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Contents dec 2011 /jan 2012

FEATURES

28

Find something special for ever yone on your list with this handy guide to intriguing gifts.

30

WINTER WHITES

Who says holiday decorations have to be red and green? Tr y an elegant white table.

34

Learn about cosmetic procedures that could improve your appearance. i n e v ery i s s ue W e Lc o m e L e T T e r e d i To r’s N oT e g aT h e r i N g s W h e r e To e aT T h i N g s To d o

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december 2011/january 2012

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on the cover: Getty imaGes. this paGe: roey yohai

TIME TO LOOK YOUNGER?

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top left: courtesy of twin farms. center left: Jason wyche. riGht (3) & bottom left: shutterstock

OUR FAVORITE THINGS


Contents

dec 2011/jan 2012

DEPARTMENTS

10

LOCAL BUZZ

48

Our guide to new ideas, tips, trends and things we love in Middlesex County

13

SHOP LOCAL LEADER

Meet the Ingegneris of the Cranbur y Inn.

26

LOCAL FASHION

Make the season joyful by selecting the per fect outfit for your holiday gatherings.

38

10

POWER FOOD

Cinnamon has a spicy international histor y— and health benefits that may surprise you.

40

TASTES

40

No gluten, no eggs, no dair y? No problem. These holiday cookies don’t trigger allergies.

42

WINE + SPIRITS

Sparkling wine and champagne for New Year’s

48

ESCAPES

Steal away to serenity at the luxurious Twin Farms resor t in Barnard, Vermont.

42

top left: courtesy of twin farms. center left: Jason wyche. riGht (3) & bottom left: shutterstock

on the cover: Getty imaGes. this paGe: roey yohai

IN GOOD HEALTH

16

FACES OF SAINT PETER’S Q&As with two ver y active physicians

18

UP CLOSE

A volunteer party planner fights breast cancer.

19

SEASONAL HEALTH

Know what to do if stomach flu strikes.

20

INSIDE LOOk

An Edison woman is glad she got a second opinion—and exper t surgical attention.

23

TECH SAvvy

How oxygen heals stubborn foot wounds

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welcome letter

SPECIAL EVENTS 

Annual Interfaith Celebration of the Life and Legacy of The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. MONDAY, JANUARY 16 • 1:00 PM Sister Marie de Pazzi Conference Center Saint Peter’s University Hospital 254 Easton Avenue, New Brunswick All are welcome. For information call Tab Chukunta, director of Community Outreach, at 732-745-8600, ext. 8551.

Fashion Runway 2012: Dress to Impress SATURDAY, MARCH 24 • 11:30 AM – 4:00 PM The Pines Manor 2085 Route 27 (Lincoln Highway), Edison Annual fashion show to benefit Saint Peter’s University Hospital’s Breast Center and breast health programs. The event also features a Tricky Tray and a 50/50 raffle. For tickets or more information, call Saint Peter’s Foundation at 732-745-8542.

Annual Gala SATURDAY, APRIL 28 • 6:00 PM – MIDNIGHT The Heldrich 10 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick Annual black-tie fundraising gala hosted by Saint Peter’s Foundation. $500 per person. Entertainment by The Infernos. Various sponsorships are available to support Saint Peter’s Healthcare System. For details, call Saint Peter’s Foundation at 732-745-8542.

HEALTH & WELLNESS 

Community Mobile Health Services Saint Peter’s Community Mobile Health Services provides health education and screenings, including blood pressure, blood sugar, breast health, cholesterol, stroke, body mass index and more. Community groups and businesses interested in scheduling screenings on site can contact Community Mobile Health Services at 732-745-8600, ext. 8903.

254 EASTON AVENUE

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SKILL + COMPASSION This ediTion of Middlesex HealtH & life magazine illuminates what makes Saint Peter’s Healthcare System so successful and so unusual among healthcare providers—namely, our technical expertise coupled with an unbounded sense of compassion for our patients. The Inside Look feature (page 20) is a perfect example. Phyllis Baker, a resident of Middlesex County, was morbidly overweight when she underwent bariatric surgery in 1998. Still, her problems persisted, so she had another round of surgeries in 2007. Even then, however, she didn’t feel right. Believing that she might have cancer, Baker sought treatment at a hospital in Philadelphia. Doctors there told Baker she had a pancreatic cyst but was basically OK. She wasn’t. Not believing that first report, Baker turned to Saint Peter’s Healthcare System and Dr. James E. Gervasoni, chief of surgery, who was convinced that Baker had cancer, and he soon discovered that he was right. Baker had pancreatic cancer, which had reached Stage 3 at that point—a stage at which survival rates are extremely low. But Dr. Gervasoni didn’t give up, and neither did Baker. Following a complicated 10-hour surgery to remove the pancreas, Baker has survived and is doing well. She credits Dr. Gervasoni and his Saint Peter’s team. Please also glance at Tech Savvy (page 23) for an update on the rapidly expanding Saint Peter’s Wound Care Center and Hyperbaric Services, which now ranks as one of the biggest and best programs of its sort in New Jersey. Hyperbaric treatments, which use pure oxygen to speed the healing of wounds, are commonly employed to treat diabetic wounds, threatened skin grafts and a host of other ailments. Not only has our service expanded in New Brunswick, but it is also coming to Monroe Township in early 2012. I hope you won’t forget, either, to read about a few of those people who make Saint Peter’s so special in Faces of Saint Peter’s on page 16 and Up Close on page 18. Thank you again for reading Middlesex Health & Life and for choosing Saint Peter’s. We are honored to serve the healthcare needs of you and your family.

RONALD C. R AK , J.D. PRE S IDE N T A ND CHIE F E X E C U T I V E OFFI CE R S A IN T PE T E R’S HE A LT H CA RE SYST E M

NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ 08901

732.745.8600 | www.saintpetershcs.com

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A Better Health Update from Saint Peter’s University Hospital

“We deliver more than 6,000 babies a year.” — Dr. Suzette Johnson, Obstetrics/Gynecology “When it comes to delivering your baby, choose a hospital you can trust. At Saint Peter’s, we’ve been caring for women and babies for generations. Our goal is simple: to make sure you have a great birthing experience. Our doctors and nurses guide parents-to-be through pregnancy and delivery. Using the latest technology, we help give expectant mothers peace of mind with advanced screenings and testing like our revolutionary 4-D ultrasound. Our birthing rooms and mother and baby units have been designed with your comfort in mind. Of course, we all want childbirth to go smoothly, but if there are complications, you can be confident our specialists have the expertise and compassion to care for you and your baby. Saint Peter’s has one of the most advanced Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) in the state. Our specialists can handle any level of emergency that may arise, during or after delivery. That’s why more parents put their trust in us than any other hospital in central New Jersey.”

To find out more about maternity services at Saint Peter’s, call Parent Education at 732-745-8579 or visit saintpetershcs.com/maternity

SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

254 EASTON AVENUE, NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ 08901

Catholic hospital sponsored by the Diocese of Metuchen Regional medical campus of Drexel University College of Medicine

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State-designated children’s hospital and regional perinatal center Affiliate of The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

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EDITOR’S NOTE

MINDFUL HOLIDAYS

We here at Middlesex Health & Life know the importance of feeling good and leading a balanced life, and over the past year, we have guided your quest for the “good life” in Middlesex County with authentic advice from local experts, including cutting-edge doctors and other healthcare practitioners. So with this issue, we set out to help you keep that balance—in mind, body and spirit— through this stressful holiday season with practical tips. You’ll learn how to ward off the flu with winter’s “wonder pill” (page 11) and how to get a great workout outdoors while snowshoeing (page 10), plus you’ll get advice from top local experts to help you make educated decisions and learn the costs associated with cosmetic surgery (page 34). Our art director, Meredith McBride Kipp, along with New Jersey florist extraordinaire Anne Miller, shows you how to glam up your holiday decorating and delight your family and friends with her chic yet practical guide to setting the perfect holiday table (page 30). If you’ve run out of gift ideas already, see page 28 for “Our Favorite Things”—a gift guide featuring a little something for everyone, on every budget. Those looking for the perfect party attire will want to check out our fashion page (26) for some great local finds. This holiday season, try to step away from the hustle and bustle and take time to share the true spirit of Christmas by giving to others—and not just under the tree. Whether you donate your time, talent or other gifts to those who are ill or less fortunate, it makes you feel good. For those of you who need scientific proof, research suggests there is a biochemical explanation for the positive emotions associated with doing good. And if you thrive on literary inspiration instead, heed the poet Maya Angelou, who said, “Among its other benefits, giving liberates the soul of the giver.” Happy Holidays!

TOP: ROBERT DESANTOS/VENTURE PHOTOGRAPHY OF RIDGEWOOD; HAIR: MARYANN ESMAILI; MAKEUP: BARBI DIAZ/PANICO SALON & SPA OF RIDGEWOOD. BOTTOM: COURTESY OF SOUL KITCHEN

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Musician and Middletown resident Jon Bon Jovi recently opened Soul Kitchen (732.842.0900, jbjsoulkitchen.org), a pay-what-you-can restaurant in Red Bank offering gourmet comfort food. Guests who can’t afford to pay at all are able to earn their meal by volunteering in the restaurant, which Bon Jovi hopes will empower individuals to participate in their community. “At a time when one in five households is living at or below the poverty level, and one out of six Americans is food insecure, this is a restaurant whose time has come,” said Bon Jovi. Reser vations are recommended if you plan to visit.

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A system wide approach to health care. Saint Peter’s Healthcare System was formed in 2007 and reflects the expansive scope of health and wellness services we offer to our community. However, our history dates back to over 100 years ago when we opened the doors of our first hospital in New Brunswick in 1872. Today, in addition to Saint Peter’s University Hospital and The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s, the healthcare system includes the Margaret McLaughlin McCarrick Care Center, our nursing home in Somerset; the New Brunswick Cardiac Catheterization Lab and the CARES Surgicenter, located in the Center for Ambulatory Resources adjacent to the hospital; our Adult Day Center in Monroe; the Saint Peter’s Sports Medicine Institute in Somerset; and the Saint Peter’s Foundation. At Saint Peter’s Healthcare System, you will find leading-edge technology and an experienced, award-winning staff. You will also find the caring and compassion that people have turned to for over a century.

For more information about Saint Peter’s Healthcare System, visit saintpetershcs.com

254 EASTON AVENUE, NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ 08901 Catholic hospital sponsored by the Diocese of Metuchen Regional medical campus of Drexel University College of Medicine

Saint Peter’s University Hospital

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Children's Hospital at Saint Peter's

CARES Surgicenter

New Brunswick Cardiac Catheterization Lab

 

732.745.8600

saintpetershcs.com

State-designated children’s hospital and regional perinatal center Affiliate of The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Saint Peter’s Sports Medicine Institute

Margaret McLaughlin McCarrick Care Center

Saint Peter’s Adult Day Center

Saint Peter’s Foundation

12/5/11 11:43 AM


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saint Peter’s healthcare system President and chief executive officer ronald c. r ak , j. d.

chief oPerating officer, senior vice President patricia carroll

chief marketing officer pe ter connolly director, marketing and media relations michelle l a z z arot ti

director, Public relations phil hartman

s a i n t p e t e r ’ s u n i v e r s i t y h o s p i ta l

President, medical and dental staff dinesh singal, m. d.

saint peter’s health and management services corporation

executive director ste ven s. radin, esq.

CONTACT US AT

saint peter’s HealtHcare system 254 Easton Avenue, New Brunswick, NJ 08901. For more information about Saint Peter’s facilities and services, please visit saintpetershcs.com or call 732.745.8600.

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Send your feedback and ideas to: Editor, Middlesex Health & Life, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; fax 201.782.5319; e-mail editor@wainscotmedia.com. Middlesex Health & Life assumes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited manuscripts or art materials.

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ano middlesex HealtH & life is published 4 times a year by Wainscot Media, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645. This is Volume 5, Issue 4. © 2011 by Wainscot Media LLC. All rights reserved. Subscriptions in U.S. outside of Middlesex County: $14 for one year. Single copies: $3.95. Material contained herein is intended for informational purposes only. If you have medical concerns, seek the guidance of a healthcare professional. advertising inquiries Please contact Shae Marcus at 856.797.2227 or shae.marcus@wainscotmedia.com. subscription services To inquire about a subscription, to change an address or to purchase a back issue or a reprint of an article, please write to Middlesex Health & Life, C i r c u l a t i o n D e p a r t m e n t , 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; telephone 201.573.5541; e - m a i l c h r i s t i n e . h a m e l @wainscotmedia.com.

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LOCALBUZZ MIDDLESEX NEWS

REVIEWS

TIPS

TRENDS

DID YOU HE AR?

New Jersey just became the first state in the nation to require downhill skiers and snowboarders age 18 and under to wear helmets.

Atlas Elektra 923 snowshoes ($160) are available at Dick’s.

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DECEMBER 2011/JANUARY 2012

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LEFT, TOP & BOTTOM: SHUTTERSTOCK

Don’t blame that powdery precipitation for hindering your winter workout—use it. “Snowshoeing, snowboarding and skiing offer the opportunity to enjoy the natural beauty of the Northeast in the winter while burning calories, toning muscle and increasing metabolism,” says Jerry Copsinis of Dick’s Sporting Goods in East Brunswick (732.651.3284, dickssportinggoods.com). In fact, snowshoeing and cross-country skiing burn more calories in an hour than the same time spent jogging or on an elliptical machine. For beginners, ailing athletes or those looking for additional resistance, a trekking pole can enhance the workout and take pressure off your knees and ankles. “Utilizing poles as you snowshoe will help you keep your balance and enable you to burn more calories as you’re engaging your core and upper body along with your legs,” says Copsinis.

SHUTTERSTOCK

IT’S SNOW EXCUSE


WINTER’S WONDER PILL Are you getting enough vitamin D? Michael Holick, M.D., author of The Vitamin D Solution, estimates that up to 50 percent of Americans are at risk for a deficiency of this vital, versatile vitamin. “The number-one thing people associate with Vitamin D is calcium absorption and bone health, and that is probably its foremost function,” says Anne Marie Van Hoven, M.D., an endocrinologist at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. But new research, she notes, suggests it promotes skin healing and blood flow, helps control diabetes and helps alleviate seasonal affective disorder, premenstrual symptoms and mood swings, and may even lower one’s odds of cancer. The vitamin is also thought to improve immune-system function, decreasing your risk of catching a cold or the flu. The U.S. Government recently raised the recommended daily allowance of D from 200–400 international units (IUs) to 600—and some experts suggest higher amounts. “I think 1,000 IUs is a dose that’s appropriate and conservative,” says Dr. Van Hoven. For optimal health, adults and children should get an adequate supply of Vitamin D from their diet or a supplement. Food sources of Vitamin D include fatty fish (salmon, mackerel and tuna), cod liver oil, milk, beef liver and fortified cereal products. But as Dr. Van Hoven notes, “It’s hard to get sufficient Vitamin D from diet alone.” Supplements of the vitamin are available in pill form (talk to your physician first). Symptoms of a deficiency include pains, especially in the bones, or fatigue. If you’re concerned that you may be D-deficient, ask your physician to check your Vitamin D level. This can be done as part of routine blood work.

LEFT, TOP & BOTTOM: SHUTTERSTOCK

SHUTTERSTOCK

Z-“APP” STRESS

With the recently released app Stress Free with Deepak Chopra (deepakchopramobile.com), you can relax without the cost and time commitment of a yoga class or a massage. The $1.99 app, which is compatible with the iPhone, iPod touch and iPad, is a six-week interactive program coached by Chopra, an expert on mind-body healing. Stress Free includes interactive exercises, music therapy, meditations, personalized nutrition advice and yoga postures. Check out Chopra’s other apps that focus on meditation and yoga—and get inspirational tidbits with the free app Daily Gift.

light bites

It’s holiday time again, and that means navigating a minefield of finger foods, appetizers and other high-calorie treats. Consider arming yourself with these tasty, healthconscious eats, all made in New Jersey: Lentil Crackers from Boonton-based Mediterranean Snack Foods are glutenfree, high-protein and low-fat. They’re available in Rosemary Herb, Sea Salt and Cracked Pepper and pair nicely with hummus or yogurt dip for a low-calorie snack. Find them at Wegmans in Woodbridge. Plantain Chips, made by Grab ’Em Snacks in Hillsborough, are gluten-free and come in seven flavors including Cinful Cinnamon, Chili Garlicious and Ragin’ Cajun. Part of the banana family, plantains are high in protein and rich in fiber, making these a smart alternative to most other kinds of snack chips. You can order them on the company’s website. Popcorn Chips: Air-popped popcorn is already a fiber-rich and figure-friendly alternative for snackers, so a makeover may not seem necessary. But Chip’ins, a new line of chips from the Popcorn, Indiana company (which, despite the name, is based in Englewood), are a fun and flavorful popcorn variation. Available in four flavors—Sea Salt, Jalapeño Ranch, White Cheddar and Hot Buffalo Wing—these chips can accompany finger sandwiches or a low-fat dip. Find them at Walgreens and Bed, Bath & Beyond.

CALLING ALL SPA LOVERS!

What’s your favorite spa in Middlesex County? E-mail liz.donovan@wainscotmedia.com and vote for the spa you think deserves the top spot in our Ultimate Spa Guide in the April issue.

MIDDLESE X XHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

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Lentil Crackers, Plantain Chips and Popcorn Chips are healthy and locally made.

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LOCAL BUZZ Wrap a gift in natural jute with the Eco Holiday Cabin Fringe Bag from ecowrap.com.

New Jersey’s own Infernos Band

HOT HOLIDAY MUSIC Most wedding and corporate-event bands cannot include performing for President Obama and Governors James McGreevey and Jon Corzine on their resume, but New Jersey’s own Infernos Band can. The Infernos have been performing since 1977 and have opened for big-name bands like Chicago. The Infernos traveled to Rome and L’Aquila—a city that was devastated by an earthquake in 2009—last year to perform a series of benefit concerts, and proceeds from that tour’s documentary, Italy Earthquake Relief Fund Tour, are going to earthquake survivors and their families. Founder and lead singer Bobby Wells says that was the least they could do. “We’ve had the honor of playing shows all over the world for over 30 years, and we feel lucky to be able to do what we love day in and day out,” says Wells. “This is just one small way we can give back.” Wells was presented with the East Hanover Italian-American Club “Humanitarian of the Year” award in October. The band’s documentary DVD will be for sale at all of their upcoming shows. Visit the infernosband.com for a list of concert dates. To download The Infernos’ version of “Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas” and “I’m So Glad That It’s Time To Be Christmas,” head to middlesexhealthandlife.com.

Half the fun of giving a gift lies in the pretty presentation. But those brightly wrapped holiday packages can be eco-unfriendly. Wrapping paper is typically nonrecyclable because it’s dyed, laminated and often contains metallic coloring or glitter. So, how to give attractive gifts and still help save the planet? Try these ideas: Open gifts carefully so you can reuse bows, wrapping paper, gift bags and tissue. Instead of buying gift boxes, reuse shoe boxes and other boxes you have around the house. Consider wrapping or containers that are part of the gift: a scarf, beach towel, mug, watering can, baby blanket, mixing bowl and so on. Buy squares of beautiful fabrics, cloth bags (check out ecowrap.com, bobowrap.com and wrapnatural. com) and cloth ribbons that can be reused each year. Purchase only wrapping paper and packaging made with mostly or entirely recycled paper. Gorgeous options abound online; check out olivepaper.com, nashvillewraps.com and snailspacepaper.com.

CHRISTMAS AT 1600 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE Glen Ridge resident Coleen Christian Burke has a passion for holiday decorating at the White House. Chosen as a volunteer decorator for then–First Lady Laura Bush, Burke has helped to decorate the White House every year since 2008. She also runs a seasonal holiday decorating business called Sugar Plums (visit haveawhitehousechristmas.com). Now Burke has come out with a glossy book, Christmas with the First Ladies (Insight Editions, $29.95). “Readers will get to see amazing photos of our first families celebrating Christmas, plus recipes and crafts used by the first ladies,” Burke says. “Each first lady has her own special holiday style, and I teach you how to copy it in your own home.”

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The BestDressed Present

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shop local leader before, there had been guests here who said they were relatives of John Predmore. Well, every time someone comes here and has some history, we ask them to sign the guest book with their name, address and telephone number. It took me about 10 minutes to find the entry—the earlier guests’ name was Bradley, and they had come all the way from Portland, ore., to find their roots. I gave the guest the earlier visitors’ phone number, and soon the guest’s grandfather, who was in his 90s and had spent his life trying to find his family, called me and said I’d given him the greatest gift of his life. That’s the beauty of what we have—the inn can be a kind of Holy grail.

Ge t tinG there the cranbury inn 21 S. Main St. Cranbury, 609.655.5595 thecranburyinn.com

tom ingegneri, 68, and his wife, gay, 70, are enthusiastic hosts at the Cranbury inn, where both the dining area (left) and the exterior (below) have a traditional appeal.

are guests able to stay overnight?

not these days. The guest rooms were converted to dining rooms for private parties. one room features a fireplace and is currently decorated for the holidays with a Christmas tree to evoke the feeling of being at home. Also, we added a banquet hall to the inn in 2005 so that we could host larger parties.

gay:

what do you enjoy most about running the

fare to remember Left and top: jennifer vreeLand. bottom right: Courtesy of the Cranbury inn

an inspired couple offers a taste of history at the cr anbury inn ToM And gAy IngegnerI HAve owned the Cranbury Inn in Cranbury since 1992, but two decades are little more than a finger-snap in the restaurant’s long history. It dates back to 1750 and is said to have been a stop on the Underground railroad. Today, the husband-and-wife proprietors thrive on upholding tradition and creating community in a place they call a “Holy grail.” what is the inn like? tom: one of the owners from the 1920s described it as a place for “gracious country dining,” and that still holds true today. our “market” is the romantic and the traditionalist. our philosophy has been to keep the inn as it is, at all costs. We have chairs that date back to 1890 and a lobby set with furniture from 1860. visitors are often struck

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you also donate use of your space to

That’s part of what we’re here for. We’re not just trying to make money; we want to be part of the community. For example, the girl Scouts have a barn dance here twice a year. And we do a church senior breakfast here for $6 once a month for 10 months a year. gay: I get up in the morning and cook all the food. Then Tom and one of our servers—a senior himself—wait on tables.

community organizations. tom:

by the fact that the inn is “old,” and it is—that’s the whole point. People come back to it year after year for the memories. you must have heard some interesting stories. tom: Here’s one. A customer once introduced himself to me as John Predmore and told me he was a descendant of the inn’s founder. (In the 1700s, when it was a post house, the inn was known simply as the house of John Predmore.) He explained that the land had been owned by three brothers, and two of them had gone out West while the third, John, stayed behind. The guest had been able to locate descendants of one of the brothers in Minnesota, but he’d never found out where the other brother landed. All of a sudden, I got a chill. I remembered that about five years

Send yoUr IdeAS For “SHoP loCAl leAder” To shopLocaLLeader@wainscotmedia.com.

restaurant? tom: The customers. When people come in here, it’s not just to eat; they want a great evening and are looking for something special. That’s what I like about it. It means we have something greater than a restaurant. When we do weddings, I create a relationship between the bride and inn. I’ve spoken with brides who were married here 25 years ago, and it’s a place they’ll never forget.

what tips do you have for people who want

Pick something you love and be prepared to be totally dedicated because that’s the secret of success. gay: Sometimes I think we keep going on spirit energy. How else could people our age have this much energy to keep going for this long and be this happy, this positive every day of the week? But it has made a wonderful life for us. —ElizabEth larnEr to open a business? tom:

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A Better Health Update from Saint Peter’s University Hospital

“We have a dedicated team of breast cancer specialists.” — Dr. Susan McManus, Breast Surgery “With a diagnosis of breast cancer, the approach to your care can make all the difference. That’s why so many people put their trust in the hands of the specialists at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. The Breast Center at Saint Peter’s is the first in central New Jersey to earn a full three-year accreditation by the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers. We are committed to caring for the whole person, not just treating the cancer. In addition to focusing on the medical aspects of the disease, we offer the compassion and emotional support needed to help patients and their families fight the toughest battle of their lives. Our team members pool their expertise in various specialties to create a customized treatment program for every patient—from diagnostic testing to chemotherapy, radiation, surgery and post-treatment care. At Saint Peter’s, we center our care around our patients.”

To find out more about our breast cancer services, call 732-846-3300 or visit saintpetershcs.com/breastcenter

SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

254 EASTON AVENUE, NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ 08901

Catholic hospital sponsored by the Diocese of Metuchen Regional medical campus of Drexel University College of Medicine

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State-designated children’s hospital and regional perinatal center Affiliate of The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

12/5/11 11:42 AM


ingoodhealth Medicine

t e c h n o lo g y

pat i e n t c a r e at sa i n t p e t e r ’ s u n i v e r s i t y h o s p i ta l

“laughter is the sun that drives winter froM the huMan face.”

shutterstock

—victor hugo

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faces of saint peter’s

David E. Jacob, M.D.

The chief of cardiology aT

Once overweight, David E. Jacob, M.D., is now trim—and a dedicated athlete.

Saint Peter’s University hospital practices what he preaches. an avid long-distance runner and triathlete, david e. Jacob, M.d., has combined exercise with prudent eating to achieve a 55-pound weight loss—and become a great example for his patients who want to lead healthier lives. The highland Park native, 53, followed an internal medicine residency at Saint Peter’s with a cardiology fellowship at deborah heart and lung center in Browns Mills, where he specialized in echocardiography and nuclear medicine. he and his wife, evy, who runs a custom stationery company, live in highland Park and have two children, Samantha, 22, and Max, 20. What motivated you to lose so much Weight?

i went to a Saint Peter’s University hospital health fair and had my blood pressure tested. it was very high, which was embarrassing to me. i had gotten up to 205 pounds, and i decided then and there to change my lifestyle. That was eight years ago. What changes did you make? i decided to eat 50 percent of what i used to eat and cut out salt and fats. i’d always been a very good athlete as a kid, but at first i could only run two laps at the high school track. as i lost weight, i could exercise more. Now exercise is a big part of my life. i do half-marathons, and i did the New york city triathlon in august. has it improved your health? for sure. My blood pressure is normal now, with no medication. do you tell your patients about your experi-

i use my story just about every day to give my patients confidence that they can do it too. i have a “before” picture in my office and sometimes pull it out to show that i am now the “after.” They are amazed. i’ve become recognized in my town. People see me walking home from work every day and exercising, and they know what i have done. i enjoy that persona. it gives me a lot of pride and satisfaction. —DaviD levine

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“i decided to eat 50 percent of what i used to eat and cut out salt and fats. as i lost weight, i could exercise more. now exercise is a big part of my life.” —david e. JacoB, M.d.

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ence?


FACES OF SAINT PETER’S

Robert Zannella, D.P.M.

AS A ONETIME CANADIAN HOCKEY

player, Robert Zannella has long had a fascination with body mechanics and movement. He earned a bachelor of science degree in human physiology at McGill University in Montreal, but an introduction to podiatry encouraged him to enter the New York College of Podiatric Medicine, after which came residencies in surgery and wound care at Saint Barnabas Medical Center. He and his wife, Valerie, who helps manage his office, are 43 and live in Hillsborough with their children Anthony, 13, Stephanie, 9, and Lisa-Marie, 5.

Robert Zannella, D.P.M., on a recent fishing trip with son Anthony, daughters Stephanie and Lisa-Marie and wife Valerie

HOW DID PHYSIOLOGY LEAD YOU TO PODIATRY?

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My wife’s father is a dermatologist, and he knew of my interest in body mechanics, so he guided me to visit with his doctor friends, one of whom was a podiatrist who exposed me to the world of podiatry. The intricate functions of movement always interested me, and the foot is the propulsive mechanism of the entire body. WHAT KIND OF PATIENTS DO YOU SEE? I treat a lot of people with diabetes, who often have foot problems, and also many patients require foot surgery—I see all age groups. We recently moved our office into a new spacious location with the latest in digital imaging and laser technology so that we can deliver the best care to our patients. DO YOU STILL PLAY HOCKEY? No, but I’m an active fisherman and golfer. The whole family loves to fish. When we travel, we go to places with good fishing, like Florida and South Carolina. All the kids love it—LisaMarie wants to put worms on the hook herself. And the older kids are good golfers. They have better swings than I do. We also love to cook as a family. I am the child of Italian immigrants, and we love to keep the tradition of cooking and eating together. We make pizza and pasta, filling the kitchen with flour and rolling pins, and talk about our lives. —D.L.

“THE INTRICATE FUNCTIONS OF MOVEMENT ALWAYS INTERESTED ME, AND THE FOOT IS THE PROPULSIVE MECHANISM OF THE ENTIRE BODY.” —ROBERT ZANNELL A, D.P.M. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT MIDDLESEXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

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Up close

good Show for a good caUSe The Saint Peter’s auxiliary fashion Show will be held Saturday, March 24, at the Pines Manor in edison. Models will include breast cancer survivors. Tickets, $60, include admission and lunch. call 732.745.6641 or visit saintpetershcs.com.

for this high-energy volunteer organiZer, fundraising’s in fashion JeNNifer MaroTTo ThrowS a great bash. her annual tour de force is the Saint Peter’s auxiliary fashion Show, which will be held this March 24 at the Pines Manor in edison. Since she joined the fashion show’s staff of volunteers in 2009, the event has raised about $120,000 to support the Breast center at Saint Peter’s University hospital and its treatment of breast cancer. “Many people have said i should quit

my job and start a party planning business,” says Marotto with a laugh. But the pediatric physical therapist says one big party a year is enough. Besides, it’s the cause that really counts, not the festivities. Marotto, 31 and single, lives in Spotswood. Though she works at another hospital, her mother, donna Marotto, is a nurse in the Saint Peter’s radiation oncology department. when donna’s boss, Scarlett Szymanski, was

To fiNd oUT More aBoUT The aUxiliary aT SaiNT PeTer’S UNiverSiTy hoSPiTal, PleaSe call 732.745.6641. To Share ThiS arTicle wiTh a frieNd or To recoMMeNd iT oN yoUr faceBooK Page, viSiT mIddLeSeXHeaLTHandLIFe.cOm.

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Party WHiZ

organizing a different benefit in 2008, both donna and Jennifer pitched in to help. and when the fashion show began in 2009, mother and daughter again stepped up, soliciting donations from the community, putting gift baskets together and doing whatever needed to be done. “i guess they were pleased with what i did,” she says, “because they asked me to chair the event in 2010.” She’s directed the show since, and its sponsors have been more than pleased. “Jennifer has an amazing way of engaging people,” says emily lyssikatos, executive director of the Saint Peter’s foundation. “They are drawn to her enthusiasm and passion and want to help her.” Marotto begins planning the next show almost immediately after each show closes. She starts by choosing a theme—the theme for this year’s event, which will feature evening wear, is “dress to impress.” She then tracks down donors; lord & Taylor will donate the clothing this year, and others provide decorations, gifts for the goody bags and other party necessities. “i put some time into the fashion show almost every day, and after the first of the year it becomes about six to seven hours a day,” she says—and that’s on top of her day job. “My close friends call me crazy, but i really enjoy the process. i have a good time getting the community involved, i like planning a party and i believe in the cause. and as crazy as it gets in the end, i appreciate walking around the room and hearing people comment about the little details they like—or hearing them offer to help out at the next show.” Marotto also likes the fact that the show continues to grow—from about 200 attendees the first year to more than 500 in 2011, thanks in no small part to her efforts. So, despite the workload, she is in no hurry to step aside. “i am very protective of this show, and i don’t want to give it up,” she says. “i feel like it’s my baby.” —D.l. bOhM-MarrazzO phOtOgraphy

Jennifer Marotto


SEASONAL HEALTH

Beat stomach flu! W I N T E R I S A N E S P E C I A L LY D A N G E R O U S TIME FOR THIS COMMON BUG ’TIS THE SEASON TO BE WARY—

ach pains or cramps and occasionally fever. The real danger, though, is dehydration. The most common winter culprit in children is the rotavirus, says Elizabeth R. Henry, M.D., a pediatrician who is a partner with the New Brunswick Pediatric Group and is affiliated with Saint Peter’s University Hospital. “Like the influenza virus, this one thrives in cold, dry winter climates,” she says. “Although any age group, even adults, can get rotavirus, the younger and smaller you are, the more prone you are to serious dehydration.” When your child comes down with the bug, it’s important to see the child’s doctor. “Many things can cause these symptoms,

SIGNS OF DEHYDRATION The most serious consequence of stomach flu is dehydration, says pediatrician Elizabeth R. Henry, M.D. Warning signs include: dry, pasty mouth and cracked lips few or no tears when crying eyes that look sunken into the head soft spot (fontanel) on top of baby’s head that looks sunken lack of urine or small amount of dark yellow urine dry, cool skin lethargy or irritability fatigue or dizziness in older children “For any of these signs, consult your pediatrician,” says Dr. Henry. “The child may need to be evaluated in the office or sent to the hospital for intravenous rehydration.”

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT SERVICES AVAIL ABLE FOR YOU OR YOUR FAMILY AT SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, PLEASE CALL 732.745.8600. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT MIDDLESEXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM. SHUTTERSTOCK

BOHM-MARRAZZO PHOTOGRAPHY

of the stomach viruses and bacteria that may be lurking in your kids’ schools, day care centers and the outside world. Lumped together under the umbrella term gastroenteritis, these stomach bugs account for about 1.5 million doctor visits for both adults and children each year. Roughly 200,000 people need hospitalization, usually for dehydration caused by excessive vomiting or diarrhea, and about 300 deaths a year are attributed to the illness. Young children are the most vulnerable. Stomach flu usually lasts about five days. Its symptoms, as any experienced parent knows, are vomiting, diarrhea, stom-

so other possible causes such as food poisoning need to be ruled out,” she says. Equally critical is the need to begin rehydrating as soon as symptoms begin, she says. “Use products like Pedialyte for small children and Gatorade for older kids, as opposed to fruit juice, because they contain electrolytes like sodium and potassium,” she notes. If kids immediately throw up liquids, try reducing the amount given to just a few ounces, but give it as often as they can handle it. If you notice signs of dehydration (see below), talk to the child’s physician immediately. Preventing stomach flu is difficult. “There is an oral vaccine,” says Dr. Henry, “but there is only a small window for administering this vaccine—between ages 2 months and 8 months.” The vaccine is not effective in older children, and it does not offer lifetime immunity to infants. But it does protect those in whom rotovirus can cause severe dehydration. Good hygiene is the only other preventive measure. “Hand washing has an impact on all infectious diseases,” says the doctor. “Ask your child’s day care workers to wash often, and try to keep your kids’ hands clean at home and in school.” —D.L.

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a pancreatic cancer patient is alive today because of a one-of-a-kind procedure 20

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The oddS were agaiNST Phyllis Baker. already suffering from a host of health problems, the 53-yearold edison woman was misdiagnosed last year when a specialist in Philadelphia told her that her stomach pains were due to a cyst on her pancreas. But she still had doubts. So she turned to Saint Peter’s University hospital and James e. gervasoni Jr., M.d., Ph.d., surgical oncologist and chairman of the department of Surgery. her illness was indeed more serious—pancreatic cancer—and her previous medical conditions made treatment seemingly impossible. But both Baker and dr. gervasoni refused to accept defeat— and that saved her life. Baker, who has worked in sales and interior decorating, and her husband, Bill, 49, an electrical engineer, have four daughters ages 17 to 27. over the years she has been diagnosed with hepatitis c and bipolar disorder, and she was morbidly overweight when she underwent bariatric weight-loss surgery in 1998. That surgery needed to be revised in 2006 when she developed ulcers and a perforation in the gastric pouch, the small stomach created by the procedure. over the years she also had her gallbladder removed and three cesarean sections. overall, she had undergone seven abdominal surgeries in her lifetime. continuous abdominal pain led Baker to suspect that she had cancer. “My mother died of pancreatic cancer at 46,” she says by way of explaining her concern. it was early 2011 when the doctor at the Philadelphia hospital, after seeing a mass on the pancreas in an endoscopic study, told her she did not have cancer. “he told me i was one of the lucky ones,” Baker says. But she felt the doctor didn’t take her seriously. “he spent no more than 50 seconds with me,” she adds. She didn’t believe him. Neither did her physician, Satya P. Kastuar, M.d., who specializes in gastroenterology and hepatology at Saint Peter’s University hospital. “he called me in and said he would send me to another doctor,” Baker says. That was dr. gervasoni, who after examining her also was convinced she had cancer. a

computed tomography (cT) scan revealed that the mass on her pancreas had nearly doubled in size since the endoscopy. “She had also developed jaundice, which strongly suggested pancreatic cancer,” dr. gervasoni says. for any hope of survival, the pancreas had to be surgically removed. But all of Baker’s previous abdominal surgeries made this a daunting challenge. Under normal circumstances, surgeons perform an operation known as a pancreaticoduodenectomy, also called the whipple procedure. it involves removing the head and sometimes the body of

“dr. gervasoni pulled no punches with me, but he was confident enough to take me on.” —PhylliS BaKer the pancreas. Parts of the stomach and small intestine, some lymph nodes, the gallbladder and part of the common bile

duct also are removed, and the remaining bile duct is attached to the small intestine so that bile from the liver can continue to enter the small intestine. even under normal circumstances it is a very complex operation with a relatively high risk of complications that may even be fatal. But Baker’s circumstances were far from normal. “The whipple is well known, but the medical literature includes fewer than five descriptions of it in a patient who has had gastric bypass surgery,” dr. gervasoni says. in bypass surgery, a small stomach pouch is created and then linked to the small intestines, bypassing the rest of the stomach and large intestines. it in essence rearranges the digestive organs. and because Baker had needed that surgery revised, along with all her other abdominal surgeries, “there was so much scar tissue around the old stomach, i couldn’t get to the pancreas,” dr. gervasoni says. as if that wasn’t enough, Baker also had cirrhosis of the liver from her hepatitis. “So if there was too much cutting, she could bleed to death,” he adds. “dr. gervasoni pulled no punches

seated: James E. gervasoni Jr., M.D., and phyllis baker. standing, left to right: rosemary roche, nurse; satya p. kastuar, M.D.; charles Franco, M.D.,; and Jennifer battiato

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with me,” Baker says. “he told me he needed some time to figure out how to do this. But i could feel he was confident enough to take me on. i felt accepted by him. he wasn’t like the other doctor, who blew me off.” he assembled a team that included charles franco, M.d., a vascular and general surgeon, chief surgical resident John Theodoropoulos, M.d., dr. Kastuar, nurse and team coordinator rosemary roche, physician assistant Jennifer Battiato and several other nurses and physician assistants. “This was going to be the most difficult procedure i had ever done, and i knew that going in,” says dr. gervasoni. “we all knew it and did quite a bit of planning. we are a team, and we needed a team approach to tackle this case.”

drain in her liver, which dr. gervasoni describes as “rock-hard and cirrhotic.” Thanks to the team’s surgical skill and precise care, Baker survived the surgery. “The hospital staff was excited for me after the operation,” Baker says. “i had no jaundice and had beautiful coloring back. dr. gervasoni gave me the biggest hug.” But she was slow to heal. She spent a total of 38 days in the hospital recovering. and she is not out of the woods yet. Pathology of the tumor revealed it was stage 3 cancer. She is currently undergoing chemotherapy, and although dr. gervasoni reports that “there is no evidence of disease right now,” pancreatic cancer is particularly dangerous. Baker will continue to see

the doctor every three months for two years. “we follow our patients for the rest of their lives,” dr. gervasoni says. he believes that Baker was fortunate to find Saint Peter’s University hospital. “you don’t have to go to New york or Philly,” he says. “we have experienced surgeons who can take care of complex upper gi cancers. She received really personal, individualized cancer care here. our team was available to her 24/7. it’s a well-oiled machine with a homey feeling.” dr. gervasoni is submitting a paper on this case to surgical journals. he believes it’s the first time a patient has undergone the whipple procedure after both open gastric bypass surgery and later revision. “it’s never been done before,” he says. —D.l .

“this was probably the most difficult whipple procedure anyone will e ver do.” —JaMeS e. gervaSoNi Jr., M.d.

To fiNd oUT More aBoUT SUrgical ServiceS aT SaiNT PeTer’S UNiverSiTy hoSPiTal, PleaSe call 732.745.8571. To Share ThiS arTicle wiTh a frieNd or To recoMMeNd iT oN yoUr faceBooK Page, viSiT mIddLeSeXHeaLTHandLIFe.cOm.

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James E. gervasoni Jr., M.D., with phyllis baker and bill baker

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as they were nearing the surgery date, Baker developed pneumonia and spent a week in the hospital battling that. once her lungs cleared, she was taken into surgery on March 30, 2011. The operation lasted 10 hours. “This was probably the most difficult whipple procedure anyone will ever do,” says dr. gervasoni. “it took three hours just to get to the pancreas because of all the scar tissue.” gaining access to the pancreas also required him to remove part of the intestine. he and his partners removed half of the pancreas and the other nearby organs that were still there, but left the old stomach in place because scarring made it too dangerous to remove. They then had to reroute her digestive tract and place a


tecH saVVY

hyperbaric medicine puts the power of pure oxygen to work in healing wounds.

SUPER HEALING FOR FEET

high-pressure oxygen therapy works wonders on stubborn foot wounds for MoST of US, cUTS, BliS-

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ters and other simple wounds on the feet heal quickly and easily. But for people with conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease or nerve damage, healing is more difficult. without proper treatment, these small injuries can lead to serious infections and severe tissue damage. in some cases, amputation is required. in the past few years, however, wound-care experts have found that treating these stubborn wounds with pure oxygen can help tissue heal more rapidly and completely. Saint Peter’s University hospital has offered hyperbaric oxygen (hBo) treatment for years and is expanding its program to meet an ever-growing demand for state-of-the-art wound care. a third hyperbaric chamber was added to the wound care center in New Brunswick this summer, while

two more chambers will be installed to complement a new wound care center slated for the Monroe adult community in 2012. “There is a huge need for comprehensive wound care in the Monroe area,” says Margaret Moss, program director of the wound care center and hyperbaric Services. She explains that aging is a significant risk factor for problematic wounds, adding that Monroe-area residents include 61,000 people 60

and older, of whom roughly 7,000 have diabetes. diabetes compromises healing due to its damage to the blood and nerve vessels in the feet. other highrisk groups for problematic wounds are cancer patients who suffer from radiation burns, patients with chronic bone infections, those who have threatened skin grafts and the numerous patients with compromised arterial and vascular systems. “in hyperbaric (literally, high-pressure) oxygen treatments, patients recline in a special hBo chamber that surrounds them in 100 percent oxygen at two to three times normal air pressure. each treatment lasts approximately two hours and is administered five days per week for a total of 20 to 40 treatments,” says charles franco, M.d., the center’s medical director. Though this technology has been around for a long time, “there is still a lot of old thinking in wound care,” says dr. franco. “we used to leave wounds open to dry and scab or treat them with solutions that actually injure tissues. we have learned to care for wounds better.” Newer treatments also include synthetic tissue that can be incorporated into wounds to facilitate healing. additionally, special shoes can be worn to help keep pressure off wounds. and new medicines and dressings have also been developed. “hBo is used as an adjunct to these other treatments,” says nurse Karen raviola, clinical coordinator. These treatments are supervised by a specially trained hBo technician such as Tracey Juba. “To be able to take part in helping people get on with their lives is the best feeling,” says Juba. “we are so happy for them.” —D.l.

excelleNce iN woUNd care for the third consecutive year, Saint Peter’s wound care center and hyperbaric Services has earned the center of distinction award from diversified clinical Services, a partner in providing specialized wound and hyperbaric management. The award is based on 12 months of outstanding patient outcomes that include patient-satisfaction scores over 90 percent and an 89 percent average healing rate within 30 days.

To fiNd oUT More aBoUT woUNd care aT SaiNT PeTer’S UNiverSiTy hoSPiTal, PleaSe call 732.846.6199. To Share ThiS arTicle wiTh a frieNd or To recoMMeNd iT oN yoUr faceBooK Page, viSiT mIddLeSeXHeaLTHandLIFe.cOm.

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gatherings at saint peter’s

excellence in wound care Patricia Carroll, kneeling, chief operating officer and senior vice president of Saint Peter’s Healthcare System, and Margaret Moss, holding plaque, director of the Wound Care Center and Hyperbaric Services at Saint Peter’s University Hospital, join a cadre of Wound Care Center employees and physicians to mark the center’s receipt of a third straight Center of Distinction Award presented by Diversified Clinical Services of Jacksonville, Fla., the world’s largest wound-care management company. Saint Peter’s was one of only 83 centers in the country to be given this honor in 2011.

how sweet it is

holiday observance Saint Peter’s Healthcare System celebrated the Jewish holiday of Sukkot, from Oct. 12 at sundown to Oct. 19, with a ceremony to celebrate the erection of a sukkah on the Saint Peter’s campus in New Brunswick. Left to right, Ronald C. Rak, president and CEO of the healthcare system, Steven S. Radin, executive director of Saint Peter’s Health and Management Services Corp., and Tab Chukunta, director of community outreach, listen to Rabbi Mendy Carlebach of Chabad HouseLubavitch in New Brunswick as he explains the meaning of palm leaves, which are used to cover the sukkah, as part of the holiday. The sukkah, located behind the rabbi, represents the fragile dwellings in which the Israelites lived during their 40 years of travel in the desert after their exodus from slavery in Egypt.

FOR INFORMaTION ON UPCOMINg EVENTS SPONSORED By THE SaINT PETER’S FOUNDaTION, gO TO saintpetershcs.com/Foundation.

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from toP: CArol negveSky, riCh green, bAShir bASkinger/SAint Peter’S heAlthCAre SyStem

Heather Veltre, R.N., director of nursing for Saint Peter’s University Hospital’s Emergency Services, and Michael Hochberg, M.D., chairman of the Department of Emergency Medicine, accept the quarterly “Sweet Success” award that was given to the Pediatric Emergency Department in October for the most improved patient satisfaction scores in the hospital. The Sweet Success award recognizes customer satisfaction achievements. The Intensive Care Unit, or ICU, also earned a Sweet Success award for departmental achievements during the third quarter.

12/1/11 10:09 AM


DO YOU HAVE • ARTHRITIS • ASTHMA Adult + Children • GOUT • HIGH BLOOD SUGAR • HYPERTENSION (High Blood Pressure)

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Happy Holidays

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12/5/11 11:42 AM


LOCAL FASHION

OH NIGHT DIVINE PART Y-WORTHY PIECES FOR E VERY OCCASION

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5 4 1 The fun and flirty pale gold metallic Georgie Clutch, $250, from Lauren Merkin will add interest to your look but won’t steal the show. Ellvie, Westfield, 908.233.7100. 2 Tory Burch’s Eddie Glitter Ballerina Flats in bronze, $198, are fun and comfortable—perfect for those playing hostess this winter. Nordstrom, Edison, 732.603.5000. 3 Ooh, la, la! The Brian Atwood Pazza Bis Sandals, $1,340, in python leopard with a sassy red ribbon are to die for! When you wear these heels, keep your clothing simple and let your shoes do the talking. Nordstrom, Edison, 732.603.5000. 4 In need of a good oldfashioned cocktail dress? Look no further than Theia’s Crystal Beaded Strapless Dress, $1,995. It can be worn with your favorite boyfriend blazer, a black leather jacket or simply on its own, no jewelry needed. Neiman Marcus, Short Hills, 973.912.0080. 5 As ladylike looks rule the runway, now is the perfect time for your Mad Men moment. Finish off your chic ensemble with Oscar de la Renta’s silk-lined Hunter Fox Fur Stole, $1,650. Saks Fifth Avenue, Short Hills, 973.376.7350. 6 The most fabulous cover-up this season is courtesy of Va Et Vien exclusively for BHLDN. The Snowdrift Jacket, $500, mixes the feel of sumptuous silk charmeuse with the comfort of a down vest and comes with a detachable jeweled brooch closure. bhldn.com. 7 Bold color is one of the season’s biggest trends. Diane von Furstenberg’s blue sequined Judith Dress, $1,600, will complement any skin tone. dvf.com. —ALLISON ANDERSON

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CHECK OUT STYLIST ALLISON ANDERSON’S FASHION BLOG AT STYLEDIRECTIONBYALLISON.COM.

12/1/11 9:59 AM


SMILES FOR EVERY SEASON.

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OUR FAVORITE THINGS THESE UNUSUAL FINDS WILL DELIGHT THE SMART, CHIC, QUIRK Y AND CREATIVE FOLK ON YOUR LIST! BY NICOLE ESPOSITO POLLY

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1 The certified organic Bamboo Grow Pot, $20, from Potting Shed Creations puts fresh ingredients at the cook’s fingertips. Charmed By Claire, Cranbury, 609.409.6077. 2 Each of the teas in Teavana’s Shizuoka Collection Green Tea Gift Set, $80, comes beautifully wrapped in traditional Japanese origami paper. Teavana, Edison, 732.744.1016. 3 Style meets function in the fourwheel, 22˝ Plume Polycarbonate Carry-On, $199, from Lipault. Its light weight makes maneuvering through airports easy. flight001. com. 4 The Spiffy Lumberjack Bifold Wallet, $38, from Jetsam is constructed from vintage plaid shirts and packaged in a box made from recycled paper. carryjetsam.com. 5 Those who love to entertain will enjoy Kim Seybert’s Holiday Ornament Napkin Rings—a whimsical addition to any place setting. $100 for a set of four. kimseybert.com. 6 Riders 16 and up can travel on Razor’s battery-powered EcoSmart Metro Electric Scooter, $400, which reaches speeds of up to 18 m.p.h. with no emissions. amazon. com. 7 Ideal for the conservationist, the Adopt-a-Polar Bear Gift Box, $39, from Gift Republic, enables the recipient to adopt a polar bear for 12 months, helping protect polar bears through a partnership with the nonprofit Polar Bears International. langtoninfo.com. 8 S’well’s double-insulated Stainless-Steel Wine Bottle, $40, keeps wine perfectly chilled, and 10 percent of all sales help provide clean water to poor communities in Africa and India. swellbottle. com. 9 Tiffany & Co.’s Satin Bracelet Bag in Chartreuse, $795, is lined in the store’s signature blue and adorned with a ball-chain handle—perfect for the hard-to-please fashionista. Tiffany & Co., Red Bank, 732.345.8150. 10 Velvet Jingle Bell Collars, $5–$12, from Harry Barker stretch easily over your pet’s head, transforming a plain pooch into a hip hound. harrybarker.com. 11 Music lovers and home decorators alike will fall for the Geneva Sound System Model S, $300. The sleek, sonorous PowerDock for iPod/iPhone is also a clock-radio. Crate & Barrel, Cherry Hill, 856.662.5499. 12 Leave yourself colorful notes from the Writer’s Block Message Pad, $10, from Bob’s Your Uncle, boasting 550 pages of recycled paper. bobsyouruncle.com. 13 Organize keys and other accessories easily on the Bird On Branch Deluxe Wall Hook, $38, from These Creatures. thesecreatures.com.

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whites

winter

this year, curb the urge to use those same old red and green holiday decorations. these entertaining ideas will help you break old habits and embrace a new palette written & styled By meredith mcBride kipp floral design By anne miller ¡ photography By roey yohai

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opener and this page, left: roey yohai for the little flower shoppe in ridgewood. right (2): shutterstock

flanking doorways and the fireplace with preserved juniper trees will make a large room feel more intimate. potted topiaries like these are a chic alternative to a traditional christmas tree.

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opener and this page, left: roey yohai for the little flower shoppe in ridgewood. right (2): shutterstock

add dimension and a punch of color at each table setting with a sculptural piece of seasonal produce like an artichoke or pomegranate.

’T

is the season to be jolly, and setting the tone for such a sentiment is all about creating great atmosphere. When it comes to holiday decorating, the hardest part is staying away from the expected. Resist the temptation to use all of your saved decorations from years past. Instead, try something new: Pick a color palette and stick to it. What doesn’t fit the bill goes back to the attic or gets a fresh coat of paint. This year, think white. White is the epitome of modernity, elegance and balance. Mixing snow white with traces of green, black and silver is on trend and très chic. To bring greenery and life into your dining room, New Jersey florist extraordinaire Anne Miller recommends hanging an

coordinate your food with your color palette for added impact and elegance.

oversize wreath. Decorate it with items found in nature such as pinecones, acorns and berries to enchant guests. Flank the hearth and doorway with preserved juniper topiar y trees for an instant dose of warmth and intimacy. For your holiday table, choose crisp white linens and layer them with a wide, black ribbon or runner down the center of the table and across at each place setting. This will add dimension to the table and visually anchor each setting. When it comes to flatware, glassware and china, you don’t need to have the best; you just need to know how to use what you’ve got. Don’t be afraid to mix like-colored pieces—whites with off-whites, stainless steel with silver and mercury glass

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stationer do them for you. Place a menu on top of each napkin, then wrap the napkin and menu with ribbon or a paper strip that matches the invite (as pictured at right). Top it all off with a fresh artichoke to add unexpected texture, dimension and a punch of color. Lastly, make sure the lighting is just right—if you don’t have dimmers on your fixtures, just use candles (always unscented around food) aided by the glow from an illuminated room nearby. Cluster large mercury glass pieces and other silver objects together to bring a little sparkle to darker areas of the room. Carry elements of this onto your table by way of mercury glass votives and a few small silver objects, and you’ll have plenty of sparkle to go around during this festive season.

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top left: © loupe images/sandra lane. top right: © loupe images/martin Brigdale. Bottom right: shutterstock

or crystal with glass. Place your white china on a clear, silver or white charger—layering adds dimension to the table. To add sparkle, use clear glassware and stemware and mix styles to vary the height and look. For centerpieces, Miller says to keep the botanicals simple and seasonal. The velvety texture of Vendela roses and silvery grey Tilandisa is warm and wintry and helps create the mood for a luxurious cold-weather soiree. For an intimate dinner party, keep the arrangements under 12 inches high so as not to disrupt the festive repartee. Bring the black-and-white theme from your mailed invitation through to the place card and menu—it’s really chic and your guests will appreciate the detail. Keep the design simple and modern, and make things easy for yourself by having your local

this page and opposite (top center and Bottom left): roey yohai for the little flower shoppe in ridgewood

adorn the table with a few beautiful objects, like these antique silver pheasant salt and pepper shakers.


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top left: © loupe Images/sandra lane. top rIght: © loupe Images/martIn BrIgdale. Bottom rIght: shutterstock

thIs page and opposIte (top center and Bottom left): roey yohaI for the lIttle flower shoppe In rIdgewood

4 1 the little things

something simple like a sachet full of lavender or a bag of homemade cookies makes a nice gift for your guests. tie it off with a ribbon and an ornament and place it on their chairs.

own vases to the florist and have him or her create arrangements that work for your table. if flowers are out of the budget, cluster like-colored objects of varying heights in the center of the table.

2 get centered

3 keep it coming

a dramatic flower arrangement is a great way to wow your guests. you can bring your

always keep your guests’ water and cocktail glasses filled—your service is very

to share this article with a friend, download a dinner playlist or get more floral tips from anne miller, go to middlesexhealthandlife.com/winterwhites.

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important and much appreciated. for great champagne and sparkling wine ideas, see page 42.

4 put it on paper

despite the multitude of e-mail and web-based invite options these days, it’s a nice gesture to send guests a printed invitation to your party. Use the same style in your

place cards and menus to create a consistent theme.

5 easy does it

food, especially desserts, that you can prepare beforehand (or buy) will save you time. french macaroons are always an elegant supplement to your homemade desserts, and they come in a multitude of colors to fit any theme.

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younger? 34

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Time To look


THInk You’D never ConsIDer PLasTIC surGerY? You maY CHanGe Your mInD. “PeoPLe In THIs ParT of the country start to come in for cosmetic rejuvenation procedures in their 40s,” says kevin T. nini, m.D., vice chairman of the Department of surgery at saint Peter’s university Hospital and a plastic surgeon at Plastic surgery arts of new Jersey in new Brunswick. after all, cosmetic procedures are more accepted today than ever (“It’s no longer something that’s hidden,” says Dr. nini)—and due to technological advances, the procedures are also more effective, with shorter recovery times. What’s more, there are plenty of treatments that don’t require surgery, such as Botox and fillers. “People come with a desire for rejuvenation of some part of their body, and it’s up to the patient and the plastic surgeon to select the most appropriate procedure,” says Dr. nini. If you’re starting to consider what you might do to help yourself look and feel younger, here’s what 10 common procedures promise—and what they require.

nonsurgical procedures... Laser TreaTmenTs

FILLers

Lasers can be used to treat skin pigmentation (sun damage, acne scars and age spots), spider veins and fine wrinkles, to tone and tighten loose skin or to remove hair. But not all lasers are created equal—and different lasers serve different purposes. a good surgeon should be well-versed in a variety of lasers, offering you the most appropriate one for your skin issue. In general, laser beams work by lightly burning the surface layer of your skin (the epidermis) and heating the deeper layer (the dermis). as the skin heals, it generates new collagen and skin that is smoother and younger-looking. Depending on the laser’s strength, it could take a day to two weeks before you’re ready to show your face again.

There are a number of different injectable fillers used to smooth out facial wrinkles and plump up hollow areas of the face (or make lips bigger). a popular filler called hyaluronic acid (a.k.a. Ha fillers) is a natural substance found in our bodies. Brand names include Juvéderm, restylane and Perlane. each of these Ha fillers may be used at the corners of the mouth, in the lips and around the nasolabial folds (the area from the nose to the corner of the mouth). “In certain areas, fillers can do things that surgery can’t,” says Dr. nini. results are quick and usually last between six and nine months; in some cases they can last up to a year. surgeons may also inject calcium-based fillers (one popular brand is radiesse) or human fat to smooth out wrinkles. Less often, surgeons will use collagen (which doesn’t last as long as newer fillers), or a poly-L-lactic acid called sculptra, which adds volume to large areas of the face. sculptra requires two to three sessions, but it stimulates collagen production in your face, and the effects can last two years.

Surgeon’S fee for full facial reSurfacing:

$3,000 to $6,000 Surgeon’S fee for Spot treatmentS: $1,000 to $3,000 Surgeon’S fee for hair removal per area: $1,000 to $3,000

BoTox The injection of botulinum toxin type a (a.k.a. Botox) is one of the most popular noninvasive procedures used to reduce lines and wrinkles on the forehead and around the eyes. Botox (and a newer brand called Dysport—known as reloxin in europe) paralyzes or “relaxes” wrinklecausing muscles so that skin appears smoother, refreshed and more youthful. “since it’s the muscle activity that causes the wrinkles, the muscle-relaxing agents, such as Botox, can really even out those areas,” says Dr. nini. The results last about four months. shutterstock

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CosmetiC proCedures may help. here, a host of surgiCal and less-invasive options BY raCHeL raBkIn PeaCHman

Surgeon’S fee: $500 to $550 per area, with each

additional area about $250

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Surgeon’S fee: $400 to $800 per syringe (expect at

least one to two syringes)

CHemICaL PeeL anD mICroDermaBrasIon During a chemical peel of the face (which can be done by a doctor or an esthetician), an acidic exfoliating solution is applied to remove the outer layers of skin. The procedure takes about 20 minutes, but it’s about a week before you see results. When the skin heals, it has a tighter, fresher look. In fact, peels can soften wrinkles, treat acne and eliminate pigmentation such as age

spots. For optimal results, you may need a series of peels, says Winnie Lee, a medical esthetician at avance aesthetics skin Care in edison, and recovery time depends on the type of peel. a common peel done by doctors called the trichloroacetic acid (TCa) peel will cause major redness (it looks like you got a sunburn on your face) for a week. The alphahydroxy peels, which are the mildest peels, don’t penetrate the skin as deeply, which means that the effects aren’t nearly as dramatic as they are with the TCa peel, but you can expect to return to work in about a day. (some people call these “lunchtime peels.”) “There are also non-acid peels, such as the ‘Green Peel,’ which contains only natural herbs and is ideal for clients with sensitive skin or rosacea,” says Lee. Peels may be used in conjunction with microdermabrasion, a treatment that also exfoliates the skin, stimulates circulation and cell turnover, eliminates pigmentation and minimizes wrinkles. “It can target problem areas such as acne, scars and enlarged pores,” says Lee. During microdermabrasion (which can be done by a doctor or an esthetician), the practitioner may use a device that sprays fine crystals onto the skin to remove the outermost layer of dead skin cells, or he or she may use a diamond-tipped wand to remove the outer layer of skin cells. You will likely need a series of treatments. recovery times can vary, but in general, you may look just slightly red and will not have any down time. Surgeon’S fee for chemical peel: $850 to

$1,300 eSthetician’S fee for chemical peel: $75 to $200 Surgeon’S fee for microdermabraSion: $300 to $400 eSthetician’S fee for microdermabraSion: $100 to $200

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“pl astic surgery is no longer something that’s hidden.” —keviN t. NiNi, m.D.

surgical procedures... When skin has aged and the soft tissue underneath the skin has fallen, people consider this surgical procedure to lift sagging areas around the neck, jaw, lips, cheeks and nose. Yet unlike the facelifts of years ago (which often resulted in a tight, pulled look), surgeons now reposition the soft tissues underneath the skin and remove excess skin in order to create a more natural look. “this is not your mother’s face-lift,” says Dr. Nini. a full face-lift involves incisions at the scalp around the ear. the surgery takes three to four hours to complete,

and it’s done under general anesthesia. the procedure may be accompanied by eyelid or eyebrow surgery. thanks to special facial glues, most of the bruising and swelling post-operation should dissipate after about a week, and you will be ready to face the world—and go back to work—in roughly two weeks. Surgeon’S fee: $8,000 to $15,000

Breast augmeNtatioN aND Breast liFt Breast augmentation is the most commonly performed invasive cosmetic

procedure, and it’s often chosen by women who are looking to restore breast shape after pregnancy or minimize the signs of aging. During this surgery, done under general anesthesia, the surgeon makes incisions under the breast, near the areola or in the armpit in order to insert a saline or silicone implant. Women who are happy with the size of their breasts yet want to reduce sagging may opt for a breast lift—a surgical procedure (also done under general anesthesia) in which incisions are made around the areola to remove excess skin

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Face-liFt


and raise and tighten breast tissue. after the operation, you will likely feel sore and tired for the next several days, and your physician may recommend that you wear a postoperative support bra or compression garment. You’ll also need to avoid strenuous activity for four to six weeks post-op, but you will be able to do some light activity in about a week and return to work within a few days to a week. surGeon’s fee for breast auGmentation:

$5,000 to $10,000. this does not include the cost of the implants, which can range from $300 to $1,000 per implant (saline is less expensive than silicone). surGeon’s fee for breast lift: $8,000 to $12,000

LIPoSUctIoN Liposuction is used to remove unwanted fat. But buyer beware: If you gain weight after the surgery, the fat will come back. If you keep your weight in check post-surgery, the results should be longlasting. Surgeons may use a variety of different liposuction methods depending on the area of the body. In the most common form of liposuction (called tumescent liposuction), tiny incisions are made into the fatty area, allowing the surgeon to inject a liquid solution that constricts blood vessels and reduces blood loss and bruising. then the surgeon inserts a thin tube called a cannula that loosens the fat. Finally, that fat is suctioned out through the cannula. In some cases, after the liquid is injected, surgeons use power-assisted cannulas to break up the fat more quickly before suctioning. In other instances surgeons perform ultrasound-assisted liposuction (brand name: Vaser liposuction), a technique that liquefies the fat before it’s suctioned out. or surgeons might use a method called laser-assisted liposuction (brand name: SmartLipo), which is another way to break up the fat before suctioning. You’ll want to talk with your surgeon about the best procedure for you. the surgery (under general or local a nesthesia) should take two to three hours. expect discomfort and bruising for one to two weeks post-op, and note that you’ll need to wear a compression garment for a month or two following surgery.

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surGeon’s fee: $4,000 to $6,000 for the first

Stay

area and tightening the abdominal muscles. “Women whose ab muscles never returned to their pre-pregnancy state—who have laxity of the abdominal wall—are good candidates for this procedure,” says Dr. Nini. Liposuction may be done at the same time if it’s desired. the surgery should take from two-and-a-half to three-and-a-half hours (additional procedures such as lipo will add more time on the operating table—and will cost more). You should expect an extreme sensation of tightness (medication will help alleviate pain). Some doctors recommend wearing a compression garment, especially if lipo is performed. Strenuous physical activity and heavy lifting are prohibited for the first several weeks post-op (though you can do light activity during this time), and you usually get the okay to resume normal activity at about six weeks. also, keep in mind that it’s helpful to start moving shortly after surgery to increase circulation, but be sure to discuss your level of activity with your surgeon first so as to avoid going too far, which could undo the effects of the surgery or lead to complications. surGeon’s fee: $6,500 to $9,500

MINI tUMMY tUck “If the upper portion of your abdomen is toned and you are concerned only with the loose skin or fat below the belly button, you may consider a mini tummy tuck,” says Dr. Nini. this procedure requires less operating time and less recovery time than a full tummy tuck. You should be able to resume normal physical activity in two weeks to a month. surGeon’s fee: $3,500 to $5,500

eYeLID SUrgerY During this procedure, surgeons remove excess, sagging skin (and sometimes fat) around the upper eyelids, lower eyelids or both to give the eyes a rejuvenated, younger look. Depending on what you and your surgeon decide is best, “eyelid surgery can be paired with the insertion of fillers or by a brow lift or face-lift,” says Dr. Nini. surGeon’s fee: $4,000 to $8,000

area. there is often a reduced rate for each

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subsequent area averaging $3,000 to $5,000.

FULL tUMMY tUck With this procedure, you’re getting rid of the loose skin in the entire stomach

note: In addition to surgeon’s fees, surgical proce-

dures will require facility and anesthesia fees, which vary greatly. Fees for three hours in the operating room (usually required for a breast lift or tummy tuck)

young-looking naturally

Here are some ways to keep your youthful glow without a cosmetic procedure.

take care aim for eight hours of shut-eye each night. Sleep restores and repairs your entire body and gives you a refreshed appearance. be sun safe. “the sun’s rays cause age spots, wrinkles and serious skin damage, so use sunblock,” says esthetician Winnie Lee of avance aesthetics Skin care in edison. Lee recommends using sunscreen with SPF 30 all year round. and wear a hat to keep your face shaded. eat healthy. “It’s important to protect your skin from the inside by eating foods rich in antioxidants that improve skin health and fight [the effects of] aging,” says Lee. So don’t forget to eat your fruits, veggies and whole grains. also remember to drink about eight glasses of water each day. exercise. keep your body toned and tight with regular workouts. KicK butts. “Smoking contributes to poor skin quality and wrinkles,” says kevin t. Nini, M.D., vice chairman of the Department of Surgery at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. Get your beauty rest.

MakeUP tHe DIFFereNce consider using products made with alphahydroxy acids (such as glycolic acid or lactic acid). these acids exfoliate the skin by removing dead skin cells, which in turn can stimulate the production of collagen, reduce the appearance of wrinkles and lead to a more even skin tone. use moisturizinG products. apply a noncomedogenic (one that does not clog pores) moisturizing lotion each morning and night after you wash your face. apply antioxidants. Skin care products that contain antioxidants can help regenerate skin cells, stabilize free radicals and even out skin tone. Look for ingredients such as vitamins c and e, retinoids (which are derivatives of vitamin a) or green tea (which contains antioxidants called polyphenols). seeK out certain inGredients. try products that have anti-aging growth factors (a.k.a. human proteins), which help nourish skin and reduce wrinkles, or look for pentapeptides (such as pal-kttkS), which are composed of five amino acids that help renew the skin’s outer layer and stimulate the production of collagen and elastin. exfoliate.

can range from $2,500 to $5,000.

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power food

Spice Up the Season cinnamon, that aromatic, sweet spice that makes holiday dishes special, has myriad health benefits—and a surprising history

Buy · SToRE · gRow

The spicy powder you sprinkle on your morning latte has a rich history spanning centuries. one of two varieties of cinnamon now available, ceylon (“true” cinnamon) was craved by Egyptians as early as 2000 B.C., when they imported the precious spice from its native Sri Lanka and used it to embalm dead pharaohs. Ancient Romans used ceylon as currency worth more than gold, paying tribute to the sun god Apollo by laying it in his temple as a gift. in medieval times, people appreciated ceylon for its more practical powers, such as treating sore throats and preserving meat. But this sweet treat also has a dark past: The dutch,

PowERS Cinnamon packs a lot of healthy heat: These deceptively sweet sticks are high in fiber and nutrients like calcium and iron. Studies have shown the spice can relieve arthritic pain, combat E. coli bacteria and curb the proliferation of leukemia and lymphoma cells. People living with diabetes may find cinnamon especially powerful, as it has been shown to regulate blood sugar levels and lower cholesterol. But beware: Cassia could cause liver irritation if you get too sprinkle-happy. Modern cooks are wise to do as the Romans did, using cinnamon as a food preservative.

RECiPE MExiCAn hoT CoCoA By whole Foods Market Serves 2 ingREdiEnTS 4 tbs. unsweetened cocoa powder 4 tbs. sugar 2½ cups whole milk 3 oz. bittersweet chocolate, chopped ½ vanilla bean, split ½ tsp. ground cinnamon ¼ tsp. ground nutmeg 2 cinnamon sticks whipped cream Chocolate shavings (use a vegetable peeler on a block of semisweet chocolate to make shavings.) PREPARATion Mix together cocoa powder and sugar. heat milk in a medium saucepan over very low heat with vanilla bean, chocolate, cinnamon, nutmeg and cocoa mixture. whisk thoroughly until chocolate has melted and milk begins to simmer. do not boil. Pour into two mugs and top with whipped cream and chocolate shavings.

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did you know?

Portugese and English enslaved natives on the island of Ceylon (Sri Lanka’s former name) in efforts to monopolize production of ceylon and reap the pricey spice’s rewards. By the late 18th century, however, the Arab delicacy had begun to lose prominence with the emergence of cassia cinnamon as an acceptable substitute. As early as 2800 B.C., Chinese doctors used cassia to treat colds, the flu and digestive problems. while Europeans still prefer the citrusy taste of ceylon, Americans favor cassia, made from the bark of the Cinnamomum cassia, an evergreen found throughout Asia.

Check the supermarket for ground cassia powder. Ceylon can be found in specialty spice stores and ethnic stores. Buy small quantities so the cinnamon doesn’t go stale and lose its flavor. To crush your own cinnamon from sticks, try using a coffee grinder. Both cinnamon powder and sticks are best stored in the cool darkness of your spice drawer. —MiChELE CoRRiSTon

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tastes ThumbprinT Gems

These jam-filled thumbprint cookies are a safe alternative to store-bought snacks, and making the prints in the dough is a fun way for the kids to help! IngredIents

Thumbprint Gems

3 tbs. water 1 tbs. ground flaxseed meal 2¼ cups Bob’s red Mill all-purpose gluten-free baking flour 1½ tsp. ground cinnamon 1 tsp. baking soda 1 tsp. baking powder 1 tsp. salt 1 tsp. xanthan gum ½ tsp. ground nutmeg ¼ tsp. ground allspice ¼ tsp. ground cloves 1 cup organic palm fruit oil shortening ¾ cup packed dark brown sugar ¾ cup granulated sugar 1 tsp. vanilla extract ½–¾ cup apricot or strawberry jam

PreParatIon

These TreaTs are sure To be a sweeT success The hoLIdAY SeASon IS fULL of CLASSRooM PARTIeS, CookIe

exchanges and family gatherings, all calling for tasty eats. But experts estimate as many as 15 million Americans have food allergies. To satisfy everyone’s sweet tooth without putting anyone in danger, try one of these gluten-, dairy-, egg-, soy- and nut-free recipes from the new book Allergy-Free Desserts by elizabeth Gordon (John Wiley & Sons, $22.95).

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minT paTTies

This quick and simple treat, similar to a York Peppermint Pattie, gives you a worry-free way to enjoy the smooth mixture of mint and a sweet candy coating. IngredIents 1 lb. confectioners’ sugar, sifted 5 tbs. organic palm fruit oil shortening 2½ tsp. peppermint extract ½ tsp. vanilla extract 6 tbs. Lyle’s golden syrup 12 oz. gluten-, soy-, dairy-, egg- and nut-free semisweet chocolate chips

PreParatIon

Combine the sugar, 3 tablespoons of shortening, and the extracts. Add Lyle’s Golden Syrup and mix thoroughly. Scoop the dough in a tablespoon and roll into balls; place them on parchment paper and chill for 30 minutes.

Jason Wyche

Desserts

worry-free

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix the water and flaxseed and let sit for three to five minutes. In a large bowl, combine flour, baking soda and powder, xanthan gum, salt and spices. Set aside. Cream the shortening and sugars. Add the flaxseed mixture, then continue beating, adding the vanilla extract. Combine with the dry ingredients then mix—the dough will be coarse. Roll tablespoonfuls of the dough into balls and place them two inches apart on parchment-covered baking sheets. Use your finger to create an indentation in the dough and fill with ½ teaspoon of jam. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes, remove tray from oven and let sit for 10 minutes before removing the cookies.

MIddLeSe xHeaLtHAndLIFe.CoM

12/1/11 10:29 AM


Mint Patties

Buckeyes

Use the bottom of a glass to press the balls into quarter-inch patties and chill for another 30 minutes. Using a double boiler, stir the chocolate chips and remaining shortening until melted. cool for 10 minutes. dip the patties in the chocolate, completely coating them, and return to wax paper. dry in the refrigerator for one hour before serving.

Buckeyes

This tasty variation of the traditional ohio treat has all the flavor without any of the allergens. Buckeyes were originally made with peanut butter and chocolate; this alternative version harnesses the sweet flavor and similar consistency of marshmallow and buttercream frosting. IngrEdIEnTs

Jason Wyche

2 cups vanilla buttercream frosting (see recipe at right) 2 Tbs. and 2 tsp. sunflower seed butter 24 oz. gluten-, soy-, dairy-, egg- and nut-free semisweet chocolate chips 2 Tbs. canola oil confectioners’ sugar (for coating hands)

PrEPArATIon

Using a stand mixer, beat the frosting and

sunflower seed butter until light and fluffy, then refrigerate for 30 minutes. coat your hands in confectioners’ sugar and scoop tablespoons of the frosting, rolling them between your hands to create balls. on two baking sheets lined with parchment paper, refrigerate the balls for at least one hour or until solid. melt the chocolate and oil in a double boiler and stir until smooth. after letting the chocolate cool for five minutes, use toothpicks to dip frosting balls in the chocolate until only a small circle is visible on top. Place back on the baking sheets and refrigerate until chocolate is hard and shiny. VAnILLA buTTErcrEAm FrosTIng IngrEdIEnTs 2 cups organic palm fruit oil shortening 2 cups marshmallow cream (see recipe at right) 3 cups confectioners’ sugar, sifted 1 Tbs. vanilla extract ½ tsp. salt

PrEPArATIon

in a stand mixer bowl, beat the marshmallow cream and shortening on medium-high for three minutes. scrape

the sides of the bowl; add the sugar and salt and mix until it is light and fluffy. Blend in the vanilla until thoroughly combined. mArsHmALLow crEAm IngrEdIEnTs ½ cup cold water 3 packages unflavored gelatin 2 cups Lyle’s golden syrup 2 cups confectioners’ sugar, sifted 1½ tsp. vanilla extract ½ tsp. salt

PrEPArATIon

add the cold water to a small saucepan and sprinkle the gelatin into it. let stand for five minutes, then add the lyle’s Golden syrup and heat on medium, stirring constantly, for about five minutes or until the gelatin is completely dissolved. Pour the mixture into a stand mixer bowl and beat for three minutes on medium speed, then 12 minutes at medium-high speed. (it will become fluffy and very sticky, like commercial marshmallow cream.) stir in the confectioners’ sugar, vanilla and salt until combined and beat on medium-high for two minutes; scrape the bowl and beat for an extra minute. —Maureen Scully

noTE Most ingredients are available at your local health-food store, Whole Foods or Wegmans. check with the location nearest you for availability.

middlese xHEALTHandLIFE.com

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dEcEmbEr 2011/jAnuAry 2012

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12/1/11 10:30 AM


where to buy buy rITe oF mILLTown 319 ryders ln. milltown 732.651.1222 markeTpLace wInes & spIrITs 647 route 18 east Brunswick 732.432.9393 wInecHaTeau.com 1380 Cen tennial ave. Piscataway 800.WIne.190

Sips

to celebrate Sparkling wine, a holiday tr adition, iS more varied than you think BuBBles, BuBBles and more bubbles! Yes, it’s that time when we toast the year past and the one to come with a pop and a hiss and tons of holiday cheer. While headlines tell of economic woes, champagne and sparkling wine sales remain effervescent: They’re expected to be up at least 7 percent this year over 2010, with some brands like California’s Iron Horse seeing as much as a 24 percent jump.

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each december, champagne and sparkling wine sales skyrocket—in some years they’ve spiked 90 percent—as many of us choose these wines as our go-to celebratory drink. But for some, they’re the pour of choice all year long. Hugh davies, winemaker at California’s schramsburg Vineyard (a.k.a. america’s House of sparkling Wine), says there are three reasons: “First, sparkling wine quality has never been higher. second,

mIddlese xHeaLTHandLIFe.Com

more people, especially Gen-xers and millennials, like the way bubbly tastes. Third, because it’s so food-friendly, people are incorporating it into their everyday dining.” sparkling wine can be called champagne only if it’s made in the Champagne region of France from three grapes: Pinot noir, Chardonnay and Pinot muenier. It’s rich, luscious and often the most expensive bubbly-wine option. Then there’s Prosecco, from Italy’s Veneto region, whose popular brands mionetto and lunetta have almost doubled their sales in the last two years, nipping at the heels of champagne for most popular girl in the glass. spain’s budget-friendly bubbly is called Cava. many sparkling wines, which start at less than $15 a bottle, are made from different grapes and in different methods than champagne. They offer fun bubbles at great prices but not the finesse and sophistication of true champagne, and their big bubbles tend to fizz out quickly. While they can still be dry like champagne, these less expensive styles are often fruitier in aroma and flavor. Champagne has more complex aromas and taste profiles including yeasty, fresh-baked bread as well as fresh-fruit attributes. sparkling wine that is made like champagne produces endless strands of teensy bubbles that create a frothy mousse (like the head of beer) when poured. There are now 10 to 12 California wineries makng $20-and-up sparkling wines using the traditional methods. says bubbly maker davies: “The best of California’s sparkling wines rival the best made in Champagne or anywhere else in the world.” From pale yellow to pink and from dry to sweet, there are many great California sparkling wines to choose from. our top picks include schramsburg Blanc de Blanc, $35, (Blanc de blanc means it’s made from 100 percent chardonnay), a lively and crisp wine that is still rich on the palate; and mumm napa Brut rosé, $22, (Brut means it’s dry, not sweet, and rosé means this sparkler will have a slightly pink or salmon color either from staying in contact with the skins of the red grapes during fermentation or from a dose of finished red wine), which smells of strawberries and raspberries with cream and pairs wonderfully with chocolate. These other american sparkling-wine producers will also help you celebrate in style: Iron Horse Vineyards, scharffenberger Cellars, roederer estate, Gloria Ferrer, domaine Carneros and argyle Winery. —Maureen C. Petrosky

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wine + spirits

12/1/11 10:34 AM


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12/5/11 12:01 PM


where toeat f i n e

AVENEL

fa m i ly

BUD’S HUT Casual dining featuring seafood and steak, 906 Route 1 North, 732.634.5530

MARIA’S Family-friendly traditional Mexican fare and diner, 194 Buckelew Ave., 732.656.9722

CARTERET

KENDALL PARK

DUSAL’S Casual Italian seafood and pizza eater y, 3300 Route 27, 732.821.9711

THE FROG & THE PEACH American fare with a focus on fresh ingredients, 29 Dennis St., 732.846.3216

JULIAN’S American steak house with seafood options, 1000 Roosevelt Ave., 732.541.9500

SHOGUN 27 Hibachi steak house with a sushi bar, 3376 Route 27, 732.422.1117

HARVEST MOON BREWERY American pub fare, 392 George St., 732.249.6666

COLONIA

KINGSTON

KAIRO CAFÉ Casual eastern Mediterranean dining, 49 Bayard St., 732.545.2476

CHATEAU MADRID Spanish and Portuguese fare, 8 Holly St., 732.969.0692

LUSO BARBECUE American and Portuguese barbecue, 330 Inman Ave., 732.499.0455

CRANBURY

CRANBURY INN Traditional American dining, 21 S. Main St., 609.655.5595 CRANBURY PIZZA Casual Italian pizzeria, 63 N. Main St., 609.409.9930 ZINNA’S BISTRO Casual Italian fare, BYO, 1275 S. River Rd., 609.860.9600

DAY TON

FUJI Japanese hibachi and sushi, 485 Georges Rd., 732.274.8830 LA TAVERNA Cozy traditional Italian dining, 375 Georges Rd., 732.274.2200

EAST BRUNSWICK

CASA NOVA 68 Traditional Italian fare, 68 Ryders Ln., 732.246.1888

EDISON

CAFÉ GALLO Family-style Italian dining, 1153 Inman Ave., 908.756.5752 LOUCÁS Upscale American and Italian fare, 9 Lincoln Hwy., 732.549.8580 MING Fusion Asian cuisine with vegetarian options, 1655 Oak Tree Rd. #185, 732.549.5051 PENANG Malaysian and Thai eater y, 505 Old Post Rd., 732.287.3038 SKYLARK FINE DINER & LOUNGE Upscale diner with creative cock tails, 17 Wooding Ave., 732.777.7878

FORDS

LITTLE SPAIN RESTAURANT Authentic Spanish cuisine in a charming atmosphere, 582 New Brunswick Ave., 732.738.7300 MCLOONE’S WOODBRIDGE GRILLE Upscale interpretations of American classics, 3 Lafayette Rd., 732.512.5025 VILLA BORGHESE Traditional Italian fare with modern twists, 432 New Brunswick Ave., 732.738.0666

HIGHL AND PARK

ENO TERRA Italian cuisine featuring seafood, homemade pasta and an extensive wine list, 4484 Kings Hwy., 609.497.1777

ME TUCHEN

TULA Contemporar y American fare with vegetarian options, 47 Easton Ave., 732.246.0014

ANTONIO’S BRICK OVEN PIZZA Traditional Italian pizzeria, 435 Main St., 732.603.0008 MAIN STREET TRATTORIA Upscale Italian cuisine, 413 Main St., 732.589.7141

FIDDLEHEADS American fine dining, Sunday brunch ser ved, 27 E. Railroad Ave., 732.521.0878

DECEMBER 2011/JANUARY 2012 |

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NORTH BRUNSWICK

ARTHUR’S TAVERN Traditional American steak house, 644 Georges Rd., 732.828.1117

MIDDLESE X

OLD BRIDGE

CARPACCIO Southern Italian fare, 651 Bound Brook Rd., 732.968.3242

BIG ED’S BARBECUE American barbecue, 304 Route 34, 732.583.2626

MILLTOWN

THE PINE TAVERN Imaginative American cuisine with continental flavors, Route 34 and Cottrell Rd., 732.727.5060

FRESCO Seafood and steak grill, prix fixe menu, 210 Ryders Ln., 732.246.7616 TOMATO FACTORY Family-friendly Italian fare, BYO, 264 Ryders Ln., 732.249.1199

PONTE VECCHIO Classic Italian and American Continental fare with seafood options, 3863 Route 516 East, 732.607.1650

MONMOUTH JUNCTION

PERTH AMBOY

PIERRE’S Fine international dining with awardwinning wine list, 582 Georges Rd., 732.329.3219 SENS ASIAN Far East fusion cuisine, 4095 Route 1 South, 732.355.1919

MONROE

THE BARGE Water front restaurant featuring steak and seafood dishes, 201 Front St., 732.442.3000

PISCATAWAY

AL DENTE Traditional Italian eater y, 1665 Stelton Rd., 732.985.8220

GARVEY’S Family-friendly American eater y, 405 Gravel Hill Rd., 732.521.3311

MIDORI Authentic Japanese and Hibachi dining, 1392 Centennial Ave., 732.981.9300

LA VILLA Casual Italian dining, 335 Applegarth Rd., 609.655.3338

PL AINSBORO

NEW BRUNSWICK

CASA ROSARIA’S ITALIAN RISTORANTE Classic Italian food, 607 Plainsboro Rd., 609.799.9009

RESTAURANT 2FIFT Y4 Saint Peter’s University Hospital restaurant, offering healthy dishes and vegetarian options for breakfast, lunch and dinner, 254 Easton Ave., 732.745.8600, ext. 7773

EAST Asian fusion fare with a bubble tea bar, 5 Market St., 609.750.3278

CARIBBEAN CAFÉ Cuban cuisine, 285 George St., 732.846.2620

COSTA VERDE Portuguese and Spanish cuisine featuring fresh seafood, 6039 Route 35 South, 732.727.7070

CATHERINE LOMBARDI Italian with locally sourced ingredients, 3 Livingston Ave., 732.296.9463

CLYDZ Contemporar y American cuisine with an extensive martini selection, 55 Paterson St., 732.846.6521

JAMESBURG

TUMULT Y’S Upscale pub food, featuring steaks and seafood, 361 George St., 732.545.6205

THE ORCHID Glatt kosher dining, 455 Main St., 732.321.9829

PITHARI TAVERNA Greek cuisine with seafood fare, 28 Woodridge Ave., 732.572.0616

URBAN SPICE Authentic Indian fine dining, 42 Marconi Ave., 732.283.1043

OLD MAN RAFFERT Y’S Casual American eater y, 106 Albany St., 732.846.6153 THE OLD BAY New Orleans–style restaurant with Cajun and French Creole dishes, 7 Church St., 732.246.3111

CHRISTOPHER’S American seafood and steak fare, 10 Livingston Ave., 866.609.4700

CASA GUISEPPE Italian fine dining, 487 Route 27, 732.283.9111

GLO ULTRA LOUNGE AND TEQUILA BAR Upscale pub food and a bar with more than 200 tequilas, 367 George St., 732.246.8330

OSTERIA PROCACCINI Quaint Italian restaurant serving pizza, sandwiches and salads with organic and local produce, 4428 Route 27 North, 609.688.0007

PAD THAI Vegetarian-friendly Thai eater y, 217 Raritan Ave., 732.247.9636

ISELIN

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c a s ua l

DELTA’S RESTAURANT Southern cuisine with live music and specialty drinks, 19 Dennis St., 732.249.1551 DUE MARI PESCE E VINOTECA Modern Italian food featuring fresh local and seasonal ingredients, 78 Albany St., 732.296.1600 EVELYN’S Lebanese food with vegetarian options, 45 Easton Ave., 732.246.8792

MIDDLESEXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

SOUTH AMBOY

SOUTH PL AINFIELD

ADELINES RISTORANTE Casual northern Italian dining, 2243 Hamilton Blvd., 908.755.8520 FLANAGAN’S American and Irish pub fare, 2501 Plainfield Ave., 908.757.1818

SOUTH RIVER

KRAKOWIAK Casual Polish restaurant, BYO, 42 Main St., 732.238.0433 RIA-MAR Traditional Portuguese, Spanish and American fare, 25 Whitehead Ave., 732.257.1100

WOODBRIDGE

CHRIS MICHAEL’S STEAKHOUSE Steak and seafood restaurant, featuring a sushi bar, 40 Oakwood Ave., 732.634.5355

FOR OUR COMPLETE LIST OF DINING OPTIONS, VISIT THE “WHERE TO EAT” SECTION OF MIDDLESExHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

11/29/11 3:00 PM


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thingstodo d e c e m b e r

ja n ua ry

celebrate NYe with fireworks at midnight in downtown Metuchen.

Don’t miss The Nutcracker and I at the George street Playhouse.

through JAN 8 The

East Brunswick Museum invited local organizations to decorate a tree or museum case in a way that represents their contribution to the community and their culture. Together, the installations make up the museum’s latest exhibition, celebraTINg Our dIversITy. Free admission. Visit east brunswickmuseum.org to learn more.

DEC 3–JuN 3 The Jane

Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum presents its newest exhibition in a series of one-man shows by early nonconformist artists, IN The search Of aN absOluTe: arT Of valery yurlOv. The Moscow-based artist worked during the 1960s and ’70s. Admission: $6 (nonmembers) or free (members, Rutgers University students and all visitors on the first Sunday of every month). Go to zimmerli museum.rutgers.edu.

DEC 8–18

Learn how the holidays are celebrated around the globe at

46

december 2011/january 2012

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hOlIday JubIlee 2011 at the Crossroads Theatre in New Brunswick, 3 and 8 p.m. Tickets: $40 . Call 732.545.8100 or go to crossroadstheatrecompany.org.

DEC 9

State Theatre and the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra will present hOme fOr The hOlIdays wITh brIaN sTOkes mITchell at State Theatre in New Brunswick, 8 p.m. The Tony Award–winning vocalist will perform carols and will be backed by the Masterwork Chorus and the New Jersey Youth Chorus. Tickets: $20–$85 . Visit statetheatrenj.com or call 732.246.7469.

DEC 10

Put on your best holiday costume and jingle all the way along a 5K route on the JINgle bell walk/ ruN, a race to support the Arthritis Foundation, 8 a.m. (registration), 9:45 a.m. (race). Children 12 and younger can register for the “Santa Chase,” 10:30 a.m. Registration: $25 (or $15 for the Santa Chase). Visit jbrmetuchen.kintera. org for more information.

DEC 22 For the only New Jersey

stop in their Christmas Reunion tour, The IrIsh TeNOrs will be appearing at State Theatre in New Brunwick, 8 p.m. Accompanied by a 30-piece orchestra, the trio will perform traditional Irish tunes as well as holiday favorites. Tickets: $32–$97. To learn more, call 732.247.7200 or visit statetheatrenj.org.

MIddLESE xHeaLTHANdLIFe.COM

DEC 29 To see creatures from

every corner of the globe, bring the family to OuTragehIsss peTs at East Brunswick Library, 1 p.m. This event, sponsored by Friends of the Library, is a chance to learn about where these animals come from and why they’re unique. Admission: free . Call 732.390.6950 or visit ebpl.org for more information.

DEC 31 If you want to burst

into 2012, try the New year’s eve fIrewOrks exTravagaNza in downtown Metuchen. The fireworks start at midnight and are a free event. To find out more, call 732.548.2964 or visit metuchenchamberexchange.com.

JAN 29

See a timeless Julie Andrews musical as never before during the sINg-a-lONg sOuNd Of musIc at State Theatre, 3 p.m. A free bag of interactive props and a costume contest make this much more than a movie! Tickets: $22 . Call 732.247.7200 or visit statetheatrenj.org to learn more. Send event listings to: Middlesex Health & Life, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; or e-mail us at thingstodo@wainscotmedia.com. Listings must be received two months before the event and must include a phone number that will be published. Share events online by clicking the “Submit an Event” link below the Community Calendar at middlesexhealthandlife.com.

shutterstock

through DEC 31

The George Street Playhouse presents The NuTcracker aNd I, which is a spin-off of the famous Christmas play and combines Tchaikovsky’s score with original lyrics and a comedic plot. Times and prices vary. Call 732.246.7717 or go to georgestreetplayhouse.org for tickets.

12/1/11 10:36 AM


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12/5/11 11:53 AM


escapes

GE t tinG thErE

clockwise from top left: the Lodge living

twin farms 452 royalton Tpk. Barnard, Vt. 802.234.9999, twinfarms.com driving time: about 6 hours

room; in the treehouse, wooden parrots stand guard atop the spiral posts of the ebonized bed; the back of the main house

dreamscape LEAVE THIs WorLD AnD EnTEr A place of dream-inspiring tranquility with a visit to Twin Farms resort in Barnard, Vermont. named the best small hotel in the U.s. by Zagat in 2010, it’s worth the drive. As you pass through quintessential Vermont landscape where small farmhouses dot snowy fields, you see a preview of what’s to come in your near-private getaway. Upon arrival, guests are personally welcomed by staff and given a short tour of the property. The main house (circa 1795) is rich in history, having been owned and occupied by nobel Prize–winning writer sinclair Lewis and his wife, journalist Dorothy Thompson. They’re considered the “twin spirits of Twin Farms,” and their artistry is honored with contemplative landscaping and bold combinations of art and architecture found throughout the several free-standing properties located on 300 acres of woods and meadows. Your most difficult task in planning a visit to Twin Farms will be deciding which accommodations most delight your senses. Within the Main House, there are four suites decorated by the late Jed Johnson to complement the traditional new England architecture. Toile drapery, quilt-covered feather beds and thick, hand-made rugs laid on original pine boards create a warm, relaxed atmosphere. If traditional décor

48

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isn’t your cup of tea, look beyond the Main House to the Lodge (with two suites) or the Farmhouse at Copper Hill (with four). For a truly private experience, reserve one of the 10 “cottages.” During my visit, I stayed in the modern studio, complete with cathedral ceiling, original artwork by Frank stella, lofted sleeping space with views into the woods and a giant copper tub, good for an afternoon soak after skiing one of the six private downhill runs. For those looking for more winter fun, the resort maintains a 100´ x 50´ ice rink. Ice skates are kept warm for guests, and steaming hot mugs of cocoa and treats from the pastry chef are just a request away. An outdoor fire warms your mittens as you enjoy a drink with friends. In case you’ve forgotten you’re at Twin Farms to relax, visit the “out of the Woods” spa. The “Ultimate Body Treatment” offers a full hour and 45 minutes of other-worldly relaxation and includes body exfoliation, a hydrotherapy session, a deep-sea body wrap and a refreshing massage. (Guests may also request spa services within their accommodations.) nearby is the free-standing Furo, a Japanese-style, 104-degree indoor soaking pool. Make sure to reserve a time in the Furo in advance of your stay. new England Culinary Institute–trained chef Ted Ask’s “farm to table” philosophy

means meals at Twin Farms are fresh, innovative and local. At breakfast, ask your server for the soufflé pancakes. During lunch, enjoy farm-fresh salads with unique wine pairings. In the evening, cocktail hour begins at 7 p.m., with dinner served promptly at 8 in the dining room located within the Main House. Expect to enjoy hearty handmade breads, Vermont butters and cheeses and exquisite main courses at once unexpected and familiar. The roasted beef strip with horseradish whipped fingerling potatoes is truly enjoyable. If you feel like staying in, dinner will arrive en suite picnic-style, complete with table setting, paired wine selection, breads, salad and main course. And don’t forget dessert—the hazelnut brown-butter cake with chocolate ganache, poached white figs and orange drizzle is the perfect winter’s eve ending. With the exception of breakfast, meals are predetermined by the chef. Because Twin Farms always aims to please, you’ll be asked your culinary preferences prior to your stay so that what’s served is tailored to your liking. In every way, Twin Farms strives to accommodate guests. The resort’s easy hospitality, serene location and inspiring architecture make for a reverie-like getaway—and right away you’ll be dreaming of your next visit. —Carole Soule

To sEE MorE PHoTos oF TWIn FArMs AnD To PLAn YoUr TrIP, Go To middlesexhealthandlife.com.

photos courtesy of twin farms

E n j oy lo w- k E y lu x u r y i n t h E V E r m o n t h i l ls

11/29/11 3:06 PM


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VOLVO OF EDISON 4 Miles South of Menlo Park Mall 842 US Route 1 North • Edison, NJ

(908) 526-7700 (732) 248-0500

VOLVO BUILDS CARS. WE BUILD RELATIONSHIPS. Search our entire Pre-owned listing at:

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12/6/11 2:44 PM


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Winters, holiday shopping at its best!

The finest in outerwear and accessories inlcuding scarves, gloves, handbags, clothing and jewelry. Now featuring shoes and boots from Charleston Shoe Co.

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In Red Bank since 1938 daMaSk

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43 MoNMouTh STreeT red BaNk, NJ 07701 732-741-2675 www.wiNTerSfurS.CoM

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12/5/11 11:49 AM


Middlesex Health & Life: December 2011