar and often wearying can reshape your vision for the future. Eating the right foods, sleeping well and meeting others who dream of sharing the same journey puts so much into perspective. For Andrew Finlay it was a life-changer

and spent the first two years living on site in a two-man tent with no electricity, no running water, and a machete under his sleeping bag. Without question, the restoration phase of the village wasn’t without its low points.

A couple of planning refusals and no guarantee it was ever going to get passed didn’t help. “Being in a tent next to a pile of ruins with no end in sight started to take its toll on me,” he recalls. “The irony of it wasn’t lost on me, that I’d left London for an easier life and replaced it with something so mammoth that I was struggling to cope. There were points when I asked myself ‘what have I done?’ We are programmed as human beings to add more and more pressure onto ourselves.”

And then it begins...

Once the build was finished, Andrew was elated, but it was then when the true hard work started.

In the beginning he was doing everything, the retreat programme design, the nutrition talks, the guided walks, the juices, repairing the showers, cleaning the pool.

“I had no staff; it was just me. My wife was stuck in London due to visa paperwork problems and I was running Wild View Retreat all on my own,” he recalls, somewhat emotionally. “I felt as if I’d climbed Mount Everest and was at the top saying ‘woohoo, well done, you made it to the top’, then someone had flicked me off the top down to the bottom and told me to do it again five times over!”

In a crazy plot twist, Andrew decided to put Wild View Retreat on the market and sell it in 2019. “I’d got to an unhappy place again and the stress of trying to run it was making me unwell. I’d taken on too much, I was back to being at one of my lowest points,” he says. But a glimmer of light crept in when Andrew realised he didn’t have to be running a health retreat every week for 30 weeks of the year as planned, burning himself out in the process.

The business model had to change, to what it is now – offering a small number of high-quality retreats with excellent nutrition expertise (often CNM lecturers flown in from London) in March, May, June, and September, allowing Andrew and the team to give 150% to each group that visits the beautiful village.

Andrew says: “It dawned on me that we have this wonderful asset that other people want to use too, be it corporate groups, individual wellness teachers looking to put on their own retreats, or large families wanting a sizeable place to stay. It gave me

the spark to carry on, change our offering and opened a much easier path forward.”

Little did he know the world would shut down less than a year later. Hello Covid-19. Luckily, Wild View weathered that storm pretty well.

And now...

With breath-taking uninterrupted 360° views, no houses, no towns, no roads, no people for as far as the eye can see, Wild View Retreat is a gem in the Portuguese countryside. Nothing but wilderness and nature, punctuated with the sounds of the birds and the gentle Algarvian wind. The true meaning of getting away from it all.

Indoor and outdoor dining areas, an infinity pool with mountain views, a log cabin sauna, a yoga and fitness studio, a yoga terrace perfect for stargazing, the list of incredible facilities is endless. The cherry on the cake being the delightful retreat team.

Andrew smiles: “Every single team member is chosen for their character, behaviour, and good energy – not because they can do a handstand! From the maintenance managers to the chefs, and the house team – surrounding yourself with great people who can support and nourish you is the key to a happy retreat.” And with a 65% guest return rate, it’s clear the team are doing something very right.

Andrew reflects: “It’s taken seven years to get to a place where I’m really happy and proud of what I’ve achieved with Wild View Retreat. This beautiful place was born purely out of desperation and unhappiness. My life had to get so unhappy and so miserable that I had no choice but to change it. All the traumatic, tragic things that have happened were a gift that was necessary, I’m very grateful for the lessons I learned.”

Moral of the story? The road to happiness isn’t always as smooth or as straight as you might expect, and a sauna might just change your life.

The details

Guests can book onto a Wild View Retreat with costs ranging from €899 to €2,000/week, depending on which retreat you opt for (Juice Retreat or Healthy Food Retreat) and which style of accommodation. I’m liking the sound of one of the Shepherd’s Huts, surrounded by nature with an outdoor shower (a ‘loo with a view’ as Andrew calls it!); a sort of off-grid experience but with plenty of home comforts (including a Starlink satellite internet system should you feel the urge to check your emails).

Andrew is kindly offering local residents with a Portuguese postcode €100 off the cost of a retreat using the code WVR100LOCAL. There are five Healthy Food retreats and nine Juice Fasting retreats this year (featuring nutrition talks daily) so plenty of dates to choose from. Expect delicious meals provided courtesy of Chef Ricardo, former Michelin-starred sous chef, and former owner of 100% Libre in Loulé.

Next Retreat Dates

1-8 June Detox Juicing Retreat

15-22 June Healthy Food and Yoga Retreat

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Renting or buying? Choose wisely!

CPROPERTY IS ALWAYS A GOOD INVESTMENT. YOU CAN EASILY RENT OUT A PURCHASED HOUSE TO GENERATE INCOME. AND WITH THE CURRENT RENTAL PRICES HERE (ALWAYS EXCLUDING WATER AND ELECTRICITY, BUT OFTEN FURNISHED!), A MORTGAGE IS SOMETIMES CHEAPER THAN RENT. YET THERE ARE SEVERAL REASONS WHY RENTING (FIRST) IS THE BEST DECISION

HOOSING Portugal as your new home country is understandable. The locals are friendly and hospitable, the country offers a unique blend of traditional and modern living, with a high quality of life and affordable living costs.

But regional differences are enormous. Most house searches start with defining the region where you want to settle. Portugal is a small country, but the differences between the regions are huge.

The climate on the Silver Coast (say, the coastal strip between Lisbon and Porto) is different (read wetter) than, for example, in the Algarve. The interior is quiet, even deserted and very authentic.

The Algarve is an easy choice for golfers but often with more expensive house prices. Cascais is also popular, but less attractive in winter. If you don’t know yet where you want to live, renting is a serious option.

You only really get to know Portugal once you have stayed here a little longer. And no one wants to come and find out that their recently purchased dream home is ultimately located in the wrong area.

Mortgage is a challenge

Portuguese banks have no problem lending to foreigners and this happens regularly. But beware. Banks only lend 70% of the home value to nonresidents. And the home value is not the sales price but the bank’s foreclosure value.

So if a house costs €500,000 and the bank values this property at €350,000, your maximum mortgage is €245,000, actually 50% of the purchase value. As a resident, you can usually borrow more than as a non-resident. If finances are a challenge, renting is a good first step. Firstly, you do not have to worry about financing, but you can also start the process of becoming a resident.

As a resident, your options at the bank are broader and you can often get better conditions.

If a house costs €500,000 and the bank values it at €350,000, your maximum mortgage is €245,000, which is actually 50% of the purchase value

Making sure it’s what you want

Another reason to rent initially is to find your way around and, importantly, to ensure you will not become homesick once you move.

This is not a theoretical notion – research shows that some 30–40% of emigrants miss their homeland, having left behind everything that is familiar – a trusted environment, family and friends, a language they are proficient in, and the obvious way of living.

Homesickness, and the loneliness that may result, do not disappear on their own and can also happen unexpectedly. By renting at first, and discovering your new surroundings, and spend time getting to know people, you avoid getting yourself into an irreversible situation. Joining sports groups, local workshops and charity ventures might be all it takes to get you settled and comfortable.

All in all, buying and renting both have their plus points... it is your approach that you need to define.

Please note that rental contracts in Portugal often have a minimum term of one year. As a tenant, you can expect to be required to lodge an advance payment of the rent (renda antecipada), which covers at least three months. The landlord can also require a deposit (caução).

Purchasing also incurs additional costs, including IMT tax and notary charges. But whatever your choice, don’t rush into anything, enjoy the emigration adventure, see the many beautiful places, talk to the locals where possible and visit the many festivals and markets to get a feel of the true Portugal that could be your new next chapter.

Rob Does is a real estate agent in the East Algarve working mainly for foreign clients. Originally from Holland, he has lived in Olhão for more than seven years and knows the area like the back of his hand. He is also a seasoned journalist and travel writer. In his free time he directs an acapella choir.

PROPERTY PLUS
Jim HAIR ARTISTS WE LOOK FORWARD TO CELEBRATING A NEW YOU. Phone or email for that special appointment. T: +351 914 452 315 E: jim@jims.pt W: jims.pt Em527 943A, 8135-128 Almancil

Digging the dirt

HAVE YOU EVER HAD THE DIRT OF YOUR GARDEN UNDER YOUR FINGERNAILS? I ASK THE QUESTION IN ALL SERIOUSNESS AS AN AMERICAN FRIEND WHO HAD A HOUSE AND GARDEN IN VALE DO LOBO ADMITTED THAT ALTHOUGH HE LOVED PLANTS AND GARDENING HE HAD NEVER PUT HIS HANDS IN THE SOIL

Words: BURFORD HURRY

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HAVE YOU ever thought about the dirt under your fingernails after doing a bit of gardening? That soil is impressive. It should be awe-inspiring as it’s older than the pyramids, definitely older than humankind and started life as part of a layer of rock to be broken down gradually over billions of years into smaller and smaller pieces of rock by wind, weather, water and the tectonic movement of the earth’s crust water.

It has seen life in all its various forms evolve over the years from fungi to the late comers, the dinosaurs, and gradually life as we know it today. It has been washed into rivers and the sea and at times compressed, only to emerge again as other kinds of softer rock to be broken down into soil as we know it. Doesn’t that impress you? It does me. It is precious. It should be respected and treasured.

Fungi matters

I have always loved soil. I never use gloves to plant. I like the smell of soil and its feel, so while living in South Africa I was horrified to see the annual haemorrhaging of red soil into the Indian Ocean because of summer rain and bad farming practice. However, I had yet to learn we were not only losing rock particles but also all kinds of fungi and bacteria that breathe life into soil were also being washed away.

That lesson has taken time. It started some years ago when a forestry ranger came and gave our local garden group a short talk on how fungi contributed to the health of trees. We listened attentively but didn’t ask too many questions – after all, what did that have to do with gardening?

It was a mistake. It was only much later, in fact only a couple of years ago, that I learnt how wrong we had been.

That lesson arrived in the form of a book called Entangled Life by Merlin Sheldrake, sent to me by a South African

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friend now living in Ireland. It arrived in the post and lay for a couple of months unopened as I was put off by the theatrical name of the author and the title. However, one day driven by idle curiosity, I opened the book and was immediately drawn into the fascinating world of fungi to find how wrong I was. In fact, fungi has everything to do with me and you and us. For one thing they are in our bodies and in the world around us both protecting and at times attacking us. What’s more, even as a ‘practising’ gardener I was light years away from any real knowledge of the part that mycorrhizal fungi play in plant life.

Feeding each other

Mycorrhizal? Does your heart sink at the thought of learning another peculiar word when you have yet to learn and remember botanical names? Pronounced my-kuh-ry-zul, it’s a gardening word that we should become familiar with and use in the same way we talk about tap roots.

Mycorrhizal fungi are part of an extremely complex living world, but suffice for us gardeners to be aware of is that all of these fungi live below the soil surface.

The most common type are predatory and penetrate the roots of a plant, but once established develop a symbiotic relationship with their host. In this relationship, the fungi takes from its host sugar and other food in order to grow. At the same time it uses its own delicate but large and elaborate mycorrhizal

Let’s learn to love our soil more and the life that lives in it. Our gardens and our planet will benefit

root system in the soil around the root to feed its host with water and nutrients, including minerals like potassium, which the plant is unable to access, as well as protecting the host from soilborne diseases.

By doing so, mycorrhizal fungi effectively and massively extend the root area of plants and are extremely important to most wild plants. However, it is less significant for garden plants where the use of fertilisers and cultivation disrupts and replaces these associations.

Mycorrhizal fungi are yet another example in nature of a symbiotic relationship in direct contrast to us totally parasitic and predatory homosapiens who generally make a point of not returning anything organic to the natural world.

Although unaware of the extremely important role that fungi play in our gardens and in our lives, I was not completely ignorant. Years ago, a friend who was a lichenologist at the university in Lisbon gave me a beautifully framed piece of wood covered in lichen for display in my living room. I had discussed with my dentist the inoculation of his holm oak tree roots with truffle spore, Tuber melanosporum (the black Perigord truffles), and Tuber aestivum (Summer truffles); my environmentalist and ecologist brother Lynn Hurry, who lives in Fishhoek in the Mediterranean Cape and writes an occasional email column called ‘Coms from Planet Earth’, sent me an article which drew attention to the allelopathic

GARDENING PLUS ALGARVE PLUS l 72
James Wainscoat (Unplash) has photographed thousands of mushrooms. Not only are they beautiful but they are helping the soil

behaviour of acacia trees, which communicate with each other when their foliage is being stripped by herbivores such as kudus or giraffe and defend themselves by increasing the tannin content in their leaves.

Then decades ago, my pal Lionel mentioned at lunch that the A22 highway was about to be driven through a field with wild orchids below Santa Bárbara de Nexe. When I in turn mentioned it to my gardening pal, Mary, she was galvanised into action, and organised a field trip to rescue as many orchids as she could for planting in her wild patch at the back of her house in São Romão. Mary intuitively knew that it was essential to remove the orchid with as much care for its roots and its surrounding soil as possible, perhaps not realising that they contained the essential fungi needed to feed the orchids’ growth. However, her skill was rewarded as the following year the orchids not only reappeared, but they flowered.

The biggest problem for us mere gardeners in relating to fungus is that many fungi – particularly mycorrhizal fungi – are not easy and often impossible to recognise. In addition, the world – I should rather say the universe – of fungus is so vast and at times so completely bewildering that it is difficult to know where to begin.

Fungi do not have a brain but can make choices, can choose partners or if that is not possible recreate more fungus without one; they can take on the task of feeding other organisms while at the same time benefitting from its helping role. While we gardeners have definite roles in life, the role of fungus is not proscribed. It cocks a snoot at how the conventional world describes and interprets the behaviour of a living organism.

Another important point relevant for gardeners that Sheldrake makes in his book is that unlike our western world of competition, plants are not always in competition with each other.

Through mycorrhizal relationships older trees will help not only saplings of the same species with nutrients but others, as well. Such complex relationships also occur between smaller plants. In doing so, Sheldrake gives credence to the school of ‘no dig’ gardeners who do as little as possible to interrupt the existing food chains between plants.

The important lesson to be drawn from all this is that we gardeners should first acknowledge then encourage mycorrhizal fungi to play a more important part in our gardens. On a practical level let’s avoid artificial fertilisers, allow fallen leaves to lie and use more natural organic material such as manure and homemade compost to enrich our soil. Let’s do less disturbing of the mycorrhizal roots by constantly digging and replanting our gardens. Let’s learn to love our soil more and the life that lives in it. Our gardens and our planet will benefit.

Entangled Life: How Fungi Make Our Worlds, Change Our Minds & Shape Our Futures by Merlin Sheldrake can be ordered from amazon.de, or FNAC

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Less is more

THE PATH TO HEALTH AND WELLNESS DOESN’T NECESSARILY NEED TO BE PAVED WITH TREADMILLS AND CROSSFIT CLASSES. DISCOVER THE HEALTH-GIVING BENEFITS OF THE ANCIENT CHINESE PRACTICE OF QIGONG RIGHT HERE IN THE ALGARVE

Words: SALLY DIXON

WITH ORIGINS tracing back thousands of years, Qigong (pronounced cheegong, in case you’re wondering), is rooted in the wisdom of Taoist teachings. It is one of the pillars of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), and can be practised by all ages, from children right the way through to older adults.

Qigong is a practice that integrates movement, meditation, and breathwork, to promote health, vitality, and spiritual wellbeing. So far, so good. The term Qigong is composed of two words, ‘qi’ meaning life force or vital energy, and ‘gong’ meaning skill or method. This isn’t your run-of-the-mill exercise routine; Qigong exudes a calm and peaceful demeanour that draws upon a stillness found within. If you’ve ever seen a group of people moving very slowly in unison in a park

and wondered what on earth they’re doing, I’d like to bet it was Qigong.

Qigong aims to harmonise the flow of energy within the body, promoting balance and renewed vitality. Through a combination of gentle movements teemed with controlled breathing and focused intention, Qigong offers a holistic approach to wellbeing encompassing body, mind, and spirit. Exercises range from slow, flowing motions, and standing postures, to more dynamic movements, all designed to cultivate and enhance the circulation of 'qi' throughout the body.

All sounds pretty zen right?

I was lucky enough to chat to Bernard, one of the founders of Zen Algarve, who together with his wife Valérie are helping locals age gracefully with their regular Qigong classes.

SHAPE UP PLUS ALGARVE PLUS l 75

Bernard and Valéire have been practising Qigong for ten years having undertaken a three-year diploma with the Institut Européen de Qi Gong et Yang Sheng in France. “The target of my teaching is to help people by improving mobility and balance to avoid future problems. Good balance is essential in preventing falls in later life,” he says. A dedicated teacher and student of Qigong, Bernard practises for an hour every day himself and is blessed to have very good mobility and balance to show for it. “I never go to see the doctor!” he proudly exclaims.

Benefits attributed to regular Qigong practice purport to include stress reduction, improved mental clarity, enhanced immune function, increased energy levels, increased flexibility and balance, better sleep, reduced stress and anxiety, better control over your emotions, and a greater sense of overall vitality and well-being. Where do I sign up?

Bernard comments: “Qigong slows down the ageing process; you can move more easily, improve your balance, and move qi and blood in the body to supply the organs with increased energy for better health.” He’s not wrong, a 2019 meta-analysis found that Qigong may have a positive impact on quality of life, especially for those suffering with a chronic disease.

The Qigong sequence called ‘Baduanjin’ is part of Bernard and Valérie’s repertoire, consisting of eight movements always performed in the same order; eight is considered to be the number of immortality and eternal life. Baduanjin is wellstudied for its health benefits, research shows it to be beneficial to patients with symptoms of fatigue syndromes, cognitive disorders, insomnia, and cardiovascular diseases. The key takeaway from most research papers is that a regular practice reaps the most benefits, with 60-minute sessions three times a week for at least three months seeing positive health effects.

Luckily, Zen Algarve run three classes every week, so dedicated students can really start to positively impact their health and wellbeing. Aside from the movement, the joy of being immersed in community is a sure-fire way to longevity in itself.

As the World Health Organisation (WHO) states: “Health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity.” Bernard has students from many countries taking part in the classes, including England, Germany, Sweden, Iceland, France, Switzerland, Belgium, Luxembourg and Canada. I can’t think of a better way to destress, move your body, and make new friends at the same time. Inner peace is only one Qigong class away. Even better, your first class is free with Zen Algarve. I’ll see you there!

THE DETAILS

Outdoor classes with Zen Algarve last for 1.5 hours and run at 08h30 every Tuesday in Portimão, 08h30 every Wednesday in Quarteira, and 08h30 every Thursday in Albufeira. Loose clothing is ideal for the session. First class is free, then €80 for ten lessons thereafter.

FB: //www.facebook.com/zenalgarve.qigong/

I: @zenalgarve on

E: zenalgarve@gmail.com

The many benefits

QI GONG develops good perception of your body and allows you, through a series of movements and stretches, to gain flexibility, relieve certain joint pain, and feel better about yourself, whatever your age.

1Management of stress and emotions

By working the body and mind simultaneously, Qi Gong helps reduce stress through the synchronization of body movements with breathing techniques. By reducing stress and developing concentration and positive thoughts, you will gradually be able to gain perspective on your emotions and control them.

2 Increased concentration

Do you tend to scatter and never finish what you start? By focusing on the movements to be performed in accordance with your breathing, you will learn to develop your concentration and your mindfulness.

3 Improved sleep

The reduction of stress and the deep relaxation in which the practice of Qi Gong and specific exercises immerses us will help you regain good quality sleep.

4 Return of vitality

The slow, fluid movements repeated during a Qigong session circulate the energy in your body. With regular practice, you will gradually regain the energy you were lacking.

5 Drainage of the body

By stimulating acupuncture points during Qi Gong exercises, you restore the proper functioning of your organs (lungs, kidneys, liver, heart, pancreas) and eliminate toxins. Thanks to the drainage of the body, the transformation of food is activated and Qi Gong helps improve digestion.

SHAPE UP PLUS ALGARVE PLUS l 76
References https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ctcp.2022.101675 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2019.06.009

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The heir the spare

ONE BROTHER DESTINED TO BE KING, THE YOUNGER JUST A STANDBY. IF THE SITUATION SOUNDS FAMILIAR THAT’S BECAUSE IT IS. THROUGHOUT HISTORY RIVALRY BETWEEN BROTHERS HAS BEEN COMMON

ALGARVE PLUS l 78 lov e a b l e rog u e

SIBLING RIVALRY? The current tension between Prince William and Prince Harry springs immediately to mind. In France, Louis XVI envied the freedom available to his younger brother and in 19th century Portugal the differences between the brothers Prince Pedro and Prince Miguel resulted in three years of civil war.

Aristotle: Give me a child and I will give you the man.

The upbringing of siblings has an influence on the adult they’ll become, and in some families parents’ expectations can be different for each child. No more so than in the case of royalty. For Pedro and Miguel their parents separated when the boys were very young. In the early years they lived with their grandmother in Lisbon’s Queluz Palace where Pedro built up a strong bond with his aia (governess). Meanwhile Miguel, the youngest son was acknowledged as his mother’s favourite.

Shakespeare: It is a wise father that knows his own child

One explanation for his mother’s obvious favouritism was Miguel’s paternity. Some people questioned if he was the son of the Marquis of Marialva who was one of Dona Carlotta’s alleged lovers. According to sources close to the Prince Regent he had not slept with his wife for more than two and a half years prior to Miguel’s birth. Nevertheless he acknowledged the boy as his own and although gossip put his wife in bed with a gardener and a storekeeper, he ignored the rumors.

As children, Pedro and Miguel would not have known of the scandal surrounding their mother or the extent of their father’s humiliation but in the age of multi-media it is unlikely that William and Harry were completely sheltered from press speculation. The details of their parents break up were widely publicised but the British public liked to believe that the brothers had the benefit of supporting each other.

Annie Lennox: Walking on broken glass

assumed by a younger son. Compare for instance Prince Louis to his more serious-minded brother, the heir apparent Prince George.

Miguel, dressed-up like a general rode around on his pony roguishly knocking off the hats of passers-by. Meanwhile Pedro would take a stroll in the grounds with his corpulent father talking politics and the possibility of him finding a wife from a suitable European royal family.

Latin idiom: From bad to worse

In Rio, despite eventually moving into separate residences, the dispute between the boys’ parents intensified. Constantly plotting to improve her own position Dona Carlotta was at the centre of an intrigue involving her brother, the Spanish King, Fernando VII.

Imprisoned by Napoleon, who had put his own brother on the throne, Dona Carlotta was now the last Bourbon heir still at liberty. She saw an opportunity to make a claim as the Spanish monarch and to escape from life with her despised husband in Brazil. She informed him she and Miguel were leaving for Buenos Aires, nominating herself as sovereign of Spanish America. Although her ambition failed to materialise, together with Miguel she was outspoken on the matter of ‘absolute monarchy’, favouring it over the new and liberal ideals of representative government. That cause was to result in a permanent rift between the brothers.

Pedro had been too trusting of his younger brother and their dispute led Portugal into a bitter civil war.

In the midst of any trauma, a new routine causes added stress. For children whose parents are separated they now have two households to call home. If you’re royal that’s two sets of staff as well. Anxious not to upset one parent or the other, whichever one you are with it must be difficult to relax.

The scenario faced by William and Harry would have been just that but for Pedro and Miguel it was worse. Following the threat of Napoleon’s invasion, the royal family left Portugal for Brazil. The boys were obliged to fit into a country that was less civilized, the climate more extreme and the customs different from anything they’d come across before. In Rio de Janeiro, a palace was hastily converted from the Viceroy’s house and for the first time in years the whole family shared a residence where there was constant conflict between the children’s parents.

Elizabeth Bowen: Mummy’s boy

Miguel spent time in the apartments of his adoring mother. Like Harry, he was a mischievous child, a role that is often

Maria Leopoldina (Pedro’s wife): My husband loves the new ideas

The Prince Regent, later Emperor Pedro of Brazil and King of Portugal, was a notorious womanizer. This continued even after he married the Austrian Archduchess Maria Leopoldina, an educated woman and a wise-advisor. After her death, Pedro made a terrible blunder when he attempted a family reconciliation with his mother and Miguel. Preferring to remain in Brazil, he relinquished his role as the Portuguese sovereign to his seven-year-old daughter, Maria II, appointing Miguel as her regent. Under a liberal Constitutional Charter Miguel agreed to the arrangement and he and his mother took up residence in Lisbon. 14th century phrase: Lying through one’s teeth

At the investiture, Miguel was presented with the written oath to defend the new Constitutional Charter. Holding a Bible in one hand he seemed unable or averse to reading the oath. According to the British Lord Carnarvon who attended the ceremony, “He (Miguel) had the constrained manner of a most unwilling actor in an embarrassing part”. Wearing a sullen expression and babbling away in an imperfect manner no one could be certain if Miguel had read the oath or not.

Old Testament: The writing on the wall

With his mother’s encouragement, two weeks later he broke the Constitutional Charter by dissolving the Cortes and failing to call for new elections. His ecstatic supporters proclaimed him as absolute ruler and many liberals who objected were either executed or fled the country. Still in Brazil, Pedro had been too trusting of his younger brother and between them their dispute led Portugal into a bitter civil war.

ALGARVE PLUS l 79 HISTORY PLUS
S

Building bridges

We asked US photographer Jeff Hirsh, a Certified Adobe Expert for Lightroom and Photoshop, to select his five favourites from the Algarve Photographers Group submissions in our Bridges challenge, and to explain what made each special

NIGEL MOORE

TOP OF PORTO BRIDGE

JH: “This image contains two of my favourite compositional elements, a single vanishing point that conveys great depth and a nearly symmetrical framing. This one really draws you all the way into the frame until you see the silhouetted figures. I also appreciate how the wet metal deck plating picks up all the little glints of light from the many light sources along the bridge.”

KEVIN SAUNDERS

PONTE DE TRAJANO

JH: “An image that makes the bridge the star of the show. The reflection is beautifully handled and I like how the two figures at the railing can be seen so clearly in that reflection. I think the framing and proportions are pleasing to the eye. The foreground elements hold you in the frame, giving the viewer time to appreciate the lovely scene of the bridge and its reflection in the water.”

PHOTOGRAPHY PLUS

 DARYL GABIN INTO THE NIGHT

JH: “Another great vanishing point perspective. This time we have a wet reflection below the bridge and the entire form is disappearing into the gentle warm to cool gradient at sunset. The colours are subtle and realistic. I think the panoramic crop used here suits the wide and receding subject very well. The sliver of moon is a nice bonus element.”

ROLF KOCK

VASCO DA GAMA

JH: “This image fully embraces the bridge theme and makes the bridge the focus of the entire composition. I love how the long gentle white curve of the bridge is perfectly mirrored by the long gentle black curve of the sand on the beach. A perfect visual echo. I also like the contrast of the geometric forms of the bridge with the organic forms of the foreground.”

ROBERT BOUSFIELD

PASSADIÇO DO BARRANCO

JH: “This image contains about the point of view of the photographer and a sense of being in this place. As viewers, we are standing at the top of this bridge waiting to descend. The path before us leads the eye right through the middle of the frame and then all the way up to the upper left corner where the boardwalk eventually ends. There is a LOT of story being told here and it is very much the story of a bridge.”

To apply for membership or check exhibition dates at the Museu do Traje, São Brás, visit algarvephotographersgroup.org

ALGARVE PLUS l 81

Locked up

PEOPLE WHO OWN SECOND HOMES IN THE SUN ARE ACUTELY AWARE OF SECURITY, AS ONE PLACE OR THE OTHER IS BOUND TO BE EITHER UNOCCUPIED OR RENTED OUT FOR WEEKS OR MONTHS AT A TIME. REGULAR LOCKS POSE A SIGNIFICANT WEAKNESS, HOWEVER PHYSICALLY STRONG THEY MIGHT BE. WHAT ’ S THE SOLUTION?

Words: CHRIS PARTRIDGE

KEYS TO YOUR second home, or your prime residence, have to be kept where family members, guests, tradesmen and the emergency services can get hold of them, and organising this can be a major hassle (and leaving the key under the flower pot is not, repeat not, a desirable solution).

If only there were locks that you could open from a thousand miles away. Wait! There are! A wide variety of smart locks are now available that can be unlocked using an app on your smartphone from anywhere in the world with an internet connection. Suddenly, home owners are back in control even when they are far away.

Smart locks can be unlocked in many ways, including entering a code on a number pad, tapping with a contactless card or fob, fingerprint scanning or even voice recognition (so handy when you are carrying a load of shopping), but it is the ability to open the door remotely via wifi that is the

crucial feature for second home owners.

This brings in a whole load of extra security considerations, of course. Can hackers open your door to criminals or terrorists? This is why buying from a reputable brand with the latest encryption technology is essential.

Decision time

Choosing the right smart lock is more complex than it seems, however. The lock has to be compatible with the existing hardware on the door, be it a deadlock (the round type of bolt), a mortice (the flat type of bolt) or a nightlatch (the wedgeshaped bolts). The thickness of the door may be a problem, too.

Another less-publicised feature of smart locks is that they use batteries, which must be either replaced or recharged regularly, adding to the massive charging schedule for all the gadgets that rule our lives from smart watches to electric cars. Some smart locks require an additional wifi unit for remote connection.

A highly-regarded smart lock for most applications is the August Wi-Fi Smart Lock (€278 on ubuy.com.pt), a sleek and

TECHNO PLUS ALGARVE PLUS l 83

compact smart lock with remote access via the August app. It has built-in wifi connectivity, eliminating the need for an additional bridge or hub.

The August Lock employs bank-grade AES 128-bit and TLS encryption to ensure secure communication and a sensor to provide real-time notifications when your door is open or closed.

Smart home fans will love the ability to work with Alexa, Google Assistant and Apple HomeKit, enabling voice control (“Alexa, open the door for the vicar”) and integration with other smart home devices such as turning on the hallway lights when the door is opened. It is designed for easy DIY installation, fitting onto most standard deadbolts without the need for replacing the entire lock.

The

installed in minutes with just a screwdriver, fitting most standard doors without requiring additional drilling.

The Yale Assure Lock SL with Connected by August (€690.98 at amazon.de) combines Yale’s trusted hardware with August’s smart lock technology, offering keyless entry, remote access, and voice control capabilities. It supports Wi-Fi connectivity and works with the August app for remote management.

Yale Assure Lock offers

Schlage Encode Smart WiFi Deadbolt (€547 at amazon. de) also offers built-in wifi connectivity, allowing you to lock and unlock your door remotely through the Schlage Home app. It also supports up to 100 access codes so family members, guests, or service providers can gain entry via the keypad.

keyless entry, remote access, voice control capabilities, and

WiFi connectivity

In addition, it features a reassuring built-in alarm, which senses potential security breaches and alerts you. The lock is also equipped with a built-in auto-lock feature, ensuring your door is always secure.

The Encode Lock is also compatible with Alexa and Google Assistant for voice control, and works seamlessly with Ring Alarm systems and Key by Amazon for enhanced security and convenience.

But one of the Schlage lock’s best features is that it can be

As with August’s own-brand lock, it utilises bank-grade encryption for secure communication and is compatible with most smart home systems. It is nicely designed with a slim, touchscreen keypad for convenient code entry. It is designed for easy retrofit installation, fitting onto most standard doors without requiring additional wiring. Priced at €976.47 at amazon.es, it features a unique PIN Genie touchscreen keypad that displays a different keypad layout each time to prevent fingerprint and code detection. It offers Wi-Fi connectivity with the Lockly app for remote access and management.

The lock utilises advanced encryption algorithms and supports up to 99 programmable codes. It also features a secure mode that prevents access code guessing.

Again, it works with Alexa and Google Assistant for voice control and a wide range of smart home devices and services. And it is designed for easy DIY installation, fitting most standard doors without requiring additional modifications.

Nightlatches, the type of lock that sits on the back of the door with a wedge-shaped bolt that clicks in when you slam the door, are commonly known as Yales for the same reason vacuum cleaners are commonly known as Hoovers. And indeed, Yale offers one of the best units for transforming a humble nightlatch (doesn’t have to be a genuine Yale) into a smart lock, the Keyless Connected.

The procedure is easy. One extra hole needs to be drilled through the door for the top mounting point of the keypad and the power cord from the battery pack mounted inside. Everything else just slots into place. Any attempt to tamper with the keypad sets off an 80dB siren that is guaranteed to raise the alarm.

The lock can be unlocked with a contactless card, a key fob (one of each included), and by entering a pin which can be time-limited codes, so you can set up access for a 24-hour period.

One limitation of the system is that the knob has to be physically turned to open the door. You’ll just have to put all that shopping down to get in.

Another drawback is lack of connectivity - to control the lock from afar you will need a wifi module at extra cost.

TECHNO PLUS ALGARVE PLUS l 84
Right: The August WiFi Smart Lock. Far right: Schlage’s Encode Plus. Below: The Yale Assure Lock

Bodies come in all different shapes and sizes. That’s part of what makes each of us unique. Finding a new bikini or swimsuit can be a time-consuming and sometimes frustrating adventure.

For my beachwear collection, I was searching for highquality materials, timeless designs and a comfortable fit. When I came across MYMARINI from Hamburg, I knew this is what I was looking for. Born out of love for surfing, the bikinis and swimsuits appeal with minimalist designs, sporty and elegant cuts and combine sustainability and style with ease. Bikini tops and bottoms can be bought separately, are reversible and come in solid colours so there are real mix and match opportunities.

By contrast, my ever-growing section of men’s beach shorts come in vibrant patterns, bold colours and flowery designs.

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WINONA RYDER

Minnesota-born Winona Ryder comes from an artistic and literary background. Her parents were both authors. They were also friendly with some of the ‘Beat’ poets, and Winona spent part of her childhood living on a commune in California.

She took acting lessons and by the late 1980s was starring in very successful movies, such as Beetlejuice in 1988 and Heathers in 1989 – the latter being controversial as it dealt with bullying and teen suicide. In 1990 she starred alongside her then-boyfriend Johnny Depp in Edward Scissorhands and also played Jo March in the 1994 remake of Little Women.

Her career suffered a setback in 2001 when she was arrested for shoplifting in Beverly Hills and given three years’ probation, even though it was later proved that she had been affected by painkillers prescribed by a doctor who later lost his license.

She continued to take on roles in a series of independent films and, most recently, in the US TV series Stranger Things. At one point, she was almost as well known for her romances with fellow stars, notably rockstar Dave Pirner and actor Matt Damon. Since 2011 she has been with fashion designer Scott McKinlay Hahn, who, she says, was so ‘non-showbiz’ that he didn’t recognise her when they first met! They have no plans to marry; as Winona says: “When your parents are still madly in love after 45 years, your standards are really high!” The couple have homes in California and New York City.

Where are they now?

ONE SPORTS HERO, ONE SCREEN ACTOR, ONE STAR FROM A MUCH-LOVED TV SERIES, AND THE CODE USED ACROSS THE WORLD TO COMMUNICATE URGENT WARNINGS. A FASCINATING MIXED BAG THIS MONTH THAT WILL BRING BACK MANY A MEMORY

PAUL MICHAEL GLASER

Actor, writer and director Paul Michael Glaser has recently celebrated five decades in show business. He was born in Massachusetts and attended Tulane University where he studied theatre and English, obtaining his M.A. from Boston Uni in 1967. He appeared in several successful TV shows like Kojak as a young actor. However, it was his starring role alongside David Soul in Starsky and Hutch – he was the Starsky half of the duo – which made him into an international star in the 1970s. Starsky and Hutch was screened between 1975 and 1979 with Paul Michael taking his turn at directing, then continuing with parallel careers on TV and in films.

However, Paul’s life was touched by tragedy when his wife Elizabeth contracted HIV through a blood transfusion, and passed the virus on to their infant daughter, who died when she was seven. Elizabeth herself passed away in 1994 and her widower is the Honorary Secretary of the Elizabeth Glaser Paediatric AIDS Foundation in the USA. The Foundation funds research into children and HIV/AIDS. Their son Jake survived and Paul subsequently re-married. He remained friends with his co-star David Soul until the latter’s death in January this year, saying “David was a brother, friend and a caring man, we shall not see his like again.”

WHERE NOW PLUS 80s 70s
ALGARVE PLUS l 86

1800s

MORSE CODE

Almost 200 years before the days of instant, digital communications that we now take for granted, scientists were experimenting with quick and simple ways of communicating, especially in emergency situations. An American artist and inventor, Samuel Morse, came up with the idea of using a sequence of light or sound pulses to replace letters and numbers. His first code, devised around 1837, could transmit numbers only but with the help of an engineer called Alfred Vail, a code that included letters as well had been invented by 1844. The International Morse Code, with adaptations, was in use by 1865.

On land, especially in wartime, on the sea, and in the air, Morse Code became an international language. The code for ‘SOS’ –three dots, three dashes, three dots, or three short, three long, and three short pulses of light – became known to everyone from mountaineers and airline pilots to Boy Scouts and amateur radio enthusiasts. In the early 20th century airships were big enough to carry the large, heavy equipment needed for transmissions. Mid-century aviation used Morse and it was used by the military on land as late as the Second World War.

The US Air Force apparently still train ten people a year in the use of Morse Code

Modern technology should have made Morse code obsolete, although the US Air Force apparently still trains ten people a year in its use. Both the British and American amateur radio societies have dropped compulsory Morse as a requirement for obtaining a full license. However, there is still a Morse Code Preservation Society, which argues that knowing how to transmit an SOS with a torch or a mirror is useful for the general public in an emergency, and it is still used by radio amateurs, air traffic controllers, pilots and US Naval Intelligence. There are also rumours that currently-fashionable K-Pop bands sometimes use Morse to release messages to their fans…

90s

When Tim Henman reached the semifinals of the men’s singles at Wimbledon in 1998, he instantly became the most successful British male tennis player since the 1970s! He had picked up a tennis racket for the first time when he was little more than a toddler, and though he enjoyed other sports, tennis was his first love. Both of his parents were sporty and his great-grandfather had played at Wimbledon, so young Tim’s early success at school and as a junior player came as no surprise.

He became the British Number One in 1996 and between 1999 and 2005, and was ranked Number Four in the world, though he never managed to win Wimbledon.

Tim retired from professional tennis in 2007 and he still takes part in the ATP Champions Tour, the tournament for former tennis professionals. Since his retirement he has been commenting on tennis for the BBC. He also heads the Tim Henman Foundation, a youth charity which is dedicated to transforming the lives of disadvantaged youngsters by offering them both sporting and educational opportunities. This, he says, combines his three core values – sport, education and both physical and mental health.

Tim is married with three young daughters and lives in Oxfordshire where in 2022 he stepped in when he heard his favourite local pub, The Chequers, was going to have to close. He bought it and it has been re-launched as a Gastropub.

ALGARVE PLUS l 87

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Property and taxes. Confused?

CAPITAL GAINS TAX IS CHARGED ON THE SALE OF ALL PROPERTY SOLD BY A PORTUGUESE TAX RESIDENT, IRRESPECTIVE OF WHERE THE PROPERTY IS LOCATED, OR IF IT WAS YOUR MAIN RESIDENCE OR NOT. CAPITAL GAINS TAX IS ALSO PAYABLE BY NON-RESIDENTS WHO SELL PROPERTY LOCATED IN PORTUGAL. MARK QUINN AND DEBRAH BROADFIELD OF THE SPECTRUM IFA EXPLAIN

Selling your main home in Portugal

If you are a Portuguese tax resident and sell your main home in Portugal, it may come as a shock that capital gains tax is due on the sale. Unless, that is, the property was purchased before 1 January 1989, in which case no capital gains tax applies to its sale.

When calculating the gain, you can deduct costs such as legal and agent fees, and if the property was held for more than two years you can apply for inflation relief. To calculate the tax due, you take 50% of the gain and add it to your other income in the tax year and this is taxed at scale rates of tax (13.25% to 48%, plus solidarity tax).

Despite the potential for high taxation, if the property sold was your main home, there are two reliefs you can take advantage of to reduce or eliminate your tax bill:

Reinvest the net sale proceeds into another main home in Portugal, or EU/EEA;

Reinvest the net sale proceeds in an approved long-term savings plan or pension; or

Use a combination of the above two options. This is useful if you wish to downsize.

Any portion of the sale proceeds not reinvested will be taxed. In order to qualify for the reliefs there are certain conditions that must be met, such as timescales and reporting to adhere to.

Reinvesting into long-term savings or a pension

The above is all well and good if you want to buy a new property valued at the same price as the property you sold, but what if you do not?

The Portuguese government introduced a relatively new relief allowing you to reinvest the proceeds, or a part of the proceeds, in a long-term savings plan or pension, rather than another property.

Again, there are certain rules in order to qualify, but this can be a particularly advantageous option for those wishing to downsize and therefore can use a combination of the reliefs, or move outside of the EU/EEA, eg back to the UK.

In order to qualify there are also conditions and rules that must be met, the most important being that the reinvestment is done within six months of the sale.

Whether a pension or a long-term savings plan is right for you will depend on your personal circumstances and

the structure must qualify in order to obtain the tax relief, so it is important to take advice from experienced professionals in this area.

Selling a property in Portugal that is not a main home: residents and non-residents

In this case, the tax rules are the same for Portuguese tax residents, even with Non-Habitual Residency (NHR), and non-residents.

Selling a property overseas as a Portuguese tax resident

For those residing here as NHR, there is no tax due in Portugal during the NHR period, so this is good opportunity to sell property. Outside of NHR and for normal residents, tax is due on 50% of the gain since purchase at scale rates in Portugal.

This is the case even if the property was your main home at some point in the past, eg you sell your property in the UK that was your main home before you moved to Portugal.

Tax will also be due in the country the property is located, but if there is a Double Tax Agreement with Portugal you will not pay tax twice. You will receive a credit for the tax paid in the country the property is located to offset against the tax due in Portugal.

NOTE If your property has an AL licence the rules changed at the end of 2023. Where an AL licence has been active, the tax is calculated at 90% of the gain at scale rates of tax. It is possible to improve the tax position; however, specialist advice must be sought.

With over 35 years experience, Debrah Broadfield and Mark Quinn are Chartered Financial Planners (level 6) and Tax Advisers specialising in cross-border advice for expatriates. in Portugal on financial and tax planning issues. ASK

PLANNING PLUS
THE SPECTRUM IFA GROUP Rua Sacadura Cabral, Lote 262, Loja C, 8135-144 Almancil T: 289 355 316 / E: info@spectrum-ifa.com / W: spectrum-ifa.com ALGARVE PLUS l 89
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RICARDO CHAVES OF ALL FINANCE MATTERS IS HERE TO HELP PEOPLE UNDERSTAND AND DEAL WITH WHAT IS ALLOWABLE – AND NOT – WHEN IT COMES TO FINANCIAL MATTERS IN PORTUGAL.THIS MONTH, QUESTIONS INCLUDE HIRING STAFF, PAYING IN CASH, AND COSTS THAT CAN BE REGARDED AS A BUSINESS EXPENSE AND CHARGEABLE TO TAX

Q

I am thinking about opening an eatery in the hills above Tavira, and looking now at operating from start April to end October each year. What is the situation regarding paying staff? Obviously I don’t want to have to rehire every year, but by the same token, I could not afford to keep people on a year’s contract when I am only planning to be open for seven months.

If you are considering hiring staff, you should seek legal advice to formalise the contracts and determine which terms you can negotiate with your employees.

If you make a contract for a fixed term, you have no obligation to keep the employee for the whole year and the contract will end in October. However, please note that you will need to recruit new employees each year in April, in case the ones you employed in the previous year are not available when you restart your season.

Q

One of my clients has asked if I would accept payment for my services in cash and reduce the amount due each month. What do you reckon? And does anyone need to know?

In Portugal, it is generally not considered legal to charge a client less if they do not ask for an invoice. This practice could be seen as an attempt to avoid taxes, which is not permitted. All business transactions should be properly documented and reported to the tax authorities. This includes issuing invoices for all goods sold or services rendered. Please remember that tax evasion is a crime in Portugal, and the penalties for tax evasion can include both administrative and criminal sanctions.

Q Is the cost of taking a full language course something that can be charged to tax? I have a small restaurant/bar and although most of my customers are ex-pats, being more proficient in Portuguese would certainly be of benefit when dealing with suppliers and also staff?

The language course you are considering taking should be deducted as a training expense for you or your staff. Although this expense is not mandatory for the restaurant

to work, providing the cost is properly documented (invoiced), you should be able to deduct it as a cost. Please liaise with an accountant to make sure that your tax regime allows you to deduct this kind of expense before starting the course.

Q

I am resident here but have bank accounts in the UK and bring money over here as and when needed. The majority of monies in those accounts are UK pensions, and also private pensions and past savings. Am I supposed to be paying taxes here? Someone mentioned this to me and I am nervous. That said, money in my main UK account has already been taxed anyway. In Portugal, you are not taxed on the simple remittance of funds. Therefore, you can continue to transfer money to your account, and this will not be considered a taxable event. However, you do need to make sure that you are not deemed as a tax resident of Portugal.

The tax authorities have notified many taxpayers to confirm whether they are tax residents in Portugal, due to the fact that they have invoices showing that they spent more than six months in Portugal.

Please remember if you spend more than 183 days in Portugal, whether consecutive or not, within any 12-month period, that means that you should be a tax resident here. Also, if you are not spending 183 days but have arrived in Portugal with the intention of staying permanently or if you already have a residency permit, then you should be considered a tax resident, as well.

If you are a resident, it’s important to understand that you must declare all your worldwide income here, including your UK pensions. This income should be taxed in Portugal, your country of residency, and not in the UK. This is a key aspect of Portugal’s tax system that you should be aware of.

PLEASE NOTE: tax laws can be complex and change frequently, so it’s always a good idea to consult with a tax professional or legal advisor for the most accurate and up-to-date information.

Send questions you may have to info@afm.tax for possible inclusion in AlgarvePLUS.

To consult directly with the experts at AFM, email helpdesk @allfinancematters.pt

ADVICE PLUS
ALGARVE PLUS l 91

QI have a problem. I am a oneperson business, working from home, producing individual items of clothing to my design, and I usually take a stand at the various quality markets across the Algarve and have developed a good client base over the past two years. However, a larger, well-financed company is copying my designs, producing them for less, and advertising them on social media. Looks-wise, they are exact copies – quality wise of course they are not. What can I legally do without getting involved in unaffordable costs? This copying is damaging my work – and my reputation if people think they can buy the same thing for less?

AOur first advice would be that your lawyer writes to the company concerned and advises them that you will pursue legal action to seek an order preventing them from using your designs, and also that you will demand compensation for the damages already caused to your business as well as the damages to your reputation, with your designs being associated with a lesser quality product.

Do note however, that if you decide to seek compensation, you need evidence to show that those damages effectively occurred.

Designs are protected by law for three years from the moment they are in a tangible form; while copyright does not protect the functional design, it does cover the artistic elements like patterns, prints and other distinctive decorative details.

If you register your copyrights, should anyone try to copy your work after the

GOING LEGAL

LEGAL EXPERTS NELSON RAMOS AND ROBERTA RAMOS WHO, TOGETHER WITH THEIR SPECIALIST TEAM AT RAMOS & ASSOCIADOS IN ALMANCIL, ADVISE CLIENTS ON FARREACHING QUESTIONS. THIS MONTH, THE PROTECTION OF COPYRIGHT THROUGH REGISTRATION IS LOOKED AT, AS IS THE QUESTION OF SUB-STANDARD SERVICE

registration is in place, all you need is to prove that the registration is done; without registration, you have to prove that the design is originally yours.

The registration of your brand name, logo, and specific elements of your design is not as expensive as you may think and in general provides effective protection.

These are legal steps which can be pursued with limited spending. We hope the information provided is helpful, preventing your creations from being copied and that your business grows, as deserved.

Q

Can one, in a restaurant – a supposedly quality restaurant – refuse to pay when the bill arrives on the basis that the meal served was appalling. There were four of us, each having different dishes, and all saying it was the worst ever. We told the waiter and the four of us left virtually full plates. I asked to see the manager and was told he was busy. Then the bill came. What should I have done and what should I do to ensure that others don’t suffer in the same way.

A Yes, you can refuse to pay if the meal is not up to acceptable standards. In simple legal terms, if the product that is advertised is not supplied, they are in breach of a verbal contract and as a client you are not obliged to pay for something you did not get.

It is important that you exercise your rights calmly and politely – if the manager, or owner and/or the staff refuse to solve the matter, in a satisfactorily manner, you can ask for the Livro de Reclamações (Complaints Book),

which is in English and Portuguese, and by law all restaurants must have one. If the manager or staff of the restaurant deny you access to the Complaints Book, you can call the police who will order the restaurant staff to make it available to you. When you write down your complaint, it is copied onto carbon paper in triplicate, one copy is for you, another will be sent to the administrative authority which supervises restaurant activity (ASAE) and the third stays in the book. Alternatively, you can file the claim in the official complaint book site at livroreclamacoes.pt

A client has rights, but an unjustified refusal to pay can have consequences and you as client can even be criminally pursued.

It is therefore important to document the situation; apart from keeping a copy from the Complaints Book, it may be a good idea to take photos of the meal, and a note of the persons with you at the table, and the staff in restaurant, or the police, if called.

These are the legal paths, but should you wish to inform the public in general, on the internet, our advice is that the information is accurate, objective, and that you can support it with evidence. Your personal opinions, or the character of the staff, manager or owners, should be left out.

As lawyers and citizens, we believe you did well in calling the staff’s attention, and requesting the presence of the manager. The quality of services and products depends on the existence of demanding consumers, who do not accept being mistreated by negligent services or products providers.

Email questions for Ramos Associados to martin@algarveplusmagazine.com

0 5 25 75 95 100
ALGARVE PLUS l 93 Ramos & Associados Sociedade de Advogados SP RL Avenida 5 de Outubro, 169–171,
Almancil T: 289 413 063 / E: info@nramoslawyers.com / nramoslawyers.com SORTED PLUS
8135-101

Algarve'sPremier Italian Dining Experience & Lifestyle Destination Set in a beautiful setting with an adjacent lifestyle and furniture shop, enjoy thin-crust pizzas, homemade pastas, and fresh salads from our very own garden.

Kitchen: open daily from 12h -23h for dining, takeaway and delivery. Shop: open Mon-Sat 10h-23h & Sun 13h-23h

PIZZERIACASAVOSTRA.COM +351289397565 Av. 5 Outubro 302, Almancil (Opposite Apolónia)

PHILIPP KEEL

In the Pink Gallery for Fine Photo Art Praça da República 69-75

Loulé 289 462 320 in-the-pink.com

On now

Watermelon Seeds is part of Philipp Keels first exhibition in Portugal. A celebration of the pleasure and strange beauty of random details and objects.

MAGDALENA MOREY

Tavira d’Artes, Tavira 962 012 111 taviradartes@gmail.com taviradartes.com

Sweeping Light 1, acrylic, mixed media and gold leaf on canvas, 100x100cm

IF

MR BRAINWASH

ArtCatto, 289 419 447

info@artcatto.com, artcatto.com

Arabesque Charlie, mixed media on canvas, 62.2x74.9cm. Part of a stunning new exhibition at ArtCatto that includes Auguste and Mario Henrique.

CAROLA COLLEY AND SUSHMA LEGENDRE MCINTOSH

República 14, Olhão, Until 26 May

Intro Through Above Below is the title of this new exhibition, which features some wonderfu images.

ARTLINK COLLECTIVE

Museu do Traje

São Brás 966 329 073

admin@amigosdomuseu.com

Local artists exhibiting their work - painting, intuitive abstract and digital composition. 17 May sees a change of artists.

REBECCA HUTCHINSON

Rua Dr. Eusébio Ramires, 80 Old town Olhão 918 571 984

Gregory Blackhorse, acrylic on plywood, 136x92cm

THIS MONTH’S SPECIAL SELECTION OF THINGS WORTH SEEING DATELINE PLUS ALGARVE PLUS l 95
YOU HAVE
WOULD LIKE TO SHARE, EMAIL susi@rogol-goodkind.com
ANYTHING YOU
ART
 
  

MUSIC

República 14, Olhão

republica14.pt, Reservas@republica14.pt

4 May, 19h00 and 21h30

CORAÇÕES DE ATUM

Music from a past that never existed. Spicy jazz with scales, canned with lots of love!

11 May, 21h00

REENCONTRO This concert celebrates the reunion, after decades, of two great Portuguese musicians: Rão Kyao, flautist, who blends the influences of jazz and Indian music, and José Eduardo, bassist, composer, and arranger, as well as a mentor and educator of generations of musicians. Their encounter dates back to the 1970s when Zé Eduardo accompanied Rão in various groups, including the Cascais Jazz Festival.

17 May, 17h00

BLUES With Felix Slim One of Spain’s leading blues musicians, born in the North African enclave of Ceuta-Cadiz and based in Brooklyn, New York, Felix Slim is an entirely selftaught multi-instrumentalist and specialises in blues, ragtime and swing from the 1920s to 1940s.

Amigos de Música

Os Agostos, Sta Bárbara de Nexe reservascontertos@gmail.com for concert bookings amigosdemusica.org

Two artists from England, clarinettist Sarah Williamson accompanied by Viv McLean, piano, will present two concerts; on 14 May works by Francis Poulenc, Frédéric Chopin, Robert Schumann and Johannes Brahms, and on the 16th by Joseph Horovitz, Carl Maria v. Weber, Johannes Brahms and Georges Gershwin.

Doors will open at 18h00 and concerts start at 19h00.

Wine, fruit juices and canapés will be available for self-service before the concert. Tickets are €30, payable in advance, and include refreshments.

JULIA’ S

Praia do Garrão Nascente

Almancil

289 396 512

Saturdays, 14h00, live music in the beach bar, Katie Hunt. Sundays, 13h30, main restaurant, The Washingtons. And starting this month

Tuesday and Thursday evenings, in the main restaurant.

Throughout the season, beachbar and lounge, DJ (dates to be confirmed)

BELLA CAPELLA

Concert at Herdade da Corte Sítio da Corte Santa Catarina da Fonte do Bispo

To book: 281 971 625 info@herdadedacorte.com

Tickets are €8 22 June, 18h30

Proud winners of the Gold Medal at the Barbershop Iberia Association in Spain, and ranked first in singing, the Bella Acapella Barbershop

Chorus from Olhão, the only barbershop group in the Algarve, will present a great selection of their music.

EXPERIENCES

Museu do Traje

São Brás, 966 329 073 admin@amigosdomuseu.com amigosdomuseu.com

ROUGE MANOUCHE

5 May, 17h00

Gypsy jazz that will get toes tapping and hands clapping. Tickets €15 (amigos €12)

PATTERNS & TEXTURES

Algarve Photographers

Group Exhibition

Until 29 May

SPRING FAIR

26 May, 10h00–16h00

QUIZ - HELPING HANDS

ALGARVE

14 May, 19:00

€3.50 to take part

THE GUITAR BARREL PROJECT

Salão Nobre, Palácio Gama Lobo

theguitarbarrelproject.com

11-18 May, 10h00–17h00

The Câmara Municipal de Loulé, through Loulé Criativo, is presenting this exhibition of guitars that, in addition to their history, are true works of art and unique pieces of master craftsmanship.

The inauguration will take place on May 11, at 16h00 at Loulé Criativo, with wine tastings from Carcavelos Villa Oeiras and a screening of the film documenting the project.

ALA ALGARVE PLUS l 96
YOU HAVE ANYTHING YOU WOULD LIKE TO SHARE EMAIL susi@rogol-goodkind.com
IF

Vale do Lobo

CHAMBER MUSIC FROM TRANQUILITY

Parque do Golfe

6 May, 18h30–20h00

Gems of American Music, exploring the works of Amy Beach and William Gra nt-Still. Free, but you’ll need a ticket.

GUEST DAYS

18 May, 08h00–18h00

Green fee €50

To book and for information 289 353 465 /golf@vdl.pt

FOURSOME WEEK

19–25 May, 08h00–22h30

A very full programme. Visit valedolobo. com/wp-content/ uploads/2024/03/2023_ Foursomes_Week_2024_ Flyer.pdf

MAY HALF TERM JUNIOR GOLF ACADEMY

27–31 May, 14h00–18h00

€125 per child for five days. Pre-registration required. Classes will take a maximum of ten children. Further information and booking, contact Vale do Lobo Golf Club Reception.

and ongoing...

Walking Tour

Tuesdays, 17h00–18h00

Fitness Centre

Social Running

Thursdays, 17h00–18h00 Fitness Centre

Yoga

Friday, 11h15–12h15

Sunday, 10h00–11h00 Fitness Centre

Aquatherapy

Monday, 09h45–10h45

Royal SPA

Fascia Training

Tuesday, 10h00–11h00, Fitness Centre Pump

Saturday, 09h00–10h00 Fitness Centre

Loulé Criativo

loulecriativo@cm-loule.pt, loulecriativo.pt FB: @loulecriativo, IG: @loule_criativo

TILE PAINTING

31 May, Oficina do Barro, Loulé

Partner: Bernadette Martins

INTRODUCTION TO THE POTTER ’ S WHEEL WORKSHOP

4 May

Oficina do Barro, Loulé

Partner: Catarina Gonçalves

Registration: catarinagoncalves.ceramics@ gmail.com

MACRAMÉ WORKSHOPLIGHTING SUPPORT

11 May

Oficina dos Têxteis, Loulé

Partner: Desi Cornelisse

Registration: jomohandmade@gmail.com

STRAPPING AND LEATHERWORK WORKSHOP

18 May

Palácio Gama Lobo, Loulé

Partner: Fernando Gonçalves

Registration: loulecriativo@cm-loule.pt

CANE BASKETRY WORKSHOP

25 May

Palácio Gama Lobo, Loulé Partner: Maria da Conceição Teixeira

Registration: loulecriativo@cm-loule.pt

COURSES

WEAVING COURSE

8-25 May

Palácio Gama Lobo, Loulé Coordination: Susana Mendez and CEARTE.

Registration: loulecriativo.oficios@cm-loule.pt

POTTER ’ S WHEEL INITIATION

13-16 May

Palácio Gama Lobo, Loulé

Coordination: Ricardo Lopes

Registration: ricardocmlopes@gmail.com

Sand city

EN125, Sítio dos Lombos 252-A, 8400-395 Lagoa 969 459 259, geral@prosandart.com, sandcity.pt

FIESA – the International Sand Sculpture Festival is the largest exhibition of sand sculptures in the world and this year boasts some 120 works by more than 60 different artists, based on international themes, well-known personalities, or simple curiosities. It is an extraordinary site and makes for a brilliant day’s outing for the whole family. Check the website for details of events, and also ticket prices.

OPENING HOURS

Until 9 June, 10h00 to 19h00

Closed on Sundays and Mondays.

10 June–15 September, 10h00 to 23h00

Open every day.

16 September–20 October 10h00 to 19h00

Open every day.

21 October–15 November 10h00 to 18h00

Closed on Sundays and Mondays.

Free parking for 300 cars.

WATERCOLOUR PAINTING RETREAT

Figs on the Funcho 912 595 539

cheryl@figsonthefuncho.com

Seven-day retreat includes accommodation, delectable cuisine and a chance to discover the spiritual nature of watercolour with Kate Olefir. For full details of the programme and availability, visit the website wetravel.com/ trips/a-watercolourpainting-voyage-inportugal-from-basicsto-mastery-figs-on-thefuncho-silves-80408642 and email Cheryl.

QIGONG CLASSES ONLINE

The benefits of Qigong are considerable, regardless of your age. If you want to join a class but want your sessions at home, visit Annie Moore’s moorwellbeing.com/

ALGARVE PLUS l 97

AND f inally

TRAVELLING THE COUNTRY HE LOVES IS SOMETHING OF AN OCCUPATION FOR ANTHONY MARTIN . DISCOVERING NEW PLACES, MEETING NEW FACES, DIGGING INTO THE YESTERDAYS THAT MADE THEM WHAT THEY ARE TODAY DELIGHTS HIM. NOT SO THE VISITORS WHO DON SHORTS AND FLIPFLOPS, IN ANY WEATHER

AS I WRITE, it is exactly 14 years to the day that I made my permanent move to the country I fell in love with.

Having visited very regularly from the mid-80s, I already knew areas from Porto southwards reasonably well, and also east to Spain.

Passing from one region to another I used to get the distinct feeling that I was crossing an imperceptible border. And this was not due solely to the change in landscape or architecture; it went beyond, to the customs, the food and the people. Decades ago, with a population of less than ten million, Portugal appeared in my eyes to be a land of various tribes – there was a different vibe wherever we went. The old adage – ‘Porto works while Lisbon plays, Coimbra studies and Braga prays’, sums it up perfectly.

Even the spread-out villages of the Alentejo seemed alien to one another – the reason possibly being that few people had cars then and as transportation was difficult, communities simply didn’t mix on a regular basis.

We would drive through different areas, exploring and discovering new surroundings and the older residents would come out and wave. Wherever we went, we were made to feel welcome, and coming from London this was something new to us. I loved the fact that everyone wanted to show us their town, was proud of their past and their present and felt that their future could only get better. It was a true culture shock.

I’ve just checked the laughingly named Accuweather app, the not-so-accurate weather report which tells me it’s going to be hot today, well around 24C°.

I’ve checked the wardrobe and looked at the serried ranks of shorts hanging there – all 16 of them. You think that’s a lot? You are wrong, it’s really only four – one in tan, one pale blue, one pink and the last one white but each, due to a manufacturer’s quality control oversight, seem to shrink in size over the winter months necessitating a replacement each year.

The app tells me that it will be at its hottest at 15h00. It’s now 09h00 and when popping out to get a few bits and have a coffee I couldn’t help but notice that nine out of ten men are wearing shorts, T-shirts and flip-flops while I’m in two layers and still feelng somewhat cold.

‘Porto works while Lisbon plays, Coimbra studies and Braga prays’, sums up the differences perfectly.

Also, one of the reasons I immediately loved this country was that it wasn’t a manicured southern Spain; it had and still has, its rough edges, but I would make a plea to those trying to modernise the place – please stop, leave the rough edges and put down the sandpaper; you are ruining the charm.

It always amazes me that to some – even in winter – the word ‘holiday’ automatically means bare legs, often clad in shorts of the style favoured by Tom Selleck in his Magnum PI role – too tight and too short and obviously purchased some 40 years ago.

Around that time I was exploring the Algarve in a rented plastic jeep’ish car with a top speed of 50kph. Between the car and the pot-holed EN125, adventuring west to Portimão and Cap St Vincent, and east to Tavira, took up most of our two-week holiday.

But getting back to the shorts issue. What is it with some northern European men and shorts? Do they like their legs rain-soaked, are they fans of blue knees and goosebumps on their goosebumps? Over the past couple of months, we have had some less than warm weather here but everywhere there were pasty male legs on display. Come on guys, if you have to shown them off at least get them ready for the public. Hang them out of the window for a dose of sun or borrow your wife’s tanning lotion and don’t forget to lose the socks – you know it makes sense.

LAST WORD PLUS
ALGARVE PLUS l 98

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