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VOLUME 19 ISSUE 8 | $3.95 | BERGENMAG.COM

VOLUME 19 ISSUE 8 | AUGUST 2019

HEALTH & LIFE | FOOD & FASHION | HOME & HAPPENINGS

THE BACK-TO-SCHOOL ISSUE

OUR 3RD ANNUAL HIGH SCHOOL FORUM

WHAT STUDENTS REALLY THINK

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FOOTBALL FEVER at Paramus Catholic

GRIDIRON GLORY: 6 COACHES ON WINNING

UPDATE YOUR SCHOOL WARDROBE DECKED OUT DORM ROOMS

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Save Your Spot_Bergen_Gate Cover 8_25 x 10_875.qxp_Layout 1 6/28/19 10:12 AM Page 1

CHOOSE A TIME

AND SKIP THE LINE! INTRODUCING

OPEN TO LEARN MORE

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Save Your Spot_Bergen_Gate Spread 17 x 10_875.qxp_February 2019 6/28/19 10:10 AM Page 1

CHOOSE A TIME

AND SKIP THE LINE!

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INTRODUCING

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Clean Eating

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Prepared Dinners Store-made Soups & Salads Store-made Provisions

Fresh Seafood ◦ Prime Meat ◦ Produce Fresh Baked Goods ◦ Delicatessen ◦ Sushi Gourmet to Go ◦ Imported Cheese

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Features Health Screenings: A Guide for Men | 34

Help keep the men in your life healthy by sharing this handy list with them.

All in the Family | 38

A new Franklin Lakes house draws upon the owner’s updated childhood home— and a savvy designer’s touch.

Emotional Rescue | 46

A County Where Education Counts | 54

The numbers show it: From pre-K to postgraduate, Bergen continues to be a leader.

Print It | 58

Whether you’re heading back to school or just need a seasonal wardrobe refresh, pretty prints add a pop to your everyday ensembles.

The Life of the Coach | 56

A dozen Bergen County high schoolers candidly discuss their lives, worries and dreams.

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IN EVERY ISSUE

Leading a Bergen County high school football team is a double duty: winning on the field and shaping wellrounded student-athletes.

6 Editor’s Note 32 Health News 86 Be There 100 Where to Eat

When a family gives a home to a shelter dog, the question sometimes becomes: Just who saved whom?

ON THE COVER: Members of the Paramus Catholic football team huddle around coach Chris Maldonado. Photo by Chris Marksbury

BERGENMAG.COM

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WHAT’S UP WITH TEENS?

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Photo by Chris Marksbury

CONTENTS

{ AUGUST 2019 }

AUGUST 2019

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New, All-Inclusive Veterinary Hospital FROM COMMON PETS TO EXOTICS—WE CARE FOR THEM ALL

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CONTENTS

Departments Bergen Buzz | 15 Our guide to new ideas, tips, trends and things we love in the county.

For Men Only | 22

Add a little whimsy to your wardrobe with playful prints from your favorite designers.

Style Watch | 24

No longer worn just for sports or exercise, on-trend fashion sneakers easily elevate your everyday style.

Jewelry Box | 26

Yellow gold hoops are always a fashion essential, even more so when amped up with unique details.

Home Front | 28

Make your college kid’s home-awayfrom-home as cozy as possible with delightful dorm décor.

Talk of the Town | 30

With views of Manhattan and Mother Nature as well as a plethora of charming small businesses, Englewood truly has something for everyone.

Escapes | 64

Which of these educational destinations fits your family’s passion?

Tastes | 72

Chill out and enjoy the last few weeks of summer with any—or all—of these perfectly refreshing frozen treats.

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Power Food | 78

Bursting with potential health benefits, flax may be just the seed you need.

Spirits | 80

Savor the island flavor of this sweet pineapple mocktail.

Gatherings | 84

Whether it’s at a charity gala or networking event, Bergenites always show up to support their friends and neighbors.

Restaurant Review | 98

Updated Hackensack eatery Lido Restaurant will feed your Italian cravings.

A Bergen Moment | 104

Two River Edge tweens hang out lakeside in their pajamas as summer winds down.

BERGENMAG.COM

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Ginger STORES

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{ EDITOR’S NOTE }

Back in Session A couple days away from the office is supposed to be refreshing, but returning Monday morning to hundreds of new emails, non-stop conference calls and multiple deadlines quickly undid the good mood created by a recent fun-filled weekend. Truth be told, my mind had turned to mush by mid-week—not exactly the feeling I wanted when leading the conversation during BERGEN’s annual high school student forum. But something instantly happened when those 12 rising juniors and seniors walked into our office and started talking. The energy, passion and positivity that each of them brought to the table immediately rubbed off on our staff. We were impressed and excited—but not surprised—by their candidness and willingness to share (getting good grades, using social media, worrying about college, etc.). Year after year, I’m amazed how a group of inspired and dedicated kids can lift and recharge everyone in the room. Read what these students had to say in “What’s Up With Teens?” on page 48. Coverage in our Back-to-School issue runs the gamut—you’ll find everything from football to fashion in this edition. A half-dozen local high school football coaches do some sharing of their own in “The Life of the Coach” on page 56. Find out what drives these guys to build winning programs and top student-athletes. Whether you’re headed back to the classroom this fall or just need a seasonal wardrobe reboot, be sure to turn to “Print It” on page 58. Here, you’ll find six cool looks that are available in your backyard—they’re all from some of the county’s best women’s clothing boutiques. But if traveling is more your cup of tea, consider one of the cities in “Field Trips” on page 64. These educational destinations can teach you plenty without taking attendance. In addition to these great stories, this issue includes tidbits from five Bergenites whose lives were “pawsitively” changed after they adopted a shelter dog (page 46), a couple who built a Franklin Lakes home to raise their growing family (page 38) and three frozen treats that you can snack on while summer is still around (page 72). We hope you enjoy these and all of the stories in this issue. We hope summer’s dog days don’t get you down and are instead filled with energy and positivity.

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Apparel  Accessories  Shoes  Gifts  Home

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@GingerNCream, @GingerNCreamKids

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FDU Salutes

Alumni Making a Difference in Education

Editor in Chief RITA GUARNA Creative Director STEPHEN M. VITARBO Senior Editor DARIA MEOLI Senior Associate Editor DARIUS AMOS Lifestyle Editor HALEY LONGMAN Contributing Editors GIANNA BARONE, LIZ DONOVAN, DONNA ROLANDO Editorial Intern CARLY CANNAVINA

Michael Avaltroni BS, Fairleigh Dickinson University 1999 MA & PhD, Princeton 2003 Dean, FDU School of Pharmacy & Health Sciences

ART

Art Director VICTORIA BEALL Contributing Photographers MARCO RICCA, CHRIS MARKSBURY, DANIEL SPRINGSTON PRODUCTION

Director of Production and Circulation CHRISTINE HAMEL Graphic Designer, Advertising Services VIOLETA MULAJ

Research scientist, holder of 10 U.S. patents, biotech entrepreneur, and college educator and administrator

“FDU’s faculty launched my early interest in research. Ultimately, I returned to my alma mater to help continue their legacy of impacting student lives.”

Production Art Associate CHRIS FERRANTE

BE SOCIAL Join our online community! LIKE us on Facebook: BergenMag FOLLOW us on Twitter: @BergenMag SEE our photos on Instagram: @BergenMagNJ VIEW our boards on Pinterest: HealthandLife SEND YOUR FEEDBACK AND IDEAS TO: Editor, BERGEN, One Maynard Dr., Park Ridge, NJ 07656; fax 201.746.8650; email editor@wainscotmedia.com. BERGEN assumes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited manuscripts or art materials. BERGEN is published 12 times a year by Wainscot Media, One Maynard Dr., Park Ridge, NJ 07656. This is Volume 19, Issue 8. © 2019 by Wainscot Media LLC. All rights reserved. Subscriptions in U.S. outside of Bergen County: $14 for one year. Single copies: $3.95. Material contained herein is intended for informational purposes only. If you have medical concerns, seek the guidance of a healthcare professional.

fdu.edu

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WHERE OUR TEAM BELIEVES IN

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Director of Marketing and Digital Media NIGEL EDELSHAIN Assistant Editor/Marketing Associate GIANA BRUCELLA Director of Advertising Services JACQUELYNN FISCHER Controller AGNES ALVES Senior Staff Accountant MEGAN FRANK Junior Accountant RANDY TASHJIAN

Learn how to protect what is important to you:

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Can I protect my "Stuff" from a long-term care facility? How? What is a trust? What's the difference between revocable and irrevocable? How can I avoid probate? Do I need to? Should I give my "Stuff" to the children? If I give my "Stuff" away, will it take 60 months for it to be safe?

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ADVERTISING INQUIRIES Please contact Thomas Flannery at 201.571.2252 or thomas.flannery@wainscotmedia.com. SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES To inquire about a subscription, to change an address or to purchase a back issue or a reprint of an article, please write to BERGEN, Circulation Department, 1 Maynard Dr., Park Ridge, NJ 07656; telephone 201.573.5541; email christine. hamel@wainscotmedia.com.

Phone: 201-890-2775 | Web: www.williselderlaw.com

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TOP RANKINGS are cause for celebration... THEIRS.

Ranked among the nation’s top children’s hospitals Joseph M. Sanzari Children’s Hospital at Hackensack University Medical Center and K. Hovnanian Children’s Hospital at Jersey Shore University Medical Center are the only children’s hospitals in New Jersey to rank among the top 50 in the nation for Cancer by U.S. News & World Report. Joseph M. Sanzari Children’s Hospital also ranks among the top 50 in the nation for Neurology and Neurosurgery, making it the only children’s hospital in New Jersey to be ranked in two specialties. Their health. Now that’s a reason to celebrate. To learn more, call 855-269-3664 or visit HackensackMeridianHealth.org/BestChildrens.

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WHAT YOU CAN FIND ON BERGENMAG.COM RIGHT NOW

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YRS YRS

Check out our showroom for the latest from:

NICE TO MEET YOU Various Bergen County business owners and BERGEN staff members mingled during a recent networking event at Park West Loft in Ridgewood. Turn to Gatherings on page 86 to see photos from the event. Then visit bergenmag.com/ bergennetwork for even more pics of the festivities.

and many more!

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PLANT PLANNING You don’t need a big yard to plant a rich vegetable garden. In Crops In Tight Spots, author Alex Mitchell details ways you can grow delicious fruits and veggies wherever you live. Find out how you can win a copy of the book at bergenmag.com/crops.

MANGIA, MANGIA! Who says you can’t have ziti or spaghetti while dieting? In Skinny Pasta, author Julia Azzarello offers 80 healthy recipes featuring your favorite pastas. The best part is each meal has less than 500 calories. Mangia! For a chance to win a copy of the book, head over to bergenmag.com/pasta.

APPLAUSE! Congratulations to Ilene Peligal of Little Ferry, who won a copy of Sweet Potato Soul, and to Alisa Jarski of Westwood, who won a copy of Farmacy Kitchen Cookbook, in our June readers’ giveaway contests. And hooray for Oakland’s Amy LaSpina—she won a barbecue seasoning sample pack by Weber in our third readers’ giveaway in June.

Follow us: BERGENMAG.C0M

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{ BERGEN BUZZ }

LEARNING’S STILL IN SEASON Kids getting rusty amid their summer fun? Head to your local library, where you’ll discover that books and learning are just as hot in August as they are in the other 11 months. These upcoming events prove the point: AUG 3: Your college-bound scholar can take a practice SAT test at the Mahwah Public Library from 10:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m.; students will receive their scores immediately upon completion. Pre-register at revolutionprep.com. AUG 6: One secret weapon for getting kids to read during the dog days: dogs! At Glen Rock Library’s “Paws for Reading” event, children can practice their reading and public speaking while befriending certified therapy dogs. The event is 3:30–4:40 p.m.; register at 201.670.3970. AUG 12: Take your crafty kiddo to Bergenfield Public Library at 50 W. Clinton Ave. to make a space-themed wreath to coincide with the official theme of 2019 summer reading. Register for one of two sessions, 2:30 and 6:30 p.m., at the children’s desk. AUG 15: Explore the library universe with Englewood Library’s “3…2…1…Blast Off into Books” event, featuring a 45-minute program full of magic, juggling, storytelling and a puppet show. The presentation begins at 6:15 p.m.—englewoodlibrary.org has more info. AUG 23: The “Mighty Minds” event at the Maurice M. Pine Free Public Library at 10-01 Fair Lawn Ave. in Fair Lawn promises to sharpen kids’ math skills and get them ready for the new school year. It’s 2:30–3:15 p.m. for grades 1–3; 3:30–4:30 p.m. for grades 4–6. Fair Lawn residents only; stop by the library to pre-register.

DID YOU KNOW? As of July, Hackensack’s Johnson Public Library has eliminated late fees and fines on most overdue materials, making it only the second in New Jersey to do so; Montclair Public Library made a similar move in May. BERGENMAG.COM

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{ BERGEN BUZZ }

RIVERSIDE REBOOT

iHE♥RT Bergen County You recognize the voice (and laugh!) but you may not recognize the face of Bergen County’s fi rst-ever ambassador—Danielle Monaro. The member of Elvis Duran and The Morning Show on Z100 has been a longtime resident of Bergen County, and executive Jim Tedesco has made her the official voice of Bergen County too. “I love so many things about Bergen County,” Monaro tells BERGEN, ”besides being the best place to shop! I love knowing that we are raising our kids in Bergen. The people, the places and the opportunities are amazing.” Listen via the free iHeartRadio app to hear the mom of two rave about our area, and go to z100.com/mybergencounty for more info on this exciting new partnership.

As part of The Shops at Riverside’s multi-million-dollar luxury makeover, renowned French chef Laurent Tourondel will open a new restaurant, LT Bar & Grill, next spring in the former Cheesecake Factory location (both The Cheesecake Factory and Barnes & Noble were moved to the other side of the Hackensack mall and redesigned during a previous phase of the renovation). The menu will feature cocktails, salads, burgers and steaks, as well as a sushi bar. Tourondel has won foodie awards, opened more than a dozen restaurants and published three cookbooks, so we have high hopes for this place. Meanwhile, a more immediate luxury addition to The Shops at Riverside is Boglioli, the Italian menswear store that opened its doors in July. The Milano-based brand of the same name is known for exceptional craftsmanship. Shop Boglioli’s full menswear collection at the new flagship store.

BUG OFF!

JUST PEACHY September is prime time for fruit and vegetable picking—a quick scroll through your Instagram feed once fall hits and you’ll see tons of folks posting pictures from their family’s apple and/or pumpkin picking excursions. But there’s another yummy fruit to be picked right here, right now—peaches. August is the official peak of peach-picking season here in Bergen County, and one popular farm is taking advantage of these ripe, juicy fruits being in bloom: Demarest Farms in Hillsdale. The best part is the peach picking (they have 12 varieties) is a full-on family activity running every Saturday and Sunday while supplies last—take a hay ride to the orchard, pick your peaches, stop by the petting zoo, pay for your goodies (it’s $5 for ages 2 and over, plus $10 per bag of fruits) and go home to enjoy the fruits of your labor. Don’t want to pick the peaches yourself but still want to take advantage of their peak freshness? Stop by the markets at Secor Farms in Mahwah or Abma’s in Wyckoff, where you can buy locally sourced peaches, baked confections like peach pie and/or yummy peach cider. • Demarest Farms, 244 Wierimus Rd., Hillsdale, 201.666.0472 • Secor Farms, 85 Airmont Ave., Mahwah, 201.529.2595 • Abma’s Farm Market, 700 Lawlins Rd., Wyckoff, 201.891.0278

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We’ve all been there: having to fend off summer’s bloodsuckers while hosting an outdoor soiree. Citronella candles have been the go-to repellent for many of us because they’re pleasant-smelling and easy to use, but they’re also generally ineffective. In fact, they’re not included on the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s list of mosquito repellents. We at BERGEN tried a new product, the Rescue DecoShield Lantern. It is said to work by using all-natural essential oils that confuse the bugs’ antennae, thereby repelling them. On a recent balmy night, one lantern kept everyone in a 300-sq.-ft. space comfortable and bite-free. (For larger spaces, you’ll need extra lanterns.) We used it for an all-day event and it worked, and the manufacturer claims it lasts four days. Refills are available after that. During mosquito-free seasons, the lantern runs on batteries and serves as a light. Retail price is around $15, and it can be found in places such as Haworth Hardware, Montvale Hardware & Supply and Hometown Hardware in Closter.

KUDOS

No coast? No problem! That didn’t stop Wyckoff’s Flotilla 10–13 from winning the coveted Best Flotilla in the Nation award recently as a volunteer arm of the U.S. Coast Guard. The local auxiliary has won four of these babies, most recently in 2015. This year, its scores were calculated on numbers such as mission hours, rescue operations, hours of member training and completions of boating safety classes. And the timing is likely no coincidence—Aug. 4 is National U.S. Coast Guard Day. Congrats, everyone!

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C H I LT O N MEDICAL CENTER

ONE OF THE SAFEST HOSPITALS IN THE COUNTRY IS RIGHT HERE IN THE COMMUNITY

“A” is the highest grade given by the Leapfrog Group, an organization dedicated to patient safety. What’s more, Chilton Medical Center was voted #1 mid-size hospital by New Jersey doctors four years in a row. Atlantic Health System is proud to bring our best to the communities we serve. Source: The Leapfrog Group, a national patient safety group

To learn more visit atlantichealth.org/chilton

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{ BERGEN BUZZ }

FOR SAFER SCHOOLS… Bergen school districts aren’t all talk when it comes to improving security in our public schools. As we speak, five local districts— Dumont, Palisades Park, Park Ridge, Teaneck and Tenafly—are testing a new app called LiveSafe intended to boost school safety. The app enables two-way communication in which staff, parents and students can send information anonymously about any risks or dangers to themselves or their schools, from cyberbullying and online threats to potential lockdown situations. The plan is for the app to be used throughout other county public schools by September, pending approval from parents and the board of education.

SALUTING SENIORS

…AND SAFER AIRPORTS Sorry, but starting next year, an ordinary driver’s license will no longer cut it on the security line at an airport. If you’re boarding a domestic flight, you’ll instead need an upgraded “Real ID,” a new driver’s license with enhanced security features that 42 states (but not New Jersey) have already. Our state’s Motor Vehicle Commission (MVC) will start issuing Real IDs beginning this month, leaving plenty of time before the federal mandate takes effect in October 2020. We suggest getting yours early, as there are about 6 million licensed drivers in New Jersey. Before you visit your nearest MVC office (there are locations in Lodi, Oakland and Paramus, among others), make sure you have the identification needed to prove you’re really you. (Go to nj.gov to see what documentation is required.) Once you’re there, you’ll fill out some forms, submit your papers, pay the $11 fee for a Real ID (or more, if your license has expired) and wait a few days until your new card arrives in the mail. Your Real ID will feature a small gold star in the top right corner—you’ll have earned it after that arduous process—and then you’re set to use it as identification on all domestic flights.

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In high school the word “seniors” usually means those tall, slightly cocky people brandishing college acceptance letters, but it can also describe folks who are a little grayer, a little wiser. Aug. 21 is National Senior Citizens Day—what better occasion to note that Bergen high schools have not forgotten those other seniors? Let three examples from the recent school year tell the tale: • In April, members of the drama club at Wood-Ridge High School invited local senior citizens to the dress rehearsal and afternoon matinee of their 2019 spring musical, 42nd Street. • Students at Ma’ayanot Yeshiva High School for Girls in Teaneck spent some quality time in May with older folks at Senior Source, a senior lounge in the Shops at Riverside, for the second annual Senior Tech Time. Students answered their elderly acquaintances’ questions about using their smartphones, laptops and tablets, and taught them how to do everything from send a text message to surf the internet. • As WCBS-TV reported in June, New Milford High School annually gives new meaning to the term “senior prom.” Some 50 students volunteer to organize and chaperone an early-bird dinner and dance for elderly area residents, aided by local sponsors who contribute food and entertainment. This year Ralph Lee, 92, danced with his wife of 65 years, 89-year-old Eve, and as the TV piece revealed, it was actually his first prom. Seventy-five years ago, when he was 17, he recalled, “I went into the Navy.” How will you make your mark for National Senior Citizens Day this year? Contact your town’s senior center for ideas on volunteering.

A STAR RETURNS NFL tight end Garrett Dickerson had quite the Bergen County homecoming. Before school let out for summer, the star New York Giants tight end came back to Dr. John Grieco Elementary School in Englewood, where he was once a student, to play sports and hang out with 100 lucky kids. Dickerson led a “summer camp” of sorts, helping the pre-teens with offensive, defensive and agility drills for the better part of the day. “It was a great time in my life, and I am still friendly with a lot of the friends that I made in Englewood,” Dickerson says. “I loved growing up here, and now I want to give back to the community.”

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{ BERGEN BUZZ }

‘DOG DAYS’ OF SUMMER The benefits of rescuing a pet are two-fold—read our feature on page 46 to see how rescued dogs in turn saved their owners. So why not, during these “dog days of summer,” open up your home to an animal in need? Here are a few local rescue centers worth checking out if you’re in the market for a new furry friend (and honestly, who isn’t?): • Closter Animal Welfare Society (CLAWS) in Closter holds appointment-only meetings with interested owners and their potential pets, but they host adoption days every other Sunday at Pet Valu in Dumont and every Saturday at Petco in Closter: check out clawsadopt. org/events for their full schedule of events. • Pawsitively Furever’s monthly scheduling is subject to change, but they’re holding adoption events at their facility in Hackensack on Saturday, Aug. 10 and Saturday, Aug. 24 from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Walk-ins are welcome. Learn more at pawsitivelyfurever.org. • Humane Society of Bergen County doesn’t only provide help on wildlife, they also have open adoption walk-ins throughout the week at their Lyndhurst location. Humanesocietybergen. org has their business hours and more details. • Ramapo-Bergen Animal Refuge allows walk-ins to stop by to meet and greet with potential pets that may suit you and your family. Cat person? Good, because summer is “kitten season,” and RBARI is overflowing with more than 50 cats and kittens at this very moment. Learn meow—oops, we mean more—at rbari.org/adopt/.

CULINARY CORNER

ALL IN THE FAMILY Why venture south for authentic barbecue now that it’s right here in Bergen County? The brotherly trio behind Brothers BBQ, who grew up in North Carolina, plan to open their first New Jersey restaurant (their sole establishment is in Orange County, N.Y.) by the end of the summer at the former Macaroni Grill spot in Ramsey. The menu will feature slow-cooked meats such as brisket, pulled pork, chicken and sausage, as well as burgers, wings, shrimps and grits, plus comfort-food sides such as mac and cheese, collard greens and candied sweet potatoes. Wash it all down with Southern-style sweet tea or an alcoholic beverage—wine, craft beer or bourbon. There will also be live music on Friday and Saturday nights. • Brothers BBQ, 900 Rte. 17, Ramsey

FROM TURKEY, WITH LOVE New to South Hackensack is Balcony Café, a casual spot serving up authentic Turkish and Mediterranean dishes, from falafel and baba ghanoush to kebabs and gyros. Balcony also hosts parties and events and has an extensive dessert and coffee menu with traditional treats like baklava and sütlac (rice pudding). This is a good choice whether you want a snack or a five-course feast. • Balcony Café, 388 Rte. 46, South Hackensack, 201.641.4630

FOOD FUSION There’s surely something to please your palate at Kuba, the new Cuban-Asian eatery in Fort Lee. The menu includes traditional Cuban fare—arroz con pollo and paella, for example—with some traditional Asian delicacies like ginger-glazed salmon and Asian rice bowls thrown in. Be sure to arrive thirsty, as the bar sells sangria, mojitos and margaritas. • Kuba, 2139 Hudson Ter., Fort Lee, 201.585.1601

THE SPIRIT OF ITALY Sometimes you do as the Romans do even when you’re not in Rome. As of 2018, more than 1.4 million New Jersey residents had Italian roots—it’s the state’s largest ethnicity. But speakers of the Italian language here are on the decline. So the Silvio Laccetti Foundation is trying to revive Italian spirit and culture. How? In part by honoring high school seniors in largely Italian-American towns with the Garibaldi Award, granted annually since 2017 to students who have worked to maintain the Italian legacy in their communities, whether through extracurricular activities or by convincing their schools to offer Italian as a language course. This year’s Bergen County recipients are Isabella Marra (East Rutherford), Cathrine Djelevic (Dumont) and Katelyn Peterson (Lyndhurst). Tanti auguri! BERGENMAG.COM

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CONGRATULATIONS

Bill and Tani Austin owners of Starkey Hearing Technologies with Mark Salvesen and Peggy Stanlick, owners of Professional Hearing Aid Center.

ON RECEIVING THE DIRECTOR’S AWARD “I am endorsing the Professional Hearing Aid Center because of their quality of work and professionalism. Mark Salvesen was recommended to me by my Ear, Nose, and Throat Specialist as the best to see when obtaining a hearing aid. For over 17 years now I have worn my hearing aids. It makes everyday living so much better. I want to reach those people who might not want to make the decision to go for help or use hearing aids. It is not something to put off, do it as soon as you can. You will never regret it. I know I never have.”

“The Professional Hearing Aid Center not only provides the best professionalism, expertise, and service but they have a genuine care and concern for every one of their clients. They treat everyone with compassion, empathy, and dignity. They make you feel like family. When I was hospitalized, Mark and Peggy visited me and my family in the hospital to extend well wishes and take care of my hearing aid needs. They went above and beyond the definition of caring and dedication. They have been an integral part of my family for over 14 years and will always be a special part of our lives.”

MITCH G. SOBEL,

Former Assemblywoman / Mayor

ROSE HECK

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MARK P. SALVESEN, BC-HIS*

PEGGY J. STANLICK, BC-HIS*

Mr. Salvesen has been owner/operator of Professional Hearing Aid Center for over 30 years. Mark has been helping people with better hearing since 1986. He is Nationally Board Certified in Hearing Instrument Sciences and has been a member of the International Hearing Aid Society since 1989. He is also a member of the American Auditory Society. Mark enjoys all facets of his profession and for over 3 decades has been honored for his outstanding achievements. In March, Mr. Salvesen was presented with the Director’s Award from Starkey Hearing Technologies for going above and beyond to help the hearing impaired in his community. Mark is an active member of the Starkey Hearing Foundation and has donated his time to mission work in several different countries. Professional Hearing Aid Center has received the Hearing Angel Award from the Foundation and remains committed to our mission work both home and abroad.

Ms. Stanlick is Nationally Board Certified in Hearing Instrument Sciences, as well as a member of the International Hearing Society and has been with Professional Hearing Aid Center for over 15 years. Peggy spent her career prior to joining Professional Hearing as the Director of Social Services in a healthcare facility. Peggy enjoys working with product development, keeping Professional Hearing Aid Center at the cutting edge of technology in the hearing healthcare industry. Ms. Stanlick had trained Dispensers throughout New Jersey and has received many awards for her dedication to serving the hearing impaired. Ms. Stanlick is actively involved in raising awareness about hearing loss and conducts educational seminars throughout the year in the community. Ms. Stanlick has been honored by the International Hearing Aid Society for excellence and continues to bring new, innovative and award winning products and techniques to the practice.

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Sarah Carberry, Professor of Chemistry, works with Ramapo College students in one of our newly renovated chemistry labs.

Learn in small classes. Succeed in big ways. With an average class size of 21 and a student-faculty ratio of 16:1, Ramapo College offers students an individualized learning experience. Our students are able to build meaningful, close-working relationships with faculty members through mentorship, collaboration and research opportunities.

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{ TALK OF THE TOWN }

WELCOME TO

Englewood With views of Manhattan and Mother Nature as well as a plethora of charming small businesses, this city truly has something for everyone. A drive through this quintessential Bergen County city that sits just 10 miles north of Manhattan acquaints one with a range of picturesque suburban homes, luscious forest and a lively downtown area. Just as enticing are Englewood’s tight-knit community and its bountiful options of eateries, shops and activities, laid out across its 4.9 square miles.

MYENGLEWOOD

The city of Englewood launched a smartphone app for its residents in 2016. Dubbed MyEnglewood, the program allows users to connect with city officials on social media, report problems, ask questions and stay up-to-date on local news. According to Englewood municipal workers, this method of communication within the city has been as fruitful as it is innovative.

■ ESTABLISHED: 1899 ■ POPULATION: 28,509 ■ WEBSITE:

CITYOFENGLEWOOD.ORG

FLAT ROCK BROOK This 150-acre nature preserve in the heart of town, a remnant of the once-abundant Palisades Forest, is known for its wildlife and hiking trails. Each year, Flat Rock Brook hosts community events to raise funds for its mission of preserving wildlife. These include a gala, 5K run and fall festival.

Englewood was named for its expansive woodlands and high population of English settlers, or “engles.” Today, the city is much more diverse, with a population that is approximately 31.3 percent white, 29.3 percent black, 24.5 percent Hispanic or Latino, 12.3 percent Asian, 2 percent two or more races, .5 percent other races and .15 percent Native American, according to datausa.io.

BERGEN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

HOME, SWEET HOME Thinking about buying or selling a house here? The median home value in Englewood is $381,100, while the median price of homes currently on the market is $430,000, according to Zillow.

ART TOUR OF ENGLEWOOD

Originally founded as the Englewood Plaza movie theater in 1926, Bergen PAC serves as an arts hub for the county. Its mission is to provide the community with easilyaccessible arts and education by hosting its own affordable events and raising money to benefit young people’s scholarship. Performers who have graced its stage include Aretha Franklin, John Legend, Ringo Starr and countless others. The venue also hosts local talent competitions, dance classes and craft sales.

DINING OUT Blue Moon, a homey hotspot known for its margaritas and Tex-Mex, sits at the center of Englewood. Or, if you’re in the mood for Asian fare, try Nori Japanese cuisine, another highlyrated eatery just around the corner on West Palisade Avenue. Stop at Jackson Hole, a classic diner, if you’re hankering for a burger, but if it’s a holiday or otherwise momentous occasion, a great option is Sofia, which has the unique menu of an “Italian farm-totable steakhouse.”

FAMOUS FACES

Performances aside, there is plenty of art to peruse in this city too, including exhibitions at Borghi Fine Art, Galerie Gabriel, Mark Gallery and Ophir Gallery.

Many notable people and celebrities have called this city home at one time or another. Some of the headliners: John Travolta, known for his roles in Pulp Fiction and Grease, was born and raised in Englewood, while actress and model Brooke Shields and comedian Eddie Murphy have lived in the city too.

Clockwise from top left: Flatrock Brook: Wiki/Jim.henderson; phone: Getty; Travolta: Wiki/Georges Biard; Shields: Wiki/Joella Marano; Murphy: Wiki/David Shankbone; Bergen PAC courtesy of Bergen PAC

WHAT’S IN A NAME?

DID YOU KNOW? Dae Bennett, sound engineer and son of “I Left My Heart in San Francisco” singer Tony Bennett, established Bennett Studios in Englewood in 2001. Unfortunately, the recording studio shut its doors 10 years later due to rising costs. BERGENMAG.COM

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READ,

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{ HEALTH NEWS }

DON’T YELL

Moms and dads who regularly read with their toddlers are less likely to yell or parent harshly. And their children are less likely to be disruptive. —Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics

The percentage of women who groom their bikini area and end up with cuts, rashes or burns as a result.

IS ED A SIGN OF HEART DISEASE?

A recent study found that men with erectile dysfunction (ED) were more likely to have type 2 diabetes or heart disease. In addition, the men had double the risk of suffering a heart attack or stroke. It’s suggested that sufferers have their hearts checked. —Circulation

—JAMA Dermatology

PHONES AND GRADES

Need a reason to convince your kids to put down the phone during class? Research found that those students who use their phones for nonacademic purposes during classes and lectures scored 5 percent lower on final exams. —Rutgers University

SIP TEA TO CUT CRAVINGS

Many folks are familiar with the flavors sweet, sour, salty and bitter; however, few are familiar with umami, the savory taste. Recent studies have determined that umami, found in green and black tea, can help decrease food cravings and increase feelings of satiety. It’s the L-theanine in tea that’s responsible for that taste.

BONE-LOSS HELP

Eating a Mediterranean diet has been shown to reduce bone loss in people with osteoporosis, so fill up on fruits, veggies, whole grains and legumes. —University of East Anglia

COFFEE CUTOFF TIME

Consuming caffeine even six hours before retiring to bed can reduce sleep time by one hour, so switch to decaf by 5 p.m.

—Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine

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—Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SAFE YOGA

Nama-stay out of the ER. Recent research found that yoga injuries nearly doubled over 13 years, so be sure you’re not hyperextending muscles when you strike certain poses. —University of Alabama, Birmingham AUGUST 2019

—Compiled by Paul Rance Jr.

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

HEALTH SCREENINGS:

A GUIDE FOR MEN

Help keep the men in your life healthy by sharing this handy list with them.

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Regular medical exams help find problems early, when they’re most treatable. Yet research conducted for the American Academy of Family Physicians found that 37 percent of American men had not had a health checkup in the most recent two-year period. The researchers also discovered that 78 percent of men who have spouses or significant others said that person has influence over whether they go to the doctor. By getting the right health services and screenings, men can improve their chances of living longer, healthier lives. Use this guide to inform yourself and your partner, but note physicians might modify or add to these guidelines based on an individual’s medical history and personal risk factors. REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH • Prostate cancer screening: A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test can detect prostate cancer earlier than no screening at all. But testing is not universally recommended because there are questions about whether the benefits of testing outweigh the risks for most men. Current guidelines advise men age 50 to 70 (starting at age 40 for African-Americans) to discuss with their physicians whether screening makes sense for them based on family history and other risk factors. • Sexually transmitted infection (STI) tests: Throughout life, before sexual intercourse with a new partner, both partners should be tested for STIs, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

HEART HEALTH • Blood pressure test: At least every two years. High blood pressure can lead to a variety of health problems, including heart attack, heart failure, stroke, kidney disease and dementia. • Cholesterol panel: At least every five years, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL and triglycerides should be measured to assess heart-disease risk. If you have diabetes, kidney problems or certain other conditions, you may need a cholesterol test more often. COLON HEALTH • Cancer screening: Colonoscopy every 10 years or stool-based test (can be done at home and requires no bowel preparation) every year. Talk to your physician about which option is best for you. For those at average risk, colon-cancer screening should occur from age 50 to 75. DIABETES • Glucose screening: Every three years for men ages 45 and older, and for younger men with a BMI greater than 25 plus at least one diabetes risk factor, such as high blood pressure or a family history of the disease. ONETIME SCREENINGS • Hepatitis C (HCV): Men born between 1945 and 1965 should talk to their doctor about this test. • Osteoporosis: Men ages 50 to 70 should be screened for osteoporosis if they have risk factors, such as long-term steroid use, low body weight, smoking, heavy alcohol use or a family history of osteoporosis.

High blood pressure is more common than smoking, elevated cholesterol and diabetes, which are the other major heart-disease risk factors for which doctors screen. Screening for high blood pressure is crucial for both men and women as it is the most important easily modified risk factor for early onset heart disease. Criteria for what constitutes high blood pressure has changed in the past few years, so patients who were borderline for high blood pressure under previous guidelines now might find themselves officially classified with hypertension.”

—Amy Rosen, M.D., internist, Teaneck

BERGENMAG.COM

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ALL IN THE FAMILY A new Franklin Lakes house draws upon the owner’s updated childhood home—and a savvy designer’s touch. By Donna Rolando

Design by Yelena Gerts

Photography by Marco Ricca

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{ PERSONAL SPACE }

Not cool and gray, but warm and inviting, this kitchen’s color story is just what a Manhattan couple wanted for their new Franklin Lakes home. Some highlights are the geometric backsplash of taupe travertine, an island with comfy cushioned stools, granite counters in shades of beige and a trio of lanterns as decorative as they are functional.

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{ PERSONAL SPACE }

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They say imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. When Manhattanites Vincent and Alessandra planned a newconstruction home in Franklin Lakes, they chose to imitate the Staten Island home he’d grown up in. That house now belonged to his sister, who’d made several renovations in a “French country” style. “The way everything was designed it was a comfortable feel— and what we wanted for our home,” says Vincent. So the couple did the logical thing: They hired the designer who’d made those renovations, Yelena Gerts, principal designer/ owner of House of Style & Design in Holmdel. But like any pro, Gerts wasn’t content with emulating herself. She used the other home merely as a starting point for a new creation unique to the couple and their two young children. While French country is elegant and comfy—a delightful mix of patterns, ruffles and distressed woodwork—Gerts evolved it into “modern country,” with contemporary elements that satisfied the couple’s desire for a bit of an edge. Right from the start, they knew their October 2018 move would be a big transition, requiring a designer’s touch. They were relocating from a modern onebedroom city apartment to a fivebedroom place in suburbia. Today they couldn’t be more pleased with the way Gerts made their dream a reality (even incorporating some builder’s-selection items in a way that’s not cookie-cutter). Cherished for its 30-foot-high ceilings and airy space, the family room is a natural favorite, although it came with a decorating challenge: This page: The family room’s brick mantel might have ruled the room if not for a few of designer Yelena Gerts’ decorating remedies, such as adding an equally tall window treatment and an assortment of picture frames for scale and dimension. Opposite page: For a family that loves to entertain, this large distressed-look dining table is up to the job, accompanied by mesh-backed chairs that won’t block the view of adjacent rooms.

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a towering brick mantel that, according to Gerts, had to be tamed stylistically or it would rule the décor. “We needed to scale it down,” says Gerts, who gave the mantel its match with soft and elegant embroidered window treatments climbing to the ceiling. She completed the magic with picture frames to add scale and dimension, along with a sectional in high-performance material (for the kids), greige walls and a distressed look for floor and finishes. Her clients love beiges and browns, says Gerts, so she really went to town with 20 to 30 different shades of these hues (and cream too). Rugs and pillows are layered for maximum effect, and even the abstract art is neutral. The dining space and kitchen are connected to the family room, so Gerts “treated it all as one space.” The table has that distressed wood typical of French country and is just right for a family that loves to entertain, with an add-on that fits 10 people easily. She cleverly chose chairs with a mesh backing so as not to block the view of adjacent rooms. Yet one of the most outstanding features is right overhead: a distressed chandelier with an antique feel. The family’s love affair with warm colors has free rein in the kitchen with soft cream cabinets, a greige island and granite counters delightfully infused with several shades of beige. The backsplash ties everything together with its taupe pattern in travertine, as does a woven wood window shade and a trio of lanterns for lighting décor. “We wanted to keep it modern and country at the same time,” says Gerts of the bedroom, where grass cloth in a geometric motif delivers a contemporary wow, while the rest of the room is wrapped in grass cloth in soft beige and gray. A velvet This page: Talk about textures! Modern country charm abounds in the family room, where this wing chair in vintage velvet with antique pewter nailheads is teamed up with a marble-topped table with an aged metal base. Opposite page: Swivel chairs, also in the family room, combine modern geometric design with crushed velvet comfort, while a sunburst mirror made of wood captures the room’s unique style in its reflection.

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{ PERSONAL SPACE }

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{ PERSONAL SPACE }

custom area rug gives that luxury feel, while the bedding delivers country-inspired patterns. For “getting away from it all,” the master has its own sitting room, which continues this intriguing style story. And for a twist in the master bath, Gerts introduced a drop-in tub, marble-look flooring with border for a custom vibe and gray wallpaper that complements the bedroom motif. Vincent and Alessandra love their new family-friendly design—and the way Gerts took them by the hand stylistically. “Coming from a smaller apartment, it was a big task—it was daunting,” says Vincent, marveling that nevertheless “she brought it all together so well.”

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This page, right: An eclectic mix of abstract art and country flowers graces the top of a gray dresser in the master bedroom. While abstract can sometimes mean intense hues, this color story is more subdued and comforting. Opposite page, top: The master bedroom has a geometric pattern for an accent wall, but the rest of the room is wrapped in grass cloth in soft shades of gray and beige. Opposite page, bottom: The master bath conquers ordinary with a drop-in tub and custom marble-look flooring that harmonize with the bedroom’s style sense. BERGENMAG.COM

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{ PUPPY LOVE }

EMOTIONAL RESCUE When a family gives a home to a shelter dog, the question sometimes becomes: Just who saved whom? By Daria Meoli

Dog owners choose their pets for many reasons—affection, protection, companionship. When the five Bergen families here opened their doors and their hearts to pets, they believed they were doing so to rescue dogs in need. But the love and energy these pooches bring their adoptive families make it clear that “rescuing” actually works both ways.

PARKER

Hometown: Moonachie Owner: Nicole Cvelich Age and breed: Approximately 1½-yearold Labrador retriever and golden retriever mix Personality: Parker is a little dog in a big dog’s body. He’s a large lap dog at heart. Favorite pastimes: This precious pup is happiest when he is eating, and he’s never met a food he didn’t love. He’s also frequently found snuggling up to anyone close by and palling around with his canine sibling, Simba, a bossy Pomeranian. Parker, who has his own Instagram profile, also enjoys mugging for the camera. How Parker found his family: Cvelich and her boyfriend were looking to adopt another pup. She had her heart set on a husky but her boyfriend wanted a Lab. Cvelich decided to do some re-

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search on Labradors and came across Parker. He was found next to a dumpster in Texas and brought to New Jersey by a local Bergen County shelter. Says his owner: “I knew he would fit right in with our wacky family, which includes a Pomeranian and a cat.” How Parker makes a difference: Cvelich adopted Parker in February 2018. A month later she received the happy news that she was pregnant. But in June, Cvelich suffered a miscarriage. She says she has no idea how she would have made it through that difficult time without Parker. “I was home for a couple of weeks after the miscarriage and I spent all day with Parker,” she says. “He was so loving and such a great distraction. Parker got me out of bed, and I focused on feeding, walking and playing with him. He was the best thing for me, and when I was pregnant again with my now 1-month-old baby, Parker was by my side, resting his head on my belly.”

WILLY

Hometown: Rochelle Park Owners: Evans and Susan Lazzaro and their daughter Teresa (age 11) Age and breed: Approximately 1½-year-old dachshund, Staffordshire bull terrier and Chihuahua mix Personality: Willy is endlessly loving and extremely friendly to all people and dogs he meets. He is best described as happy-go-lucky and has tons of energy. Favorite pastimes: He loves going on walks, staring out the window at his “domain,” chewing on bones and toys and running around with the neighbors’ dogs. How Willy found his family: After researching and discussing many different breeds, the Lazzaros found no clear choice. They thought of going to a shelter but didn’t know which one to approach. That’s when Evans’ darts team, the Knights of Columbus Council #2842, made a donation to Pawsitively Furever Dog Rescue in Hackensack, and the family learned of an adoption event. Susan, Evans’ wife, had a feeling that if they went to the event, they would fall in love—and that’s exactly what happened. How Willy makes a difference: Over the years, Evans and Susan had lost pets to illness or old age, and they didn’t know if they ever wanted to experience that sorrow

again. When their daughter Teresa begged them for a dog, the couple made excuses and said they were too busy to care for one. But when Teresa’s stepbrothers’ dog passed away in April 2018, the couple knew it was time. “Willy has shown us that the memories we are making with him are worth the potential loss down the road,” says Susan. “Every single day he wakes us up with his silly antics and genuine love. We know that having a pet was the way to make our family whole. He makes us slow down a bit in our very busy lives and take time for what matters—the ones we love.”

BARLEY

Hometown: Garfield Owner: Harry Peck Age and breed: 2-year-old mutt. While his pedigree is a mystery, Barley’s owner suspects he is a terrier mix. Personality: Barley is a happy, very active, loyal guy who spreads love to everyone. He is a fast learner and always wants to please his people. Favorite pastimes: Barley loves to help his owner brew beer (hence his name). Peck plans to open Xbeerimental Brewing Co. soon, and Barley is the official “brew dog” and constant brewer’s companion. How Barley found his family: Peck’s parents adopted a dog in need, and Peck found that pup to be “grateful and wise.” “It is as if he knows he was rescued,” Peck says. With so many other dogs in need of a home, Peck knew he would go the same route to find his own four-legged buddy. A family friend connected Peck with the Humane Society of Bergen County. Peck was sent a picture of Barley, and when he finally met the dog, he was instantly taken with his personality, energy and quirkiness. How Barley makes a difference: “No matter what happened during the day and regardless of my mood, when I come home he puts a smile on my face,” Peck says.

SCOOTER

Hometown: River Edge Owner: Amy O’Leary Age and breed: 1-year-old Jack Russell terrier mix

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Personality: Scooter is hyper but playful by day and very loving and snuggly by night. This pup was easy to train, and he loves everyone he meets. Favorite pastimes: Scooter likes to make new friends, whether of the two- or four-legged variety. He also is always down to play a game of fetch with his favorite ball. How Scooter found his family: O’Leary was browsing the Pawsitively Furever Dog Rescue site and spotted Scooter. The 4-month-old mutt was picked up by the organization after the founders saw him on a “free dog” post on Facebook. Scooter was scheduled to be at an adoption event O’Leary was unable to attend. She was sure someone would scoop up the adorable pup, but to her surprise, Scooter was still listed on the site as available after the event. O’Leary knew it was meant to be. How Scooter makes a difference: O’Leary is the mom of two young boys, but didn’t feel her family was quite complete. “Scooter is my other baby,” she says. “I just melt when he looks at me. He knows I’m his mom.”

ELVIS

Hometown: WoodRidge Owners: Kelli and Thomas Miller and their two children, Austin (age 4) and Julianna (age 1) Age and breed: 10-year-old beagle mix Personality: Elvis is a very laid-back, easygoing dog. The Yonkers, N.Y., shelter where the Millers adopted Elvis called him “Moo” because of his black and white coloring. However, this rock star prefers the moniker the Millers gave him. Favorite pastimes: Elvis loves to chase birds and likes it when his humans pet him, especially on the belly. When he isn’t going on long walks or running around his backyard with Austin, Elvis can be found relaxing on the couch. How Elvis found his family: Sadly, Moo/Elvis was abandoned in an apartment and sent to a shelter where the Millers found him. “We decided to rescue a dog because there are so many dogs out there that need a loving home, which we knew we could provide for him.” How Elvis makes a difference: This sweet doggie prepared the Millers for parenthood. “Elvis was our first baby and is now a big brother to our human babies,” Kelli says. “Our kids love Elvis as much as we do. Austin nicknamed him “E” and says he’s his doggy. Elvis is part of our family and we can’t imagine our life without him.”

AUGUST 2019

7/22/19 12:02 PM


{ SCHOOL DAZE }

WHAT’S UP WITH TEENS? A dozen Bergen County high schoolers candidly discuss their lives, worries and dreams. By Rita Guarna

Take what you remember from high school and its challenges, and add these ingredients: ubiquitous social media, vaping, fears of terrorism, news reports of frequent school shootings, and colleges harder than ever to get into—and pay for. Isn’t it a wonder that most Bergen high school students maintain their hope, their openness and their sense of humor? For the third straight year, BERGEN has investigated high school life—not by consulting sociologists or educational studies, but by going to the source: teens themselves. Showing remarkable candor and generosity, our panel of 12 high school students met recently with Editor in Chief Rita Guarna and her team, Daria Meoli, Haley Longman and Darius Amos, for a no-holds-barred discussion that demonstrated two things: (1) These kids are busy high achievers who are more than typically articulate, and (2) if the word “like” ever suddenly vanishes from the language, they’re in big trouble. Rita: Let’s talk about competition. Nina: I study theater at Bergen County Academies (BCA), so there is quite a bit of competition in our theater classes—whose monologue is the best, who’s the best dancer. And, of course, in the actual mainstage productions, who’s getting the parts. Jordan: I’m going to piggyback off that. They actually don’t give us our class ranks at Bergen County Technical Schools (BT) because they don’t want us to fight with each other. The only thing they tell us is who’s valedictorian and salutatorian when you graduate. We’re always asking, “What’d you get on this test?” Everybody’s always trying to be the best.

Elizabeth: A lot of high school students think success is a limited resource, but we’re trying to shift the culture at Immaculate Heart Academy, and we found that helps the bullying issue. Nina: Especially on social media, it’s almost like a trend to see who the most stressed person is. Everyone is like, “Oh my God, I have all these assignments.” “No, I have all these assignments!” But in reality it’s very possible to go to teachers and ask, “Can I move this over?” Sophia: I see the same thing. You’ll say, “Oh, I’m taking four APs,” and someone’s like, “Well, I’m taking five!” and they’ll post on their Snapchat story, on Instagram or on their

Finsta that they’re stressed about a test. Nina: Yeah. So then you see someone’s Finsta story and they have, like, a 3:30 a.m. sticker on it. It’s almost like people are staying up so they can post that they’re staying up. Haley: Can you explain what Finsta is for readers who might not know? Nina: So, you have your Rinsta, which is the Instagram where you put out the image that you want to project of yourself to the world. And then your Finsta is typically private for your friends, although it’s usually a hundred-something followers where you kind of post your deepest emotions. Sophia: Sometimes people won’t talk about things in real life, and you’ll go to them and ask, like, “Oh are you OK? I saw you posted something,” and they’ll pretend nothing happened or that they’re fine. Nina: There are lots of pictures of people crying on their Finstas. Anna: I think social media definitely adds to the competitive culture. It’s only getting worse and worse. People are getting more, like, addicted, and whether it’s on Snapchat, Instagram, all that [even though] there are some people who will step back from it and say “I’ve had enough.”

MEET OUR STUDENTS Opposite page, top row: Caroline Poskrobko, Saddle Brook, Class of ’20; Rachel Rhee, Emerson, Class of ’20; Alexander Testa, Ridgewood, Class of ’20; second row: Christopher Morello, Leonia, Class of ’21, Elizabeth Croci, Immaculate Heart Academy, Class of ’20; Sophia Luongo, Academy of the Holy Angels, Class of ’20; third row: Nina Osso, Bergen County Academies, Class of ’20, Nathan Fallin, Ridgewood, Class of ’21; Cierra Roberts, Lodi, Class of ’20; Bottom row: Brielle Roberts, Lodi, Class of ’20; Anna Urrea, Pascack Valley, Class of ’20; Jordan Zeigler, Bergen County Technical Schools, Class of ’21. BERGENMAG.COM

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{ SCHOOL DAZE } Rachel: People don’t ask for your phone number. They’re asking, “Oh what’s your Snapchat? What’s your ‘Insta?’” to stay social and be a part of a social life and the different activities you join. Even here, I’m sure people will exchange different social media accounts. That’s a big part of our culture now. People are constantly competing with, “How many likes did I get? How many comments did I get?” Nathan: I definitely agree. But for me it’s important to find balance where you’re not off social media—because, like we said, it’s, like, almost entirely impossible—but you just have to realize that it’s kind of a forced image that people are portraying and that it’s not 100 percent real. You can look at it, have fun with it, but try not to obsess over it. Sophia: Sometimes people obsess over how many likes or comments they get and they have to have at least a thousand followers. And if they don’t, it’s like they go crazy. Also, instead of talking directly to someone when they have a problem, they’ll post an “indirect” message about the person on social media. Then sometimes people can tell who it’s about. So the person still finds out, but instead of directly confronting them, it just becomes more public. And sometimes it creates bigger fights.

also important because you need money—you know, to get to where you want to be. Rita: When you say “work,” you don’t mean schoolwork, but actual work? Cierra: Yes. Rita: Does everybody have a job besides going to school? [Six students raise their hands.] Anna: I think the hardest thing is the fact that you have to accept that you’re going to be fine no matter what. It’s just stressful to think about, like, “Is this test or this ACT really gonna affect where I end up?” Rachel: There’s kind of an expectation for people our age, especially juniors and seniors, that you’re supposed to have it all figured out. Like, I love science, but I also love the performing arts. It’s pretty stressful because, of course, there are the kids who are like, “I know exactly what I want to do,” “I want to get a five-year degree,” “I want to go into med school.” It’s not like we’re not working hard. We’re still putting all the effort in, but we don’t know exactly where we’re going. And it’s hard to compare yourself to people who do know exactly where they’re going. Nathan: A big stress for me is if you put all your time into one path [but] you don’t really know what you’re going to like later on in

DO YOU FEEL ACCEPTED BY YOUR PEERS? Yes-12 No-0

Rita: This is something that came up at last year’s forum when we talked about bullying. Nina: There’s this girl in my academy, and she’s not really on [much] social media. She texted this one kid and he posted a screenshot of it on his Finsta and he was like, “Oh my God, look at what she texted me. Ha ha!” And then everyone was commenting, “Oh my God, that’s so weird.” She’s such a sweet person, but she couldn’t even see what this kid had posted. It’s really upsetting to watch how people use social media in a destructive way. Elizabeth: I notice the days when I say I’m not going to check anyone’s Snapchat story for 24 hours, I kind of go through my day a little bit easier. I’m not worried about what every other person in my circle is doing. And oftentimes when you are checking social media, you’re not out with your friends, you’re not out having a good time. You’re sitting there stressing and saying, “Wow, look what everyone else is doing.” Rita: What stresses you out the most? Caroline: For me, it’s definitely the fear of the unknown. For the past three years, high school has been, like, my safe place. And you’re walking out of a comfortable setting and into the real world. It’s a little stressful because you don’t know what to expect. Cierra: I’d say what can be most stressful is balancing work, school and friends, because you’re also trying to figure out what you want to be when you grow up. Your work now is

terms of a job. And then it might be too late. Nina: I plan on going into theater. And on one hand, I’m totally thrilled about that. I’m fortunate in that my parents support me. But also, a lot of the programs for theater are like, 2,000 auditions, and 12 kids get in. There’s the top 20 BFA programs that everyone wants to go to. So, you look at your Playbill when you see a show and see that all of these people went to this school. I really better cross my fingers that I get into this school, but there is literally less than a 1 percent chance that I will. And I’m a brunette soprano, so if they happen to already have one of those, it doesn’t even matter how good the audition is. I also should have a backup plan. Like, what am I going to do if the arts don’t work out for me? Rita: So does everybody have a plan B or backup plan? All: No. Elizabeth: I don’t even have a plan A! Alexander: I’d say my biggest fear and stress is just failing to meet expectations. Rita: Whose? Your own? Alexander: My own, my coaches’, my teachers’ and my parents’. I’m expected to get a certain score in my subject tests, on my ACT and SAT, a certain GPA, to try to get into certain levels of colleges. So if I’m unable to do that, it’s disappointing myself and the people around me. Elizabeth: I have to agree that the person who puts the most pressure on me is myself. I think BERGENMAG.COM

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not being good enough has been a challenge for our generation. Nathan: Being way too concerned about college is kind of, like, not a good idea. I know people who did everything right. It’s kind of a gamble at the end of the day. And so, you can only do your best. Rita: Are drugs an issue in your environment? Christopher: In my school, it’s not as extreme as heroin. But we do have a huge weed and Juul problem. All: Yes! Christopher: Especially with the introduction of a “pen.” Anna: Yeah. I feel bad talking about this. Like, because the “pens” and the Juul just came about, it’s so much easier for people to just be high all day at school without anyone knowing. Rita: Is that tied directly to the level of stress? Anna: I don’t think so. All: No. Elizabeth: It’s not really a coping mechanism. Rachel: Because it’s in the “pen” form, people just do it in the bathroom so easily and that becomes an issue. Caroline: It’s crazy too. Some kids have become so reliant on it that they can’t go about their day without using it. Otherwise they freak out. Anna: If they’re using not-as-hard drugs, just weed and nicotine, imagine what they’re going to be using in college. Caroline: So, my high school is connected to the middle school [and] “pens” are seeping into the younger grades. When I was a middle schooler, this was never a thing. Now, they’re growing up in an environment where, like, that’s the norm. Nina: People think it’s artsy. They’ll post on their VSCO [videos] of them Juuling. And then you’re like, “Wait, you’re doing drugs?” Rita: What about alcohol? Caroline: Some schools treat it as normal now. There are parties, and people are trying things. Anna: I feel like when my parents were younger, as teenagers, everyone at one point would drink. A big thing my friends and I talk about sometimes is driving drunk, because it’s so looked down upon. I know no one would ever do that, at least the people I surround myself with. Nina: I think driving drunk and texting and driving are things that our generation, since we were like babies, have been told not to do. So, if someone is texting and driving, the other people in the car will be like “Put that down immediately!” No one drinks and drives. Rita: Wait a minute. I know almost all of you are driving. You don’t ever text and drive? All: No. Anna: Never. I know people who do. Nathan: My parents text and drive a lot more than I do. Nina: Yeah! I love my parents, they’re the best. But, like, they’ll have their phone on their lap [while driving] so they can feel it vibrate if they get a text. In my opinion, that’s still a distrac-

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tion. So then I’ll be like, “Mom, can you, like, move that or whatever?” Rita: What about cheating? Sophia: People just ask each other for answers. Rita: That is still considered cheating, right? Sophia: People don’t think it’s cheating. If there are two different classes taking the same tests at different periods, they’ll ask each other for details about the test, but then they don’t consider it cheating because they think, “Oh, I didn’t look at their paper.” Alexander: I think we all know it’s cheating; we’ve just become so accustomed to it. Rita: But if we go back to the issue of competitiveness, if you’re the person who’s being asked, and you didn’t have the luxury of knowing in advance, are you willing to share that information? Sophia: I say no. Anna: It’s hard when it’s your friends. When you’re working together on projects and stuff, and you’re helping each other through the whole year and then they ask you what was on it, you’re not gonna be like, “No.” Rachel: It is pretty common, honestly. The kids that have the test later in the day will ask people earlier in the day about the test. “How was it, what was the open-ended question, etc.” For

me, at least, it’s a pet peeve of mine, so I morally think it’s wrong. Even people who share work. Rita: What do you mean, “share work?” Rachel: Like, homework assignments. Some people don’t think it’s as big of a deal. But you’re still copying answers and handing that in as your own. Nina: What happens at BCA a lot is, kids will just get their work done, not really learn stuff, and then the test comes up. And the night before the test, everybody is up all night studying and FaceTiming each other and helping each other out. Again, it’s a part of the stress culture almost, to push everything off like that. But the other thing is, as competitive as everybody is, people want to survive it together, if you will. [They] try to help each other out, because they look at it as almost morally wrong if they don’t help their friends. But, what a lot of teachers do these days is change their tests. Sophia: Yeah, we started having that too. The teacher would just make different versions because they caught onto what was going on. A lot of my friends, whenever I don’t give them answers, it’s because I just strongly believe that it’s part of my values. They think we’re just helping each other out and they’ll blame me for not doing it. I suggest to people, like, “I can help you

with the concept or the chapter.” And they’re like, “No, I just want the exact answers.” Rachel: People are getting, like, inflation in grades just because they’re sharing work and things like that, which isn’t fair to the kids that actually put in the time. Anna: At least at [Pascack Valley], the teachers are extremely helpful. They’re willing to stay after school, come in before school, eat their lunch with you and sit to make sure you really understand what you’re learning. Rita: What about safety? Do you guys feel safe in your environments with everything that’s going on in the world? Brielle: I don’t feel bad about the safety in my school. Although one time this year we had a drill and my teacher freaked out because she didn’t know what to do. Rita: Do you feel like there’s ever somebody who perhaps is going through something and that person is a danger, or do you ever feel unsafe? Brielle: No, but we always have security guards walking around anyway. Nathan: I think the lack of bullying makes it feel safer because you feel like everyone’s accepted in some way. At Ridgewood, we have a completely open campus.

Top row, left to right: Cierra Roberts, Alexander Testa, Christopher Morello, Brielle Roberts, Jordan Zeigler, BERGEN Editor in Chief Rita Guarna, Rachel Rhee, Caroline Poskrobko, Nina Osso and Sophia Luongo. Seated, left to right: Elizabeth Croci, Nathan Fallin and Anna Urrea.

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Rita: What does that mean? Nathan: Anyone can leave whenever they want and, like, come back. We can leave during our “frees” and go to town. Cierra: Throughout the years in high school I’ve definitely seen a change—they’ve taken safety more seriously. But, at the same time, some of the students don’t take it as seriously. Jordan: I was actually inside BCA when something happened. I was there for a game and I was stuck in the gym for two and a half hours. It was one of the scariest experiences of my life. I saw coaches taping paper to the windows. We couldn’t see what was going on. You could hear SWAT teams going around the building and sweeping it. I was freaking out the entire time. Rita: How did this come about? Somebody called in a threat? Jordan: This was one day when there had been threats all across the state. Anna: My school has definitely taken the right steps to ensure school safety. Like, they added security guards and they closed—we have this breezeway where you can kind of walk into the

school, and they closed that. And they have security cameras. Nina: We have like a lot of exchange programs at BCA, and when the Danish kids visited I had a Dane shadowing me, and we had a drill, and they had no idea what was going on. They were like, “You guys do what?” Rachel: I feel like for our generation growing up, like, you know, being born around the time of 9/11 and seeing like all these school shootings, more kids are concerned—at least kids that I know—about the safety of the world and of our country than safety in school. Cierra: Yeah. I don’t know about anybody else, but when I go to the movies, I find myself, like, looking for an exit. Rita: Do you guys worry about what it’s going to cost to go to college? Anna: Yes. A lot. It’s like, even if I’m not paying for it I feel bad for my parents. Alexander: My parents would like me, of course, to graduate college in four years. And they said they already have the costs at least partially covered. But for me, I think that if I could either go to, like, a school that’s pretty

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good or a school that’s a bit lower, but that I get a scholarship for, I’d easily take a scholarship even though my parents don’t necessarily need the money. I feel like it’s just something to pay them back for everything. Anna: A lot of kids feel that way now. Rita: One of the things that came up last year was the political climate in the country. Nathan: Most kids in my school aren’t very politically informed at all. So when I’m sharing a political opinion and it’s controversial, I feel, like, very comfortable because they won’t know enough to say anything. Even if they do know about it, I like that too. I actually like engaging in conversations. Rita: So you feel that people are open to listening to the other side? Nathan: If they’re interested in politics at all. Elizabeth: A big part of high school is learning how to form your own opinion. So I think that, especially at my school, people definitely aren’t afraid to raise their hand and share their opinion. And for the most part I don’t think they get bullied or judged for it. Anna: Sometimes I’ll just keep my mouth shut if I don’t know what I’m talking about. ’Cause, like,

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{ SCHOOL DAZE }

WHAT IS YOUR BIGGEST CONCERN AS A HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT? BALANCING ACADEMICS WITH YOUR SOCIAL LIFE STUDYING FOR AND DOING WELL ON YOUR ACTS/SATS THE COLLEGE APPLICATION PROCESS AS A WHOLE PEER AND/OR PARENTAL PRESSURES

SAFETY AND SECURITY IN THE SCHOOL

we don’t learn a ton about politics in school. Sophia: I feel like the teachers keep it objective. Jordan: I’m going to disagree with you on that. I just finished taking AP U.S. government politics. That’s part of my major, and my teacher—I like her and I don’t mean to attack her—but she totally brought her personal political beliefs into the class. And I feel like some of the people in our class just absorbed it. They’re like, “I want to get a 5 on the AP exam.” I wholeheartedly disagreed with almost everything she had to say. Rita: Did you speak up? I’m just curious. Jordan: No. I didn’t feel comfortable saying anything about it because I didn’t want to get attacked for it. Christopher: My town is just about as far left as you can imagine, and it’s extremely feminist, which I’m fine with—I have three sisters. But there comes a point when so many people voice the same opinion and I don’t have the same opinion, I don’t voice any opinion because if I do, I’ll just get flamed. Nathan: In my school, I think we have pretty liberal teachers overall. But I’d say the students are more generally conservative, and that can cause a little bit of strife sometimes. Alexander: Just one example is the walkout [to protest gun violence]. It wasn’t supposed to be political at all, and the people who went up to talk on stage, it was just kind of bashing everything about the Second Amendment. That was something I didn’t like. Elizabeth: At my school it’s interesting, ’cause you throw in the religion aspect too. So people have a more focused view of certain issues, but on others they’ll disagree.

Caroline: In our school, I feel it comes with the sense of maturity. Everyone understands that not everyone’s going to agree, and it just comes down to that and that you have to respect what people need. Rachel: We’re small at Emerson—my grade is like 90 kids. So everyone’s really, like, closeknit. It’s like a closed community. You know the kids who are hard-core Republicans or hard-core Democrats. But we have a lot of discussions and a lot of debates where people aren’t afraid to state their opinions, and they’ll get heated in that moment. But at the end of the day, we respect each other. Rita: Is that part of the curriculum? Anna: Teachers definitely like to bring it in as much as possible. It’s just that there’s so much in the curriculum in a year that there’s not a lot of time for it. But it’s good to practice debating. Jordan: I feel like most of my school leans to the left. Most of the teachers lean to the left. There are a couple of us who are, like, more centrist or toward the right, and we’re kind of just left in the dark. Rita: Finally, let’s talk about balance. Jordan: On weekends I am a soccer referee, I coach a soccer team, I help run a soccer club. I find myself in trouble at some point. I get home from school on Friday and I’m like, “I have to do all my homework!” I don’t do it until 3 a.m. Sunday because I’m not home at all on the weekend because I’m doing all this other stuff. But I feel like balance is a hard thing just between schoolwork and outside of school. I’ve known Chris for a long time. We both live in Leonia, and I haven’t seen him in a while. Let’s BERGENMAG.COM

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just be honest. Right, Chris? I don’t have time. My friends are at school, I see them at school and then I don’t have any time other than that. Christopher: Balance isn’t really a struggle for me because I’ve learned to adapt to five, four hours of sleep a night. I play baseball. And then you gotta do an hour at the gym. Then you’ve got to do your three hours of homework, and then you gotta do an hour of YouTube. All: [Laugh.] Rachel: Balance is definitely a struggle. My conflict comes in that I want to be involved in too many things. Next year I’m going to be president of student council. I run all the events during the year. I do theater as well, so sometimes during play season we have rehearsals until 10 p.m. Then I get home and I’m exhausted after a long day and I have to do homework until 2 a.m. just to keep up or else I fall behind. And on top of that, balancing clubs and extracurriculars and schoolwork with trying to have a social life. I feel like, especially as a rising senior with college apps and everything like that coming up, finding balance is important for mental health. Anna: I’m involved in a lot too, but honestly I don’t know if I find balance a struggle. I think overall, people figure out after freshman year what they want to spend their time on. And if they’re doing too much, that’s on them. Rita: How many hours of sleep do you get? Anna: Probably around five, six hours. Alexander: I wouldn’t say it’s too difficult for me. The most difficult part of the year is when I’m playing a sport—I play soccer. Brielle: I personally don’t have a problem with balancing everything, but I think a big reason is because I don’t have a job. I think when I do get a job, I’m gonna struggle a little bit to figure out how to balance it, because I do spend a lot of time with my friends. Nathan: For me it’s not really too much of an issue because I was pretty strategic. I didn’t overload myself with things. I chose the three or four things I care about and I get, like, seven hours of sleep a night, which is pretty good. And I’m able to see my friends very consistently. Caroline: I have a tendency to want to be the best in everything, [and] I’m involved in a lot. Sometimes I have something that’s very important to do and I can’t necessarily just come out and hang out, and I wish sometimes people understood more so they don’t think I’m just blowing them off. Elizabeth: At the end of junior year I was kind of able to go, “Wait. I can work really hard during the week and have a really good time on the weekend, and there’s time I can make for family and friends.” I didn’t figure it out until the last couple months of junior year. But I think it’s possible. And what you’re doing, it has to make you happy. If it’s not making you happy, then why are you doing it? Editor’s note: Special thanks to Darius Amos, Gianna Barone, Victoria Beall, Carly Cannavina, Haley Longman and Daria Meoli.

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{ BACK TO SCHOOL }

A COUNTY WHERE EDUCATION COUNTS

percentage of 2017 high school seniors in Bergen County who graduated (versus 89.3 in Middlesex, 83.7 in Hudson and 86.8 in Manhattan) —Opendatanetwork.com

The numbers show it: From pre-K to postgraduate, Bergen continues to be a leader.

It won’t come as news to Bergen County residents, as they prepare their kids to return to the classroom next month, that education here is tops. For many, that’s a big part of why they’re here. (It isn’t the cheap cost of living!) Schools are an investment in the future, and it seems our county— which boasts some of the top-rated school districts in the high-ranking state of New Jersey—believes that investment is worth making. These stats paint a picture of education in Bergen:

percentage of residents age 25 or above in Bergen County (2013–2017) who have earned a bachelor’s degree or higher (compared with 39.3 for Hudson, 42 for Middlesex and 38.1 for New Jersey as a whole) ——U.S. Census Bureau

public high schools in Bergen County in the statewide ranking of the top 50 high schools for athletics

public school districts in Bergen County

—Bergen County at a Glance, December 2018

$67,101

47.9

8

77

average salary for a high school teacher in New Jersey as of June 2019 —Salary.com

10

institutions or campuses of higher education in Bergen County

—New Jersey Office of the Secretary of Higher Education

230,965 total Bergen County residents enrolled in some type of schooling, from pre-K to graduate school

—Niche.com

—Towncharts.com

132,006

Bergen County students enrolled in K–12 district schools

—New Jersey Department of Education

12

number of students per teacher in Bergen in 2014 (versus 13 in Hudson and Middlesex and 14 in Manhattan) —Opendatanetwork.com

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.49

diversity score of Bergen County public schools (which is higher than the state average of .43)

14

percentage of high school students in Bergen County enrolled in private schools 

—Towncharts.com

—Publicschoolreview.com BERGENMAG.COM

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FAFSA-BergenMag-0719.qxp 7/11/19 9:34 AM Page 1

By ďŹ ling a Free Application for Federal Student Aid, students earn access to programs that can help pay for Bergen Community College – even by making it tuition-free!

Learn more at studentaid.ed.gov/sa/fafsa or email fafsa@bergen.edu.

055_BERGEN_0819.indd 1

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{ FROM THE SIDELINES} 2018 record/ # of seasons:

THE LIFE OF THE COACH

Leading a Bergen County high school football team is a double duty: winning on the field and shaping well-rounded student-athletes. By Darius Amos

Are you ready for some football? With a Super Bowl-caliber venue and two pro teams rooted in our backyard, we’d say Bergen County is always ready for the gridiron. But the Jets and Giants aren’t the only games in town: Our high school football programs compete with the best—many of the teams are in the national championship hunt annually—and produce college-level talent on and off the field. In each case, the student-athletes can thank their coaches for a part of the success. Here are snapshots of six guys at the helm of their programs, teaching kids the X’s and O’s of the game as well as lessons in life. BERGENMAG.COM

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Where did you play high school football and where did you line up?

What are you doing when you’re not on the sidelines?

3–6, second season

I was a member of the Bogota High School Class of 2005 and played offensive and defensive line.

I teach physical education and health at Bogota High.

Be ou te at ou Re an

3–6, fourth season

I was a tight end and defensive end at Passaic Valley.

You can find me at Pascack Valley—I’m a physical education and health teacher there. But if I’m not on the football field, I’m home spending time with my family and friends.

W ta in pr si tu

13–0, state champion 18th season

I was a wide receiver and defensive back at Midland Park High School.

You’ll find me inside the school—I’m a physical education teacher.

Th ta th ow an sit bo No to

10–2, state champion sixth season

St. Joseph is my alma mater. I played here and graduated in 1999.

When I’m not coaching, I work at St. Joe’s in the Advancement and Admissions office.

Ib lif bo in th te if ha

9-3, 35th season

I captained the Ridgewood football team in 1969 and played offensive and defensive tackle.

I teach a wellness and lifestyle class, a hybrid of health and PE. It’s taught in the classroom, in the fitness center to show kids what an average person should be doing in a weight room, and on the track for aerobic exercises.

Fo la w a cr

8–4, 16th season

I was a receiver, free safety and punt returner when I played at Miller Place High School in New York.

When I’m not coaching, I’m teaching history at River Dell High School. If you don’t see me on the sidelines, you can find me in the high school library.

W ac re in st te gi

BRIAN APPLETON Bogota

LEN CUSUMANO Pascack Valley

DREW GIBBS Ramapo

AUGIE HOFFMAN

St Joseph’s Regional

CHUCK JOHNSON Ridgewood

DJ NIMPHIUS River Dell

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a

t

n ss

Besides showing them how to play the sport, what lessons are you trying to teach your student-athletes?

What’s your favorite Do you have any pre-game sports rituals or superstitions? movie?

Most memorable coaching moment?

Beyond the X’s and O’s, we look for our athletes to show great character—on the field, in the classroom and at home. We expect them to follow our core values of P.R.I.D.E. (Passion, Responsibility, Integrity, Discipline and Enthusiasm).

I try to visualize the game for 15 minutes. I take this time by myself and go through the game minute by minute. I go through everything as detailed as possible—pre-game warmups, coin toss, quarter by quarter and post-game.

The Program.

“E + R = O” or “Event + Reaction = Outcome.” The event will always happen; you cannot control that.

It was in 2009, my first year as an assistant coach for Bogota. We had a playoff win against Westwood in Westwood. It was a classic game—and the muddiest I have ever been a part of. Both teams played with a lot of heart, and we came out with the win.

We hope they understand the importance of sacrificing time, hard work in preparation and toughness under pressure—and that they respond to situations in life with a great attitude and perseverance.

That was more prevalent when I was a player. I don’t have any go-to rituals now other than making sure we cover everything we need to as a team in our pre-game walk- through.

Rocky.

“Lead, follow or get out of the way.”

It’s definitely winning back-to-back state championships in our 2013 and 2014 seasons.

There are five things. No. 1 is the importance of the team and willingly putting the needs of the group ahead of your own personal interests. No. 2 is perseverance, never giving up regardless of the situation. No. 3 is resilience, the ability to bounce back after disappointments. No. 4 is a great work ethic, and No. 5 is to win or lose with dignity and grace.

I try to have a Reuben sandwich from Market Basket in Franklin Lakes before every Friday night game. If we’re playing on Saturday afternoon, my pre-game meal is a Taylor ham, egg and cheese from Abbie’s Diner in Wyckoff.

Remember the Titans.

“The only time winning comes before work is in the dictionary.”

After 18 years on the sidelines with great kids, there are too many good memories to pick just one.

I believe football teaches some of life’s greatest lessons. I hope my boys learn what it means to be a cog in a much greater operation. I want them to learn to sacrifice for the betterment of their teammates and that if they’re selfless, great things will happen.

I always have to get a workout in on game day. I think it helps get some of the tension and anxiety out prior to the game.

The Program and Bull Durham.

“Life is a storm, my young friend. You will bask in the sunlight one moment, be shattered on the rocks the next. What makes you a man is what you do when that storm comes.” —Alexandre Dumas

It was last season in the state championship, when we beat Bergen Catholic 13–0 at MetLife Stadium.

Football mimics the trials and tribulations in life, and it’s one of the best ways to teach life ethics skills. It’s a theater to model those things and create opportunities to teach.

I’m not a big superstition guy. Pre-game is all about being together. We meet in the gym before the game; the kids bring their own music and I sit with them.

Rudy and Rocky.

I try to come up with a theme each year. This year’s theme is, “It’s time to start grinding.” We have the phrase on wristbands and a banner in the weight room.

Without question, my two greatest moments were the opportunities I had to coach my sons. Greg was the quarterback from 2005 to 2007, and Mike was a tight end in 2010–11.

We want to teach the kids that achieving success isn’t easy. It requires hard work and may even include failure. We also want the students to learn how to play as a team, to play for and with the guy or girl next to you.

What do I do? I just disappear for a little bit.

Hoosiers and Chariots of Fire.

The poem The Guy in the Glass by Dale Wimbrow.

It really touches my heart when I see invested kids cry after a championship game or event—whether it’s in victory or defeat. The humanity of it tells the entire story of what really matters.

, c

f

Favorite quote or inspirational saying?

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{ FASHION }

PRINT IT Whether you’re heading back to school or just need a seasonal wardrobe refresh, pretty patterns add a pop to your everyday ensembles.

Photography by Daniel Springston

Dress by Lover, shoes by Jimmy Choo, both available at Gito, Englewood, 201.541.7330.

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Jacket and shorts by Cupcakes and Cashmere, bodysuit by Dance & Marvel, bag by Sorial, all available at Ginger N’ Cream, Westwood, 201.664.2440.

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{ FASHION }

Leather jacket by Suprema, shirt and pants by MiJo by Michelle Jonas, clutch by Kempton & Co., shoes by Calaxini, all available at Society Femme, Westwood, 201.722.9300.

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Dress by Wild Honey, T-shirt by Double Zero, belt bag by Like Dreams, sneakers by Steve Madden, all available at Ginger N’ Cream, Westwood.

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{ FASHION }

Jacket and pants by Mason’s, tank top by Monrow, bag by Kempton & Co., all available at Society Femme, Westwood.

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Jacket by Cupcakes and Cashmere, top by Waverly Grey, pants by Heartloom, bag by Ginger N’ Cream, boots by Sam Edelman, all available at Ginger N’ Cream, Westwood.

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{ ESCAPES }

Which of these educational destinations fits your family’s passion? By Gianna Barone It won’t be long before the classroom beckons. But who says that school has a monopoly on knowledge? Here are a half-dozen travel destinations that can teach you plenty without taking attendance. Whether you’re making the most of late summer or planning a family getaway for fall, these spots—keyed to six areas of interest so you can choose the subject you’d like to “major” in—offer an enriching travel curriculum. Now, just in case there’s a test, pay close attention to the fun!

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FOR ART LOVERS…

Marfa, Texas This west Texas desert town half the size of Ho-Ho-Kus has achieved mythical status among art and music scenesters from both coasts. Named for a Russian character in a Jules Verne novel, it has a down-home, relaxed vibe that keeps it from becoming the least bit pretentious. Visual and contemporary art fans will appreciate that Marfa serves as a giant art exhibit. The Judd Foundation, which preserves the work of the late Marfa pioneer, artist and educator Donald Judd, offers custom-guided tours of the artist’s studios and workspaces around town, and you can spend time studying select sculptures by Marfa’s biggest names in minimalist art. If you’re traveling in the fall, the Judd Foundation will host “open hours” when visitors can learn about Judd’s (and Marfa’s) role in the minimalism movement of the 1960s and ’70s. While in town, visitors can turn their Wild West inspiration into art at Workshops Marfa, a crafting center that teaches classes on everything from repairing Japanese pottery to accurately painting detailed landscapes of south Texas.

FOR HISTORY BUFFS…

Boston, Massachusetts Stop the presses—Boston is historic! OK, so you knew that, but did you know how handson history can be? Head to the harbor and climb aboard the Boston Tea Party Ship and Museum, where you can participate in the “Destruction of the Tea” program, throwing actual tea parcels overboard and learning all about the protests against “taxation without representation.” For more historical fun on the water, hop onto the U.S. Navy’s oldest commissioned ship that’s still afloat, the U.S.S. Constitution, for a historical cruise around the harbor that offers incredible views of landmarks such as the Bunker Hill monument and the Old North Church. After docking, roam around the U.S.S. Constitution Museum to explore exhibits on the War of 1812, the ship’s crew and artifacts from the sailors who inhabited the vessel. For an adults-only itinerary, end your evening with a Boston Crawling pub crawl that includes a guided tour of major American Revolution sites and historical taverns—along with sips from the best of Boston’s local brews.

Top left: courtesy of the Judd Foundation

‘FIELD’ TRIPS

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LEFT PHOTO COURTESY OF THE JUDD FOUNDATION

FOR SCIENCE GEEKS…

Huntsville, Alabama Prepare for an out-of-this-world vacation when you travel down to the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville and enroll the whole family in Space Camp! A dream destination since 1982, the Family Space Camp Program invites your crew to get a firsthand look at a rocket’s journey from design to engineering to blastoff. Learn what it’s like to experience astronaut boot camp with a simulation mission, realistic operations training, rocket construction and an all-encompassing history lesson on the nation’s space program. Set off on your three-day mission to Rocket City and learn about the behind-the-scenes work it takes to run a real rocket launch and discover what the pros experience in residence at the International Space Station. Space Camp also offers an Aviation Challenge Camp Program for families who are eager to learn about the power and art of aviation, which includes fighter pilot simulations, a lesson in flight survival skills and a historical overview of the advancements in flight. (If you want to sound like a native, go easy on the “ville” here—it’s more like “Hunts’v’l.”)

FOR ANIMAL LOVERS...

San Diego, California Anyone with even a passing interest in wildlife should someday check out the more than 3,000 species at the San Diego Zoo, the most visited zoological reservation in the United States. But for the true zoologists at heart, the San Diego Zoo offers upgraded experience “packages” that take visitors behind the scenes to learn about—and participate in—the care of animals. If you’ve ever wondered what the critters do after the zoo gates close, the “Animals in Action” package allows ticket-holders to feed, touch and learn facts about animals that are not available for viewing by general admission. For a truly immersive behind-the-scenes encounter, the five- or eight-hour Exclusive VIP Experience package grants you a personal tour guide at the zoo, complete with special access to off-exhibit areas, a sit-down meal inside the park and personal interactions with creatures big and small.

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FOR FOODIES…

Gazelle, California Put away the canoe and sharpen your butcher knife— this isn’t your childhood camp experience. Welcome to Meat Camp, held at Belcampo Farms in Gazelle, a small “censusdesignated place” in northern California’s Siskiyou County that’s home to a modest population of roughly 70. Covering about half a mile of land, Gazelle’s sparse homesteads and desert landscape provide the perfect backdrop for a retreat in which foodies spend three days learning the secrets of how to butcher, prepare and enjoy fresh meats. It’s a rugged, stripped-down culinary experience like none other. Camp out for three days and two nights in a luxury-style tent in one of the quietest, most surreal locations in the Golden State. Also on offer are upgraded glamping (glamour camping) options on Belcampo’s orchard. The workshop covers info about animal welfare-approved and organic farming, and you can develop knife skills that are sure to impress future dinner guests. Enjoy this long, unplugged weekend away as a couple, with your whole meat-loving family or even as an adventurous and gritty spin on a girls’ getaway.

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FOR SPORTS FANATICS…

Park City, Utah Grab your skis and parka when you head out west to Park City’s pro-approved slopes for a trip that is sure to improve your shred. The Mahre Training Center at Deer Valley Resort is run by former Team USA Olympic medal-winning skiers (and twin brothers) Phil and Steve Mahre. Here you can sharpen your skills and train alongside other Olympic medalists in an exclusive ski camp. With options for three- or five-day excursions on the slopes, your registration includes daily ski instruction, training by professional skiers and a video analysis with a critique from world-renowned coaches. After your day of expert-level ski practice, kick back in style at one of Deer Valley Resort’s luxury inns and private lodgings. Warm up frozen fingers while at Fireside Dining restaurant or stop by Snowshoe Tommy’s, Deer Valley’s cozy coffee-brewing cabin.

AUGUST 2019

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SPRING 2019

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SUMMER SWEETS

Chill out and enjoy the last few weeks of summer with any­—or all—of these perfectly refreshing frozen treats.

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{ TASTES }

RED VELVET ICE CREAM SANDWICHES Yields: 8 servings

INGREDIENTS

n2  ¾ oz. unsalted butter, softened n 4½ oz. soft light brown sugar n 1 medium egg n 1 tsp. vanilla extract n ½ tsp. baking powder n 6 oz. plain flour n 2 fl. oz. buttermilk n 1 Tbs. good quality red food coloring n pinch of salt n 8 scoops vanilla ice cream n icing sugar, for dusting

DIRECTIONS

Preheat the oven to 350°F and line three baking trays with baking parchment. Put the butter and sugar in the bowl of a food processor and beat for 3 minutes until light and fluffy. Add the egg and vanilla extract and beat until well-combined. Add the baking powder. With the machine on low speed, beat in the flour and buttermilk alternately. Finally, beat in the food coloring and the salt. Spoon the batter into a piping bag fitted with a ½-inch plain nozzle. Pipe the batter onto the lined baking trays to form 16 large circles, roughly 2¾ inches in diameter. Leave a 1½ inch space between them as they will spread upon cooking.

Who doesn’t love red velvet and ice cream? Combining two favorite treats and flavors brings dessert to the next level and will impress guests at any event you’re hosting.”

—Kara Schnaidt, owner, Kara Kakes, Franklin Lakes

Bake for 16-18 minutes or until they are puffed up and spring back to the touch. Cool on the baking trays. Remove the ice cream from the freezer and allow it to soften for 4-5 minutes before scooping and sandwiching it between each pair of biscuits. Gently press together with your hands before serving, and dust with icing sugar. Tip: These sandwiches can be made in advance and returned to the freezer. Simply remove from the freezer 5 minutes or so before serving.

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{ TASTES }

BLACK AND BLUE FREAKSHAKE Yields: 4 servings

INGREDIENTS

6 oz. blueberries 1 Tbs. water 1 Tbs. clear honey 6 scoops blackberry ice cream n 12 mini meringues n additional handful of blueberries and a few blackberries n silver balls (optional) n n n n

DIRECTIONS

For the compote, put the blueberries, water and honey into a small saucepan and cook over low heat for 5-6 minutes, stirring intermittently, until the berries burst. If needed, lightly mash with a masher until most berries have been crushed. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. To assemble the sundaes, spoon 1-2 Tbs. of compote into the base of each sundae glass. Build up alternate layers of ice cream, meringues, compote and blueberries, finishing with a scoop of ice cream, a couple of meringues and some berries. Sprinkle with a few silver balls, if using, and serve immediately.

Top this shake with chia, flax seeds or cacao nibs to add crunchy texture and nutrients to this recipe. You can also use ice cream made with organic milk for added health benefits.�

—Jane Mun, executive pastry chef, Ciel Dessert, Westwood

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{ TASTES }

WATERMELON AND STRAWBERRY GRANITA Yields: 8-10 servings

INGREDIENTS

n 1 unwaxed lime n 3½ oz. golden caster sugar n 7 fl. oz. water, room temperature n ½ watermelon, peeled, deseeded and cut into chunks (approx. 11 lbs. 10 oz. flesh) n 9 oz. strawberries, hulled and halved, plus extra to decorate, if desired

DIRECTIONS

Thinly pare the rind from the lime and put it in a small saucepan with the sugar and water. Squeeze the lime juice into the pan. Bring to a boil and simmer for 6-8 minutes until the volume is reduced roughly by half to make a syrup. Remove from the heat, and set aside to cool to room temperature before removing the lime rind. Put the cooled syrup, watermelon chunks and strawberries in the bowl of a food processor and pulse until smooth. Pour into a shallow baking dish (ceramic or metal—a metal one will freeze fastest) and spread the bright red pulp evenly. Transfer to the freezer and freeze the mixture until the edges begin to set, for about 3035 minutes. Remove from the freezer and use a fork to scrape and break up the frozen portions. Freeze again, scraping and breaking up the granita every 20-30 minutes until it resembles fluffy shaved ice—the total time will take 2-4 hours. Serve the granita in bowls or glasses, decorated with strawberries, if using.

Before using the lime peels, clean them by rubbing them with coarse salt and rinsing off the salt with water. Then pass the peels through a fine mesh strainer before putting them into the saucepan for better texture in your granita.”

—Jane Mun, executive pastry chef, Ciel Dessert, Westwood

All recipes and photos are reprinted with permission from Jude’s Ice Cream & Desserts: Scoops, Bakes, Shakes And Sauces by Chow and Alex Mezger. Photos by Yuki Sugiura © Kyle Books.

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{ POWER FOOD }

The Facts on Flax

Bursting with potential health benefits, it may be just the seed you need.

The use of flaxseed for nutritional benefits is almost as old as civilization itself. Cultivation of the seed, which comes from a plant with a stunning blue-violet flower, can be traced back to 3000 B.C., and records show it was used for medicinal purposes in the time of Hippocrates and among the ancient Egyptians; a few centuries later, Charlemagne passed laws requiring its consumption. Today, nutritionists laud its heart-health benefits as well as its potential ability to help ward off certain types of cancer. As an added plus, it’s tasty. POWER UP For a food with a composition that’s almost one-half oil, flaxseed is relatively low in calories. One serving (a tablespoon of ground flaxseeds) has only 37 calories. With that come 1.3 grams of protein (3 percent of the recommended daily value, or DV) and 2 grams of fiber (8 percent DV). But flaxseed’s greatest claim to fame is its high content of omega-3 fatty acids. The seed is a top provider of these hearthealthy polyunsaturated fats, offering more in a tablespoon than an entire serving of salmon. The National Institutes of Health lists flaxseeds as a top source of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA)—one tablespoon of whole flaxseeds has more than 2 grams of ALA, and the same amount of flaxseed oil has 7 grams (the oil has a higher calorie count—about 120 in a tablespoon). Flaxseed also beats out all fruits and vegetables for its levels of an antioxidant called lignans, which studies have shown may prevent breast and prostate cancers and reduce levels of low-density lipoprotein, better known as “bad” cholesterol. Just 100 grams of flaxseed offers three times more of this phytochemical than the most lignan-rich fruit (prunes) or vegetable (kale). A caveat: The Mayo Clinic suggests that flaxseed oil may have less cancerfighting prowess than the seeds themselves. Recent research suggests that flaxseed may help lower blood-sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. Again, that’s not the oil, but the oil itself got good news this year with publication of a study indicating that mice who dined regularly on it had healthier levels of gut microbiota—along with high energy levels and better glucose tolerance—than control subjects.

eaten whole—they add a pleasant texture to soups and salads— nutrition experts say the body gets more benefits from the seed when it’s ground because it doesn’t have to break through the hard outer layer during digestion. The downside is that the ground seeds perish faster. As a solution, buy the seeds whole and grind them yourself in a coffee or spice grinder—they last up to year in a cabinet whole and only about a month ground. The oil should be kept in the refrigerator, and the expiration date should be heeded—a bitter taste indicates that the oil has gone bad. One of the additional benefits of this power food is its versatility. Flaxseeds’ noticeably nutty flavor is mild, so they can be added to most dishes without altering their taste. Bake them into bread or muffins; sprinkle them in smoothies, on rice and on salads, or use them as a breading for vegetables or protein. You also can use flax as a vegan egg substitute while baking. Mix one tablespoon ground with three tablespoons water to replace one egg in a recipe. Flaxseed oil can take the place of butter on vegetables, and when mixed with an acid, like lemon or vinegar, it makes for a nutritious salad dressing. —Liz Donovan

7

BUY/STORE/SERVE For culinary purposes, flaxseed is available whole, ground or pressed into oil, otherwise known as linseed oil. It’s also sold in capsule form to take as a supplement. Although the seeds can be

DID YOU KNOW? Egyptian mummies were wrapped in linen made from flaxseeds.

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{ SPIRITS }

A Tropical Treat Savor the island flavor of this sweet mocktail.

FROZEN PINEAPPLE MARGARITA INGREDIENTS

■ 2 lbs. 3 oz. small pineapple chunks, frozen ■ 9 fl. oz. quick gingered tepache ■ juice of 4 limes ■ ¼ tsp. Himalayan salt ■ dried hibiscus flowers ■ additional Himalayan salt (for garnish) ■ 1 additional lime, cut into wedges (for garnish)

Tepache is a Mexican fermented beverage made from the rinds of a pineapple, and what better way to use a whole pineapple than in this frozen margarita? If you want to make this an alcoholic beverage, add in your favorite spiced rum or tequila.”

DIRECTIONS

■ Chill four margarita glasses in the freezer for at least 10 minutes. ■ Prepare the garnish by grinding together the dried hibiscus flowers and Himalayan salt and placing in a saucer or shallow dish. Set aside. ■ Put the frozen pineapple chunks, tepache, lime juice and Himalayan salt in a blender and blend until smooth. ■ Run a wedge of lime around the rim of each glass and then dip the rim into the hibiscus salt. ■ Scoop the frozen margarita into the glasses, being careful not to disturb the salty rim.

—Michael Stroganoff, bar manager, Esty Street, Park Ridge

Recipe courtesy of Alcohol-Free Cocktails

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

ASK

THE HE ALTH PROFESSIONAL

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ASK T H E H E A LT H P RO

How do you decide to continue non-surgical care or start considering surgical options for your back and leg pain? As one of NJBSC’s advocates for conservative treatments, I feel that the most time-tested cure for back and leg pain is time itself. Back and leg pain often gets better on its own when supplemented with non-surgical treatments like activity modification, pain relievers, physical therapy and steroid injections. Surgical intervention may be needed in some cases. I recommend watching out for the following symptoms to help you decide: • Your pain and weakness are bad enough to get in the way of your normal activities and have become more than you can manage. • You’ve tried other treatments, such as modifying your activities, taking medicine to manage pain including steroid injections and getting physical therapy, for at least a few months, and they don’t seem to be helping anymore. • You’re less able than usual to control your bladder or bowels. • You notice sudden changes in your ability to walk in a steady way, or your movements become clumsy. If you suffer from any of these symptoms, spine surgery may be warranted. You should discuss these symptoms with your spine surgeon to sort out where you stand. At NJBSC, we believe that conservative care is the way to go at first until you feel the need to have a conversation about surgery with one of our top-notch surgeons.

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• Board-certified Neurosurgeon - Fellow of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons • Fellowship trained in Complex & Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery, University of Miami • Served at the renowned Miami Project to Cure Paralysis

Why should you see a spinal surgeon who often rejects surgery as a first option? At NJBSC, we have a unique approach to patients with pain. We first use state-ofthe-art tests (beyond MRI) to find the pain generator. If obvious, we consider a minimal access approach. If not, or the patient prefers a conservative approach, we harness the remarkable synergy between the brain and the body. This is done through either exercise and/or behavioral modifications. To help our patients better understand the psychology and physiology behind back pain, I wrote The End of Back Pain (HarperOne, 2014), which teaches patients how to strengthen their “hidden core” to treat pain. Shopping for a doctor to care for your spine can be a daunting task. Where do you start? We try constructing treatments that are individualized and aimed at the acquisition of back health. I believe that it is “humanity” rather than “hands” that distinguishes a surgeon. Patients should choose their surgeon based on his or her character. How to achieve health is explored in my second book, The Me in Medicine (Changing Lives, 2018).

Patrick Roth, M.D.

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• Founding member of NJBSC • Chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery at Hackensack University Medical Center and Chair of Hackensack School of Medicine at Seton Hall • Completing Master’s in Public Health at Columbia University

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ASK T H E H E A LT H P RO

What do you do if your back operation fails? If you’ve had back surgery and the symptoms don’t improve, there may be multiple reasons why. It could be because the nerves weren’t adequately decompressed, the total balance of your spine wasn’t taken into consideration or the best approach to your back problem wasn’t fully addressed. In cases like this, revision spine surgery may be necessary. In addition to recurring symptoms, you may begin experiencing new symptoms after the first procedure. It takes a well-formulated plan for a successful second back surgery. We need to appropriately decompress the nerves, restore proper alignment or use a different approach to achieve the end goal of healing your back. Spinal revision surgery is a difficult procedure, but with the unique and extensive experience, skills and training that we have within our practice at NJBSC, we can reach an excellent outcome. With a strong background in the minimally invasive treatment of complex spinal conditions, including spinal trauma, spinal degenerative disorders, deformity and spinal tumors, I help patients manage all aspects of their spinal disease to significantly improve their quality of life. At NJBSC, physicians and surgeons have a temperament that provides a prudent, thoughtful level of treatment and care which makes all the difference in a patient’s outcome, as well as their outlook.

Harshpal Singh, M.D. NORTH JERSEY BRAIN & SPINE CENTER

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What is the XLIF procedure for back pain and what are its advantages? The XLIF procedure, which is extreme lateral lumbar interbody fusion, is used to treat leg or back pain caused by a number of degenerative disc conditions. The technique has a number of benefits over more traditional fusion techniques. The procedure provides direct access to the disk through a less damaging corridor. Truly minimal access surgery, this approach through the side of the spine lets us avoid the major back muscles, offers immediate support to the spine and results in highly successful fusion rates. As the first neurosurgeon in New Jersey to receive extensive training and perform the procedure, and one of a small number of highly experienced XLIF surgeons in the country, I’m able to offer this advanced procedure, if appropriate, to help patients regain their back health, and resume a more functional lifestyle. At NJBSC, we focus on conservative management of patients with spinal conditions. When we find that surgery is right for a patient, we use the most advanced technology to improve outcomes. Our practice is innovative and adopts the latest proven techniques and technologies to treat our patients. Each patient is approached with their own individualized treatment plan. At NJBSC, we know that choosing a doctor to treat spinal conditions is a serious decision. Our patient outcomes matter most, regardless of whether achieved through surgery, or hopefully less invasive options.

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Roy D. Vingan, M.D. • Founding member of NJBSC • Board-certified neurosurgeon • Former president of the medical staff at Hackensack University Medical Center • President of New Jersey Spine Society 2015-2019

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{ ON THE TOWN }

Gatherings

Whether it’s at a charity gala or networking event, Bergenites always show up to support their friends and neighbors.

1 ACADEMY OF THE HOLY ANGELS

2

HACKENSACK UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER FOUNDATION

3

Leaders and staff from Hackensack Meridian Health John Theurer Cancer Center gathered alongside network leaders and board members at the recent “Springtime in Paris” gala, held at Carnegie Hall in New York City. The event raised more than $500,000, which will benefit the John Theurer Cancer Center and its initiatives. 3 Hackensack University Medical Center staff gathers at Carnegie Hall for the hospital’s spring gala.

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Academy of the Holy Angels (1,2), Hackensack University Medical Center (3), Chris Marksbury (4-13)

Students, faculty and staff at the Academy of the Holy Angels in Demarest participated in Service Day, offering their time and skills to the community. Volunteers spent the day at New Jersey Audubon’s Lorrimer Sanctuary in Franklin Lakes, Allison Park in Englewood Cliffs, Holy Name Medical Center in Teaneck and the Community FoodBank of New Jersey in Hillside, among other places. 1,2 Holy Angels students volunteer throughout the community.

AUGUST 2019

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{ ON THE TOWN } BERGEN MAGAZINE BERGEN magazine held a networking event at Park West Loft in Ridgewood, where the publication’s staff members socialized with various Bergen County business owners. Attendees also enjoyed cocktails and appetizers. 4 BERGEN magazine staff 5 Kathy and John Nye, Michael Mariotti 6 Brian Parks, Heather Knapp 7 Angela Thomas, BERGEN Editor-in-Chief Rita Guarna 8 Mark Bograd, Karen Arakelian 9 Rolando Cibischino, Mariann and Raymond Sweeney 10 Angela Thomas, Tom Flannery, Eva Hajek, John Cioletti 11 Ramona Panus, Kim Adams 12 Carla Culkin, Cynthia Aybar 13 Linda Alvino, Bart Colasuono 14 Donna Slaughter, Corinne Donaghey, Sandra Catania 15 Zinka Ramdedovic, Darren Magarro 16 Scott Doty, Rita Guarna, Dan D’Agostino, Andrea Vecchione

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Academy of the Holy Angels (1,2), Hackensack University Medical Center (3), Chris Marksbury (4-13)

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{ ON THE TOWN }

Be There

From festivals and fundraisers to concerts and competitions, there’s something for everyone this month in Bergen County. AUG 5 Certified Financial Services of Paramus will host the annual TEE OFF FOR THE KIDS fundraiser at the North Jersey Country Club in Wayne. The event will benefit Make-A-Wish New Jersey and begin with registration at 10:15 a.m. followed by a barbecue lunch. The first golfers will tee off at 12 p.m., and a cocktail and dinner program will start at 6 p.m. For registration fees, sponsorship opportunities and more details, check out the events page at cfsllc.com.

AUG 8 Whether you’re a budding Picasso or just like to watch Bob Ross on Netflix, PAINT NITE at The Olive Garden in Ramsey is the place to show off your artistic side. From 7 to 9 p.m., painters of all skill levels (age 21 and older) can create a masterpiece—under the guidance and supervision of a session director—while sipping a glass or two of wine. Admission: $35. Paintnite.com has more info and registration forms.

AUG 10 Browse (and perhaps buy) some of the artistic creations of more than 60 artisans at the HERMITAGE MUSEUM OUTDOOR CRAFT FAIR in Ho-Ho-Kus. The event, scheduled from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., is held on the grounds of the historic mansion and features kids’ activities and food vendors. Admission is $4, which includes entry to the museum. For more info, visit pjspromotions.com. AUG 11 Stash the tablets and video games, and bring your little ones to the JMK SUMMERTIME DOLL & BEAR SHOW from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. at the Hilton in Hasbrouck Heights. Thousands of antique, vintage, collectible and contemporary toy models for all ages (yes, even grown-ups) will be on display and available for purchase. Hours of playtime await! Admission: $7. Details are available at jmkshows. com. AUG 11 Relax your mind and body with a session of SUNSET YOGA, from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hackensack’s Atlantic Street Park. Led by instructor Jennifer Dorney, the class is open to yogis of all ages and skill levels. Admission: FREE. Head to hacpac.org for the full scoop. AUG 13, 20, 27 Why stay indoors this summer when you can watch MOVIES UNDER THE STARS at Teaneck’s Votee Park? The featured films are recent family-friendly box office hits The Incredibles 2 (Aug. 13), Smallfoot (Aug. 20) and Ralph Breaks the Internet (Aug. 27). Admission and popcorn are FREE. See teanecknj.gov for more information. AUG 14 Swing to the big brass sound of the WALDWICK BAND, which will perform at 7 p.m. in Ridgefield Park’s McGowan Park. The FREE concert will feature selections from the band’s repertoire, including from stage and film, orchestral arrangements and more. Find out more at waldwickband.org.

August 11 SUNSET YOGA

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August 20 SQUEEZE

AUG 18 Get a taste of some of New Jersey’s best food trucks at the PARAMUS FOOD TRUCK FESTIVAL, scheduled from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. at Garden State Plaza in Paramus. You’ll find everything your taste buds crave and all the Instagram content you need, from All-American hot dogs and sweet treats to tasty empanadas and lobster rolls. General admission is $5; kids age 10 and under are FREE. Head to justjerseyfest.com to find out more. AUG 20 Here’s a tempting event: New wave icons SQUEEZE will take the bergenPAC stage in Englewood at 8 p.m. as part of their Squeeze Songbook Tour. Sing along as the band plays tunes from its list of hits including “Tempted,” “Pulling Mussels” and “Cool for Cats.” Tickets start at $59. For additional information or to buy tickets, go to bergenpac.org. AUG 20 Cool cars and loud guitars return to Overpeck Park in Ridgefield Park for the Q ROCK AND ROLL CAR SHOW. From 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., classic and novelty autos will fill the park, while a bounce house, live music, vendors and more entertain the crowd. Admission: FREE. Car registration: $10. Check Q1043.iheart.com for more. AUG 25 Find your next treasure or pick out a gift

for that special someone at Westwood’s ANTIQUES IN THE PARK SHOW. The annual event takes place in Veterans’ Memorial Park from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and showcases products from a variety of vendors. Admission is FREE. To learn more, visit njvendors.com.

AUG 25 Enjoy great music and salute the country’s veterans at the annual BERGEN COUNTY MUSICAL FESTIVAL, which kicks off at 1 p.m. at Overpeck Park in Ridgefield Park. The family-friendly concert is FREE and will feature The Dells, The Delfonics, The Supremes Revue and more. Check out bergencountymusicfestival.com for more details. SEPT 7 If you see one more outdoor show this summer, be sure it’s the LET IT GROW BENEFIT CONCERT. The music festival raises money for Push to Walk, a nonprofit that helps individuals with paralysis, and is held at Let It Grow’s location, 52 Ackerson St. in River Edge. Performers include local bands like Wig Jam, The Particle Theory and Danny Lane Band & The High Wolfs, among others. Food and refreshments will be available for purchase. General admission: $30; kids age 12 and under are FREE. Find out more at Let It Grow’s Facebook page (@letitgrow1986).

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Send event listings to: BERGEN, 1 Maynard Dr., Park Ridge, NJ 07656; or email us at editor@wainscotmedia.com. Listings must be received two months before the event and must include a phone number or website that will be published. Share events online by clicking the “Submit an Event” link below the Community Calendar at bergenmag.com.

AUGUST 2019

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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IN THE CLASSROOM, ON THE FIELD AND IN SERVICE TO OTHERS Bergen Catholic is a college preparatory school where young boys become Christian gentlemen and leaders who discover a devotion for helping others. The curriculum is rigorous. Students enjoy rewarding clubs, enriching programs in art, music, theater, championship athletics, and an unmatched brotherhood, where Brothers-Help-Brothers. The Crusader College Counseling Experience begins freshman year providing support and results as evidenced by the fact that the Class of 2019 achieved multiple acceptances to top tier schools including Princeton, Cornell, Georgetown, Notre Dame, Boston College, and NYU. Enrollment is selective. For more information, call the Admissions Department at (201) 634-2205.

Founded and staffed by the Edmund Rice Christian Brothers Bergen Catholic High School 1040 Oradell Avenue Oradell, NJ 07649 | P: 201.261.1844 F: 201.599.9507 | www.bergencatholic.org

#1 Ranked Catholic High School in Bergen County. #1 Ranked All-Boys Catholic High School in Bergen County.


EDUCATION PLANNER SADDLE RIVER DAY SCHOOL Saddle River Day School is a coed, college-prep day school enrolling approximately 320 students in PreK-12. A low student-teacher ratio provides personal attention

Advertise Education Planner Special Advertising Section

in a rigorous academic setting and allows students the opportunity to engage in learning outside of the classroom through innovative activities like

OCTOBER 2019 ISSUE

robotics, TEDx and career/entrepreneurial exploration. The school boasts state-of-the-art facilities including a Maker Space lab and fully equipped graphic arts center, and has an awardwinning performing/visual arts program and an outstanding athletics program. Graduates are prepared for college and are coveted by some of the nation’s most selective colleges, including Boston College, Michigan, NYU and UPenn..

SPECIAL ADVERTIS

ING SECTION

WHO SHOULD PARTICIPATE? Private schools, colleges and universities, continuing education programs, tutoring and college prep services, and more.

147 CHESTNUT RIDGE RD., SADDLE RIVER, NJ 201.327.4050, SADDLERIVERDAY.ORG

SAINT JOSEPH REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL Since 1962, Saint Joseph Regional High School has been synonymous with excellence in Catholic college preparatory

EDUCATION

Promote your school or services to parents at key decision-making times!

PL ANN ER

education. Visit our beautiful 33-acre suburban campus with state-of-the-art facilities (New Science Labs, Media Center, TV Studio, Turf Athletic Field and renovated Gymnasium) and meet the special people who make up the SJR Community!

FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION, CONTACT THOMAS FLANNERY, PUBLISHER

40 CHESTNUT RIDGE RD., MONTVALE, NJ 201.391.3300 | SJRNJ.ORG

201.571.2252 | THOMAS.FLANNERY@WAINSCOTMEDIA.COM

EducationPlanner_HouseAd_1-4P_Final.indd 1

7/19/19 11:59 AM

Don Bosco Prep TOGETHER, WE ARE IRONMEN

We are Leaders...

We are Scholars... Academic curriculums centered around college & career preparedness 100% college acceptance rate Committed and caring faculty and staff Multiple AP & Middle College Programs Merit-based and need-based aid available Entrepreneurial/Engineering/Arts Pathways 19 Varsity sports/60 clubs & activities/Intramurals Thriving Theater and and Performing Arts Program Youth Ministry/Service Opportunities/Mission Trips 35-acre campus with four academic buildings

fall OPEN HOUSES for Prospective Students Thursday, September 26, 2019* 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Sunday, October 27, 2019* 1:00 - 3:00 p.m.

Preceded by 12:00 p.m. Mass

We are Brothers...

492 N. Franklin Tpke, Ramsey NJ 07446 Untitled-25 1

We are Teammates...

*Hour-long tours begin every 15 minutes

Together, we are Ironmen! 201-327-8003

Register at www.donboscoprep.org 7/18/19 4:10 PM


Bergen County Technical High School

Paramus Campus

CLASS OF 2024 OPEN HOUSES BCTHS/Paramus Campus is a public magnet high school of choice offering a full-time Career and Technical Education program for students with I.E.P.s and a shared-time program for general education students and students with an I.E.P./504 Plan. The school provides a strong academic and technical foundation that allows students to pursue either postsecondary educational opportunities or entrance into the workforce upon graduation. Our students learn in classrooms and career-specific technical labs that mirror future academic and professional environments.

• Tuesday, September 24 at 6:30 p.m. • Wednesday, October 16 at 6:30 p.m. • Thursday, November 14 at 6:30 p.m. Programs include: Auto Collision Repair; Automotive Technology, A.S.E.; Cosmetology; Culinary Arts; Green Building Trades— Carpentry, Electrical, Masonry, Plumbing; Healthcare Occupations: Information Technology; Landscape Design; Skin Care/Esthetician; Animal Care/Vet Assisting; and Visual and Graphic Design.

Bergen County Technical High School

Applied Technology High School @ Bergen Community College

CLASS OF 2024 OPEN HOUSES

• A unique educational experience comprising academic high-school curriculum, college classes, and technical training. • Dual enrollment coursework provides advanced standing into BCC technical associates programs, including A.A.S. programs in General Engineering Technology, Nursing, Radiography, Dental Hygiene, and others, upon graduation from high school. • Students participate in Bergen Tech sports, clubs, and activities.

Open House events will take place at ATHS in Ender Hall on the BCC Paramus Campus • Thursday, September 26 at 6:00 p.m. • Tuesday, October 15 at 6:00 p.m. • Tuesday, October 29 at 6:00 p.m.

To attend a BCTHS/Paramus open house, register at http://bctsopenhouse.bergen.org beginning September 19, 2019

To attend an open house at ATHS, please register at http://bctsopenhouse.bergen.org beginning September 19, 2019

A Free Public High School of Choice for Bergen County Residents

A Free Public High School of Choice for Bergen County Residents

Online application site opens October 14—Application Deadline December 12

DePaul DePaulCatholic Catholic High High School School

Online application site opens Oct. 14—Application Deadline Dec. 12

BALANCING CHALLENGE, INSPIRATION AND OPPORTUNITY.

isisexcited excitedto towelcome welcome

The The Class Class of of 2023 2023

This Thisgroup groupof of young youngmen menand andwomen womenisis about about to to join join aa community communityof of Champions, Champions,ininthe theclassroom classroom and and on on the the playing playingfield, field,who whoare arecommitted committedto toexcellence excellence ininall allthat thatthey theydo. do. We Weare arehonored honoredto towelcome welcomethem themto toour our Family. Family. 1512 1512Alps AlpsRoad, Road,Wayne, Wayne,NJ NJ07470 07470**www.depaulcatholic.org www.depaulcatholic.org**973-694-3702 973-694-3702

Exceptional teachers, an innovative curriculum and personalized college counseling prepare students to thrive at top colleges like Boston College, Colgate, Michigan, NYU and UPenn.

OPEN HOUSES October 3 • 6 p.m. & October 19 • 10 a.m.

Pre-K to Grade 12 • Saddle River, NJ 201-327-4050

We work individually with every family to make SRDS an affordable option for their child.

SCHEDULE YOUR VISIT: ksweeny@saddleriverday.org

Merit scholarships are available for new students.

SaddleRiverDay.org/OpenHouse


JOIN OUR ONLINE COMMUNITY! LIKE US ON FACEBOOK  BergenMag FOLLOW US ON TWITTER  @BergenMag VIEW OUR BOARDS ON PINTEREST

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LEARN MORE ABOUT SPECIAL OFFERS, CONTESTS AND NEWS!

Why leave anything to chance, when you can leave everything to us? COMPLETE COLLEGE COUNSELING SERVICES • High school course and extracurricular activity selection • Creation of a complete college list • Guidance for college campus visits • Assist and edit essays, supplements and resume writings • Completion and submission of all applications • Interview preparation • Available 7 days a week, 16 hours a day

Ruth Laura 201.739.9309 | 551.655.2372

COLLEGE C MPASS

Think. Lead. Serve.

CLASS OF 2019 • College Destinations Include: Amherst, Boston College, Brown, Fordham, Harvard, Holy Cross, Lafayette, Northeastern, Notre Dame, Villanova, Virginia • 87% earned at least one scholarship offer • 30% earned SJR service awards, averaging 89 volunteer hours

OPEN HOUSES Sun, Sept. 29

11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Wed, Nov. 6

6:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

sjrnj.org/openhouse/


Selling Bergen County since 1993 The home of your dreams is on the market! On a quiet street in a great part of Elmwood Park, this 4,500 SqFt total living space home (largest home in the area) has amenities and features you must see! Both units are nearly the same and differ stylistically, 2000 Sqft per floor. This 8 year old home has a modern feel with mahogany double doors in front, granite counter tops, stainless steel appliances, Pella windows, and balcony. The bathroom on the first floor has a Jacuzzi, shower and double sinks. The living room has a fireplace. A family room/play room, home office, as well as plumbing for a half bath complete the base/ground floor. The backyard features a patio. There’s separate laundry rooms for each unit, a two car attached garage, and infinite potential. Call Today! REMAX Excellence | Office: 201.843.2000 Halina Strzepek, Broker/Owner Cell: 201.906.4343 agenthalina@gmail.com

David Strzepek, Sales Associate Cell: 201.906.9767 movewithdavenj@gmail.com

87 KIPP AVE., ELMWOOD PARK

Hire The Best! Photographers & Writers Wanted

DO YOU WANT YOUR WORK TO BE FEATURED IN OUR REGIONAL MAGAZINES? Actively seeking professional freelance photographers and writers for Advertising Department’s Special Sections

freelancer 1-2HNB.indd 1 097_BERGEN_0819.indd 1

If interested please contact Jacquelynn Fischer 201.746.7806 Jacquelynn.Fischer@wainscotmedia.com

7/22/19 9:32 AM 7/22/19 9:34 AM


{ ON THE TOWN }

RESTAURANT REVIEW:

Lido Restaurant Updated Hackensack eatery will feed your Italian cravings.

Photos by Darius Amos

Hackensack is known for its history, but there’s much more to Bergen’s county seat than old buildings and Revolutionary War ties. Much of the city’s culinary landscape has been there and back again; places like Lazy Lanigans, Solari’s, General Poor’s Tavern and White Manna are more than just neighborhood eateries— they’re local institutions. Another longtime dining destination, Lido Restaurant, recently got a reboot when it closed for three months this year for a sweeping renovation. From the floors and ceilings to the bar (it’s up and running!) and restrooms, all areas of the Italian restaurant were updated—all except the familiar menu. It’s a simple and family-friendly menu, one that surely brings the locals back for more. But simplicity in this case also means a lack of variety (when compared with newer restaurants), so Lido depends on old-fashioned flavor and taste to lure out-of-towners for follow-up visits. The restaurant scores major points for its calamari appetizer, a perfect portion for my friend and me. The morsels were lightly breaded and fried to a perfect crisp, and the accompanying marinara sauce gave a pinch of sweetness to every bite. We passed on the remaining four apps (zucchini sticks, mozzarella sticks, shrimp cocktail and chicken fingers) and split a small pizza as a second starter. Kinchley’s Tavern in Ramsey often takes top prize for its thin-crust pizza, but Lido’s pies can stand toe-to-toe with the best. Considering the generous amount of sauce and glimmering cheese (the restaurant has improved lighting), the razor-thin crust had an exceptional crunch and just the right amount of char to give it a genuine brick-oven taste. Though this pizza could’ve passed any test with flying colors, we gave it higher marks thanks to the meatball topping. First timers shouldn’t expect a long list of topping options—Lido offers six standard favorites: meatball, pepperoni, sausage, mushroom, anchovies and black olives. Entrée options at this spaghetti-and-meatballs eatery include burgers, steaks and a handful of pasta dishes. If pizza is Lido’s No. 1, the open-face sliced steak sandwich is its 1A. To feed my hankering for meat, I ordered a double steak: a hungry man’s portion of thin-sliced sirloin piled atop two slices of bread. I’ll admit that I did a double take when my meal arrived (it looked like a plate of medium-rare cold cuts), but the bread was there; I just really had to dig to find it. I likened the dish to a deconstructed warm roast beef sandwich, but instead of a horseradish dressing or spicy mustard it’s topped with a mouthwatering onion butter. While the butter had extraordinary flavor, there was an overwhelming amount of it, so much that it pooled in several spots on the sirloin. My friend also ended up with a buttery dish: shrimp scampi with spaghetti. Every ounce of the six large shrimp (tails on because they add flavor, I explained to my friend) absorbed the delicious garlic-butter gravy but the abundance of the sauce seemed to drown her pasta. An easy fix would have been some nice Italian bread to mop up some of the tasty leftover sauce, but we realized diners weren’t provided table bread upon sitting. Having filled up on carbs, dessert was out of the question. I kicked myself when I overheard our neighbors ordering a cake roll, vanilla ice cream rolled into chocolate cake. Perhaps I’ll order that next time. After trying some of the must-haves, it’s easy to see why locals have been flocking to Lido since 1956. The menu selections are dependable and rich with flavor, but pizza is the sure-fire bet here— the pies are every bit worth a first, second and third try. —Darius Amos Lido Restaurant, 701 Main St., Hackensack, 201.487.8721

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7/22/19 9:22 AM


{ ON THE TOWN }

Where To Eat

Getting three squares a day has never been easier—Bergen County is home to a selection of restaurants diverse enough to satisfy all of your cravings. LUKA’S 10 River Rd. 201.440.2996 lukasitaliancuisine.com

SEAR HOUSE 411 Piermont Rd. 201.292.4612 searhouse.com

JACK’S LOBSTER SHACK 1040 River Rd. 201.224.2808 jackslobstershack.com

CARLSTADT

CRESSKILL

BIGGIE’S 430 Rte. 17 S. 201.933.4000 biggies.com

DELVINA RESTAURANT 172 Piermont Rd. 201.816.0239 delvinarestaurant.com

KINARA 880 River Rd. 201.313.0555 kinararestaurant.com

GIANNA’S 843 Washington Ave. 201.460.7997 giannas.biz

FARMHOUSE CAFÉ 15 E. Madison Ave. 201.266.8931 farmhousecafenj.com

IL VILLAGGIO 651 Rte. 17 N. 201.935.7733 ilvillaggio.com

DEMAREST

MASSAMAN THAI CUISINE 312 Hackensack St. 201.559.1424 massamanthaicuisine.com

CLIFFSIDE PARK

RUDY’S 591 Anderson Ave. 201.943.9252 rudyscliffsidenj.com

EAST RUTHERFORD

CLOSTER MASA SUSHI & GRILL 81 W. Allendale Ave. 201.934.6616 masasushiandgrill.com

KIKU 385 Rte. 9 W. 201.767.6322

MEZZALUNA BISTRO 97 W. Allendale Ave. 201.327.6556

BAMBOO GRILL 54 S. Washington Ave. 201.384.5951 bamboo-grill.com

SAVINI 168 W. Crescent Ave. 201.760.3700 savinirestaurant.com

BERGENFIELD

CHAPALA GRILL 52 S. Washington Ave. 201.387.2107 chapalamexicangrill.com WAGON WHEEL 16 S. Front St. 201.384.9464

BOGOTA 101 PUB 101 Queen Anne Rd. 201.343.9802

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FOSCHINI’S 21 E. Madison Ave. 201.387.9998 foschinis.com IL MULINO 132 Veterans Plz. 201.384.7767 ilmulinodumont.com

T & THAI 644 Anderson Ave. 201.941.0099 tnthai.com

ALPINE

DUMONT

AVO’S GRILL 720 Anderson Ave., Ste. 4, 201.945.9038 orderavos.com

SEDONA TAPHOUSE 679 Anderson Ave. 201.943.2300 sedonataphouse.com

ALLENDALE

YASOU MYKONOS 134 Hardenburgh Ave. 201.768.8500 yasoumykonos.com

BUON GUSTO 534 Durie Ave. 201.784.9036 THE HILL 252 Schraalenburgh Rd. 201.899.4700 thehillcloster.com LOCALE CAFÉ & BAR 208 Piermont Rd. 201.750.3233 locale208closter.com

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ANNABELLA’S HOUSE OF MOZZARELLA 900 Paterson Plank Rd. 201.804.0303 annabellasmozz.com CAFFE CAPRI 119 Park Ave. 201.460.1039 caffecapri restaurant.com

EDGEWATER CAFÉ ARCHETYPUS 266 River Rd. 201.941.0609 archetypus.com HAVEN 2 Main St. 201.943.1900 havenedgewater.com IZZY’S PIZZERIA 86 The Promenade City Place 201.795.2600 izzyspizzeria.com

PA DE THAI 264 Old River Rd. 201.945.9999 padethai.com PIER 115 115 River Rd. 201.313.2155 pier115bar andgrill.com REBECCA’S 236 Old River Rd. 201.943.8808 rebeccasedgewater.com THE RIVER PALM TERRACE 1416 River Rd. 201.224.2013 riverpalm.com ROBERTO’S II 936 River Rd. 201.224.2524 robertosii.com THAT FONDUE PLACE 934 River Rd. 201.224.2524 thatfondueplace.com

ELMWOOD PARK ELMWOOD PARK DINER 375 Market St. 201.796.6641 epdiner.com ROYAL WARSAW 871 River Dr. 201.794.9277 royalwarsaw.com TAVERNA MYKONOS 238 Broadway 201.703.9200 tavernamykonos.com THE TWISTED ELM 435 River Dr. 201.791.3705 twistedelm.com

This page: Delvina; opposite page: Noches de Colombia

Delvina in Cresskill

AUGUST 2019

7/19/19 11:24 AM


EMERSON FRANCO’S PIZZA 207 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.265.8111 francospizza restaurant.com PIMAAN THAI 79 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.967.0440 pimaanthai.com

ENGLEWOOD AKAI LOUNGE 11 N. Dean St. 201.541.0086 akailounge.com BAUMGART’S CAFÉ 45 E. Palisade Ave. 201.569.6267 baumgartscafe.com CASSIE’S 18 S. Dean St. 201.541.6760 cassiespizzeria.com DARUMA 45 N. Dean St. 201.567.9600 darumaenglewood.com EMMA 34 E. Palisade Ave. 201.227.6103 emma34.com RED, WHITE & PASTA 21 E. Palisade Ave. 201.731.3223 redwhiteandpasta.com

ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS

This page: Delvina; opposite page: Noches de Colombia

CAFÉ ITALIANO 14 Sylvan Ave. 201.461.5041 cafeitaliano.net

MEI SUSHI 14-20 Plaza Rd. N. 201.398.9882 meisushi.com

SUSHI COCORO 856 Franklin Ave. 201.560.1333 sushicocoro.com

OCEANOS 2-27 Saddle River Rd. 201.796.0546 oceanosrestaurant.com

GARFIELD

RIVER PALM TERRACE 41-11 Rte. 4 201.703.3500 riverpalm.com SHOTI BREAD HOUSE 14-29 River Rd. 201.272.1900 shoti-bread-house. business.site

GLEN ROCK

PATSY’S 344 Bergen Blvd. 201.943.0627

NECTAR CAFE 175 Rock Rd. 201.857.0825 nectarcafenj.com

IN NAPOLI 116 Main St. 201.947.2500 inapoli.com LOUI LOUI 210 Main St. 201.461.7080 louiloui.com

CLIFFS STEAKHOUSE 18 Sylvan Ave. 201.944.0233 cliffssteakhouse.com

MOOD FOOD 1224 Anderson Ave. 201.313.8278 moodfood.life

GRISSINI 484 Sylvan Ave. 201.568.3535 grissinirestaurant.com

PRIME & BEYOND 501 Main St. 201.461.0033 primeandbeyond.com

LEFKES 495 Sylvan Ave. 201.408.4444 lefkesnj.com

VENTANAS AT THE MODERN 200 Park Ave. 201.583.4777 ventanasatthemodern. com

FAIR LAWN DAVIA 6-09 Fair Lawn Ave. 201.797.6767 KIMCHI MAMA 7-09 Fair Lawn Ave. 201.703.2905

FRANKLIN LAKES THE CHEF’S TABLE 754 Franklin Ave. 201.891.6644 GOLDEN DYNASTY 825 Franklin Ave. 201.891.6644 goldendynastynj.com

ROCCA 203 Rock Rd. 201.670.4945 roccanj.com

HACKENSACK CHEERS 774 Main St. 201.487.0660 HOUSTON’S 1 Riverside Sq., #181 201.488.5667 houstons.com MORTON’S THE STEAKHOUSE 1 Riverside Sq., #274 201.487.1303 mortons.com/hackensack THE OCEANAIRE 175 Riverside Sq. 201.343.8862 theoceanaire.com THE PICCO TAVERN 160 Prospect Ave. 201.880.8750 piccotavern.com SOLARI’S 61 S. River St. 201.487.1969 solarisrestaurant.net STONY HILL INN 231 Polifly Rd. 201.342.4085 stonyhillinn.com WHITE MANNA 358 River St. 201.342.0914 BERGENMAG.COM

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Noches de Colombia in Fairview

HASBROUCK HEIGHTS

LA FORTALEZA 361 Midland Ave. 973.928.4470 lafortalezamexrestaurant.com

THE GLEN ROCK INN 222 Rock Rd. 201.445.2362 glenrockinn.com

CITY PERCH 2023 Hudson St. 201.582.7101 cityperch.com

ORIGINAL PRESTO’S PIZZA 90 La Roche Ave. 201.750.1077 originalpresto.com

LA CAMBUSA 517 River Dr. 973.272.8739 cambusanj.com

NOCHES DE COLOMBIA 172 Broad Ave. 201.840.8428 nochesdecolombia.com

CAFFÉ MILANO 2117 Rte. 4 E. 201.461.0466

DONATELLA RISTORANTE 12 Tappan Rd. 201.767.4245

GOODFELLAS 661 Midland Ave. 973.478.4000 goodfellasristorante.com

FAIRVIEW

FORT LEE

HARRINGTON PARK

BENDIX DINER 464 Rte. 17 201.288.0143 BENSI 459 Rte. 17 S. 201.727.9525 bensihh.com IVY INN 268 Terrace Ave. 201.393.7699 ivyinn.com

HAWORTH

HO-HO-KUS INN & TAVERN 1 E. Franklin Tpk. 201.445.4115 hohokusinn.com

LEE’S HAWAIIAN ISLANDER 768 Stuyvesant Ave. 201.939.3777

ALESSANDRO’S 157 Terrace St. 201.385.8544 alessandrosnj.com

ST. EVE’S 611 N. Maple Ave. 201.857.4717 stevesnj.com

MICHAEL’S RIVERSIDE 528 Riverside Ave. 201.939.6333 michaelsriverside.com

ANDIAMO 23 Hardenburgh Ave. 201.384.1551 andiamorestaurant.net

LEONIA

MAHWAH

DANTE’S PLACE 373 Broad Ave. 201.592.9071 dantesplace.com

MASON JAR 219 Ramapo Valley Rd. 201.529.2302 masonjar.com

FONTANA DI TREVI 248 Fort Lee Rd. 201.242.9040 fontanaditrevirestaurant. com

NAGOYA 1007 MacArthur Blvd. 201.818.9933 nagoyacuisine.com

TERRACE STREET CAFÉ 149 Terrace St. 201.338.4720 terracestreetcafe. wixsite.com

HILLSDALE THE CORNERSTONE 84 Broadway 201.666.8688 thecornerstonenj.com

NAKAHARA 299 Broad Ave. 201.482.4358 nakahara299.com

MATSU SUSHI & GRILL 140 Broadway 201.722.9388 matsunj.com

LITTLE FERRY

NINO’S PIZZA 456 Broadway 201.497.6900 ninospizzaonline.com OSSO BUCO 343 Broadway 201.664.1600 ossobucogrill.com

HO-HO-KUS ALBERT’S CAFE AMICI 4 Sycamore Ave. 201.389.6377 albertscafeamici.com ALT EATS CAFÉ 622 N. Maple Ave. 201.444.1300 alteatscafe.com

101

SEGOVIA STEAKHOUSE & SEAFOOD 217 Main St. 201.814.1100 segoviasteakhouse.com

LODI REBAR & KITCHEN 132 Essex St. 201.368.8181 rebarnj.com SERGIO’S MISSIONE 2 N. Mercer St. 973.778.4545 sergiosmissione.com

LYNDHURST ANGELO’S 263 Ridge Rd. 201.939.1922

SANGRIA 1033 MacArthur Blvd. 201.962.3310 sangriamahwah.com STATELINE DINER 375 Rte. 17 201.529.3353 statelinediner.com

MAYWOOD ANGELO’S 245 Maywood Ave. 201.845.4278 MAYWOOD PANCAKE HOUSE 92 W. Pleasant Ave. 201.880.7842

MIDLAND PARK ARTURO’S 41 Central Ave. 201.444.2466 arturos.co FIONA’S RISTORANTE 118 Godwin Ave. 210.857.5800 fionasristorante.com

AUGUST 2019

7/19/19 11:24 AM


{ ON THE TOWN } THE PARK STEAKHOUSE 151 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.930.1300 theparksteakhouse.com

THAI PALACE 218 E. Main St. 201.441.9119 thaipalaceteaneck.com

PEPPERCORNS 176 Colony Ave. 201.391.2818 peppercornsparkridge.com

RIDGEWOOD

YUKI HANA 131 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.391.3230 yukihanaparkridge.net

RAMSEY ANTHONY’S COAL FIRED PIZZA 984 Rte. 17 201.818.2625 acfp.com CAFÉ PANACHE 130 E. Main St. 201.934.0030 cafepanachenj.com

MONTVALE

SECTION 201 704 River Rd. 201.262.5600 section201.com

WILD WASABI 460 Livingston St. 201.767.1300 gowildwasabi.com

NORTHVALE

OAKLAND

HEARTH & TAP CO. 125 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.307.6300 hearthandtap.com

THE GREEK VILLAGE 254 Livingston St. 201.750.8570 greekvillagenj.com

CAFÉ L’AMORE 455 Ramapo Valley Rd. 201.337.5558 cafelamore.com

MOONACHIE

MADELEINE’S PETIT PARIS 416 Tappan Rd. 201.767.0063 madeleinespetitparis.com

BELLISSIMO 12 S. Kinderkamack Rd. 201.746.6669 bellissimonj.com

BAZZARELLI 117 Moonachie Rd. 201.641.4010 bazzarellirestaurant.com BISTRO 107 107 Moonachie Rd. 201.440.3339 bistro107nj.com LA HAVANA 59 110 Moonachie Ave. 201.964.9515 lahavana59.com PROVA 94 Moonachie Ave. 201.939.8500 provanow.com SEGOVIA 150 Moonachie Rd. 201.641.4266 segoviarestaurant.com

NEW MILFORD CASUAL HABANA CAFÉ 200 Main St. 201.576.0400 casualhabanacafe.com SANZARI’S 105 Old New Bridge Rd. 201.692.7700 sanzaris.com

TASTE OF SPAIN 493 Tappan Rd. 201.767.8904 tasteofspain restaurant.com

NORWOOD CHOK DEE THAI KITCHEN 561 Livingston St. 201.750.8880 chokdeethaikitchen.com COUSINS PIZZA 450 Livingston St. 201.767.4300 cousinsnorwoodnj.com DIMORA 100 Piermont Rd. 201.750.5000 dimorarestaurant.com RAGAZZI 530 Livingston St. 201.660.7950 ragazzirestaurant lounge.com

PORTOBELLO 175 Ramapo Valley Rd. 201.337.8990 portobellonj.com W’S GRILL 20 Elm St. 201.651.0005 wsgrilloakland.com

OLD TAPPAN HOSHITORI 216 Old Tappan Rd. 201.666.6544 VICOLO RISTORANTE 216 Old Tappan Rd. 201.497.8777 vicoloristorante.com

ORADELL

MESON MADRID 343 Bergen Blvd. 201.947.1038 mesonmadrid.com

GAO THAI KITCHEN 63 W. Main St. 201.962.2691 gaothaikitchen.com

TO SOK CHON 138 W. Central Blvd. 201.482.0910

GIOVANNA’S CAFÉ 19 E. Main St. 201.825.5835 giovannascafe.com

PARAMUS CHAKRA 144 Rte. 4 E. 201.556.1530 chakrarestaurant.com

THE SHANNON ROSE 1200 Rte. 17 201.962.7602 theshannonrose.com

KIKU 365 Rte. 17 S. 201.265.7200

VARKA ESTIATORIO 30 N. Spruce St. 201.995.9333 varkarestaurant.com

MANTRA 275 Rte. 4 W. 201.342.8868 mantranj.com POKEWORKS 1 Garden State Plz. 201.712.1700 pokeworks.com

PARK RIDGE

ESTI’S CAFE 680 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.322.6362 estiscafe.com

103 PRIME AT VALENTINO’S 103 Spring Valley Rd. 201.391.2220 103prime.com

RED APPLE RESTAURANT 235 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.986.1800 redappleoradell.com

ESTY STREET 86 Spring Valley Rd. 201.307.1515 estystreet.com

OCEAN SUSHI 619 Oradell Ave. 201.986.1113 oceansushioradell.com

GREEK CORNER GRILL 99 Park Ave. 201.476.1400 greekcornergrill.com

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RIDGEFIELD CAFÉ TIVOLI 533 Shaler Blvd. 201.941.5561 cafetivoli.com TUTTO A MODO MIO 482 Bergen Blvd. 201.313.9690 tuttoamodomio.com

RIDGEFIELD PARK LUIGI’S RESTAURANT 54 Mt. Vernon St. 201.641.9869 luigisridgefieldpark.com MK VALENCIA 228 Main St. 201.373.0228 mkvalenciarestaurant.com SPARTA TAVERNA 206 Main St. 201.296.0095 spartataverna.com

A MANO 24 Franklin Ave. 201.493.2000 amanopizza.com BAMBOO HOUSE 28 S. Broad St. 201.447.3111 BAUMGART’S CAFÉ 158 Franklin Ave. 201.612.5688 baumgartscafe.com CAFÉ 37 37 S. Broad St. 201.857.0437 café-37.com FELINA 54 E. Ridgewood Ave. 551.276.5454 felinarestaurant.com FINCA 20 E. Ridgewood Ave. 201.444.1199 fincanj.com FROM SCRATCH 44 E. Ridgewood Ave. 201.857.5188 fromscratch ridgewood.com GREEN FUSION 22 Oak St. 201.670.7502 greenfusionnj.com KUMO 55 Franklin Ave. 201.251.9693 kumo55.com LA LANTERNA CAFÉ & GRILL 29 W. Ridgewood Ave. 201.444.5520 lalanternaof ridgewood.com LISA’S 28 Oak St. 201.251.8686 lisasmediterranean cuisine.net PARK WEST TAVERN 30 Oak St. 201.445.5400 parkwesttavern.com PEARL RESTAURANT 17 S. Broad St. 201.857.5100 pearlridgewood.com

Photo courtesy of Varka Estiatorio and Volares

Varka Estiatoria in Ramsey

AUGUST 2019

7/19/19 11:24 AM


{ ON THE TOWN } RAYMOND’S 101 E. Ridgewood Ave. 201.445.5125 ROOTS STEAKHOUSE 17 Chestnut St. 201.444.1922 rootssteakhouse.com

RIVER EDGE A TASTE OF GREECE 935 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.967.0029 atasteofgreecenj.com FUKI SUSHI 828 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.225.0160 fukisushi4u.com GREEN PAPAYA 110 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.678.1888 greenpapayanj.com ISTANBLUE 645 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.262.4400 istanblueriveredge.net SANDUCCI’S 620 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.599.0600 sanduccis.com

RIVER VALE AMMATA THAI KITCHEN 184 Rivervale Rd. 201.664.2299 ammata.com ARMANDO’S TUSCAN GRILL 688 Westwood Ave. 201.722.5820 armandostuscangrill.com

CRECCO’S CAFÉ 649 Westwood Ave. 201.664.7200 creccoscafe.com

VOLARES 7 Station Sq. 201.935.6606 volaresrestaurant.com

TEANECK AL’S CHARCOAL PIT 540 Cedar Ln. 201.530.7786

SAYOLA RESTAURANT 50 Prospect Ter. 201.871.2182 sayolarestaurant.com

MEZZA 20 Jefferson Ave. 201.722.8822 mezzawestwood.com

ROCHELLE PARK

SADDLE BROOK

AMARONE 63 Cedar Ln. 201.833.1897 amaroneristorante.net

SIMPLY VIETNAMESE 1 Hollywood Ave. 201.568.7770 simplyvietnamese.info

P.J. FINNEGAN’S 274 Fairview Ave. 201.664.7576 pjfinnegans.com THE IRON HORSE 20 Washington Ave. 201.666.9682 theironhorse.com

BUCCO’S 60 Essex St. 201.226.1030 buccosristorante.com

MATSUYA 490 Market St. 201.843.5811 matsuyasteakhouse.com QUE PASTA 326 Market St. 201.712.1900 qpitalian.com

ROSE RESTAURANT 1150 Teaneck Rd. 201.569.3600 rosepersian restaurant.com

WALDWICK

THE DOG AND CASK 55 Rte. 17 S. 201.845.5101 thedogandcask.com NANNI 53 W. Passaic St. 201.843.1250 nanni.com

SADDLE BROOK DINER 30 Market St. 201.843.5929 saddlebrookdiner.com

VEGGIE HEAVEN 473 Cedar Ln. 201.836.0887 veggieheaventeaneck.com

CIRCOLO 53 Franklin Tpke. 201.882.1818 circolo.info

WOODSTONE PIZZA BAR AND GRILL 352 W. Passaic St. 201.845.7600 woodstonepizza barandgrill.com

THE GOLDEN PUB 335 Market St. 201.843.9210 thegoldenpub.com

TENAFLY

LIMONCELLO 32 Franklin Tpke. 201.652.5573 limoncellonj.com

RUTHERFORD CAFÉ MATISSE 167 Park Ave. 201.935.2995 cafematisse.com FINCH’S RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE 801 Rutherford Ave. 201.231.3141 PAISANO’S 132 Park Ave. 201.935.5755 paisanos.com

AXIA TAVERNA 18 Piermont Rd. 201.569.5999 axiataverna.com

THE PLANK PIZZA CO. BEER PARLOR 383 Market St. 201.843.2426 ppcbp.com

CAFÉ ANGELIQUE 1 Piermont Rd. 201.541.1010 cafeangeliquenyc.com

SADDLE RIVER

KINARA 10 Jay St. 201.399.7788 kinaracuisineofindia.com

THE SADDLE RIVER INN 2 Barnstable Ct. 201.825.4016 saddleriverinn.com

SOUTH HACKENSACK I GEMELLI RISTORANTE 268 Huyler St. 201.487.4220 igemelliristorante.com

PALMER’S CROSSING 145 Dean Dr. 201.567.4800 palmerscrossing restaurant.com

ANDREA’S 20 E. Prospect St. 201.670.0275 andreasrestaurantnj.com

MOSHI MOSHI 137 Franklin Tpke. 201.444.1130 sushimoshi.com THE VILLAGE GRILLE 71 Crescent Ave. 201.670.8200 villagegrillewaldwick.com

MARTINI GRILL 187 Hackensack St. 201.939.2000

WING LEE KITCHEN 301 Pascack Rd. 201.358.0702 wingleekitchen.com Photo courtesy of Varka Estiatorio and Volares

WESTWOOD BOP N SUSHI 441 Broadway 201.722.8687 bopnsushi.com CAFFÉ ANELLO 11 Madison Ave. 201.786.8137 caffeanello.com DOWNTOWN DHABA 266 Center Ave. 201.664.0123 dhabadowntown.com

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ANGELONI’S AT THE WOODRIDGE INN 191 Valley Blvd. 201.939.1234

BACARI GRILL 800 Ridgewood Rd. 201.358.6330 bacarigrill.com

PHO MIU 255 Pascack Rd. 201.497.3915

103

WOOD-RIDGE

WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP

LILI’S BISTRO 251 Pascack Rd. 201.664.5454 lilisbistronj.com

BERGENMAG.COM

CASA DEL SOLE 115 Broadway 201.391.5671 casadelsole.biz

JUSTIN’S 269 Hackensack St. 201.933.4276 justinsristoranteii.com

DOG HOUSE SALOON & GRILL 270 Pascack Rd. 201.722.1820

Volares in Rutherford

WOODCLIFF LAKE BLUE MOON MEXICAN CAFÉ 42 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.782.9500 bluemoonmexican café.com

WYCKOFF 3 CHICAS MEXICAN KITCHEN 637 Wyckoff Ave. 201.848.4700 3chicas.com ALDO’S 640 Wyckoff Ave. 201.891.2618 aldosofwyckoff.com BENARES 327 Franklin Ave. 201.904.2222 benaresnj.com THE BRICK HOUSE 179 Godwin Ave. 201.848.1211 thebrickhousewyckoff.com T.S. MA 637 Wyckoff Ave. 201.891.8878 tsmachinesecuisine.com

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For our complete list of dining options, visit the “Where to Eat” section at bergenmag.com.

AUGUST 2019

7/19/19 11:24 AM


{ A BERGEN MOMENT }

—Cynthia Castellari, C.C.Candids Photography, River Edge

BERGEN Magazine Volume 19, Issue 8 (ISSN# 2573-8151 and USPS 025-351) is published 12 times a year by Wainscot Media, One Maynard Dr., Park Ridge, NJ 07656. Postmaster: Send address changes to Subscription Department, Wainscot Media, One Maynard Dr., Park Ridge, NJ 07656. Periodicals postage paid at Park Ridge, N.J., and additional mailing offices.

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Send us your Bergen Moment! Email your photo and a short description to editor@wainscotmedia.com.

Photo courtesy of Cynthia Castellari, Instagram: @cccandids

“I captured these two River Edge girls celebrating the last month of summer in the most relaxing way possible—spending a quiet morning by the lake in cozy pajamas! In one month, they’ll have to re-acclimate to waking up early for school, but for now, they’re taking it easy.”

AUGUST 2019

7/19/19 11:25 AM


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