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Contents MESSAGE FROM THE MAYOR.................................................................2

• Infrastructure Services.................................................................... 47

- Roads and Footpaths................................................................... 48 AUDIT REPORT....................................................................................................6

- Water Supply................................................................................... 56 - Sewerage and the Treatment and Disposal of Sewage.... 64

PURPOSE OF THE COUNCIL................................................................... 11

- Stormwater Drainage.................................................................. 70

• The Council's Mission....................................................................... 11

- Solid Waste...................................................................................... 76

• The Council's Values......................................................................... 11

• Community Services......................................................................... 85

- Recreation........................................................................................ 86 STATEMENT OF COMPLIANCE AND RESPONSIBILITY...... 12

- Libraries and Museums.............................................................. 96 - Community Protection..............................................................102

COMMUNITY OUTCOMES........................................................................ 14

- Community Development.........................................................116 • Property Management...................................................................125

SIGNIFICANT ACTIVITIES......................................................................... 19 • Earthquake Recovery....................................................................... 21 • Community Leadership................................................................... 27

• Te Kohaka o Tuhaitara Trust.......................................................134

- Governance...................................................................................... 28 - District Development................................................................... 34

• Transwaste Canterbury Ltd.........................................................138

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• Financial Statements.....................................................................143 • Funding Impact Statement for Whole of Council...............149 • Accounting Policies.........................................................................153 • Notes to the Financial Statements..........................................167 • Cost of Activity Statements........................................................209

OTHER DISCLOSURES........................................................................... 227 • Maori Contributions To Decision-Making..............................228

GLOSSARY........................................................................................................ 233

COUNCIL CONTROLLED ORGANISATIONS (CCO's)........... 131

• Enterprise North Canterbury.......................................................136

Annual Report 2012-2013

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT.................................................................. 141

COUNCIL AND MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE (as at 30 June 2013)............................................................................237 DIRECTORY...................................................................................................... 241

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MESSAGE FROM THE MAYOR

Message

FROM THE MAYOR

I have pleasure in presenting our Council's Annual Report for the year ended 30 June 2013, being the first in the three-year cycle of the 2012-2022 Ten Year Plan.

I have pleasure in presenting the Council’s Annual

Arts Complex. The Council has approved the

Report, the first in the three year cycle of the 2012-22

acceleration of the realignment of Red Lion Corner in

Ten Year Plan, and the last full financial year of this

Rangiora, bringing this important project forward from

Council’s term (2010-2013).

2016/17 in the Ten Year Plan, to 2013/14 and 2014/15.

The Council’s focuses have continued to be on earthquake recovery and rapid population growth over the 2012/13 year, and there are emerging signs that

Public consultation on earthquake strengthening and redeveloping the Oxford Town Hall has brought about positive community support.

this District’s response to the Canterbury earthquakes

The Kaiapoi waterfront precinct received good news

has made Waimakariri an attractive place to live.

during the year with support for the river banks and

Reconstruction and redevelopment of essential community infrastructure started during the year including works on the Kaiapoi Aquatic Centre and around Kaiapoi’s Williams Street Bridge. Decisions

was washed away in June 2013. Since that incident, the 60% share from Central Government has been approved and the total costs of a replacement bridge are now fully funded. Work on the new bridge will take place in 2013/14 and 2014/15.

walkways project announced from the Christchurch Earthquake Appeal fund. In addition, the Council approved works for the redevelopment of the Kaiapoi wharf.

have been made to proceed with the reconstruction

Another significant project during the year was

and redevelopment of the Kaiapoi Library and Service

the connection of the Mandeville and Swannanoa

Centre, which will include a museum and community

sewerage schemes to the Eastern Districts

art space, and the Rangiora Town Hall and Performing

Sewerage Scheme.

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Significantly, even though Council budgeted in the Ten Year Plan for its 40% share of the replacement of the Cones Road Bridge over the Ashley River, the 60% contribution from Central Government was not at first approved until one of the pylons of the bridge

Business development in Rangiora and Kaiapoi has been impaired throughout the year as earthquake prone buildings have been closed, repaired, or, in some cases, demolished. Both town centres have been significantly disrupted as landowners work through time-intensive processes with engineers, insurers and tenants. There are, however, encouraging signs as plans emerge for reconstruction, using the

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


opportunities of these forced changes to bring about

the year to March 2013, compared with Canterbury at

Strategy Waimakariri Zone Committee. The Council

improvements to business and customer service.

5.4% and New Zealand at 2.8%. The District is home

has also undertaken a public consultation exercise

Council also approved for public consultation a draft

to approximately 5,800 businesses, and numbers have

about possible changes to the District Plan in relation

of the Woodend Pegasus Area Development Strategy

been growing strongly, up 40% since 2000. The number

to Kaiapoi Maori Reserve (MR 873) to make residential

which provides a growth management framework for

of employees grew by 55% to 11,580 in 2012.

development possible for Maori land holders in the

this third largest urban settlement in the District.

There is currently approximately 437.5 hectares of land

Tuahiwi vicinity.

The Council’s Building Unit has experienced

zoned for business activity in the District, and of this,

Internally the Council is upgrading its Information

unprecedented pressure over 2012/13 and has

more than 90 hectares of land is vacant. More than 16

Technology systems with an enterprise-wide Line of

approved some 1,125 consents for residential dwellings

hectares of additional zoned business land is currently

Business review. A review of this nature has not been

in the 12 months to 30 June 2013. This is more than

being planned for. The draft Land Use Recovery Plan

undertaken by this Council for some 25 years, and the

double the number of new building consents that

(LURP) under the Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Act

process of upgrading business process systems is a

this District normally approves, typically four or five

seeks an additional 22 hectares of Business 2 land in

taxing one on all staff. The review is expected to be

hundred per year.

the Southbrook area.

completed by July 2014.

These large numbers of new building consents have

The relationship between Council and Te Ngai

The Council approved a draft Local Alcohol Policy

been trending upwards since March 2012 and, based

Tuahuriri Runanga is enshrined in a Memorandum

for public consultation in response the new Sale and

on this and other analyses, the provisional residential

of Understanding which was reviewed during the

Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 in 2012/13. The draft policy

population for the Waimakariri District as at 30 June

2012/13 year, and endorsed at the Annual Hui in March

has a process to go through, before it is approved

2013 is 51,000. The estimated population at that date

2013 and by the Council in May 2013. Installation of

by Council. The draft policy retains many of the

for Rangiora is 15,250, for Kaiapoi 8,500, for Woodend 2,650, for Pegasus 1,250, for Oxford 2,100 and for the rest of the District 21,250. The estimated population of the District is expected to increase to more than

a reticulated water supply for Tuahiwi progressed throughout 2012/13 and the new Marae at Tuahiwi was completed and opened. Also of note during the year was the completion of the Mahaanui Iwi

provisions that Waimakariri has had in previous years with regard to hours of operation for the sale and supply of alcohol.

65,000 people by 2031.

Management Plan 2013. The Tuahiwi water supply, the

Council’s triennial Customer Satisfaction Survey was

new Marae at Tuahiwi and the Iwi Management Plan

undertaken in 2012/13. The final report was approved

Waimakariri District is rated the third most successful

have all received financial contributions from Council.

by Council in September 2013 and findings from the

district in the country in terms of economic

In addition, the Runanga executive meets regularly

survey indicate that of the survey respondents (82%

performance according to the Bureau of Economic

(scheduled monthly) with me and senior Council

response rate) who had requested customer service,

Research Limited’s (BERL) Regional Rankings for

officers, and the Runanga is represented at the monthly

91% of those who offered an opinion were satisfied

2012. Gross Domestic Product increased by 6.8% in

meetings of the Canterbury Water Management

with the standard of courtesy from staff, and 79%

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

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were satisfied with the overall standard of customer service. In addition 76% of survey respondents were satisfied with the overall performance of the Council. The Council has, as one of its values, the objective of continuous improvement, and each year the Council and staff are keen to improve the level of service to the Waimakariri community and engage groups and individuals about the issues that impact on delivery of local government services.

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David Ayers M AYO R

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

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AUDIT REPORT

Audit Report

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT

To the readers of Waimakariri District Council and group’s annual report for the year ended 30 June 2013 The Auditor General is the auditor of Waimakariri

District Council (the District Council) and group. The Auditor General has appointed me, Andy Burns, using the staff and resources of Audit New Zealand to audit: •

the financial statements of the District Council and group that comprise: -

the balance sheet as at 30 June 2013 on page 146;

-

the income statement, statement of comprehensive income, statement of movements in equity and statement of cash

-

the statement of service provision (referred to as Significant Activities) of the District Council, including the funding impact statements in relation to each group of activities on pages 22 to 138.

schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 2002, where applicable, by including : •

-

internal borrowing on page 192;

pages 144 to 145 and page 147;

-

reserve funds on pages 195 to 197;

the funding impact statement of the District

-

remuneration paid to the elected members and certain employees of the District Council on pages 204 to 205;

the notes to the financial statements that include accounting policies and other explanatory

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a statement of compliance signed by the mayor of the Council, and by the District Council and group’s chief executive on page 12.

Opinion Audited information In our opinion: •

the financial statements of the District Council and group on pages 144 to 208:

-

employee staffing levels and remuneration on page 205;

-

comply with generally accepted accounting practice in New Zealand; and

-

severance payments on page 172; and

-

fairly reflect:

information about the financial statements on pages 154 to 208 and pages 228 to 231; and

a report on the activities undertaken by the District Council and group to establish and maintain processes to provide opportunities for Maori to contribute to the Council’s decision making processes on pages 228 to 231; and

information about:

flows for the year ending 30 June 2013 on

council controlled organisations on pages 132 to 138.

In addition, the Auditor General has appointed me to report on whether the District Council and group’s annual report complies with the Other Requirements of

Council on page 151; -

-

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fairly reflects by each group of activities, the

Compliance with the other requirements of schedule 10

as at 30 June 2013; and

amount of funds produced from each source

In our opinion, which is not an audit opinion, the

the results of its operations and cash flows for the

of funding and how the funds were applied as

District Council and group’s annual report complies

compared to the information included in the

with the Other Requirements of schedule 10 that are

District Council’s long term plan.

applicable to the annual report.

the District Council and group’s financial position

-

year ended on that date. •

the statement of service provision (referred to

the statements about budgeted and actual capital

Our audit was completed on 29 October 2013. This is

statements in relation to each group of activities

expenditure in relation to each group of activities

the date at which our opinion is expressed.

of the District Council on pages 22 to 138:

of the District Council on pages 22 to 138 and the

as Significant Activities) and funding impact

-

complies with generally accepted accounting practice in New Zealand; and

-

reflects by each group of activities the capital

we outline the responsibilities of the Council and our

expenditure spent as compared to the amounts

responsibilities, and we explain our independence.

budgeted and set out in the District Council’s long

of service for the year ended 30 June 2013,

term plan or annual plan.

We carried out our audit in accordance with the Auditor General’s Auditing Standards, which incorporate the

Council on page 151, fairly reflects the amount

International Standards on Auditing (New Zealand).

of funds produced from each source of funding

Those standards require that we comply with ethical

and how the funds were applied as compared to

requirements and plan and carry out our audit to obtain

the reasons for any significant variances between

the information included in the District Council’s

reasonable assurance about whether the information

the actual service and the expected service.

annual plan.

we audited is free from material misstatement.

the levels of service as measured against the plan; and

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

Basis of opinion

the funding impact statement of the District

intended levels of service adopted in the long term •

The basis of our opinion is explained below. In addition,

fairly reflects the District Council’s levels including:

movement explanations on pages 210 to 225, fairly

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AUDIT REPORT

Material misstatements are differences or omissions of amounts and disclosures that, in our judgement, are likely to influence readers’ overall understanding of

An audit also involves evaluating: •

the appropriateness of accounting policies used and whether they have been consistently applied;

the reasonableness of the significant accounting estimates and judgements made by the Council;

the adequacy of all disclosures in the information we audited;

determining the appropriateness of the reported the statement of service provision (referred to as Significant Activities) within the Council’s framework for reporting performance; and

the financial statements and the statement of service provision (referred to as Significant Activities). If we had found material misstatements that were not corrected, we would have referred to them in our opinion. An audit involves carrying out procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the information we audited. The procedures selected depend on our judgement, including our assessment of risks of material misstatement of the information we audited, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, we consider internal control relevant to the District Council and group’s preparation of the information we audited that fairly reflect the matters to which they relate. We consider internal control in order to design procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the District Council and group’s internal control.

8

the overall presentation of the information we audited.

We did not examine every transaction, nor do we guarantee complete accuracy of the information we audited. When reporting on whether the annual report complies with the Other Requirements of schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 2002, our procedures were

limited to making sure the information required by schedule 10 was included in the annual report, where relevant, and identifying material inconsistencies, if any, with the information we audited. This work was carried out in accordance with International Standard on Auditing (New Zealand) 720; The Auditor’s Responsibilities Relating to Other Information in Documents Containing Audited Financial Statements. As a result we do not express an audit opinion on the District Council’s compliance with the requirements of schedule 10. We did not evaluate the security and controls over the electronic publication of the information we are required to audit and report on. We have obtained all the information and explanations we have required and we believe we have obtained sufficient and appropriate evidence to provide a basis for our opinion. Responsibilities of the Council The Council is responsible for preparing: •

financial statements and the statement of service provision (referred to as Significant Activities) that:

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


-

comply with generally accepted accounting

the amount of funds produced from each source of funding and how the funds were applied as compared to the information included in the District Council’s annual plan; and

practice in New Zealand; -

fairly reflect the District Council and group’s financial position, financial performance and cash flows;

-

fairly reflect its service performance, including achievements compared to forecast;

funding impact statements in relation to each group of activities that fairly reflects by each group of activities the amount of funds produced from each source of funding and how the funds were applied as compared to the information included in the District Council’s long term plan;

statements about budgeted and actual capital expenditure in relation to each group of activities that fairly reflects by each group of activities the capital expenditure spent as compared to the amounts budgeted and set out in the District Council’s long term plan or annual plan;

a funding impact statement that fairly reflects

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

the other information in accordance with the requirements of schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 2002.

The Council is responsible for such internal control as it determines is necessary to ensure that the annual report is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. The Council is also responsible for the publication of the annual report, whether in printed or electronic form.

opinion to you. Our responsibility arises under section 15 of the Public Audit Act 2001 and section 99 of the Local Government Act 2002. Independence When carrying out this audit, which includes our report on the Other Requirements, we followed the independence requirements of the Auditor General, which incorporate the independence requirements of the External Reporting Board. Other than this audit, which includes our report on the Other Requirements, we have no relationship with or interests in the District Council or any of its subsidiaries.

The Council’s responsibilities arise under the Local Government Act 2002. Responsibilities of the Auditor We are responsible for expressing an independent opinion on, the information we are required to audit, and whether the Council has complied with the Other Requirements of schedule 10, and reporting that

Andy Burns Audit New Zealand On behalf of the Auditor-General Christchurch, New Zealand

9


PURPOSE OF COUNCIL

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Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Purpose of the Council The Council's Mission To pursue with the community a high quality physical and social environment, safe communities and a healthy economy

The Council's Values We are committed to service through: Working with our communities and each other Keeping people informed Doing better every day Taking responsibility Acting with integrity, honesty and trust

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STATEMENT OF COMPLIANCE AND RESPONSIBILITY

Statement

OF COMPLIANCE AND RESPONSIBILITY

Compliance 1 The Council and management of the Waimakariri District Council confirm that all the statutory requirements of Section 98 and Schedule 10 Part 3 of the Local Government Act 2002 have been complied with. Responsibility 2 The Council and management of the Waimakariri District Council accept responsibility for the preparation of the annual Financial Statements and the judgments used in them. 3

The Council and management of the Waimakariri District Council accept responsibility for establishing and maintaining a system of internal control designed to provide reasonable assurances as to the integrity and reliability of financial reporting.

4

In the opinion of the Council and management of the Waimakariri District Council, the annual Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2013 fairly reflect the financial position and operations of the Waimakariri District Council.

David Ayers Mayor 29 October 2013

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Jim Palmer Chief Executive 29 October 2013

Jeff Millward Manager Finance & Business Support 29 October 2013

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

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COMMUNITY OUTCOMES

Community OUTCOMES

The first six statements are the Outcomes that

to aspects of particular concern, as identified through

There is sufficient clean water to meet the needs of communities and ecosystems • The demand for water is kept to a sustainable level.

community consultation.

the community told us are priorities. Below each main Outcome are statements which point

There is a safe environment for all •

Harm to people from natural and man-made hazards is minimised and the District has the capacity and resilience to respond to natural disasters.

Crime, injury and road accidents are minimised.

Our District is well served by emergency services and volunteers are encouraged.

The standard of our District’s roads is keeping pace with increasing traffic numbers.

Christchurch is readily accessible by cycle, car, truck, bus or train, and the communities in the District are well linked with each other.

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The District is well served by public transport.

Energy and telecommunications services have sufficient capacity.

Solid waste is minimised and residues do not cause harm to the environment.

Water supplies to communities are of a high quality.

Housing is affordable and available to meet the needs of an aging population, responses to natural disasters, and population growth.

Businesses in the District are diverse, adaptable, and growing •

There are growing numbers of business and employment opportunities in the District.

There are sufficient and appropriate places where new businesses are able to set up in our District.

There are opportunities for our young people to enter employment and gain skills in our District.

Transport is accessible, convenient, reliable, affordable and sustainable

Harm to the environment from the spread of contaminants into ground and surface water is minimised.

Core utility services are provided in a timely, sustainable and affordable manner • Harm to the environment from sewage and stormwater discharges is minimised.

The community’s needs for health and social services are met • Our people are supported by a wide range of health services that are available and accessible in our District. •

Participation in community-based support services is acknowledged and encouraged.

The community has told us that the following Outcomes are also important: The air is clean • Reliance on open fires and older style burners for home heating in Kaiapoi and Rangiora is reduced.

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


The smells from farming activities are usually only

short term and/or seasonal. The land is healthy •

Soils are protected from inappropriate farming practices.

There is a wide variety of public places and spaces

People are friendly and caring, creating a strong

to meet people’s needs.

sense of community in our District

There are wide ranging opportunities for people to

The range of community and recreation facilities meets the changing needs of our community.

There are areas of significant indigenous

The distinctive character of our towns, villages

vegetation and habitats for indigenous fauna

and rural areas is maintained

and/or habitats is encouraged.

convenient and attractive places to visit and

Heritage buildings and sites are protected and the cultural heritage link with our past is preserved.

• •

Different cultures are acknowledged and respected.

Our rural land is mainly used for farming.

The particular recreational needs of children and young people are met.

Public effect is given to the spirit of the Treaty of Waitangi •

The Council and Te Ngai Tuahuriri Runanga, through the Memorandum of Understanding, continue to build their relationship.

There are wide ranging opportunities for people to

People have wide ranging opportunities for

contribute to the decision-making by local, regional

learning and being informed

and national organisations that affects our District

Our schools are well resourced, have the

Local, regional and national organisations make

There are wide ranging opportunities to

capacity to cope with population growth,

information about their plans and activities readily

participate in arts and cultural activities.

and the capacity to meet the needs of

available.

tertiary students.

Public spaces and facilities are plentiful, accessible and high quality •

recreational activities.

do business.

The community’s cultures, arts and heritage are conserved and celebrated

The centres of our main towns are safe,

There are wide ranging opportunities for people of different ages to participate in community and

enjoy the outdoors.

The loss of topsoil by wind erosion is minimised.

Conservation of significant areas of vegetation

People enjoy clean water at our beaches and rivers.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

Local, regional and national organisations make

Our people are easily able to get the information

every effort to accommodate the views of people

they need.

who contribute to consultations.

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Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Guide to Significant Activities Sections Group of Activities Individual Activities

The services the Council intended to provide for the year

How the activity contributes to the outcomes sought by the community

Outcome

How the Activity Contributes

There is a safe environment for all

Council has an ongoing role in earthquake recovery to restore core utilities and community facilities...

Services and Levels of Service (2012/2013) • •

Maintain Kaiapoi Earthquake Hub operations... Provide information, assistance, updates...

How the Council actually performed: did it deliver the services it said it would?

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

Activity Performance Measures and Targets

Progress for the 2012/2013 Year

Number of earthquake affected residents assisted

1661 queries responded to / appointments held

What the Council spent on the services, and the income it received

Total Income Total Operating Expenditure Operating Surplus Total Capital Expenditure Total Funding

Shows where expenditure was different from that planned

Explanations of Significant Variances for this Activity

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Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Significant Activities EARTHQUAKE RECOVERY COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP ––Governance ––District Development INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES ––Roads and Footpaths ––Water Supply ––Sewerage and the Treatment and Disposal of Sewage ––Stormwater Drainage ––Solid Waste COMMUNITY SERVICES ––Recreation ––Libraries and Museums ––Community Protection ––Community Development PROPERTY MANAGEMENT COUNCIL CONTROLLED ORGANISATIONS ––Te Kohaka O Tuhaitara Trust ––Enterprise North Canterbury ––Transwaste Canterbury Ltd ––Canterbury Economic Development Company Ltd 19

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


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Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Earthquake Recovery

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EARTHQUAKE RECOVERY

Earthquake Recovery The overall Earthquake Recovery programme divides into 7 components that were progressed during 2012/13:

1. Red Zone Transition Management

damaged by the earthquakes were all progressed

demolished commercial properties were held and

The head agency in this regard is the Canterbury

during the year. Notably funding commitments were

plans advanced. The Council also resolved to fasttrack

Earthquake Recovery Authority who on behalf of

made for the new library/service centre in Kaiapoi

the upgrade of the Red Lion Corner realignment in

the Crown progressed and settled offers on the

and the strengthened and expanded Rangiora Town

Rangiora and substantially progressed the first phase

majority of Red Zone residential properties during the

Hall. Repairs to the Kaiapoi Aquatic Centre were

of upgrade of the Williams Street and bridge area in

year. The Council continued to maintain services to

substantially progressed towards its reopening in

the Kaiapoi town centre.

occupied dwellings.

August 2013. Plans for 25 Elderly Persons Housing

2. Green Zone Infrastructure Rebuild Programme

Units towards replacement of the 29 that were

5. New Residential Development

included in the residential Red Zone were confirmed.

The Council continues to work with major developers

Major progress was made during the year in design

in Kaiapoi and across the district seeking to provide

and construction of repaired and replaced water, sewer

4. Town Centres and Business Support

land and housing options for earthquake affected

and stormwater infrastructure and roading damaged

The Council continued to provide temporary

households. The rate of residential development in the

by the earthquakes in "Green Zone" areas adjoining the

accommodation for earthquake displaced businesses

district in the 2012/13 year set a new high.

Red Zone.

in Rangiora and Kaiapoi and through Enterprise North Canterbury a range of business support services are

6. Council Recovery and Support

3. Community Facilities and Reserves

available and were utilised. Significant discussions

The Council through its social recovery programme

Plans, designs, funding and construction of repaired

with town centre property owners towards advancing

continued to provide co-ordination and

and replaced community facilities and reserves

plans for redevelopment of property with now

accommodation for support services to those affected

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Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


by the earthquakes based at the earthquake hub in Kaiapoi. Temporary accommodation located on the Kaiapoi Domain was well utilised during the year. A longer term community development programme called "You Me We Us" was developed during the year to reflect the huge upheaval and change in the Kaiapoi and environs community. 7. Legacy Projects Apart from a contribution by the Canterbury Earthquake Appeal Trust to the Kaiapoi Aquatic Centre rebuild the Trust has committed $2million to the restoration of the earthquake damaged Kaiapoi riverbanks walkway and offer public improvements as a lasting contribution to the most affected communities in this part of the district.

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EARTHQUAKE RECOVERY

Community Outcomes and How the Activity Contributes COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

EARTHQUAKE RECOVERY There is a safe environment for all. Core utility services are provided in a timely, sustainable and affordable manner. The community’s needs for health and social services are met.

Council has an ongoing role in earthquake recovery to restore core utilities and community facilities, and lead the social recovery of affected communities.

Maintain Kaiapoi Earthquake Hub operations, engagement with external agencies, and contribution to transition and recovery plans. Provide information, assistance, updates and official agency and community organisation material to 300 earthquake affected residents per quarter in the 2012/13 year.

Number of earthquake affected residents The Kaiapoi Earthquake Hub has held or assisted. responded to 1661 appointments/queries as at 30 June 2013 for the 2012/2013 year.

Ensure temporary accommodation for residents displaced by earthquakes of at least 22 housing units.

Number of households per quarter provided with temporary accommodation.

The occupancy rate for the temporary accommodation village ranged between a minimum of 17 and a maximum of 22 occupied units during the financial year. The village is managed by the Canterbury Earthquake Temporary Accommodation Service (CETAS).

Complete repair/rebuild works on community facilities as per programme.

Works complete.

Work on repairing community facilities is progressing and is being managed through the Council's Community Facilities Working Party. Construction of the new Kaiapoi Library/ Service Centre is underway and a contract has been let for the strengthening and expansion of the Rangiora Town Hall. See table Building Status on page 93 for a full list of repair works on earthquake affected community buildings.

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Waimakariri District Council 130802059252

 


COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

EARTHQUAKE RECOVERY Complete repair/rebuild infrastructural works as per programme.

Works complete.

Work is progressing and is being managed by the Earthquake Infrastructure Steering Group. The programme is regularly reported to the Earthquake Recovery Committee in terms of programme and budget. The overall programme is generally on track and construction activity is gaining momentum. Nine projects have been completed and a further 27 are underway. Nine have yet to be started, which is in accordance with the approved programme. There are 13 projects currently in the construction phase, three of which are expected to be completed in July 2013 and three in August 2013. The types of work includes; water mains, gravity sewer and pressure sewer pipeline, stormwater pipelines and infrastructure, pump stations and roading. The works are all being coordinated with other Council projects, with other utilities and some private sector building work. Some of the works also programmed to follow, and are dependent on, the red zones being fully vacated.

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EARTHQUAKE RECOVERY

FUNDING IMPACT STATEMENT for the year ended 30 June 2013 for Earthquake Recovery 2012 Long Term Plan

2013 Long Term Plan

2013 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

General Rates, uniform annual general charges, rates penalties

1,132

-

-

Targeted Rates (other than a targeted rate for water supply)

-

-

-

Subsidies and grants for operating purposes

-

-

-

Internal charges and overheads recovered

-

-

-

Fees, charges and targeted rates for water supply Local authorities fuel tax, fines, infringement fees, and other receipts

-

-

-

17,775

4,582

2,862

18,907

4,582

2,862

7,000

3,627

2,668

933

1,041

494

Internal charges and overheads applied

-

-

-

Other operating fund applications

-

-

-

7,933

4,668

3,162

10,974

(86)

(300)

64,467

6,317

4,433

-

-

-

12,756

4,663

-

Lump sum contributions

-

-

-

Gross proceeds from sale of assets

-

-

-

77,223

10,980

4,433

Sources of operating funding

TOTAL OPERATING FUNDING Applications of operating funding Payments to staff and suppliers Finance costs

TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF OPERATING FUNDING SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF OPERATING FUNDING Sources of capital funding Subsidies and grants for capital expenditure Development and financial contributions Increase (decrease) in debt

TOTAL SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING Applications of capital funding Capital expenditure - to meet additional demand

-

-

-

- to improve the level of service

-

1,607

423

- to replace existing assets

102,452

18,962

12,195

Increase (decrease) in reserves

(14,255)

(9,675)

(8,485)

Increase (decrease) in investments TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF CAPITAL FUNDING SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF CAPITAL FUNDING FUNDING BALANCE

26

-

-

-

88,197

10,894

4,133

(10,974)

86

300

-

-

-

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Community Leadership GOVERNANCE ––Community involvement in decision-making ––Council’s accountability to the community ––Iwi relationships DISTRICT DEVELOPMENT ––District development ––Managing effects of development on the environment

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

27


GOVERNANCE

Governance Community Involvement in Decision Making, Council's Accountability to the Community, Iwi Relationships

Overview Ten Year Plan (TYP) This is the first year of the 2012-2022 TYP. The Plan has a ten year outlook but is updated annually as a statutory requirement to reflect necessary and unforeseen changes. The TYP undergoes a full review every three years and will next be reviewed in early 2015. Annual Plan The Council adopted the 2013-2014 Annual Plan after public consultation. Sixty one submissions were received and 41 submitters were heard by Council. Local Government Amendment Act 2012 The Local Government Amendment Act 2012 was passed in December and provided a new purpose statement for local government, new financial prudence requirements, a new intervention and assistance framework, and changes to the procedure to reorganise local government.

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The Government has announced its intention to introduce another bill to further amend the Local Government Act in 2013. Results • The Council achieved its target of conducting 95% of its business in meetings open to the public during the year. Some confidential property transactions relating to the earthquake needed to be considered with the public excluded and these had an impact on the overall percentage. •

Insurance The Council has full cover for all Council buildings, valued at $266 million for flood, fire and other perils excluding earthquake damage. With respect to all residential and non-residential council property, buildings such as service centres, aquatic centres, community centres and elderly persons housing, as well as the ocean outfall and Oxford sewer systems, insurance cover is also provided for natural disasters such as earthquakes.

Council has been successful in terms of delivering on its non-financial performance objectives. To the year ending 30 June, 75% of Council objectives were met and 21% were almost met.

The Council’s earthquake insurance cover is set at a maximum of $115 million for one or more earthquake events – a significant improvement on the $20 million cover that the Council was able to achieve last year.

There has been a 49% increase in new dwelling building consents issued this year. The total for the

Assets which are classified as “below ground”, which typically include water and sewerage pipes, have

year ended 30 June 2013 is 1125 compared with 902 for the previous period.

traditionally been covered by the Local Authorities Protection Programme (LAPP) – a mutual funding pool

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


created by local authorities to cater for infrastructure

important to Maori. The Council also had a significant

damage caused by natural disaster. In the light

presence at the opening of the new Tuahiwi Marae on

of repair and reinstatement work following the

1 December 2012.

earthquakes of 2010 and 2011, these underground

The Memorandum of Understanding between the

assets in the Waimakariri District have been valued at $344 million. Central Government meets 60% of the

Council and Te Ngai Tuahuriri Runanga was revised, endorsed by the Runanga at the annual hui and

in recognition of many years of voluntary service in clubs and organisations within the District. Welcome to the District to all 194 people who attended ceremonies where they were granted New Zealand citizenship.

As with last year, LAPP is unable to provide earthquake

progressed throughout 2012/13 and the Mahaanui Iwi

Council Strategies • Local Economic Development Strategy Progress was made on implementing the LED which was adopted by Council the previous year.

cover for these below-ground assets for the Council.

Management Plan was released in February 2013.

However LAPP provides cover for other peril damage

The Tuahiwi water supply, new Tuahiwi Marae and

including floods, up to a total claim limit of $100million.

the Mahaanui Iwi Management Plan have all received

The council’s insurance broker is still exploring

financial assistance from Council.

cost of any damage, with the Council responsible for the balance.

alternative options for its below-ground assets. Relationships with Maori

endorsed by the Council on 7 May 2013. Installation of a reticulated water supply for Tuahiwi

The Council has also undertaken a public consultation exercise about possible changes to the District Plan in

The Council continues to build its relationship with

relation to the Kaiapoi Maori Reserve (MR 873).*

local iwi. As well as regular monthly meetings, an

Civic Functions

annual hui was held with Te Ngai Tuahuriri Runanga

The Council hosted a number of civic functions

at the Tuahiwi Marae on 5 March 2013, to address

throughout the year. It was particularly pleasing

issues and identify opportunities to increase Maori

to recognise twelve citizens of the Waimakariri

participation in decisions relating to matters that are

District who received a community service award

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

Rangiora Town Centre Strategy and Kaiapoi Town Centre Plan A number of strategic actions were completed for the implementation of both of these strategies.

Woodend/Pegasus Area Development Strategy This strategy was launched 30 August 2012 and a draft was approved by Council for public consultation at its July 2013 meeting.

* MR873 - Maori Reserve 873 is an area of approximately 2,600 acres set aside for residential purposes in 1848. It includes the village of Tuahiwi and land today is held in a variety of titles.

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GOVERNANCE

Community Outcomes and How the Activity Contributes COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT IN DECISION MAKING There are wide ranging opportunities for people to contribute to the decision-making by local, regional and national organisations that affects our District.

Taking into account the Provision of opportunities for views of interested and community involvement in affected parties in Council’s decision making. decision-making.

Number of special consultative procedures held per quarter.

Three SCP's were undertaken this financial year. These were for the discontinuation of chlorination in the Rangiora and Oxford water supplies, the draft Annual Plan 2012-2013 and the Local Alcohol Policy.

Number of other consultation processes conducted.

Fifty eight consultations were carried out over the past financial year.

Maintaining the Committees, Community Boards and the Ward Advisory Board as avenues for community input to Council decision-making.

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All Board meetings held monthly from February to December.

Number of scheduled Community Board and Ward Advisory Board meetings held per quarter.

45 Board meetings were held during the financial year with all four Boards meeting in the months of July, August, September, February, March, April, May and June 2013. One monthly KCB, RCB and OEWAB meeting was cancelled during the second quarter during to a lack of business.

All Committee meetings held as scheduled.

Number of scheduled Committee meetings held per quarter.

Ten meetings were scheduled and held in the first quarter, nine were scheduled and eight held in the second quarter, eight were scheduled and nine held in the third quarter and eight were scheduled and held in the last quarter.

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252

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COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

COUNCIL'S ACCOUNTABILITY TO THE COMMUNITY There are wide ranging opportunities for people to contribute to the decision-making by local, regional and national organisations that affects our District.

Establishing and maintaining effective decision-making processes.

Maintaining accountability to Adoption of Annual Plans by 30 June the whole community through each year and Annual Reports by 31 the decisions reflected in the Ten October each year. Year Plan and Annual Plan and their implementation through the Annual Report.

The Long Term Plan 2012-2022 was adopted on the 19th June 2012. The Council's Annual Report was adopted by Council on 23rd October 2012. The Audit Opinion was an unmodified (clear) opinion. All Council policies and GAAP requirements have been complied with during the year. The draft Annual Plan 2013 -2014, being the second year of the LTP, was adopted for consultation on 26 February 2012. Community consultation was carried out between 9 March 2013 and 9 April 2013 and 61 submissions were received. The Annual Plan was adopted by Council on 18 June 2013.

Public access is provided to Council decision-making.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

95% of Council items of business Percentage of Council items of business are open to the public. that are open to the public.

95.04% of matters were considered in open meetings over the financial year.

Ensure Community Board and Community Plans reviewed by 30 Ward Advisory Board Community September each year. Plans are reviewed annually.

All four Board Community Plans are current and on the Council website. The Kaiapoi Community Board and Woodend Ashley Community Board Community Plans were updated in November 2012, the Rangiora Community Board Plan was updated in April 2013 and the Oxford Eyre Ward Advisory Board Plan was updated in June 2013.

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GOVERNANCE

COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

IWI RELATIONSHIPS Public effect is given to the spirit of the Treaty of Waitangi.

Continuing to build the Council’s relationship with Te Ngai Tuahuriri Runanga through the Memorandum of Understanding.

Continue to consult with Te Ngai Tuahuriri Runanga on issues of concern to it in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). Monthly meetings in accordance with the MOU.

Number of Runanga Executive meetings with Councils staff each quarter.

Meetings were held in July, August and October 2012, January, February, April and June 2013. The March 2013 monthly meeting was postponed due to the Hui being held at Tuahiwi Marae in the same month. The May meeting was cancelled due to a tangi being held at the Marae. There was a significant staff and Council attendance at the opening of the new Tuahiwi Marae on 1 December 2012.

Yearly Hui at Council or the Marae.

Annual Hui held.

The Annual Hui was held on 5 March 2013.

Canvass with the Runanga at least 5 major issues per quarter.

Number of issues canvassed quarterly.

81 significant items were discussed with the Runanga during the financial year. 12 significant items were discussed each quarter in the first and second quarters, 22 in the third quarter and 35 during the two meetings held in the last quarter.

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Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


FUNDING IMPACT STATEMENT for the year ended 30 June 2013 for Governance 2012 Long Term Plan

2013 Long Term Plan

2013 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

1,265

1,295

974

283

291

294

Subsidies and grants for operating purposes

-

-

Internal charges and overheads recovered

-

-

-

Sources of operating funding General Rates, uniform annual general charges, rates penalties

Targeted Rates

Fees, charges and targeted rates for water supply

13

12

3

1,561

1,598

1,271

1,236

1,283

1,415

-

-

-

335

353

131

1,571

1,636

1,546

(10)

(38)

(275)

Subsidies and grants for capital expenditure

-

-

-

Development and financial contributions

-

-

-

Increase (decrease) in debt

-

-

-

Lump sum contributions

-

-

-

TOTAL SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING

-

-

-

- to meet additional demand

-

-

-

- to improve the level of service

-

-

-

- to replace existing assets

-

-

-

(10)

(38)

(275)

TOTAL OPERATING FUNDING Applications of operating funding Payments to staff and suppliers Finance costs Internal charges and overheads applied TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF OPERATING FUNDING SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF OPERATING FUNDING Sources of capital funding

Applications of capital funding Capital expenditure

Increase (decrease) in reserves Increase (decrease) in investments TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF CAPITAL FUNDING SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF CAPITAL FUNDING FUNDING BALANCE

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

-

-

-

(10)

(38)

(275)

10

38

275

-

-

-

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DISTRICT DEVELOPMENT

District Development District Development, Managing Effects of Development on the Environment

Overview District Development The year saw 496 resource consent applications received. 311 Land Use consents, 122 subdivision consents and 51 other consents were approved. As at 30 June, 2012 the remaining 12 were in the approval process. When compared with the 291 applications received in the 2011/12 year this significant increase is likely to be a reflection of the community response in earthquake rebuild and development activity. Overall 86% of resource consents were dealt with in statutory timeframes. In accordance with the discount requirements of the Resource Management Act 1991 a total of $2460.20 was paid back to applicants. Comparisons with previous years are not available as any discount only applied to consents received after 1 April 2012.

34

District Plan Review The Council continued the District Plan rolling review with an expectation that the majority of provisions will be notified by November 2015. This will see an increasing call for community comment on plan provisions over the next few years. Plan topics under consideration this year have included signs, heritage, indigenous vegetation, localised flooding and MR873. Plan changes for Kaiapoi and Rangiora urban design and Mandeville greenfields have been made. Private Plan Changes Council staff have also processed private plan changes including work on finding a suitable area for a small commercial activity in Mandeville and the commissioners’ decision to rezone rural land to residential 4a in Ohoka. The Smith Street Business Zone plan change was assessed and substantial plan changes by Silverstream (business and residential) and

Beachgrove (residential) in Kaiapoi progressed through their subdivision consent stages. Draft Land Use Recovery Plan Staff have been extensively committed to the preparation of the draft Land Use Recovery Plan and the negotiations with interested parties. This covers planning and development to accommodate anticipated community needs for additional residential and business areas (a need generated by the earthquakes) and negotiating these matters with all the interested parties. Rangiora and Kaiapoi Town Centre Development A significant workload has been undertaken in implementing the Kaiapoi and Rangiora Town Centre projects, specifically in relation to the need to respond to building closures due to earthquake damage so that redevelopment is enabled as quickly as possible, and to providing displaced businesses temporary

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


accommodation. More generally, good progress in difficult circumstances has been made in implementing priority projects to give effect to both town centres’ adopted strategies. For Rangiora, Council decided to accelerate the Red Lion Corner Realignment project and a preferred alignment was confirmed in principle. Staff commissioned a concept plan for a key area north of High Street and are working with property owners to see this come to fruition. Discussions also took place with other key land and business owners to encourage a revitalised and sustainable town centre. Roundabouts at Queen Street have been installed and directional signage into and within the town centre upgraded. Plans were developed to extend the Rangiora Town Hall to become a major District facility and Performing Arts Centre. On and off-street car parking have been improved, and a change was made to the District Plan to introduce additional requirements for the look and feel of new buildings in the town centres (both Rangiora and Kaiapoi). For Kaiapoi, The Williams Street and Charles Street intersection and north of Williams Street streetscape have been improved. Detailed design was developed for a new Kaiapoi Library / Service Centre and plans, including a recreation precinct , have been drawn up for the Kaiapoi riverbanks. Designers also worked on a redeveloped Raven Quay road space east and west of

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

Williams Street. For Rangiora, Council has been holding discussions on (re)development opportunities with property owners. Woodend Pegasus Area Strategy During the 2012/13 year Council staff developed a draft Woodend Pegasus Area Strategy in consultation with an external Steering Group. The draft strategy identifies a vision for the Woodend Pegasus area and proposes a number of directions under four key themes: Connectivity, Business, Community and Open Spaces. Economic Development The top ten priority actions were identified in the Waimakariri Local Economic Development Strategy, adopted by Council in April 2012. This strategy clarifies the Council’s roles and responsibilities in enabling and providing for a prosperous local economy. The priority actions focus on transport and communication, the Council’s regulatory process and performance, business land management and business retention and attraction. All projects have been progressed significantly over 2012/13, particularly streamlining building consent processes, implementing the Council’s town centre strategies and providing immediate business support to the District’s existing businesses This targeted those businesses adversely affected by the closure of dangerous buildings in the District’s main town centres and by other earthquake related disruption. Through the draft Land Use Recovery Plan for greater Christchurch, the

Council also sought additional business land to expand the growing Southbrook business area. Council took steps to attract new businesses to set up in the District and to understand and advocate for the provision for rural broadband needs and demands. In May broadband provider Enable announced the decision to bring fibre broadband to Rangiora and Kaiapoi commercial centres. Also during 2012/13 Enterprise North Canterbury (ENC), a trust jointly controlled and significantly funded by Waimakariri and Hurunui District Councils and a key partner in the development and implementation of the Local Economic Development Strategy, continued to offer a wide range of business networking, support and advisory services. ENC continued to champion opportunities for broadband development in North Canterbury and assessed opportunities to speed up broadband rollout District Promotion ENC also undertakes district promotional services focused on attracting businesses and visitors to the District. It operates the i-SITE visitor information centre at Kaiapoi, undertakes a range of district marketing activities and advises on and provides limited funding for the promotion and organisation of local events.

35


DISTRICT DEVELOPMENT

Community Outcomes and How the Activity Contributes COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

DISTRICT DEVELOPMENT Transport is accessible, convenient, reliable, affordable and sustainable. There is a safe environment for all. The distinctive character of our towns, villages and rural areas is maintained. Public spaces and facilities are plentiful, accessible and high quality.

Enabling well informed decisions on intended land uses and required services and facilities to accommodate future population and business growth, taking into account their transport network needs.

Preparing planning strategies and studies for whole towns, town centres and larger areas of the district to develop and maintain the District Development Strategy. Implementing the agreed key actions outlined in the high level implementation table in the Kaiapoi Town Centre Plan 2011.

Number of agreed actions completed.

Nine of the 14 actions for year 2 (12/13) have been completed or have commenced as intended: • Progressing development of a strategy addressing medium to long term development and enhancement of the Kaiapoi Riverbanks. • Continuing discussions and negotiations with private property and business owners (on-going). • Preparing design for Williams Street south. • Preparing design for intersection improvements at Williams/Hilton Streets and Raven Quay/Williams Street. • Preparing design for car parking. • Preparing design for enhanced Hilton/ Williams Streets streetscapes. • Carrying out physical works to enhance Williams Street north. • Carrying out physical works to alter the Williams Street north intersection (Williams/Charles Streets).

36

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Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

DISTRICT DEVELOPMENT (CONT'D) • Commencing physical works for the rebuild of public facilities/buildings (Library/ Service Centre site cleared and services relocated, i-Site relocated) Five have not been completed or commenced as intended as follows: • Physical works on (former) Bridge Tavern site redevelopment. Insurance/multiple ownership issues have delayed project. Site is now cleared and on the market. • Physical enhancement of streetscape at Hilton Street, Williams Street (south of Hilton and north of Charles Street) delayed as was put on hold by the Kaiapoi Community Board. • Physical reconfiguration of car parking and parking management. Car parking/ redesign at Raven Quay will occur with rebuild of Library/Service Centre and rebuild of Blackwell’s Dept. Store. Raven Quay west works to occur over Aug/Sept 2013. Raven Quay east works to occur alongside construction of Library/Service Centre. • Physical improvements to Williams St bridge will commence in 2013/14 year instead to enable more efficient management of traffic when Raven Quay west works are underway. Upgrade of directional signage has not commenced.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

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DISTRICT DEVELOPMENT

COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

DISTRICT DEVELOPMENT (CONT'D) Implementing the agreed actions outlined in the high level implementation table in the Rangiora Town Centre Strategy 2010 (RTC 2020)

Number of agreed actions completed.

All of the 12 high-level actions identified for 2010/11 have been completed or commenced as intended (for long-term projects) (11) or are partially completed (1). Four of the 7 high-level actions identified for 2011/12 have been completed, some actions of which spanned into the 2012/13 year: • Undertaking design work for the redevelopment of the Blake Street car park and surrounding area in conjunction with neighbouring land owners (on-going). • Installation of roundabouts at the Queen/ Percival and Queen/Victoria Street intersections completed in July 2012. • Upgrade directional signage leading into and within the town centre, completed in August 2012. • Making provisions in the 2012/22 Long Term Plan for expenditure to implement town centre strategy projects. Three have not been completed/have been delayed as follows: • Design work for Council precinct is delayed as the library extension was put off to 2020/21 due to budget pressures on facilities because of earthquake repairs/ rebuilds on other facilities. • Physical upgrade of land behind shops at north of High Street.

38

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252

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COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

DISTRICT DEVELOPMENT (CONT'D)

• Upgrade of access lanes to Blake Street car park delayed due to project scope change because of buildings' demolition though discussions with owners taking place. Five long-term projects were signalled in the Strategy for 2012-22. The status of these is as follows: • Investigate to ensure the protection of the opportunity for long-term roading options, including the extension of Queen and Blackett Streets to East Belt and the construction of an eastern bypass. Investigations in 2010 concluded that an Eastern Arterial is not a viable option in the short or medium term and that there are limited benefits associated with the Blackett Street - East Belt connection, however the future opportunity is protected through land use patterns. • Plan improvements to public transport. Submission put into ECan’s 2012 review of public transport provision. Council staff are active members of ECan’s Passenger Transport Advisory Group and there is ongoing liaison with ECan regarding public transport provision. In-house surveying and monitoring of community’s needs and demands.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

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39


DISTRICT DEVELOPMENT

COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

DISTRICT DEVELOPMENT (CONT'D) • Involvement in planning and provision for additional community facilities in Rangiora. Construction works to strengthen, upgrade and extend the Rangiora Town Hall into a Performing Arts Centre for the District will commence in October 2013. • Commence realignment of the Ashley/ Ivory/High Streets intersection. Project progressed significantly, with funding brought forward to 2013/14-2014/15 years. An alignment was confirmed and construction is likely to commence towards the end of 2014 calendar year. • Construct library extension. As above, this project is delayed as library extension put off to 2020/21 due to budget pressures on facilities because of earthquake repairs/ rebuilds on other facilities. Defining growth options for MR873* for land owner and community consultation by 2012, as part of preparing an agreed MR873 development strategy. Community consultation on options to be undertaken by 30 June 2012.

Community consultation completed.

Community consultation was carried out on development options for MR873 between 27/03/13 and 17/05/13. The submissions were summarised and a hearing was held on 26/06/13. The hearing panel is to report to the Resource Management & Regulation Committee at the end of July 2013.

*MR873 - Maori Reserve 873 is an area of approximately 2,600 acres set aside for residential purposes in 1848. It includes the village of Tuahiwi and land is held today in a variety of titles.

Note: Any performance measures in italics are items where there was a significant variance between the actual service provision and the expected service provision. 40

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252

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COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

DISTRICT DEVELOPMENT (CONT'D) Issues and implications reported to Council by 30 September 2012.

Report to Council completed.

A report is to be prepared to go a special Resource Management and Regulation Committee meeting at the end of July 2013 on the results of the consultation and a possible plan change.

Consultation on the implementation of a preferred option or options.

Consultation complete.

Consultation will be carried out for the implementation of a Plan Change. The timing of the public consultation will depend upon the outcome of the Draft Land Use Recovery Plan.

MANAGING EFFECTS OF DEVELOPMENT ON THE ENVIRONMENT There is a safe environment for all. The distinctive character of our towns, villages and rural areas is maintained. Public spaces and facilities are plentiful, accessible and high quality.

Helping achieve the sustainable management of natural and physical resources through developing, maintaining and administering the District Plan.

The land is healthy.

Reviewing and updating the District Plan through Council initiated plan changes.

Number of plan changes initiated (when a file has been started for a plan change).

Council has initiated 4 new plan changes to date and is working on a number of plan changes for notification in 2013. Plan Change 38 - Residential 1 & 2, September 2012 Plan Change 39 - Technical Council Plan Change which deals with two aspects: 1) road widths in the Business zones, except Business 3. 2) dwellings within farm effluent application separations. Plan Change 40 - Parking Review deals with the parking requirements of the District Plan across all zones. Plan Change 41 - Retailing looks at aspects of retailing outside the Business 1 zone.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

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DISTRICT DEVELOPMENT

COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

MANAGING EFFECTS OF DEVELOPMENT ON THE ENVIRONMENT (CONT'D) Providing opportunities to the community for involvement in decision making, as required by the RMA and LGA.

Number of consultation processes undertaken.

Eighteen consultations have taken place to date: 4 x private plan changes - calling for submissions and further submissions, P09, P019, P020 and P021. 13 resource consents have been subject to either public or limited notification as follows: Bupa, RC No. 125204 Fitzsimmons, RC No. 125086 Delta & Reeves, RC No. 125123 Adams Group, RC No. 105289 William Lee, RC No. 085524 Ashley Lodge, RC No. 135004 Bupa, RC No. 125204 Fitzsimmons, RC No. 125086 Delta & Reeves, RC No.125123 Adams Group, RC No. 105289 William Lee, RC No. 085524 Ashley Lodge, RC No. 135004 Bupa, RC No. 135003 Methodist Church, RC No. 125378 Crerar RC No's. 125436/125437 Starkey RC No. 125326 Vodafone NZ Ltd RC No. 125416 x 2 limited notification Rowse RC135078 Kettle RC135084

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Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

MANAGING EFFECTS OF DEVELOPMENT ON THE ENVIRONMENT (CONT'D) Consultation closed on 3 July 2012 on draft variations to the east and west Rangiora Structure Plans, draft Woodend Structure Plan and to the draft Kaiapoi Structure Plans. Responding to privately initiated changes to the District Plan. 100% of private plan changes are dealt with in accordance with statutory timeframes.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

Percentage of private plan changes responded to in accordance with legal timeframe requirements.

100% of private plan changes were dealt with in accordance with statutory timeframes. The decision for P017 (Ohoka Plan Change Group, to re-zone an 85.2 ha area in Ohoka from 'Rural' to 'Residential 4A), was issued on 18/05/13 which was within the statutory timeframe. All private plan changes that have been publicly notified are being processed and are on track to comply with statutory timeframes as follows: P09 - Woodend Beach Developments, Woodend Beach Road P019 - Freeman Family Trust, Parsonage Road, Woodend P020 - Clampett Investments, Smith Street, Kaiapoi P021 - Bagrie, Bradleys Road, Ohoka P022 - McHugh, Mandeville (application received) P023 - Evansvale, Fernside (application received) P025 - Snellex, Ashley (application received)

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DISTRICT DEVELOPMENT

COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

MANAGING EFFECTS OF DEVELOPMENT ON THE ENVIRONMENT (CONT'D) Processing and monitoring resource consents within all legal timeframes (20 days for non-notified, and 70 days for notified) to address and mitigate potential adverse effects on the community and environment. Process 100% of resource consents within statutory timeframes.

Percentage of resource consents issued within legal timeframes.

95% of 484 resource consents were issued over the past financial year and 95% of these were issued within statutory timeframes. (2012: 327 consents were issued, 87% within statutory timeframes). A total of 24 resource consents were issued outside of statutory timeframes. The reasons for this vary from consent to consent but include matters such as the complexity of issues associated with the consent and delays on receiving external advice/decisions.

Audit land use consent (LUC) decisions for compliance with conditions of consent.

Number of land use consent decisions audited.

343 LUC decisions were issued over the past financial year. 20.4% (70) of these were monitored and confirmed as being fully compliant. 186 LUC's were known to have become effective over the past financial year.

Annually audit 100 historic consents for compliance with conditions.

Number of consents audited.

4 historic land use consents were audited for conditions of compliance over the past financial year.

Note: Any performance measures in italics are items where there was a significant variance between the actual service provision and the expected service provision.

44

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


FUNDING IMPACT STATEMENT for the year ended 30 June 2013 for District Development 2012 Long Term Plan

2013 Long Term Plan

2013 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

General Rates, uniform annual general charges, rates penalties

2,057

2,496

1,868

Targeted Rates (other than a targeted rate for water supply)

291

113

116

-

-

-

660

687

701

Sources of operating funding

Subsidies and grants for operating purposes Internal charges and overheads recovered Fees, charges and targeted rates for water supply TOTAL OPERATING FUNDING

435

459

1,014

3,443

3,755

3,699

3,201

3,507

4,309

-

-

-

229

248

239

Applications of operating funding Payments to staff and suppliers Finance costs Internal charges and overheads applied Other operating fund applications

-

-

-

3,430

3,755

4,548

13

-

(849)

Subsidies and grants for capital expenditure

-

-

-

Development and financial contributions

-

-

-

Increase (decrease) in debt

-

-

-

Lump sum contributions

-

-

-

TOTAL SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING

-

-

-

- to meet additional demand

-

-

-

- to improve the level of service

-

-

-

- to replace existing assets

-

-

-

13

-

(849)

TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF OPERATING FUNDING SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF OPERATING FUNDING Sources of capital funding

Applications of capital funding Capital expenditure

Increase (decrease) in reserves Increase (decrease) in investments TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF CAPITAL FUNDING SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF CAPITAL FUNDING FUNDING BALANCE

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

-

-

-

13

-

(849)

(13)

-

849

-

-

-

45


46

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Infrastructure Services ROADS AND FOOTPATHS ––Promoting Environmental Sustainability ––Supporting Business and Employment ––Protecting and Promoting Health, Safety and Security ––Improving Access and Mobility WATER SUPPLY ––Water Supply and Quality ––Water Conservation ––Stockwater SEWERAGE AND THE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL OF SEWAGE ––Reticulation Systems ––Effluent Quality STORMWATER DRAINAGE ––Managing Stormwater ––Minimising the Impact of Flood Hazards ––Customer Satisfaction ––Community Engagement SOLID WASTE ––Waste Collection ––Waste Disposal ––Waste Minimisation

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

47


ROADS AND FOOTPATHS

Roads and Footpaths Overview Key roading activities during the year focused on the earthquake recovery programme, Rangiora and Kaiapoi Town Centre enhancement projects, growth related projects, the new Ashley Bridge and the ongoing maintenance and renewal programme.

concern about the vulnerability of the bridge. As a

Pavement rehabilitation work was completed in South

consequence NZTA approved construction funding for

Eyre Road, Fernside Road, Depot Road and King Street.

a new bridge. All effort is now being made to build the

The majority of this rehabilitation was completed by

new bridge as soon as possible.

stabilising existing material and so was both cost

Rangiora saw further progress. As this project is key

A section of Riverside Road, Loburn, was sealed as part

The earthquake recovery work in Kaiapoi, Pines Beach and Kairaki gathered some momentum with permanent repairs completed at the east end of Beach Road, the

to the revitalisation of the Rangiora Town Centre, the

of the subdivision contribution programme and new

Council agreed to accelerate the work and proceed

kerb and channel was installed in Main Street, Oxford.

north end of Dunns Ave and part of Reid Memorial Avenue in Pines Beach, Kalmia Place and Fuller Street in Kaiapoi and Charles Street and Williams Street in the Kaiapoi Town Centre. The Kaiapoi Town Centre work is ongoing and includes enhancements to the town centre.

Council purchased the Westpac property, seen as pivotal

Opus International Consultants Ltd was engaged during the year to design the new Ashley Bridge and the design work was well underway by 30 June. At the time Opus was engaged, NZTA had approved the design funding but not the construction funding. In June 2013 high water levels in the Ashley River washed out one of the piers. This heightened the Council’s

48

Work on the realignment of the Red Lion Corner in

without NZTA funding assistance. During the year the to the realignment.

effective and environmentally friendly.

Road safety continued to be a major focus during the year with the development and implementation of Road Safety Action Plans. These plans ensure a

Work also progressed on the new Arterial Road in West

coordinated approach to the improvement of road

Kaiapoi. This new road, built in conjunction with the

safety in the District by bringing together the Council’s

Silverstream development, was a critical project to

road safety partners and enforcement, education and

enable the development to progress. It also improved

engineering aspects. The primary focus continued to be

the Island Road/Ohoka Road intersection. By the end of

on intersections, speed restraints and alcohol.

June 2013 a detailed scheme plan had been completed and property purchase was underway.

To enhance safety at rural schools, variable speed limits were approved by NZTA and signs were installed on

The ongoing renewal programme included kerb and

Tram Road at Swannanoa School and on Hodgsons

channel renewal in King Street and Bush Street in

Road at Loburn School. A variable speed limit was also

Rangiora, and Davie Street and Akaroa Street in Kaiapoi.

approved on Fawcetts Road at Ashley School and signs

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


were installed in July 2013. The signs at Ashley School were fully funded by NZTA as part of their national trial. The Active Warning Signs previously at Swannanoa School, were relocated to Fuller Street for St Patricks School and to Southbrook Road for Southbrook School and the Rangiora New Life School. The Active Warning Signs from Ashley School are to be relocated to Sefton School in July 2013. Other road safety improvements were carried out at the Lehmans Road/Johns Road Intersection and new street lighting was installed at the Fernside Road/ Townsend Road intersection to improve visibility.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

49


ROADS AND FOOTPATHS

Community Outcomes and How the Activity Contributes COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

PROMOTING ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY Transport is accessible, convenient, reliable, affordable and sustainable.

Maintaining and developing the District’s roads, footpaths, cycleways and passenger transport facilities to provide a convenient, accessible, responsive, sustainable and comfortable transport network.

Promoting sustainable use of transport modes and encouraging greater use of alternatives like public transport and ride-sharing where practical. Annually decrease single occupancy vehicles on key commuting routes (7am to 9am) into Christchurch as determined by survey in the base year of 2009-2010. Tram Road Lineside Road Main North Road

Number of single occupancy vehicles on weekday morning peak periods.

The results of the survey carried out on 8 May 2013 are as follows. Tram Rd - 80% SOV, Lineside Rd - 84% SOV, Main North Rd - 85% SOV. Tram Rd is 4% lower than the previous survey, while Lineside Rd and Main North Rd have not changed.

Number of projects where renewable resources were used.

Five projects using renewable resources ( stabilising the existing material) were completed over the financial year. These were:

83% SOV 82% SOV 81% SOV

Providing roading infrastructure using renewable resources where feasible.

• Beach Road and Adderley Terrace earthquake repairs • Fernside Road and King Street rehabilitation • Murray Street shoulder repairs.

50

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252

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COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

SUPPORTING BUSINESS AND EMPLOYMENT Businesses in the district are diverse, adaptable and growing.

Providing businesses with efficient access to the local and wider transport network, in particular through connections to the State Highway system and Christchurch.

Providing the network for a range of transport modes for people and goods moving around the District for employment, education, leisure, recreation and social activities. At least 75% of vehicle travel is on smooth roads in urban areas and at least 95% is on smooth roads in rural areas.

Percentage of roads in urban and rural areas that reach the standard.

This target is measured biannually as part of the condition rating and roughness survey. Data from NZTA's Road Rating Reports submitted annually to NZTA showed 81% of vehicles travelled on smooth roads in urban areas and 99% of vehicles travelled on smooth roads in rural areas. Roads currently comfortably exceed Council’s roughness target so current work is more than adequate to achieve satisfactory smooth travel.

No more than 5% of the unsealed roading network carrying more than 120 vehicles each day.

Percentage of unsealed roads that carry more than 120 vehicles per day.

2.16% of unsealed roads carry more than 120vpd. Generally few unsealed roads manage to meet the criteria for sealing, while the length of sealed roads in the network is increasing as subdivisions are vested in Council.

Promptly responding to defects in the transport system. More than 90% of faults in the transport network are repaired within 48 hours for emergency faults and 14 days for routine faults.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

Percentage of faults in the transport network that are repaired within the required timeframe: 1) for emergency faults, and 2) for routine faults.

85% of faults were recorded as being completed on time. This measure does not take into account faults which are programmed to be completed after these target dates, often due to a need to obtain extra materials, etc.

 

51


ROADS AND FOOTPATHS

COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

PROTECTING AND PROMOTING HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY There is a safe environment for all. The community’s need for health and social services are met.

Designing and maintaining roads to protect the safety of all road users (including cyclists and pedestrians) and to provide people with access to essential health and social services.

Provide and maintain a safe road network. Less than the 20 fatal and serious injury crashes per year. (Base year 2009).

Number of fatal and serious injury crashes on District roads.

Figures supplied by NZTA show 3 fatal and 15 serious injury crashes, resulting in 3 people killed and 24 seriously injured for the 2012 calendar year. The definitions of fatal and serious crashes are as per the NZTA national definitions (death within 30 days of crash, serious injuries requiring at least one night hospitalisation, broken bones or other similar degree of injury). The Waimakariri District Council Road Safety Action Plan outlines actions being taken to achieve a reduction in serious and fatal crashes. This action plan has been developed in collaboration with a number of road safety partners.

Ensure appropriate co-operation with Road Safety Partners. One meeting every two months.

52

Number of meetings of the Road Safety Co-ordinating Committee.

Meetings were held in August, October and December 2012 and February, April and June 2013.

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252

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COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

IMPROVING ACCESS AND MOBILITY Public spaces and facilities are plentiful, accessible and high quality. Transport is accessible, convenient, reliable, affordable and sustainable.

Promoting a sense of community by providing people and businesses with access to all parts of the District, and providing facilities for all modes of active transport including walking and cycling.

Providing for access and mobility of the road network through parking facilities. Implementation of parking related projects outlined in the Kaiapoi Town Centre Plan and the Rangiora Town Centre Strategy.

Evidence of progression of parking related projects.

Parking changes as identified in the Rangiora Town Centre Strategy were implemented earlier in 2012. This consisted of improved time restrictions and additional on-street parking. This was offset by the temporary loss of on-street parking due to earthquake building closures resulting in barricades blocking off parking areas. No progress has been made on implementing parking projects in Kaiapoi, due to slower than expected progress with the rebuild.

Providing for access and mobility of the road network through footpath provision. Annually increase and/or improve total length of District footpaths to NZ Standard.

The length of footpath extensions and improvements per annum.

11.8 kilometres of new footpaths have been added to the network through vested assets.

Providing for access and mobility of the road network through cycling facilities. Annually increase and/or improve the length of cycle lanes and/or paths.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

The length of dedicated cycle lanes and cycle paths and improvements per annum.

No cycle lane and cycle paths have been constructed or improved to date.

53


ROADS AND FOOTPATHS

FUNDING IMPACT STATEMENT for the year ended 30 June 2013 for Roads and Footpaths 2012 Long Term Plan

2013 Long Term Plan

2013 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

Sources of operating funding General Rates, uniform annual general charges, rates penalties

-

-

89

Targeted Rates (other than a targeted rate for water supply)

7,197

7,331

7,593

Subsidies and grants for operating purposes

1,986

2,155

2,332

-

-

36

Fees, charges and targeted rates for water supply

145

138

201

Local authorities fuel tax, fines, infringement fees, and other receipts

307

307

364

9,635

9,931

10,615

Payments to staff and suppliers

4,462

4,523

5,415

Finance costs

1,123

999

363

Internal charges and overheads applied

1,613

1,761

985

Internal charges and overheads recovered

TOTAL OPERATING FUNDING Applications of operating funding

Other operating fund applications

-

-

-

TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF OPERATING FUNDING

7,198

7,283

6,763

SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF OPERATING FUNDING

2,437

2,648

3,852

4,069

3,001

2,103

404

1,106

1,634

1,226

816

583

-

-

-

5,699

4,923

4,320

2,106

Sources of capital funding Subsidies and grants for capital expenditure Development and financial contributions Increase (decrease) in debt Lump sum contributions TOTAL SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING Applications of capital funding Capital expenditure - to meet additional demand

1,841

1,106

- to improve the level of service

2,898

1,848

220

- to replace existing assets

5,274

4,444

4,233

(1,877)

174

1,613

-

-

-

8,136

7,572

8,172

(2,437)

(2,648)

(3,852)

-

-

-

Increase (decrease) in reserves Increase (decrease) in investments TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF CAPITAL FUNDING SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF CAPITAL FUNDING FUNDING BALANCE

54

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

55


WATER SUPPLY

Water Supply Water Supply and Quality, Water Conservation, Stockwater Provision

Overview

Works have commenced on the extension of the

from all other schemes have shown compliance with

Water

Woodend water supply to Tuahiwi. These works are

the Drinking Water Standards.

There has been considerable work undertaken on the

planned to be completed by December 2013, with

water supply systems throughout the District to repair

supply available for connection in January 2014.

Public Health Risk Management Plans have been

Investigation and preliminary design work has

versions prepared for Oxford Urban, Pegasus, Fernside,

commenced on the Oxford No.1 and Oxford No.2 water

Summerhill and Garrymere water supplies.

earthquake damaged infrastructure, upgrade existing supplies and accommodate for growth. The new Rangiora water supply was officially

supply upgrades. It is planned to consult with the

opened in December 2012, marking the completion

community on these projects in early 2014.

of a significant multiyear project which included the construction of a new source at the Smith Street wells and a new reservoir and pump station at the South Belt headworks. Due to growth in Rangiora the drilling of

prepared for Kaiapoi and Rangiora and updated

The Council's water supply has been successfully operated and maintained such that there were no

Routine water quality sampling has been undertaken

outages interrupting the continuity of supply exceeding

for all schemes in accordance with the Drinking-

8 hours duration.

Water Standards. There were two instances where the testing detected the presence of E.coli, one at the

The implementation of the Water Conservation

Mandeville water supply in August 2012 and one at the

strategy has continued this year with on-going

Wooded water supply in December 2012. Remedial

leak reduction work and the community awareness

The chlorination of the Rangiora and Oxford Urban

works to address the source of contamination have

programme. The leak reduction work has assessed

water supplies was discontinued in November 2012,

been implemented on both supplies and further work is

that 6 of the 17 supplies currently are less than the

following consultation with the community.

proposed for the Mandeville water supply. The results

target level of leakage.

the fourth Smith Street bore has been brought forward to 2014.

56

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


The Council's 2013 Customer Satisfaction survey showed that 95% of respondents who expressed an opinion were satisfied with the standard of service they received from their Council water supply. This was an increase on the previous survey in 2010 (91% satisfaction). Stock Water There was a high level of reliability in the supply of stock water throughout the network in the 2012/13 financial year with no reports of supply being unavailable for more than 24 hours. All of the service requests received were responded to within 48 hours.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

57


WATER SUPPLY

Community Outcomes and How the Activity Contributes COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

WATER SUPPLY AND QUALITY There is sufficient clean water to meet the needs of communities and ecosystems. There is a safe environment for all.

58

Provide community water supplies that provide capacity for anticipated growth, and for improved drinking water quality.

Upgrading the following water supplies to comply with the health requirements of the Drinking Water Standards for New Zealand 2008 in accordance with the Health (Drinking Water) Amendment Act 2007 to provide for growth and ensure continuity of supply. New supply to Tuahiwi by June 2013.

Upgrade complete.

Construction started on the Tuahiwi Water Supply upgrade works in March 2013. The works are currently planned to be completed in October 2013, although actual completion may be later depending on weather and ground conditions. The new supply will be available to connect to from January 2014.

Upgrade Oxford Rural 2 by June 2014.

Upgrade complete.

Investigation is currently underway to determine upgrading and rating options to amalgamate the Oxford Rural No.2 Scheme with the Oxford Urban Scheme. It is planned to apply for resource consent for the second bore in October 2013 and consult with the community in November and December 2013. The drilling of the second well will be undertaken in early 2014 and be completed by June 2014. The physical works to join the two schemes will not be completed until June 2015 but the Public Health Risk Management Plans will be completed by June 2014 so that the scheme complies with the DWS 2008.

â€‚ď ľ

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

WATER SUPPLY AND QUALITY (CONT'D)

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

Upgrade Oxford Rural 1 by June 2015.

Upgrade complete.

Investigation is currently underway to determine a suitable location for a new well. The drilling of the well has been programmed for 2013/14 to align with contractor availability. The overall upgrade to the Oxford Rural No.1 Scheme is still on track for completion by June 2015.

All water supply schemes complying with Drinking Water Standards for New Zealand 2008.

Number of water supply schemes where water testing is compliant with ecoli requirements of the Drinking Water Standards.

The water quality sampling has been undertaken in accordance with the Drinking Water Standards for New Zealand (DWSNZ). There was a transgression (i.e. noncompliance with the E.coli requirements of the DWSNZ) on the Mandeville Water Supply Scheme in August 2012 and in Woodend in December 2012. Both of these have been reported to the Drinking Water Assessor in accordance with the Drinking Water Standards. Remedial works to address the source of contamination have been implemented at Woodend and are currently being implemented at Mandeville. The results from all other schemes have shown compliance with the Drinking Water Standards.

â€‚ď ľ

59


WATER SUPPLY

COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

WATER SUPPLY AND QUALITY (CONT'D) Preparing Public Health Risk Management Plans for schemes as follows: • Kaiapoi by July 2012 • Rangiora by December 2012 • Oxford Rural No. 1 and No. 2 by 2014

Public Health Risk Management Plans complete and approved by the Water Supply Assessors from Crown Public Health.

PHRMPs have been completed for Kaiapoi and Rangiora and approved by Community and Public Health (Canterbury District Health Board). The Rangiora and Oxford Urban PHRMPs need to be updated as Council has discontinued the chlorination of these supplies. In addition, the existing PHRMPs for Pegasus, Fernside, Summerhill and Garrymere have been updated and submitted to the to Community and Public Health for approval. Preparation of the Woodend, Oxford Rural No.2, Cust, Poyntzs Road and West Eyreton PHRMPS will be undertaken in 2013/14.

Continuity of supply. No outages of water to exceed more than 8 hours duration.

60

Number of outages recorded interrupting No outages of water exceeded more than continuity of supply. 8 hours duration. This result is based on the information from the customer services system. The majority of the service requests have been processed through this system with an insignificant amount not being recorded in the system. Council has recently improved processes, to make sure all service requests are recorded in the customer services system.

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252

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COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

WATER CONSERVATION There is sufficient water to meet the needs of communities and ecosystems.

Carefully managing water demands, including minimising leakage.

Implement the measures in the Water Conservation Strategy identified for the 2012 to 2014 period. Implementation leak reduction programme by June 2014 and achieve the target level of leakage of 240 litres/ connection/day by June 2015.

Leak reduction programme implemented and target leakage level achieved.

As part of this programme the leakage level in 15 out of 17 schemes has been determined, with one of the remaining two schemes to be tested by November 2013. As Pegasus is a new scheme it is assumed the leakage will be well below the target level and therefore it is not scheduled to be tested at this stage. Council currently meets the target level of leakage in 6 out of 17 schemes (Cust, Garrymere, Kaiapoi, Ohoka, Oxford Rural No.1 and Pegasus). Works are proposed next financial year to reduce leakage in Pines / Kairaki, Mandeville and potentially Summerhill. It is recognised that the target level of leakage may need to be revised to an economic level of leakage in the future.

Implement Community Awareness Programme by June 2014.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

Community Awareness Programme implemented.

The implementation of the Community Awareness Programme commenced in 2011/12. This is part of an on-going programme to educate children in both smart water use and waste minimisation. A total of 156 classroom presentations have been delivered this financial year on water conservation.

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61


WATER SUPPLY

COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

STOCKWATER Businesses in the District are diverse, adaptable and growing. There is sufficient water to meet the needs of communities and ecosystems. There is a safe environment for all.

62

Providing stockwater to support the economic activity of the farming sector.

Providing a reliable source of stockwater to approximately 1629 properties through a 791km network of races, managed under contract by Waimakariri Irrigation Ltd. No loss of service to exceed more than 24 hours duration.

Number of exceedences of more than 24 hours.

There were 57 water stoppages this financial year. The longest stoppages were for 24 hours on two separate occasions in January due to flooding in the Waimakariri River preventing the take of water.

100% of all service requests responded to within 48 hours.

Percentage of service requests delivered within 48 hours.

There were 104 service requests this financial year. The longest period taken to address a service request was 24 hours.

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


FUNDING IMPACT STATEMENT for the year ended 30 June 2013 for Water Supply 2012 Long Term Plan

2013 Long Term Plan

2013 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

Sources of operating funding General Rates, uniform annual general charges, rates penalties

2

2

61

Targeted Rates (other than a targeted rate for water supply)

4,440

5,199

5,195

Subsidies and grants for operating purposes

-

-

-

Internal charges and overheads recovered

105

66

135

Fees, charges and targeted rates for water supply

347

411

153

-

-

-

4,894

5,678

5,544

Local authorities fuel tax, fines, infringement fees, and other receipts TOTAL OPERATING FUNDING Applications of operating funding Payments to staff and suppliers

2,208

2,351

2,799

Finance costs

435

873

429

Internal charges and overheads applied

389

450

430

-

-

-

TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF OPERATING FUNDING

3,032

3,674

3,658

SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF OPERATING FUNDING

1,862

2,004

1,886

Other operating fund applications

Sources of capital funding Subsidies and grants for capital expenditure Development and financial contributions Increase (decrease) in debt Lump sum contributions TOTAL SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING

-

-

-

464

1,528

2,085

17,628

1,839

(818)

-

-

-

18,092

3,367

1,267

1,235

Applications of capital funding Capital expenditure - to meet additional demand

19,154

3,602

- to improve the level of service

222

183

140

- to replace existing assets

782

679

550

(204)

907

1,228

-

-

-

TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF CAPITAL FUNDING

19,954

5,371

3,153

SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF CAPITAL FUNDING

(1,862)

(2,004)

(1,886)

-

-

-

Increase (decrease) in reserves Increase (decrease) in investments

FUNDING BALANCE

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

63


SEWERAGE AND THE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL OF SEWAGE

Sewerage

AND THE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL OF SEWAGE

Reticulation Systems, Effluent Quality

Overview

The Oxford Waste Water Treatment Plant has

The repair of earthquake damaged sewer infrastructure

continued to experience issues with high wet

is now well underway with the completion of the Kaiapoi

weather flows. It is proposed to construct a holding

and Rangiora relining contracts, the commencement of

pond on the inflow to the treatment plant to balance

the Deep Sewer and the Shallow Sewer contracts and

the high flows. This work is planned to be completed

the tendering of the Kaiapoi pump station repairs works.

by June 2014.

The existing system in the Red Zone remains functional, but is progressively being abandoned as demolition

The closed circuit television work has focused primarily

work progresses.

on identification of earthquake damaged infrastructure this year. The programme for closed circuit television

The Mandeville, Ohoka Meadows and Swannanoa

inspection in 2013/14 will focus on condition assessment

sewer schemes have been connected into the Eastern

and infiltration identification for the purposes of

Districts Sewer Scheme, with the construction of

determining the future renewals programme.

the Bradleys Road pump station, the Mandeville to Rangiora pipe line and associated pipework in

The effluent quality from the District's existing

Mandeville. This has allowed for the decommissioning

wastewater treatment plants has generally complied

of the three existing treatment plants at Mandeville,

with the resource consent conditions, except for two

Ohoka Meadows and Swannanoa and it has also given

non-compliances at the Oxford Waste Water Treatment

an opportunity to provide reticulated wastewater to

Plant relating to wet weather overflows. All other

properties in Ohoka.

conditions have generally been graded as compliant.

64

Investigation has been undertaken into the long term options to improve the financial sustainability of the Loburn Lea and Fernside sewer schemes. The results from the Loburn Lea investigation did not identify any favourable option to reduce the sewer rates however, further investigation is currently being undertaken to assess alternative options. The preliminary results from the Fernside investigation suggest that the best option is to connect into the Eastern Districts Sewer Scheme via Rangiora when the proposed development in the area occurs. The Council's 2013 Customer Satisfaction survey showed that 99% of respondents, who expressed an opinion, were satisfied with the standard of service they received from the Council sewer scheme. This is the same as satisfaction level from the previous survey in 2010.

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

65


SEWERAGE AND THE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL OF SEWAGE

Community Outcomes and How the Activity Contributes COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

RETICULATION SYSTEMS Core utility services are provided in a timely, sustainable and affordable manner. There is a safe environment for all.

Providing reticulated sewerage systems of sufficient capacity to prevent uncontrolled discharge of effluent.

Provide reticulation systems for existing urban areas and new developments, recognising that existing systems currently experience high stormwater inflow and infiltration resulting in overflows during heavy rainfall. Reinstate the wastewater trunk mains in earthquake damaged areas, outside of the red zones, in particular for Kaiapoi, and Pines and Kairaki beaches by June 2014.

Wastewater trunk mains re-instated.

Reinstatement of earthquake damaged sewers is underway (refer cell below for project details). The trunk mains are on track to be completed before June 2014.

Reinstate permanent wastewater reticulation systems to service all earthquake damaged areas, excluding the red zones, by June 2015.

Wastewater reticulation systems reinstated.

Reinstatement of earthquake damaged sewers is underway with the following projects: • Kaiapoi Town Centre (Williams / Charles) - sewer replacement construction was completed by June 2013. • Kaiapoi sewer relining - sewer relining was completed by June 2013 and lateral relining is due to be completed by the end of July 2013. • Kaiapoi sewer repairs - the deep sewers and shallow sewers contracts have been awarded and are due to be completed by the end of April 2014. • Kaiapoi pump station repairs - the physical works have been tendered and are due to be completed by the end of December 2013. • Rangiora sewer relining - sewer relining was completed by June 2013 and lateral relining is due to be completed by the end of July 2013. • Kaiapoi Lakes Sewer - design complete and waiting EQC decision on land remediation.

66

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252

 


COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

RETICULATION SYSTEMS (CONT'D) • Sneyd Street Sewer - options currently being assessed. • Ocean Outfall - investigations underway. The permanent wastewater repair works are on track to be completed before June 2015.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

Construct a wastewater pump Sewer schemes amalgamated with station at Mandeville and a pipeline Eastern Districts. to Rangiora to amalgamate the Mandeville, Ohoka Meadows and Swannanoa sewer schemes with the Eastern Districts Sewer Scheme by December 2012.

The Bradleys Road Pump Station and the Mandeville - Rangiora pipeline are complete and were commissioned in June 2013.

Carry out Close Circuit TV (CCTV) inspections of trunk sewer mains to assess the condition and identify sources of stormwater infiltration on at least a 2 yearly cycle.

The CCTV work carried out this financial year has focused on the inspection of earthquake damage, which has included extensive inspection of the network in the eastern part of the District. Since the earthquakes a total of 46 kilometres of pipework have been inspected (as at October 2011, results between then and June 2013 were not available at the time of writing), with 14 kilometres being identified for repair or replacement. A programme for CCTV inspections of sewers, not affected by the earthquakes, has been developed based on pipe criticality and a risk based prioritisation. Budget provisions have been made in the 2013/14 Annual Plan for undertaking annual inspections. The results will be used to prioritise repair and replacement works to be undertaken as part of the renewals programme.

Inspections complete.

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67


SEWERAGE AND THE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL OF SEWAGE

COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

EFFLUENT QUALITY Core utility services are provided in a timely, sustainable and affordable manner. There is a safe environment for all.

68

Providing reliable and efficient wastewater treatment plants to minimise the harm to the environment from the discharge of contaminants to ground or water.

Continuing to operate the wastewater treatment plants in a way that minimises the impacts of wastewater discharges on the environment. 100% compliance with resource consent conditions for wastewater discharges.

Percentage of compliance with resource consent conditions.

A minor non-compliance was received for the Oxford Waste Water Treatment Plant on two occasions this financial year relating to the pumped quantity of flow during wet weather events. Works are proposed in the 2013/14 Annual Plan to construct a holding pond to address the wet weather capacity at the plant. All other conditions have been graded as fully compliant in the reports received to date.

Review long term options to improve the sustainability of the Loburn Lea sewerage scheme by December 2012.

Loburn Lea review complete.

A report on the review of the Loburn Lea Wastewater Scheme was presented to the Utilities and Roading (U&R) Committee in June 2013. Further assessment of the options for the scheme has been requested and will be presented to the U&R Committee in October 2013.

Review long term options to improve the sustainability of the Fernside sewerage scheme by June 2013.

Fernside review complete.

The draft report on the review of the Fernside Wastewater Scheme has been received. This report will be presented to the U&R Committee in October 2013.

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


FUNDING IMPACT STATEMENT for the year ended 30 June 2013 for Sewerage and Treatment and Disposal of Sewage 2012 Long Term Plan

2013 Long Term Plan

2013 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

Sources of operating funding General Rates, uniform annual general charges, rates penalties Targeted Rates (other than a targeted rate for water supply)

Subsidies and grants for operating purposes

57

57

124

6,496

6,872

6,711

-

-

-

18

14

54

172

175

340

-

-

-

6,743

7,118

7,229

Payments to staff and suppliers

3,045

2,905

2,579

Finance costs

1,691

1,458

674

588

620

594

Internal charges and overheads recovered Fees, charges and targeted rates for water supply Local authorities fuel tax, fines, infringement fees, and other receipts TOTAL OPERATING FUNDING Applications of operating funding

Internal charges and overheads applied Other operating fund applications

-

-

-

TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF OPERATING FUNDING

5,324

4,983

3,847

SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF OPERATING FUNDING

1,419

2,135

3,382

Sources of capital funding Subsidies and grants for capital expenditure Development and financial contributions Increase (decrease) in debt Lump sum contributions TOTAL SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING

-

-

-

957

3,729

3,296

(667)

1,399

(1,503)

-

-

-

290

5,128

1,793

Applications of capital funding Capital expenditure - to meet additional demand - to improve the level of service - to replace existing assets Increase (decrease) in reserves Increase (decrease) in investments TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF CAPITAL FUNDING SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF CAPITAL FUNDING FUNDING BALANCE

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

586

5,035

3,798

1,150

171

258

733

1,550

563

(760)

507

556

-

-

-

1,709

7,263

5,175

(1,419)

(2,135)

(3,382)

-

-

-

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STORMWATER DRAINAGE

Stormwater Drainage Managing Stormwater, Minimising the Impact of Flood Hazards, Customer Satisfaction, Community Engagement

Overview The Council has continued with the repair of earthquake damaged stormwater infrastructure in Kaiapoi with the completion of the Kaikanui basin repair, the Courtenay basin repair and the Kaiapoi Cemetery pipe replacement. The existing system in the Red Zone remains functional, but does not provide the same level of service with ponding occurring during rainfall events in some areas. A number of other stormwater projects has also completed this year, including construction of Peraki Street Stage 3 works, construction of the Oxford East drainage upgrade and completion of the East Rangiora Storm Water System. The global consent application for maintenance and minor works in watercourses has been prepared and is due to be submitted to Environment Canterbury

70

in September 2013 following consultation with stakeholders. Work has also commenced on the comprehensive consent for stormwater discharge from Rangiora.

works incorporated into the drainage maintenance

Managing Stormwater

exception of the East Rangiora Stormwater System

The District experienced two significant storm events in 2012/13, one on the 13 August 2012 and one on 17 June 2013. Surface flooding was reported across the District in each event and internal dwelling flooding was reported at one property in the August event and two properties in the June event. Remedial works have been undertaken following the August event and investigation work is currently underway to identify the cause and any necessary works following the June event.

which had a minor non-compliant for inadequate

Service requests for drain maintenance have been responded to within 5 working days and the physical

Additionally the hydraulic models for the Rangiora and

programme of works. Resource consents for stormwater management areas and discharges have been fully compliant, with the

grass growth. Minimising the Impact of Flood Hazards The Localised Flood Hazard Maps are in the process of being updated and are to be adopted by Council in 2014. This includes rerunning the district wide localised flood hazard models for 200 and 500 year events to align with the Regional Policy Statement.

Kaiapoi urban stormwater systems are currently being

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


updated to identify deficient stormwater infrastructure. Information on flood events and undercurrents has been collated from staff observations, flood photos and videos, rainfall data, flood service requests from the public and responses, as well as from other authorities such as Environment Canterbury for the two significant flood events that occurred in 2012/13. Customer Satisfaction The Council has developed a customer satisfaction measure through its triennial survey, and in 2013 80% of those who expressed an opinion were satisfied with drainage services. This was an increase on the previous survey in 2010 (74% satisfaction).

its regular monthly meetings with the Runanga. The drainage team have attended all meetings and given Runanga representatives an update on progress with current drainage works and upcoming future projects. The Council's drainage team has met regularly with the Drainage and Water Race advisory groups throughout the year to discuss maintenance needs in each designated rural drainage or stock water supply areas.

Community Engagement The Council has continued its relationship with the local Ngai Tuahuriri Runanga over the 2012/13 year, through

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

71


STORMWATER DRAINAGE

Community Outcomes and How the Activity Contributes COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

MANAGING STORMWATER There is a safe environment for all. Core utility services are provided in a timely, sustainable and affordable manner.

Developing public drainage infrastructure to be effective and efficient in reducing risks of flooding to residential areas and business zones.

Manage and maintain stormwater systems that provide safety and protection from flooding throughout the District. 100% of service requests actioned within 5 working days.

Service delivery standards achieved.

Businesses in the District are diverse, adaptable and growing.

100% (48 out of 48) of service requests for drain cleaning were responded to or actioned within 5 working days. An actioned service request in this instance means that the drain cleaning works were either completed or included in the drain maintenance programme of works.

Provide and maintain stormwater attenuation and treatment prior to discharge into waterways and groundwater.

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100% compliance with discharge resource consents.

Compliance with resource consents achieved.

The Council achieved full compliance with the exception of one minor non-compliance for inadequate grass strike on the East Rangiora Stormwater System. The area was regressed by the contractor to achieve the required grass cover.

Annual report on baseline water quality (suspended solids, nutrients, metals and hydrocarbons) in five selected waterways (North Brook, Middle Brook, South Brook, Taranaki Stream and the Waikuku North Stream), throughout the district.

Annual report delivered.

The water quality testing was undertaken in February and June this financial year. A report on the findings will go to the Utilities and Roading Committee in August 2013.

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Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

MINIMISING THE IMPACT OF FLOOD HAZARDS There is a safe environment for all. Core utility services are provided in a timely, sustainable and affordable manner.

Developing information systems to enable up to date flood hazard information for stakeholders.

Mitigate flood hazard through maintaining and updating undercurrent and flood hazard information (eg maps and registers). 100% of potential flooding in urban areas identified from stormwater models.

Annual report on flood hazard and undercurrent information.

Hydraulic models for the Rangiora and Kaiapoi urban stormwater systems are currently being updated. In addition to this, the District-wide localised flood hazard models are being re-run for 200 and 500 year events. A report on the 13 August 2012 flood event has been presented to the U&R Committee. A report on the 17 June 2013 flood event will be presented to the Utilities and Roading Committee in August 2013. An annual report summarising the work undertaken in 2012/13 will go to the Utilities & Roading Committee in August 2013.

CUSTOMER SATISFACTION Core utility services are provided in a timely, sustainable and affordable manner.

Managing and maintaining drainage services that balance providing protection from flood risk with affordability.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

Provide prompt response to drainage related enquiries. 100% of drainage enquiries actioned within 5 working days.

Percentage of drainage enquiries actioned within 5 working days.

100% (212 out of 212) of drainage enquiries this financial year have been responded to or actioned within 5 working days.

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STORMWATER DRAINAGE

COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT Public effect is given to the spirit of the Treaty of Waitangi.

There are wide ranging opportunities for people to contribute to the decision-making by local, regional and national organisations that affects our District.

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Continue to build the relationship with Te Ngai Tuahuriri Runanga regarding freshwater management as part of the drainage activity.

Maintain dialogue and consultation with Ngai Tuahuriri Runanga in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding with Council.

Consulting with interested and affected groups on drainage related proposals.

Engage with drainage and Water Race Advisory Groups at meetings.

100% representation by the Drainage Team at the monthly Runanga meetings.

Engage with drainage and Water Race Advisory Groups and hold three meetings per year.

Drainage team represented at all scheduled Runanga meetings.

Number of advisory group meetings held per year.

The Drainage Team was represented at the Annual Hui and attended all scheduled meetings with Te Runanga o Ngai Tuahuriri this year. An update on progress with current drainage works and upcoming future projects was delivered at each meeting.

A total of 20 out of 21 Advisory Group meetings were held this financial year. The exception was a Cust Drainage Advisory Group meeting which was cancelled due to unavailability of members.

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


FUNDING IMPACT STATEMENT for the year ended 30 June 2013 for Stormwater Drainage 2012 Long Term Plan

2013 Long Term Plan

2013 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

Sources of operating funding General Rates, uniform annual general charges, rates penalties Targeted Rates (other than a targeted rate for water supply)

Subsidies and grants for operating purposes Internal charges and overheads recovered Fees, charges and targeted rates for water supply TOTAL OPERATING FUNDING

139

136

130

2,212

2,698

2,796

-

-

-

51

16

48

18

21

1

2,420

2,871

2,975

Applications of operating funding Payments to staff and suppliers

1,247

1,324

1,075

Finance costs

490

611

439

Internal charges and overheads applied

193

228

218

-

-

-

1,930

2,163

1,732

490

708

1,243

Other operating fund applications TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF OPERATING FUNDING SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF OPERATING FUNDING Sources of capital funding Subsidies and grants for capital expenditure Development and financial contributions Increase (decrease) in debt

-

-

-

940

1,026

887

3,176

2,622

(30)

Lump sum contributions

-

-

-

Gross proceeds from sale of assets

-

-

-

4,116

3,648

857

- to meet additional demand

9,060

7,356

3,181

- to improve the level of service

2,775

630

366

164

70

25

(7,393)

(3,700)

(1,472)

TOTAL SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING Applications of capital funding Capital expenditure

- to replace existing assets Increase (decrease) in reserves Increase (decrease) in investments

-

-

-

TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF CAPITAL FUNDING

4,606

4,356

2,100

SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF CAPITAL FUNDING

(490)

(708)

(1,243)

-

-

-

FUNDING BALANCE

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

75


SOLID WASTE

Solid Waste Waste Collection, Disposal and Minimisation

Overview The Council completed its review of the Waste Management Plan 2009 (WMP) in 2011. The review determined that it was necessary to prepare a new Waste Management & Minimisation Plan (WMMP). Consultation on the draft WMMP was undertaken in early 2012 and the final WMMP was adopted in August 2012. A Solid Waste Analyst Protocol (SWAP) waste audit carried out in 2012 showed that around 36% of waste sent to landfill (5,450 tonnes) is compostable organic waste, and 18% is timber (2,770 tonnes). Funding continues at a level that enables schools to have more access to waste education and to continue the Enviroschools and Sustainable Living programmes. The Council still sells EMBokashi systems and home-composting units at窶田ost to Waimakariri District households. Other initiatives include:

76

A waste minimisation education programme is provided under contract by Mastagard Ltd, which is free to all schools and pre-schools within the Waimakariri District. The Southbrook Resource Recovery Park (RRP) has been operating for over a year, and seems to be popular destination for residents to carry out recycling and get second hand bargains. RRP recycling has increased by 13% and other diversion by 9% over 11/12 figures. The wheelie bin recycling & refuse bag collection contract has again seen an increase in recycling. Overall kerbside recycling has increased by 6% over the previous year's quantities. Investigations were undertaken this year to determine what treatment (composting) options are practicable for use in this district to treat diverted organic wastes. 窶「

The capacity of the Cleanfill Disposal Site has

been calculated to enable planning for expansion and replacement of the site. 窶「

The Canterbury Waste Joint Committee has provided funding toward a number of projects this year which are particularly relevant to this District. These include: - Treated -

Timber disposal options

Non Natural Rural Waste survey

The 2012 Waste Management & Minimisation Plan provides for Council to undertake a range of investigations into services or facilities, to determine how more materials could be diverted from landfill. Further investigations are proposed to consider how best to divert organic waste from residents' rubbish bags and bins, including the provision of multiple bin collection services by the Council. Increases in population equate to increases in waste to landfill if no additional diversion methodologies

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


are put in place, and allowance is needed at design

Total Waste (tonnes/annum)

level for new developments or when Council changes

35,000

existing road configurations, to cater for current and

30,000

changing levels of service for kerbside collections. Climate Change regulations have implications on landfill disposal with increased charges, such as potentially higher charges for specific materials such as organic waste, and construction & demolition

The District's growth as a result of increased subdivision and building works has outstripped loss of properties from Red Zone settlements. There has been a slight increase in the number of bins in circulation, but kerbside recycling services and quantities will continue to be affected until the changes in population become more settled.

25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13

waste (particularly timber).

Landfilled

The measured quantity of total waste has been

Recycled

Other Diverted

virtually static (total annual waste quantities are

Table 1: Total waste quantities through Council facilities

down by 0.2% and per-capita quantities down by

Total Waste (kg/capita/annum)

2.9%). Despite population growth, the quantity of landfilled waste has decreased by 1.5% (per-capita quantities decreased by 7.1%) this year. The quantity of recycled and diverted waste has increased by 8.7% (per-capita quantities increased by 5.7%). Table 1 shows the trending of total quantities of rubbish, recyclables and divertible materials that are handled by the Council. Table 2 shows the changes to per-capita quantities of rubbish. recyclables and other divertible materials handled by the Council.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

600 500 400 300

There are no approved facilities for storage and sorting of earthquake-related building demolition waste in the District, and house demolition waste has not presented too many challenges in 12/13 apart from a few isolated instances of inappropriate dumping. This waste still needs to be managed in order to reduce the impacts that the repair and rebuild of affected buildings could have on the amount of waste sent to landfill. The Council's cleanfill site is still well used for disposal of concrete rubble generated from driveways & footpaths that sustained earthquake damage.

200 100 0 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 Landfilled

Recycled

Other Diverted

Table 2: Per Capita waste quantities through Council facilities

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SOLID WASTE

Community Outcomes and How the Activity Contributes COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

WASTE COLLECTION Core utility services are provided in a timely, sustainable and affordable manner.

Developing an effective and efficient service for businesses and households to dispose of their waste.

Businesses in the District are diverse, adaptable and growing.

Supporting businesses to safely and conveniently dispose of their waste.

Providing waste disposal, materials diversion and recycling services at: Oxford Transfer Station for two days per week.

Number of scheduled days Oxford Transfer Station was not open.

There were no scheduled days where the Oxford Transfer Station was not open.

Southbrook Resource Recovery Park for seven days per week.

Number of scheduled days Southbrook Resource Recovery Park was not open.

There were no scheduled days where the Southbrook Resource Recovery Park was not open.

Cleanfill disposal services at Sutherlands Pit for six days per week.

Number of scheduled days Sutherlands Pit was not open.

There were no scheduled days where Sutherlands Pit was not open.

Providing a weekly kerbside refuse bag and a fortnightly recycling wheelie bin collection service to all properties rated for kerbside refuse and recycling collection. Providing a weekly kerbside refuse bag and a fortnightly recycling wheelie bin collection service.

All kerbside collections provided as scheduled.

All kerbside collections were provided as scheduled.

WASTE DISPOSAL There is a safe environment for all.

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Minimising the risk of waste being inappropriately or dangerously disposed of by utilising the regional landfill facility.

Transporting residual waste to the regional landfill at Kate Valley in the Hurunui District. No significant incidences of non-compliant materials in the waste sent to the regional landfill facility.

Number of significant incidences of noncompliant materials.

There were no significant incidences of noncompliant materials in the waste sent to the regional landfill facility.

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Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

WASTE DISPOSAL (CONT'D) The land is healthy. There is sufficient clean water to meet the needs of communities and ecosystems.

Managing adverse environmental effects on land and water through best practice management at the regional landfill and District disposal and waste transfer sites.

Managing five closed landfill sites at Rangiora, Kaiapoi, Oxford, Mandeville and Cust, in accordance with the consent conditions. 100% compliance with consent conditions for the closed landfills.

Percentage of compliance with consent conditions.

90% compliance was achieved (2012: 100%). One bore at Kaiapoi was unable to be sampled in September 2012 due to its removal during subdivision earthworks and another two have been removed since December. These were all private wells. The Council is seeking a change to the conditions to install and sample from two replacement wells, before the September 2013 sampling round. The groundwater analysis report has been finalised and provided to Ecan. ECan has inspected the sites at Oxford, Mandeville, Kaiapoi and Rangiora and assessed them as having 'minor non-compliance'. Rangiora has mounds and hollows caused by disposal of soil from a number of Council and other earthworks contracts which should be smoothed out; Kaiapoi bores were ‘lost’ as reported and there was also a stockpile of tyres for the BMX track which need to be removed.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

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SOLID WASTE

COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

WASTE DISPOSAL (CONT'D) Operating a clean fill disposal site, resource recovery park and transfer station in accordance with the consent conditions. 100% compliance with consent conditions for the three sites.

Percentage of compliance with consent conditions.

There was 100% sampling at cleanfill as per consent conditions. Groundwater analysis results have been forwarded to Ecan. No sites were open beyond operating hours. No complaints were received relating to odour, dust or noise. ECan has inspected the cleanfill site and assessed it as having 'minor non-compliance'. There were no significant non-compliances for the cleanfill site, transfer station or resource recovery park. Minor non-compliance was issued for non-acceptable material at the cleanfill site. This was removed subsequent to the ECan inspection.

WASTE MINIMISATION The land is healthy. There is sufficient clean water to meet the needs of communities and ecosystems.

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Changing household and business waste disposal practices to minimise waste generation.

Providing waste minimisation information and education programmes to businesses, households and schools to encourage the reduction in quantity of waste sent to landfill: Reducing annual per capita quantity of waste to landfill from the 405kg per capita disposed of in the base year of 2007/08 and subsequent years.

Annual kg per capita.

The Council achieved '289.4kg/capita (pop base of 51,000 to 30 June 2013 in-house estimate) c.f. 404.7kg/capita (pop base of 46,100) for entire year. This is 71.5% of the 07/08 baseline figure.

Increasing annual per capita quantity of materials diverted from the 116.1kg per capita diverted in the base year of 2007/08 and subsequent years.

Annual kg per capita.

The Council achieved '160.8kg/capita (pop base of 51,000 to 30 June 2013 in-house estimate) c.f. 116.1kg/capita (pop base of 46,100 07/08) for entire year. This is 38.5% more material diverted than the 07/08 baseline figure.

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Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

WASTE MINIMISATION (CONT'D) Implementing a long-term waste minimisation programme in accordance with the adopted Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2012.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

Complete a Solid Waste Analysis Protocol (SWAP) of landfilled waste by June 2013.

Analysis complete.

The SWAP waste audit was completed by Waste Not Consulting in September 2012. The final report was received in November 2012.

Investigate organic waste treatment and collection options by June 2014.

Investigation complete.

First phase investigations into treatment options have been completed and a draft report was received in June 2013. The investigations and report on the diversion options are to be completed by October 2013.

Investigate and consult on rural recycling services by June 2014.

Investigation complete.

Discussions have been held with contractors about rural drop-off points. Schools are yet to be approached about carrying out trials on their premises for community drop-off points. Census information will be used to provide information about populations in rural areas. The Council Customer Satisfaction Survey and the Oxford Area Community Survey will provide some information about the level of demand from residents for service. This will be used to guide the consultation. Consultation will be carried out in specific areas in 2013 and in the remaining areas in 2014.

Investigate cleanfill pit capacity by June 2014.

Investigation complete.

Capacity calculations have been completed, and the lifespan of the clean fill site has been forecast.

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SOLID WASTE

COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

WASTE MINIMISATION (CONT'D)

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Investigate feasibility of, and consult on, a multiple bin service for kerbside collection of residual, recycling and organic waste materials by June 2015.

Investigation complete.

The detail of this investigation depends on outcomes of Solid Waste Analysis Protocol (SWAP) and organic waste treatment investigations (multiple bin system) which is being undertaken in 2013. Consultation on the options will be carried out in conjunction with 2014/15 Annual Plan.

Investigate feasibility of establishing waste minimisation education facility at Rangiora Resource Recovery Park by June 2017.

Investigation complete.

This Project not yet begun. A detailed investigation will be carried out closer to the 16/17 financial year.

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


FUNDING IMPACT STATEMENT for the year ended 30 June 2013 for Solid Waste 2012 Long Term Plan

2013 Long Term Plan

2013 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

General Rates, uniform annual general charges, rates penalties

262

487

376

Targeted Rates (other than a targeted rate for water supply)

895

915

896

Sources of operating funding

Subsidies and grants for operating purposes

-

-

-

Internal charges and overheads recovered

7

38

13

Fees, charges and targeted rates for water supply

4,269

3,832

3,893

TOTAL OPERATING FUNDING

5,433

5,272

5,178

4,908

4,784

5,008

31

14

41

386

378

373

Applications of operating funding Payments to staff and suppliers Finance costs Internal charges and overheads applied Other operating fund applications

-

-

-

5,325

5,176

5,422

108

96

(244)

Subsidies and grants for capital expenditure

-

-

-

Development and financial contributions

-

-

-

190

(7)

(19)

Lump sum contributions

-

-

-

Gross proceeds from sale of assets

-

-

-

190

(7)

(19)

TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF OPERATING FUNDING SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF OPERATING FUNDING Sources of capital funding

Increase (decrease) in debt

TOTAL SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING Applications of capital funding Capital expenditure - to meet additional demand - to improve the level of service - to replace existing assets Increase (decrease) in reserves Increase (decrease) in investments TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF CAPITAL FUNDING SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF CAPITAL FUNDING FUNDING BALANCE

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

-

-

-

200

170

78

-

6

-

98

(87)

(341)

-

-

-

298

89

(263)

(108)

(96)

244

-

-

-

83


84

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Community Services RECREATION ––Rangiora Airfield ––Council Owned Community Buildings ––Parks and Reserves ––Aquatic Facilities LIBRARIES AND MUSEUMS ––Library Services COMMUNITY PROTECTION ––Emergency Management ––Rural Fire ––Environmental Health Services ––Animal Control Services ––Building Services ––Public Cemeteries COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ––Strengthening Communities ––Community Information ––Community Housing

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

85


RECREATION

Recreation Airfield, Council Owned Community Buildings, Parks and Reserves and Aquatic Facilities

Overview Recreation There was a continuing focus on earthquake recovery in the 2012/2013 financial year. Council secured $2 million in funding from the Christchurch Earthquake Appeal Trust for the redevelopment of the Kaiapoi Riverbanks. Community consultation has been completed, and a design approved for a recreation precinct along the riverbanks. The design includes a skate park, playground, basketball half court, public toilet and a civic courtyard. Population growth resulting from the 40-plus active subdivision developments in the District continued to place pressure on existing green space assets and emphasised the need for additional and alternative assets to be acquired to ensure desired levels of service are maintained. An example of consideration of alternative assets was the needs-based assessment, commissioned to give Council guidance on the provision of indoor

86

court space and, in particular, the type of indoor court facility that might be required and the best location for such a facility. A second alternative focused on the provision of artificial sports turf. A detailed assessment was undertaken to identify the most appropriate type of artificial turf and the best location for this. A football and rugby specific artificial turf surface to be located at Kendall Park was identified as the most appropriate solution. This was subsequently confirmed by Council and is due for installation in the 2013/2014 financial year. Assisting the development of sports clubs was another key feature of the 2012/2013 year. Resource consent was obtained for the development of a sporting facility at Millton Memorial Reserve to accommodate both the Rangiora Table Bowls and Rangiora Croquet Club. A resource consent was also obtained for the development of facilities for the Riverside Bowling Club at Hinemoa Park. The club was displaced from its

Kaiapoi site due to the earthquakes. This development is currently under construction. There are a number of other key green space projects which have been completed this year. These include: •

Landscaping at the Kaiapoi Aquatic Centre, Woodend Community Centre and Rangiora Library.

A scaled down redevelopment at Pines Oval, including a new toilet and junior and senior playgrounds.

Stage two of the Kairaki Beach car park redevelopment.

Development of reserve areas in Waikuku Beach, including new bollards, playground repainting, tennis court resurfacing and the enhancement of the Ashley River Mouth.

Installation of pop-up irrigation, levelling and consent to take water from a new well at Mainpower Oval.

Deconstruction of the old log cabin at the Ashley Gorge Reserve.

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Installation of a new potable water supply, upgrade

will provide spaces for the Kaiapoi Museum, Art

to the gas network, and new car park at Mandeville

Display, Community Meeting Rooms and the Council

Sports Ground.

Service Centre. It is expected that the building will be

Redevelopment and landscaping of the Good Street

completed in December 2014.

Reserve Car Park.

The plans for the extension and seismic strengthening

Demolition of the Pines Beach Surf Club.

for the Rangiora Town Hall are completed and tenders

Completion of a new auto rotation area at the

are being sought in August 2013 for construction. It is

Rangiora Airfield.

Other projects that were started included; •

expected that a contract will be let by Council by the end of September 2013.

Redevelopment of the Pearson Park tennis courts.

The community has also been consulted on plans

These are currently being constructed.

for alterations to the Oxford Town Hall. These plans

Design and construction of a new public toilet at the

include the demolition of the existing A& P room but

Rangiora Airfield.

retention and strengthening of the main auditorium. A replacement A&P room will be constructed on the

Aquatic Facilities The Waimakariri District Council Aquatic Facilities include the Dudley Park Aquatic Centre, Kaiapoi Aquatic Centre and the Oxford Community Aquatic Centre. Both the Dudley Park and Kaiapoi Aquatic Centres normally operate all year round, with the Oxford Community Aquatic Centre operating from around November to March each year. In addition to this, the Waimakariri District Council has traditionally operated paddling pools at Pines and Waikuku Beaches. There has been a significant reduction in the amount of pool space available, both in the Waimakariri District and the wider Canterbury area, as a result of the Canterbury earthquakes. In the Waimakariri District, the Kaiapoi Aquatic Centre and two paddling pools were closed as a result of major earthquake damage.

In addition to the completed projects, a new tree

North Side of the Town Hall and staff expect to call for

contract was developed and awarded to Treetech

tenders for the construction in November 2013.

Due to wider earthquake considerations in the Pines Beach area, the Council decided not to replace the

focus on scheduled work, with all trees, including

Extensions to the Woodend Community Centre, which

street trees and parks trees, being maintained on

included some earthquake repairs, were completed and

a three year cyclical programme. A third of the

the building was opened in May 2013.

paddling pool at Pines Beach Oval. However, a new and improved paddling pool was built at Waikuku Beach and this opened in October 2012 for the 2012/2013 summer season.

Tree Care Specialists. The contract had a stronger

programme has now been completed and there has already been a marked reduction in the number of tree related service requests.

Pearson Park Pavilion seismic strengthening has been completed and opened for community use in June 2013. Seismic strengthening has also been completed on

Community Buildings

the Kaiapoi Community Centre, Cust Museum and the

There has been good progress on the redevelopment of

Oxford Community Centre.

community buildings during the year.

In addition twelve community buildings have been

Tenders have been called for the new Kaiapoi Library

seismically assessed by structural engineers and

and the Council is expected to complete a contract

strengthening and repairs completed on four of these

for construction in August 2013. The new building

community buildings.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

The Kaiapoi Aquatic Centre rebuild began in September 2012, after considerable design and planning work. The rebuild, which involved replacing the pool’s walls and roof and making significant improvements to changing rooms and pool plant, was completed in time for the Centre to be opened on 5th August 2013.

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RECREATION

Community Outcomes and How the Activity Contributes COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

RANGIORA AIRFIELD Public spaces and facilities are plentiful, accessible and high quality. Businesses in the District are diverse, adaptable and growing.

Maintaining and developing Rangiora airfield enabling additional recreation as well as business opportunities.

Maintaining and developing Rangiora Airfield to provide greater opportunities for recreation and general aviation.

100% compliance with general aviation requirements.

100% compliance with general aviation requirements was achieved. No incidents were reported to the Council. Improvements include new hazard signs and marker boards and remarked delineation lines. The runway security has also been improved.

COUNCIL OWNED COMMUNITY BUILDINGS Public spaces and facilities are plentiful, accessible and high quality.

Providing buildings and halls as community focal points and meeting places for events, gatherings and recreational activities.

Provision of facilities to cater for meetings and events of civic importance, as operating bases for social service groups, and places for people to meet for recreation, sporting and other social purposes.

1) District Wide Venues (3) out of a total of 5

Cust Community Centre, West Eyreton Hall and the Woodend Community Centre. Currently closed - Rangiora Town Hall and the Oxford Town Hall.

2) Community Meeting Facilities (11) out of a total of 13

88

Cust Community Centre (meeting room/supper room), Dudley Park Pavilion, Fernside Memorial Hall, Oxford Centennial building (community leased), Rangiora War Memorial Offices and Hall, Waikuku Beach Hall, West Eyreton Hall meeting room, Woodend Community Centre (mezzanine floor), Lees Valley School House, Kaiapoi Portacom meeting room and the Kaiapoi Community Centre.

There are currently a significant amount of buildings closed due to earthquake damage or strengthening requirements. Where temporary buildings are considered appropriate, such as at Murphy Park, steps have been taken to provide these. Planning and consultation regarding the future of some of the closed buildings is underway. The Kaiapoi Community Centre has now been reopened to the public after significant strengthening work has been completed and increases the community meeting spaces from 10 at the beginning of the financial year to 11. The Pearson Park Pavilion has also recently re-opened. District Wide Venues (3) Community Meeting Spaces (11) Sports Pavilions (7)

â€‚ď ľ Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

COUNCIL OWNED COMMUNITY BUILDINGS (CONT'D) Currently closed - Oxford Town Hall (AMP Hall), and the Oxford JC Hall (currently a pharmacy). 3) Sports Pavilions (6) out of a total of 7

Kendall Park Pavilion, Loburn Domain Pavilion, Cust Domain Pavilion, Ohoka Domain Pavilion, Sefton Domain Pavilion, View Hill Pavilion, Pearson Park Pavilion.

PARKS AND RESERVES Public spaces and facilities are plentiful, accessible and high quality. There are areas of significant indigenous vegetation and habitats for indigenous fauna.

Providing reserves and sports grounds enables many recreational opportunities for communities as well as protecting and enhancing areas of indigenous vegetation.

The distinctive character of our towns, villages and rural areas is maintained. The community’s needs for health and social services are met.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

No less than 8 hectares per 1000 residents of open space will be provided across the District for recreation purposes.

100% provision of 8 hectares of park land per 1000 residents.

Current Council open space provision is 14 hectares of open space per 1000 residents.

Reserves providing a neighbourhood function will be provided in the 5 main towns (Kaiapoi, Rangiora, Oxford, Woodend and Pegasus) within 500 metres or ten minutes walking distance of Residential 1 and 2 households. 90% provision of reserves within 500 metres or ten minutes walking distance of residential 1 and 2 households.

Percentage of reserves provided for Residential 1 and 2 households.

90% provision of reserves was achieved.

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RECREATION

COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

PARKS AND RESERVES (CONT'D) Areas of significant indigenous vegetation and habitats for indigenous fauna will be maintained in accordance with the Reserve Management Plans. 112 hectares currently maintained.

Number of hectares maintained.

110 hectares of natural park is currently maintained. The target will be achieved when Hegan Reserve, Rangiora, and Taranaki Reserve, Waikuku Beach are opened to the public. The Parks Unit is currently consulting with surrounding schools regarding the development of Hegan Reserve.

Public spaces and facilities are plentiful, accessible and high quality. There are areas of significant indigenous vegetation and habitats for indigenous fauna. The distinctive character of our towns, villages and rural areas is maintained. The community’s needs for health and social services are met.

90

Providing reserves and sports grounds enables many recreational opportunities for communities as well as protecting and enhancing areas of indigenous vegetation.

Parks, reserves and public conveniences will be maintained to standards specified in the Parks and Recreation Activity Management Plan. 100% of playgrounds comply with NZ Standard 5828.

Compliance achieved.

There is currently 100% compliance of play equipment with NZ Standard 5828. Maintenance work identified during monthly audits has been scheduled for completion. The bark playground safety surfacing has just been replaced in those areas identified during audits as requiring attention.

95% compliance with agreed forward works programme in the tree maintenance contract.

Compliance achieved.

A new tree contract was awarded and started 1 September 2012.

95% compliance per annum with maintenance standards specified in the Park and Services contract.

Compliance achieved.

A forward works programme has now been completed. This is on target to achieve 95% compliance for the first contract year. An average compliance rate of 96.5% has been achieved to date for the Parks and Services Maintenance Contract.

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Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

AQUATIC FACILITIES The community’s needs for health and social services are met. Public spaces and facilities are plentiful, accessible and high quality.

Providing public swimming facilities: • Improves public safety by encouraging widespread involvement in learn to swim programmes

People are friendly and • Assists public caring, creating a strong health by enabling sense of community in injury rehabilitation our district. access and mobility enhancement • Enables recreation and social cohesiveness by providing a safe environment for leisure swimming, competition and fitness training.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

Water quality Conforming to the NZ Standard 5826:2010 for microbiological water testing.

100% compliance with internal water testing and external microbiological water quality standards.

Water testing achieved 100% compliance at the Dudley Park Aquatic Centre. The Kaiapoi Temporary Pool and Oxford Community Pool also achieved 100% compliance while they were operational during the summer months.

100% compliance with annual independent PoolSafe audit.

Pool safe Accreditation was achieved after assessments were conducted in March. 100% compliance for the Dudley Park Aquatic Centre and the Oxford Community Pool. Kaiapoi will be reassessed upon its re-opening in August 2013.

PoolSafe Accreditation The Dudley Park Aquatic Centre, Kaiapoi Aquatic Centre, and Oxford Community Aquatic Centre all maintain New Zealand Recreation Association PoolSafe Accreditation. Customer Satisfaction Through regular surveying of programme participants and recreational swimmers, the Aquatic facilities can track and trend customer feedback and make operational improvements to improve customer satisfaction. 90% of quarterly surveyed Learn to Swim participants are satisfied with the WaiSwim programme.

Percentage of customers satisfied with the WaiSwim programme.

Term Four 2012, Term One 2013 and Term Two 2013 surveys were conducted with a total of 230 responses received. Of the 230 responses, 212 people (92.2%) responded to the question of overall satisfaction. 96% of the 230 responses were satisfied with the WaiSwim Term lessons. School Term 3 surveys were not conducted due to a lack of availability of key staff.

90% of customers surveyed in the Aquatic Facilities 6 monthly general customer survey are satisfied with the facilities and services offered.

Percentage of customers satisfied with the facilities and services offered.

The two general customer satisfaction surveys carried out in January and June received a total of 257 responses. 213 of the respondents answered the question, 'Overall, would you say you are satisfied with your experience/s at this facility?'

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91


RECREATION

COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

AQUATIC FACILITIES (CONT'D) Around 97% of respondents indicated they were satisfied with their experience/s at the Aquatic Facilities.

Aquatic Facilities Attendance 354,000 attendances across all three facilities through leisure swimming and programmes. 1) Casual Attendance - (Casual Adult, Child, and Senior/ Community Card holder visits. It also includes Parent & Preschooler, and Family attendances (160,000 attendances)) 2) Prepaid Attendance (Attendances from all Concession Card and Membership holders (40,000 attendances) 3) Programme Attendance (Includes Learn to Swim, Aquarobics and Schools programme 154,000 attendances))

Number of attendances across all three facilities.

The opening date of the Kaiapoi Aquatic Centre was unknown at the time of setting the attendance target of 354,000. A more realistic target of 250,000 was set once it was determined that the Kaiapoi Aquatic Centre would open in August 2013. The total number of aquatic facilities attendances to the end of June for the Dudley Park Aquatic Centre, and to the end of March for the Oxford Community Pool was 262,489, excluding non paying visits such as spectators. The new target was therefore exceeded by 12,489 attendances.

Note: Any performance measures in italics are items where there was a significant variance between the actual service provision and the expected service provision.

92

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


BUILDING STATUS for the year ended 30 June 2013 Building

Programmed

Stage

Cust Domain Pavilion

Report completed

Recommendation to bring up to 67% NBS

Cust Domain Pavilion shower extention

Report completed

Recommendation rebuild or demolish

Cust Domain Cricket Shelter

Report completed

Greater than 67% NBS

Yes

Cust standalone toilet block

Report completed

Greater than 67% NBS

Yes

Dudley Park Pavilion

Report completed

Greater than 67% NBS

Woodend Community Centre

Strengthening, repairs and extension finished

Sefton Domain Pavilion

Report completed

Greater than 67% NBS

Yes

Oxford Swimming Pool

Evaluation complete

Summer Facility only – Minor work required to bring building up the code

No

View Hill Pavilion

Report completed

Greater than 67%NBS

Yes

Cust Community Centre

Evaluation booked for first week in August

Structural investigation required

Yes

Kendal Park Pavilion

Evaluation yet to be commenced- date to be advised

West Eyreton Hall

Evaluation yet to be commenced

By the end of August – requires physical investigation

Yes

West Eyreton Archway and Gates

Deconstructed and design complete

Building of arch yet to commence

No

Fernside Hall

Report completed

Earthquake repairs done – 60% NBS – minor strengthening still to be done

Ohoka Domain Pavilion

Evaluation yet to commence

End of September – requires physical investigation

Loburn Domain Pavilion

Evaluation yet to commence – date to be advised

Saltwater Creek hall

Hall deemed as unsafe

Kaiapoi Community Centre

Strengthening and repairs completed

Cust Museum

Report completed

Rangiora Library

Strengthening and repairs completed

Kaiapoi Clock Tower

Design complete

Deconstruction yet to commence

Oxford Community Centre

Strengthening repairs completed

Earthquake repairs completed

July 2012

Yes

Rangiora War Memorial Hall

Report Completed

Greater than 67% - Repair of Earthquake damage completed

Early 2012

Yes

Ohoka Domain Pavilion

Evaluation yet to be commenced

End of September requires physical investigation

Yes

Oxford Jaycees and Museum

Report completed

Local Chemist has use of these premises until their new premises are constructed

Yes

Oxford Town Hall

Report completed

Strengthening and extension to be started early 2014

No

Oxford Library and Service Centre

Report complete

Remedial (temporary)Strengthening completed

Permanent work to be competed

Yes

Pearson Park Pavilion

Report Completed

Strengthening and upgrade work completed

June 2013

Yes

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

Completed

Open Yes

Yes April 2013

Yes

Yes

April 2011

Yes Yes Yes

Decision yet to be made

No November 2012

Strengthening underway

Yes No

October 2012

Yes No

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RECREATION

FUNDING IMPACT STATEMENT for the year ended 30 June 2013 for Recreation 2012 Long Term Plan

2013 Long Term Plan

2013 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

Sources of operating funding General Rates, uniform annual general charges, rates penalties

563

722

641

Targeted Rates (other than a targeted rate for water supply)

7,721

8,166

7,832

Subsidies and grants for operating purposes

-

-

41

Internal charges and overheads recovered

-

-

-

1,661

1,447

1,751

-

-

-

9,945

10,335

10,265

Fees, charges and targeted rates for water supply Local authorities fuel tax, fines, infringement fees, and other receipts TOTAL OPERATING FUNDING Applications of operating funding Payments to staff and suppliers

7,276

7,249

7,321

Finance costs

781

871

494

Internal charges and overheads applied

828

880

752

-

-

-

TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF OPERATING FUNDING

8,885

9,000

8,567

SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF OPERATING FUNDING

1,060

1,335

1,698

Other operating fund applications

Sources of capital funding Subsidies and grants for capital expenditure

-

-

-

Development and financial contributions

1,848

3,478

6,182

Increase (decrease) in debt

1,180

4,105

(266)

Lump sum contributions

-

-

-

Gross proceeds from sale of assets

-

-

-

3,028

7,583

5,916

3,303

3,682

5,692

292

4,829

2,188

- to replace existing assets

1,293

1,831

570

Increase (decrease) in reserves

(800)

(1,424)

(836)

-

-

-

4,088

8,918

7,614

(1,060)

(1,335)

(1,698)

-

-

-

TOTAL SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING Applications of capital funding Capital expenditure - to meet additional demand - to improve the level of service

Increase (decrease) in investments TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF CAPITAL FUNDING SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF CAPITAL FUNDING FUNDING BALANCE

94

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

95


LIBRARIES AND MUSEUMS

Libraries and Museums Library Services, Canterbury Regional Museum Overview

at the Oxford Library pending a decision on future

Libraries

development; the building and Portacom addition at

With less seismic activity to contend with in the

the Kaiapoi Temporary Library are functioning well;

2012/2013 year, great strides have been made towards

and plans by architects, Warren and Mahoney, for a

recovery. We have been able to undertake building

new Library, Museum, Council Service Centre and Art

repairs, earthquake strengthening and active planning

Space for Kaiapoi have gone out to tender.

for new library facilities. We have started to move our thoughts towards new programmes and created a raft of customer service improvements. Future plans include the implementation of RFID (radio frequency identification), for items borrowed from the library and the reshaping of services in line with projected population growth.

Collections - The collection from the Kaiapoi Library was removed following the earthquake of September 2010 from the damaged and now, demolished building. The storage facility that it was transferred to, collapsed in a later quake and the collection was then moved into four 40 foot long shipping containers in a random ‘arrangement’ of shelving, furniture, cartons

Buildings - Building repairs, exterior painting and

and supermarket trolleys of books. In a concerted effort

landscaping have been completed on the Rangiora

over the summer, the stock was sorted, re-packed

Library, Chamber Gallery and Citizens’ Advice Bureau

and relocated to secure storage in preparation for its

site; earthquake strengthening has been completed

future move to the new Kaiapoi Library.

96

Customer service improvements – With buildings and collections largely under control, our energy has turned towards new service developments. In March 2012, the Waimakariri District Libraries moved to the Kōtui Library Management System and this move provided plenty of scope for service innovation through new methods of customer communications, integration of library databases, development of the Wheelers’ eBook Platform and the Libraries’ website. Other improvements have come in the form of digital signage, expansion of Aotearoa People’s Network Kaharoa (APNK) wireless to a 24/7 service and wireless printing; electronic kiosks displaying collection items from the Canterbury Museum; and installation of the Inzone Careers service. New online services have included the creation of genre-based Pinterest boards; development of a social reading platform known as BookPsychic; web pages of catalogue search tips,

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


library events calendar, hot topics, resources for the

The future of libraries – The future of libraries

of the Canterbury Museum which are levied under the

business community, and a teen WaiRead blog.

has been challenged in the media during the year

Canterbury Museum Trust Board Act 1993.

New initiatives - New programmes have been added in the year which complement the traditional Storytime, Babytime, Book Group, Children’s Summer Reading and Kidsfest programmes. New initiatives include Creative Writing workshops, Picture Book Illustration workshops, regular Friends of the Libraries’ guest speaker and author events, pre-school visits, monthly Family Nights at the Library, a teen Summer Reading programme, drop-in help sessions for eBook users and, for people who are new to the District, a weekly Justice of the Peace Signing Centre, a craft group which meets on

with many discussions taking place around the role of libraries in the age of eBooks and electronic

This Council continues to monitor the operations of

resources. The detractors have been outweighed

the Museum and submitted to the draft Canterbury

by loud and convincing commentary on the vital

Museum Annual Plan 2012-13 on concerns, including

role that libraries play in adding value to our

the escalation of costs relating to the $69m

communities. A large and willing band of volunteers

redevelopment project and the impact on operating

continue to support the operations of the Libraries.

costs. The Council will continue to monitor the progress

We look forward to embracing new radio frequency

of the Museum.

identification (RFID) technologies and to engaging with the District’s ever increasing population in the

The Council continues to support our local museums

year ahead.

and has included sums to assist in the operations of the buildings within the Long Term Plan.

Sunday afternoons, a weekly Library programme for

Museums

adults with special needs, displays and promotions

Jointly with Christchurch City, Selwyn District and

The council expects to award a contract in August

and in the Chamber Gallery, a full programme of art

Hurunui District Councils, the Waimakariri District

2013 for a new library facility at Kaiapoi which will

exhibitions, music concerts and recitals.

Council provides funding towards the operating costs

incorporate museum facilities.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

97


LIBRARIES AND MUSEUMS

Community Outcomes and How the Activity Contributes COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

LIBRARY SERVICES People have wide ranging opportunities for learning and being informed. The community’s cultures, arts and heritage are conserved and celebrated. Businesses in the District are diverse, adaptable and growing. Public spaces and facilities are plentiful, accessible and high quality.

98

Connecting people with information, encouraging social interaction, empowering individuals and promoting recreational reading. Preserving our past and present cultural heritage and encouraging cultural diversity. Contributing to prosperity and desirability of the District as a place to live and work. Building a sound collection that caters for diverse needs.

Delivery Points – Providing lending, information and reference services seven days per week at Kaiapoi and Rangiora, and six days per week at Oxford: 24,000 or more visitors per month to the Trevor Inch Memorial Library in Rangiora.

Number of visitors per month to the Trevor Inch Memorial Library in Rangiora.

An average of 22,379 people visited the Rangiora Library per month throughout 2012/2013.

Percentage of District population that are library members.

78.25% of the District's population are registered as library members. 38,811 registered members calculated against 49,600 (LTP 2012-2022 population estimate).

(Visitor numbers are not available for Oxford or the temporary library in Kaiapoi). 70% or more of the District's population are registered library members.

Online Services – Providing, via the internet, access to quality online information including databases, library catalogue, local history and community resources, and supporting the community to use this technology: At least 3,000 visits per month to the Libraries website.

Number of visitors per month to the libraries website.

There were 4,429 visits on average per month to the Libraries website in 2012/2013.

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252

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COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

LIBRARY SERVICES (CONT'D) Collection Services – Providing a collection that meets the diverse needs of the community: The number of items held in stock per capita will increase to 2.8 by 2015 from 2.61 as at baseline year of 2008.

Number of items held in stock per capita.

2.52 stock items are held per capita. This is calculated by dividing 125,154 stock items by 49,600 people (LTP 2012-2022 population estimate). A change in collection size has resulted from a major collection management project being undertaken prior to the implementation of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID).

Customer Service – Providing quality reference service, educational opportunities and customer interactions: 90% or more of library users are satisfied with library services as measured through the annual library customer satisfaction survey.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

Percentage of library users that are satisfied with library services.

89.24% of respondents to the annual Library Customer Satisfaction Survey, carried out in June 2012, rated the library's services (resources, signage and staff service) 'good to excellent'. Of these, 50.3% rated the services as 'excellent'.

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LIBRARIES AND MUSEUMS

FUNDING IMPACT STATEMENT for the year ended 30 June 2013 for Libraries and Museums 2012 Long Term Plan

2013 Long Term Plan

2013 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

1,908

2,139

2,087

360

385

372

-

-

-

19

20

21

178

161

125

-

2,000

-

2,465

4,705

2,605

1,980

2,086

2,027

9

8

5

197

209

194

Sources of operating funding General Rates, uniform annual general charges, rates penalties Targeted Rates (other than a targeted rate for water supply)

Subsidies and grants for operating purposes Internal charges and overheads recovered Fees, charges and targeted rates for water supply Local authorities fuel tax, fines, infringement fees, and other receipts TOTAL OPERATING FUNDING Applications of operating funding Payments to staff and suppliers Finance costs Internal charges and overheads applied Other operating fund applications TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF OPERATING FUNDING SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF OPERATING FUNDING

-

-

-

2,186

2,303

2,226

279

2,402

379

Sources of capital funding Subsidies and grants for capital expenditure

-

-

-

Development and financial contributions

95

466

370

Increase (decrease) in debt

(6)

(6)

(6)

Lump sum contributions

-

-

-

Gross proceeds from sale of assets

-

-

-

89

460

364

TOTAL SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING Applications of capital funding Capital expenditure - to meet additional demand

-

-

-

- to improve the level of service

-

180

6

- to replace existing assets

368

2,700

1,399

Increase (decrease) in reserves

-

(18)

(662)

Increase (decrease) in investments

-

-

-

368

2,862

743

(279)

(2,402)

(379)

-

-

-

TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF CAPITAL FUNDING SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF CAPITAL FUNDING FUNDING BALANCE

100

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

101


COMMUNITY PROTECTION

Community Protection Overview Emergency Management (EM) The Council continues to enhance its Civil Defence Emergency Management (CDEM) capability.

CDEM for running emergency operation centres is currently being customised. •

A key lesson learned from national reviews and reports about the Canterbury Earthquakes was the need to further develop community resilience. (i.e. a community’s capacity to look after itself and, in addition to this capacity, the formal response by official emergency response agencies, including the Council). The Waimakariri CDEM has focused on engaging the community in the development of communitybased arrangements to further enhance resilience to emergencies. This approach is consistent with the new direction Civil Defence is taking at a national level, Over the past year the following key resilience projects have been undertaken; •

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EM has established and actively used a Waimakariri CDEM Facebook page to engage trained CDEM volunteers and the wider community. A web-based product provided by the Ministry of

A tsunami resilience project within the District’s coastal communities has been completed. This has involved the placement of tsunami information boards, reaching agreement with communities on tsunami evacuation zones and establishing community tsunami response plans for each beach community. Since completing this project, the Ministry of CDEM has advised that agreed tsunami evacuation zones may need to be reviewed to take into account the results of new scientific modeling for tsunami hazards. It is expected that consultation around this new information will occur in the 2013-2014 financial year.

The four-year project to wire some of the District’s designated emergency centres is on target. This will give these centres the capability to run large capacity generators in the event of a significant mains power failure during civil defence emergencies. So far three venues have received funding from the Council and the wiring at these venues has been completed. Tuahiwi Marae has

also purchased a generator for its new whare (meeting house). •

Two major field exercises were conducted to enhance community resilience in relation to flood hazard from the Ashley River and the effects of a major snow storm on the rural farming community. Both exercises involved significant multi-agency collaboration and consultation with those sectors of the community likely to be affected by the two potential hazards.

EM has embarked on a regular (fortnightly) program of pre-recorded and live radio talk back shows with local radio station 104.9 Compass FM. This program is part of a wider public education and awareness program on both civil defence and rural fire matters.

A new District CDEM Welfare Plan has been established in collaboration with a range of Government and local community organisations. Part of this plan involves the establishment of a multiagency health and welfare forum that will serve both the Hurunui and Waimakariri Districts during civil defence emergencies requiring welfare services.

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


There has been only one significant deviation from the Council’s Ten Year Plan and that has been to bring forward from 2015-2016 the procurement of a dedicated vehicle to support CDEM volunteers. The old CDEM vehicle, due for disposal in July 2012, has been retained as the dedicated vehicle as this option was significantly cheaper than the option of purchasing a new vehicle. Environmental Health The Environmental Health Team has completed audit training in preparation for the introduction of new legislation expected in 2013. The proposed Food Act implements a new system of food premises control, moving away from the current annual licenses and inspections system to a reliance on owner - developed food safety plans with independent audit. So far more than fourteen premises have migrated to this system in the Waimakariri District. The intent of the new legislation is to reduce compliance costs for businesses; however start-up costs will be incurred as businesses develop systems and train staff for the new approach.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

Other health fees were modified in 2012/13 to better reflect where costs fall. The earthquake has continued to cause disruption to business premises. Some businesses have set up new premises, some have now reopened after rebuilding, others have changed hands or are under new ownership and three have closed. One application was received to increase the number of class 4 gambling machines, however, there has been a net decline in machine numbers across the District. The Gambling Venue Policy is currently under review and is expected to be completed in September 2013.

took place. This excellent result perhaps reflects the good systems that District retailers have in place to prevent direct sales to young people. The team also responded to minor hazardous spills to ensure public safety and prevent pollution. This included dealing with asbestos contamination following two house fires. Members of the team also responded to some 587 noise, nuisance and litter complaints. Animal Control Services The Animal Control Unit is currently staffed by three full-time Animal Control Officers. There are 10,811 registered dogs in the District and 6,808 owners.

The new Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 was passed in December 2012 which gave the Council the ability to have a Local Alcohol Policy. This has gone through a special consultative procedure under the Local Government Act 2002 and public submissions to the policy were heard on 31st July 2013.

Funding for the Unit remains sourced completely from

The Environmental Health Team and the NZ Police carried out two controlled purchase operations this year and found that no sales to underage persons

a ranger service and promoting dog registration.

registration fees. The Unit has a significant role to play in promoting responsible dog ownership and minimising dog related nuisance. This includes educating owners and the public about dog control, talking to schools, providing Impounding animals and imposing fines are also tactics that are employed when necessary.

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COMMUNITY PROTECTION

While no prosecutions were lodged during this period, the Unit issued 72 infringement notices to encourage owners to exercise more control over their animals thereby reducing nuisance to the public. Earthquake response The Environmental Services Team continued to be part of the first response to the earthquakes, initially checking building safety and then carrying out continual checks on water potability and food safety to ensure public health and safety. Building safety continues to be a major work thrust as the implementation of the Council’s Earthquake Prone Building Policy is brought forward to address risk to public safety in a timely manner. Through this programme some buildings have been declared as dangerous and have either been closed and fenced off or remedial work has been undertaken to remove the danger. The Council’s Earthquake Prone Buildings Policy requires owners to have a detailed engineering assessment completed for each building within two years, and if necessary, strengthen the building to a required standard. One team member is dedicated full

104

time to this programme and has been seconded to this role for a further two years. Building Control The Building Unit received 2,410 building consent applications, 16% more than last year. Of these, 1,125 were for dwellings, compared to the 902 received the previous financial year. The long term average is 450 dwellings per annum. Over the year the Council’s building inspectors completed over 17,000 building inspections, 55% more than the previous year and 98% more than the preearthquake years. The substantial and sustained rise in dwelling applications over the last two financial years saw the Building Unit utilise the services of a growing band of independent contractors. It is envisaged that the use of agents will be necessary while workloads remain elevated. The Council has employed another four inspectors in addition to this, to meet current and projected demand. Electronic processing of building consents was introduced during the latter part of the previous financial year and

is now well embedded into day to day business with over 85% of all work being lodged electronically. It should be noted that all applications are processed electronically. The bi-annual International Accreditation New Zealand (IANZ) audit of the Waimakariri Building Consent Authority (BCA) was completed in July 2013. At the exit interview the auditors advised they would be recommending renewal of WDC’s BCA accreditation upon completion of five corrective actions. BCA accreditation will remain valid for a period of two years from renewal. The Building Unit maintains a presence in Kaiapoi by locating an inspector at the hub to provide assistance to various project managers and the general public. We envisage this service continuing until it is no longer necessary. The Government has reaffirmed its desire to establish a risk-based consent system where the amount of time spent by Council staff processing and inspecting work is matched to the complexity of the building project. If adopted this could mean simple structures such as farm sheds would have a minimal requirement from

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


the Council, while complex residential and commercial

several areas where improvements could be made, and

Hazards, which is to be operational by July 2013. As

proposals would need comprehensive scrutiny. The

in particular, the regular testing of fire equipment. An

part of the project, extensive consultation was carried

adoption and timing of this is tied closely to the degree

external contractor has been retained to address this

out with various user groups across the District in

of comfort the Government has with the Licensed

and ensure compliance with National Standards.

order to understand general perceptions and required

Building Practitioners scheme.

The new Voluntary Rural Fire Force (VRFF) based in

responses to rural fire situations.

In addition to this the Government has signalled a

Swannanoa is active and enthusiastic with eighteen

The Enlarged Rural Fire District (ERFD) project is

desire to establish a centralised building consent

committed members. Their equipment includes an

progressing slowly. Although it is probably inevitable

processing hub where Councils will load applications into

urban appliance (high pressure/ high volume pump)

that an enlarged rural fire authority will be formed,

a centralised database and work on jobs over the web.

which they own, two high pressure pumps, assorted

the exact dimensions of this authority are yet to be

It is intended that adoption of the model will deliver

waterway equipment, a fire fighting trailer and a

determined.

consistent interpretation and application of the Building

Toyota Hi Lux Smokechaser. The RFA has applied to

Code through the use of standardised check sheets.

the NRFA for a 50% subsidy to build an 8,000 litre

The control and maintenance of this will fall to the Ministry of Innovation Business and Employment, formally the Department of Building and Housing. Rural Fire The Waimakariri Rural Fire Authority (Council) has recently been audited for compliance with the National

water carrier. The RFA will also be applying to both the Council and the NRFA for finance to build a fire station

recognised as a national event.

Firefighter numbers at the other two Fire Stations in Waikuku Beach and Pines/Kairaki, are steady at twelve each. The Strategic and Tactical Fire Management Plan

rural fire equipment, personal protective equipment

is nearing completion. This project was initiated in

(PPE) and weather observations. The audit identified

response to the National Standard for Assessing Fire

130802059252

training and the October Challenge, which is now

in the near future.

Rural Fire Authority (NRFA) minimum standards for

Annual Report 2012-2013

Planning is well underway for both the annual August

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COMMUNITY PROTECTION

Community Outcomes and How the Activity Contributes COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT There is a safe environment for all. People have wide ranging opportunities for learning and being informed.

Administering emergency management, civil defence and rural fire legislation, in order to ensure that emergencies and hazards are identified, managed and minimised.

Protect the community from disasters using the philosophy of the '4 R's' of emergency management: Reduction, Readiness, Response, Recovery Provide three Emergency Operations Centre training sessions annually.

Number of Emergency Operations Centre training sessions provided.

Five EOC training sessions were held this financial year. These were: • Two sessions held on 9 July and 12 September 2012 • Training provided for all EOC sections between 11 - 20 March 2013 • South Island Te Ripahepa Exercise held on 29 May for EOC Managers • Exercise Pandora held on 8 June 2013 involving a full EOC.

106

Participate in the Canterbury Civil Defence Exercise Pandora annually.

Participation in Exercise Pandora complete.

The Te Ripahapa exercise held on 29 May 2013 was the 2013 Pandora Exercise for the Canterbury CDEM Group. In addition to this, Exercise Pandora was held in the District on 8 June and involved community-based volunteer teams and the rural farming sector. Both exercises included an EOC component.

Maintain a minimum of 100 trained civil defence volunteers.

Number of trained civil defence volunteers maintained annually.

136 volunteers are currently registered with the Council. 87 of these are regular attendees at training. The remainder make themselves available during a real event.

 

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT (CONT'D) Provide civil defence emergency management (CDEM) education to a minimum of 15 school classes annually.

Number of Civil Defence Emergency Management (CDEM) education classes held.

Emergency management education was provided to 38 classes this financial year. These were as follows: The 'Down The Back Paddock' programme was run for 7 classes at the Cust School on 24 and 25 September 2012. Presentations were made to 12 classes at: • Ohoka School on the 23 and 26 October 2012, • 6 classes at Oxford School on 26 March 2013, • 7 classes at Oxford School on 9 May 2013 and • 6 classes at Loburn School on 20 May 2013.

Deliver a minimum of one civil defence emergency management workshop in each ward of the District.

Number of civil defence workshops held.

A workshop was held in three of the four wards this financial year. These were: • Woodend Ashley Community Board tsunami consultation held on 2 July 2012 • Rangiora Community Board training on CDEM role held on 12 September 2012 • Rural farming sector public workshop held in Oxford on 8 June 2013. A workshop for the Kaiapoi area is envisaged for the next financial year as part of targeting business continuity planning with the District's business sector.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

 

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COMMUNITY PROTECTION

COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

RURAL FIRE There is a safe environment for all.

Administering emergency management, civil defence and rural fire legislation, in order to ensure that emergencies and hazards are identified, managed and minimised.

Preparing and managing responses to rural fires.

Number of rural fire volunteers that are adequately coordinated, trained and equipped.

There is a total of 51 trained volunteers across the three voluntary fire forces. These are:

Swannanoa - 18 Waikuku Beach - 16 Pines/Kairaki - 17

All trainees are either trained to the National Standard or being trained to the level of Fire Fighter, Pump Operator, Crew Leader or higher. Public awareness of fire safety in open and closed seasons.

Number of fires per year as a basis for monitoring trends.

There were 354 callouts across the District in the financial year. These were as follows:

Rangiora - 94 Kaiapoi - 77 Woodend - 81 Oxford - 25 Cust - 77

There were no major fires to claim from the Rural Fire Fighting Fund. A restricted fire season was in place from 1 - 11 April.

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES There is a safe environment for all. Businesses in the district are diverse, adaptable and growing.

Administering environmental health laws and regulations to ensure hazards to people are identified, managed and minimised. Supporting the safe operation of food and liquor outlets.

108

Protecting people and the environment through licensing to standards for food and liquor premises; investigating reports of infectious or notifiable diseases; and promoting the adoption of food safety programmes. Complete an annual inspection of over 300 food and liquor premises to ensure compliance with legislation.

Number of inspections of compliant food and liquor premises per year. Percentage compliant with target.

100% compliance. 343 food and liquor premises were inspected this financial year. 257 of these were food premises and 86 were liquor premises. Two Control Purchase Operations were carried out, one on 12 July 2012 and the other on 2nd November 2012.

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252

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COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES (CONT'D) 60 sale of liquor premises were visited during the CPO's with no sales to underage purchasers. Assist 10 premises develop food control plans.

Number of compliant premises assisted with the development of food control plans.

100% compliance. Fourteen premises developed registered food control plans in the last financial year.

Administering the Gambling Act 2003. Process (pokie) applications within the 30 day statutory period.

100% of applications processed within statutory timeframes.

100% of applications were processed within statutory timeframes. One application was heard on 18 December 2012. There was no further applications for the year

Responding to noise and other nuisance complaints. 90% within agreed timeframes of 2 hours. Administering the Building Act 2004 and ensuring other relevant safety regulations are complied with in order to protect public safety.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

Percentage of noise and nuisance complaints responded to within service delivery timeframes.

91.5 % compliance with level of service. 551 complaints were received and 504 were completed in time.

Monitoring the performance of the delivery of Building Compliance Services. Audit a minimum of 30 premises per annum for Building Warrant of Fitness compliance to achieve 100% coverage by June 2017.

Number of premises audited for Building Warrant of Fitness compliance. Percentage compliant with target.

A law change during the year resulted in the Department having to change its processes. A casual person was employed to go through the list, send new compliance forms to building owners, make sure their Independent Qualified Persons completed the forms to the new standards and returned them to the Council.

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COMMUNITY PROTECTION

COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES (CONT'D) All correspondence was sent to the building owners on 27 May 2013 and there has been a 75% return rate to date. Audits will commence in the 2013-2014 year. Determining compliance of building projects with the Building Act 2004 and the Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987. Audit 150 swimming pools annually.

Number of swimming pools audited annually.

430 pool inspections/audits were undertaken this financial year.

ANIMAL CONTROL SERVICES There is a safe environment for all.

Protecting the public from animal related nuisances and dangers to reduce the risk of accidents or injuries (e.g. dog attacks).

Respond to 100% of complaints within the agreed service level timeframes. 100% of complaints responded to within 24 hours for serious attacks and 48 hours for other incidences.

Percentage responded to within timeframe.

1433 complaints were lodged in the last financial year. 100% were responded to on time and 1330 were completed.

Provide a response to notification of wandering stock on roadways. 100% of responses replied to immediately for wandering stock.

Percentage responded to immediately.

241 calls about wandering stock were received by the Police, Court Security or Animal Control over the last financial year. 100% were responded to immediately.

BUILDING SERVICES There is a safe environment for all.

110

Administering the Building Act 2004 and ensuring other relevant safety regulations are complied with in order to protect public safety.

Monitoring the performance of the delivery of building compliance services. 100% of building consent applications processed within the statutory 20 days.

Percentage processed within statutory timeframes.

2,410 consent applications were lodged over the financial year. Of these applications, 1,125 were for dwellings. Over the same period last year 2,070 applications were lodged with the Council, of which 902 were for dwellings. At the end of the year 88%

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252

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COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

BUILDING SERVICES (CONT'D) of all applications were issued within the statutory requirement of 20 working days. Additional consent approval capacity was secured to enable the Building Unit to better meet the demands placed on it. This resulted in an improvement over the last five months where 98% of all applications were granted within 20 working days. The average days lapsed over the financial year was 13 days but this dropped to between 10 and 11 working days over the last five months of the financial year. A small number of jobs were not issued within the statutory requirements over the financial year. The reasons for this are multifaceted but in general can be attributed to occasions where peaks of demand coincided with a shortfall in capacity. In all cases actions have been undertaken to address areas of underperformance. 100% of Code of Compliance Certificates issued within 20 working days.

Percentage issued within statutory timeframes.

1,940 Code Compliance Certificates (CCC) were issued up to June 30th 2013 at an average of 7 working days compared to 1,620 CCCs being issued over the same period last year at an average of 6 days. 4% of CCCs were issued outside the statutory requirement of 20 working days, unchanged from last year. Additional resources were engaged during the year to enable statutory time frames to be fully met. A small number of jobs were not issued within the statutory requirements over the financial year.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

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COMMUNITY PROTECTION

COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

BUILDING SERVICES (CONT'D) The reasons for this are multifaceted but in general can be attributed to occasions where peaks of demand coincided with a shortfall in capacity. In all cases actions have been undertaken to address areas of underperformance. Maintaining Building Consent Authority accreditation.

Accreditation maintained.

The International Accreditation New Zealand (IANZ) completed an audit of the BCA in July 2013. IANZ assessors have recommended continuation of accreditation subject to satisfactorily addressing five corrective actions. The internal auditing of quality systems has been completed.

Providing a property information service to assist private decision-making in relation to development and building projects. 100% of Land Information Memoranda (LIM) applications issued within 10 days.

Percentage issued within timeframes.

2036 LIMS were issued for 2012/2013 and were all (100%) completed within the ten working day statutory timeframe. The average time to process the LIMS is 6 working days. This compares to 2482 LIMS issued for 2011/2012 which were all (100%) completed within statutory timeframes, also with an average processing time of 6 days.

100% of Project Information Memoranda (PIM) applications issued in 20 days.

112

Percentage issued within timeframes.

1113 PIMS have been issued this financial year with an average number of processing days of 8. One consent was over the statutory time frame resulting in 99.9% being issued within 20 working days.

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252

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COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

BUILDING SERVICES (CONT'D) A total of 695 compliance check sheets have been issued this year with an average number of processing days of 7. One consent was over the statutory time frame, again giving a figure of 99.9% issued within 20 working days.

PUBLIC CEMETERIES The community’s needs for health and social services are met.

Providing and managing cemeteries to provide for community health.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

Cemetery provision will meet the interment needs of District residents for accessible and appropriate sites. Providing berm capacity for at least 3 years.

Amount of berm development undertaken.

New berms have been completed at the Rangiora and Kaiapoi Cemeteries. 12 trees have been removed at the Oxford Cemetery to make room for future ash berms which have now been ordered.

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COMMUNITY PROTECTION

FUNDING IMPACT STATEMENT for the year ended 30 June 2013 for Community Protection 2012 Long Term Plan

2013 Long Term Plan

2013 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

1,309

1,333

1,001

189

212

221

Subsidies and grants for operating purposes

-

-

1

Internal charges and overheads recovered

-

-

-

3,591

5,063

6,759

-

-

-

5,089

6,608

7,982

4,807

6,119

7,115

33

27

3

339

439

428

Sources of operating funding General Rates, uniform annual general charges, rates penalties Targeted Rates (other than a targeted rate for water supply)

Fees, charges and targeted rates for water supply Local authorities fuel tax, fines, infringement fees, and other receipts TOTAL OPERATING FUNDING Applications of operating funding Payments to staff and suppliers Finance costs Internal charges and overheads applied Other operating fund applications

-

-

-

5,179

6,585

7,546

(90)

23

436

Subsidies and grants for capital expenditure

-

-

-

Development and financial contributions

-

-

-

Increase (decrease) in debt

-

117

10

Lump sum contributions

-

-

-

Gross proceeds from sale of assets

-

-

-

TOTAL SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING

-

117

10

TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF OPERATING FUNDING SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF OPERATING FUNDING Sources of capital funding

Applications of capital funding Capital expenditure - to meet additional demand

32

16

-

- to improve the level of service

10

126

23

- to replace existing assets Increase (decrease) in reserves Increase (decrease) in investments TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF CAPITAL FUNDING SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF CAPITAL FUNDING FUNDING BALANCE

114

7

62

40

(139)

(64)

383

-

-

-

(90)

140

446

90

(23)

(436)

-

-

-

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

115


COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Community Development Strengthening Communities, Community Information, Community Housing

Waimakariri is a growing community with a diverse

Key achievements over the 2012/2013 period include:

population in excess of 51,000.

Together Waimakariri District Council, Central Government and community organisations provide

and Refer'' cases of violence to children.

Progress towards the establishment of a -

drugs and alcohol on the developing brain. -

In addition Waimakariri is an accredited World Health

programme. A Youth Alcohol project is currently

Organisation Safe Community and Council facilitates a

under development. •

Support for the Hope Trust in acquiring funding for the Community Garden.

Promotion of the national White Ribbon Family Violence campaign.

drinking, 'Plan your Night' project with local Licensees and a Recidivist Drink Driving

A series of community education workshops on Family Violence and the impact of violence,

Continued implementation of the Waimakariri Role Models' programme around responsible

services through District-wide strategies.

An education programme for the health and education sector on how to "Recognise, Respond

Alcohol Action Plan, including a 'Parents as

central government to provide a range of integrated

116

-

Waimakariri Youth Council.

of not-for-profit groups who partner with council and

priorities and develop local solutions.

earthquakes, including:

Facilitation of youth-led initiatives across the and Youth festival activities.

the community.

number of community-led projects which identify local

violence incidence following the Canterbury

Community; including Youth Forum, Youth Week

diversity of the community including young and old,

Waimakariri is also fortunate to have a wide range

Development and facilitation of a series of initiatives to address an increase in family

Accredited International Safe Community.

valuable services and support to reflect the people with disabilities and those who are new to

Redesignation as a World Health Organisation

Facilitation of the delivery of resilience-building seminars for those working in the social sector.

Facilitation of the delivery of a series of training workshops for those working in the volunteer sector.

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Assistance for community partners in the

acquisition of funding for community-led initiatives. •

Support for increasing the capacity and reach of community-building organisations.

legislation, family violence and District

Facebook page, which has an average monthly

support group and a wellbeing initiative for young

reach peaking at 34,000 and a "liked" following

rural workers. •

Transition of the Restorative Justice programme to a community provider to increase the ability

Collation and distribution of community newsletter

of the programme to affect long-term positive outcomes for it's clients in terms of easy access

and individuals. Maintenance of a volunteer directory to inform the

to social support. •

Facilitation and ongoing support for the

community about opportunities to get involved on

establishment and operation of Community

a voluntary basis.

Gardens and Menz Sheds in Kaiapoi and Rangiora.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

planning; including administrative support/

Injury Prevention Waimakariri's establishment

and the establishment of a 'Bereaved by Suicide'

and directory- "Chatter'' to over 3000 local groups

programme in local schools.

advice with submissions. •

Assessment and Action Plan to address suicide

Development of a "Waimakariri Community"

Promotion of local, regional and national consultations relating to health, alcohol

collaborative development of a local Needs

Newcomers Network.

of over 1200.

'Down the Back Paddock' rural safety education

of a Suicide Prevention Steering Group and

E.g. Neighbourhood Support and the

Continued delivery of our nationally recognised

Coordination of the "Telling our Stories" earthquake recovery programme in Kaiapoi.

Facilitation and delivery of Child Safety education for new parents and Falls Prevention initiatives aimed at the DIY home handy-person.

Facilitation of a number of initiatives to support our growing population including: - The development of an information pack for newcomers to the community and an associated weekly 'drop-in' at the Rangiora Library - Facilitation of the potential establishment of a new, Kaiapoi-based, newcomers network

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COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

-

and a new group to target younger new

discuss community issues such as community

residents in our communities.

housing, food banks and access to central

Support for the establishment and on-going

government services.

aspirations of local residents groups in Cust, - •

•

-

Woodend, Rangiora and Pegasus Town.

discuss youth issues and initiatives such as

Involvement in local and regional housing

youth development and transition services

discussion forums and working groups.

from school to work or further education.

The Community Team Annual Report Card has

-

Waimakariri Health Advisory Group meets

been produced for 2011/2012; with the 2012/2013

monthly to discuss health issues and

report due for release in August.

initiatives such as after hours services and transportation issues relating to accessing

The Community Team facilitates a number of

medical services.

regular community based meetings across the District, facilitating the translation of local issues

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Youth Services Network meets bi-monthly to

-

Safe Community Governance Group meets

into local action:

quarterly to discuss crime prevention and

-

Monthly community networking meetings

injury prevention issues and initiatives

hosted in Rangiora, Kaiapoi and Oxford

such as alcohol, family violence and

quarterly to exchange information and

strengthening communities.

-

The Team is an active participant in monthly Social Services Waimakariri meetings, and the associated Social isolation Working Party

-

Social Service Waimakariri meets monthly to discuss social service issues and initiatives such as mental health, community and older persons services and supporting families with children.

-

Waimakariri Access Group meets monthly to discuss access and disability issues particularly relating to physical access to town centres, public buildings and public facilities.

-

North Canterbury Family Violence Network meets bi-monthly to plan collaborative action to address Family Violence in the Waimakariri District.

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COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Community Outcomes and How the Activity Contributes COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

STRENGTHENING COMMUNITIES People are friendly and caring, creating a strong sense of community in our District. The community’s needs for health and social services are met. People have wide ranging opportunities for learning and being informed.

Fostering and supporting community inclusion, coordination, cooperation and participation at all levels.

Providing advice, resources and training to support community capacity. At least four training events per year.

Number of training events provided.

42 training events were provided over the financial year. 10 groups within the education and social service sectors received 'Recognise, Respond and Refer' Family Violence awareness training. These included the two largest primary schools in Kaiapoi, senior students and staff at a two rural schools and four preschools. Training sessions were also delivered to the Earthquake Social Recovery and Pastoral Care teams and the local Citizens Advice Bureau . Approximately 250 people have participated in these sessions so far. Two Brainwave Trust seminars were held; one on the affects of violence on the developing brain and one on the adolescent brain. Lesley Elliot spoke on recognising the signs of potential abuse in a relationship. Eight Child Safety Education seminars and seven 'Down the Back Paddock' events were held. Interactive car restraint displays were set up at five local events. A Girls and Violence seminar was held as well as two additional parent education sessions.

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COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

STRENGTHENING COMMUNITIES (CONT'D) Other activities included a White Ribbon Day at Oxford High School, a District-wide car restraint check and education day at all local primary schools, a media breakfast on suicide, a 'Transition to High School' Seminar, a Community Challenge event at the Rangiora A and P Show, linked to the 'Five Winning Ways to Wellbeing' and the Oxford A and P Show 'Young Farmers Wellbeing' Programme. Provide a coordination function to build collaboration between community groups. Facilitate collaborative partnerships to address priorities in the following areas: • Social Services • Health • Community Development • Community Safety • Youth Development

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Number of collaborative partnerships developed and maintained.

The Community Team is working with a total of approximately 300 partners in relation to Community Development and Community Safety. All partnerships are maintained across the District. New partnerships were developed through a new initiative called the Social Isolation Party. These include Victim Support and Waimakariri Shared Ministry. Further to this, the roll-out of the mentoring component of the funky Farmworkers Food programme has seen the development of new partnerships in the rural community.

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COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

COMMUNITY INFORMATION People have wideranging opportunities for learning and being informed.

Distributing information that meets the community’s needs.

Increasing the range of relevant information available to the community. A minimum of 3,300 copies of Chatter distributed, both hard copy and electronic, to groups and individuals.

Number of Chatter recipients quarterly.

Between 3,588 and 3,600 Chatters were distributed either electronically or as hard copy each quarter.

At least 1,380 hits on all Community sections of the Council website.

Number of hits on the Community section of the Council website.

The Community Section of the Council website had a total of 12,031 hits this financial year. The Community Team's Facebook page, launched in September 2012, stands at 1074 'likes' and generates an average of 70 conversations weekly, peaking at 1500. It has an average reach of 1500 per week, peaking at 34,500.

COMMUNITY HOUSING The community’s needs for health and social services are met.

Providing suitable low cost accommodation for the elderly and a limited number of community houses to assist good social outcomes for those most in need.

Providing housing for the elderly to a suitable standard and achieve 98% occupancy rate. 98% occupancy rates for housing for the elderly units and the community housing units.

Percentage of compliance.

The average occupancy rate for community housing over the last financial year was 99.5%.

100% of service requests responded to within 10 working days.

Percentage of compliance.

92 requests for service were received for the year and 100% of these were responded to within 10 working days. The measurement is applied to the first response to the service request, that is dealing with the request and advising the customer of the outcome. This could include placing an item on a future works program.

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FUNDING IMPACT STATEMENT for the year ended 30 June 2013 for Community Development 2012 Long Term Plan

2013 Long Term Plan

2013 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

271

318

237

-

-

-

45

65

139

Sources of operating funding General Rates, uniform annual general charges, rates penalties Targeted Rates (other than a targeted rate for water supply)

Subsidies and grants for operating purposes Internal charges and overheads recovered Fees, charges and targeted rates for water supply Local authorities fuel tax, fines, infringement fees, and other receipts TOTAL OPERATING FUNDING

2

3

9

945

2,895

2,083

-

-

-

1,263

3,281

2,468

Applications of operating funding Payments to staff and suppliers

939

1,105

1,150

Finance costs

55

53

22

Internal charges and overheads applied

69

71

70

-

-

-

1,063

1,229

1,242

200

2,052

1,226

Subsidies and grants for capital expenditure

-

-

-

Development and financial contributions

-

-

-

(70)

(30)

(53)

Lump sum contributions

-

-

-

Gross proceeds from sale of assets

-

-

-

(70)

(30)

(53)

-

Other operating fund applications TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF OPERATING FUNDING SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF OPERATING FUNDING Sources of capital funding

Increase (decrease) in debt

TOTAL SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING Applications of capital funding Capital expenditure - to meet additional demand - to improve the level of service - to replace existing assets Increase (decrease) in reserves Increase (decrease) in investments TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF CAPITAL FUNDING SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF CAPITAL FUNDING FUNDING BALANCE

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-

-

30

30

-

2

2,000

1,719

98

(8)

(546)

-

-

-

130

2,022

1,173

(200)

(2,052)

(1,226)

-

-

-

123


124

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Property Management

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PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Property Management Overview Property During the year much time was spent on matters relating to the Canterbury earthquakes.

adjacent to the existing camp. The camp suffered significantly in the September 4, 2010, earthquake, from liquefaction and lateral spread. Council decided to reestablish the camp on higher ground in the same locality.

High on the priority list was progressing the establishment of 25 pensioner housing units to replace the 29 units within the Kaiapoi red zone. Land was acquired on Williams Street to undertake this development. Designs were prepared for

During the year a working party consisting of campers, camp lessees, Council representatives, a local residents’ association representative and Council staff met on several occasions to advance the design plans and to firm up a desired location for the

the units during the year to enable earthworks consent to be obtained. These were subjected to a ‘barrier free audit’ and passed with only minor modification. A land use consent has yet to be granted, but significant background work has been undertaken to enable this to be obtained early in the next financial year.

camp. Initially it was hoped that two sites could be established but that was changed to one when cost indications were received.

Twenty five of the existing 29 units are occupied. These tenants will shift in to the new units when construction is completed. Substantial progress was also made on the reinstatement of the Kairaki Motor Camp on newly developed land,

126

The earthquakes also significantly damaged some of Council’s housing for the elderly units and community houses. Extensive negotiations with EQC resulted in a pay-out and Council managing a repair contract involving approximately 80% of the properties. Some repair work to pathways and driveways at the units was undertaken following payment from Council’s insurers. Council owned commercial property In Kaiapoi, on the corner of Williams and Charles Streets, in the form of two ground level shops and one large building on the first floor above privately owned shops. The buildings

The layout of the site has been determined but the consenting process has yet to be concluded. The new design includes the creation of an area for a relocatable home, a new ablution block, several casual occupation sites and an extensive green space on the earthquake-damaged land.

were demolished in January due to earthquake damage.

It is planned for the site to be developed during the 2013/14 financial year. Costs are to be met from a combination of Council funding and insurance payments.

Six shops, held in five different ownerships, were

The other property title-holders agreed to pursue sale as though the land was held in one consolidated title and the land was placed on the market. It is hoped that this centrally-located commercial land can be sold to a developer for an appropriate development.

located opposite the Williams/Charles Streets property on Council-leased land. These shops ceased

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


occupation after the earthquakes and were demolished during the year. The intention is to rebuild and re-lease the land. The Southbrook Business Park was developed with 12 lots being serviced and sold during the year. The two major purchasers were MainPower and Continental Caterers. Forestry During the year more milling was undertaken at Woodend, and on smaller blocks around the District. A significant achievement was realised when a forestry agreement was negotiated and signed with Te Kohaka o Tuhaitara Trust. The agreement recognises the need for both parties to proceed in a co-operative manner, sets out requirements for advance warnings on areas to be milled and gives some direction for reinstatement of land following milling.

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PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Community Outcomes and How the Activity Contributes COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT There is a safe environment for all. Businesses in the District are diverse, adaptable and growing.

Managing Council property to enable service delivery and safety for its users.

Maintaining and administering buildings and commercial properties: Responding to 100% of service requests received about the maintenance or management of Council property within the agreed timeframe of 10 working days.

100% of service requests responded to within 10 working days.

31 requests for service were received for the year and 100% of these were responded to within 10 working days. The measurement is applied to the first response to the service request, that is dealing with the request and advising the customer of the outcome. This could include placing an item on a future works program.

Maintenance expenditure carried out in accordance with the Activity Management Plan.

Number of instances where expenditure is not carried out in accordance with the AMP.

A draft Activity Management Plan has been completed. All earthquake repair work at the rental accommodation units has been completed. A major refurbishment of a housing for the elderly unit in Tyler Courts, Rangiora, is currently underway. Routine maintenance is up-to-date.

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FUNDING IMPACT STATEMENT for the year ended 30 June 2013 for Property Management 2012 Long Term Plan

2013 Long Term Plan

2013 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

General Rates, uniform annual general charges, rates penalties

-

-

-

Targeted Rates (other than a targeted rate for water supply)

-

-

-

Subsidies and grants for operating purposes

-

-

-

112

248

182

-

-

-

Local authorities fuel tax, fines, infringement fees, and other receipts

557

513

266

TOTAL OPERATING FUNDING

669

761

448

Sources of operating funding

Internal charges and overheads recovered Fees, charges and targeted rates for water supply

Applications of operating funding Payments to staff and suppliers

122

94

169

Finance costs

63

64

22

Internal charges and overheads applied

33

33

33

-

-

-

TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF OPERATING FUNDING

218

191

224

SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF OPERATING FUNDING

451

570

224

Subsidies and grants for capital expenditure

-

-

-

Development and financial contributions

-

-

-

(16)

(15)

(13)

Other operating fund applications

Sources of capital funding

Increase (decrease) in debt Lump sum contributions

-

-

-

Gross proceeds from sale of assets

164

164

2,082

TOTAL SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING

148

149

2,069

Applications of capital funding Capital expenditure - to meet additional demand

-

42

2,122

- to improve the level of service

16

36

114

- to replace existing assets

15

-

-

568

641

57

Increase (decrease) in reserves Increase (decrease) in investments TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF CAPITAL FUNDING SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF CAPITAL FUNDING FUNDING BALANCE

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

-

-

-

599

719

2,293

(451)

(570)

(224)

-

-

-

129


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Council Controlled Organisations (CCO's) TE KOHAKA O TUHAITARA TRUST ENTERPRISE NORTH CANTERBURY TRANSWASTE CANTERBURY LTD CANTERBURY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMPANY LTD

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COUNCIL CONTROLLED ORGANISATIONS (CCO'S)

Council Controlled ORGANISATIONS

Te Kohaka o Tuhaitara Trust The objective of the Trust is the management and administration of 550 hectares of coastal reserve land in accordance with the terms of the Trust deed. The Trust gives effect to a formal partnership between the Council and Te Runanga o Ngai Tahu, and each partner appoints half of the trustees. The Trust was formed in response to negotiations between the Crown and Ngai Tahu over the Coastal Reserve land. The Trust’s control of the land is subject to the Reserves Act 1977. The Trust’s Vision is “To create a coastal reserve which is founded on and expresses strong ecological, conservation and cultural values and provides opportunity for compatible recreation and education activities for all people of New Zealand and to uphold the mana of Ngai Tahu Whanui by protecting and enhancing the mahinga kai values of Tutaepatu lagoon”.

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Enterprise North Canterbury

50% of the shares in Transwaste Canterbury Limited.

Enterprise North Canterbury is a not for profit trust

The Council shareholders appoint representatives to

which provides promotion and economic development

a joint committee which in turn appoints four of the

services for the North Canterbury region on behalf of

eight directors.

Waimakariri and Hurunui District Councils. Its activities are focused on developing existing businesses and

Canterbury Economic Development Company (CEDC)

promoting new businesses within the region. The Trust

The CEDC is a Council Controlled Organisation

also promotes the region as a visitor destination.

(CCO) that enabled the allocation of regional

The Mayors of the two councils are trustees and the two Chief Executive Officers are advisory trustees. Other trustees are appointed jointly by the Hurunui and Waimakariri District Councils.

partnership funding for economic development from central government for the Canterbury Region. Two of the ten company directors represent North Canterbury; one was nominated by the three councils (Kaikoura, Hurunui and

Transwaste Canterbury Limited

Waimakariri Districts) and the other is an industry

Transwaste Canterbury Limited operates a regional

representative endorsed by the councils.

landfill at Kate Valley and associated transport services in a joint venture with Canterbury Waste Services.

These directors represented North Canterbury during the contestable funding allocation processes from the

The Waimakariri District Council is one of the councils

Ministry of Economic Development and New Zealand

in the Canterbury region which between them own

Trade and Enterprise.

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


The successful projects were: • Canterbury Regional Water Infrastructure •

Canterbury Food and Wine Trail

Canterbury Rural Broadband Project

Canterbury Regional Innovation System

Blueprint Farm Business Plan

This company was expected to have a short life and as the Regional Strategy Funding Programme has now been completed, the Board met in June 2012 to discuss the future of the company and the company is shelved for future use of the councils.

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COUNCIL CONTROLLED ORGANISATIONS (CCO'S)

Community Outcomes and How the Activity Contributes COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

TE KOHAKA O TUHAITARA TRUST There are areas of significant indigenous vegetation and habitats for indigenous fauna.

The Trust manages 550 hectares of coastal reserve land in accordance with the Trust Deed.

Public spaces and facilities are plentiful, accessible and high quality.

The coastal reserve preserves, protects and presents ecological, conservation and cultural values, and provides an opportunity for compatible recreational and educational activities for all people of New Zealand, upholding the mana of Ngai Tahu Whanui by protecting and enhancing the mahinga kai values of Tutaepatu lagoon.

The community’s cultures, arts and heritage are conserved and celebrated. People have wide ranging opportunities for learning and being informed. Public effect is given to the spirit of the Treaty of Waitangi.

Cultural values Complete staged restoration of Tutaepatu Lagoon to restore its mauri and mahinga kai values.

Stages complete.

Stage 3 of the restoration has been completed with the south eastern side of the lagoon cleared and planted. 100% of the female grey willow has been identified and 60% has been drilled and poisoned. Pest control has continued with the purchase of additional traps. No additional restoration has been carried out since stage 3 was completed, however trap lines and maintenance of previous stages is on-going. An additional $40k to commence stage 4 was confirmed by the CWMS zone committee and 5000 native plants have been ordered for planting in July. Waiora has been contracted to complete $20k of weed control including female willow drilling. Regular Friends of Tuhaitara Park volunteers have been actively planting, weeding and trapping throughout the year. To date approximately 250 animal pests have been trapped at the Lagoon. Stage 5 of the restoration has been scoped.

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COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

TE KOHAKA O TUHAITARA TRUST (CONT'D) Biodiversity values – Implementing the restoration of the coastal indigenous vegetation. Establishment of two biota nodes per annum.

Number of performing biota nodes.

To date the Trust has established 7 nodes and 4 have been planted. The total number of plants in these nodes is approximately 7,000. The Friends of the Park node is showing regeneration. A further 1000 natives have been planted in the biota nodes. Nine nodes are now functional with two programmed for development from July 2013.

Recreational values – Providing a range of walking, cycling and bridal trails within the park for recreational purposes. 15 kilometres of maintained and functional trails per year.

The length of functioning trails network.

15 kilometres of trails is maintained and functional. The completed Pines Wetland section has now settled and has become a popular regular route for walking groups and mountain bikers. Signage has been developed and is being installed.

Educational values – Develop and implement environmental education modules. Two new schools per year adopt a biota node.

Number of schools adopting a biota node.

The Tuhaitara Coastal Park project won the 2013 Best Coastal Restoration Project award from The Dunes Restoration Trust of NZ. Woodend School has started the second year on their node. A biota node has now been adopted by Tuahiwi School and Ferndale School has confirmed it will adopt a node. The Westpac Bank, He Waka Tapu and Woodend Scouts have also adopted nodes.

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COUNCIL CONTROLLED ORGANISATIONS (CCO'S)

COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

ENTERPRISE NORTH CANTERBURY Businesses in the District are diverse, adaptable and growing. The centre of our main towns are safe, convenient and attractive places to visit and do business.

Encourages the development of exceptional businesses, experiences, land-use and infrastructure.

Support existing businesses by the provision of training, coaching, and mentoring services and networking opportunities. Undertake at least 55 Capabilities Assessments and Action Plans.

Number of businesses assessed for training and coaching needs.

A total of 94 one on one Capability Assessments were undertaken over the financial year with a further 20 new business enquiries fielded by ENC.

Provide up to 12 topical business seminars and workshops annually.

Number of business seminars and workshops delivered.

A total of 9 'User Pay' Courses were held involving 91 attendees. 4 half day workshops were also held with 128 attendees. 2 Intermediary Breakfasts were also held this financial year. The Heartland Bank and Ministry of Science and Innovation sponsored a breakfast on 21st August 2012 and 30 guests attended. ACC and MSD sponsored the 2nd breakfast on 28 May 2013 which 32 people attended. ENC hosted three Coffee and Update sessions with Rangiora businesses. 65 people attended in February , 45 in March and 40 in May 2013.

Run the North Canterbury Business Awards biannually.

136

Business Awards held.

The Gala Dinner and Awards was held on 31st August 2012 and 247 people attended. 44 entries (up from 29 in 2010) were received from 36 businesses (26 in 2010). The next awards will be held in 2014.

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252

â€‚ď ľ


COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

ENTERPRISE NORTH CANTERBURY (CONT'D) Undertake six monthly economic confidence surveys.

Survey results published.

Two economic confidence and employment survey's were undertaken during this twelve month period, one in November 2012 and the 2nd one in May 2013. Around a half of participating firms reported more positive business conditions in the last six months while a third reported no change. 40% are expecting the outlook for business conditions to improve further over the next six months and close to a half are anticipating no change. Overall business confidence remains high which is consistent with almost all available numeric regional growth indicators such as increasing output, falling unemployment, rising retail sales and guest night stays and a marked increase in construction activity in North Canterbury.

Promote the development of 'business to business' networks within the region. Host three networking functions annually.

Number of networking functions held per Three networking functions were held in year. 2012/13. The first Business Network Function was held with the launch of the Business Awards on 31 July 2012 at the Flat White Café, Pegasus with 106 people attending. The second Business Networking Function was held on 29th November 2012 at CRT's new premises in Flaxton Road and 94 business people attended.

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COUNCIL CONTROLLED ORGANISATIONS (CCO'S)

COMMUNITY OUTCOMES That this activity contributes to

COUNCIL RESPONSE How this activity contributes to outcomes

WHAT COUNCIL PROVIDES Proposed Services and Levels of Service 2012-2022

MEASURING PROGRESS AND PERFORMANCE Performance Measures and Targets 2012-2022

PROGRESS for the 2012-2013 Year

ENTERPRISE NORTH CANTERBURY (CONT'D) The third Business Networking Function was held on the 1st May at Artisan Bakery. It was sponsored by Daiken New Zealand and WDC with 61 attendees. 14 business people took advantage of an offer from Daiken to tour their plant before the networking function.

TRANSWASTE CANTERBURY LIMITED There is a safe environment for all. Core utility services are provided in a timely, sustainable and affordable manner.

Operates the regional landfill at Kate Valley to ensure solid waste is removed safely and efficiently and ensures that Council receives a return on its investment.

Effectively operate the regional landfill at Kate Valley. 9% average return on invested capital.

Percentage of average return on invested capital.

A return of 10.5% is expected for the 2012/13 financial year.

No proven breach consents of the Resource Management Act 1991. Nil proven breach consents

100% compliance with consent conditions.

100% compliance with consent conditions was achieved over the last financial year.

Implement the native forest restoration project in accordance with the Tiromoana Bush Management Plan. 4000 plants of native species planted during the year.

Number of natives planted.

The total number of plants planted in the 2012/13 financial year was approximately 4,600.

Timely, high quality and reliable transport services. Empty containers are available for transfer stations for more than 99.5% of waste transport fleet hours worked.

Percentage of empty containers available for transfer stations.

100% achieved.

Reliability of access to the landfill. Landfill is available to waste transporters for more than 99% of normal annual transport access hours. 138

Percentage of landfill available to waste transporters.

Landfill was available for waste transporters 99.5% of the time over the past financial year.

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


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Financial Management FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ––Consolidated Income Statement for the year ended 30 June 2013 ––Statement of Comprehensive Income for the year ended 30 June 2013 ––Consolidated Statement of Movements in Equity for the year ended 30 June 2013 ––Consolidated Balance Sheet as at 30 June 2013 ––Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows for the year ended 30 June 2013 ACCOUNTING POLICIES NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ––Rates ––Subsidies and grants ––Other revenue ––Other Gains ––Non Significant Activities (Corporate Services) ––Expenditure ––Severance Payments ––Income Tax ––Cash and Cash Equivalents ––Other Financial Assets ––Trade and Other Receivables

––Non-current Assets Held For Sale ––Forestry Assets ––Investments in Associates ––Derivative Financial Instruments ––Investment Property ––Property, Plant and Equipment ––Trade and Other Payables ––Employee Benefit Liabilities ––Development and Other Contributions ––Borrowings ––Equity ––Statement of Cash Flow Reconciliation ––Financial Instruments ––Commitments and Contingencies ––Remuneration ––Related Parties ––Landfill Sites and Aftercare Provision ––Capital Management ––Events After Balance Date ––Explanation of Major Variances Against Budget COST OF ACTIVITY STATEMENTS OTHER DISCLOSURES

141

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142

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Financial Statements ––Consolidated Income Statement for the year ended 30 June 2013 ––Statement of Comprehensive Income for the year ended 30 June 2013 ––Consolidated Statement of Movements in Equity for the year ended 30 June 2013 ––Consolidated Balance Sheet as at 30 June 2013 ––Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows for the year ended 30 June 2013

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

143


FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

CONSOLIDATED INCOME STATEMENT for the year ended 30 June 2013 Note

Income Rates Interest Subsidies and grants Other revenue Development and other Contributions Other gains Earthquake Recoveries - Insurance Earthquake Recoveries - Government Earthquake Recoveries - Other Vested Assets

1 2 3 20 4

TOTAL INCOME

Group 2013 Actual

Parent 2013 Actual

Parent 2013 Budget

Group 2012 Actual

Parent 2012 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

39,129 537 4,709 17,497 14,455 3,625 3,715 4,433 158 20,992

39,129 537 4,709 17,497 14,455 3,625 3,715 4,433 158 20,992

39,149 672 5,221 16,804 11,332 270 6,318 6,317 15,219

36,595 326 5,566 14,068 7,469 2,011 14,643 3,909 133 17,025

36,595 326 5,566 14,068 7,469 2,011 14,643 3,909 133 17,025

109,250

109,250

101,302

101,745

101,745

1,546 4,308 13,296 5,726 5,534 2,351 5,526 10,092 2,641 7,553 1,828 2,235 3,162 1,137

1,636 3,516 13,367 5,014 7,324 2,780 5,250 10,374 2,673 6,592 1,477 538 4,668 747

1,479 3,310 12,559 4,597 5,443 1,942 5,361 10,853 2,620 5,766 1,402 1,707 17,329 2,028

1,479 3,310 12,559 4,597 5,443 1,942 5,361 10,853 2,620 5,766 1,402 1,707 17,329 2,028

Operating Expenditure Activity Governance District Development Roads and Footpaths Water Supply Sewerage and the Treatment and Disposal of Sewage Stormwater Drainage Solid Waste Recreation Libraries and Museums Community Protection Community Development Property Management Earthquake Recovery Non Significant Activities

5

1,546 4,308 13,296 5,726 5,534 2,351 5,526 10,092 2,641 7,553 1,828 2,235 3,162 1,137

TOTAL EXPENDITURE

6

66,935

66,935

65,956

76,396

76,396

42,315

42,315

35,346

25,349

25,349

17

-

-

(4)

-

42,332

42,315

35,346

25,345

25,349

OPERATING SURPLUS BEFORE TAXATION Plus Share of Associates

14

NET SURPLUS / (DEFICIT) BEFORE TAXATION Less Taxation expense

8

NET SURPLUS / (DEFICIT)

(75)

(75)

(112)

(80)

(80)

42,257

42,240

35,234

25,265

25,269

Total operating expenditure includes Impairment increase/(decrease) of property, plant & equipment and infrastructual assets Interest

144

17c

619

619

-

(341)

(341)

3,001

3,001

4,875

3,040

3,040

The accompanying accounting policies and notes form part of these financial statements.

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME for the year ended 30 June 2013 Note

NET SURPLUS / (DEFICIT)

Group 2013 Actual

Parent 2013 Actual

Parent 2013 Budget

Group 2012 Actual

Parent 2012 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

42,257

42,240

35,234

25,265

25,269

Gain / (Loss) on asset revaluation

22a

27,367

27,138

32,560

16,757

16,757

Increase / (decrease) in asset revaluation reserve due to impairment

22a

(7,397)

(7,397)

-

14,970

14,970

Financial assets at fair value

22a

TOTAL COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

21

21

-

(27)

(27)

62,248

62,002

67,794

56,965

56,969

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF MOVEMENTS IN EQUITY for the year ended 30 June 2013 Note

EQUITY AT BEGINNING OF THE YEAR Total Comprehensive Income for the year TOTAL MOVEMENTS IN EQUITY EQUITY AT END OF THE YEAR

Group 2013 Actual

Parent 2013 Actual

Parent 2013 Budget

Group 2012 Actual

Parent 2012 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

1,087,944

1,085,510

1,051,637

1,030,979

1,028,541

62,248

62,002

67,794

56,965

56,969

62,248

62,002

67,794

56,965

56,969

1,150,192

1,147,512

1,119,431

1,087,944

1,085,510

The accompanying accounting policies and notes form part of these financial statements.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

145


FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET as at 30 June 2013 Note

Group 2013 Actual

Parent 2013 Actual

Parent 2013 Budget

Group 2012 Actual

Parent 2012 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

29,342 205 15,924 928

29,342 205 15,924 928

9,270 210 11,712 -

24,821 235 15,562 977

24,821 235 15,562 977

46,399

46,399

21,192

41,595

41,595

1,184 2,391 2,679 507 2,840 43,553 1,127,714

1,184 2,391 507 2,840 43,553 1,127,714

965 3,669 4,808 37,721 1,136,843

983 3,734 2,434 3,670 32,524 1,073,959

983 3,734 3,670 32,524 1,073,959

TOTAL NON CURRENT ASSETS

1,180,868

1,178,189

1,184,006

1,117,304

1,114,870

TOTAL ASSETS

1,227,267

1,224,588

1,205,198

1,158,899

1,156,465

21,983 1,892 2,449 61 19,000

21,983 1,892 2,449 61 19,000

12,294 1,369 1,603 3,981

21,050 1,831 1,176 23

21,050 1,831 1,176 23

45,385

45,385

19,247

24,080

24,080

1,690 30,001

1,690 30,001

1,932 64,588

2,855 44,020

2,855 44,020

TOTAL NON CURRENT LIABILITIES

31,691

31,691

66,520

46,875

46,875

TOTAL LIABILITIES

77,076

77,076

85,767

70,955

70,955

1,150,192

1,147,512

1,119,431

1,087,944

1,085,510

650,768 6,482 492,942

648,317 6,482 492,714

753,340 3,094 362,997

608,134 6,375 473,435

605,700 6,375 473,435

1,150,192

1,147,512

1,119,431

1,087,944

1,085,510

Current Assets Cash and cash equivalents Inventories Trade and other receivables Non-current assets held for sale

9 11 12

TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS Non Current Assets Other financial assets Forestry assets Investments in associates Derivative financial instruments Investment properties Property, plant and equipment Infrastructural assets

Current Liabilities Trade and other payables Employee benefit liabilities Development contributions Derivative financial instruments Current portion of borrowings

10 13 14 15 16 17a 17b

18 19 20 15 21

TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES Non Current Liabilities Derivative financial instruments Borrowings

15 21

NET ASSETS Ratepayers Equity Accumulated general equity Other reserves Revaluation reserve TOTAL RATEPAYERS' EQUITY

146

22a 22a 22a

The accompanying accounting policies and notes form part of these financial statements.

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS for the year ended 30 June 2013 Note

Group 2013 Actual

Parent 2013 Actual

Parent 2013 Budget

Group 2012 Actual

Parent 2012 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

37,403

Cash Flows From Operating Activities Cash was provided from: Receipts from ratepayers

38,859

38,859

39,149

37,403

Receipts from subsidies (excluding earthquake subsidies)

4,796

4,796

3,090

5,545

5,545

Earthquake related receipts

6,425

6,425

8,448

15,158

15,158

Receipts from other revenue

18,181

18,181

22,749

20,844

20,844

Development and other contributions

15,728

15,728

11,332

7,042

7,042

Interest received

550

550

672

257

257

Dividends received

270

270

373

230

230

6,461

6,461

4,900

5,937

5,937

-

-

-

2,204

2,204

91,270

91,270

90,713

94,620

94,620

Receipt of Canterbury Regional Council Rates Net Goods and Services Tax Cash was disbursed to: Payments to suppliers

(31,947)

(31,947)

(33,184)

(30,031)

(30,031)

Payments to employees

(16,932)

(16,932)

(15,270)

(16,136)

(16,136)

(6,335)

(6,335)

(4,900)

(6,071)

(6,071)

(75)

(75)

-

(38)

(38)

(2,960)

(2,960)

(4,875)

(2,932)

(2,932)

Payments to Canterbury Regional Council Income tax paid Interest paid Net Goods and Services Tax

NET CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

23

(1,558)

(1,558)

-

-

-

(59,807)

(59,807)

(58,230)

(55,208)

(55,208)

31,463

31,463

32,483

39,412

39,412

5,210

5,210

164

1,639

1,639

15

15

-

6

6

5,225

5,225

164

1,645

1,645

(36,945)

(36,945)

(64,972)

(24,073)

(24,073)

(180)

(180)

-

(38)

(38)

(37,125)

(37,125)

(64,972)

(24,111)

(24,111)

(31,900)

(31,900)

(64,808)

(22,466)

(22,466)

Cash Flows From Investing Activities Cash was provided from: Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment Proceeds from Community loans repaid and Investments returned Cash was disbursed to: Purchase of Non Current Assets Acquisition of investments

NET CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

 

The accompanying accounting policies and notes form part of these financial statements.

147


FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS (cont'd) for the year ended 30 June 2013 Note

Group 2013 Actual

Parent 2013 Actual

Parent 2013 Budget

Group 2012 Actual

Parent 2012 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

Cash Flows From Financing Activities Cash was provided from: Proceeds from borrowings

5,000

5,000

18,321

15,000

15,000

5,000

5,000

18,321

15,000

15,000

Cash was applied to: Repayment of borrowings

NET CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES Net Increase (Decrease) in Cash Held Add Opening Bank Brought Forward ENDING CASH

(42)

(42)

(2,817)

(9,022)

(9,022)

(42)

(42)

(2,817)

(9,022)

(9,022)

4,958

4,958

15,504

5,978

5,978

4,521

4,521

(16,821)

22,924

22,924

24,821

24,821

26,091

1,897

1,897

29,342

29,342

9,270

24,821

24,821

The accompanying accounting policies and notes form part of these financial statements.

148

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Funding Impact Statement for Whole of Council

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

149


FUNDING IMPACT STATEMENT

Funding Impact Statement FOR WHOLE OF COUNCIL

Funding impact statement The funding impact statement is required under the Local Government Act 2002 Schedule 10 and conforms to the Local Government (Financial Reporting) Regulations 2011. General accepted accounting practice does not apply to the preparation of the funding impact statement as stated in s111(2) of the Local Government Act.

150

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


FUNDING IMPACT STATEMENT for the year ended 30 June 2013 Whole of Council

Source of operating funding General Rates, uniform annual general charges, rates penalties Targeted Rates (other than a targeted rate for water supply)

FUNDING IMPACT STATEMENT for the year ended 30 June 2013 Whole of Council

2012 Long Term Plan

2012 Actual

2013 Long Term Plan

2013 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

12,485

12,849

10,949

14,985

16,722

16,229

Subsidies and grants for capital expenditure

68,480

4,219

9,325

6,536

4,708

7,469

11,332

14,455

11,766

17,025

15,219

20,992

88

2,011

270

3,625

(11,870)

(11,353)

(13,285)

(12,670)

-

(4,486)

-

(1,247)

-

-

-

(1,607)

-

-

-

(619)

90,028

25,349

35,346

42,315

2,213

2,515 17,193

988

560

1,045

827

30,773

15,319

5,468

3,732

70,427

71,021

65,156

63,886

Development and financial contributions Vested assets Gain on sale Depreciation Fair Value movement on assets/liabilities non monetary Assets written off

Applications of operating funding

SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF OPERATING FUNDING

$’000

16,856

17,281

TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF OPERATING FUNDING

$’000

SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF OPERATING FUNDING PER FUNDING IMPACT STATEMENT

5,291

Other operating funding applications

$’000

23,390

12,743

Finance costs

$’000

22,427

4,440

Payments to staff and suppliers

2013 Actual

22,123

2,088

TOTAL OPERATING FUNDING

2013 Long Term Plan

21,189

Fees, charges and targeted rates for water supply Local authorities fuel tax, fines, infringement fees and other receipts

2012 Actual

Reconciliation between Income Statement and Funding Impact Statement

Subsidies and grants for operating purposes Interest and dividends from investments

2012 Long Term Plan

Impairment recognised on Income Statement 50,199

57,517

47,796

48,036

3,372

3,040

4,875

3,001

-

-

-

-

53,571

60,557

52,671

51,037

16,856

10,464

12,485

12,849

NET SURPLUS/(DEFICIT) BEFORE TAXATION

10,464

Sources of capital funding Subsidies and grants for capital expenditure

68,480

4,219

9,325

6,536

Development and financial contributions

4,708

7,469

11,332

14,455

Increase (decrease) in debt

2,690

5,978

15,504

4,958

164

3,358

164

3,498

-

-

-

-

76,042

21,024

36,325

29,447

35,100

19,019

20,838

18,134

7,920

4,682

10,125

3,816

- to replace existing assets

111,666

15,258

33,345

23,328

Increase (decrease) in reserves

(61,788)

(7,471)

(15,498)

(3,147)

-

-

-

165

TOTAL APPLICATIONS OF CAPITAL FUNDING

92,898

31,488

48,810

42,297

SURPLUS (DEFICIT) OF CAPITAL FUNDING

(16,856)

(10,464)

(12,485)

(12,849)

-

-

-

-

Gross proceeds from sale of assets Lump sum contributions TOTAL SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING Applications of capital funding Capital expenditure - to meet additional demand - to improve the level of service

Increase (decrease) in investments

FUNDING BALANCE

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

  151


152

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Accounting Policies

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

153


ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Accounting Policies Statement of Accounting Policies

The Waimakariri District Council is a territorial local authority governed by the Local Government Act 2002. The Waimakariri District Council (WDC) was formed on 1 November 1989 and constituted under the Local Government Reorganisation Order 1989. WDC consists of the Waimakariri District Council and its subsidiary, Prime Building Compliance Ltd (which was placed into liquidation on 28 April 2010). WDC holds equity shares in the following of its associates, 50% equity share in Te Kohaka o Tuhaitara Trust, 50% equity share in The Waimakariri District Libraries Trust, 50% in Enterprise North Canterbury and 33% equity share in The Waimakariri Arts Collection Trust. The primary objective of WDC is to provide goods and services for the community or social benefit rather than making a financial return. Accordingly, WDC has designated itself and the group as public benefit entities for the purposes of New Zealand equivalents to International Financial Reporting Standards (NZ IFRS).

154

The financial statements of WDC are for the year ended

and buildings, certain infrastructural assets, investment

30 June 2013. The financial statements were authorised for

property, forestry assets and financial instruments

issue by Council on 29 October 2013.

(including derivative instruments).

Statement of Compliance and Basis of Preparation

The financial statements are presented in New Zealand

The financial statements of WDC have been prepared in

Dollars (NZD) and all values are rounded to the nearest

accordance with the requirements of the Local Government Act 2002: Part 6, Section 98 and Part 3 of Schedule 10, which includes the requirement to comply with New Zealand generally accepted accounting practice (NZ GAAP). The financial statements of WDC have been prepared in accordance with NZ GAAP. They comply with NZ IFRS, and other applicable Financial Reporting Standards, as appropriate for public benefit entities.

thousand dollars ($’000) unless stated. The functional currency of WDC is New Zealand dollars. Standards, amendments and interpretations issued that are not yet effective and have not been early adopted. Standards, amendments and interpretations issued but not yet effective that have not been early adopted, and which are relevant to the Council include:

The accounting policies set out below have been applied consistently to all periods presented in these financial statements. The financial statements have been prepared on historical cost basis, modified by the revaluation of land

Application Date

Reference

Title

NZ IAS 9

NZ IFRS 9 Financial Instruments

1 January 2013

Reference

1

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


(XRB). Under this Accounting Standards Framework, the

Basis of Consolidation

replace NZ IAS 39 Financial Instruments:

Council will be eligible to apply the reduced disclosure

The purchase method is used to prepare the

Recognition and Measurement. NZ IAS 39 is

regime (Tier 2 reporting entity) of the public sector

consolidated financial statements, which involves

being replaced through the following 3 main

Public Benefit Entity Accounting Standards. The effective

adding together like items of assets, liabilities, equity,

phases: Phase 1 Classification and Measurement,

date for the new standards for public sector entitles is

income and expenses on a line-by-line basis. All

Phase 2 Impairment Methodology, and Phase 3

for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 July 2014.

significant intra-group balances, transactions, income

Hedge Accounting. Phase 1 on the classification

Therefore, the Council has not assessed the implications

and expenses are eliminated on consolidation.

and measurement of financial assets has been

of the new Accounting Standards Framework at this time.

1. NZ IFRS 9 Financial Instruments will eventually

completed and has been published in the new financial instrument standard NZ IFRS 9. NZ IFRS

Due to the change in the Accounting Standards

9 uses a single approach to determine whether a

Framework for public benefit entities, it is expected that

financial asset is measured at amortised cost or

all new NZ IFRS and amendments to existing NZ IFRS

fair value, replacing the many different rules in

will not be applicable to public benefit entities. Therefore,

NZ IAS 39. The approach in NZ IFRS 9 is based on

the XRB has effectively frozen the financial reporting

how an entity manages its financial instruments

requirements for public benefit entities up until the new

(its business model) and the contractual cash

Accounting Standard Framework is effective. Accordingly,

flow characteristics of the financial assets. The

no disclosure has been made about new or amended NZ

new standard also requires a single impairment

IFRS that exclude public benefit entities from their scope.

method to be used, replacing the many different impairment methods in NZ IAS 39. The new standard is required to be adopted for the year

Subsidiaries WDC consolidates as subsidiaries in the group financial

ended 30 June 2014. WDC has not yet assessed the

statements all entities where WDC has the capacity to

effect of the new standard and expects it will not

control their financing and operating policies so as to

be adopted early.

obtain benefits from the activities of the entity. This

Where applicable Council uses the exemption available

power exists where WDC controls the majority voting

WDC’s investments in its subsidiaries are carried at cost in the WDC’s own “parent entity” financial statements. Associates WDC accounts for an investment in an associate in the group financial statements using the equity method. An associate is an entity over which the WDC has significant influence and that is neither a subsidiary nor an interest in a joint venture. The investment in an associate is initially recognised at cost and the carrying amount is increased or decreased to recognise WDC’s share of the surplus or deficit of the associate after the date of acquisition. WDC’s share of the surplus or deficit of the associate is recognised in WDC’s Income Statement. Distributions received from an associate reduce the carrying amount of the investment.

on the governing body or where such policies have

If WDC’s share of an associate’s deficit equals or

been irreversibly predetermined by WDC or where the

exceeds its interest in the associate, WDC discontinues

The Minister of Commerce has approved a new

determination of such policies is unable to materially

recognising its share of further deficits. After WDC’s

Accounting Standards Framework (incorporating a Tier

impact the level of potential ownership benefits that arise

interest is reduced to zero, additional deficits are

Strategy) developed by the External Reporting Board

from activities of the subsidiary.

provided for, and a liability is recognised, only to

to Public Benefit Entities (PBEs).

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

155


ACCOUNTING POLICIES

the extent that WDC has incurred legal or

year to which the rates have been set. Rate revenue is

if there are significant uncertainties regarding recovery

constructive obligations or made payments

recognised when payable.

of the consideration due, associated costs or the

on behalf of the associate. If the associate subsequently reports surpluses, WDC will resume

possible return of goods.

Grants and subsidies are recognised as revenue when

Where revenue is derived by acting as an agent for

eligibility is established (reasonable assurance that

another party, the revenue that is recognised is the

deficits not recognised.

the grant or subsidy will be received and the WDC

commission or fee on the transaction.

WDC’s share in the associate’s surplus or

at their fair value. The Council receives government

deficits resulting from unrealised gains

grants from the New Zealand Transport Agency, which

on transactions between the WDC and its

subsidises part of the costs in maintaining the local

associates is eliminated.

roading infrastructure. The subsidies are recognised as

recognising its share of those surpluses only after its share of surpluses equals the share of

WDC’s investments in associates are carried at cost in WDC’s own “parent entity” financial statements. Revenue Revenue is recognised to the extent that it is probable that the economic benefits will flow to the Group and the revenue can be reliably measured. The following specific recognition criteria must also be met before revenue is recognised: Revenue is measured at fair value of consideration received.

156

Grants and Subsidies

will comply with all the conditions) and is recognised

revenue upon entitlement as conditions pertaining to eligible expenditure have been fulfilled. Goods and Services Revenue from the sale of goods and services is recognised in the income statement when the significant risks and rewards of ownership have been

Interest Interest income is recognised using the effective interest method. Insurance proceeds Insurance proceeds are recognised as revenue when the compensation becomes receivable. Dividends Dividend income is recognised when the right to receive payment has been established.

transferred to the buyer or the obligation to pay arises

Development contributions

or in the case of licence fees, upon renewal of the

Development contributions are recognised through

licence. The revenue recorded is the gross amount of

the income statement when capacity exists or where

the sale, including fees payable for the transaction.

a project is in development. These funds are held in

Such fees are included in other expenses.

restricted reserves and are applied against the capital

Services Rendered Revenue from services rendered is recognised in

programmes, including the repayment of loans raised to fund capital projects.

Rates Revenue

the income statement in proportion to the stage of

Vested Assets

Rates are set annually by a resolution from

completion of the transaction at the balance sheet

When a physical asset is acquired for nil or nominal

Council and relate to a financial year. All

date. The stage of completion is assessed by reference

consideration the fair value of the asset received is

ratepayers are invoiced within the financial

to surveys of work performed. No revenue is recognised

recognised as revenue. Assets vested in Council are

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


recognised as revenue when control over the asset is obtained. Capital works in progress Capital works in progress are not depreciated. The total cost of a project is transferred to the relevant asset class on completion and then depreciated. Borrowing costs WDC has elected to defer the adoption of NZ IAS 23 Borrowing Costs (Revised 2007) in accordance with the standard’s transitional provisions that are applicable to public benefit entities. Consequently, all borrowing costs are recognised as an expense in the period in which they are incurred. Grant expenditure Non-discretionary grants are awarded if the grant application meets the specified criteria and are recognised as expenditure when an application that meets the specified criteria for the grant has been received and approved. Discretionary grants are those where the WDC has no obligation to award on receipt of the grant application and are recognised as expenditure when a successful applicant has been notified of the WDC’s decision. Income tax Income tax in relation to the surplus or deficit for the period comprises current tax and deferred tax.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

Current tax is the amount of income tax payable on the taxable profit for the current year, plus any adjustments to income tax payable in respect of prior years. Current tax is calculated using rates that have been enacted or substantively enacted by balance date.

of the temporary difference and it is probable that

Deferred tax is the amount of income payable or recoverable in future periods in respect of temporary differences and unused tax losses. Temporary differences are differences between the carrying amount of assets and liabilities in the financial statements and the corresponding tax bases in the computation of taxable profit.

Current and deferred tax is charged or credited to the

Deferred tax liabilities are generally recognised for taxable temporary differences. Deferred tax assets are recognised to the extent that it is probable that taxable profits will be available against which the deductible temporary differences or tax losses can be utilised. Deferred tax is not recognised if the temporary difference arises from the initial recognition of goodwill or from the initial recognition of an asset and liability in a transaction that is not a business combination, and at the time of the transition, affects neither accounting profit nor taxable profit. Deferred tax is recognised on temporary differences arising on investments in subsidiaries and associates, except where the company can control the reversal

the temporary difference will not reverse in the foreseeable future. Deferred tax is calculated at the tax rates that have been enacted or substantially enacted by balance date.

Income statement, except when it relates to items charged directly to equity, in which case the tax is dealt with in equity. Leases Finance Lease A finance lease is a lease that transfers to the lessee substantially all of the risks and rewards incidental to ownership of an asset, whether or not title is eventually transferred. At inception, finance leases are recognised as assets and liabilities on the balance sheet at the lower of the fair value of the leased item or the present value of the minimum lease payments. Any additional direct costs of the lessee are added to the amount recognised as an asset. The amount recognised as an asset is depreciated over its useful life. If there is no certainty as to whether WDC will obtain ownership at the end of the lease term, the asset is fully depreciated over the shorter of the lease term and its useful life.

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ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Operating leases

cost using the effective interest rate method, less any

The write down from cost to replacement cost is

An operating lease is a lease that does not transfer

provision for impairment.

recognised in the Income Statement.

substantially all the risks and rewards incidental to

A provision for impairment of receivables is established

Financial instruments

ownership of an asset. Lease payments made under operating leases are recognised in the income statement on a straight-line basis over the term of the lease. Third party transfer payment agencies WDC collects monies for many organisations. Where collections are processed through the WDC accounts,

when there is objective evidence that WDC will not be able to collect all amounts due according to the original terms of receivables. The amount of the provision is the difference between the assets carrying amount and the present value of the estimated future cash flows, discounted using the effective interest method.

The WDC undertakes financial instrument arrangements as part of WDC’s normal operations. These financial instruments include cash and bank balances, investments, receivables, payables and borrowings. All financial instruments are recognised in the Balance Sheet and all revenues and expenses in

any monies held are shown as liabilities in the accounts

Loans including loans to community organisations

relation to financial instruments are recognised in the

trade and payables.

made by WDC at nil, or below-market interest rates

Income Statement.

Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents includes cash in hand, deposits held at call with banks, other short term highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less, and bank overdrafts. Bank overdrafts are shown within borrowings in current liabilities in the Balance Sheet. Trade and other receivables Trade receivables, which generally have 30-90 day terms, are recognised and carried at original invoice amount less an allowance for any uncollectible amounts. An estimate for doubtful debts is made when collection of the full amount is no longer probable. Bad debts are written off when identified.

are initially recognised at the present value of their expected cash flows, discounted at the current market rate of return for a similar asset/investment. They are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method. The difference between the face value and present value of expected future cash flows of the loan is recognised in the income statement as grant expenditure. Inventories Inventories (such as spare parts, materials and other items) held for distribution or consumption for provision of services that are not supplied on a commercial basis are stated at the lower of cost and

The WDC enters into interest rate swaps to hedge against and manage its exposure to risk on debt. The WDC’s foreign exchange policy does not allow it to borrow or enter into incidental arrangements within or outside New Zealand in currency other than New Zealand currency. Financial assets Financial Assets are initially measured at fair value plus transition costs unless they are carried at fair value through profit or loss in which case the transaction costs are recognised in the Income Statement.

current replacement cost.

Purchases and sales of investments are recognised

Where inventories are acquired at no cost, or for

on trade-date, the date on which WDC commits

nominal consideration, the cost is determined by

to purchase or sell the asset. Financial assets are

Term trade and other receivables are initially measured

using the current replacement cost as at the date

derecognised when the rights to receive cash flows

at fair value and subsequently measured at amortised

of acquisition.

from the financial assets have expired or have been

158

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


transferred and the WDC has transferred substantially

or determined payments that are not quoted in an

all risks and rewards.

active market.

Fair value of financial instruments traded in active

statement. Loans and receivables are classified as

The fair value of financial instruments that are •

hold to maturity. •

After initial recognition they are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest rate

discounted cash flows, are used to determine fair value

method. Gains and losses when the asset is

for the remaining financial instruments.

impaired or derecognised are recognised in the Income Statement. •

Investments in this category include term deposits, investments in local authority and

Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss

government stock.

A financial asset is classified in this category if acquired principally for the purpose of selling

Financial assets at fair value through

in the short term. After initial recognition they

comprehensive income

are measured at their fair values. Gains or

Financial assets at fair value through

losses on remeasurement are recognised in the

comprehensive income are those that are

Income Statement.

designated as fair value or are not classified in any of the other three categories above.

Loans and receivables •

These are non-derivative financial assets with fixed

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

On derecognition the cumulative gain or loss previously recognised in comprehensive income is

that WDC has the positive intention and ability to

term debt instruments held. Other techniques, such as

Held to maturity investments are assets with fixed or determinable payments and fixed maturities

existing at each balance date. Quoted market prices or

categories

Gains and losses are recognised in comprehensive income except for impairment, which is recognised in the Income statement. In the event of impairment, any cumulative losses previously recognised in comprehensive income will be removed from comprehensive income and recognised in the Income statement even though the asset has not been derecognised.

Held to maturity investments

assumptions that are based on market conditions

WDC’s financial assets are classified into four

“trade and other receivables” in the Balance Sheet.

WDC uses a variety of methods and makes

dealer quotes for similar instruments are used for long-

WDC’s investments in its subsidiary and associate companies are not included in this category as they are held at cost.

or derecognised are recognised in the Income

the current bid price.

valuation techniques.

Gains and losses when the asset is impaired

balance sheet date. The quoted market price used is

not traded in an active market is determined using

After initial recognition they are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method.

markets is based on quoted market prices at the

intends to hold long-term but which may be realised before maturity and shareholdings that WDC holds for strategic purposes.

This category includes investments that WDC

recognised in the Income statement. Impairment of financial assets At each balance date WDC assess whether there is any objective evidence that a financial asset or group of financial assets is impaired. Any impairment losses are recognised in the Income Statement. Derivative financial instruments and hedging activities The WDC uses derivative financial instruments to hedge its exposure to interest rate risks arising from operational, financing and investment activities. In accordance with the treasury policies of the respective group entities, the WDC does not hold or issue derivative

159


ACCOUNTING POLICIES

financial instruments for trading purposes. However, derivatives are accounted for as trading instruments. Derivative financial instruments are recognised initially at fair value and subsequently at fair value. The gain or loss on re-measurement to fair value is recognised immediately in the Income Statement. The fair value of interest rate swaps is the estimated amount that the WDC would receive or pay to terminate the swap at the balance sheet date, taking into account current interest rates and the current creditworthiness of the swap counterparties. Non-current assets held for sale Non-current assets held for sale (intended for sale) are stated at the lower of their carrying amount and fair value less costs to sell if their carrying amount will be recovered principally through a sale transaction rather than through continuing use. An impairment loss is recognised for any initial or subsequent write down of the asset (or disposal group) to fair value less costs to sell. A gain is recognised for any subsequent increases in fair value less costs to sell of an asset (or disposal group), but not in excess of any cumulative impairment loss previously recognised. A gain or loss not previously recognised by the date of the sale of the non-current asset (intended for sale) is recognised at the date of derecognition. Non-current assets (including those that are part of an intended for sale) are not depreciated or amortised while they are classified as intended for sale. Interest

160

and other expenses attributable to the liabilities of a disposal group classified as held for sale continue to be recognised. Property, plant and equipment and other non current assets Property, plant and equipment consist of: Operational assets – These include land and buildings, library books, plant and equipment and motor vehicles owned by WDC. Infrastructural assets – Infrastructure assets are the fixed utility systems owned by WDC. Each class includes all items that are required for the network to function, for example, sewer reticulation includes reticulation piping and sewer pump stations. Property, plant and equipment are shown at cost or valuation, less accumulated depreciation and

infrastructure assets have been valued based on the actual quantities of infrastructure components vested and the current “in the ground” cost of providing identical services. Land

Not Depreciated

Buildings: Structure

55 – 100 years

(1% - 1.82%)

Roof

40 years

(2.50%)

Panels & Fitout

15 years

(6.67%)

Ventilation & Heating

20 years

(5.00%)

Plant and Machinery

4 – 15 years

(6.67 – 25%)

Computer Equipment

4 years

(25%)

Office Equipment

10 years

(10%)

Furniture and Fittings

5 – 10 years

(10 – 20%)

Vehicles

5 – 8 years

(12.5 – 20%)

Library Books

3 – 10 years

(10 – 33%)

Infrastructure Assets Roads: Formation

Not depreciated

impairment losses:

Top surface

1 - 25 years

(4% - 50%)

Pavement

40 - 100 years

(1% - 2.5%)

Additions The cost of an item of property, plant and equipment is recognised as an asset if, and only if, it is possible that future economic benefits or service potential associated with the item will flow to WDC and the cost of the item can be measured reliably.

Footpaths

20 - 50 years

(2% - 5%))

Streetlights

25-60 years

(1.67% - 4%)

Bridges

40 – 150 years

(0.67% - 2.5%)

Pipes

35 – 100 years

(1% - 2.86%)

Valves, hydrants

75 years

(1.33%)

Pump stations

20 – 100 years

(1% - 5%)

Tanks

60 – 80 years

(1.25% - 1.67%)

Pipes

35 – 100 years

(1% - 2.86%)

Manholes

60 – 75 years

(1.33% - 1.67%)

Treatment plant

30 – 80 years

(1.25% - 3.33%)

Pipes

25 – 50 years

(2% - 4%)

Manholes, cesspits

50 years

(2%)

Pump stations

25 – 50 years

(2% - 4%)

Additions between valuations are recorded at cost, except for vested assets. Certain infrastructure assets and land have been vested in the WDC as part of the subdivisional consent process. The vested reserve land has been valued at the most recent fair value determined by reference to market prices. Vested

Water Reticulation

Sewerage systems

Drainage systems

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Costs incurred in obtaining any resource consents are capitalised as part of the asset to which they relate. If a resource consent application is declined then all capitalised costs are written off in the current period.

The residual value and useful life of an asset is

Disposals Gains and losses on disposal are determined by comparing the proceeds with the carrying amount of the asset. Gains and losses on disposal are included in the Income Statement. When revalued assets are sold, the amounts included in asset revaluation reserves in respect of those assets are transferred to accumulated equity.

Those asset classes that are revalued are revalued

Subsequent costs Cost incurred subsequent to initial acquisition are capitalised only when it is possible that future economic benefits or service potential associated with the item to WDC and the cost of the item can be measured reliably. Depreciation Depreciation is provided on a straight-line basis on property, plant and equipment other than land, at rates that will write off the cost (or valuation) of the assets to their estimated residual values over their useful lives. Land is not depreciated. The useful lives and associated depreciation rates of major classes of assets have been estimated as follows: The depreciation rates used are applied at a component level and are depreciated on the remaining useful life of each component.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

reviewed, and adjusted if applicable, at each financial year end. Revaluation on a 3-5 year valuation cycle on the basis described below. All other asset classes are carried at depreciated historical cost. The carrying values of revalued items are reviewed at each balance date to ensure that those values are not materially different to fair value.

Water, Sewer, Drainage and Waste assets were valued internally as at 30 June 2011 and the valuation was independently reviewed by Graeme Hughson (Associate Director—Asset Management) of Aecom New Zealand Limited.

Library collections are carried at cost as at 30 June 2013. Accounting for revaluations WDC accounts for revaluations of property, plant and equipment on a class of asset basis. The results of revaluing are credited or debited to other comprehensive income and are accumulated to an

Land and buildings have been valued at fair value as

asset revaluation reserve for that class of asset.

at 30 June 2013 by Kerry Stewart (Val Prof Urb, PG Dip

Where this would result in a debit balance in the

Env Audit, MBA, FNZIV, FPINZ) of Darroch Valuations.

asset revaluation reserve, this balance is expensed

The basis of the valuation is net current value.

in the Income statement. Any subsequent increase

Infrastructure assets have all been valued at fair value on a depreciated replacement cost basis. WDC assesses the carrying values of its infrastructural assets to ensure that they do not differ materially from the assets’ fair values. If there is a material difference, then the off-cycle asset classes are revalued. The most recent valuations were performed as follows: •

Road assets were valued as at 30 June 2013 by Nigel Lister, BSc & PGDip Sci (Surveying), BE (Civil), of MWH New Zealand Ltd. Parks and Reserves assets were valued internally as at 30 June 2013 and the valuation was independently reviewed by John Vessey of Opus International Consultants Ltd.

on revaluation that off-sets a previous decrease in value recognised in the Income Statement will be recognised first in the Income Statement up to the amount previously expensed, and then credited to the revaluation reserve for that class of asset. Investment property Properties leased to third parties under operating leases are classified as investment property unless the property is held to meet service delivery objectives, rather than to earn rentals or for capital appreciation. Investment property is measured initially at its cost, including transaction costs.

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ACCOUNTING POLICIES

After initial recognition, WDC measures all investment property at fair value as determined annually by an independent valuer. Investment properties were valued as at 30 June 2013 by Kerry Stewart (Val Prof Urb, PG Dip Env Audit, MBA, FNZIV, FPINZ) Darryl Taggart (BCom, (VPM), NZIV, MPINZ) of Darroch Valuations. The fair value is based on open market evidence. Gains or losses arising from a change in the fair value of investment property are recognised in the Income Statement. Forestry Forestry assets are valued annually at fair value less estimated point of sale costs. Fair value is determined based on the present value of expected net cash flows

annually for impairment. Assets that have finite useful life are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount may not be recoverable. An impairment loss is recognised for the amount by which the asset’s carrying amount exceeds its recoverable amount. The recoverable amount is the higher of an asset’s fair value less costs to sell and value in use. Value in use is depreciated replacement cost for an asset where the future economic benefits or service potential of the asset are not primarily dependent on the assets ability to generate net cash inflows and where the entity would, if deprived of the asset, replace its remaining future economic benefits or service potential.

discounted at a current market determined pre-tax rate. The valuation is carried out internally and peer reviewed independently. Gains or losses arising on initial recognition of forestry assets at fair value less estimated point of sale costs and from a change in fair value less estimated point of sale costs are recognised in the Income Statement. The costs to maintain the forestry assets are included in the Income Statement. Impairment of non-financial assets Non-financial assets that have an indefinite useful life are not subject to amortisation and are tested

162

The value in use for cash-generating assets is the present value of expected future cash flows. If an asset’s carrying amount exceeds its recoverable amount the asset is impaired and the carrying amount is written down to the recoverable amount. For revalued assets the impairment loss is recognised against the revaluation reserve for that class of asset. Where that results in a debit balance in the revaluation reserve, the balance is recognised in the Income Statement. For assets not carried at a revalued amount, the total impairment loss is recognised in the Income Statement.

The reversal of an impairment loss on a revalued asset is credited to the revaluation reserve. However, to the extent that an impairment loss for that class of asset was previously recognised in the Income Statement, a reversal of the impairment loss is also recognised in the Income Statement. For assets not carried at a revalued amount (other than goodwill) the reversal of an impairment loss is recognised in the Income Statement. Employee benefits Short term benefits Employee benefits that WDC expects to be settled within 12 months of balance date are measured at nominal values based on accrued entitlements at current rates of pay. These include salaries and wages accrued up to balance date, annual leave earned to, but not yet taken at balance date, long service entitlements expected to be settled within 12 months, and sick leave. Liabilities for accumulating short-term compensated absences (e.g. annual and sick leave) are measured as the amount of unused entitlement accumulated at the balance sheet date that the entity anticipates employees will use in future periods in excess of the days that they will be entitled to in each of those periods. WDC recognises a liability and an expense for bonuses where contractually obliged or where there is a past practice that has created a constructive obligation.

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Long term benefits Long term entitlements such as long service leave entitlements that are payable beyond 12 months, are calculated on an actuarial basis. The calculation is based on likely future entitlements accruing to staff, based on years of service, years to entitlement, the likelihood that staff will reach the point of entitlement and contractual entitlements information. Superannuation schemes Defined contribution schemes Obligations for contributions to defined contribution superannuation schemes are recognised as an expense in the Income Statement. Provisions A provision is recognised in the balance sheet when the WDC has a present legal or constructive obligation as a result of a past event, and it is probable that an outflow of economic benefits, the amount of which can be reliably estimated, will be required to settle the obligation. Provisions are determined by discounting the expected future cash flows at a pre-tax discount rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and, where appropriate, the risks specific to the liability. Financial guarantee contracts A financial guarantee contract is a contract that requires the WDC to make specified payments to reimburse the holder for a loss it incurs because a specified debtor fails to make payment when due.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

Financial guarantee contracts are initially recognised at fair value. If a financial guarantee contract was issued in a standalone arm’s length transaction to an unrelated party, its fair value at inception is equal to the consideration received. When no consideration is received a provision is recognised based on the probability WDC will be required to reimburse a holder for a loss incurred discounted to present value. The portion of guarantee that remains unrecognised, prior to discounting to fair value, is disclosed as a contingent liability. Financial guarantees are subsequently measured at the initial recognition amount less any amortisation, however if WDC assesses that it is probable that expenditure will be required to settle a guarantee, then the provision for the guarantee is measured at the present value of the future expenditure.

Accumulated General Equity

Special reserves and other reserves

Revaluation reserves

Reserves Special reserves are a component of equity generally representing a particular use to which various parts of equity have been assigned. Reserves may be legally restricted or created by WDC. Restricted reserves are those reserves subject to specific conditions accepted as binding by the WDC and which may not be revised by the WDC without reference to the Courts or third party. Transfers from these reserves can be made only for certain specified purposes or when certain specified conditions are met. WDC created reserves are reserves established by

Borrowings Borrowings are initially recognised at their fair value. After initial recognition, all borrowings are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method.

WDC decision. The WDC may alter them without

Equity Equity is the community’s interest in the WDC and is measured as the difference between total assets and total liabilities. Public equity is disaggregated and classified into a number of reserves to enable clearer identification of the specified uses that the WDC makes of its accumulated surpluses. The components of equity are:

Goods and Services Tax (GST)

reference to any third party or the Courts. Transfers to and from these reserves are at the discretion of the WDC.

All items in the financial statements are stated exclusive of Goods and Services Tax (GST), except for receivables and payables, which are stated on a GST inclusive basis. Where GST is not recoverable as input tax then it is recognised as part of the related asset or expenses.

163


ACCOUNTING POLICIES

The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable

activities using appropriate cost drivers such as actual

sensitivity and uncertainty than would normally be the

to, the Inland Revenue Department (IRD) is included as

usage, staff numbers and floor area.

case. These include:

Critical accounting estimates and assumptions

•

part of receivables or payables in the Balance Sheet.

the physical deterioration and condition of an

The net GST paid to, or received from the IRD,

In preparing these financial statements WDC has

asset. That is, the WDC's assessment of physical

including the GST relating to investing and financing

made estimates and assumptions concerning the

age, and therefore remaining life, of many of our

activities, is classified as an operating cash flow in the

future. These estimates and assumptions may differ

assets are based on their age when compared

Statement of Cash flows.

from the subsequent actual results.

to the typical life of that particular asset. This

Commitments and contingencies are disclosed

Estimates and judgements are continually

exclusive of GST.

evaluated and are based on historical experience

Budget figures

visible, for example stormwater, wastewater and water supply pipes that are underground.

and other factors, including expectations or future

To date, the WDC has undertaken a number

events that are believed to be reasonable under

The budget figures are those approved by WDC at the

the circumstances. The estimates and assumptions

beginning of the year in the annual plan. The budget

that have a significant risk of causing a material

figures have been prepared in accordance with NZ

adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets

GAAP, using accounting policies that are consistent

and liabilities within the next financial year are

with those adopted by WDC for the preparation of the

discussed below:

financial statements.

is particularly so for those assets, which are not

physical condition assessment on our assets to provide a more robust assessment of the condition and remaining life. Preparation and implementation of a condition monitoring programme has been identified in the improvement programme of the WDC's Activity

Infrastructural assets

Management Plans and this work is currently

Cost allocation

For the purpose of the valuations carried over as at 30

underway. The risk associated with the actual

WDC has derived the cost of service for each

June 2011, 2012 and 2013 Council has assumed that

remaining life being significantly different to

significant activity of WDC using the cost allocation

there has been no damage to the assets as a result of

the estimated remaining life is relatively low at

system outlined below.

the earthquakes. Impairment provision has then been

present as the average condition of the WDC's

estimated to calculate the assets carrying values.

assets, based on age, is moderate to good.

Direct costs are those costs directly attributable to

That is, the WDC has relatively few assets that

a significant activity. Indirect costs are those costs,

There are a number of assumptions and estimates

which cannot be identified in an economically feasible

used when performing DRC valuations for

manner, with a specific significant activity.

infrastructural assets.

Direct costs are charged directly to significant

Following the September and February earthquakes

depreciated. These estimates can be impacted by

activities. Indirect cost are charged to significant

these assumptions are of a higher degree of

the local conditions, for example weather patterns

164

are nearing the end of their economic life. •

estimates are made when determining the remaining useful lives over which the asset will be

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


and traffic growth. If useful lives do not reflect the actual consumption of the benefits of the asset, then WDC could be over or under estimating the annual depreciation charge recognised as an expense in the Income Statement. To minimise this risk WDC’s infrastructural asset useful lives have been determined with reference to the NZ Infrastructural Asset Valuation and Depreciation Guidelines published by the National Asset Management Steering Group, and have been adjusted for local conditions based on past experience. Council has estimated impairment of its assets as a result of the Canterbury earthquakes. These estimates contain a high level of uncertainty following the Government’s “red zone” announcement in August 2011. Landfill sites and aftercare provision WDC previously operated refuse landfill sites within the Waimakariri District, which are all now closed. WDC has been investigating the extent of landfill postclosure costs and to date preliminary risk analysis has not identified any additional costs.

Critical judgements in applying WDC’s accounting policies Management has exercised the following critical judgements in applying the WDC’s accounting policies for the period ended 30 June 2013: Classification of property WDC owns a number of properties which are maintained primarily to provide housing for the elderly, affordable community housing and for the provision of future reserves. The receipt of market-based rental from these properties is incidental to holding these properties. These properties are held for service delivery objectives as part of the WDC’s Community Development activity. These properties are accounted for as property, plant and equipment. WDC purchases property as part of its infrastructure development. As a consequence to these purchases, sometimes surplus land may become available. Given the uncertainty over the area required and until the determination of whether the land is surplus or to

insignificant risk of changes in value, in which the WDC invests as part of its day to day cash management. Operating activities include cash received from all income sources of the WDC and record the cash payments made for the supply of goods and services. Agency transactions (for example, the collection of Regional Council rates) are recognised as receipts and payments in the Statement of Cash flows, given that they flow through the WDC’s main bank account. Investing activities are those activities relating to the acquisition and disposal of non-current assets, which are of long term assets and other investments not included in cash equivalents. Financial activities comprise activities that result in changes in the size and composition of the contributed equity and borrowings of the WDC. Changes in accounting policies There have been no changes in accounting policies during the financial year.

be utilised as for WDC services is known, the land is classified as property, plant and equipment.

WDC minimises its risk associated with any potential post closure costs by complying with its responsibilities in terms of the resource consents and has been actively monitoring sites within the operational programme. Investigations are ongoing, and if any costs are identified, these costs will be provided for at that time.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

Statement of Cash flows Cash comprises cash balances on hand, held in bank accounts, demand deposits and bank overdrafts. Cash equivalents are the short term (90 days or less), highly liquid investments that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and which are subject to an

165


166

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Notes to the Financial Statements ––Rates ––Subsidies and grants ––Other revenue ––Other Gains ––Non Significant Activities (Corporate Services) ––Expenditure ––Severance Payments ––Income Tax ––Cash and Cash Equivalents ––Other Financial Assets ––Trade and Other Receivables ––Non-current Assets Held For Sale ––Forestry Assets ––Investments in Associates ––Derivative Financial Instruments ––Investment Property ––Property, Plant and Equipment ––Trade and Other Payables

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

––Employee Benefit Liabilities ––Development and Other Contributions ––Borrowings ––Equity ––Statement of Cash Flow Reconciliation ––Financial Instruments ––Commitments and Contingencies ––Remuneration ––Related Parties ––Landfill Sites and Aftercare Provision ––Capital Management ––Events After Balance Date ––Explanation of Major Variances Against Budget

167


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

1. RATES Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

5,047

5,047

3,489

3,489

Roads and Footpaths

7,593

7,593

7,158

7,158

Water Supply Sewerage and the Treatment and Disposal of Sewage

5,195

5,195

4,421

4,421

6,711

6,711

6,441

6,441

Stormwater Drainage

2,796

2,796

2,236

2,236

896

896

908

908

42

42

214

214

116

116

289

289

GENERAL RATES

Parent 2012

Targeted Rates

Solid Waste Central Business Areas Promotion and Economic Development Stock Control

32

32

27

27

Rural Fire Control

189

189

164

164

Community Ward Museum Levy

294

294

285

285

372

372

357

357

Community Services - Parks and reserves, buildings and grants

5,432

5,432

5,216

5,216

Library

2,056

2,056

1,900

1,900

Pools

2,358

2,358

2,363

2,363

-

-

1,127

1,127

TOTAL TARGETED RATES

34,082

34,082

33,106

33,106

TOTAL RATES

39,129

39,129

36,595

36,595

Earthquake Recovery

Rates remissions Rates revenue is shown gross of rates remissions. Waimakariri District Council's rates remission policy allows the Council to remit rates on community services charges, penalty charges, sewer pan charges for schools, churches and non-profit organisations, partial remission on dwellings in commercial zones, fixed charges on subdivided sections or land affected by natural calamity. On 18 May 2011, Council resolved to extend a policy to remit rates for houses which were uninhabitable due to the September earthquake and associated aftershocks for a period of time until the property is able to become available for use. To be eligible, rating units must meet criteria defined in the Councils Rate's Remission Policy. 2013

2012

$'000

$'000

Land used for sport, recreation or cultural purposes

20

178

Water and Sewer remission on vacant sections

17

11

Sewer pan remission for schools, churches, nonprofit organisations

81

156

193

432

37

37

348

814

Rates remissions

Earthquake remissions Penalty remissions TOTAL

168

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


1. (cont'd) GENERAL RATE TRANSFERS Reconciliation to significant activity statements Actual Rates Levied

Actual Transfer from Reserves

Actual Total 2013

Budget General Rates 2013

$

$

$

$

Activity Governance District Development

955

340

1,295

1,295

1,840

656

2,496

2,496

Community Development Community Protection

234

84

318

318

983

350

1,333

1,333

Recreation

532

190

722

722

1

1

2

2

42

15

57

57

Solid Waste

359

128

487

487

Stormwater Drainage

100

36

136

136

5,047

1,799

6,846

6,846

Water Supply Sewerage and the Treatment and Disposal of Sewage

The budgeted General rate is the gross general rate before the transfer of income from restricted reserves.

2. SUBSIDIES AND GRANTS

New Zealand Transport Agency less NZTA Subsidy for Earthquake Recoveries reported separately Other subsidies Grants TOTAL SUBSIDIES AND GRANTS

Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

5,482

5,482

5,854

5,854

(1,064)

(1,064)

(443)

(443)

4,418

4,418

5,411

5,411

65

65

7

7

226

226

148

148

4,709

4,709

5,566

5,566

There are no unfulfilled conditions and other contingencies attached to subsidies and grants recognised (2012: nil).

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

169


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

3. OTHER REVENUE Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

User charges

6,537

6,537

5,578

5,578

Regulatory revenue - resource consents

1,501

1,501

1,068

1,068

Regulatory revenue - building consents Regulatory revenue

5,480

5,480

2,812

2,812

563

563

897

897

240

240

201

201

81

81

194

194

Rental income from Investment properties Infringements and fines Rendering of services

322

322

385

385

Petrol tax

364

364

349

349

Dividend income

289

289

234

234

Forestry revenue

32

32

82

82

Rates Penalties

497

497

513

513

Earthquake Donations Other TOTAL OTHER REVENUE

2

2

35

35

1,589

1,589

1,720

1,720

17,497

17,497

14,068

14,068

Other revenue by activity Governance

22

22

40

40

District Development

1,042

1,042

769

769

Roads and Footpaths

654

654

622

622

Water Supply

213

213

160

160

Sewerage and the Treatment and Disposal of Sewage

422

422

343

343

Stormwater Drainage

31

31

28

28

Solid Waste

3,910

3,910

3,580

3,580

Recreation

1,859

1,859

1,245

1,245

155

155

166

166

6,751

6,751

4,302

4,302

Community Development

809

809

1,054

1,054

Property Management

556

556

584

584

Earthquake Recovery

203

203

-

-

Non Significant Activities

870

870

1,175

1,175

17,497

17,497

14,068

14,068

Libraries and Museums Community Protection

TOTAL OTHER REVENUE

170

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


4. OTHER GAINS Note

Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

-

-

182

182

51

51

54

54

Gains on disposal of non-current assets held for sale Gains on disposal of forestry

1,859

1,859

1,775

1,775

19

19

-

-

Gain on derivative financial instruments

1,611

1,611

-

-

85

85

-

-

3,625

3,625

2,011

2,011

Gains on changes in fair value of forestry assets Gains on disposal of property, plant and equipment

Gains on disposal of investment property TOTAL OTHER GAINS

13

5. NON SIGNIFICANT ACTIVITIES - CORPORATE SERVICES This area of responsibility primarily provides internal support functions including: management, finance and administration, service centres and the Council computer system. Allocation of expenditure is based on the level of activity reflected by the level of expenditure. Rating collection costs have been allocated based on the level of rates funding budgeted in the Ten Year Plan for 2012-2013. Parent 2013 Actual

Parent 2013 Budget

Parent 2012 Actual

$'000

$'000

$'000

Expenditure District Management

627

650

625

Financial and Information Services Secretarial Services

3,668

3,773

3,220

571

584

453

Revenue Collection and Service Centres

2,260

2,235

2,371

TOTAL EXPENDITURE

7,126

7,242

6,669

Activities

4,288

4,440

3,640

Computers

1,366

1,543

1,410

555

615

629

6,209

6,598

5,679

Less internal allocations

Rate Collection

917

644

990

Corporate On Cost

BALANCE TO NON SIGNIFICANT ACTIVITIES

(353)

(56)

(430)

Sundry Operations

407

159

406

Loss on Interest Rate Swaps

-

-

924

Provision for Doubtful Debts

166

-

138

1,137

747

2,028

370

292

323

TOTAL AS PER NON SIGNIFICANT ACTIVITIES IN THE INCOME STATEMENT Financial and information Services includes depreciation of: Sundry Operations above includes unallocated overhead accounts, separate and special accounts.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

171


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

6. EXPENDITURE Group 2013 Actual

Parent 2013 Actual

Parent 2013 Budget

Group 2012 Actual

Parent 2012 Actual

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Employee benefit expenses

17,192

17,192

15,270

16,321

16,321

Depreciation and amortisation

12,670

12,670

13,285

11,353

11,353

3,001

3,001

4,875

3,040

3,040

131

131

95

115

115

-

-

73

72

72

258

258

-

60

60 196

Interest expense Audit Fees to Principal Auditor Audit Fees to Principal Auditor - Long Term Plan Lease Costs Bad Debts Written Off

12

12

2

196

Changes in provision for Doubtful Debts

173

173

103

321

321

Remissions provided on rates

348

348

476

814

814

Donations and Grants

-

-

-

-

-

1,257

1,257

787

451

451

2

2

3

2

2

399

399

51

103

103

1,609

1,609

-

2,940

2,940

Loss on change in fair value of interest rate swaps

-

-

-

924

924

Loss on change in fair value of forestry assets due to price changes and physical changes

1,201

1,201

-

-

-

46

46

-

963

963

1,410

1,410

1,318

1,629

1,629

1,780

1,780

2,871

13,071

13,071

Insurance premiums Ceremonies for the public or a section of the public Direct expenses from investment property generating income Loss on disposal of fixed and other infrastructural assets

Loss on change in fair value of investment property Payment of levies or general contributions to organisations considered appropriate to the function of the Council Earthquake recovery expenditure excluding employee benefit expenses, interest expense, insurance expense, doubtful debts expense and Loss on disposal of Assets Impairment of assets Other expenses TOTAL EXPENDITURE

619

619

-

(341)

(341)

24,827

24,827

26,747

24,362

24,362

66,935

66,935

65,956

76,396

76,396

7. SEVERANCE PAYMENTS For the year ending 30 June 2013 the Council made two severance payments to employees (2012: three) of $8,571 and $15,749 (2012: $10,374, $38,810 and $15,749).

172

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


8. INCOME TAX Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Components of tax expense Current tax expense

75

75

80

80

INCOME TAX EXPENSE

75

75

80

80

Surplus/ (deficit) before tax

42,332

42,315

25,345

25,349

Income tax using a rate of 28%

11,853

11,848

7,603

7,604

(11,778)

(11,773)

(7,523)

(7,524)

75

75

80

80

Relationship between tax expense and accounting surplus

Plus (less) effect of permanent differences INCOME TAX EXPENSE There are no deferred tax liabilities at 30 June 13 (2012: Nil)

Prime Building Compliance Limited (Council's wholly owned subsidiary) was placed into liquidation on 28 April 2010. There will be no imputations credits available or future dividends. The liquidation was still proceeding as at balance date.

9. CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

Cash at Bank and in hand Short Term Deposits maturing three months or less from date of acquisition TOTAL CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

9,380

9,380

9,449

9,449

19,962

19,962

15,372

15,372

29,342

29,342

24,821

24,821

The carrying value of short-term deposits with maturity dates of three months or less approximates their fair value.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

173


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

10. OTHER FINANCIAL ASSETS Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Non-Current portion Fair value through comprehensive income Civic Assurance

104

104

105

105

Transwaste Canterbury Limited

900

900

878

878

Unlisted shares in NZ Local Government Funding Agency Ltd (NZLGFA)

180

180

-

-

TOTAL NON-CURRENT PORTION

1,184

1,184

983

983

TOTAL OTHER FINANCIAL ASSETS

1,184

1,184

983

983

There were no impairment provisions for other financial assets (2012: nil). Unlisted shares - valuation The fair value of unlisted shares of Civic Assurance, Transwaste (Canterbury) Limited and NZLGFA have been determined based upon the net assets as per their latest annual reports. SUBSIDIARIES Prime Building Compliance Limited Waimakariri District Council holds 500,000 shares (2012:500,000) of $1 each. The Council holds 100% of the issued shares The principal activity of the company was to provide building services. This function was brought back within Council from 1 December 2009 and the company was placed into liquidation on 28 April 2010. The liquidation was still proceeding as at balance date. Any equity remaining in the company has been recognised as a receivable. OTHER SHAREHOLDINGS Civic Assurance Waimakariri District Council holds 88,172 shares (2012: 88,172) of $1 each. On 6 December 2011, the Council resolved to accept an offer to purchase 50,086 shares at $0.90 per share. The Council holds 0.80% of the issued shares. Transwaste Canterbury Limited Waimakariri District Council holds 780,000 shares (2012: 780,000) of $1 each. The Council holds 3.9% of the total shares in the company. NZ Local Government Funding Agency Ltd Waimakariri District Council holds 180,000 shares (2012: nil) of $1 each. The Council holds 0.4% of the total shares in the company.

174

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


11. TRADE AND OTHER RECEIVABLES Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Rates receivables

2,056

2,056

1,718

1,718

Other receivables

2,361

2,361

4,696

4,696

10,328

10,328

8,425

8,425

281

281

254

254

1,109

1,109

1,299

1,299

Community loans

197

197

213

213

Accrued Interest

63

63

76

76

Goods and Services Tax

589

589

-

-

Prepayments

161

161

193

193

17,145

17,145

16,874

16,874

- Rates

1,015

1,015

849

849

- Other

206

206

463

463

15,924

15,924

15,562

15,562

Earthquake recovery receivables Related party receivables (Note 27) New Zealand Transport Agency

Less provision for impairment of receivables

TOTAL TRADE AND OTHER RECEIVABLES

The carrying value of trade and other receivables approximates their fair value. There is no concentration of credit risk with respect to receivables outside the group, as the group has a large number of customers and ratepayers. The ages of rates receivable are as follows:

Current 3 to 6 months

Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

58

58

-

-

164

164

165

165

6 to 9 months

154

154

145

145

9 to 12 months

106

106

156

156

1,574

1,574

1,252

1,252

2,056

2,056

1,718

1,718

Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

3,365

3,365

12,804

12,804 162

> 12 months CARRYING AMOUNT The ages of other receivables are as follows:

Current 3 to 6 months

732

732

162

6 to 9 months

582

582

47

47

27

27

44

44

9 to 12 months > 12 months CARRYING AMOUNT

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

8,264

8,264

318

318

12,970

12,970

13,375

13,375

  175


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

11. TRADE AND OTHER RECEIVABLES (cont'd) As at 30 June 2013 and 2012, all overdue receivables have been assessed for impairment and appropriate provisions applied. WDC holds no collateral as security or other credit enhancements over receivables that are either past due or impaired. On 18 July 2013, WDC received $9.1m (GST inclusive) from CERA to cover the infrastructural earthquake repair costs incurred up to 30 April 2013. Earthquake repair costs incurred in May and June 2013 have been accrued in Earthquake recovery receivables and will be settled with CERA in the 2013/14 financial year. The impairment provision for rates receivables has been calculated based on expected losses for WDC's pool of debtors. Expected losses have been determined based on an analysis of WDC's losses in previous periods, and review of specific debtors. The collection provisions of the Local Government Rating Act do not apply to Maori freehold land. The impairment provision for other receivables has been calculated based upon a review of specific debtors. Movements in the provision for impairment of receivables are as follows: Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

At 1 July

849

849

705

705

Additional provisions made during the year

173

173

266

266

Rates Receivables

Receivables paid or written off during the period AT 30 JUNE

(7)

(7)

(122)

(122)

1,015

1,015

849

849

Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

463

463

286

286

-

-

251

251

(257)

(257)

(74)

(74)

206

206

463

463

Other Receivables At 1 July Additional provisions made during the year Receivables paid or written off during the period AT 30 JUNE

176

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


12. NON-CURRENT ASSETS HELD FOR SALE The Waimakariri District Council administers leasehold sections at Pines Kairaki beach. The Council facilitates the sale of the leasehold land at Pines Kairaki Beach on request of the occupier/lessee. As at 30 June 2013, there were no leasehold properties recognised as held for sale (2012: none). As at 30 June 2013 there was 1 lot at the Southbrook Business Park classified as Non-current assets held for sale (2012: 11) As at 30 June 2013 one lot of land which was formerly used for a sewerage treatment plant was surplus to requirements and was made available for sale (2012: none). Note Land Transfer from Investment properties TOTAL NON-CURRENT ASSETS HELD FOR SALE

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

16

Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

528

528

977

977

400

400

-

-

928

928

977

977

177


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

13. FORESTRY ASSETS

Balance at 1 July Increases due to purchases Gains/(losses) arising from changes in fair value less estimated point of sale costs attributable to price changes and physical changes Decreases due to sales BALANCE AT 30 JUNE

Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

3,734

3,734

3,669

3,669

64

64

56

56

(1,201)

(1,201)

182

182

(206)

(206)

(173)

(173)

2,391

2,391

3,734

3,734

The Council owns 647 hectares of forestry (2012: 641 hectares), which are at various stages of maturity ranging from 1 to 28 years. Forestry is valued annually as at 30 June based on the estimated worth of the maturing tree stocks in the Council's forests. The valuation method adopted is based on current establishment and tendering costs, factored by the age, at 7% (2012: 7%) compounding interest. The valuation was carried out by the Council's Forestry Supervisor. The valuation methodology has been independently reviewed and is considered appropriate by Dave Janett (registered forestry consultant, NZIF) of Forestry Management Ltd and in accordance with that approved by the New Zealand Institute of Forestry. Coastal Protection Forests Coastal protection forests are on a strip of land 100m - 200m wide from the foreshore inland and from Waikuku Beach south to the Waimakariri River mouth and total 600 hectares of land. The primary objective of the use of this strip is to prevent wind erosion of the unstable fore dunes, with a secondary use being recreation forest. As coastal protection forest this strip has no commercial value and is not included in the forestry asset valuation. On 21 December 2001, Te Kohaka O Tuhaitara Trust, a charitable trust, was formally established as part of the Ngai Tahu settlement and cares for 562 hectares of coastal land between Waimakariri and Rakahuri Rivers. 200 hectares of the 600 hectares of protection forest is located on the Trust land. The object of the Trust is to manage and administer the Recreation Reserves in the interests of Ngai Tahu Whanau and other New Zealanders in terms of the Reserves Act 1977. Te Kohaka o Tuhaitara Trust is in the process of furthering the implementation of the Reserve Management Plan for the Tuhaitara Coastal Reserve. Financial Risk Strategies WDC operates its forestry operations incidental to WDC's core functions. Limited insurance cover is provided for re-establishment costs and third party liability. WDC is exposed to some financial risks arising from changes in timber prices. WDC has a longterm forestry view to harvest the forestry production at maturity and does not expect timber prices to decline significantly in the foreseeable future, therefore has not taken any measures to manage the risks of a decline in timber prices. WDC reviews its outlook for timber prices regularly in considering the need for active financial risk management.

178

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


14. INVESTMENTS IN ASSOCIATES Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

10

-

10

-

Te Kohaka O Tuhaitara Trust

2,396

-

2,157

-

Enterprise North Canterbury

217

-

213

-

56

-

54

-

2,679

-

2,434

-

The Waimakariri District Libraries Trust

Waimakariri Art Collection Trust TOTAL INVESTMENTS IN ASSOCIATES All the Associates are resident in New Zealand.

Movements in the carrying amount of investments in associates

New investments during the year Gain on revaluation of property Disposal of investments during the year Share of total recognised revenues and expenses BALANCE AT 30 JUNE

2013

2012

$'000

$'000

The Waimakariri District Libraries Trust Assets

21

21

Liabilities

2

2

Revenues

3

3

Surplus (Deficit)

-

-

Group's interest

50%

50%

4,847

4,360

Te Kohaka O Tuhaitara Trust

2013 Balance at 1 July

SUMMARISED FINANCIAL INFORMATION OF ASSOCIATES

2012

$'000

$'000

2,434

2,438

-

-

228

-

-

-

17

(4)

2,679

2,434

Assets Liabilities

56

46

Revenues

238

205

Surplus (Deficit)

21

(15)

Group's interest

50%

50%

Enterprise North Canterbury Assets

701

711

Liabilities

267

285

Revenues

934

1,060

Surplus (Deficit)

8

12

Group's interest

50%

50%

171

162

Waimakariri Art Collection Trust Assets Liabilities

2

-

Revenues

9

5

Surplus (Deficit)

7

3

Group's interest

33.3%

33.3%

Associates' contingencies There are no contingent assets or liabilities arising from the group's involvement in the associates.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

179


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

15. DERIVATIVE FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Current Asset Interest rate swaps

-

-

-

-

TOTAL CURRENT ASSET

-

-

-

-

Interest rate swaps

507

507

-

-

TOTAL NON-CURRENT ASSET

507

507

-

-

Non-current Asset

Current Liability Interest rate swaps

61

61

-

-

TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITY

61

61

-

-

Non-current Liability Interest rate swaps

1,690

1,690

2,855

2,855

TOTAL NON-CURRENT LIABILITY

1,690

1,690

2,855

2,855

NET LIABILITY

1,244

1,244

2,855

2,855

The national principal or contract amounts of agreements in place, at year end, to manage interest rate risk were as follows: Fair Value 2013 Nominal Value 2013 Rates %

$'000

$'000

Fair Value 2012 Nominal Value 2012 Rates %

$'000

$'000

Interest rate swaps Payable maturities: Up to One year

5.99%

(61)

2,500

-

-

-

One to Two years

5.85%

(251)

7,000

5.99%

(141)

2,500

Two to Five years

6.24% - 6.52%

(1,241)

17,000

5.85% - 6.52%

(2,249)

24,000

Beyond Five years

3.89% - 4.99%

309

35,000

4.94% - 4.99%

(465)

20,000

(1,244)

61,500

(2,855)

46,500

TOTAL INTEREST RATE SWAPS

The fair value of interest rate swaps are based on market values of equivalent instruments at the reporting date.

180

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


16. INVESTMENT PROPERTY Note Balance at 1 July Additions from acquisitions Disposals Fair value gains/(losses) on valuation Transfer to non-current assets held for sale TOTAL INVESTMENT PROPERTY

12

Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

3,670

3,670

4,808

4,808

-

-

5

5

(384)

(384)

(180)

(180) (963)

(46)

(46)

(963)

(400)

(400)

-

-

2,840

2,840

3,670

3,670

Waimakariri District Council's investment properties are revalued annually at fair value effective 30 June. The valuation was performed by Kerry Stewart (Val Prof Urb, PG Dip Env Audit, MBA, FNZIV, FPINZ) independent valuer from QV Valuations.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

181


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

17a. PROPERTY PLANT AND EQUIPMENT Cost /

Accumulated Depreciation and impairment charges

Carrying

1-Jul-12

1-Jul-12

1-Jul-12

$'000

$'000

Revaluation

Current year additions

Current year disposals NBV

Current year impairment charges

Current year depreciation

Revaluation surplus

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

amount

Cost /

Accumulated Depreciation and impairment charges

Carrying

30-Jun-13

30-Jun-13

30-Jun-13

$'000

$'000

$'000

Revaluation

amount

Analysis of Fixed Assets 2013 Land (at valuation)

11,785

-

11,785

5,651

77

-

-

(1,698)

15,661

-

15,661

Buildings (at valuation)

18,489

3,757

14,732

1,583

390

(426)

411

3,199

21,546

2,567

18,979

Furniture & Fittings (at valuation)

1,903

1,579

324

-

-

-

65

-

1,903

1,644

259

Furniture & Fittings (at cost)

2,530

719

1,811

84

3

-

307

-

2,611

1,026

1,585

Library Books (at cost)

3,365

1,663

1,702

414

-

-

359

-

3,779

2,022

1,757

Plant & Equipment (at cost)

2,917

1,861

1,056

717

19

-

324

-

3,615

2,185

1,430

Computer Equipment (at cost)

2,784

1,792

992

223

1

-

370

-

3,006

2,162

844

43,773

11,371

32,402

8,672

490

(426)

1,836

1,501

52,121

11,606

40,515

TOTAL PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT BEFORE ADDING ASSETS UNDER CONSTRUCTION

Assets Under Construction Property & Investments Plant & Equipment

TOTAL PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT ASSETS

182

14

-

14

1,950

14

1,950

-

1,950

108

-

108

1,088

108

1,088

-

1,088

122

-

122

3,038

122

3,038

-

3,038

43,895

11,371

32,524

11,710

612

55,159

11,606

43,553

(426)

1,836

1,501

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252

 


17a. PROPERTY PLANT AND EQUIPMENT (cont'd) Cost /

Accumulated Depreciation and impairment charges

Carrying

1-Jul-11

1-Jul-11

1-Jul-11

$'000

$'000

$'000

Revaluation

amount

Current year additions

Current year disposals NBV

Current year impairment charges

Current year depreciation

Revaluation surplus

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Cost /

Accumulated Depreciation and impairment charges

Carrying

30-Jun-12

30-Jun-12

30-Jun-12

$'000

$'000

$'000

Revaluation

amount

Analysis of Fixed Assets 2012 Land (at valuation)

11,785

-

11,785

-

-

-

-

-

11,785

-

11,785

Buildings (at valuation)

17,292

3,508

13,784

1,197

-

(147)

396

-

18,489

3,757

14,732

Furniture & Fittings (at valuation)

1,903

1,519

384

-

-

-

60

-

1,903

1,579

324

Furniture & Fittings (at cost)

2,156

420

1,736

376

2

-

299

-

2,530

719

1,811

Library Books (at cost)

2,971

1,318

1,653

394

-

-

345

-

3,365

1,663

1,702

Plant & Equipment (at cost)

2,658

1,544

1,114

287

28

-

317

-

2,917

1,861

1,056

Computer Equipment (at cost)

2,113

1,452

661

675

4

-

340

-

2,784

1,792

992

40,878

9,761

31,117

2,929

34

(147)

1,757

-

43,773

11,371

32,402

Property & Investments

36

-

36

14

36

14

-

14

Plant & Equipment

15

-

15

108

15

108

-

108

51

-

51

122

51

122

-

122

40,929

9,761

31,168

3,051

85

43,895

11,371

32,524

TOTAL PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT BEFORE ADDING ASSETS UNDER CONSTRUCTION

Assets Under Construction

TOTAL PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT ASSETS

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

(147)

1,757

-

183


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

17b. INFRASTRUCTURAL ASSETS Cost /

Accumulated Depreciation and impairment charges

Carrying

1-Jul-12

1-Jul-12

1-Jul-12

$'000

$'000

$'000

54,678

-

2,301

-

21,519

3,777

Revaluation

Current year additions

Current year disposals NBV

Current year impairment charges

Current year depreciation

Revaluation surplus

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

54,678

-

318

-

-

2,301

1,673

-

-

-

17,742

-

232

(112)

512

8,807

amount

Cost /

Accumulated Depreciation and impairment charges

Carrying

30-Jun-13

30-Jun-13

30-Jun-13

$'000

$'000

$'000

11,998

66,358

-

66,358

(3,974)

-

-

-

28,588

2,782

25,807

Revaluation

amount

INFRASTRUCTURAL ASSETS 2013 Infrastructural Land and Buildings Land (at valuation) Land (at cost) Buildings (at valuation) Buildings (at cost)

1,914

-

1,914

2,041

-

-

-

(3,955)

-

-

-

80,412

3,777

76,635

3,714

550

(112)

512

12,876

94,946

2,782

92,165

32,458

3,343

29,115

-

109

(1,543)

340

8,972

40,271

1,090

39,181

4,856

557

4,299

1,216

-

-

135

(5,380)

-

-

-

37,314

3,900

33,414

1,216

109

(1,543)

475

3,592

40,271

1,090

39,181

Culture and Recreation Community Facilities (at valuation) Community Facilities (at cost) Roads Land (at cost)

123,449

-

123,449

588

2

-

-

-

124,035

-

124,035

Road Network (at valuation) Bridges & Culverts (at valuation)

532,156 45,543

11,585 -

520,571 45,543

18,545 81

-

1,121 -

5,897 626

7,223 1,947

552,027 46,945

12,706 -

539,321 46,945

701,148

11,585

689,563

19,214

2

1,121

6,523

9,170

723,007

12,706

710,301

Water Reticulation Network (at valuation)

76,985

3,664

73,321

-

219

3,192

1,018

-

76,766

7,874

68,892

Water Reticulation Network (at cost)

12,577

80

12,497

2,745

-

-

178

-

15,322

258

15,064

147,269

19,973

127,296

-

36

5,974

1,538

-

147,233

27,485

119,748

3 Waters and Solid Waste

Sewer Reticulation Network (at valuation) Sewer Reticulation Network (at cost)

5,439

31

5,408

4,895

-

-

108

-

10,334

139

10,195

44,193

3,989

40,204

-

111

(460)

269

-

44,082

3,798

40,284

Drainage Reticulation Network (at cost)

6,633

53

6,580

3,097

-

-

123

-

9,730

176

9,554

Waste Systems (at valuation)

2,392

70

2,322

-

-

-

69

-

2,392

139

2,253

Waste Systems (at cost)

1,036

15

1,021

-

-

-

21

-

1,036

36

1,000

296,524

27,875

268,649

10,737

366

8,706

3,324

-

306,895

39,905

266,990

1,115,398

47,137

1,068,261

34,881

1,027

8,172

10,834

25,638

1,165,119

56,483

1,108,637

Drainage Reticulation Network (at valuation)

TOTAL INFRASTRUCTURAL ASSETS BEFORE ADDING ASSETS UNDER CONSTRUCTION

184

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252

 


17b. INFRASTRUCTURAL ASSETS (cont'd) Cost /

Accumulated Depreciation and impairment charges

Carrying

1-Jul-12

1-Jul-12

1-Jul-12

$'000

$'000

$'000

Revaluation

amount

Current year additions

Current year disposals NBV

Current year impairment charges

Current year depreciation

Revaluation surplus

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Cost /

Accumulated Depreciation and impairment charges

Carrying

30-Jun-13

30-Jun-13

30-Jun-13

$'000

$'000

$'000 628

Revaluation

amount

Assets Under Construction Roading

2

-

2

628

2

628

-

Water

95

-

95

596

61

630

-

630

Sewer

558

-

558

3,617

177

3,998

-

3,998

2,480

-

2,480

909

164

3,225

-

3,225

55

-

55

78

55

78

-

78

322

-

322

658

322

658

-

658

Drainage Solid Waste Culture & Recreation Earthquake Recovery

TOTAL INFRASTRUCTURE ASSETS

2,186

-

2,186

8,150

476

9,860

-

9,860

5,698

-

5,698

14,636

1,257

19,077

-

19,077

1,121,096

47,137

1,073,959

49,517

2,284

1,184,196

56,483

1,127,714

8,172

10,834

25,638

Vested Assets Total vested assets for 2012/13 were $21,461,768 (2012: $17,025,181). Infrastructural assets transferred to the Council from subdivisional properties were $20,707,897 (2012: $16,911,086). Valuation "Land and buildings have been valued at fair value as at 30 June 2013 by Kerry Stewart (Val Prof Urb, PG Dip Env Audit, MBA, FNZIV, FPINZ) of QV Valuations. The basis of the valuation is net current value. Infrastructure assets have all been valued at fair value on a depreciated replacement cost basis. The most recent Infrastructure valuations were performed as follows: - Road assets were valued as at 30 June 2013 by Nigel Lister (BSc & PGDipSci(Surveying), BE Civil) of MWH New Zealand Ltd. - Water, Sewer, Drainage and Waste assets were valued internally as at 30 June 2011 and the valuation was independently reviewed by Graeme Hughson Associate Director – Asset Management of Aecom New Zealand Limited. - Community Facilities assets were valued internally as at 30 June 2013 and the valuation was independently reviewed by John Vessey (Technical Principal Asset Valuation) of Opus International Consultants Ltd. Insurance The Council was advised after the 13 June 2011 earthquake the LAPP fund could not provide earthquake insurance cover for the Council's infrastructure assets. However LAPP provides cover for other peril damage including floods, up to a total claim limit of $100million. Central government has a Disaster Recovery Plan which states that central government will pay 60% of eligible restoration costs. From 30 June 2013 the Council has secured material damage and business interruption insurance with AIG/Vero. The material damage insurance covers Council's residential and non residential properties, Oxford Sewerage Scheme and Eastern Districts Ocean Outfall Sewerage Scheme. Urban Portions of State Highway Network Treasury has confirmed that ownership of the Urban Portions of the state highway network rests with the Crown. Waimakariri District Council has not recognised the urban portion of the state highway network maintained by Land Transport New Zealand in these financial statements. The estimated distance of highway involved is 2.2 kilometres. Land Transport New Zealand maintains the carriageway of the highway in their entirety without any costs accruing to local authorities. The Council is responsible for footpath and a share of the costs of cleaning kerb and channel on these street areas.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

185

 


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

17b. INFRASTRUCTURAL ASSETS (cont'd) Cost /

Accumulated Depreciation and impairment charges

Carrying

1-Jul-11

1-Jul-11

1-Jul-11

$'000

$'000

$'000

56,482

-

240

-

21,533

3,283

Revaluation

Current year additions

Current year disposals NBV

Current year impairment charges

Current year depreciation

Revaluation surplus

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

56,482

782

2,586

240

2,061

18,250

-

amount

Cost /

Accumulated Depreciation and impairment charges

Carrying

30-Jun-12

30-Jun-12

30-Jun-12

$'000

$'000

$'000

54,678

Revaluation

amount

INFRASTRUCTURAL ASSETS 2012 Infrastructural Land and Buildings Land (at valuation) Land (at cost) Buildings (at valuation) Buildings (at cost)

14

-

-

-

54,678

-

-

-

-

2,301

-

2,301

-

494

-

21,519

3,777

17,742

958

-

958

1,002

46

-

-

-

1,914

-

1,914

79,213

3,283

75,930

3,845

2,646

-

494

-

80,412

3,777

76,635

32,458

3,003

29,455

-

-

-

340

-

32,458

3,343

29,115

4,115

456

3,659

741

-

-

101

-

4,856

557

4,299

36,573

3,459

33,114

741

-

-

441

-

37,314

3,900

33,414

Culture and Recreation Community Facilities (at valuation) Community Facilities (at cost) Roads Land (at cost)

123,441

-

123,441

8

-

-

-

-

123,449

-

123,449

Road Network (at valuation)

509,481

15,254

494,227

15,706

-

(3,669)

5,240

12,209

532,156

11,585

520,571

40,392

-

40,392

1,183

-

-

580

4,548

45,543

-

45,543

673,314

15,254

658,060

16,897

-

(3,669)

5,820

16,757

701,148

11,585

689,563

78,103

3,818

74,285

-

1,118

(1,163)

1,009

-

76,985

3,664

73,321

-

-

-

12,577

-

-

80

-

12,577

80

12,497

147,891

27,552

120,339

-

622

(8,996)

1,417

-

147,269

19,973

127,296

-

-

-

5,831

392

-

31

-

5,439

31

5,408

44,748

5,063

39,685

-

555

(1,336)

262

-

44,193

3,989

40,204

-

6,633

-

-

53

-

6,633

53

6,580

2,392

-

2,392

-

-

-

70

-

2,392

70

2,322

-

-

-

1,036

-

-

15

-

1,036

15

1,021

273,134

36,433

236,701

26,077

2,687

(11,495)

2,937

-

296,524

27,875

268,649

1,062,234

58,429

1,003,805

47,560

5,333

(15,164)

9,692

16,757

1,115,398

47,137

1,068,261

Bridges & Culverts (at valuation) 3 Waters and Solid Waste Water Reticulation Network (at valuation) Water Reticulation Network (at cost) Sewer Reticulation Network (at valuation) Sewer Reticulation Network (at cost) Drainage Reticulation Network (at valuation) Drainage Reticulation Network (at cost) Waste Systems (at valuation) Waste Systems (at cost)

TOTAL INFRASTRUCTURAL ASSETS BEFORE ADDING ASSETS UNDER CONSTRUCTION

186

-

 

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


17b. INFRASTRUCTURAL ASSETS (cont'd) Cost /

Accumulated Depreciation and impairment charges

Carrying

1-Jul-11

1-Jul-11

1-Jul-11

$'000

$'000

$'000

Roading

1,224

-

1,224

2

Water

5,213

-

5,213

76

Revaluation

amount

Current year additions

Current year disposals NBV

Current year impairment charges

Current year depreciation

Revaluation surplus

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Cost /

Accumulated Depreciation and impairment charges

Carrying

30-Jun-12

30-Jun-12

30-Jun-12

$'000

$'000

$'000

1,224

2

-

2

5,194

95

-

95

Revaluation

amount

Assets Under Construction

Sewer

17

-

17

548

7

558

-

558

5,033

-

5,033

437

2,990

2,480

-

2,480

Solid Waste

851

-

851

55

851

55

-

55

Culture & Recreation

274

-

274

215

167

322

-

322

Drainage

Earthquake Recovery

TOTAL INFRASTRUCTURE ASSETS

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

13,190

-

13,190

2,186

13,190

2,186

-

2,186

25,802

-

25,802

3,519

23,623

5,698

-

5,698

1,088,036

58,429

1,029,607

51,079

28,956

1,121,096

47,137

1,073,959

(15,164)

9,692

16,757

187


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

17c. IMPAIRMENT Total impairment

Additional

Impairment Impairment reversal Impairment reversal revaluation reserve via asset additions

Total Impairment

Impairment against

(reversal) Income

revaluation reserve

Statement

1 July 2012

30 June 2013

30 June 2013

30 June 2013

30 June 2013

30 June 2013

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

2,871

-

-

(266)

(160)

2,445

Infrastructure buildings

2,764

-

-

(2)

(110)

2,652

Culture & recreation

2,633

-

-

(1,543)

-

1,090

11,585

1,121

-

-

-

12,706

2013 Property, plant and equipment BUILDINGS Infrastructural assets

Roading Water

2,655

2,573

619

-

-

5,847

Sewer

18,556

5,974

-

-

-

24,530

Drainage

3,727

-

-

(460)

-

3,267

SUBTOTAL INFRASTRUCTURAL ASSETS

41,920

9,668

619

(2,005)

(110)

50,092

TOTAL

44,791

9,668

619

(2,271)

(270)

52,537

Impairment Impairment reversal Impairment reversal revaluation reserve via asset additions

Total Impairment

Total impairment

Additional Impairment against

(reversal) Income

revaluation reserve

Statement

1 July 2011

30 June 2012

30 June 2012

30 June 2012

30 June 2012

30 June 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

3,018

-

-

(147)

-

2,871

Infrastructure buildings

2,764

-

-

-

-

2,764

Culture & recreation

2,633

-

-

-

-

2,633 11,585

2012 Property, plant and equipment BUILDINGS Infrastructural assets

Roading

15,254

-

-

(3,669)

-

Water

3,818

-

-

(1,163)

-

2,655

Sewer

27,552

-

(341)

(8,655)

-

18,556

Drainage

5,063

-

-

(1,336)

-

3,727

SUBTOTAL INFRASTRUCTURAL ASSETS

57,084

-

(341)

(14,823)

-

41,920

TOTAL

60,102

-

(341)

(14,970)

-

44,791

188

 

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


17c. IMPAIRMENT (cont'd) The 4 September 2010 earthquake and subsequent aftershocks resulted in damage to the district's buildings and infrastructural assets, particularly in the Kaiapoi and Pines/Kairaki areas. In the past, the Council undertook impairment assessments on its buildings and infrastructural assets and found that an impairment of some of its assets had occurred. The total value of impairment as at 30 June 2013 has increased from the amount recognised in 2012 as now the Council has more information available for those earthquake projects and their costs. The restoration method has been used to estimate the effect of the impairment. Under this approach, the present value of the remaining service potential of the asset is determined by subtracting the estimated restoration cost of the asset from the current cost of replacing the asset that would return the asset to the service potential that existed prior to the asset being damaged For infrastructural assets this was assessed using estimates derived from asset replacement strategies which were developed for the Council's recovery plan from the earthquakes. The Sewer Replacement Strategy was developed by the Council's Project Delivery Unit and adopted by the Council on 22nd May 2013. The Water Replacement Strategy was developed by the Council's Project Delivery Unit and adopted by the Council on 22nd May 2013. The Stormwater Replacement Strategy was developed by the Council's Project Delivery Unit and adopted by the Council on 22nd May 2013. The Roading recovery programme was development by the Council's Roading Unit and adopted by the Council on 22nd May 2013. For Council Buildings and Community Facilities the value of the impairment was assessed using estimates of costs to repair buildings prepared for the Council by Jan Stanway of MWH. Impairment charges were applied against asset values held at the time that the impairment event occurred. Impairment costs are initially offset against the available asset revaluation reserves and, to the extent that the impairment is greater than these reserves, the excess is taken to the income statement. On the 18th August 2011 the Government announced a programme providing options for residents to move from within red zone areas where Council infrastructure is most affected. The Council has derecognised the value of Sewer, Water and Stormwater assets in the red zones. Roading assets in the red zones have been reduced to reflect their reduced expected life.

18. TRADE AND OTHER PAYABLES Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012 $'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

10,124

9,961

6,973

6,820

9,897

9,897

10,064

10,064

Accrued expenses

720

720

1,410

1,410

Accrued Interest on borrowings

381

381

340

340

Income received in Advance

861

861

810

810

-

-

1,453

1,453

Trade payables Deposits and bonds

Goods and Services Tax Related parties (Note 27) TOTAL TRADE AND OTHER PAYABLES

-

163

-

153

21,983

21,983

21,050

21,050

Trade and other payables are non-interest bearing and normally settled on 30-day terms, therefore the carrying value of trade and other payables approximates their fair value.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

189


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

19. EMPLOYEE BENEFIT LIABILITIES Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Accrued pay

369

369

345

345

Annual leave

1,423

1,423

1,412

1,412

Long service leave

21

21

21

21

Sick leave

48

48

23

23

Time in Lieu TOTAL EMPLOYEE BENEFIT LIABILITIES

31

31

30

30

1,892

1,892

1,831

1,831

20. DEVELOPMENT AND OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

1,176

1,176

1,603

1,603

Development contributions received

15,728

15,728

7,042

7,042

Contributions transferred to income

(14,455)

(14,455)

(7,469)

(7,469)

BALANCE AT 30 JUNE

2,449

2,449

1,176

1,176

Current

2,449

2,449

1,176

1,176

-

-

-

-

2,449

2,449

1,176

1,176

Balance at 1 July

Non-current

Contributions are levied as one method of funding the costs associated with the development of assets to meet the demands of growth of the population. Contributions are recognised as income when the assets are ready to provide the service intended or current capacity exists. Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Transferred to income by activity Roads and Footpaths

1,635

1,635

1,130

1,130

Water Supply

2,085

2,085

1,265

1,265

Sewerage and the Treatment and Disposal of Sewage

2,370

3,296

3,296

2,370

Stormwater Drainage

887

887

1,101

1,101

Reserves (Recreation)

6,182

6,182

1,473

1,473

Libraries and Museums

190

370

370

130

130

14,455

14,455

7,469

7,469

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


21. BORROWINGS Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Secured loans

-

-

23

23

Committed Cash Advance Facility

-

-

-

-

Bonds/Notes issued

19,000

19,000

-

-

TOTAL CURRENT BORROWINGS

19,000

19,000

23

23

Current

Non-current Secured loans

1

1

20

20

Bonds/Notes Issued

30,000

30,000

44,000

44,000

TOTAL NON-CURRENT BORROWINGS

30,001

30,001

44,020

44,020

TOTAL BORROWINGS

49,001

49,001

44,043

44,043

Interest Rate Risk Borrowings include floating and fixed interest rates. Interest rate risk is minimal as borrowings are managed under policy and hedged with fixed interest rate swaps. The interest rates range 3.50% - 6.83% (2012 3.50% - 9.08%). The weighted average interest cost is 6.8% (2012: 6.2%). Security The Committed Cash Advance Facility with the ANZ (limit-2013: $3m, limit-2012: $5.1m) is secured over the rates of the Waimakariri District Council. This facility was not drawn upon as at 30 June 2013 (2012: nil). Bonds/Notes issued are secured over the rates of the Waimakariri District Council. Refinancing Waimakariri District Council manages its borrowings in accordance with its funding and financial policies, which includes a liability Management policy. These policies have been adopted as part of the Council's Long Term Plan. Maturity Analysis of Borrowings Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

19,000

19,000

23

23

5,001

5,001

19,012

19,012

Later than two years, not later than three years

15,000

15,000

5,004

5,004

Later than three years, not later than four years

5,000

5,000

15,004

15,004 5,000

Payable no later than one year Later than one year, not later than two years

Later than four years, not later than five years Later than five years The total amount of borrowings approximates the fair value.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

-

-

5,000

5,000

5,000

-

-

49,001

49,001

44,043

44,043

â€‚ď ľ

191


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

21. BORROWINGS (cont'd) Internal Borrowings Internal borrowings for each Group of Activities are detailed below. Internal borrowings are eliminated on consolidation of activities in the Council's financial statements. Group of Activities

Internal Borrowing 2012

Repaid 2012-13

Borrowed 2012-13

Internal Borrowing 2013

Internal Interest 2012-13

Actual

Actual

Actual

Actual

Actual

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Roads and Footpaths

4,217

(217)

800

4,800

391

Water Supply

6,989

(895)

76

6,170

464

Sewerage and the Treatment and Disposal of Sewage

3,162

(1,503)

-

1,659

726

Stormwater Drainage

5,567

(254)

224

5,537

473

833

(19)

-

814

45

5,303

(266)

-

5,037

532 6

Solid Waste Recreation Libraries & Museums

56

(6)

-

50

Community Protection

46

(12)

22

56

4

322

(11)

-

311

24

277

(14)

-

263

28

3,636

-

-

3,636

534

Community Development Property Management Earthquake Recovery Non Significant Activities

192

144

(34)

-

110

11

30,552

(3,231)

1,122

28,443

3,238

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


22a. EQUITY Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

608,134

605,700

579,908

577,470

1,064

1,064

512

512

463

463

2,812

2,812

Accumulated General Equity Opening Accumulated General Equity Transfers from: Restricted reserves Asset revaluation reserve on disposal of Property, Plant and Equipment Transfers to: Restricted reserves

(1,150)

(1,150)

(363)

(363)

Net Surplus/ (deficit)

42,257

42,240

25,265

25,269

650,768

648,317

608,134

605,700

6,099

6,099

6,248

6,248

(1,064)

(1,064)

(512)

(512)

TOTAL ACCUMULATED GENERAL EQUITY Restricted reserves Opening Balance Transfers to: Accumulated General Equity Transfers from: Accumulated General Equity

1,150

1,150

363

363

6,185

6,185

6,099

6,099

Restricted reserves consist of: Replacement Funds Reserve Funds

785

785

617

617

4,951

4,951

4,991

4,991

Development Funds

111

111

88

88

Trust Funds

337

337

403

403

6,185

6,185

6,099

6,099

276

276

303

303

21

21

(27)

(27)

297

297

276

276

6,482

6,482

6,375

6,375

473,435

473,435

444,520

444,520

(463)

(463)

(2,812)

(2,812)

Fair value reserve As at 1 July Valuation gains (losses) AS AT 30 JUNE TOTAL OTHER RESERVES Asset revaluation reserves Opening Balance Transfer of revaluation reserve to accumulated general equity on disposal of Plant, Property and Equipment Change in revaluation reserve due to revaluation

27,367

27,138

16,757

16,757

Change in revaluation reserve due to impairment

(7,397)

(7,397)

14,970

14,970

492,942

492,714

473,435

473,435

TOTAL ASSET REVALUATION RESERVE

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

 

193


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

22a. EQUITY (cont'd) Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Land

8,266

8,062

9,776

9,776

Buildings

8,072

8,048

4,679

4,679

16,338

16,110

14,455

14,455

41,396

41,396

33,387

33,387

5,545

5,545

880

880

Water

26,948

26,948

29,569

29,569

Roads

313,192

Consisting of Fixed

Infrastructural Land Buildings

321,242

321,242

313,192

Reserves

21,455

21,455

16,373

16,373

Sewer

41,938

41,938

47,934

47,934

Drainage

17,369

17,369

16,934

16,934

711

711

711

711

476,604

476,604

458,980

458,980

492,942

492,714

473,435

473,435

Solid Waste

194

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


22b. STATEMENT OF SPECIAL AND SEPARATE FUNDS Opening Balance

Income

Operating Expenditure

Capital and Transfers

Closing Balance

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

28

-

(2)

(26)

Cam River Restoration Fund

193

10

-

-

Plant Renewal & Replacement Fund

617

21

-

147

785

Loburn Reserve Development Fund

18

1

-

-

19

Sefton Reserve Investment Fund

11

1

-

-

12 Established by investment of surplus funds for use at the Reserve

3,366

168

-

(168)

This fund was established to receive the income from the endowment land vested in the 3,366 Council. Subsequently, the properties were sold, and the interest income from funds invested is used to subsidise the general rates

2

-

-

-

2 Established to enable new publications such as the history of the former Rangiora County area

1,389

66

(89)

-

3

-

-

-

25

1

-

-

Mayoral Relief Fund

197

8

(63)

-

Funds are available for providing grants under a guidance criteria, at the discretion of the 142 Mayor. The grants annually are the balance of income after inflation proofing the opening balance of the account.

Mayoral Relief Fund (Kaia / Pines)

181

11

(23)

-

169

6,030

287

(177)

(47)

6,093

Special Funds Insurance Excess Reserve Fund

Long term investment/Ashburton Farm Investment Centennial Fund Account LAPP Disaster Fund Kaiapoi War Memorial Maintenance Fund Mayoral Relief Fund (Non Inflation)

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

Purpose of the fund - To provide funds for payment of insurance excesses. Funded by transfers from finance services 203 Established in 2002 to provide for Cam River restoration

1,366

To provide for purchase of replacement plant and vehicles from transfers of depreciation and interest on the book value of assets Proceeds of the sale of land in the Loburn area were invested for the purchase of land to extend the size of the Loburn Domain

Provides funds for the annual insurance cost for the Local Authority Protection Programme Disaster Fund (natural disaster insurance for infrastructural assets)

3 To carry out future maintenance of the building. 26

Funds available for providing grants for relief under a guidance criteria, at the discretion of the Mayor.

Funds available for providing grants to residents affected by the 2010/11 earthquakes under a guidance criteria by the Earthquake relief fund committee

â€‚ď ľ

195


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

22b. STATEMENT OF SPECIAL AND SEPARATE FUNDS (cont'd) Opening Balance

Income

Operating Expenditure

Capital and Transfers

Closing Balance

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Separate Accounts Separate Accounts are maintained for targeted rates charged for a specific purpose. A separate account is maintained for each targeted rate to ensure that the funds are held and used for the specific purpose intended. Water Supply Rangiora

3

3,308

(2,104)

(1,107)

Southbrook

7

10

-

-

17

Woodend

27

301

(351)

21

(2)

Pegasus

367

292

(298)

116

477

Waikuku

172

109

(87)

(18)

176

Fernside Ohoka Mandeville Kaiapoi Pines

100

9

43

(51)

(2)

(1)

28

45

(52)

8

29

38

701

(387)

69

421

848

1,009

(625)

76

1,308 30

10

62

(669)

627

Oxford1

(61)

287

(322)

95

(1)

Oxford2

82

198

(156)

(17)

107

Oxford

4

372

(379)

42

39

Summerhill

-

181

(195)

15

1

(54)

75

(68)

11

(36)

Cust Poyntzs Road

12

43

(42)

1

14

WestEyreton

6

63

(51)

4

22

Garrymere

-

82

(39)

(48)

(5)

(39)

288

(308)

33

(26)

Eastern Communities

867

8,487

(3,637)

565

6,282

Southbrook

214

236

(123)

(293)

34

Fernside

26

32

(27)

6

37

Ohoka Meadows

62

31

(29)

7

71

Swannanoa

64

20

(28)

9

65

Mandeville

127

66

(57)

31

167

Loburn Lea

15

54

(46)

13

36

(21)

480

(489)

39

9

(296)

936

(828)

190

2

(19)

224

(91)

(19)

95

Stock Water Sewerage and the Treatment and Disposal of Sewage

Oxford Stormwater Drainage Rangiora Coastal Urban Pegasus Kaiapoi

196

193

213

(151)

29

284

(363)

1,140

(1,056)

280

1

â€‚ď ľ Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


22b. STATEMENT OF SPECIAL AND SEPARATE FUNDS (cont'd) Opening Balance

Income

Operating Expenditure

Capital and Transfers

Closing Balance

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000 56

Oxford

22

77

(42)

(1)

Ohoka Rural

(1)

105

(112)

9

1

Loburn Lea

6

19

(11)

2

16

Oxford Rural

85

30

(19)

3

99

Clarkville

18

30

(31)

2

19

Coastal Rural

(40)

69

(78)

2

(47)

Waimakariri Central Rural

(10)

69

(84)

26

1

Cust

6

3

(1)

-

8

Ashworths

1

-

-

-

1

777

1,774

(1,485)

(838)

228

Solid Waste Solid Waste Recreation Rangiora CBA Kaiapoi CBA

(4)

22

(108)

86

(4)

(20)

21

(93)

75

(17)

Libraries and Museums Museum Levy

47

377

(394)

7

37

412

21

-

-

433

7

222

(194)

(32)

3

(10)

33

(43)

-

(20)

135

18

(1,171)

1,184

166

4

93

(87)

-

10

Rangiora Community Board

45

88

(85)

-

48

Woodend/Ashley Community Board

48

78

(81)

-

45

Oxford/Eyre Ward Advisory Board

34

39

(26)

-

47

District Promotion

44

80

(381)

283

26

Economic Development

18

43

(234)

202

29

Museum Development Levy Community Protection Rural Fire Stock Control Governance Council Kaiapoi Community Board

District Development

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

197


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

23. STATEMENT OF CASH FLOW RECONCILIATION Net Surplus / (Deficit):

Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

Parent 2012 $'000

42,257

42,240

25,265

25,269

Add Non Cash Items: Depreciation Assets vested in Council Associated entity (surplus) / decifit (Gains) / losses in fair value of forestry assets (Gains) / losses in fair value of investment property Recognise (Gains) / losses on interest rate swaps Impairment recognised on P&L Assets/Opening work in progress expensed

12,670

12,670

11,353

11,353

(20,992)

(20,992)

(17,025)

(17,025)

(17)

-

4

-

1,201

1,201

(182)

(182)

46

46

963

963

(1,611)

(1,611)

924

924

619

619

-

-

1,607

1,607

11,812

11,812

35,780

35,780

33,114

33,114

Movements in Working Capital (Increase)/ Reduction in Stock (Increase)/ Reduction in Trade and other receivables (Increase)/ Reduction in Tax due Increase/ (Reduction) in Trade and other payables

30

30

(26)

(26)

(2,546)

(2,546)

(3,905)

(3,905)

-

-

(42)

(42)

(3,209)

(3,209)

6,063

6,063

Increase/ (Reduction) in Employee benefit liabilities

62

62

462

462

Increase/ (Reduction) in Development contributions

1,273

1,273

(427)

(427)

(Increase)/ Reduction in Accrued interest receivable

13

13

(69)

(69)

2,074

2,074

2,204

2,204

(2,303)

(2,303)

4,260

4,260

33,477

33,477

37,374

37,374

(1,929)

(1,929)

1,858

1,858

(Gains) / losses on disposal of investment property

(85)

(85)

180

180

NET CASH IN(OUT)FLOW FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

31,463

31,463

39,412

39,412

Net GST

Items Classified as Investing Activity (Gains) / losses on disposal of property, plant and equipment and forestry assets

198

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


24. FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Cash and cash equivalents

29,342

29,342

24,821

24,821

Trade and other receivables

15,174

15,174

15,369

15,369

FINANCIAL ASSETS

[Basis of Fair value]

Loans and Receivables

Fair Value through comprehensive income Civic Assurance

Non-observable inputs

104

104

105

105

Transwaste Canterbury Limited

Non-observable inputs

900

900

878

878

Local Government Funding Agency

Non-observable inputs

180

180

-

-

Observable inputs

507

507

-

-

21,983

21,983

21,050

21,050

2,449

2,449

1,176

1,176

49,001

49,001

44,043

44,043

1,751

1,751

2,855

2,855

Fair Value through income statement Derivative financial instruments Financial Liabilities Financial Liabilities at amortised cost Trade and other payables Development contributions Borrowings Fair Value through income statement Derivative financial instruments

Observable inputs

Financial instrument risks WDC has a series of policies to manage the risks associated with financial instruments. WDC is risk averse and seeks to minimise exposure from its treasury activities. WDC has established Council approved liability management and investment policies. These do not allow any transactions that are speculative in nature to be entered into. MARKET RISK Price risk Price risk is the risk that the value of a financial instrument will fluctuate as a result of changes in market prices. WDC is not exposed to equity securities price risk on its investments, which are classified as financial assets held at fair value through equity. Currency risk Currency risk is the risk that the value of a financial instrument will fluctuate due to changes in foreign exchange rates. WDC is not exposed to currency risk, as its treasury policy does not allow WDC to enter into foreign currency transactions and that financial instruments are transacted in New Zealand dollars. Interest rate risk The interest rates on WDC's borrowings are disclosed in note 21. Fair value interest rate risk Fair value interest rate risk is the risk that the value of a financial instrument will fluctuate due to changes in market interest rate. Borrowings issued at fixed rates expose the WDC to fair value rate risk. WDC's liability management policy outlines the level of borrowing that is to be secured using fixed rate instruments. Fixed to floating interest rate swaps are entered into to hedge the fair value interest rate risk arising where WDC has borrowed at fixed rates. In addition, investments at fixed interest rates expose the WDC to fair value interest rate risk. Sensitivity Analysis If interest rates on borrowings/derivative financial instruments at 30 June 2013 had fluctuated by plus or minus 0.5%, the effect would have been to increase/ decrease the surplus after tax by $63,000 (2012: $13,000).

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

â€‚ď ľ 199


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

24. FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS (cont'd) 2013 Parent

2012 Parent

+0.5% $'000

-0.5% $'000

+0.5% $'000

-0.5% $'000

(245)

245

(220)

220

308

(308)

233

(233)

63

(63)

13

(13)

Income Statement impact: Financial Liabilities Financial Liabilities at amortised cost Borrowings Fair Value through income statement Derivative financial instruments

Cash flow interest rate risk Cash flow interest rate risk is the risk that the cash flows from a financial instrument will fluctuate because of changes in the market interest rates. Borrowings and investments issued at variable interest rates expose WDC to cash flow interest rate risk. WDC manages its cash flow interest rate risk on borrowings by using floating-to-fixed interest rate swaps. Such interest rate swaps have the economic effect of converting borrowings at floating rates and swaps them into fixed rates that are generally lower than those available if WDC borrowed at fixed rates directly. Under the interest rate swaps, WDC agrees with other parties to exchange, at specified intervals, the difference between fixed contract rates and floating-rate interest amounts calculated by reference to the agreed notional principal amounts. Credit risk Credit risk is the risk that a third party will default on its obligation to WDC, causing WDC to incur a loss. WDC has no significant concentrations of credit risk, as it has a large number of credit customers, mainly ratepayers, and WDC has powers under the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 to recover outstanding debts from rate payers. WDC invests funds only in deposits with registered banks and local authority stock and its investments policy limits the amount of credit exposure to any one institution or organisation. Investments in other Local Authorities are secured by charges over rates. Other than other Local Authorities, the group only invests funds with those entities, which have a Standard and Poor's credit rating of at least A for short term and A for long term investments. Accordingly, the group does not require any collateral or security to support these financial instruments. All Council's cash assets and derivative financial instrument assets are with New Zealand registered banks with the credit ratings ranged from AA- to AA (AA being Kiwi Bank). WDC also owns shares in LGFA (Refer to Note 10) and their shares were rated AA+. Liquidity risk Liquidity risk is risk that WDC will encounter difficulty raising liquid funds to meet commitments as they fall due. Prudent liquidity risk management implies maintaining sufficient cash, the availability of funding through an adequate amount of committed credit facilities and the ability to close out market positions. WDC aims to maintain flexibility in funding by keeping committed credit lines available. In meeting its liquidity requirements, WDC maintains a target level of investments that must mature within the next 12 months and to meet its projected business requirements in the next 12 months. WDC manages its borrowing in accordance with its funding and financial policies, which includes a liability management policy. These policies have been adopted as part of the WDC's Long Term Council Community Plan. WDC does not have a overdraft facility and manages its additional funding requirements through a $10,000,000 bank funding facility agreement (2012: $10,000,000) and Bond/Note issues $49,000,000 (2012: $44,000,000). These facilities are managed within the liability management policy. The maturity profiles of the WDC's interest bearing investments and borrowing are disclosed in note 10 and 21 respectively.

200

â€‚ď ľ

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


24. FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS (cont'd) Maturity analysis and effective interest rates of financial assets

Short term deposits (with maturities of 3 months or less: average maturity Call days) Weighted average effective interest rate

Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

19,962

19,962

15,372

15,372

3.53%

3.53%

3.76%

3.76%

19,962

19,962

15,372

15,372

Group 2013

Parent 2013

Group 2012

Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

21,983 21,983

21,983 21,983

21,050 21,050

21,050 21,050

2,449 -

1,176 -

2,449

2,449 2,449

1,176

1,176 1,176

19,000 5,001 20,000 5,000 49,001

19,000 5,001 20,000 5,000 49,001

23 19,012 25,008 44,043

23 19,012 25,008 44,043

2,070 1,523 1,595 862 6,050

2,070 1,523 1,595 862 6,050

2,149 1,783 1,937 5,869

2,149 1,783 1,937 5,869

831 790 2,210 892 4,723

831 790 2,210 892 4,723

796 777 2,082 845 4,500

796 777 2,082 845 4,500

84,206

84,206

76,638

76,638

Maturity analysis of financial liabilities

Trade and other payables Less than 1 year 1 - 2 years 2 - 5 years More than 5 years Development contributions Less than 1 year 1 - 2 years 2 - 5 years More than 5 years Borrowings Less than 1 year 1 - 2 years 2 - 5 years More than 5 years Interest payable on borrowings Less than 1 year 1 - 2 years 2 - 5 years More than 5 years Interest payable on interest rate swaps Less than 1 year 1 - 2 years 2 - 5 years More than 5 years

TOTAL

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

201


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

25. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES Group 2013 Parent 2013 $'000

$'000

25. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (cont'd)

Group 2012 Parent 2012 $'000

Group 2013 Parent 2013

$'000

$'000

Capital commitments Capital expenditure contracted for at balance date but not yet incurred for property, plant and equipment.

8,956

8,956

3,242

Not later than one year

269

269

105

Later than one year and not later than five years

968

968

412

412

1,704

1,704

1,221

1,221

2,941

2,941

1,738

1,738

Later than five years

Details of the commitments under these contracts are as follows: Group 2013 Parent 2013

TOTAL NON-CANCELLABLE OPERATING LEASES

Group 2012 Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Not later than one year

6,445

6,445

11,825

11,825

Later than one year and not later than two years

4,337

4,337

2,439

2,439

Later than two years and not later than five years

11,221

11,221

644

644

4,012

4,012

1,540

1,540

26,015

26,015

16,448

16,448

Contingencies Group 2013 Parent 2013

$'000

$'000

Claims

173

173

70

70

Later than one year and not later than five years

558

558

835

835

-

-

-

-

731

731

905

905

$'000

$'000

85

85

128

128

Guarantees The value of guarantees disclosed as contingent liabilities reflects Council's assessment of the undiscounted portion of financial guarantees that are not recognised in the Balance Sheet. Group 2013 Parent 2013

Contingent rent payable has been determined on the basis of the contract schedule of payments and provisions. Leases can be renewed at Council's option, with rents set by reference to current market rates for items of equivalent age and condition. Council does not have the option to purchase the asset at the end of the lease term.

202

$'000

Prime Building Compliance Limited was placed into liquidation on 28 April 2010. As at 30 June 2013 there were 5 claims lodged with the liquidators. The claims are still being processed and evaluated. The financial effect of these claims is not considered to be material.

$'000

Not later than one year

There are no restrictions placed on Council by any of the leasing arrangements.

$'000

The Council has claims under The Building Act 2004 which imposes certain obligations and liabilities on local authorities in respect to the issue of building consents and inspections of work done. At the date of this report, four matters under that Act indicating potential liabilities of $85,000 (2012:$50,000) had been brought to the Council's attention. Riskpool has not made a call on this Council to fund any deficit in the funds which meet the cost of leaky buildings. This Council's liability is estimated to be zero for the 2013/2014 year, previous year (2012:$78,000).

Group 2012 Parent 2012 $'000

Group 2012 Parent 2012

Contingent liabilities

The Council leases property, plant and equipment in normal course of its business. The majority of these leases have non-cancellable terms of 36 to 60 months. The future aggregate minimum lease payments to be collected under non-collectable operating leases are as follows: Group 2013 Parent 2013

105

No contingent rents have been recognised in the income statement during the period.

Operating leases as lessee

TOTAL NON-CANCELLABLE OPERATING LEASES

$'000

Non-cancellable operating leases as lessor

The Council has entered into non-cancellable contracts.

Later than five years

$'000

The Council leases its investment property under operating leases. 39 (41%) of the leases have a non-cancellable term of 21 years or less. 10 leases have a term of 35 years, 32 leases have a term of 30 years, 2 leases have a life of 15 years, 4 leases have a term of 10 years and 7 leases have a life of 5 years. The future aggregate minimum leases payments to be collected under non-cancellable operating leases are as follows:

3,242

Non-cancellable operating commitments

TOTAL OPERATING COMMITMENTS

$'000

Operating leases as lessor

No capital commitments exist in relation to investment property as at 30 June 2013 (2012: Nil).

Later than five years

Group 2012 Parent 2012

Financial guarantees

 

Group 2012 Parent 2012

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

165

165

150

150

 

The Council financial guarantees relate to loan funding of Oxford Community Trust Oxford Art.

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


25. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (cont'd)

25. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (cont'd)

Unquantified claims

Contingent assets

There are 5 claims outstanding with the Weathertight Homes Resolution Service (WHRS) as at 30 June 2013 (2012: 7). Any claims relate to weather tightness issues of homes in the Waimakariri District and name the Council as well as other parties. Three claims have been accepted in relation to the Department of Building and Housing Financial Assistance Package. The claimants are still deciding on which resolution path to take. The balance have not been assessed. It is uncertain whether these claims are valid and who will be liable for the building defects. Therefore, Council is unable to assess its exposure to the claims lodged. The costs of any successful claims against Council are expected to be substantially covered under the Council's insurance policies. The policy for public and professional indemnity is with Riskpool which has recognised this Council as a low risk for weathertight claims coverage. Riskpool may make future calls on Council for the funding deficit for its possible share. Council is unable to accurately assess the extent of any future liability in relation to leaky buildings.

Council operates under specified agreements whereby sports clubs are able to construct facilities (e.g. club rooms) on reserve land. The clubs control the use of these facilities and the Council will gain control of the asset if the club vacates the facility. Until this event occurs these assets are not recognised as assets in the Balance Sheet. As at 30 June 2013 there are 12 facilities having an approximate value of $3.3 million (2012:12 facilities, $2.8 million). This estimate has been based on government valuations for the area. The Council holds two bonds for development commitments of $6.5 million (2012: $6.7 million). Developers have been bonded to complete the subdivision to Council's requirements. Failure to complete the subdivision will result in Council retaining the bond and completing the outstanding work. The assets will in turn be vested once the subdivision warranty period is complete. The Council has a number of contribution pledges towards the Dudley Park Aquatic Centre which are to be received over the next ten years. As at 30 June 2013, the value of donations outstanding totals $28,000 (2012: $49,000). Contingent assets related to earthquake recovery

Share of associates' contingent liabilities

As a result of the earthquake on 4 September and its subsequent aftershocks the Council has two contingent assets.

Council has not identified any contingent liabilities where it would be severally liable for all or part of the liability.

The first is a contingent asset for subsidies from central government relating to the restoration of infrastructure assets in the District. Government policy is to subsidise 60% of the recovery costs incurred by a Council. In the Council's Ten Year Plan this was estimated to be $17.16 million, excluding subsidy income recorded in the financial statements. For the year ended 30 June 2013 the Council recognised income of $3.4 million (2012: $3.08 million).

Local Government Funding Agency The Council is a guarantor of the New Zealand Local Government Funding Agency Limited (LGFA). The LGFA was incorporated in December 2011 with the purpose of providing debt funding to local authorities in New Zealand and it has a current credit rating from Standard and Poor's of AA+.

The Council also has a contingent asset for insurance recoveries relating to damage on its insured buildings and community facilities. In the Council's Ten Year Plan it was estimated that this will be $8.32 million, excluding income recorded in the financial statements. This is contingent upon the Council's Insurer's continued acceptance of claims. For the year ended 30 June 2013 the Council recognised income of $3.7 million (2012: $14.6 million).

The Council is one of 30 local authority shareholders and 8 local authority guarantors of the LGFA. In that regard it has uncalled capitol of $1m. When aggregated with the uncalled capital of other shareholders, $20m is available in the event that an imminent default is identified. Also, together with the other shareholders and guarantors, the Council is a guarantor of all LGFA's borrowings. At 30 June 2013, NZLGFA had borrowings totaling $2.3 billion (2012 $835m).

Emissions Trading Scheme The New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) became law on 28 September 2008 with the passing of the Climate Change Response (Emissions Trading) Amendment Act 2009 (the Act). The Act provides for carbon credits to be allocated to owners of pre-1990 forest land pursuant to the New Zealand Government's Allocation Plan. The Council has registered its pre-1990 land to receive its entitlements. The latest figures held by The Ministry of Primary Industry shows Council pre 1990 forest being 150.58 hectares.This provides an allocation of 9,060 carbon credits at 30 June 2013. The current market value is $ 18,120 (2012: 8,880 carbon credits $42,624 estimate).

Financial reporting standards require the Council to recognise the guarantee liability at fair value. However, the Council has been unable to determine a sufficiently reliable fair value for the guarantee, and therefore has not recognised a liability. The Council considers the risk of the LGFA defaulting on repayment of interest or capital to be very low on the basis that: • it Is not aware of any local authority debt default events in New Zealand; and • local government legislation would enable local authorities to levy a rate to recover sufficient funds to meet any debt obligations if further funds were required.

Additionally, under the ETS the Council will have an obligation to account for any emission released as a consequence of deforestation of pre-1990 land by surrendering credits equal to the extent of that emissions. The Council has no liability for deforestation as at 30 June 2013 (2012: Nil)"

Local Authority Protection Programme The Council is a member of the Local Authority Protection Programme (LAPP). If there is shortfall (whereby claims exceed contributions of members and reinsurance recoveries) in any Fund year, then LAPP may make a call for additional contributions from its members. Council’s financial exposure to this is up to 5 times of its annual insurance premium and up to a maximum of 2 times a year. Council is not aware of any calls for additional contributions from LAPP in the current year (2012: Nil).

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

 

203


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

26. REMUNERATION Remuneration of Chief Executive In accordance with section 98 and schedule 10 part 3 section 18(1) (c) of the local Government Act 2002. The Chief Executive of the Waimakariri District Council is appointed under section 42(1) of the Local Government Act 2002.

TOTAL REMUNERATION PAID TO THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE

2013

2012

281,000

280,000

Remuneration of Mayor, Councillors and Board Members In accordance with Section 98 and Schedule 10 part 3 (18(1)a and 18(1)b) of the Local Government Act 2002. 2013 2013 Honorarium Meeting / (including mileage and Hearings

2013 Total

2012 Honorarium

2012 Meeting / Hearings

2012 Total

$

$

$

(including mileage and other reimbursements)

other reimbursements)

$

$

$

David Ayers

98,347

-

98,347

98,315

-

98,315

Kevin Felstead

36,955

-

36,955

39,618

-

39,618

Peter Allen

33,335

1,040

34,375

32,669

529

33,198

Neville Atkinson

33,110

-

33,110

32,668

-

32,668

Kirstyn Barnett

33,185

160

33,345

32,668

-

32,668

Roger Blair

33,260

-

33,260

32,683

829

33,512

Robbie Brine

33,260

-

33,260

32,668

80

32,748

Peter Farrant

33,110

-

33,110

32,668

-

32,668

Jim Gerard

33,110

-

33,110

32,786

-

32,786

Dan Gordon

34,001

-

34,001

32,691

691

33,382

John Meyer Kaiapoi Community Board Members

33,110

160

33,270

32,868

-

32,868

Robyn Wallace

7,709

-

7,709

7,606

-

7,606

Caroline Faass

6,074

-

6,074

6,083

-

6,083

Steve Ryder

6,074

-

6,074

6,083

-

6,083

Sandra Stewart

6,892

-

6,892

7,471

-

7,471

Jackie Watson

6,074

-

6,074

6,083

-

6,083

Chris Greengrass

6,250

-

6,250

-

-

-

-

-

-

4,997

-

4,997

Murray Clarke

7,084

-

7,084

6,981

-

6,981

Greg Miller

6,699

-

6,699

6,709

-

6,709

Keith Galloway

6,699

-

6,699

6,709

-

6,709

Judith Hoult

6,699

-

6,699

6,709

-

6,709

Angela Smalley

6,699

-

6,699

6,709

-

6,709

Sharleen Stirling

6,699

-

6,699

6,709

-

6,709

Mayor and Councillors as at 30 June:

Member ceased office Ben Brennan (resigned in April 2012) Rangiora Community Board Members

204

  Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


26. REMUNERATION (cont'd) 2013 Honorarium

2013 Meeting / Hearings

2013 Total

2012 Meeting / Hearings

2012 Total

$

$

$

$

$

$

Duncan Lundy

6,699

-

Keith Nelson

7,307

-

6,699

7,054

-

7,054

7,307

7,645

-

7,645

James Ensor

6,699

Rick Cable

7,726

-

6,699

6,709

-

6,709

-

7,726

6,709

-

Mike Northmore

6,709

6,699

-

6,699

6,709

-

Chris Prickett

6,709

6,699

-

6,699

6,709

-

6,709

(including mileage and other reimbursements)

2012 Honorarium (including mileage and other reimbursements)

Woodend-Ashley Community Board Members

Council Appointees Te Kohaka O Tuhaitara Trust Alan Joliffe TOTAL

296

1,300

1,596

-

638

638

556,560

2,660

559,220

552,682

2,767

555,449

With the enactment of the Local Government Act 2002, the Remuneration Authority is now responsible for setting the remuneration level for elected members. The (Council) monetary remuneration detailed above was determined by the Remuneration Authority. As permitted under the Authority's guidelines the Council chose for its elected members to receive an annual salary rather than the alternative option of a combination of meeting fee payments and annual salary. Meeting fees paid to Councillors relate to Resource Management Act hearings. Council Employees 2013

Percentage of employees

2012

Percentage of employees

Total annual remuneration by band for employees as at 30 June: < $60,000

208

62%

196

62%

$60,000 - $79,999

64

19%

68

21%

$80,000 - $99,999

34

10%

32

10%

$100,000 - $119,999

16

5%

10

3%

$120,000 - $159,999

7

2%

7

2%

$160,000 - $299,999 TOTAL EMPLOYEES

7

2%

4

1%

336

100%

317

100%

Total remuneration includes non-financial benefits provided to employees. At balance date, the Council employed 183 (2012:170) full-time employees, with the balance of staff representing 73 (2012:71) full-time equivalent employees. A full-time employee is determined on the basis of a 40-hour working week.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

205


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

27. RELATED PARTIES

27. RELATED PARTIES (cont'd) (a) Inter-Group Transactions and Balances

All related party transactions between the parties are conducted on normal business terms. SUBSIDIARIES Prime Building Compliance Limited (in Liquidation) The Waimakariri District Council owns 100% of the share capital of Prime Building Compliance Limited. Prime Building Compliance Limited was placed into liquidation on 28 April 2010. The building service functions, which includes building consents processing and building inspections, were brought back within the Waimakariri District Council on 30 November 2009. The liquidation process was still proceeding as at balance date.

Enterprise North Canterbury Amounts paid by the Council (Excluding GST)

2013

2012

$'000

$'000

445

432

Amounts payable to Enterprise North Canterbury (Including GST)

-

-

Amounts received from Enterprise North Canterbury (Excluding GST)

2

39

ASSOCIATES

Accounts payable to the Council (Including GST)

Te Kohaka o Tuhaitara Trust

Unperformed operating commitments by the Council

Te Kohaka o Tuhaitara Trust is a Council Controlled Organisation (CCO). The Trust was formed in response to negotiations between the Crown and Te Runanga o Ngai Tahu over the coastal reserve land. The settlers of the Trust are Council and Te Runanga o Ngai Tahu. The assets administered by the Trust includes the Tuhaitara coastal reserve (which is subject to the reserves act 1971) and the Tutaepatu Lagoon. The Council's ownership is 50%.

Te Kohaka O Tuhaitara Trust

Enterprise North Canterbury Trust

The Council has a commitment to provide an annual grant of $30,000 to Te Kohaka O Tuhaitara Trust.

Enterprise North Canterbury is a Council Controlled Organisation (CCO). Enterprise North Canterbury is a charitable trust which provides promotions and economic development services for the North Canterbury region on behalf of Waimakariri and Hurunui District Councils. Its activities are focussed on developing existing businesses and promoting new businesses within the region. The trust also promotes the region as a visitor destination. The Council's ownership is 50%.

Waimakariri District Libraries Trust

Waimakariri District Libraries Trust

Transwaste Canterbury Limited

The Waimakariri District Libraries Trust was formed to support the Waimakariri District Library Service by providing books and other library resources. The Council's ownership is 50%.

Services provided by the Company (Excluding GST)

Amounts paid by the Council (Excluding GST) Amounts payable by the Council (Including GST) Accounts receivable from the Trust (Excluding GST)

Amounts paid by the Council (Excluding GST)

1

1

441

262

79

63

-

-

21

17

2

2

4

4

2,065

1,867

Waimakariri Arts Collection Trust Amounts paid by the Council (Excluding GST)

Waimakariri Arts Collection Trust

Accounts receivable from the Council (Including GST)

163

153

Dividends paid/payable to the Council (Inclusive of Imputation Credits)

289

234

-

-

Canterbury Economic Development Company Limited

Waimakariri Arts Collection Trust was formed to establish and maintain a collection of artwork of merit that has an association with North Canterbury. The Council's ownership is 33%.

Amounts paid by the Council (Excluding GST) No related party debts have been written off or forgiven during the year.

OTHER Transwaste Canterbury Limited

(b) Key Management and Elected Members

Transwaste Canterbury Limited (TCL) is a Council Controlled Organisation (CCO) under the Local Government Act 2002 as the Waimakariri District Council is one of the Councils in the Canterbury region which between them own 50% of the shares in Transwaste Canterbury Limited. TCL operates a regional landfill at Kate Valley and associated transport services. Canterbury Waste Services owns the other 50% share of the TCL. Council owns 3.9% of the shares in TCL.

During the year elected members and key management, as part of normal customer relationships, were involved in minor transactions with Council (such as payment of rates, purchase of rubbish bags). These services were provided on normal business terms. During the year, the Council contracted SP Ryder Limited, a building company in which Kaiapoi Community Board Member Steve Ryder is a director and shareholder. The value of work totalled $10,735.21 and was supplied on normal commercial terms.

Canterbury Economic Development Company Limited Canterbury Economic Development Company Limited (CEDCL) is a Council Controlled Organisation (CCO) which promotes transformational economic development projects that will benefit Canterbury and to utilise the Canterbury Regional Economic Development Strategy to coordinate strategic economic development initiatives. There are ten local authorities involved, each Council owns 10% of the shares in CEDCL.

Key management personnel compensation

â&#x20AC;&#x201A;ď ľ Salaries and other short term benefits

2013

2012

$'000

$'000

1,587

1,548

Key management personnel received no post employment, termination or other long term benefits in the year ended 30 June 2013 (2012: Nil). Key management personnel include the Mayor, Councillors, Chief Executive and other senior management personnel.

206

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


28. LANDFILL SITES AND AFTERCARE PROVISION All Council refuse landfill sites within the Waimakariri District have been closed. The Council has responsibility to put in place procedures for managing and monitoring these landfills. The Council is complying with all its responsibilities in terms of the resource consents and has been actively monitoring sites within the operational programme. The Council is also currently investigating the extent of landfill post-closure costs.

30. EVENTS AFTER BALANCE DATE There was a storm event on 10th September 2013, which has damaged about 13% of Council’s forestry assets. The estimated loss in forestry value, clean-up costs and repairs to fences after the sale of damaged trees is about $270,000 and not considered significant and will be covered by any existing forestry reserves (2012: none).

To date preliminary risk analysis has not identified any additional costs. Investigations are continuing, and if any costs were identified, these would be provided for at the time. Recent subdivision civil works adjacent to the Kaiapoi closed landfill have required the relocation and redevelopment of groundwater monitoring bores, which will interrupt the history of water quality results.

31. EXPLANATION OF MAJOR VARIANCES AGAINST BUDGET Explanations for major variations from Council's estimated figures in the 2012/2022 Tern Year Plan are as follows:

29. CAPITAL MANAGEMENT The Council's capital is its equity (or rate payers' funds), which comprise retained earning and reserves. Equity is represented by net assets. The Local Government Act 2002 (the Act) requires the Council to manage its revenues, expenses, assets, liabilities, investments, and general financial dealings prudently and in a manner that promotes the current and future interests of the community. Ratepayer's funds are largely managed as a by-product of managing revenues, expenses, assets, liabilities, investments, and general financial dealings. The objective of managing these items is to achieve intergenerational equity, which is a principle promoted in the Act and applied by Council. Intergenerational equity requires today's ratepayers to meet the costs of utilising the Council's asset and not expecting them to meet the full cost of long term assets that will benefit ratepayers in future generations. Additionally, the Council has in place asset management plans for major classes of assets detailing renewal and maintenance programmes, to ensure ratepayers in future generations are not required to meet the costs of deferred renewals and maintenance. The Act requires the council to make adequate and effective provision in its Long term Plan (LTP) and in its annual plans (where applicable) to meet the expenditure needs identified in those plans. The act sets out the factors that the Council is required to consider when determining the most appropriate sources of funding for each of its activities. The sources and levels of funding are set out in the funding and financial policies in the Council's LTP. The Council has the following created reserves:

-reserves for different areas of benefit, including replacement provisions

-self-insurance reserves; and

-trust and bequest reserves

Reserves for different areas of benefits are used where there is a discrete set of rate or levy payers as distinct from the general rate. Any surplus or deficit relating to these separate areas of benefit is applied to the specific reserves. Self-insurance reserves are built up annually from general rates and are made available for specific unforeseen events. The release of these funds generally can only be approved by Council. Trust and bequest reserves are set up where Council has been donated funds that are restricted for particular purpose. Interest is added to trust and bequest reserves where applicable and deductions are made where funds have been used for the purpose the were donated.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

INCOME STATEMENT INCOME Subsidies and Grants were lower than budget due to the delay in the New Ashley Bridge project. This project is now expected to be completed in 2013-14. Development and other contributions were higher than budgeted due to increased development activity in the District. Funds received from development are recognised as income where capacity in the network exists. Excess funds are held in reserves and applied as the funding is required. Actual $14.5m, Budget $11.3m. The Council continued its recovery from the Canterbury Earthquake events. The Council is entitled to recover certain earthquake related expenditure through our Insurers and the Government. Income of $8.3m has been recorded for the period ended 30 June 2013, compared with a budget of $12.6m. Other Gains include unbudgeted gains from the sale of the Southbrook Business Area Development $1.9m and gains on the Council's derivative instruments of $1.6m. Assets vested into Council ownership relates to the assets received from subdivisional developments. The actual amount vested is highly variable from year to year as it is dependent on the progress of subdivision developments within the district. The total vesting to 30 June 2013 was $21.0m compared to the budget of $15.2m. EXPENDITURE District Development - Expenditure was over budget for resource consent processing services by $0.7m. This was due to increased demand for consents from the rebuild of the District after the Canterbury Earthquakes. Water Supply - Expenditure was over budget by $0.7m as a further impairment of $0.6m was made to the value of Pines Kairaki water assets. Sewerage and the Treatment and Disposal of Sewage - Expenditure was under budget by $1.8m. Interest was under budget by $0.8m as debt for the activity was below budget due to delays in the capital programme. Depreciation expense was below budget by $0.7m. Community Protection - Expenditure was over budget for building consenting services by $1.2m. This was due to increased demand for building consents from the rebuild of the District after the Canterbury Earthquakes. Property Management - Expenses were over budget due to the change in fair value from the revaluation of forestry assets of $1.2m and expenses in relation to the sale of the Southbrook Business Area Development. Earthquake Recovery - Expenditure was under budget by $1.5m. Interest was under budget by $0.5m as debt for the activity was below budget due to delays in the capital programme. Operating expenditure for maintaining earthquake damaged infrastructural assets was below budget as the maintenance required is reducing over time.

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207


31. EXPLANATION OF MAJOR VARIANCES AGAINST BUDGET (cont'd) COMPREHENSIVE INCOME The Council recorded a $27.1m gain on asset revaluation (budget $32.6m). This represents the increase in the value of roading, reserves and land and building assets which were revalued at 30 June 2013. The impairment of assets resulted in a decrease in the asset revaluation reserve of $7.4m. This represents the change in the Council's assessment of the impairment to the Council's assets, which was not budgeted for. BALANCE SHEET Assets Current assets are $25.2m higher than budget. Cash is higher than budgeted due to an insurance settlement received for Earthquake Recovery work and bonds held for work required by developers applying for resource consents. Receivables are over budget because of the accrual of $8.7 million of government reimbursements of earthquake recovery expenditure. Infrastructural assets are $9.1 million lower than budget due the impairment of assets as a result of the Canterbury Earthquakes and capital projects being delayed, also as a result of the Canterbury Earthquakes. Liabilities Borrowings (Current and non-current) are $19.6m under budget, mainly due to Earthquake recovery projects not progressing as budgeted.

208

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Cost of Activity Statements

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

209


COST OF ACTIVITY STATEMENTS

Governance

GOVERNANCE for the year ended 30 June 2013

Explanations of significant variances for the activity

2013 Actual

2013 Budget

2012 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

General rates

955

1,295

746

Targeted Rates

294

291

285

Income

Fees and Charges

22

12

40

TOTAL INCOME

1,271

1,598

1,071

1,171

1,241

1,131

279

314

269

96

81

79

1,546

1,636

1,479

Rates Rates levied were lower than the budget as income from reserves and investments was used to reduce the rates required from ratepayers. Please see note 1 to the financial statements.

Operating Expenditure Council Community Boards, Ward Advisory Board Subscriptions, Levies & Grants

-

-

-

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURE

1,546

1,636

1,479

OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

(275)

(38)

(408)

Renewals

-

-

-

New Works

-

-

-

Loan repayments

-

-

-

TOTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

-

-

-

Loans

-

-

-

Reserves

-

-

-

Cash from operating

-

-

-

TOTAL FUNDING

-

-

-

Interest

-

-

-

Depreciation

-

-

-

131

353

336

(275)

(38)

Depreciation

-

-

Development contributions

-

-

(275)

(38)

Internal Interest Elimination

Capital Expenditure

Funded by

Operating Expenditure includes

Corporate services overhead Reconciliation with Funding Impact Statement Surplus (Deficit) of operating funding per Funding Impact Statement

OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

210

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


DISTRICT DEVELOPMENT for the year ended 30 June 2013

District Development Explanations of significant variances for the activity

2013 Actual

2013 Budget

2012 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

1,840

2,496

1,212

116

113

289

Fees and Charges

1,042

459

769

TOTAL INCOME

2,998

3,068

2,270

696

596

394

Income General Rates Targeted Rates

Operating Expenditure District Development Policy and Strategy

900

910

773

Plan Administration

2,097

1,384

1,547

District Promotion

381

379

365

Economic Development

234

247

231

4,308

3,516

3,310

-

-

-

4,308

3,516

3,310

(1,310)

(448)

(1,040)

Renewals

-

-

-

New Works

-

-

-

Loan repayments

-

-

-

TOTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

-

-

-

Loans

-

-

-

Reserves

-

-

-

Cash from operating

-

-

-

TOTAL FUNDING

-

-

-

Interest

-

-

-

Depreciation

-

-

-

239

8

(74)

(849)

-

Internal Interest Elimination TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURE OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

Rates Rates levied were lower than the budget as income from reserves and investments was used to reduce the rates required from ratepayers. Please see note 1 to the financial statements. Fees and Charges Resource consent income was above budget as a result of rebuild and development activity in the District. Operational Expenditure Resource Consent processing expenditure was over budget as a result of rebuild and development activity in the District.

Capital Expenditure

Funded by

Operating Expenditure includes

Corporate services overhead Reconciliation with Funding Impact Statement Surplus (Deficit) of operating funding per Funding Impact Statement Less internal recoveries OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

(461)

(448)

(1,310)

(448)

211


COST OF ACTIVITY STATEMENTS

ROADS AND FOOTPATHS for the year ended 30 June 2013

ROADS AND FOOTPATHS (cont'd) for the year ended 30 June 2013

2013 Actual

2013 Budget

2012 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

Income Roading Rates Fees and Charges

7,593

7,331

7,158

290

138

275

Petrol Tax

364

307

349

Subsidies

4,435

5,156

5,417

Interest

$’000

$’000

363 6,529 985

1,049 6,085 697 1,021

713 5,820 983

Surplus (Deficit) of operating funding per Funding Impact Statement

3,852

2,648

(6,529) 2,103 1,634 (3)

(6,085) 3,001 1,106 -

1,057

671

-

86

1,106

1,130

14,352

14,038

14,415

Structural Maintenance

2,023

1,935

1,869

Depreciation Subsidies and grants for capital Development contributions Assets written off

Corridor Maintenance

1,312

1,344

1,350

OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

Land Transport and Safety

121

110

119

Other Maintenance

994

761

1,104

Operating Expenditure Subsidised Maintenance

2012 Actual

$’000

36

TOTAL INCOME

2013 Budget

Operating Expenditure includes Interest Depreciation Depreciation not funded Corporate services overhead Reconciliation with Funding Impact Statement

1,634

Contributions

2013 Actual

Unsubsidised Expenditure General Maintenance

451

372

356

Management Costs

517

740

583

Interest Depreciation Council Overheads Internal Interest Elimination TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURE OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

754

1,049

713

6,529

6,085

5,820

985

1,021

983

13,686

13,417

12,897

391

50

338

13,295

13,367

12,559

1,057

671

1,856

Roads and Footpaths Explanations of significant variances for the activity Subsidies Roading subsidies were under budget largely due to the in the New Ashley Bridge project which is due to be completed in 2013-14. Fees and Charges Resource consent income was above budget as a result of rebuild and development activity in the District.

Capital Expenditure Renewals

4,233

4,444

5,176

New Works

2,326

2,954

2,964

217

249

181

6,776

7,647

8,321

800

1,065

525

-

573

5,904

Cash from operating

5,976

6,009

1,892

TOTAL FUNDING

6,776

7,647

8,321

Loan Principal Repayments TOTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

Operational Expenditure Depreciation charges over budget due to the revaluation of roading assets at 30 June 2012.

Funded by Loans Reserves

212

 

Capital Expenditure New works under budget as the design of the new Ashley Bridge project was still being finalised at 30 June 2013.

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


WATER SUPPLY for the year ended 30 June 2013

WATER SUPPLY (cont'd) for the year ended 30 June 2013

2013 Actual

2013 Budget

2012 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

Income General Rates Targeted Rates Fees and Charges Interest Development Contributions

1 5,195 213 135 2,085

2 5,199 411 66 1,528

1 4,421 160 66 1,265

TOTAL INCOME

7,629

7,206

5,913

Operating Expenditure Rangiora Woodend Pegasus Waikuku Fernside Ohoka Mandeville Kaiapoi North East Kaiapoi Structure Plan Area Pines / Kairaki Oxford No 1 Rural Oxford No 2 Rural Oxford Summerhill Cust Poyntz Road West Eyreton Garrymere Water Race Water Investigation

2,269 295 202 92 45 44 208 689 2 72 274 124 328 193 78 38 34 34 312 1

1,763 270 253 87 45 52 217 697 1 88 238 129 342 143 93 36 30 36 415 -

6,190

5,334

4,935

464

320

338

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURE

5,726

5,014

4,597

OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

1,903

2,192

1,316

550 1,375 895

679 3,785 343

631 9,424 392

2,820

4,807

10,447

Internal Interest Elimination

Capital Expenditure Renewals New Works Loan Repayments TOTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

2013 Budget

2012 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

77

2,182

7,490

-

-

541

2,743

2,625

2,416

2,820

4,807

10,447

Funded by Loans Reserves Cash from operating TOTAL FUNDING Operating expenditure includes Interest

2,109 351 298 87 51 52 387 625 1 669 322 156 379 195 68 42 51 39 308 -

2013 Actual

Depreciation Depreciation not funded Corporate services overhead

429

1,197

713

1,208

1,340

1,100

-

89

-

430

450

385

1,886

2,004

Reconciliation with Funding Impact Statement Surplus (Deficit) of operating funding per Funding Impact Statement Depreciation

(1,208)

(1,340)

Development contributions

2,085

1,528

Assets written off

(241)

-

Impairment recognised on P&L

(619)

-

1,903

2,192

OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

Water Supply Explanations of significant variances for the activity Development Contributions Development Contributions was above budget as a result of rebuild and development activity in the District. Operational Expenditure A further impairment because of earthquake damage of $0.6m was made to the value of Pines Kairaki water assets.

 

Capital Expenditure New works under budget due to the Rangiora Alternative Source project being delivered under budget.

213


COST OF ACTIVITY STATEMENTS

SEWERAGE AND THE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL OF SEWAGE for the year ended 30 June 2013

SEWERAGE AND THE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL OF SEWAGE (cont'd) for the year ended 30 June 2013

2013 Actual

2013 Budget

2012 Actual

2013 Actual

2013 Budget

2012 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

Income General Rates Targeted Rates Fees and Charges Interest Development Contributions TOTAL INCOME

Operating expenditure includes 42

57

34

6,711

6,872

6,441

422

175

343

Depreciation

54

14

133

Depreciation not funded

3,296

3,729

2,370

Corporate services overhead

10,525

10,847

9,321

Reconciliation with Funding Impact Statement

5,292

6,719

5,477

Impairment/(impairment reversal) Interest

Surplus (Deficit) of operating funding per Funding Impact Statement

Operating Expenditure Total Eastern District Communities Southbrook

123

135

167

East Rangiora

105

105

78

East Woodend

38

54

36

Fernside

27

32

33

Ohoka Meadows

29

36

42

Swannanoa

28

32

28

Mandeville

57

41

75

4

-

4

46

56

43

North Kaiapoi Area A Loburn Lea Oxford Internal Interest Elimination

511

547

456

6,260

7,757

6,439

726

433

996

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURE

5,534

7,324

5,443

OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

4,991

3,523

3,878

Depreciation Development contributions Assets written off OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

-

-

(341)

674

1,891

2,105

1,646

2,341

1,449

-

388

-

594

620

583

3,382

2,135

(1,646)

(2,341)

3,296

3,729

(41)

-

4,991

3,523

Capital Expenditure Renewals

563

1,550

491

New Works

4,056

5,206

305

Loan Repayments

1,503

621

6,949

TOTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

6,122

7,377

7,745

Loans

-

2,020

1,413

Reserves

-

-

1,346

Funded by

Cash from operating

6,122

5,357

4,986

TOTAL FUNDING

6,122

7,377

7,745

214

 

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Sewerage and the Treatment and Disposal of Sewage Explanations of significant variances for the activity Development Contributions Development Contributions are less than budget due to the delay in completion of the Amalgamation of Mandeville, Ohoka, Swannanoa sewer project. Operational Expenditure Interest was under budget by $0.8m as debt for the activity was below budget due to delays in the capital programme. Depreciation expense was below budget by $0.7m, also due to delays in the completion of the capital programme. Capital Expenditure Both renewals and new works under budget because of projects which were not completed at year end. Significant projects that were delayed include: • Mandeville Waste Water Treatment Plants - decommissioning of old treatment plants to occur; • West Rangiora Structure Plan Area Pump Station & Rising Main - still being designed at 30 June 2013; • West Kaiapoi Structure Plan Area Pump Station & Rising Main - fully developer driven; • Rangiora Ivory St Catchment Diversion - construction was being tendered at year end; • Tuahiwi Pump Station Replacement - being constructed at year end; and • Ocean Outfall Corrosion work - project delayed due to hold ups in materials.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

215


COST OF ACTIVITY STATEMENTS

STORMWATER DRAINAGE for the year ended 30 June 2013

STORMWATER DRAINAGE (cont'd) for the year ended 30 June 2013

2013 Actual

2013 Budget

2012 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

Income General Rates Targeted Rates Fees and Charges Interest Development Contributions TOTAL INCOME

100

136

82

2,796

2,698

2,236

31

21

28

48

16

34

887

1,026

1,101

3,862

3,897

3,481

2013 Actual

2013 Budget

2012 Actual $’000

$’000

$’000

Reserves

1,699

3,900

1,177

Cash from operating

1,903

1,534

1,854

3,826

8,723

8,236

TOTAL FUNDING Operating expenditure includes Interest

439

813

720

Depreciation

392

619

315

-

33

-

218

228

193

708

Depreciation not funded

Operating Expenditure

Corporate services overhead

Rangiora

840

857

731

Reconciliation with Funding Impact Statement

Southbrook East Rangiora Coastal Urban

308 91

129 113 202

155 98

Surplus (Deficit) of operating funding per Funding Impact Statement

1,243

Depreciation

(392)

(619)

East Woodend

-

35

-

887

1,026

Pegasus Kaiapoi Kaiapoi - Area A Oxford Ohoka Rural

151

196

153

Assets written off

(227)

-

1,056

1,057

800

OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

1,511

1,117

-

8

-

42

56

58

112

104

86

Loburn Lea

11

18

14

Oxford Rural

19

40

30

Clarkville

31

31

27

Coastal Rural

78

69

79

Central Rural

84

64

48

1

2

4

2,824

2,981

2,283

Cust Internal Interest Elimination

Development contributions

473

202

341

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURE

2,351

2,780

1,942

OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

1,511

1,117

1,539

Capital Expenditure Renewals New Works Loan Repayments TOTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

25

70

140

3,547

7,986

7,932

254

667

164

3,826

8,723

8,236

224

3,289

5,205

Funded by Loans

216

 

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Stormwater Drainage Explanations of significant variances for the activity Operational Expenditure Interest was under budget by $0.2m as debt for the activity was below budget due to delays in the capital programme. Depreciation expense was below budget by $0.2m, also due to delays in the completion of the capital programme. Capital Expenditure New works under budget due to: • West Rangiora Structure Plan Area Land Purchase - dependent on Ravenscar and Waters/Vermeulen developments; • East Woodend Detention Pond - design and consenting work underway at year end; • East Woodend Internal Reticulation - no development work had been performed in 2012/13; and • Southbrook Development - project completed under budget.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

217


COST OF ACTIVITY STATEMENTS

SOLID WASTE for the year ended 30 June 2013

RECREATION for the year ended 30 June 2013

2013 Actual

2013 Budget

2012 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

General Rates

359

487

154

General Rates

Targeted Rates

896

915

908

Community Services Rates

3,678

3,613

3,387

13

38

39

Interest Waste Minimisation charges

Targeted Rates Fees and Charges Subsidies

232

220

193

5,178

5,273

4,681

Disposal

3,722

3,434

3,589

TOTAL INCOME

Collection

1,485

1,525

1,485

Operating Expenditure

364

298

293

5,571

5,257

5,367

45

7

6

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURE

5,526

5,250

5,361

OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

(348)

23

(680)

TOTAL INCOME

Internal Interest Elimination

Capital Expenditure Renewals New Works

-

6

-

78

170

1,302

Loan Repayments

19

7

4

TOTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

97

183

1,306

-

-

1,100

97

86

206

-

97

-

97

183

1,306

Funded by Loans Reserves Cash from operating TOTAL FUNDING Operating expenditure includes Interest

41

21

12

Depreciation

104

74

98

Corporate services overhead

373

378

388

(244)

96

(104)

(74)

(348)

23

Reconciliation with Funding Impact Statement Surplus (Deficit) of operating funding per Funding Impact Statement Depreciation OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

218

Development Contributions Gain on Sale

Operating Expenditure

Waste Minimisation

2013 Budget

2012 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

Income

Income

Fees and Charges

2013 Actual

Reserves

532

722

332

7,790

8,126

7,579

42

40

214

1,860

1,447

1,369

41

-

-

6,182

3,478

1,472

-

-

2

16,447

13,813

10,968 4,736

4,965

4,799

Airfield

271

248

347

Buildings

815

912

864

Pools

3,506

3,568

3,869

Central Business Areas

201

198

222

Camping Grounds

101

112

153

Community Grants

282

289

593

Public Conveniences Internal Interest Elimination TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURE OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

483

435

469

10,624

10,561

11,253

532

187

400

10,092

10,374

10,853

6,355

3,439

115

Capital Expenditure Renewals New Works Loan Repayments TOTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

570

1,831

444

7,880

8,511

1,007

266

337

223

8,716

10,679

1,674

-

4,442

-

1,234

-

544

Funded by Loans Reserves Cash from operating

7,482

6,237

1,130

TOTAL FUNDING

8,716

10,679

1,674

494

1,058

930

Operating expenditure includes Interest

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252

 


RECREATION (cont'd) for the year ended 30 June 2013

Depreciation Dpreciation not funded Corporate services overhead

Recreation Explanations of significant variances for the activity

2013 Actual

2013 Budget

2012 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

1,127

1,374

1,015

-

114

-

752

880

820

1,698

1,335

Reconciliation with Funding Impact Statement Surplus (Deficit) of operating funding per Funding Impact Statement Depreciation

(1,127)

(1,374)

Development contributions

6,182

3,478

Assets written off

(398)

-

6,355

3,439

OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

Development Contributions Reserve Development Contributions was above budget as a result of rebuild and development activity in the District. Capital Expenditure Renewals under budget due to: • Toilet Renewals (Kaiapoi Town Centre) - The plan was being reviewed by the Kaiapoi Riverbanks Steering Group; • Hard Court Renewals (District wide) - Construction was just started before 30 June 2013; and • Mandeville Sports Ground Capital Works - various works to be completed. New works under budget mainly due to: • The Rangiora Town Hall & Performing Arts Centre project was delayed (still being designed at year end) and Council's spending on land purchases (for Recreation) was less than budgeted.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

219


COST OF ACTIVITY STATEMENTS

LIBRARIES AND MUSEUMS for the year ended 30 June 2013

Libraries and Museums Explanations of significant variances for the activity

2013 Actual

2013 Budget

2012 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000 1,900

Income Targeted Community Services Rates

2,056

2,139

Targeted Rates

372

385

357

Fees and Charges

156

2,161

169

21

20

20

Interest Development Contributions TOTAL INCOME

370

466

130

2,975

5,171

2,576

2,250

2,280

2,251

394

389

369

3

7

6

2,647

2,676

2,626

Fees and Charges Insurance recoveries budgeted were not received. These are now expected to be received in 2013-14. Capital Expenditure Renewals under budget as the Kaiapoi Library project was to be tendered at 30 June 2013. This project is expected to be completed in 2014.

Operating Expenditure Library Museum Operational Levy Museums Internal Interest Elimination TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURE OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

6

3

6

2,641

2,673

2,620

334

2,498

(44)

Capital Expenditure Renewals

1,399

2,700

281

New Works

6

180

104

Loan Repayments

6

6

6

1,411

2,886

391

-

-

-

662

-

52

TOTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Funded by Loans Reserves Cash from operating TOTAL FUNDING

749

2,886

339

1,411

2,886

391

Operating expenditure includes Interest

5

11

12

Depreciation

415

369

383

Corporate services overhead

194

209

189

379

2,402

(415)

(369)

Reconcilation with Funding Impact Statement Surplus (Deficit) of operating funding per Funding Impact Statement Depreciation Development contributions

370

466

OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

334

2,498

220

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Community Protection

COMMUNITY PROTECTION for the year ended 30 June 2013

Explanations of significant variances for the activity

2013 Actual

2013 Budget

2012 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

Income General Rates Targeted Rates Fees and Charges Subsidies

983 221 6,776 1

1,333 212 5,063 -

771 191 4,299 1

TOTAL INCOME

7,981

6,608

5,262

Operating Expenditure Civil Defence Environmental Services Building Services Stock Control Dog Control Rural Fire Cemeteries

312 1,149 5,365 43 388 194 106

340 1,346 4,169 29 358 195 155

300 1,252 3,597 34 315 197 124

7,557

6,592

5,819

4

-

53

7,553

6,592

5,766

Internal Interest Elimination TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURE OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

430

16

(504)

Capital Expenditure Renewals New Works Loan Repayments

40 23 12

62 142 6

2 22 179

TOTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

75

210

203

Funded by Loans Reserves Cash from operating

22 53

123 87

203 -

TOTAL FUNDING

75

210

203

Operating expenditure includes Interest Depreciation Corporate services overhead Reconciliation with Funding Impact Statement

3 7 428

27 6 439

26 6 351

Surplus (Deficit) of operating funding per Funding Impact Statement

436

23

(7) -

(6) -

430

16

Depreciation Development contributions OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

Fees and Charges Building consent income was above budget as a result of rebuild and development activity in the District. Operational Expenditure Expenditure was over budget for building consenting services by $1.2m. This was due to increased demand for building consents from the rebuild of the District after the Canterbury Earthquakes.

221


COST OF ACTIVITY STATEMENTS

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT for the year ended 30 June 2013

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (cont'd) for the year ended 30 June 2013

2013 Actual

2013 Budget

2012 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

Income

2013 Actual

2013 Budget

2012 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

Surplus (Deficit) of operating funding per Funding Impact Statement

1226

2052

(196)

(247)

-

-

Reconciliation with Funding Impact Statement

General Rates

234

318

160

Fees and Charges

872

895

1,076

1,214

2,000

-

Depreciation

9

3

9

Development contributions

139

65

-

Assets written off

2,468

3,281

1,245

285

265

385

55

56

80

Safer Communities

153

165

151

Injury Prevention

109

142

117

Earthquake Recoveries - Insurance Interest Subsidies TOTAL INCOME

OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

(390)

-

640

1804

Operating Expenditure Community Development Social Services

Youth Development Housing for the Elderly Community Housing Internal Interest Elimination TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURE OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

67

63

-

1,079

685

596

105

101

97

1,853

1,477

1,426

25

-

24

1,828

1,477

1,402

640

1,804

(157)

1,719

2,000

4

-

30

-

53

30

74

1,772

2,060

78

-

-

-

936

-

39

Community Development Explanations of significant variances for the activity Earthquake Recoveries - Insurance Earthquake Insurance recoveries relating to Housing for the Elderly were under budget. The balance is expected to be received in 2013-14. Operational Expenditure Expenditure was over budget because of the write-off of Housing for the Elderly units in the Kaiapoi red-zone.

Capital Expenditure Renewals New Works Loan Repayments TOTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

Capital Expenditure Total project costs for the Hills St housing for the elderly units (renewals) are budgeted at $5m with $3m in 2013/14. During the current financial year, Council has purchased the land in Kaiapoi and relevant consents had been applied for. Construction is planned to begin in the new financial year.

Funded by Loans Reserves Cash from operating TOTAL FUNDING

836

2,060

39

1,772

2,060

78

Operating expenditure includes Interest Depreciation Corporate services overhead

222

22

53

51

196

247

196

70

71

67

 

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


PROPERTY MANAGEMENT for the year ended 30 June 2013

PROPERTY MANGEMENT (cont'd) for the year ended 30 June 2013

2013 Actual

2013 Budget

2012 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

Income Forestry revenue Investment property revenue Other revenue

32

377

82

161

132

211

73

4

60

Interest

182

248

175

Dividends

289

373

234

Gain on sale / Revaluation

1,963

270

1,960

TOTAL INCOME

2,700

1,404

2,722

Surplus (Deficit) of operating funding per Funding Impact Statement Depreciation Dividends Gain on sale Revaluation loss on investment properties Revaluation loss on forestry assets

Civic Buildings Investment Property Other Property

Assets written off 157

165

139

(5)

14

60

752

130

162

275

52

156

Forestry

1,322

178

168

Investments

(238)

6

1,048

2,263

545

1,733

28

7

26

2,235

538

1,707

Internal Interest Elimination TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURE Less Taxation expense OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

75

112

390

754

Taxation Internal surplus from Council Water Unit OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

New Works Loan Repayments TOTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

-

-

6

78

641

13

15

13

2,249

93

660

2,082

27

-

Loans

-

-

-

Reserves

-

-

-

167

66

660

2,249

93

660

Cash from operating TOTAL FUNDING

Depreciation Corporate services overhead

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

26

64

55

455

338

376

33

33

33

$’000

224

570

(455)

(338)

289

373

1,963

270

(46)

-

(1,201)

-

(309)

-

(75)

(112)

-

(9)

390

754

Operational Expenditure Expenditure was over budget due to the change in fair value from the revaluation of forestry assets of $1.2m and expenses in relation to the sale of Southbrook Business Area Development. Capital Expenditure New works above budget as the Southbrook Business Park project completed this year was not budgeted.

Operating expenditure includes Interest

$’000

Gain on sale/Revaluation This reflects the gain on the sale of Southbrook Business Area Development which was finalised in June 13.

Funded by Capital Income

$’000

Explanations of significant variances for the activity

1,015

2,236

2012 Actual

Property Management

Capital Expenditure Renewals

2013 Budget

Reconciliation with Funding Impact Statement

Operating Expenditure General Management

2013 Actual

 

223


COST OF ACTIVITY STATEMENTS

EARTHQUAKE RECOVERY for the year ended 30 June 2013

EARTHQUAKE RECOVERY (cont'd) for the year ended 30 June 2013

2013 Actual

2013 Budget

2012 Actual

$’000

$’000

$’000

Income Rates

-

-

203

-

-

Recovery - Insurance

2,501

4,318

14,643

Recovery - Government

3,369

4,051

3,158

-

-

308

158

264

133

Recovery - NZTA Subsidy

1,064

2,266

443

TOTAL INCOME

7,295

10,899

19,812

621

640

957

-

400

-

General Response and Recovery

872

525

803

Water

235

20

2,199

Sewer

130

890

8,138

Drainage

180

330

1,480

Roading

126

432

1,736

Rent -Temporary Business Accommodation

Recovery - EQC Recovery - Other

Rates Remissions

Recreation

1,127

504

390

2,016

1,028

1,041

-

3,696

4,668

17,329

534

-

-

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURE

3,162

4,668

17,329

OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

4,133

6,231

2,483

12,195

18,962

7,281

423

1,607

-

-

537

-

12,618

21,106

7,281

Loans

-

5,200

5,000

Transfer to Libraries and Museums

-

(215)

-

Reserves

8,485

9,890

-

Cash from operating

4,133

6,231

2,281

12,618

21,106

7,281

Interest Internal Interest Elimination

Interest

New Works Loan repayments TOTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

224

$’000

$’000

$’000

494

1,041

352

-

-

-

Corporate services overhead Reconciliation with Funding Impact Statement

-

-

-

(300)

(86)

Subsidies and grants for capital expenditure

4,433

6,317

OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

4,133

6,231

Earthquake Recovery Explanations of significant variances for the activity Recoveries Recoveries from Insurance and Government are below budget due to delays in the recovery programme. Operational Expenditure Expenditure was under budget due to the maintenance required for earthquake damaged infrastructure reducing over time. Interest was under budget due to delays in the recovery programme. Capital Expenditure Renewals under budget. Significant projects that were delayed include: • Chapman Place Sewer - tender closed before 30 June 2013;

Funded by

TOTAL FUNDING

2012 Actual

Depreciation

Surplus (Deficit) of operating funding per Funding Impact Statement

Capital Expenditure Renewals

2013 Long Term Plan

Operating expenditure includes

Operating Expenditure Recovery Centre

2013 Actual

• Kaiapoi Sewer Relining - under construction at year end;

 

Continued on next page

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 


Earthquake Recovery (cont'd) Explanations of significant variances for the activity Capital Expenditure Renewals under budget. Significant projects that were delayed include: • Holland Drive Sewer - tender closed in April 2013 and construction was started end of June 2013; • Rangiora Sewer - under construction at year end; • Kaiapoi Wharf - the Working Party was working on the cost plan at year end; • War Memorial Building Kaiapoi - work scope was still to be finalised; • Kairaki Motor Camp - public consultation underway; • Kaiapoi Town Centre - project scope still being discussed; and • Kaiapoi Town Centre Bridge Improvements - under construction; • New works under budget as seismic strengthening at various sites was still work in progress at year end.

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Other Disclosures

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

227


OTHER DISCLOSURES

Other Disclosures Maori Contributions To Decision-Making

proposals and processes and to maintain relationships

(Clause 35, Part 3, Schedule 10 - Local Government Act

between both parties. There were seven monthly

2002).

meetings held, and one Annual Hui, between 1 July 2012

The Waimakariri District Council has undertaken the following activities to establish and maintain processes which provide opportunities for Maori to contribute to the decision-making processes of the Council: Monthly Meetings

Some key topics considered in the 2012/13 year during monthly forum meetings included:

and 30 June 2013. Any meetings postponed during this

Stormwater Drainage

period were generally due to a shortage of business or tangis at the Marae. During the 2012/2013 year

• Drain Cleaning Arrangements – renewal of Drainage Maintenance Contract

the Mayor and Chief Executive have attended most of

• East Woodend Stormwater Basin

these meetings, as well as various staff involved in the

• Waimakariri Zone Lowland Streams Advisory Group

meeting administration and item presentation.

• Kaiapoi Lakes Biological Control of Aquatic Weeds • Comprehensive Stormwater consent

One of the key techniques that the Council uses

These meetings provide an avenue for kanohi ki

to build the capacity of Maori to participate in its

te kanohi (face to face) discussion about aspects

decision-making is in hosting and facilitating monthly

of various Council activities that impact on or are

forum meetings between representatives of the

of interest to the Runanga and local iwi, including

Executive of Te Ngai Tuahuriri Runanga, Councillor

resource management and infrastructure development

representatives and Council staff.

projects.

Under the requirements of the Memorandum of

Council advises the Runanga about opportunities for

• Bramleys Road sealing

Understanding between Te Ngai Tuahuriri Runanga

their participation in any decision of interest through

• Cones Road/Ashley Bridge update on new design

(December 2003, updated and adopted by Council

these monthly forum meetings. Within the meetings,

7 may 2013) and the Waimakariri District Council, a

information about any projects likely to be of interest

Water Supply

meeting is to be held monthly, as required, to share

to the Runanga are circulated for participants to view

• Tuahiwi Water Supply Project

information and views on the Resource Management

and to take back to discuss further within the Runanga

Act 1991 processes, to provide advice on other relevant

Executive’s own management meetings.

• Rangiora and Oxford water supplies discontinuation of chlorination

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• Henry Hudson Report – Kaiapoi River • Cam River Enhancement Fund sub-committee • Global consent for drain maintenance and minor works • McIntosh Drain catchment

Roads and Footpaths

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


District Development

Earthquake Recovery

Costs

• Development/sub-division activity

• Regular updates on social issues and economic development

costs associated with attendance by Runanga

• Maori Reserve 873 and consultation update • Old North Road Urupa

Governance • Marae opening

• Regular updates on construction activity for permanent recovery works • The Natural Environment Recovery Plan (NERP) • The Land Use Recovery Plan (LURP)

• Council sought advice on naming of reserves using local Maori names

Community Services Information

• Memorandum of Understanding Review

• Family Violence Network

• Council sought advice on the presentation and laying out of the pre-European collection for the new Kaiapoi Library/Museum • Annual Hui

• Waimakariri Community Directory 2012 • Parenting Support and Information for Families

The Council has agreed to reimburse some representatives at the monthly forum meetings to enable their participation, acknowledging that their time is voluntarily given. Annual Hui Another key feature of Council’s approach to Maori capacity building was in the attendance at the Annual Hui on Tuesday 5 March 2013, hosted this year by the new marae in Tuahiwi. This enabled the Councillors and Council staff to consider a number of issues

• Injury Prevention including suicides

of particular significance to the Runanga, including

• Local Alcohol Policy

discussion on the Memorandum of Understanding

• Review of the Gambling and Board Venue Policies

review, Maori Reserve 873, Tuahiwi water supply, and Council’s draft Annual Plan. The notes of that Hui

• Iwi Management Plan

Green Space

• Council’s submission to Ecan’s draft Annual Plan

• Naming of Parks and Reserves Policy

Annual Plan 2013-2014.

• A general update on the status of Pegasus town

• Update on Grass Carp as a potential biological control in the Kaiapoi Lakes

Tuahiwi Water Supply Project

• Kaiapoi Riverbanks Steering Group

The Council had formed the Tuahiwi Water Supply

• Repair of Tukutuku panels in the Council foyer • Maori Language Week

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

• Kaiapoi Aquatic Centre landscaping

formed the written submission on the Council’s draft

Working Party following the 2009 Hui to identify and assess options for bringing a water supply to the

229


OTHER DISCLOSURES

Tuahiwi area. After extensive consultation with the Tuahiwi community and concluding in September 2011, the Council approved, and has since commenced, constructing the community water supply for Tuahiwi,

sourced from Woodend at Gladstone Road. This is likely to be operational by January 2014. Council has confirmed through its Annual Plan

additional budget of $240,000 in 2013/2014 for the Tuahiwi water supply extension and sewer reticulation upgrade, which will be recovered through residential properties in Tuahiwi, the Woodend Water Supply and the Eastern Districts Sewer Scheme. Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) Review The MOU had not been through a formal review since its adoption in December 2003. This review was discussed at monthly meetings and through the Hui on 5 March 2013 and input was provided by Mahaanui Kurataiao Ltd.

Feedback was minor which included:

Incorporating grammatical changes

Support from Mahaanui Kurataiao Ltd as a resource to Council and the Runanga, changes

230

from the Local Government and Resource Management Acts

responsible for project services on behalf of Te Ngai

Reflecting the Mahaanui Iwi Management Plan 2013 and the Ngai Tahu Freshwater Policy 1999 as the key planning documents for the Waimakariri District

management. This resource now also sits in-house one

Use of the Marae for various meetings including as a Welfare Centre

David Ayers at a formal ceremony with other Councils

An update of the Community Outcomes

Marae. Iwi Management Plans have statutory

This feedback was collated and the Memorandum of Understanding 2013 was adopted by Council at its 7 May 2013 meeting. Mahaanui Kurataiao Ltd Council has confirmed its arrangement it made with Mahaanui Kurataiao Ltd (MKT) through its Services and Funding Agreement, originally signed on 10 December 2009, by extending MKT’s service for a further year. Budget approval has been made through Council’s Annual Plan of $30,000 to give effect to this service. The Council now has a permanent resource person from MKT who attends the monthly meetings and is

Tuahuriri Runanga in regards to planning and resource day per fortnight. Mahaanui Iwi Management Plan 2013 The Iwi Management Plan was received by Mayor in the takiwa area on 1 March 2013 at the Tuahiwi recognition under the Resource Management Act (1991), and Iwi Management Plans must be taken into account when preparing or changing regional policy statements and plans, and District Plans. There are two one-hour training sessions planned in the month of July, facilitated by MKT for staff and Councillors to familiarise themselves with the Plan. Some more detailed Phase 2 workshops will follow. Maori Reserve 873 In addition to the above opportunities Council consults directly with Maori landowners about any issues that affect them.

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Council staff are currently developing the content of a District Plan Change to then recommend to the Council. This includes collating supporting information on the environmental constraints that will need to be understood in order to effectively implement a Plan Change, which will enable the land in MR873 to be used in the manner as set out in Kemps Deed and the Crown grant of 1862, that is, as places of residence and living for the grantees and those who come after. In the interim, Council staff are also collating the response from the recent consultation on issues and options for development. Five forms of development were identified which would provide additional housing within the reserve. The feedback from this consultation will help to inform Council in its decision to make changes to the District Plan. Those changes will then be put out for formal public consultation before any changes to the District Plan are made.

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Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Glossary

233

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


GLOSSARY

Glossary Activity Related or like services that are grouped together for management and budgeting purposes. Allocated Costs A form of spending where one Council department pays for services provided by another department. Annual Plan This Plan is prepared annually and reflects the overall structure and focus of the Ten Year Plan for that given year. Assets Assets are things that the Council owns such as roads, parks, footpaths, buildings. Capital Expenditure This is spending on new Council assets or replacing existing assets. CBD Central Business Districts of Kaiapoi and Rangiora.

234

Capital Value The probable sale price of the freehold interest of the property if offered for sale at the time of valuation.

have the right, directly or indirectly, to appoint 50% or

Community Outcomes How the community wants the District to be, to make it a better place to live, work and play.

Is a Council-controlled organisation that operates

Community Boards Selected community members/ward councillors to represent the interests of the community to Council. Contestable Fund Funding, often supplied by central Government, for which individuals and organisations, including district councils, may apply. Council-Controlled Organisation A Council-controlled organisation is a company in which equity securities carrying 50% or more of the voting right at a meeting of the shareholders of the company are held by one or more local authorities; or controlled, directly or indirectly, by one or more local authorities; or in which one or more local authorities

more of the directors of the company. Council-Controlled Trading Organisation a trading undertaking for the purposes of making a profit. Depreciation This accounts for the annual cost of the wearing out of or the economic use of our assets. It is generally based on the value of the asset divided by its remaining life. Development Contributions Money required from developers to recover the cost of providing infrastructure that caters for future growth. Expenditure Spending by Council. Financial Year Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s financial year runs from 1 July to 30 June the following year.

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


General Rate A rate based on the value of every property in the District. Indigenous Vegetation Site Areas of indigenous vegetation listed in and protected through the provisions of the Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s District Plan. Hearing

Loan Funds This is money used by Council that it has obtained by raising a loan. Local Government Act 2002 The key legislation that defines the regulations and responsibilities for local authorities including Waimakariri District Council.

Your chance for your views to be expressed in person to the Council, following its receipt of your written submission. Hearing Panel A selection of councillors who will hear all submissions made in person. Infrastructural Assets Fixed utility systems that provide a continuing service to the community and are not generally regarded as tradeable. These assets include roads, waste, sewerage and stormwater systems. Internal Recoveries Payment by one Council department to another in return for a service provided. Land Value The probable price that would be paid for the bare land as at the date of valuation. The value includes development work such as drainage, excavation, filling, levelling, retaining walls, clearing, fertility build-up, flood protection.

Annual Report 2012-2013 130802059252

Long Term Plan (LTP) or Ten Year Plan (TYP) A plan, adopted every three years, that sets the strategic direction for the Council over the next 10 years and outlines Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contribution towards achieving the community outcomes. Main District Towns Kaiapoi, Oxford, Pegasus, Rangiora and Woodend. Mission This describes Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basic purpose (its fundamental reason for being) and specifies the role Council is going to play in its environment.

Public Benefit This relates to spending which benefits the community in general and for which no individual beneficiaries can be clearly identified. Private Benefit This occurs when individuals who benefit from a service can be clearly identified and therefore charged for that service. It applies to user charges, application fees, purchase price, and water by meter, though there are exceptions to the rule. Rates Funds collected from property owners in the District. Regional Policy Statement (RPS) Regional Policy statements must be prepared for each region in line with the requirements of the Resource Management Act. They enable regional councils to provide broad direction for all of the territorial local authorities in their region and a framework for resource management which each District Plan must

Operating Expenditure Spending for the normal day-to-day services of Council. This also includes depreciation, interest on loans and allocated costs.

give effect to.

Output Services, activities or goods produced by Council.

as the originals.

Policy Guidelines to support effective decision making.

The final waste product that has no resource content

Renewal Expenditure This is spending that replaces deteriorating assets with new assets that have the same service potential

Residual Waste and currently goes to landfill.

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GLOSSARY

Resource Consent This is permission to use resources such as land, water and air, granted under the Resource Management Act 1991. Restricted Assets Assets that cannot be disposed of because of legal or other restrictions and that provide benefit or service to the community. They include reserves vested under the Reserves Act 1977, endowments and property held in

Special Funds / Reserve Funds Money set aside for a specific purpose. Strategy Outlines how the District is going to undertake particular actions to deliver the community outcomes. Submission Your opportunity to tell the Waimakariri District Council your views on the Ten Year Plan. Submissions need to be made in writing.

trust for specific purposes. Revenue Money received by Council. Revenue and Financing Policy

Targeted Rating Area A defined geographical area which attracts a specific rating requirement.

services provided by Council. The policy outlines who

Uniform Annual Charge (UAC) A specific levy of an equal amount on each rateable property. This amount does not vary with the value of

will benefit for each Activity and who should pay for it,

the property.

This is a statement about who should pay for the

taking into account fairness and what is practical. Service Levels & Performance Targets A measure of the service that the activities deliver i.e. number of sports fields available for use, library opening hours, water quality etc. Significance This is the degree of importance of an issue, proposal, decision, or matter, as assessed by the local authority, in terms of its likely impacts, and or likely consequences.

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roads, streetlights, water and wastewater reticulation, stormwater disposal systems and reserve land. At the completion of the subdivision, the ownership and hence future maintenance of these assets, passes to Council. Vision Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s view of the future state of its community. It is used to inspire people into action, define future direction and implies that what we do now can influence and change the future for the better. Ward Advisory Board Selected community members / ward councillors to represent the interests of the community to Council.

User fees and charges Fees charged to the community for use of specific services and facilities provided by the Council. Variants (low / medium / high) In the case of the Ten Year Plan this normally applies to low, medium or high population growth estimates made by statistics. Vested Assets Infrastructural assets and land provided by the developer of a subdivision. Examples of this may be

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Council and Management Structure

237

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


COUNCIL AND MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE

The Structure OF COUNCIL

STANDING COMMITTEES

Mayor David Ayers

Deputy Mayor Kevin Felstead

Standing Committees (Mayor David Ayers is ex officio on all Standing Committees)

238

Audit Committee Kirstyn Barnett (Chairperson) Kevin Felstead Roger Blair Peter Farrant Jim Gerard

Earthquake Recovery Committee Mayor David Ayers (Chair) All Councillors Robyn Wallace (Chair Kaiapoi Community Board)

Community and Recreation Committee Neville Atkinson (Chairperson) Peter Allen Kevin Felstead Dan Gordon Robbie Brine

BOARDS

Resource Management and Regulation Committee Dan Gordon (Chairperson) John Meyer Peter Allen Jim Gerard Roger Blair Utilities and Roading Committee John Meyer (Chairperson) Neville Atkinson Robbie Brine Kirstyn Barnett Peter Farrant

Kaiapoi Community Board Robyn Wallace (Chair) Neville Atkinson Chris Greengrass Steve Ryder Jackie Watson Caroline Faass (Deputy Chair) Roger Blair John Meyer Sandra Stewart Woodend-Ashley Community Board Rick Cable (Chair) Kirstyn Barnett Duncan Lundy Mike Northmore Chris Prickett (Deputy Chair) James Ensor Peter Farrant Keith Nelson

Rangiora Community Board Murray Clarke (Chair) Peter Allen Keith Galloway Jim Gerard Sharleen Stirling Greg Miller (Deputy Chair) Robbie Brine Judith Hoult Angela Smalley Oxford / Eyre Ward Advisory Board Victor Allen (Chair) Joe Boulton Wendy Doody Bruce Stokes Donald Hutchings Bob Leader (Deputy Chair) (resigned Feb 2013) Mark Brown Doug Nicholl Andy Woolhouse Kevin Felstead Dan Gordon

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Chief Executive Jim Palmer B.Comm, CA, AFNZIM

Manager, Finance and Business Support Jeff Millward

Manager, Policy and Customer Service Simon Markham BA, BTP, AFNZIM

Manager, Utilities and Roading Gerard Cleary

B. Bus., CA

BE, BSc, PGDipBusAdmin, CPEng, MIPENZ

Manager, Community and Recreation Craig Sargison

Manager, Planning and Regulation Nick Harrison

LLB, Dip. NZLS

BSc Dip Ag Sc

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Council

AND COMMITTEES STRUCTURE COUNCIL

Code of Conduct Committee

(Mayor and Councillors)

Hearings Committee

50-70 Advisory Groups

Audit Committee

Resource Management and Regulation Committee

Earthquake Recovery Committee

Utilities and Roading Committee

Chair - Cr Barnett

Chair - Cr Gordon

Chair - Mayor Ayers

Chair - Cr Meyer

Chair - Cr Atkinson Waimakariri District Recreation Fund Distribution Committee

Joint Committees

Drainage/ Community/ Water Recreation

Community and Recreation Committee

Oxford-Eyre Ward Advisory Board

Chair - V Allen Canterbury Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Membership: All Canterbury Councils

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Canterbury Waste Joint Committee Membership: Ashburton, Christchurch, Environment Canterbury, Hurunui, Kaikoura, Mackenzie, Selwyn, Timaru, Waimakariri and Waimate Councils

Canterbury Regional Landfill Joint Committee

Urban Development Strategy Implementation Committee

Canterbury Water Management Strategy - Waimakariri Zone Water Management Committee

Membership: Ashburton, Christchurch, Hurunui, Selwyn, and Waimakariri Councils

Membership: Christchurch City Council, Selwyn and Waimakariri District Councils, and Environment Canterbury

Membership: Environment Canterbury and Waimakariri District Council

Community Boards Kaiapoi

Rangiora

Chair Chair R. Wallace M. Clarke

Woodend/ Ashley

Chair R. Cable

Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


Directory

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Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


DIRECTORY

Directory Postal Address Waimakariri District Council Private Bag 1005 Rangiora 7440 New Zealand

Bankers

Locations Head Office 215 High Street Rangiora

Audit New Zealand

Oxford Service Centre 34 Main Street Oxford

Auditor General

Kaiapoi Service Centre 24 Sewell Sreet Kaiapoi Telephone (03) 311 8900 or (03) 327 6834 Facsimile (03) 313 4432

ANZ Banking Group 85 High Street Rangiora Auditor PO Box 2 Christchurch On behalf of: Audit Office Wellington Solicitors Helmore Bowron and Scott Good Street PO Box 44, Rangiora Corcoran French The Crossing Cnr Williams and Hilton Streets PO Box 15, Kaiapoi

www.waimakariri.govt.nz

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Waimakariri District Council 130802059252


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