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T R I H E A LT H

S P R I N G 2 0 19 THE GOOD LIVING MAGA ZINE

CARDIAC SURGERY CENTER OF EXCELLENCE A HEARTFELT ANNIVERSARY ACTIVE DESTINATIONS

HOW TO PICK THE R IGHT FITNE S S TR ACKER H E A R T - H E A LT H Y R E C I P E S

STATE-OF-THE-ART

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SPRING 2019 | $3.95 | TRIHEALTH.COM

C I N C I N N AT I H E A LT H & L I F E

CINCINNATI T H E

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FEATURES

{ SPRING 2019 } 16

HEARTFELT ANNIVERSARY

A couple’s 50 th wedding anniversary coincides with two unexpected but successful open-heart surgeries.

24

ELEVATING CARDIAC SURGERY CARE

Combining the cardiac surgical programs at Good Samaritan Hospital and Bethesda North Hospital brings big benefits for patients.

26

NEW SPACES FOR HEART CARE Phase one of TriHealth’s Heart Center of Excellence includes new cardiac catheterization labs, new operating rooms and more.

28

GO ACTIVE!

A trip to one of these tempting locations will leave you feeling fit as well as refreshed.

34

NEW HEART PROCEDURES Providing the latest treatments for patients can transform lives.

40

WHEN EVERY SECOND COUNTS

I N E V ERY I S S UE

4 6 4 4 4 6

W E LC O M E L E T T E R E D I TO R’S N OT E W H E R E TO E AT BE THERE

CONTENTS

TriHealth delivers rapid, lifesaving care for cardiovascular emergencies.

28 CINCINNATI HEALTH & LIFE | SPRING 2019

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{ SPRING 2019 }

CONTENTS

36 18 DEPARTMENTS 10

42

Our guide to new ideas, trends, tips and things we love in or near Hamilton County.

Photos from recent events in Hamilton County.

LOCAL BUZZ

12

HEALTH NEWS

Tips and insights you can use now.

14

14

GATHERINGS

48

POWER FOOD

Chock-full of flavor and rich in vitamins, broccoli rabe is the kitchen’s next rising star.

FAREWELL

How to pick the right fitness tracker for you.

18

48

TASTES

With lots of vegetables, nuts and beans, these heart-healthy vegan dishes pack quite a nutritional punch. So tasty, you won’t miss the meat!

36

HOME

With the lazy days of summer just around the corner, now’s the time to plan your perfect patio.

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SPRING 2019 | TRIHEALTH.COM

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When hearts attack, we fight back. TriHealth Heart Institute is a top provider of acute heart attack care, with the most experienced cardiac team in the region.

To learn more, go to TriHealth.com/heart To find a doctor call 513 865 2222

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{ WELCOME LETTER }

YOUR HEART IS IN THE RIGHT PLACE...

Fulfill your heart’s desire If you are a woman with cardiac conditions, TriHealth’s Center for Maternal Cardiac Care may be able to help you have the baby you’ve dreamed about. Now in the Cincinnati area, our multidisciplinary program combines the talents of clinical experts in the fields of: • Maternal–fetal medicine • Adult cardiology • Cardiothoracic surgery • Adult and adolescent congenital heart disease • Cardiac and obstetric anesthesia

For those with any underlying heart concerns who are pregnant or considering pregnancy, we will provide you with a comprehensive care plan to optimize your health and the health of your unborn baby.

WHILE TYPICALLY a figurative expression, when it refers to TriHealth, your heart is literally in the right place! Over the past year, TriHealth has taken significant steps forward to establish our TriHealth Heart Institute as the premier regional provider of comprehensive cardiology services. Our aim is to ensure that all TriHealth cardiac patients have convenient and affordable access to the right care, at the right time, in the right place to treat every cardiovascular condition. To do so, we have evolved our care models and are making significant investments in technology, educational programming, and care coordination to strengthen our commitment to population health, prevention, and well-being. This has enabled us to do more to help people avoid or minimize the risks of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Additionally, we continue to enhance and expand cardiology services, facilities, and treatment options throughout the greater Cincinnati area to make it as easy as possible for our patients with the most advanced or complex conditions to get world-class care close to home. Featured in this issue are several examples of these commitments in action. You’ll learn about our newly unified and enhanced cardiac surgery program now on the Bethesda North Hospital Campus, and the important benefits this surgical program consolidation brings to patients. We also share the innovative changes we’re making to our Emergency Department procedures to ensure the safest, highest-quality, most efficient care possible for every patient experiencing a critical cardiac issue. Additionally, you’ll get a firsthand look at two new state-of-the-art cardiology procedures we offer that are giving at-risk patients safer options to receive lifesaving valve replacements and minimize stroke risk...and much more! Heart disease affects nearly every family in some way, including our own TriHealth family. So we are proud to “invest from the heart for the heart” to help all of our cardiac patients and their families live full and healthy lives filled with lots of love and lasting memories. Yours in Good Health,

Contact us today. TriHealth.com/womens | 866 846 4767 MARK C. CLEMENT TRIHEALTH PRESIDENT AND CEO

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT TRIHEALTH, VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT TRIHEALTH.COM.

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Over 80,000 children in the tristate are at risk of hunger today. $1 could help provide 3 meals.

Our Mission: We provide food and services, create stability, and further self-reliance for people in crisis.

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freestorefoodbank.org

10/19/2018 9:52:17 AM 3/15/19 1:46 PM


{ EDITOR’S NOTE } Use BEFAST to know the signs: B: Balance lost E: Eyesight problems F: Face drooping A: Arm weakness S: Speech difficulty T: Time to call 9-1-1

Actor portrayal

Paul’s second chance at life provided by strokeready care at TriHealth When a stroke happens, time is of the essence. Our certified doctors and nurses are ready 24/7. Our Emergency Departments are certified for stroke care via the Joint Commission Advanced Primary Stroke Center — Good Samaritan Hospital —Bethesda North Hospital Acute stroke-ready certified —Bethesda Butler Hospital —Bethesda Arrow Springs —Good Samaritan Western Ridge

TO YOUR HEART HEALTH! When we say something is close to our hearts, we mean it’s highly important. And what could be more so than heart health itself? For that reason, and because TriHealth is making so many exciting changes to elevate cardiovascular care, we’re dedicating this issue to heart health. In addition to interesting features highlighting all that TriHealth is doing to continue leading the region in comprehensive cardiology services, we’ve included heart-healthy recipes. They happen to be vegan, containing no animal products, but believe us: You won’t miss a thing with these richly flavored dishes (page 18). As we all know, exercise is as important to your heart as making healthy food choices. For many people, fitness trackers boost activity by increasing a user’s awareness of how much they’re exercising, by sending reminders to get up and move and by enabling friendly competition with others. We’ve researched the latest fitness trackers on the market and outlined features you should take into consideration when selecting the right one for you. Check it out on page 14. Like healthy eating, exercise is more a lifestyle choice than an isolated item on our “to do” lists. For example, when it comes to vacations and weekend getaways, choose to plan trips that keep you moving, exploring and having new experiences. Read our suggestions on page 28 to start dreaming about your next trip. That’s not to say we’re not in favor of relaxing! To help you do so in comfort and style outdoors this summer, we share some ideas to help you plan your perfect patio (page 36). Thanks for spending some of your day with us! Warm regards,

MARIA K. REGAN EXECUTIVE EDITOR

TriHealth.com/emergency

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CINCINNATI MARIA K. REGAN

E XECU TIVE ED ITOR

KIJOO KIM

CRE ATIVE D IR ECTOR ED I T O R I A L

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

CARL OLSEN PUB LI S HER

M A R K E T I N G , D I G I TA L & O P E R AT I O N S

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING & DIGITAL MEDIA NIGEL EDELS HAIN

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT GIANA BRUCELL A

JIM ALLEN PATRICIA DIBONA

ADVERTISING SERVICES DIRECTOR

ART

GRAPHIC DESIGNER, AD SERVICES

ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR AL ANNA GIANNANTONIO

DESIGN CONTRIBUTOR EILEEN CR ABILL PRODUCTION

DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION AND CIRCULATION CHRISTINE HAMEL

PRODUCTION / ART ASSOCIATE

PHYSICIANS, HOSPITALS AND COMMUNITIES WORKING TOGE THER TO HELP YOU LIVE BET TER.

JACQUELYNN FISCHER VIOLETA MUL AJ

CONTROLLER AGNES ALVES

SENIOR ACCOUNTANT MEGAN FRANK

JUNIOR ACCOUNTANT

RANDY TAS H JIAN

COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER

CATHERINE ROS ARIO

T R I H E A LT H

PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER MARK C. CLEMENT

VP MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS ROB WHITEHOUSE

MANAGER, EXTERNAL AND DIGITAL MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS JOYCE BAT TOCLE T TE

SENIOR MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS CONSULTANT DENYSE REINHART

MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS CONSULTANT CHRISTINE SWALLOW

MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS CONSULTANT EMILY KITZ MILLER

MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS CONSULTANT LINDS AY LOMA X

CHRI S FERR ANTE

PUBLISHED BY WAINSCOT MEDIA CHAIRMAN CARROLL V. DOWDEN

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WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! Send your feedback and ideas to: Editor, Cincinnati Health & Life, One Maynard Drive, Park Ridge, NJ 07656; fax 201.782.5319; email editor@wainscotmedia.com. Cincinnati Health & Life assumes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited manuscripts or art materials CINCINNATI HEALTH & LIFE is published 4 times a year by Wainscot Media, One Maynard Drive, Park Ridge, NJ 07656. This is Volume 5, Issue 1. © 2019 by Wainscot Media LLC. All rights reserved. Subscriptions in U.S.: $14 for one year. Single copies: $3.95. Material contained herein is intended for informational purposes only. If you have medical concerns, seek the guidance of a healthcare professional. ADVERTISING INQUIRIES Please contact Carl Olsen at 847.274.8970 or carl.olsen@wainscotmedia.com. SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES To inquire about a subscription, to change an address, or to purchase a back issue or a reprint of an article, please write to Cincinnati Health & Life, Circulation Department, One Maynard Drive, Park Ridge, NJ 07656; telephone 201.573.5541; email christine.hamel@wainscotmedia.com.

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Memories are the one gift you give to yourself.

Elevate your stay with an intimate place to belong beyond your hotel room. The Ritz-Carlton Club Level is an exclusive space with unique amenities and services where guests enjoy fine culinary presentations ideal for families and business travelers. ritzcarlton.com/resortsofnaples

NAPLES____________ NAPLES GOLF__________

Š

2017 The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, L.L.C.

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{ LOCAL BUZZ }

FILM FOR ALL

T H E R E H A S N E V E R B E E N a more crucial time in American history for the existence of groups like Women in Film. The non-profit organization’s Cincinnati arm was founded in 2016 to further the cause of female filmmakers in the region, and in retrospect, it seems like Women in Film (WIF) Cincinnati came together just in the nick of time. Over the last couple of years, the #MeToo movement has created awareness of the ways in which women are at a disadvantage in the entertainment industry. WIF aims to help level the playing field. Staffed by a resourceful and gifted group of media professionals that includes directors, film editors, producers and film educators, WIF Cincinnati embodies the organization’s agenda and brings it home in a multitude of important ways. Its mission includes the creation of networking opportunities, the development of funding sources for members’ work and the forging of practical paths to help women reach vital resources like mentors, scholarships and technical services. WIF Cincinnati frequently sponsors screenings and other events in town, raising awareness and funds for its mission. Visit www.wifcincinnati.org to keep up with the goings on.

RELIGHTING A LIBRARY

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T H E R E ’S B OT H A LOT H A P P E N I N G currently and a whole lot of history in Clifton’s Gaslight District, and the opening of the Gaslight Bar & Grill has driven both points home splendidly. David and Claudia Taylor had already done their share of historic reclamation by bringing music back to the legendary Ludlow Garage, but they still found themselves drawn to the old Clifton Branch Library building across the street. The Gaslight Bar & Grill is the result of their pact to bring it back to life. A menu overseen by local culinary hero Kevin Worthington updates American standards with touches of unpretentious sophistication, making it a special spot indeed. The Gaslight’s menu mixes simple fare with slightly more elaborate dishes, offering a little something for everyone. Clam chowder, wings, burgers, fries and fish and chips lend a comfort-food kind of feel to the restaurant. But entrées like Greek spaghetti with tapenade, spinach and feta; creamy mushroom risotto with leeks, asparagus and asiago; and duck confit ravioli all serve to establish the Gaslight as a place where foodies can find refuge, too. SPRING 2019 | TRIHEALTH.COM

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BOOKISH BATTLE I N T H E P U B L I C , a Universal Pictures film, a vital part of everyday life in Cincinnati—the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County—serves as the setting for a stirring conflict. Having written, directed, produced and starred in the movie, Emilio Estevez is its driving force. But the library is where all the action goes down in this story of high-stakes class conflict. Shot in 2016, the film tells the tale of a group of homeless library visitors who seek refuge there during a freezing winter night when all local shelters are full. Kenneth C. Williams (best known as Omar in The Wire) is their de facto leader, and Estevez is the unfortunate librarian who gets caught up in a quickly escalating battle between the homeless individuals and the police, represented by Alec Baldwin. There are even more local connections to be found in the film. For instance, one of The Public’s co-producers is Kristen Schlotman, who heads up Film Cincinnati, an organization dedicated to promoting local film production. And if you keep your eyes peeled, you can catch some of the library’s real-life employees appearing as extras in the movie. The film had its premiere in January 2018 at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival, but it didn’t take long before it was picked up by Universal and given a spring 2019 theatrical release date. While Estevez has been working as a writer and director for a long time, this will mark his first starring film role in more than a decade. The attention his reemergence brings with it will undoubtedly draw some much-needed notice to the issue of homelessness.

FREE FOR TEA T H E P O P - U P D A N C E PA R T Y series known as the Tea Dance has been happening around town for the last couple of years. The concept has its roots in the 1940s and ’50s when gay couples couldn’t openly dance together, but the idea of the Tea Dance has been brought forward into a very different social landscape, transforming into something more celebratory than subversive in the process. In April of 2017, Richard Cooke and his husband, Marty Wagner, held their inaugural Tea Dance event at the bar Mr. Pitiful’s. Since then, it has moved around to other spots, including Sartre in OTR and 3 Points Brewery, but always on a Sunday afternoon. And each time, it picks up steam. At this point, it’s typical for one of Cooke and Wagner’s Tea Dances to attract some 400–500 people. The umbrella organization they’ve created to host the parties is known as It’s Time For Another Tea Dance—Teadancecinci. And when they put out the call for LGBTQ folks to join with their friends and allies in these monthly events, they manage to work a little bit of magic each time around.

SYMPHONIC CELEBRATION OVER THE DECADES, classical music lovers have come to know the Cincinnati Symphony as a venue for enjoying the sounds of world-class talent as they interpret the works of the world’s great composers. The list of events the orchestra has in store to celebrate its 125th anniversary throughout the 2019-2020 season will be a larger-than-life reminder of exactly how much artistry the city’s symphony encompasses, so prepare to be impressed. The season will start in September, kicking off with a bang thanks to the legendary French sibling piano duo of Katia and Marielle Labeque, who will be on hand to perform the American premiere of Bryce Dessner’s “Concerto for Two Pianos.” Subsequent concerts will include violin phenomenon Anne-Sophie Mutter delivering Beethoven and Brahms alongside the premiere of a new work by Gabriella Smith, and international opera superstar Renee Fleming bringing the songs of Strauss to life. The official 125th anniversary celebration concert itself will take place in January of next year, with a bill that includes everything from Duke Ellington’s “New World A-Comin’” to a unique performance of Gershwin’s iconic “Rhapsody in Blue” for player piano and orchestra. But the run-up to that event will be just as captivating, so there’s no reason not to start getting excited right now. CINCINNATI HEALTH & LIFE | SPRING 2019

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{ HEALTH NEWS } NIGHT OWLS, BEWARE

A recent study shows that burning the midnight oil may up your risk of diabetes, as well as respiratory and gastrointestinal disorders. —Chronobiology International

TAKE A

(WINDOW)

SEAT

You’re less likely to catch a cold by booking a window seat on an airplane. Researchers found that travelers sitting in aisle seats were more likely to pick up a bug than their seat neighbors. —Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

SWEAT YOUR WAY TO SLEEP

12

37 TIP

The percentage of adults who take prescription medications—including certain heart and blood pressure meds— experiencing depression as a side effect. Risk of depression increases when patients take multiple medications. —University of Illinois at Chicago

10

Folks who worked out four times a week for at least half an hour not only fell asleep more than 10 minutes earlier than people who didn’t exercise, they also slept more than 40 minutes longer.

The number of years the HPV vaccine can protect against the virus’s four most dangerous strains.

—JAMA

—The Journal of Pediatrics

TO STAY FOCUSED If you need to be laser sharp, consider leaving your phone in another room. Why? On average, we check our phones 221 times per day. —Journal of the Association for Consumer Research

PICK THE RIGHT PROTEIN

People who used nuts and seeds to satisfy their protein intake were 40 percent less likely to develop heart disease than those in a control group, according to a recent study. So skip the meat when you can. —International Journal of Epidemiology

SPRING 2019 | TRIHEALTH.COM

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Tirisi Jewelry is made of 18 Kt gold with high quality diamonds and fine handcut semi-precious stones

www.tirisi.com

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{ FAREWELL }

HOW TO PICK THE RIGHT FITNESS TRACKER

WHY A SPORTSBAND MIGHT BE JUST WHAT THE DOCTOR ORDERED TO HELP YOU GET AND STAY FIT.

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A FITNESS TRACKER is a great tool to help you get serious about keeping active. Designed to be comfortable, easy to use and fashionable—most companies offer a range of bracelet styles in varying colors—fitness trackers (also called sportsbands) can help you track daily and weekly activity levels and ensure your heart rate stays within a safe zone while working out. More than that, fitness trackers can serve as the motivation you need to keep up your new regimen. They provide encouragement that ranges from a virtual coach who delivers voiced approval while you’re exercising to game-like scoring systems that reward you for progress and prompt you to share your accomplishments with friends for a little positive reinforcement. But picking the right tracker can be a bit tricky. Sportsbands come in many shapes and sizes, offer varying features and can differ in price by hundreds of dollars. Begin by identifying the key features you want. If all you need is a device that counts your steps and tracks calories burned, you can get away with spending a lot less. If you want something more advanced—like the ability to track your jogging route via GPS

MOOV NOW $60 One of the most affordable—yet surprisingly robust— fitness trackers currently available, this is a screen-free wear-all-day device that captures your movement and sends it to a smartphone app for analysis. It automatically detects the type of activity you’re performing—swimming, jogging, sit-ups—and provides encouragement and voiced guidance on how to improve your technique to avoid injury and improve performance. No recharging required, but the battery needs to be replaced every six months.

GARMIN VIVOFIT 4 $80 Garmin’s entry-level fitness tracker covers the sportsband basics, counting steps, tracking distance travelled and calories burned, and monitoring your sleep. Its small, non-interactive color screen provides essential information, but to see more details you’ll need to open a companion app on your smartphone. Its biggest selling point is its battery life—up to a year with standard use, at which point you’ll need to replace a pair of little lithium discs.

without bringing your phone with you—you’ll pay a lot more. You also should consider details such as battery life—some sportsbands need to be recharged every few days; others come with a replaceable battery that can last up to a year—and the companion app that’s available for your phone. Depending on how serious you want to get about monitoring and improving your performance, these apps can make a big difference. Some simply organize and present information collected by your tracker (which might be all you really need), while others provide detailed reports and insights on each of your daily activities, help you set long-term goals and connect you with a network of peers for extra motivation. Typically free, these apps can be downloaded in advance so you can browse their features to get a better sense of which tracker and app are right for you. We’ve rounded up a handful of popular fitness trackers to give you a sense of what’s available. They differ widely in form and function—and we didn’t even get into luxury options, like the Apple Watch—but you can be confident that all of them are designed with one primary purpose: to help you become the healthier, fitter version of yourself that you want to be.

FITBIT ALTA $100 From one of the companies credited for starting the fitnesstracker trend, the Fitbit Alta is a blissfully simple and easy-to-understand sportsband designed to gently nudge you toward maintaining a healthier lifestyle. It tracks your steps, distance travelled and calories burned; sends you little reminders to get up and move when you’ve been stationary too long; and even tracks your sleeping habits. It connects to your phone, but you also can see and review key stats on the Alta’s bright and clear touch display. You can expect about five days of use per charge.

WITHINGS PULSE HR

SAMSUNG GEAR FIT2

$130 Withings’ fitness bracelet is focused on your heart. It performs the same functions as other trackers—counting steps, estimating calories burned and keeping tabs on your sleep cycles— but its signature feature is that it monitors your pulse all day, measures beats during specific activities and analyzes changes over the long term. You’ll need to plug it in now and then, but it can run for up to 20 days on a single charge.

$180 This slightly more advanced sportsband has a complete set of core features. It automatically identifies and tracks your performance in activities ranging from street walking to elliptical training and keeps tabs on your heart for good measure. But it stands out thanks to its bright and colorful screen with large, easy-to-read text, and a built-in GPS that lets you track your outdoor activities and routes without lugging a phone along. The downside is that this added technology drains its rechargeable battery fairly quickly—typically in just a few days.

CINCINNATI HEALTH & LIFE | SPRING 2019

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

From left: Charles and Elizabeth Chadwell with Dr. Kathryn O'Keefe, who performed coronary artery bypass graft surgery on them both around the time they celebrated 50 years of marriage.

HEARTFELT ANNIVERSARY A COUPLE’S 50TH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY COINCIDES WITH TWO UNEXPECTED BUT SUCCESSFUL OPEN-HEART SURGERIES.

16

ELIZABETH AND CHARLES Chadwell of Wilmington, Ohio, share most everything—three children, three grandchildren, a companionable retirement, a beautiful home and a welltended garden. In 2018, the Chadwells, celebrating 50 years of marriage, discovered they had yet another thing in common: coronary artery disease.

A STRANGE SENSATION Elizabeth, 71, was landscaping her backyard in the summer of 2017 when she noticed a strange sensation. “I was planting flowers and spreading mulch,” says Elizabeth, who mows the grass with a self-propelled lawnmower. “I felt something in my abdomen under my breast that lasted a few seconds.”

Summer moved to fall and she remained quiet about the occasional vague feeling as she raked leaves and decorated for the holidays. When a friend visited in December, Elizabeth described the sensation and was taken aback by her friend’s response: “Liz, I think you’ve got a blockage.” Days later, Elizabeth’s primary care physician ordered an electrocardiogram (EKG) which showed an irregularity. She was referred to a cardiologist who ordered a stress test and an angiogram. The angiogram revealed coronary artery disease in multiple blood vessels. Told she would need surgery, Elizabeth requested a transfer to TriHealth's Bethesda North Hospital, where she met cardiovascular surgeon Kathryn O’Keefe, MD. “We had an

SPRING 2019 | TRIHEALTH.COM

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immediate connection,” Elizabeth recalls. Dr. O’Keefe calls herself a “straight shooter.” She says she’s up front with patients about surgical risks and benefits. Elizabeth, Dr. O’Keefe points out, is typical of women with heart disease. “Women don’t realize heart disease is their number one killer. Their symptoms are often atypical so they often ignore them.”

ELIZABETH: CABG SURGERY Because Elizabeth was diabetic and had blockages in three arteries, Dr. O’Keefe recommended coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. The procedure involved a team of specialists working alongside her: a cardiac anesthesiologist, a perfusionist operating the heart-lung machine, a surgical assistant, surgical technicians, nurses and nurse practitioners. Of the four-hour CABG procedure, Dr. O’Keefe says, “I opened Elizabeth’s breastbone down the middle (sternotomy) and used an artery from behind her breast bone and a vein from her leg, which we harvested minimally invasively, to reroute blood flow around the blockages.” After surgery, Elizabeth was monitored in the cardiac intensive care unit before being released. Bethesda North Hospital arranged for a nurse, an occupational therapist and a physical therapist to go to Elizabeth’s home after discharge. “She made a smooth recovery and was driving and grocery shopping within a month,” says Dr. O’Keefe.

CHARLES: CABG SURGERY AND AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT In March 2018, three months after surgery, Elizabeth organized a party to celebrate the Chadwells' 50th wedding anniversary. Charles began complaining of back pain two months later. When he failed a stress test, further cardiac tests were ordered. An angiogram showed the entire left main artery of his heart was blocked. Charles was transferred to Bethesda North Hospital where Dr. O’Keefe performed CABG surgery the next day on June 10. “During surgery, I found that his aortic valve—the gatekeeper valve of the heart— was narrowed and not functioning well,” says Dr. O’Keefe. She replaced the diseased valve with an artificial one. The Chadwells say it was daunting to be back at the hospital for cardiac care, but they were grateful for Dr. O’Keefe’s expertise. Elizabeth was pleased to see her former nurses again. “Our cardiac team gets a small glimpse of a patient’s total recovery,” Dr. O’Keefe says. “They love when patients come back all healed up.”

RETURN TO LIFE Like his wife, Charles had an excellent recovery and also completed cardiac rehabilitation in the TriHealth Heart Institute’s Cardiac Rehabilitation Department. The Chadwells resumed their daily routine and the partnership that works so well. “Last summer, I gardened and reset brick borders while Charles worked on various projects around the house and yard,” says Elizabeth. “We’re a good team.”

WOMEN AND HEART DISEASE Heart disease is the number one killer of women, according to the American Heart Association. Education about symptoms and steps to reduce risks can prevent heart disease and save lives. Regina Kayse, MD, a cardiologist at the TriHealth Heart Institute, says cardiac disease is underrecognized in women. “Though people associate a heart attack with crushing chest pain, women often have less dramatic symptoms. They put symptoms on the back burner or attribute them to a less serious health issue like acid reflux or a GI illness,” she says. “I tell my female patients to pay attention to their bodies and seek help if something seems off.” Heart attack symptoms in women can include: • Chest pain, pressure or fullness that lingers or is intermittent • Discomfort in the arms, back, neck, jaw or stomach • Shortness of breath • Nausea or lightheadedness

FOLLOW “LIFE’S SIMPLE 7” FOR BETTER HEART HEALTH Following the American Heart Association’s “Life’s Simple 7” steps can improve your cardiovascular health:

Manage Blood Pressure

Control Cholesterol

Reduce Blood Sugar

Get Active

Eat Better

Lose Weight

Stop Smoking

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THE TRIHEALTH HEART INSTITUTE OFFERS A RANGE OF CARDIOVASCULAR SERVICES, INCLUDING DIAGNOSTIC TESTING, AT LOCATIONS THROUGHOUT CINCINNATI. CALL 513.865.2222 FOR MORE INFORMATION.

TO LISTEN TO DR. KATHRYN O’KEEFE AND THE CHADWELLS TELL THEIR INCREDIBLE STORY, GO TO WWW.TRIHEALTH.COM/HEART AND CLICK ON THE LINK TO TRIHEALTH’S HEALTH TALK PODCAST.

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{ TASTES }

HEARTY PICKS WITH LOTS OF VEGETABLES, NUTS AND BEANS, THESE HEARTHEALTHY VEGAN DISHES PACK QUITE A NUTRITIONAL PUNCH. PLUS, THEY HAVE SO MUCH FLAVOR, YOU WON’T MISS THE MEAT!

ASIAN STIR FRY YIELDS: 3 OR 4 SERVINGS

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

12 oz. rice noodles n  4 heads of bok choy, white stems separated from the greens n  2 garlic cloves, chopped n  ½ red chile, sliced or chopped n 1 thumb-sized piece of fresh ginger, peeled and finely chopped n  4 Tbs. low-sodium soy sauce n  Sweet & Salty Cashews, chopped (see recipe below)

Cook the noodles in boiling water following the package instructions. When done, drain then rinse with cold water and let sit.

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SWEET & SALTY CASHEWS 1 Tbs. maple syrup 1 Tbs. low-sodium soy sauce n 1 tsp. garlic powder n 1 tsp. smoked paprika (optional) n 1½ cups raw cashews

Chop the white stems of the bok choy and cook them in a wok over high heat with a splash of water, stirring constantly. After 3 to 4 minutes, add the garlic, chile and ginger and keep stirring. After a minute, add the noodles, bok choy greens and a splash of water if needed. Mix well until the noodles are warm (about two minutes), then add the soy sauce. Toss well. Serve scattered with the chopped cashews. You can also drizzle with some toasted sesame oil, if you like. TO MAKE THE CASHEWS Preheat the oven to 350°F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

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In a small bowl, mix the maple syrup and soy sauce with the garlic powder and smoked paprika, if using. Place the cashews in a large bowl, pour over the sauce and mix well until thoroughly coated. Transfer the cashews (leave the excess seasoning in the bowl) to the lined baking sheet, spread out evenly and roast in the oven for 3 minutes. Remove the sheet, stir the nuts then return them to the oven and cook for a further 3 to 4 minutes. Keep an eye on them: They should turn light golden, but you don’t want to burn them. Remove the nuts from the oven and allow to cool so they become crisp, then serve.

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{ TASTES }

OIL-FREE PISTOU WITH PASTA YIELDS: 4 SERVINGS

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

14 oz. short pasta n  14 oz. green beans, cut in half or into thirds n  1 head of broccoli, cut into small florets n 2 large bunches of basil (each 3 oz.), roughly chopped n ¼  avocado n  4 to 6 garlic cloves, chopped n  juice of 1 lemon n  pine nut “Parmesan” (optional, see recipe, below)

Cook the pasta according to the package instructions in plenty of boiling water. Bring another pot of water to a boil and add the green beans. Cook for 7 to 8 minutes with the lid on, and after 3 to 4 minutes, add the broccoli, then drain and let sit.

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PINE NUT “PARMESAN” ¼ cup pine nuts ½ tsp. garlic powder (optional) n  3 Tbs. nutritional yeast

Meanwhile, make the pistou. Put the basil, avocado, garlic, lemon juice and 1 tsp. salt in a blender and add about ¼ cup of water. Process until smooth. Add more water a tsp. at a time if it needs loosening. Drain the pasta, reserving 3 Tbs. of the cooking water. Add the vegetables, pistou and reserved cooking water (it will make your pasta creamier) to the pasta and mix so the pasta is evenly coated. Serve immediately.

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TO MAKE THE “PARMESAN” In a food processor, combine the pine nuts, garlic powder, if using, and yeast with ½ tsp. of sea salt; pulse until a grated Parmesan-like consistency is formed.

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{ TASTES }

NOODLES WITH CARROT MISO SAUCE YIELDS: 4 SERVINGS

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

9 oz. carrots, peeled and grated n  ½ cup light miso paste n  ¼ cup tahini n  1 Tbs. yuzu or rice vinegar n  1 thumb-sized piece of ginger, peeled and grated n 12 oz. noodles of your choice n  1 ¼ cup cooked edamame beans n Mrs. Dash seasoning (optional)

First make the sauce by blending the grated carrots, miso, tahini, vinegar, ginger and 1 cup of water in a high-speed blender until smooth. Taste, add Mrs. Dash seasoning if needed, then let sit.

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Cook the noodles in boiling water according to the package instructions. When ready, drain and rinse. Divide the sauce between four bowls, then top with the noodles and beans and serve immediately.

All recipes and photos reprinted with permission from Vegan in 7 by Rita Serano. Photography by Laura Edwards. © 2016 Kyle Books.

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

ELEVATING CARDIAC SURGERY CARE

COMBINING THE CARDIAC SURGICAL PROGRAMS AT GOOD SAMARITAN HOSPITAL AND BETHESDA NORTH HOSPITAL BRINGS BIG BENEFITS FOR PATIENTS.

ADVANCED CARDIAC SURGICAL PROCEDURES The expert surgeons at TriHealth Heart Institute perform a wide range of lifesaving procedures including: • Coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) CABG is an open-heart operation (sternotomy) that uses blood vessels to bypass clogged heart arteries and restore circulation. • Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) LVAD is an implanted mechanical heart pump for patients who have reached end-stage heart failure. • Maze Surgery This procedure creates scars to restore normal rhythm for atrial fibrillation (AFib) through open-heart surgery or robotic-assisted surgery (called mini-maze). • Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) TAVR is a minimally invasive procedure to replace a diseased aortic valve that doesn’t open properly (aortic stenosis).

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TRIHEALTH SEES 90,000 heart patients annually at its hospitals, outpatient centers and physician practices across greater Cincinnati. Of that large number, only a small percentage require surgery. TriHealth is the region’s largest provider of minimally invasive and open-heart surgery, performing more than 800 procedures each year. In 2017, 452 procedures were done at TriHealth’s Bethesda North Hospital and 388 at TriHealth’s Good Samaritan Hospital. Consolidating TriHealth’s two heartsurgery programs into one location at Bethesda North Hospital is the first step toward creating the region’s destination cardiac surgery center of excellence. “The move allows us to consolidate two medium-sized great programs into one large extraordinary program,” says Stephen Lewis, MD, System Chief and Medical Director of Cardiovascular Care, TriHealth Heart Institute. Only the surgery programs are being combined—interventional cardiology and non-surgical cardiology services are still available at both Good Samaritan Hospital and Bethesda North Hospital.

LEADING THE WAY TriHealth has long been a leader in cardiac innovation. Its surgeons were among the first in the United States to treat patients with transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). They offer deep expertise in robotic-assisted techniques for coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery and valve repair and replacement. “With Good Samaritan and Bethesda North surgeons under one roof, our minimally invasive program will expand,” says Dr. Lewis. “We can take on more complex cardiac surgeries that require

R. DOUGLAS ADAMS, MD

a large team effort, including advanced heart failure interventions such as LVAD (left ventricular assist device), surgery for patients with end-stage heart failure, and Maze surgery for atrial fibrillation.”

ONE FOCUSED TEAM Cardiothoracic surgeon is a demanding profession, requiring years of additional training, long hours in the OR and an intense on-call schedule. The field is facing a national shortage as surgeons retire and medical school graduates opt for less taxing specialties. “By combining our surgical programs into one site, we’re ensuring high-quality patient care and fostering a better work environment for our surgeons,” explains Dr. Lewis. “In addition,” he says, “having surgeons at one location means help is readily available if there’s a difficult surgery that needs an extra set of hands. That’s hard to do when surgeons are across town.”

POSITIVE CHANGE According to Dr. Lewis, trepidation quickly turned to excitement when Good Samaritan’s cardiac surgery staff moved to Bethesda North. “We retained a large portion of our Good Sam team during the transfer,” he says. “We doubled the size of our cardiac intensive care unit team. There’s been a lot of renewed energy.” Two exceptional cardiothoracic surgeons—R. Douglas Adams, MD, and Louis Brunsting, III, MD, recently came to TriHealth from other institutions. Other members of this robust cardiothoracic surgery team include noted surgeons Kathryn O’Keefe, MD, Loren Hiratzka, MD, and Steven Park, MD.

LOUIS BRUNSTING, III, MD

LOREN HIRATZKA, MD

MORE CASES MEAN BETTER OUTCOMES Uniting TriHealth’s cardiac surgery sites under a single roof increases heart-surgery volume, which translates to even more experience for surgeons and the best possible outcomes for patients. “Medical evidence shows a clear correlation between cardiac surgery site volumes and clinical outcomes,” says Dr. Lewis. Hospitals with higher patient volumes have lower mortality and complication rates. For example, a recent study in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery showed mortality rates for aortic valve replacement patients were 2.41 percent at high-volume hospitals, compared to 4.34 percent at low-volume hospitals.

COMBINING RESOURCES FOR BETTER CARE Creating a single, highly specialized surgical team and center qualifies Bethesda North Hospital to become a Center of Excellence for payers, enabling patients to stay within the network rather than being forced to find surgical care elsewhere. “When Good Samaritan and Bethesda came together to form TriHealth, they envisioned a truly integrated health system that utilized its broad resources to provide patients the best possible care—at the best cost,” says Mark C. Clement, TriHealth President and CEO. The decision to combine cardiac surgery sites is another step in TriHealth’s journey as the only truly integrated health system in Cincinnati. “By bringing these two excellent program sites together,” says Clement, “we’re confident we can build a cardiac surgery program that will be second to none in the region when it comes to service, clinical expertise and patient outcomes.”

KATHRYN O’KEEFE, MD

STEVEN PARK, MD

LEARN WHY THE TRIHEALTH HEART INSTITUTE IS LEADING THE REGION IN HEART CARE AT WWW.TRIHEALTH.COM/HEART.

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

NEW SPACES FOR HEART CARE PHASE ONE OF TRIHEALTH’S HEART CENTER OF EXCELLENCE INCLUDES NEW CARDIAC CATHETERIZATION LABS AND OPERATING ROOMS PLUS AN EXPANDED CARDIOVASCULAR INTENSIVE CARE UNIT.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE TRIHEALTH HEART INSTITUTE, GO TO WWW.TRIHEALTH.COM/HEART.

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THE TRIHEALTH HEART INSTITUTE is creating a center of excellence for cardiac patient care on the campus of TriHealth’s Bethesda North Hospital, where the open-heart surgical programs of TriHealth’s Good Samaritan Hospital and Bethesda North Hospital were recently combined. Months of teamwork led to a master facility plan for the TriHealth Heart Institute at Bethesda North Hospital’s campus in Montgomery, Ohio. The plan brings open-heart surgery services and providers together in one expansive location, adding treatment space to accommodate community needs and future growth. “The open-heart surgical facility is being built within the existing infrastructure of Bethesda North,” explains Lisa Baker, Executive Director of the TriHealth Heart Institute. “Our goal is to improve efficiencies by developing a centralized, highly organized layout for cardiac surgical care.”

PHASE ONE ADDITIONS The first phase adds four state-of-the-art cardiac catheterization labs. These will be open seven days a week and available on-call nights and weekends for cardiac emergencies such as heart attacks, vascular issues and strokes, enabling cardiologists to diagnose and treat

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Eugenia S. and Harold M. Thomas The Thomas Comprehensive Care Center, named in honor of Harold M. and Eugenia S. Thomas, who donated $10 million for the expansion project, will house care centers for cardiology and cancer patients.

THE THOMAS COMPREHENSIVE CARE CENTER The Thomas Comprehensive Care Center is a new four-story, 135,000-square-foot project on the Bethesda North Hospital campus. This multidisciplinary center, expected to open in late 2019, will house physician offices in Cardiology, Electrophysiology, Vascular Surgery and Cardiothoracic Surgery. Says Lisa Baker, Executive Director of the TriHealth Heart Institute: “This is a home run from a patient experience perspective and for urgent consultations because all of our cardiac specialists will be together.”

more patients using advanced imaging technology and minimally invasive catheterization procedures. With open-heart surgery consolidated at Bethesda North Hospital, two more dedicated operating rooms have been added. “We’ve gone from two to four ORs,” says Baker. “We have one hybrid operating room and plan to add a second this year.” Hybrid ORs allow staff to perform highend diagnostic imaging and multiple surgical or non-surgical interventions in one visit. Stephen Lewis, MD, System Chief and Medical Director of Cardiovascular Care, TriHealth Heart Institute, says there are also plans to expand the Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit (CVICU). “Our cardiothoracic surgery patients remain in the CVICU from after surgery until discharge. We’ve found this provides better quality of care and gets them out of the hospital quicker.” Patients whose hearts are being monitored with telemetry will now be in one location. “Previously, telemetry patients were spread throughout the hospital. Having them in one centralized unit increases efficiency,” says Dr. Lewis. Another new project on the Bethesda North Hospital campus, The Thomas

Comprehensive Care Center, will bring additional patient-care benefits. “The Thomas Center will be uniquely designed to promote collaboration of all cardiovascular specialists to provide world-class, patient-focused care, says Dr. Lewis.

During the continuing development of the heart center of excellence, Dr. Lewis says cardiac services will not be interrupted. “We’re planning for multiple levels of phasing. Nothing will be shut down and no operations will be compromised.”

NEW TRIHEALTH CARDIAC SURGEONS BRING EXTENSIVE EXPERTISE Cardiothoracic surgeons R. Douglas Adams, MD, and Louis “Trey” Brunsting III, MD, recently joined the TriHealth Heart Institute at Bethesda North Hospital. Dr. Adams comes from Owensboro Health in Kentucky, where he developed a large minimally-invasive thoracic surgery practice. After completing a medical degree at the University of Illinois, he went on to do a residency in general surgery at North Carolina Baptist Hospital. Continuing his training, he was a cardiovascular and thoracic surgery resident and a research and clinical fellow at RushPresbyterian St. Luke’s Medical Center in Chicago. Dr. Brunsting, formerly director of cardiothoracic surgery at East Alabama Medical Center, has performed more than 700 robotically-assisted heart operations. He has been clinical director of cardiac transplantation at the University of Michigan and chief of minimally invasive cardiac surgery at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Dr. Brunsting completed a medical degree at the University of California at San Diego, a surgical residency at the University of Rochester and a thoracic residency at Duke University, where he was a research fellow.

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Rock climbing in Acadia National Park, Mount Desert Island, Maine.

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{ ESCAPES }

A TRIP TO ONE OF THESE TEMPTING LOCATIONS WILL LEAVE YOU FEELING FIT AS WELL AS REFRESHED. GOING ON VACATION doesn’t have to mean neglecting your health. Just be sure to pack your good eating habits and pick a destination where the focus is on active diversions. These three spots are among the best for outdoor spring and summer fun—from hiking, biking and horseback riding to fishing, paddleboarding, whitewater rafting and kayaking. Plus, they each offer compelling hotel options, friendly locals and a quaint, walkable small town or intriguing urban landscape to explore. So, go ahead and treat yourself to plenty of fun—with no regrets.

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{ ESCAPES }

Rafting the Snake River in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.

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Whether you’re longing to kayak or to mount a troutfishing expedition, Jackson Lake in Grand Teton National Park is a winning destination. Bottom: Jump in the saddle to enjoy a leisurely trail ride or sign up for rodeo school—Jackson Hole offers both.

© GETTYIMAGES.COM

JACKSON HOLE, WYOMING The Jackson Hole valley, ideally located for exploring both Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks, offers endless opportunity for outdoor fun, plus a western charm all its own. Whether your speed is white-water rafting on the Snake River, a scenic kayak paddle around Jackson Lake or fishing just about any local waterway, Jackson Hole has the liquid adventure for you. For those who like to ride, the city of Jackson is among the most bike-friendly in the nation. You can enjoy stunning views of Grand Teton National Park along the Jenny Lake Pathway or test your mountain bike skills on winding Teton trails. Experience the West in authentic style on horseback via guided trail ride or try your hand at team roping and barrel racing at a local rodeo school. If you prefer to keep your feet on the ground, the area offers endless hiking trails and many wildlife tours for chances to see moose, elk, bison, grizzly bear, black bear, wolf and more. Less than a mile from Jackson’s Town Square, Snow King Mountain is a short but steep hike that promises views of the Teton Range and the National Elk Refuge—plus a chairlift ride down to save your knees. After the sun sets, keep your heart pumping with two-stepping and boot-scooting in the Silver Dollar Showroom of the historic Wort Hotel. You may even want to kick off your boots and stay the night in this western-style luxury hotel built by the Wort brothers in 1941 on the site of the family’s livery stable.

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Above and below: Montreal is highly bikeable—tour on your own or with a group to learn more about the city. Below, right: Lac-des-Dix-Milles is in Parc National du Mont-Tremblant, which lies about two hours northwest of Montreal and offers a variety of hiking trails (this view is from the Mont de l’Envol trail). Bottom, left to right: Paddleboarding on the Saint Lawrence River at Montreal’s Parc Jean-Drapeau; the well-equipped gym at Fairmont The Queen Elizabeth hotel.

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City lovers will find many ways to stay active in Montreal, widely considered one of the most cosmopolitan cities in North America. Get the lay of the land on a biking or even running tour through the artsy Latin Quarter, historic Old Montreal and hip Mile-End. In Parc Mont-Royal, you can hike to the top of Mont-Royal, the point from which the city takes its name, or rent a rowboat for a paddle around Beaver Lake. More water fun awaits on the Saint Lawrence River, with stand-up paddleboarding, river surfing and kayaking, as well as fishing excursions for bass and walleye that offer gorgeous city views as a bonus. At Voiles en Voiles in the Old Port of Montreal, families can enjoy 10 aerial adventure courses and an inflatable playground on two life-size replicas of 18th century sailing ships—one belonging to the Crown and one a pirate ship. Thrill seekers of all ages are welcome to take high-flying trapeze lessons at Trapezium. In case of inclement weather, head underground: Montreal is home to the world’s largest indoor network of stores, the Underground Pedestrian Network, with more than 20 miles of passages connecting shops, restaurants, museums and hotels. One notable member of the network is Fairmont The Queen Elizabeth. The first hotel in North America to have escalators and air conditioning when it opened in 1958, it has undergone a renovation that preserves the mid-century feel while bringing in modern amenities, including a 24-hour wellness center with fitness equipment, an indoor pool, and virtual yoga and pilates classes to keep you fit away from home.

Above and below: CRÉDIT FR © PISTE POLYVALENTE DU CANAL DE LACHINE, BERNARD AMIOT-EN CREDIT © LACHINE CANAL MULTIPURPOSE PATH, BERNARD AMIOT | SPADE & PALACIO TOURS-EN CREDIT © SPADE & PALACIO TOURS Below, right: STEVE DESCHÊNES-EN CREDIT © STEVE DESCHÊNES | Bottom, left: EVA BLUE-EN CREDIT © EVA BLUE | Bottom, right: FAIRMONT LE REINE ELIZABETH-EN CREDIT © FAIRMONT LE REINE ELIZABETH

MONTREAL, CANADA

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Sunset from the top of Cadillac Mountain in Acadia National Park, Maine. The Park Loop Road winds 3.5 miles to the summit, with views of Western Bay, coastal islands and Bar Harbor. Below, top to bottom: The picturesque resort town of Bar Harbor offers a shoreline dotted with lobster pots and fishing boats; the historic Bar Harbor Inn; the Jordon Pond Shore Trail, a serene 3.3-mile loop with water views.

ACADIA NATIONAL PARK, MAINE

© GETTYIMAGES.COM

Above and below: CRÉDIT FR © PISTE POLYVALENTE DU CANAL DE LACHINE, BERNARD AMIOT-EN CREDIT © LACHINE CANAL MULTIPURPOSE PATH, BERNARD AMIOT | SPADE & PALACIO TOURS-EN CREDIT © SPADE & PALACIO TOURS Below, right: STEVE DESCHÊNES-EN CREDIT © STEVE DESCHÊNES | Bottom, left: EVA BLUE-EN CREDIT © EVA BLUE | Bottom, right: FAIRMONT LE REINE ELIZABETH-EN CREDIT © FAIRMONT LE REINE ELIZABETH

{ ESCAPES }

Situated primarily on Mount Desert Island and encompassing more than 47,000 acres of protected lands, Acadia National Park offers plenty of terrain to explore, including granite mountains, Atlantic shoreline, coastal forests, rocky beaches and historic lighthouses. Take it all in on foot via 158 miles of hiking trails, by bike or horseback on 45 miles of paved Carriage Roads, or on the water by canoe or sea kayak. Hike to the summit Cadillac Mountain, the highest peak on the U.S. Atlantic Coast—if you’re there in time for the sunrise you could be among the first in the nation to see it. While you’re up there, check out HawkWatch to look for raptors, including bald eagle, American kestrel and peregrine falcon. With 338 bird species, Acadia is one of the nation’s premier bird-watching areas so there are plenty of species to spy at lower elevations as well. Beautiful Sand Beach sits between two walls of solid pink granite. Breathtaking views of the beach await those who climb the granite stairs of the Great Head Trail or brave the iron rungs and attached ladders of the Precipice Trail. Try your hand at deep sea fishing on an excursion from nearby Southwest Harbor: Make a big catch, watch the crew haul in lobster traps and enjoy spotting porpoises, seals and ospreys. For a leisurely change of pace, stroll the streets of Bar Harbor, checking out shops and restaurants. A short walk from downtown sits the Bar Harbor Inn, which began life in the 1800s as a culture club that once feted President Taft and later served as local headquarters for the U.S. Navy and the American Red Cross. Today, hotel guests can wander the half-mile Shore Path, swim in the heated outdoor pool, take a waterfront yoga class or soothe tired muscles in the world-class spa.

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NEW HEART PROCEDURES

TRANSFORM LIVES INTEGRATING THE LATEST TREATMENTS AND TECHNIQUES INTO CARE OPTIONS FOR PATIENTS IS A TOP TRIHEALTH PRIORITY. THE TRIHEALTH Heart Institute sets the standard in groundbreaking cardiac care, offering state-of-the-art technologies by highly trained heart specialists. Electrophysiologists and interventional cardiologists now lead the region in two novel procedures: the WATCHMAN implant, which reduces stroke risk for patients with atrial fibrillation (AFib) and frees them from blood-thinning medications, and the BASILICA technique, which makes valve replacement safer for high-risk patients.

NEW AFIB TREATMENT Indiana resident Guy Kaeser learned he had AFib, an irregular heartbeat, during a routine physical with his primary care doctor. “I was feeling fine,” says Guy, 68, of the surprise diagnosis. He was referred to TriHealth cardiologist David Arya, MD, who performed cardioversion to shock his heart back into rhythm. Because AFib increases a patient’s risk of developing heartrelated problems such as stroke, Guy was prescribed a preventative blood-thinning medication. It wasn’t until he was involved in a motorcycle accident that the medication became a lifestyle concern. Though his injuries were minor, Guy was told he must stop riding his motorcycle. Blood thinners have a potential side effect of internal bleeding. Even a small bump or scrape could become life-threatening. “I’m an active guy,” says Guy, a realtor who’s constantly on the move, splits his own wood and takes long motorcycle trips. “I can’t be sedentary and I don’t want to be on meds for the rest of my life.” Dr. Arya told him about a device called the WATCHMAN Left Atrial Appendage Closure Implant and suggested he meet with TriHealth electrophysiologist Marshall Winner, MD. The WATCHMAN device, which is the only FDA-approved implant proven to

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reduce stroke risk in people with AFib not caused by a heart valve problem, has been implanted in 50,000 patients worldwide. Dr. Winner and his team recently completed their 50th WATCHMAN procedure. According to Dr. Winner, WATCHMAN reduces stroke risk and frees AFib patients of blood thinners by permanently closing the left atrial appendage, a small sac in the top left chamber of the heart where blood can collect and form clots. When clots are pumped out of the heart, they can cause a stroke. “The WATCHMAN is a small, umbrella-shaped plug that we insert through a vein in the leg and up into the heart. It springs open in the left atrial appendage and seals it off so blood clots can’t form,” explains Dr. Winner. “It’s revolutionary for patients.” Now free of his blood thinner, Guy says the procedure, which Dr. Winner completed at TriHealth’s Good Samaritan Hospital, has him back on his bike with confidence. He’s planned a motorcycle trip with friends this summer. “We’re riding to Wendover, Utah, to see the Bonneville Salt Flats and then to Canada.”

LESS INVASIVE VALVE REPLACEMENT Tom Beck’s heart health was paramount as he cared for his ailing wife and daughter, both of whom died recently. “The three of us were always together,” he says. He’d first had triple bypass surgery followed by an aortic valve replacement in 2013 and then stents to open blocked arteries in 2017. To strengthen his heart and keep social connections, Tom, 84, routinely walked a half-mile on the indoor track at his community center in Deerfield Township, Ohio. Last year, Tom says the stroll became a struggle. “I was winded and in pain and had to stop to catch my breath.” He went to the Emergency Department

at Bethesda North Hospital where imaging tests revealed his bioprosthetic aortic valve had degenerated. He was referred to TriHealth interventional cardiologists William Martin, MD, and Puvi Seshiah, MD. The doctors recommended BASILICA, a new technique they’d perform during transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) surgery. TAVR offers a less invasive alternative to open-heart surgery for patients who are elderly or frail. But in some patients, the placement of the new valve causes the old valve’s leaflets to block the coronary artery, a complication that can trigger a fatal heart attack. Dr. Seshiah says tests revealed that Tom’s heart anatomy put him at risk.

FIRST IN CINCINNATI The BASILICA (Bioprosthetic Aortic Scallop Intentional Laceration to prevent Iatrogenic Coronary Artery obstruction) technique prevents this complication. “TriHealth is the only healthcare system in Greater Cincinnati and the fourth worldwide to use this approach,” says Dr. Martin. Tom was excited about the promising new technology. He had TAVR surgery in December 2018 by cardiothoracic surgeon Steven Park, MD. During the procedure, Drs. Seshiah and Martin wove an electrified wire the size of a sewing thread through a catheter and used it to split the original leaflet. “This created a doorway for the coronary artery,” explains Dr. Martin. Tom’s surgery went well and he returned home three days later. “With BASILICA, we now have a treatment option for a whole cohort of highrisk patients who previously were told they weren’t candidates for valve replacement surgery,” says Dr. Martin. Tom agrees that TAVR with BASILICA intervention was well worth it. “I’m back walking the track and I feel great.”

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

Patient Tom Beck, 84, is back to being active following state-of-the-art heart-valve surgery.

DAVID ARYA, MD

WILLIAM MARTIN, MD

PUVI SESHIAH, MD

MARSHALL WINNER, MD

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE WATCHMAN AND BASILICA PROCEDURES, GO TO TRIHEALTH.COM/HEART.

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{ HOME } To create an outdoor living space that sets the stage for a memorable summer, consider color, texture, scent and sound. Here, the furniture and hardscape stay neutral to highlight the rich landscape beyond. To tie the two areas, shades of green are brought onto the patio via throw pillows, candles and linens. Flowers add a touch of whimsy and bright pops of color.

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TAKE IT OUTSIDE

WITH THE LAZY DAYS OF SUMMER JUST AROUND THE CORNER, NOW’S THE TIME TO PLAN YOUR PERFECT PATIO AND SPRUCE UP OUTDOOR SPACES.

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Texture keeps things interesting—especially important when the color palette is neutral. Above: Woven wicker, smooth ceramic and glass, rough terracotta, nubby fabrics and a soft, fuzzy throw offer textures as varied as those found in nature. Below, right: The sleek surfaces of the watering can and the pails (creatively turned into plant pots) contrast nicely with the textures of flowering herbs like lavender, which lend a summery scent to outdoor spaces.

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Clockwise from left: Whether used for steps, walkways or decorative accents­, natural rock contrasts charmingly with plants; fountains— from elaborate to simple—add the soothing sound of flowing, splashing water (gravel walkways and wind chimes are other ways to design sound into your outdoor space); place potted flowering plants around your patio for reliable color throughout summer; bamboo screening provides shade, privacy and natural texture.

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{{IN INGOOD GOODHEALTH HEALTH}}

WHEN EVERY SECOND COUNTS TRIHEALTH DELIVERS RAPID, LIFESAVING CARE FOR CARDIOVASCULAR EMERGENCIES INCLUDING HEART ATTACK AND STROKE. PATIENTS CAN COUNT ON TRIHEALTH to deliver expert cardiovascular emergency care 24 hours a day, seven days a week for the full spectrum of concerns—from angina, aortic aneurysm and arrhythmia to heart attack, heart failure and stroke. In cardiovascular emergencies, timing is everything, says Kenneth Patton, DO, Medical Director for TriHealth’s Bethesda North Hospital Emergency Department (ED). “If you’re having chest pain or shortness of breath, or signs of stroke, don’t wait. Call 911 and get to an Emergency Department as soon as possible.”

FAST TRACK FOR HEART ATTACKS All TriHealth hospital EDs have protocols in place that fast-track cardiac patients. “Our goal is to obtain an electrocardiogram (EKG) within 10 minutes of a patient’s arrival,” says Dr. Patton. “The attending physician reviews the EKG and if a heart attack is confirmed, our STEMI team is alerted.” STEMI stands for ST-elevation myocardial infarction, a type of heart attack caused by a complete blockage in a coronary artery. Life-threatening, STEMI requires a quick response.

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The STEMI alert at TriHealth mobilizes a team in the Cardiac Catheterization Lab to perform a balloon angioplasty, a non-surgical procedure that opens blocked coronary arteries. STEMI teams at Bethesda North Hospital and TriHealth’s Good Samaritan Hospital include an interventional cardiologist and an emergency medicine physician, nurses from cardiac catheterization and the ED, and staff from radiology, pharmacy and the laboratory. Both Bethesda North and Good Samaritan hospitals have “door-to-balloon time” for heart attack patients averaging 50 to 60 minutes—significantly better than the national benchmark of 90 minutes. Door-to-balloon time is measured from when a heart attack patient enters the ED to the time the blocked artery is opened. Heart attack patients stabilized at other TriHealth hospitals are transferred by ambulance or air transport to Bethesda North Hospital or Good Samaritan Hospital for catheterization.

PARTNERING WITH EMS By partnering with Emergency Medical Services (EMS) in four

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Greater Cincinnati counties, TriHealth assures rapid treatment for heart attack patients throughout the region. Paramedics communicate with emergency department staff at Good Samaritan Hospital and Bethesda North Hospital via a modem that transmits EKG data directly from the ambulance to hospital personnel who activate the STEMI alert. “The team is often ready and waiting for the patient in the Cath Lab before the ambulance even arrives,” says Dr. Patton. Most TriHealth cardiac patients (about 99 percent) receive nonsurgical emergency treatments such as angioplasty or pacemaker placement, another common ED procedure. When cardiac surgery is required, TriHealth transfers patients safely and quickly to the TriHealth Heart Institute at Bethesda North Hospital, where they’re met by a cardiothoracic surgeon.

DO YOU KNOW THE SYMPTOMS? Though stroke and heart attack share a few symptoms, like dizziness and vomiting, most are different. Speed to treatment is critical for both of these medical emergencies, so it’s important to recognize them quickly. You could save a life.

STROKE vs HEART ATTACK

ADVANCED STROKE CARE Like heart attack, every minute counts with stroke, a medical emergency caused when blood flow to the brain is stopped by a blood clot (ischemic stroke) or by a ruptured blood vessel (hemorrhagic stroke). “The quicker patients get to us, the quicker we can begin treatment, minimize damage to brain cells and improve outcomes,” says Dr. Patton. All TriHealth EDs have trained stroke teams ready to evaluate patients and initiate care. Bethesda Arrow Springs, Bethesda Butler Hospital and Good Samaritan Western Ridge are accredited as Acute Stroke Ready EDs. Patients needing highly specialized treatment are stabilized at the closest ED and transferred to Good Samaritan Hospital or Bethesda North Hospital, both designated as Advanced Primary Stroke Centers. Most ischemic strokes are treated with clot-dissolving medication. TriHealth meets national standards in “door-to-needle time,” which is measured from the time a patient enters the ED to the time clotdissolving medication (called tissue plasminogen activator) is given. A 2017 TriHealth initiative using a multidisciplinary approach for early recognition and treatment of stroke in the ED reduced door-toneedle times to an average of less than 60 minutes.

PIONEERING NEW TREATMENTS Patients who have a blockage in one of the large arteries leading to the brain often don’t benefit from clot-dissolving medication. Neurosurgeon Andrew Ringer, MD, Chief of TriHealth’s Neuroscience Institute, has pioneered a breakthrough option for these emergency stroke patients. Utilizing the Magellan Robotic Catheter System, Dr. Ringer and his team perform a procedure called mechanical thrombectomy, a minimally invasive surgery in which a catheter is threaded through an artery to the clot. A tiny net-like device is inserted into the catheter and guided to the blockage, where it’s used to break up the clot and restore blood flow. “This is one of the most advanced and latest and greatest techniques in stroke care,” says Dr. Patton. “It significantly decreases the time needed to remove large blood clots and restore blood flow to the brain.” At every TriHealth emergency department, care is delivered by a dedicated team with decades of experience diagnosing and treating cardiovascular diseases and conditions. “Our nurses are certified in advanced cardiac life support and have specialty training in trauma and geriatrics,” says Dr. Patton. “Emergency medicine physicians are board-trained and our cardiologists are regional leaders in electrophysiology.” Kenneth Patton, DO

IF YOU EXPERIENCE ANY OF THESE SYMPTOMS CALL 911.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT EMERGENCY CARE AT TRIHEALTH, VISIT WWW.TRIHEALTH.COM/EMERGENCY.

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{ GATHERINGS }

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THE GOOD SAMARITANS’

35th Annual Gala 42

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2 CANCER TOUCHES all of us in some way, and we often wish there were something more we could do. On February 9, 2019, more than 670 generous individuals gathered at the Hyatt Regency Cincinnati to do just that and take a big step forward in the fight against cancer.

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The Good Samaritans’ 35th Annual Gala, “Good Luck, Good Health, Good Cheer—Let’s Celebrate Chinese New Year!” raised more than $607,000 to support the creation of the TriHealth Cancer Institute Personalized Medicine Program at Good Samaritan Hospital, along with annual support of the Good Samaritan Free Health Center and Medical Education Research Fund. The Personalized Medicine Program is cutting edge cancer care that considers each individual’s genes, environment and lifestyle to identify precision treatments that improve outcomes. Proceeds will also impact more than 2,500 uninsured individuals in our community as well as help to educate the physicians of tomorrow. Guests enjoyed cocktails and dinner, and were then treated to dancing with The Number One Party Band from Nashville. Supporters also celebrated their impact on the community with Chinese calligraphers, a wine-bottle ring toss, green screen photography, a bao bun station and more. We are grateful to all our guests, especially our sponsors and underwriters who made the evening possible: • Presenting Sponsor: Navigant • Underwriter, Musical Entertainment: Good Samaritan Hospital Medical and Dental Staff • Underwriter, Cocktail Hour and After-Dinner Cocktails: PFS Group •C  orporate Sponsors: Bricker & Eckler, Attorneys at Law; Cincinnati Bell Technology Solutions; Fifth Third Bank; Oswald Company, Inc.; Phillips Supply Company; Seven Hills Anesthesia, LLC; and TriHealth, Inc. We are extremely grateful for the The Good Samaritans, a dedicated volunteer organization of Good Samaritan Foundation whose annual Gala has made a $9.3 million impact on our community in its 35-year history. Thank you also to Joyce Lehmann, Gala Chair; Melody Weil, Gala Co-Chair; and James Maher, MD, PhD, Physician Champion. It is quite fitting that in the Chinese calendar, 2019 is the Year of the Pig. In Cincinnati, it will also be the year of advancing cancer care in our community!

6 1. Guests enjoying after-dinner cocktails and activities. 2. TriHealth Resident Physicians. 3. G  ail Donovan, TriHealth President of Health Services and Chief Operating Officer; Joyce Lehmann, Gala Chair; Melody Weil, Gala Co-Chair; James Maher, MD, PhD, Physician Executive, TriHealth Cancer Institute, System Chief, Oncology Service Line and 2019 Gala Physician Champion. 4. S eated: Tessie Hayden; Jay Hayden; Jeff Martin; Lisa Martin. Standing: Rick Rafferty; Mary Rafferty, President and CEO, Good Samaritan Foundation; Marla Silliman, TriHealth Senior Vice President, Good Samaritan Region; Bill Silliman. 5. E  rik Dunki-Jacobs, MD, TriHealth Cancer Institute and Good Samaritan Foundation Board Member; Kari Dunki-Jacobs. 6. Supporters having fun at the wine-bottle ring toss.

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{ WHERE TO EAT }

AMERICAN

ARNOLD’S BAR AND GRILL The city’s oldest bar, featuring traditional American comfort food and a wide beer selection. 210 E. 8th St., 513.421.6234 BJ’S RESTAURANT AND BREWHOUSE Handcrafted burgers and deep-dish pizzas with beers brewed on-site. 11700 Princeton Pike, Unit J1A, 513.671.1805 CHARLEY’S STEAKERY Serving quality Philly steaks for more than 25 years. Liberty Center, 7100 Foundry Row, Liberty Township, 513.755.1626 THE CHEESECAKE FACTORY Inventive American cuisine with an extensive dessert menu focusing on cheesecake. Liberty Center, 7612 Blake St., Liberty Township, 513.755.2761 THE EAGLE FOOD AND BEER HALL Southern comfort food and beer hall. 1342 Vine St., 513.802.5007 FLIP SIDE BURGER & BAR Burger, shake and craft beer concept featuring Ohio grass-fed beef and free-range chicken. Liberty Center, 7622 Blake St., Liberty Township, 513.777.6328 THE GOLDEN LAMB Comfort food that may just be worth the half-hour trek to Lebanon. 27 S. Broadway, 513.932.5065 HOLY GRAIL TAVERN & GRILLE Lively sports bar with casual fare and drink menu. 161 Joe Nuxhall Way, 513.621.2222 INCLINE PUBLIC HOUSE Upscale pub food including NYC-style pizzas served against a stunning view of the city. 2601 W. 8th St., 513.251.3000

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J. AUSTIN’S RIVERBANK CAFE Southern-style specialties like grilled catfish and shrimp po-boys. 102 Main St., Hamilton, 513.795.7640

THE PRESIDENTS ROOM Eclectic menu that blends contemporary American, Italian and German flavors. 812 Race St., 513.721.2260

KRUEGER’S TAVERN Contemporary American bar food with a European influence. 1211 Vine St., 513.834.8670

RED ROOST TAVERN Contemporary American fare with organic, farmto-table ingredients. 151 W. 5th St., 513.579.1234

MELT ECLECTIC CAFE Vegetarian restaurant specializing in sandwiches and meat substitutes. 4165 Hamilton Ave., 513.681.6358 METROPOLE Contemporary dishes cooked in a wood-burning fireplace. 609 Walnut St., 513.578.6660 MITCHELL’S FISH MARKET Specializing in off-the-boat-fresh fish. 9456 Water Front Dr., West Chester, 513.779.5292 NORTHSTAR CAFE Hearty, healthy American fare with a renowned brunch service. Liberty Center, 7610 Sloan Way, Liberty Township, 513.759.0033 ORCHIDS AT PALM COURT Contemporary American food at Hilton’s well-established fine-dining restaurant. 35 W. Fifth St., 513.421.9100 THE ORIGINAL MONTGOMERY INN Cincy staple well-known for its BBQ ribs. 9440 Montgomery Rd., Montgomery, 513.791.3482 PALACE RESTAURANT Inventive finedining establishment located inside the historic Cincinnatian Hotel. 601 Vine St., 513.381.3000 PAXTON’S GRILL Relaxed, friendly spot housed in one of Loveland’s oldest buildings. 126 W. Loveland Ave., Loveland, 513.583.1717 PIES & PINTS Authentic craft pizza and beer establishment featuring bar food. Liberty Center, 7621 Gibson St., Liberty Township, 513.755.7437

RICK’S TAVERN & GRILLE Friendly neighborhood drinkery serving up pub grub amid 50 flat-screen TVs. 5955 Boymel Dr., Fairfield, 513.874.1992 THE RUSTY BUCKET Relaxed, family-friendly neighborhood tavern. Liberty Center, 7524 Bales St., Liberty Township, 513.463.2600 SALAZAR Casual contemporary American fare with farm-inspired lunch and dinner menus. 1401 Republic St., 513.621.7000 SENATE RESTAURANT Casual contemporary American eatery specializing in upscale hot dogs. 1212 Vine St., 513.421.2020 SKYLINE CHILI It’s a Cincy staple, famous for its chili served as Cheese Coneys and 3-Ways. Multiple locations, including 10792 Montgomery Rd., 513.489.4404 SLATTS Relaxed neighborhood pub with plenty of plasma TVs for watching the game. 4858 Cooper Rd., Blue Ash, 513.791.2223 STONE CREEK DINING COMPANY A varied menu of sandwiches, salads, seafood and steaks. Multiple locations, including 9386 Montgomery Rd., Montgomery, 513.489.1444 and 6200 Muhlhauser Rd., West Chester, 513.942.2100

TANO BISTRO & CATERING Contemporary bistro in historic Loveland, featuring fresh ingredients and a menu that changes with the seasons. 204 W. Loveland Ave., 513.683.8266 TERRY’S TURF CLUB Laid-back burger joint with large portions and vegetarian options. 4618 Eastern Ave., 513.533.4222 TOM + CHEE Specializes in tomato soup and grilled cheese. Multiple locations, including 9328 Union Centre Blvd., West Chester, 513.860.0638 THE WILDFLOWER CAFE Farmto-table fare served in a converted century-old farmhouse. 207 E. Main St., Mason, 513.492.7514

BBQ

MIDWEST BEST BBQ & CREAMERY BBQ joint and ice cream parlor launched by the popular local BBQ sauce and rub company. 7832 Glendale-Milford Rd., Camp Dennison, 513.965.9000 MONTGOMERY INN BOATHOUSE Ribs, burgers and other BBQ specialties. 925 Riverside Dr., 513.721.7427 SMOQ Southern BBQ soul food cooked low and slow, including ribs, brisket and pulled pork. 275 Pictoria Dr., Springdale, 513.671.7667

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FRENCH

JEAN-ROBERT’S TABLE Exquisite French cuisine with a weekly changing lunch menu. 713 Vine St., 513.621.4777 TASTE OF BELGIUM Waffles and crepes (both sweet and savory) at this local favorite. Multiple locations, including 1133 Vine St., 513.381.4607

GREEK/ MEDITERRANEAN

ABIGAIL STREET Inventive cuisine with cheese menu and wine on tap in a trendy but casual setting. 1214 Vine St., 513.421.4040 DURUM GRILL Small, casual gyro eatery loved by the locals. 4764 Cornell Rd., 513.489.4777 PALOMINO Offering a mix of Mediterranean and contemporary American cuisine with a view of Fountain Square. 505 Vine St., 513.381.1300 PHOENICIAN TAVERNA Mediterranean cuisine in a trendy but casual setting. 7944 S. Mason Montgomery Rd., Mason, 513.770.0027 RAYA’S LEBANESE Mediterranean food, specializing in kabobs and gyros. 801 Elm St., 513.421.0049 ZULA Eclectic menu of Greek tapas dishes and extensive wine and craft beer lists. 1400 Race St., 513.744.9852

ITALIAN

BOCA French and Italian dishes, NYC-style pizzas and a gluten-free menu. 114 E. 6th St., 513.542.2022 BRIO TUSCAN GRILLE Serving high-quality steaks, housemade pasta and flatbreads prepared in an authentic Italian oven. Liberty Center, 7600 Gibson St., Liberty Township, 513.759.4500 BRAVO CUCINA ITALIANA Upscalecasual chain serving Italian classics with a twist amid Roman-ruin decor. Multiple locations, including 5045 Deerfield Blvd., Mason, 513.234.7900, and 9436 Waterfront Dr., West Chester, 513.759.9398 NICOLA’S RISTORANTE Italian cuisine featuring fresh pastas and an extensive wine list. 1420 Sycamore St., 513.721.6200 PITRELLI’S A true mom-and-pop dining experience with cuisine from several regions of Italy. 404 2nd Ave., Mason, 513.770.0122 PRIMAVISTA Traditional Italian entrees with wine menu and a view of the city. 810 Matson Pl., 513.251.6467 SOTTO Trendy Italian restaurant serving small plates and handmade pastas. 118 E. 6th St., 513.977.6886 VIA VITE Casual dining of stone-fired pizza and fresh pastas with alfresco courtyard seating. 520 Vine St., 513.721.8483

PIZZA

DELICIO COAL-FIRED PIZZA An artisan pizzeria that fuses rustic Italian traditions with the smoky flavors of the U.S. Southwest. 9321 Montgomery Rd., Montgomery, 513.834.5460; Xavier, 3701 Montgomery Rd., 513.834.5460 DEWEY’S PIZZA Specialty pizza pies with seasonal menu. Multiple locations, including 7663 Cox Ln., West Chester, 513.759.6777 GOODFELLAS PIZZERIA Pizzeria with large slices and late-night hours. 1211 Main St., 513.381.3625 LAROSA’S PIZZERIA Casual pizza joint serving the area for more than 60 years. Multiple locations RICHARDS PIZZA Local chain serving up pies since 1955. Multiple locations, including the original at 417 Main St., Hamilton, 513.894.3296 SBARRO Casual eatery serving up New York-style pizza and pastas. Liberty Center, 7100 Foundry Row, Liberty Township, 512.443.8300

STEAK HOUSE

BISTRO ON ELM Located within the Millennium Hotel Cincinnati, this bright spot offers steaks, seafood and pasta. 150 W. 5th St., 513.352.2189 CARLO & JOHNNY Another winner from Jeff Ruby serving prime steaks, seafood options and bountiful sides in an elegant space that was once a stagecoach stop. 9769 Montgomery Rd., 513.936.8600 CELESTIAL STEAKHOUSE Upscale steak house and seafood restaurant with an impressive view. 1071 Celestial St., 513.241.4455 JAG’S STEAK & SEAFOOD Surf and turf is served in the dining room or the high-energy piano bar. 5980 West Chester Rd., West Chester Township, 513.860.5353

THE PRECINCT The original Jeff Ruby’s location features fine steaks and seafood in a turn-of-the-century setting. 311 Delta Ave., 513.321.5454 PRIME 47 Upscale menu featuring prime cuts and a wine vault. 580 Walnut St., 513.579.0720 RODIZIO GRILL Brazilian steakhouse serving succulent meats and authentic sides. Liberty Center, 7630 Gibson St., Liberty Township, 513.777.4777 TONY’S OF CINCINNATI Huge portions of prime beef and the freshest seafood (salad and potato included) are the hallmarks of this steak house from Tony Ricci. 12110 Montgomery Rd., 513.677.1993

SUSHI/ASIAN FARE

MEXICAN

BAKERSFIELD Authentic Mexican street food with extensive tequila and whiskey menus. 1213 Vine St., 513.579.0446 CHUY’S Eclectic Tex-Mex eatery featuring handmade tortillas. 7980 Hosbrook Rd., 513.793.2489

ASIAN PARADISE Asian fusion restaurant and lounge offering popular happy-hour specials. 9521 Fields Ertel Rd., Loveland, 513.239.8881

EL PUEBLO Authentic Mexican fare made from secret family recipes. 4270 Hunt Rd., Blue Ash, 513.791.4405

BIBIBOP Healthy Korean meals that include quality proteins, vegetables, gluten-free grains and Asian sauces. Liberty Center, 7616 Blake St., Liberty Township, 513.310.6615

JEFFERSON SOCIAL Upscale Mexican fare with extensive cocktail weekend. 101 E. Freedom Way, 513.381.2623

FUSIAN Sushi bar with create-yourown rolls, fresh juices and healthy side dishes. 600 Vine St., 513.421.7646 KAZE Trendy sushi and Japanese gastropub featuring a beer garden. 1400 Vine St., 513.898.7991 KONA GRILL Innovative exotic entrees, award-winning sushi and fresh fish. 7524 Gibson St., Liberty Center Mall, Liberty Township, 513.322.5860 MANGO TREE THAI & SUSHI Casual eatery serving fresh, authentic Thai cuisine and sushi. 7229 Wooster Pike, 513.271.0809 QUÁN HAPA Asian fusion and gastropub with trendy setting. 1331 Vine St., 513.421.7826

MAZUNTE TAQUERIA MEXICANA Casual Mexican eatery with trendy, festive decor. 5207 Madison Rd., 513.785.0000 NADA Trendy Mexican cantina serving creative cocktails and modern twists on traditional south-of-the-border favorites. 600 Walnut St., 513.721.6232 QDOBA Casual Mexican grill featuring fresh, handcrafted meals. 2721 Edmonson Rd., 513.351.2269; Liberty Center, 7100 Foundry Row, Liberty Township, 513.755.0486; Mason, 5030 Deerfield Blvd., 513.770.0301; Blue Ash, 9749 Kenwood Rd., 513.984.2629; Florence, 7683 Mall Rd., Florence, KY, 859.647.0296

JEFF RUBY’S STEAKHOUSE Reservations highly recommended at this high-end steak house. 700 Walnut St., Ste. 206, 513.784.1200 MCCORMICK & SCHMICK’S Steak house and seafood with extensive bar menu and tapas options. 21 E. 5th St., 513.721.9339 MOERLEIN LAGER HOUSE Fine-dining establishment and artifact-adorned beer bar with a wonderful view of the river. 115 Joe Nuxhall Way, 513.421.2337 MORTON’S THE STEAKHOUSE Popular steak house and seafood restaurant overlooking Fountain Square. 441 Vine St., 513.621.3111 PARKERS BLUE ASH TAVERN Elegantly rustic restaurant known for its prime rib and award-winning wine list. 4200 Cooper Rd., Blue Ash, 513.891.8300

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{ BE THERE }

BOLD MOVES: April 25–28

As part of the Broadway Across America initiative that brings some of the greatest plays in theater history all around the country, the Procter & Gamble Hall at the Aronoff Center for the Arts will present MISS SAIGON, the epic story of love between a Vietnamese woman and an American soldier. Expect top-tier performances and a score that overflows with unforgettable songs. Learn more at https://cincinnati.broadway.com/shows/ miss-saigon-baa

APRIL 13

SLEEPING BEAUTY April 27–May 6

The Cincinnati Arts Association’s DANCING FOR THE STARS contest benefits the Overture Awards, the nation’s largest locally run high school arts scholarship competition, as well as arts education programs. TriHealth is pleased to be a Presenting Sponsor for the fundraiser, which offers a wine tasting, online silent auction, food and open dancing before and after the main event. Speaking of which, the dance-off will pair professional dancers with local stars— pillars of the Cincinnati community—in an edge-of-your-seat cha-cha competition. Audience members are the judges, so if you want to weigh in on the proceedings at the Music Hall Ballroom, get more details at http://bit.ly/CincyDancingStars

APRIL 24 Artist, author and businessman ERIK WAHL will be the guest speaker when 46

the Bethesda Foundation holds its annual BETHESDA LYCEUM event at Jack Cincinnati Casino. Fueled by Wahl’s own artistic experiences, his books are renowned for their unique approach to exploring the meeting place between art and action. The event benefits the TriHealth Heart Institute’s new Thomas Comprehensive Care Center. Find more information at www.bethesdafoundation.com/events/ bethesda-LYCEUM

APRIL 25–28 The Cincinnati Ballet presents a remarkable triple feature in BOLD MOVES, a program that contains three very different pieces whose underlying themes reveal a striking kind of common emotional thread. The pieces, Sechs Tanze, Dancing to Oz and Near Light, are by Czech, American and Chinese choreographers, respectively. But the movements and motivations all seem to share a common language of the heart. Get the complete lowdown at www.cballet.org/bold-moves

APRIL 27 The Ovarian Cancer Alliance of Greater Cincinnati’s annual JEANS & JEWELS GALA will be happening at Receptions this year. As always, it offers a chance to have fun while generating some funds to help combat ovarian cancer. It’s not very often that the words “jeans” and “gala” have cause to come

GETTYIMAGES.COM / ILLUSTRATION BY NATE XOPHER

APRIL 9–21

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together, but true to its name, this unusual event encourages its participants to make both jeans and jewels a part of their attire. And don’t forget to toss in a little teal, which is the official color of ovarian cancer awareness. For more, see cincyovariancancer.org

APRIL 27–May 6 The Children’s Theatre of Cincinnati puts a new twist on an old tale with its production of SLEEPING BEAUTY. Forget what you’ve seen before, this version is a rock musical comedy, focusing on the strong-willed Princess Rory, who forges her own path and refuses to attend Princess School. But don’t worry, there’s still a wicked godmother in the story and a sleeping curse that can only be cured by true love. For more details, see http://bit.ly/ CincySleepingBeauty

APRIL 28

GETTYIMAGES.COM / ILLUSTRATION BY NATE XOPHER

Anyone with a love of fine food will want to be on hand when the Cincinnati State Culinary Institute offers up 1 NIGHT, 12 KITCHENS. It’s the kind of very special event that can only happen when you put together winning ingredients like this: some of the most gifted chefs in the area; food from dozens of the

finest restaurants around; a chance to see the kitchens of the Culinary Institute up close; a supply of excellent wine and craft beer; and some sizzling live music. Sound like a recipe for fun? Full details at http://bit.ly/ 1night12kitchens

APRIL 30–MAY 12 The Broadway Across America series brings the sixtime Tony Award winner DEAR EVAN HANSEN to Cincinnati to delight theater lovers. The musical, with songs by Benj Pasek and Justin Paul and book by Steven Levenson, tells the tale of a lonely teenager who gets himself into a situation way over his head. When it’s all said and done, you won’t be able to forget the songs or the story of Evan Hansen. To get more information, visit http://bit.ly/ CincyEvanHansen

MAY 8 The Duke Energy Convention Center will host the YWCA CAREER WOMEN OF ACHIEVEMENT LUNCHEON, featuring keynote speaker Erin Gruwell. A teacher, writer and the force behind the Freedom Writers Foundation, Gruwell was portrayed by Hilary Swank when her story was told in the film Freedom Writers. One of the YWCA’s biggest fundraisers, the luncheon will honor those named as Career Women of Achievement for 2019. To learn more about the

1 NIGHT, 12 KITCHENS: April 28

JUNE 22 Join in with the countless revelers who’ll be turning out for this year’s CINCINNATI PRIDE FESTIVAL, a jubilant, all-out celebration of the city’s LGBTQ community. It’s a one-of-a-kind event that blurs the line between party and parade, with music, drink, performers, a Family Fun Zone and more. It all adds up to an almost deliriously joyful experience that brings the whole community closer together and adds plenty of new friends to the fold. Find out more by visiting www.cincinnatipride.org

event, visit http://bit.ly/ CincyWomenOfAchievement

MAY 11 The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation 2019 CINCINNATIANS OF THE YEAR GALA will be held at the Duke Energy Convention Center. There’ll be music by Beach Boys tribute band Sail On, a cocktail hour followed by a scrumptious three-course dinner and, of course, some exciting auctions. If you’ve still got more energy after all of that, stick around for the after-party, which runs from 10 p.m. until 1 a.m. Get the rest of the story at http://bit.ly/ CincyJDRFGala

JUNE 11–16 Everybody knows that CATS is one of the most beloved shows in the history of musical theater, with seven Tony Awards to its credit and timeless tunes like “Memory” that have become a part of our collective consciousness. But you might not know that the show will be making its way to Procter & Gamble Hall at the Aronoff Center for the Arts, in a revamped production that brings more energy to the show than ever before. You don’t have to go to New York City to get that Broadway feel. Learn more at www.cincinnatiarts.org/ events/detail/cats

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{ POWER FOOD }

A GREEN GODDESS

MOVE OVER, KALE. WITH ITS DISTINCT FLAVOR AND NUTRITIONAL GIFTS, BROCCOLI RABE IS THE KITCHEN’S NEXT RISING STAR. First thing’s first: Broccoli rabe is not a type of broccoli. Also called rapini, this leafy green is—like broccoli—a cruciferous vegetable, but it’s more closely related to turnips. In fact, in some parts of Italy, broccoli rabe is called cime della rapa, or “tops of the turnip.” Its large leafy stems do somewhat resemble the heads of turnips and other leafy greens, but its buds have clusters of broccoli-like florets. (Note: Broccoli rabe should not be confused with broccolini, which resembles long broccoli stalks.) Known for its bitter yet nutty taste, rapini is a staple in many southern Italian dishes—and is a main ingredient in the country’s “most popular sandwich.” (Soppressata and rapini, anyone?) And it has an array of health benefits to boot.

POWER UP One cup of raw broccoli rabe has only about nine calories and .2 grams of fat (this, of course, doesn’t take into account the olive oil or heavy Italian sauces that the vegetable is often cooked in). But the pièce de résistance is the nutrients it contains: notably, almost 90 milligrams of vitamin K (or more than 100 percent of the daily recommended value), which promotes blood and bone health. It also has generous amounts of immune-boosting vitamins A (21 percent) and C (13 percent), iron (5 percent) and lutein, which is beneficial for eyesight. It also works to cleanse the body: 33.2 micrograms (8 percent) of folate help

with liver function, and 1 gram of fiber promotes digestion. Finally, the vegetable contains a small amount (45.2 mg) of omega-3 fatty acids, useful for brain function.

BUY/STORE/SERVE Though broccoli rabe is in season through the end of June, it can be found in the produce section of most supermarkets all year long. Look near the other bitter greens, like kale and mustard greens, and select a bundle that is crisp, sturdy and a vibrant green color, without any browning or yellowing. It can be stored in a refrigerator wrapped in plastic for about five days. The major hurdle in cooking this vegetable is overcoming its acrid flavor. Chefs offer several solutions: Blanching it in boiling water followed by an ice bath brings out its sweetness, and a splash of lemon or apple cider vinegar also works well to counterbalance the bitterness. Chef Steve Dunn wrote in Cooks Illustrated that after experimenting, he found that keeping the leafy tops intact while cutting the stems into bite-size pieces before blanching or roasting also did the trick. Broccoli rabe is a common ingredient in a diverse range of cuisines, from Chinese to Italian. It can be used in place of spinach in recipes, or as a side dish, topped with olive oil and garlic. It pairs well with pasta or Italian sausage, and can be used in sauces, on pizza, and even in lasagna.

DID YOU KNOW? BROCCOLI RABE IS USUALLY HARVESTED BEFORE THE FLOWERING SEASON TO PREVENT UNWANTED CHANGES IN THE TASTE OF LEAVES, WHICH START TO ACCUMULATE BITTER COMPOUNDS DURING THE FLOWERING SEASON.

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Profile for Wainscot Media

Cincinnati Health & Life: Spring 2019  

The Good Living Magazine from TRIHEALTH

Cincinnati Health & Life: Spring 2019  

The Good Living Magazine from TRIHEALTH