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Cultivate february 2011

Virginia Farm Bureau

| food • home • life

Farm is good for the horse—and the land, of course!

SaveOurFood.org


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Cultivate Volume 4, Number 1 February 2011

Contents 14

Cultivate (USPS 025051) (ISSN 1946-8121) is published four times a year, February, April, July, November/December (combined issue). It is published by Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, 12580 West Creek Parkway, Richmond, VA 23238. Periodicals postage rate is paid in Richmond, VA. The annual subscription rate is $1.42 (included in membership dues).

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POSTMASTER: Please send changes of address to, Cultivate, Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261; fax 804-290-1096. Editorial and business offices are located at 12580 West Creek Parkway, Richmond, VA 23238. Telephone 804-290-1000, fax 804-290-1096. E-mail address is Cultivate@vafb.com. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. All advertising is accepted subject to the publisher’s approval. Advertisers must assume liability for the content of their advertising. The publisher maintains the right to cancel advertising for nonpayment or reader complaints about services or products. The publisher assumes no liability for products or services advertised.

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Member: Virginia Press Association EDITORIAL TEAM

Greg Hicks Vice Pres., Communications Pam Wiley Managing Editor Kathy Dixon Sr. Staff Writer/Photographer Sara K. Owens Staff Writer/Photographer Bill Altice Graphic Designer Maria La Lima Graphic Designer Cathy Vanderhoff Advertising VISIT US ONLINE

VaFarmBureau.org SaveOurFood.org

Departments

Features 14 Good for the horse—and the land, of course! Edith Kennedy was thinking of her horses when she responded to an ad about mud problems. Now her farm is a model of conservation practices that other horse owners can adopt.

6 Through foundation, Farm Bureau assists value-added agribusinesses Find out how your Farm Bureau membership helped establish a green dairy operation, a family winery, a multi-purpose ag complex, a franchised Internet farm cooperative and a biofuel production facility.

16 Photo contest winners shared varied views of agriculture See first-place winners in Virginia Farm Bureau’s annual farm-focused photo contest.

13 Your Membership Advantage 20 In the Garden 22 Taste of Virginia 25 Good for You! 26 Diggin’ It! 29 Member Marketplace

Publication schedule Associate members will receive their next issue of Cultivatee in April. The magazine is published quarterly.

On the Cover

14

C.C. is one of the horses on a Prince William County farm that’s being used to model environmentally friendly equine accommodations (Photo by Kathy Dixon). Cultivate FEBRUARY 2011

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Food for Thought

Making connections during National Ag Week, and all year long At about the same time Virginia Farm Bureau unveiled a statue honoring the commonwealth’s farmers last year (See next page), its volunteers began introducing children to another Virginia farmer. Farmer Ben is the main character in Ready, Set, GROW!, a book produced by Virginia Farm Bureau’s Agriculture in the Classroom program. Modeled after 21st-century Virginia farmers, he takes readers on a tour of varied Virginia farms. During National Ag Week, March 13-19, Farm Bureau volunteers and others from the agriculture industry will observe Virginia’s first Ag Literacy Week. They’ll be visiting schools in their communities to read Ready, Set, GROW!! and other farm-related books and conduct fun and educational activities. “We’ve been delighted that county Farm Bureaus have expressed an interest in reading Ready, Set, GROW!! in local schools,” said AITC executive director Karen Davis. “Farmers reading to children is a very simple and powerful way to help children understand their own connections to agriculture.” Farm Bureau fosters numerous other connections between producers and consumers. The organization sponsors the twiceyearly Save Our Food festivals (See Page 28) that invite the public to enjoy Virginia foods and meet the people who produce them.

And this year Farm Bureau expanded its Member Marketplace classified advertising service (See Page 29) to foster greater awareness of local food and special events on Virginia farms. Through their membership, Farm Bureau members have helped innovative farm and agribusiness operations that were assisted by the Virginia Foundation for Agriculture Innovation and Rural Sustainability (See Page 6). If you know a teacher who might benefit from the free training and materials AITC provides educators, please tell him or her about the program’s website at AgInTheClass.org. If you are interested in participating in Ag Literacy Week, there is information in the site’s “Volunteer” section. And if you know someone who wants a stronger connection to the people who produce our food and other farm products, tell them about SaveOurFood.org—and Farm Bureau. They can easily join online.

Get new Health Care Reform policies here! Yoour Farm Bure reau au m mem embe bers rship ip ca cann he help lpp … INDIVIDUAL INSURANCE Get the beest rates avvail ailabl ablee on on Anth Ant em Blue Cross and Bluee Shhield cooverage and the personall ser servic vicee of 1077 Faarm Burea au offices statewide. So when you havee quuestionns, you’re able to talk directly withh a proofesssionall you yo can trust.

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Virginia Fa Farm Bureau Ser Service vice Corpora poration tion is an indeppendent authorized agent in Virginia for Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield. Anthem’s service area is Virginia, excluding g the cityy of Fairfax,, the he tow townn of Vie Vienna nna, and th the are areaa east east of of state Route 123. HMOs are not ot availablle in all a areas of Virginia. i Anth Anthem em Blue Blue Cros Crosss and and Blue Shi Shiel hield ld is i the h tra tradde de name name off Anthe h m He H alth l h Pl Plans Pla ns of of Virgin rgini i ia, ia Inc. Inc Anth Anthem hem Bl Blue Cross Cross andd Bl Blue lue Shi Shield Shie ld and and its its af affiliat liated ed HMOs HMOs, Hea HealthK lthKeepe eepers, Inc., Peninsula P Health Care, Inc. an nd Pr P ior iori o ty Health Ca , Inc. Care Inc are independe endent ende nt licen icensees ic sees ee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. ®ANTHEM is a registered trademark. The Blue Cross and Blue Shield names and symbols are registered marks of the Blue Cross ss and and Blue Blue ue Shie Shield ldd Association. A For exclusio usions,, limitati tations, ons, terms terms under un which the policy may be continued in force or discontinued, costs and complete details of the coverage, call or write your insurance agent or the company, whichever is applicable.

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Cultivate FEBRUARY 2011

SaveOurFood.org


david proett

Farm Bureau pays tribute to producers with statue When visitors enter Virginia Farm Bureau’s headquarters in Goochland County, they know immediately that the company is affiliated with farming. Farm Bureau unveiled a 6-foot bronze statue of a farmer in a field of new corn in the building’s entryway last fall. It is a tribute to those who contribute almost $79 billion annually to Virginia’s economy and those who produce safe, fresh, local foods and other products nationwide. “Without a doubt, now anyone walking through the door will know that we are an agricultural organization,” said President Wayne F. Pryor. The idea to honor farmers stemmed from a Rockbridge County Farm Bureau resolution recommending some sort of tribute. The statue is based on a drawing by Brenda Bulifant, a Farm Bureau senior subrogation specialist who grew up on a farm in Lunenburg County. The farmer is depicted gazing into the distance, as if contemplating the future of his crop. “I’ve seen my father and grandfather strike that pose a thousand times,” Bulifant said.

VirginiaFarmBureau.com

Cultivate FEBRUARY 2011

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VA FAIRS

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Through Virginia FAIRS, Farm Bureau assists valueadded agribusinesses

Your membership helps open up new options for Va. farmers With any business venture, there are always challenges to staying profitable. Your Farm Bureau membership helps the organization assist farmers in developing business strategies to meet those challenges and continue producing fresh, local food for your family. Farm Bureau also provides staff support for the Virginia Foundation for Agriculture Innovation and Rural Sustainability, an independent, nonprofit organization offering technical services to rural and agricultural businesses. This is where your membership helps support an even larger business community: The foundation offers a Web-based, online business planning and development program that will allow anyone interested in starting a small business to assess his or her financial needs and build a financial plan. It’s at www.vafairs.com. In addition to businesses featured here, other Virginia FAIRS success stories include the following:

By Kathy Dixon

A

green dairy, multi-generational winery, franchised Internet cooperative, multipurpose agriculture complex and biofuels made from grass might not seem to have a common denominator. But they do. Each of the value-added businesses received assistance from the Virginia Foundation for Agriculture Innovation and Rural Sustainability and are succeeding because of it. VA FAIRS was created by Virginia Farm Bureau to promote and facilitate economic opportunities for farmers and other rural Virginians. The foundation provides technical and financial assistance for those developing value-added agricultural products and markets, and those who are exploring new opportunities using existing resources. With VA FAIRS’ help, the Vanderhydes of Pittsylvania County are converting manure into energy. The Williams family, also of Pittsylvania, was able to transition from tobacco farming to viticulture and winemaking. Molly Harris of Goochland County started an online farmers’ cooperative and is now franchising the system so others can do the same thing. The Olde Dominion Agricultural Complex houses the Pittsylvania County Farm Bureau, a horse center and space for agricultural and social functions. And Piedmont Bio Products in Pittsylvania started a community-based hybrid cooperative to make petroleum replacement products from feedstocks. These are just a few examples of the more than 20 projects in which VA FAIRS is involved across the state.

• The Virginia Aquaculture Association established a cooperative to help producers market their fish.

photos by kathy dixon

• The Cumberland County Farm Bureau secured a U.S. Department of Agriculture grant to study generating energy and organic fertilizer from poultry waste.

Piedmont Bio Products creates biofuel from feedstock plants such as the giant reed on the left and the myscanthus in the foreground, grown on land not suitable for food grain crops.

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Cultivate FEBRUARY 2011

• A sheep producers’ association in Scott County undertook a study of how it can market to grocery chains in Southwest Virginia. • Regional cattlemen’s associations in Virginia have begun exploring how they can retain more profit by building meat processing facilities to serve their communities.

SaveOurFood.org


‘I know how to milk cows, but I don’t know how to navigate bureaucracy.’ ➻ Roy Vanderhyde, Vanderhyde Dairy Inc.

With assistance from the Virginia Foundation for Agriculture Innovation and Rural Sustainability, dairyman Roy Vanderhyde was able to get grant money for an anaerobic digester that will recover methane from animal waste to generate electricity.

FAIRS offers technical assistance “I know how to milk cows, but I don’t know how to navigate bureaucracy,” said Roy Vanderhyde, one of the owners of Vanderhyde Dairy Inc. He recently built an anaerobic digester using grants he secured with help from FAIRS. “They took an idea and helped make it a reality,” he said. From business plans to feasibility studies to helping with software and website needs, VA FAIRS’ goal is to help rural Virginians develop value-added agricultural products, improve production and marketing of existing agriculture operations and make rural Virginia more sustainable. “Agriculture is changing, and crops that used to be the mainstay of the rural economy are in decline,” in some parts of the state, said Chris Cook, VFBF agriculture enterprise development coordinator. “Producers need to look at innovative

VirginiaFarmBureau.com

opportunities, and FAIRS can help turn an idea into a new business venture.” The Vanderhydes’ anaerobic digester will recover methane from the waste of 950 dairy cows through airless digestion. The waste will be used to produce enough electricity for more than 500 households, as well as liquid fertilizer and odorless animal bedding. Vanderhyde had been considering a methane digester for five years, but it wasn’t until he sought help from FAIRS that the wheels started turning. The foundation helped him conduct a feasibility study and then walked him through the grant application process. The dairy received more than $1.6 million in grants, without which the digester never would have been possible,

Vanderhyde Dairy Inc. has 950 cows.

Vanderhyde said. While other FAIRS projects are not on the same scale as the dairy’s methane digester, they have all benefited from the foundation’s expertise.

Cultivate FEBRUARY 2011

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VA FAIRS

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Joe and Brenda Williams, far right, run The Homeplace Vineyard with the help of their daughter, Mary, and her husband, Chris Smith (center), and their son, Jessie (left), as well as daughter Renee Reaves and her husband, Billy.

Feasibility studies help small businesses In 2005, Joe Williams was a tobacco producer who started diversifying into wine grape production. His family contracted grapes to local wineries, but when sales dropped due to the economy they looked into opening their own winery. Williams, like Vanderhyde, had FAIRS assist him with a feasibility study and preparation of a value-added grant application. The grant will help pay for bottles, corks, sales software and marketing plans. “There’s so much paperwork involved that I wouldn’t know where to begin if I tried to do it myself,” Williams said. His Homeplace Vineyard ((thehomeplacevineyard.com) has 9 acres planted in wine grapes, including the four varietals Traminette, Viognier, cabernet sauvignon and Chambourcin. Williams currently sells wine on-site but hopes to expand sales to local stores and restaurants this year.

‘There’s so much paperwork involved that I wouldn’t know where to begin if I tried to do it myself.’ ➻ Joe Williams, The Homeplace Vineyard

Food hub had nationwide potential Through Molly Harris’ Lulu’s Local Food (luluslocalfood.com), farmers can sell their products online to customers who join an online farmers’ market. Customers pay a one-time seasonal fee and then log on weekly to order fresh meat, produce and other farm-raised products. They pick up their purchases at a designated site. VA FAIRS has helped Harris expand the concept, which began as Richmond-area Fall Line Farms online food hub, across the United States. The foundation worked with Harris to plan the business, set up a website and work out the kinks before she decided to offer franchises on the software.

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Cultivate FEBRUARY 2011

“When I first met Molly two years ago, she walked into my office with a huge pile of paper in a cardboard box and 100 customers,” Cook said. After considerable work on Harris’ part, “she now has a food hub in Richmond with over 1,000 customers. “And now food hubs in Goochland, Virginia Beach and even Montana are using her software program.” FAIRS even hired a consultant to help with the infrastructure of the software, which Cook said “will create a food hub network from California to Virginia.” All the sites will have the same look and feel and will be linked to each other. “This gives others the latest in technology that we’ve learned through Fall Line Farms,” Harris said. “It’s been a

successful program, and FAIRS made me realize we could turn it into a franchise that could be used in other states.”

SaveOurFood.org


Business plan aids ag complex, grows biofuel co-op Pittsylvania County Farm Bureau, on the other hand, wanted to keep its agriculture enterprise local. They needed a new office building and bought land on U.S. Route 29 on which to build an office and a pole shed for local youth livestock shows. “We were told we needed to think bigger,” said President Tommy Motley. “We sat down with Chris and VA FAIRS for an afternoon and came up with a business plan.” As a result of that meeting, they created the Olde Dominion Agricultural Foundation (oldeagfoundation.org), a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization to oversee the building and management of a 76,000-square-foot agricultural complex, complete with an indoor livestock arena. Ground was broken in March 2010, and by the end of the year the complex was close to being finished. An official ribboncutting and grand opening took place in January. “We want this facility to benefit the community and to be sustainable,” said Robert Mills, chairman of the ODAF’s fundraising committee. Piedmont Bio Products (piedmontbio products.com) wants to be sustainable as well. The company’s mission is to secure farm-based feedstocks grown by members of its Piedmont Producer Agricultural Cooperative and turn them into biofuel. “Without the help of FAIRS and the Virginia Tobacco Commission, we wouldn’t be where we are today,” said CEO Ken Moss.

VirginiaFarmBureau.com

Ground was broken a year ago for the Olde Dominion Agricultural Complex (depicted above) in Pittsylvania County.

The company produces a secondgeneration biofuel grown on land that is not suited for food grain crops. “It’s a community investment, and it’s a win-win for everyone,” Moss said. The plants that farmers grow for fuel put oxygen back into the atmosphere, and growing crops for alternative fuel products is another business option for former tobacco producers or those who want to diversify. The grasses can be baled like hay with existing equipment, and the input is minimal—$120 to $150 per acre, compared to $350 to $450 an acre for corn, Moss said. “We like the idea of growing oil.”

‘We want this facility to benefit the community and to be sustainable.’ ➻ Robert Mills, Olde Dominion Agricultural Foundation fundraising chairman

Cultivate FEBRUARY 2011

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PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Your Membership Advantage -SAVING YOU MONEY >> Your Farm Bureau membership helps support the farmers who produce foods for your family’s table.

It also gives you access to a wide variety of benefits and services, and it can pay for itself quickly in savings and convenience! TRAVEL ADVANTAGES Avis Save up to 25% on daily and weekly rates. Visit Avis.com/vafb, or call 800-331-1212 and use Avis Worldwide Discount #A298846 when scheduling a rental. Budget Get up to 20% off rental car rates. Visit Budget.com/vafb, or call 800-527-0700 and reference Budget Customer Discount #Y775746. Budget Truck Rental Save 15% on truck rentals. Visit BudgetTruckRental.com/virginia or call 800-566-8422 to make a reservation. Use Budget Truck Discount #56000132266. Choice Hotels Use Choice Hotels’ Significant Organization Savings plan and get a 20% discount at participating locations. Visit ChoiceHotels.com, or call 800-258-2847 and use ID# 00800605. Advance reservations required. Wyndham Hotel Group Get 20% off “best available rates” at participating locations. Call 877-670-7088, and use ID #67496. Advance reservations required. Children’s Museum of Richmond memberships Save 25% on any annual museum membership. Visit C-mor.org/membership.

HEALTHY ADVANTAGES NEW! Member’s Medical Alert Help ensure that you or a loved one can summon help at home in an emergency. Get free shipping, a 30-day, money-back trial and no long-term contract. Visit MembersMedicalAlert.com or call 877-288-4958, and use code FB102. Prescription Drug Discount Save on more than 12,000 prescription drug products, at more than 53,000 pharmacies nationwide. Obtain a discount card from your county Farm Bureau, and find a participating pharmacy near you at VaFarmBureau.org. QualSight LASIK Save up to 50 percent off the national average cost of LASIK vision correction. Visit QualSight.com/-vafb, or call 866-979-9575 to schedule an initial appointment with a participating doctor near you.

HOME AND BUSINESS ADVANTAGES NEW! CDW Member Purchase Program Purchase selected electronics at cost and any other product at cost plus 3%; also, get free ground shipping on one order per year. Visit CDW.com/epp or call 877-813-4435, and reference EPP Access #F1F4D954. Dodge Get $500 off the purchase or lease of select Dodge cars and trucks. Simply present your Farm Bureau member card at your local Dodge dealership. Grainger Get 10% off any item in the Grainger industrial supply catalog. Order online at Grainger.com and qualify for free shipping, or call 877-202-2594. Reference Discount #809039274.

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FINANCIAL ADVANTAGES Farm Bureau Bank Full member banking services. Contact your county Farm Bureau office, visit FarmBureauBank.com or call 800-492-FARM for more information.

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>> For information about all of the services included in your Membership Advantage, call your county Farm Bureau office

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>> save the date

>> save the date

Members can save at Farm Bureau warehouse open house on Feb. 25

Rural health essay contest winners to receive $1,000; entries due March 31

Farm Bureau members can save up to 10 percent on purchases from Virginia Farm Bureau Service Corp. Products Division at its Feb. 25 open house. Since 1965, Virginia Farm Bureau Service Corp. Products Division has provided farmers with a variety of quality supplies through more than 200 Farm Bureau-approved dealers and the Farm Bureau warehouse in Henrico County. The open house will run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the warehouse at 1541 Mary St. in Sandston. Refreshments will be available. Members can save on a variety of parts for their cars, trucks and farm machinery, including tires, batteries and oil and grease products. “The open house provides the opportunity for members to see the wide variety of products we offer only to Farm Bureau members, and they can save even more money,” said Ron Diamond, Farm Bureau’s director of administrative services and the Products Division. The warehouse serves about 400 dealers throughout Virginia, Maryland and North Carolina as well as a handful in West Virginia and Delaware. For information on specific products, call 800-476-8473.

High school and college students from Virginia Farm Bureau member-families who are interested in a health-related career in a rural area have an opportunity to earn cash toward their education. Participants in Farm Bureau’s 2011 Rural Health Essay Contest have until March 31 to submit an essay on “My Future Career in Rural Health in Virginia.” First-place winners will receive $1,000, and second-place winners will receive $500. Essays must be 400 words in length and typed. Entries from high school students and college students will be judged separately, and two prizes will be awarded in each group. Guidelines and entry forms are available at county Farm Bureau offices and at VaFarmBureau.org g in the “Member Programs” section.

Teens encouraged to apply for Outstanding Young Agriculturalist Award High school juniors and seniors with an interest in agriculture have until March 31 to enter Virginia Farm Bureau Federation’s Outstanding Young Agriculturalist Award program. The annual award recognizes teens for outstanding academic, community and agribusiness achievement. Martin “Marty” Harris of Orange County won the award in 2010. Harris lives on an 80-acre farm where he and his family raise about 100 Holstein heifers. Harris said the competition has inspired him to stay involved in the agricultural community, even if his career takes him elsewhere. VirginiaFarmBureau.com

“Agriculture occupies a huge place in our society, and without young advocates to step forward and continue to represent the farming community it could be overlooked by the rest of the American public,” he said. He encourages others to enter the competition for its opportunity to develop public speaking skills and self-confidence. “The connections that could be made with others in the agriculture industry are invaluable,” Harris said. “Just having the opportunity to attend the Young Farmers Summer Expo and the annual Virginia Farm Bureau Federation convention was incredible, and everywhere I went I was met with kindness and support.”

Entry forms and details are available at county Farm Bureau offices and online at VaFarmBureau.org in the “Member Programs” section. District winners will compete for the state-level award at the VFBF Young Farmers Summer Expo in late July. The state winner will receive an award valued at $1,500—$250 from Virginia Farm Credit Associations, $500 from the VFBF Service Corp.’s Dodge program and $750 from the VFBF Young Farmers Committee and Women’s Committee. All prizes are subject to change based on sponsor availability. Cultivate FEBRUARY 2011

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Your membership can save you $500 on a new Dodge

Recently enrolled in Medicare? If you’ve recently enrolled in Medicare and aren’t sure what to do next, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services offer the following tips:

Call your doctor’s office, and schedule your “Welcome to Medicare” physical exam. The exam is an easy way for you and your doctor to get an accurate benchmark for your health. At the end of your appointment, be sure to schedule an annual “Wellness Exam” for the following year. Medicare now covers a yearly check-up.

Register at MyMedicare.gov

Farm Bureau members can save $500 on the purchase or lease of eligible 2010 or 2011 Dodge vehicles. Presenting your Farm Bureau member card at your local Dodge dealership entitles you to a $500 cash allowance on the purchase or lease of a 2010 Dodge Ram 1500, 2500 or 3500 pickup, as well as the 3500, 4500 or 5500 Chassis Cab models. The certificate also can be used when purchasing or leasing a 2010 Dodge Journey, Grand Caravan, Dakota, Durango, Nitro, Charger, Avenger or Caliber or a 2011 Dodge Journey; Grand Caravan; Ram 1500, 2500 or 3500 pickup, including the 3500, 4500 or 5500 Chassis Cab models; Charger, Dakota; Nitro; Avenger; or Caliber. The cash allowance can be used in addition to any national consumer incentives. Specific restrictions apply, and details are available from your county Farm Bureau.

Register at MyMedicare.govv for easy access to your health information. The free, secure online service provides access to personalized information regarding your Medicare benefits and services.

Take advantage of all your Medicare resources Check out the “New to Medicare?” section of medicare.govv for information customized for new enrollees, or review your “Medicare & You 2011” handbook.

Get updates on health care insurance reform Virginia Farm Bureau is compiling updates on the details of health care reform legislation passed earlier this year in the “Resource Center” section of its insurance website at FarmBureauAdvantage.com. Farm Bureau offers individuals and families Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield medical and dental insurance as well as medical and dental Medicare supplement plans. Members who are business owners have access to group health insurance products from Anthem and several other major insurance providers. Licensed staff at your county Farm Bureau office can share details about available products and help you compare the coverage you currently have to coverage available through Farm Bureau.

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Cultivate FEBRUARY 2011

Got something to move? Members save with Budget Truck Rental Make moving easier with the trucks and services of Budget Truck Rental. Your Farm Bureau membership will save you 15 percent when you make your next Budget Truck Rental reservation. Budget offers reliable, easy-to-drive trucks from more than 2,800 locations nationwide and provides roadside assistance. Renters must meet Budget age, driver and credit requirements. To make your reservation visit budgettruck.com/virginiaa or call 800-566-8422, and use the Virginia Farm Bureau account number: 56000132266.

E-newsletter, video blog showcase food and Farm Bureau issues If you haven’t signed up to receive Connections, Virginia Farm Bureau’s monthly e-newsletter for its Save Our Food campaign, look for sign-up links on many of the pages at SaveOurFood.org. Connections delivers a broad range of articles compiled by Farm Bureau staff about farming and food issues and their impact on the foods you choose for your family.

Also, get The Real Dirt Farm Bureau uses The Real Dirt, its video blog on YouTube (TheRealDirtVA) and VaFarmBureau.org, to share insights into issues of concern to the organization’s producer members.

SaveOurFood.org


Your Membership Advantage

Business owners: Are you at risk for an ERISA violation? The Patient Protection Affordable Care Act will impose specific obligations on employers who sponsor group health plans. Each plan must be reviewed separately to determine the applicability of “grandfathered” or “non-grandfathered” status under the PPACA. Your Virginia Farm Bureau health insurance agent can put you in touch with Farm Bureau’s third-party vendor who can assist you with the various Employee Retirement Income Security Act reporting requirements and help you obtain the documentation necessary to comply with the requirements. Call the Farm Bureau Health Care Consultants department at 800-277-8323: The PPACA requires annual notices to eligible employees based upon status of any group health plan. Grandfathered plans will be required to send out 11 specific notices to employees, and non-grandfathered plans will be required to send out 14 notices. PPACA reforms are added to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act portability subparts of ERISA, and mandates require insurers and plan sponsors to properly notify all eligible group health plan employees on or before the first day of the renewal or effective date of the plan. Liability for failure to comply with reforms is the same as violating HIPAA portability under ERISA and IRS code.

Identity Theft 911 benefit to be discontinued Virginia Farm Bureau will on March 1, 2011, discontinue the LifeStages Identity Theft Services member benefit provided by Identity Theft 911. Members receiving assistance through that program as of that date will continue to be assisted until the resolution of their cases. Starting March 1, information on protecting personal information and avoiding identity theft will be available at FarmBureauAdvantage.com.

VirginiaFarmBureau.com

Your membership helps Farm Bureau enhance members’ lives by promoting and supporting agriculture. It also affords you access to a variety of benefits and services available to members of your immediate household. For more information or details on all of your Farm Bureau member benefits, contact your county Farm Bureau office.

BizPlan can mean major tax savings for business owners Virginia Farm Bureau members who own small businesses can save significant amounts of money through BizPlan. BizPlan is a medical reimbursement plan well-suited for sole proprietors, corporations, limited liability companies and partnerships. The plan saves substantial tax dollars by allowing businesses to deduct 100 percent of their family health insurance premiums and out-of-pocket medical, vision and dental expenses not covered by insurance. How does it work? BizPlan is an IRS Code Section 105 Medical Reimbursement Plan. Self-employed participants can offer a part-time or full-time employed spouse a medical reimbursement package that covers qualified costs and those incurred by family members, including the employer. The plan is administered by Total Administrative Services Corp., which currently works with other state Farm Bureaus to offer members the same benefit. TASC offers an industryexclusive audit guarantee, along with efficient processing and complete documentation of eligible expenses; assistance with IRS, DOL and ERISA compliance; and support via a tollfree hot line. For more information call TASC toll free at 888-595-2261 and mention that you are a Virginia Farm Bureau member.

Cultivate FEBRUARY 2011

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Model farm is good for the horse—and the land, of course!

photos by kathy dixon

By Kathy Dixon

“I had no idea what they were offering” farmowner Edith Kennedy (top photo, right) said of her response to an ad seeking horse owners with mud problems. Today, her farm is being used by the Prince William Soil and Water Conservation District to showcase conservation practices such as manure composting systems (bottom left) and automatic waterers (bottom right). Kennedy is shown with PWSWCD District Manager Kate Norris.

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When Edith Kennedy of Gainesville answered a Prince William Soil and Water Conservation District ad looking for horse owners with mud problems, she had no inkling her Oakwood Farm would become a model for other county horse owners. “I had no idea what they were offering when I first contacted them,” Kennedy said with a grin. “I was looking at how it could benefit my horses, not how it could make my farm green.” Instead, what she got was almost $40,000 worth of land management practices that benefit the environment and her four horses. The improvements were part of a project that the PWSWCD funded with a grant from the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation. The state funds were matched with donations from almost 75 groups and individuals in the community. “In Prince William County we’ve seen a transition from traditional livestock farms to small-acreage horse farms,” said Kate Norris, PWSWCD district manager. “Horse owners have different land management needs, and we wanted to show them how to implement best management practices on a model farm. “We don’t expect anyone to replicate all of this, but they can come here and see the practices for themselves and adopt one or two of them,” Norris said. “We’re trying to educate, motivate and inspire horse owners.” Norris said the conservation district sought a small horse farm that had a nearby waterway and had issues with mud, manure and pasture management. They also wanted someone who wasn’t already using conservation practices. Prior to the improvements, Oakwood Farm was “typical,” Norris said. The horses had 24-hour access to the pastures, and because of that the grass was overgrazed. There were a lot of problems with mud, a need for more fencing and a need for a natural buffer between the pasture and the stream that runs beside it. The soil district planted a mixture of grasses in the pastures, created a confinement area with bluestone gravel dust where the horses stay during wet conditions or when the pastures need time to rest and regrow, and installed five different types of fencing around the farm for rotational grazing and keeping horses out of the stream.

SaveOurFood.org


courtesy photos

PWSWCD also put in two automatic water troughs, strategically located to water seven different turnout areas, and installed a special manure composter that turns raw stall waste into compost in 90 days without requiring manual aeration. The composter runs on solar power and is the first of its kind in the United States. Kennedy said some of her friends have visited the farm and are now interested in adopting the practices. One has installed a plastic-coated, high-tensile fence like the one around the perimeter of her farm, another bought the same type of waterer and a third “was pea green with envy over the composter.” Kennedy said she never would have been able to afford all the practices on her teacher’s salary, but she sees their value to horse owners and protecting water quality. She recommends that other horse owners come up with an overall game plan for managing their farms and then implement one conservation practice at a time. PWSWCD currently is seeking grant funding and partnerships to explore innovative and cost-effective options for confinement paddocks.

Oakwood Farm project best management practices  Buffer/filter area alongside the stream  Automatic waterers  Pasture seeding  Interior fencing to allow for rotational grazing  Manure storage in a solar-powered composter  Confinement paddock for non-pasture turnout  Natural pest management, including the use of fly predators and bats for insect control

For more information, visit the Prince William Soil and Water Conservation District website at pwswcd.org g and click on “Horse Owners” near the top of the menu on the left. To schedule a guided tour of the farm, call 703-594-3621.

VirginiaFarmBureau.com

The two upper photos show trouble spots on Kennedy’s farm before improvements were made. In the lower photo, one of Kennedy’s horses eats from a “slow feeder” designed to minimize hay waste while providing ready access. The feeder is in a gravel dust confinement area.

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PHOTO CONTEST WINNERS shared varied views of agriculture First-place winners in the 2010 Virginia Farm Bureau Federation photo contest captured the colors, textures and interactions that are integral to farming in Virginia. All winning entries can be viewed at VaFarmBureau.org, and an entry form and guidelines for the 2011 contest is available on the VFBF website as well, in the “Member Programs”” section. “My Goat, My Friend” by Marrisa Cowart, Campbell County

“Lone Cow in the Morning” by Molly Harrison, Carroll County

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SaveOurFood.org


“Grain & Seed Clipper” by Robert Bartlett, Pittsylvania County

“Bring Me Some Hay” by Ellen Davidson, King William County

“Sis in the Hay” by Daniel Dockery, Scott County “Hay Barn” by Abby Parsons, Richmond County

“Feeding Time” by Mary McCoshey, Washington County

“I’m First” by Joe Miller, Shenandoah County

“Rise & Shine” by Kyle McGhee, Bedford County

VirginiaFarmBureau.com

“Setting Sun” by Chelsie Haines, Augusta County

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Buying rural property? Consider these safety issues When purchasing rural property, don’t get blinded by the beauty or the possibilities and forget about safety issues that could be present.

If you’re considering buying rural land for your dream home or weekend getaways, “make sure you take a second look at the land and research the property as much as possible,” said Jimmy Maass, safety coordinator for Virginia Farm Bureau. “It’s a really good idea to walk around the property beforehand and take note of anything that may not look quite right. Neighbors also are a good source of information.” According to Colonial Farm Credit, the following are safety risks to consider when shopping for rural property.

Dumps Keep an eye out for old dumps and burn piles, which can contain old pesticide containers, barrels of waste oil or worse. In addition to leaking containers, watch out for dangerous objects. A few items on the surface of the ground may hint at more refuse below. “If you have children, keep them away from these areas,” Maass said. Also, don’t forget to look around all the corners, because draws, or small, deadend canyons, are natural dumping spots. If you find scrap metal on your property it can be sold for money, “but you have to properly decontaminate any leaking containers and clean up the ground in that area, which is costly,” Maass said.

Storage tanks Look to see if chemicals, fuel or oil has been spilled onto the soil around storage tanks and, if possible, “confirm what used to be stored in the tanks,” Maass said. “Try to find a licensed and insured contractor to dispose of unwanted tanks. If you cannot afford to or decide you want to use

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Cultivate FEBRUARY 2011

the tanks in the future, properly secure them and keep children and animals out.” Check for underground storage tanks. Barrels of toxic oil and the potential for spills pose a risk to your drinking water.

Wells and septic tanks Make sure all old wells and septic tanks are adequately sealed. “If they are no longer in use, follow proper procedures to take them out of service, and check with the health department or your local soil and water conservation district for more information on how to properly seal a well or septic tank,” Maass said. “Block access to the wells and tanks until you can properly secure them, so that children and pets will not fall in.” Know the signs of a non-functioning septic field. Sewage gurgling to the surface can migrate over to the wellhead. “Note where all septic tanks are, and until you can properly seal them or fill them in, mark them and keep heavy equipment and vehicles away,” Maass said. “The septic tank could collapse under the weight of the vehicles.”

Ponds and streams Mark your property with posted signs to keep unwanted swimmers out of your pond or stream. “It may even be advisable to fence the pond,” Maass said. “If you do allow swimming in your pond or lake, make sure no one swims alone.” It’s also important to teach children how to stay away from snakes and other animals they might see near the water— and not to drink from streams, he said. “While you may think your creek water is clean enough to drink, never assume it is.”

SaveOurFood.org


VirginiaFarmBureau.com

Cultivate FEBRUARY 2011

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In the Garden

Be frugal when buying new plants— split them into more plants shoots are the plant you want, and not weeds. If the weather conditions are not favorable, you can divide the plants, put them back in the pot, and plant them outside when the soil is more workable. When cutting plants in large containers, you can use an old saw or an old, rigid kitchen knife. Find a natural point to divide the plant, then cut through the crown and pull the sections apart. “If you buy a hosta with lots of shoots, you can make as many as 12 plants out of one $18 hosta,” Viette said. Or you can take a $50 daylily that has not yet budded and divide it. Put your knife between the two fans, and once you hear a cracking sound, pull apart the two sections. “Separate the sections, and replant shoots and any little plants and you just saved $50 or more,” Viette said.

sara owens

No matter what you’re buying, every penny counts. And dividing newly purchased daylilies, hostas, tall bearded irises and ferns can save you $50 or more. Dividing existing perennials every five to seven years can save you even more. “When you see lots of shoots or the flowers start to look smaller, tired or too crowded, then it’s time to divide,” said horticulturalist Mark Viette. When choosing new plants to divide, it’s best not to divide the ones in full bloom. If you are not worried about sacrificing the blooms for a year, use hedge shears to cut them off, and then divide. “There are a couple of ways to divide the plants and make a lot of plants for your garden,” Viette said. If a potted purchase has little plants growing in it, carefully pull them out and plant them separately. Make sure the

Dividing a potted perennial such as sedum or hostas into two or more plants can give you more bang for your gardening buck. 20

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SaveOurFood.org


In the Garden

photos by pam wiley

From garden to gift item, gourds can be a family project

What’s not to like about a plant you can grow, harvest, preserve and decorate as a family? And they make unique gifts as well! “You can grow your own, or you can buy them toward the end of the season,” between Halloween and Thanksgiving, said horticulturist Mark Viette, who has grown and decorated apple and bottle gourds. They take 6 months to a year to dry, Viette said, and their ideal storage

temperature is 55 to 65 degrees. “Put them in a cool basement or garage that won’t get too cold,” he said. As the gourds dry out, their outer surfaces will lose their color but sometimes start to show interesting markings. When you shake them, you’ll hear loose seeds inside. Dried gourds can be cleaned up with sandpaper if you want a cleaner finish, or

Mark Viette appears on Down Home Virginia, Virginia Farm Bureau’s monthly television program. Viette and his father operate the Andre Viette Farm and Nursery in Augusta County and have a weekly radio show. They also are members of the Augusta County Farm Bureau. Andre Viette currently serves on the organization’s board of directors, and Mark Viette is a former board member.

VirginiaFarmBureau.com

with a plastic scrubbing pad if you want a more distinct look. Then they’re ready to be painted, stained or given a coat or two of polyurethane. If you’re making gourds into bird houses, cut a 1¼-inch hole for the entrance, and drill small holes in the bottom for drainage. Don’t forget to put a hole in the top for a cord or wire by which the gourd can be suspended.

To find the station nearest you that airs Down Home Virginia, or to view this show online, visit VaFarmBureau.org.

Cultivate FEBRUARY 2011

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Taste of Virginia

APPLES AND BRANDY LEND DISTINCTIVE ? FLAVOR TO THIS POTATO CHOWDER ? The equation is simple. “Bacon plus potatoes equals chowder,” said Chef John Maxwell. “This soup is great for the cold weather.”

Apple and Potato Chowder INGREDIENTS

4 ounces bacon, diced 2 leeks, white part only, cleaned and sliced 5 cups tart apples such as Granny Smith, peeled, cored and chopped, plus half an apple, diced for garnish 6 cups chicken stock ¹⁄8 teaspoon ground cinnamon, or one cinnamon stick 2 cups potatoes, peeled and chopped 2 teaspoons apple brandy 1 cup heavy cream salt and white pepper to taste (optional) 2 tablespoons butter parsley for garnish PREPARATION

In a heavy-bottomed stock pot, cook the bacon until it is crispy and all fat has been rendered. Remove the bacon.

Look for a tart apple such as Granny Smith for this recipe.

Over medium heat, sauté the leeks in the bacon fat, covered, for 3 to 4 minutes. Toss in the chopped apples and cook, uncovered, for about 5 minutes, coating them well with the fat. Pour in chicken stock, add cinnamon and potatoes, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer for 45 minutes. Stir in brandy and cream, and season to taste. If using a cinnamon stick, remove it from soup. Sauté the diced apple in butter and let pieces drain on paper towels until ready to serve. Ladle soup into bowls and top with apple and parsley. Good hot or chilled; serves 6.

To find the station nearest you that airs Down Home Virginia, or to view this show online, visit VaFarmBureau.org.

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Chef John Maxwell appears each month on Down Home Virginia, Virginia Farm Bureau’s monthly television program, courtesy of Virginia Grown, a program of the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. He’s also director of the Food Service Management Program at the Culinary Institute of Virginia in Norfolk.

SaveOurFood.org


Taste of Virginia

SOUTHWESTERN STIR-FRY ? IS SIMILAR TO CHILI ? The secret ingredient in Chef John Maxwell’s Southwestern Beef Stir-Fry is coffee. “I always add coffee to my chili,” he said.

Southwestern Beef Stir-Fry INGREDIENTS

2 pounds beef, trimmed 2 tablespoons minced garlic

The caffeine might be an eye-opener, but flavorful, fresh ingredients do much for this warm-you-up recipe.

1 tablespoon oregano 1 tablespoon cumin powder 1 lime 2 tablespoons vegetable oil ½ cup diced onion ½ cup green onion, white part only, reserving tops for garnish ½ cup minced Poblano pepper 1 cup peeled, diced tomato

Garlic, lime juice, cumin and Poblano pepper make for a flavorful mix in this coffee-enhanced dish.

1 cup black beans, drained 1 cup beef stock ¼ cup coffee 1 ounce tequila (optional) PREPARATION

Cut the beef into julienne strips and toss with garlic, half of the oregano and half of the cumin. Add a squeeze of lime juice and allow to marinate for one hour. Heat the oil in a wok or sauté pan until it’s almost smoking. Add the onion and sauté until clear, then stir in the marinated beef. Add the white part of the green onions and more lime juice. Stir in the Poblano pepper, tomatoes and black beans. Add in the beef stock and then the coffee. Iff desired, add the tequila. Garnish with minced green onion tops and serve with tortillas.

VirginiaFarmBureau.com

Cultivate FEBRUARY 2011

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Includes taxes. Airfare extra

Departs on 8/18/2011 Start in DUBLIN with a city tour including TRINITY COLLEGE (Book of Kells), DUBLIN CASTLE, and ST. PATRICKS CATHEDRAL. Travel to the NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL MUSEUM. Then it’s on to the WATERFORD CRYSTAL FACTORY visitor centre, CORK, and the BLARNEY CASTLE. Next is the KISSANE SHEEP FARM, and a short stop at the CLIFFS OF MOHER. You’ll visit the KYLEMORE ABBEY, the LIVESTOCK MARKET at ENNISKILLEN, The ULSTER & AMERICAN FOLK MUSEUM, GIANT’S CAUSEWAY, and BUSHMILLS DISTILLERY. You’ll also visit the IRISH NATIONAL STUD (only stud farm in Ireland open to the public) and BALLARD ORGANIC FARM (modern Irish organic farm). *Per Person Based on Double Occupancy. AIRFARE IS EXTRA.

Call for Information & Itinerary

800-888-8204 Carefree Vacations Since 1967

SaveOurFood.org


Good for You!

Help control your weight by eating breakfast By Kathy Dixon There is no magic way to lose or maintain weight, although some say boosting your metabolism is the key. Eating breakfast may not necessarily boost your metabolism, but it can help you manage your weight. Registered dietitian Karen Ridings said there is no evidence that eating breakfast boosts your metabolism. “But if you eat breakfast, it will help you manage your appetite so you don’t eat unhealthy snacks later on,” she said. And there are other proven methods to rev up metabolism and help control weight. “The American Dietetics Association recommends aerobic exercise and building muscle mass through strength training exercises to increase your metabolism,” said Ridings, who is also a Virginia Cooperative Extension family and consumer science agent in Frederick County. Muscle mass decreases as people age, and muscle burns more calories than fat tissue. So by lifting weights and increasing their muscle mass, people can increase their metabolism, Ridings said. Additionally, as people age, their metabolism slows down, so they need to cut back on calories. Some people think skipping breakfast is a way to do that. However, Ridings explained, when people wake up in the morning they are operating on a glucose deficit and need food to increase their energy level.

“There are a lot of nutritious, low-calorie options for breakfast,” she said. “And for people who don’t like breakfast food, they can eat sandwiches instead.” A tomato and egg white sandwich on whole-grain bread, for example, is a healthy breakfast. So is lean ham and lowfat Swiss cheese on a multi-grain English muffin. Ridings also recommends eating highfiber cereals with added fruit, oatmeal with raisins and nuts, or yogurt with fruit and granola. Stay away from pastries, doughnuts and overly sugared cereals, she said. No matter what you are eating, portion control is important, Ridings said. People can use the “plate method” for eating dinner, in which half of the plate is filled with vegetables, a quarter of the plate is protein and the other quarter is something starchy like corn or brown rice, she said. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s mypyramid.govv nutrition website recommends five servings of fruit and vegetables each day, so it’s important to work them into every meal. “To get in your daily requirement of fruits and vegetables you have to make a conscious effort,” Ridings said. “People are hoping for an easy way to lose or maintain weight, but there isn’t one. It’s a balance between the intake of food and the output of exercise.”

Nutty Breakfast Pizza ingredients 1 whole-wheat English muffin 2 teaspoons peanut butter 2 teaspoons apple butter ¹⁄⁄8 cup mixed fruit, such as banana, pineapple or strawberries 1 teaspoon raisins (optional) 1 teaspoon nuts (optional) directions Split English muffin in half, and toast it. Spread peanut butter and apple butter on the muffin halves. Top with mixed fruit. Add raisins or nuts as desired.

Fruity French Toast ingredients 4 large eggs, beaten 1 cup skim milk ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon or nutmeg ½ teaspoon vanilla 8 slices whole-wheat bread 1 tablespoon margarine 3 cups strawberries, sliced ¹⁄⁄3 cup maple syrup dash of cinnamon directions In a large bowl, beat eggs, milk, cinnamon and vanilla until mixed well. Melt margarine in a large skillet on medium high heat. Dip one slice of bread at a time in the egg mixture to coat both sides. Place in hot skillet, and brown each side, about 2 minutes or more. To make the fruit sauce, combine strawberries, syrup and cinnamon, and mix well. Microwave mixture for 30 seconds until it’s warm. Spoon immediately over French toast. Recipes courtesy of Virginia Cooperative Extension

Eating breakfast can help manage your appetite so there’s less temptation to snack later in the day. VirginiaFarmBureau.com

Cultivate FEBRUARY 2011

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Diggin’ It!

A statewide survey found that there were about 215,000 horses—and ponies, donkeys and mules—in Virginia. Quarter horses and thoroughbreds were the two most popular breeds.

DIG INTO

VIRGINIA HORSE SENSE DID YOU KNOW? • The United States’ longest-running horse show, the Upperville Colt and Horse Show, takes place in Fauquier County each year. It began in 1853.

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V

people and products and to pull plows largest equine—or horse—

and tread grain from harvested wheat

state. The equine industry

plants, and some even served in the

began in Virginia in 1610 with the arrival

military. Today, Virginia is still a vibrant

of the first horses in the Jamestown

horse state, and horses are used

colony. Horses were valuable to the

for racing, pleasure riding, hunting,

colonists. They were used to transport

competitions and breeding.

SaveOurFood.org


Diggin’ It!

 TRY THIS! Make Your Own Horsee MATERIALS • brown or black construction pap per • scissors • markers • brown or black yarn • glue • “googly” eyes for crafts (optional)

DIRECTIONS

A Field Full of Horses (suggested age: 4–7) The beauty of horses is captured in A Field Full of Horses by Peter Hansard. This softly illustrated book takes readers on a ride through the pasture using descriptive writing and creative imagery. Readers will learn about different types of horses and basic horse care.

1. Place a piece of construction paper on the floor. Trace your shoe onto the paaper. This will be the horse’s head. 2. Use the rest the paper to cut out the ears and neck. 3. Cut 2-inch pieces of yarn for the horse’s mane. Glue to the neck. 4. Complete your horse by adding eyes and nostrils.

Horse breed round-up A breed is an animal group that shares many of the same characteristics. There are more than 100 different breeds of horses. Horses in the same breed can have a similar appearance, size and stride. Find the different horse breeds in the word search below (Answers on Page 29).

Make your own feed snack! INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING: Blue jellybeans = water Corn cereal squares (such as Chex) = corn, which provides protein and carbohydrates Granola = oats, which provides protein and vitamin B Shredded whole-wheat cereal biscuits (such as Shredded Wheat) = hay, which provides protein, minerals and vitamins Toasted oat cereal (such as Cheerios) = bran, which provides protein and carbohydrates

VirginiaFarmBureau.com

M Q F A I C A A Z T E C A B M

Y U U A H Y A J V S X R T B C

A A F L O X I S H J J Q N X T

S R L T Y N A E P C Q E E I P

O T M L E T T Y O I R I H B Z

O L A P P A D O C I E R H O R S E N L M A F E D Y M U I Y W E N N R O D P M D E E A D R I I R O E B L B G A Z H M L S H T A A A R D S A D S N E N L I D L P A L T N I P A U B G L E E P I W Q F B R E W A A R A B I A N E Z V N Z C C J C S M D R W Z N E X N I Y J T A P N S L R R L T R D N K F L Z C D U

Appaloosa Arabian Azteca Caspian Clydesdale Falabella Lipizanner Morgan Palomino Pinto Quarterhorse Shetland Shire Standardbred Welsh

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Diggin’ It!

Save Our Food festival draws 3,000 in second year

photos by sara owens

More than 3,000 people attended the second Save Our Food Holiday Festival on Dec. 11, 2010, in Caroline County. The event is the area’s largest holiday food and wine show. Virginia first lady Maureen McDonnell (top right) was on hand to assist Todd Schneider, executive chef at the Executive Mansion, in preparing and sharing Virginia corn and crab fritters. Kroger Bistro chefs prepared Virginia apple flambe, and food samples were shared by vendors like Goats R Us of Nottoway County and Pungo Creek Mills of Accomack County. The next Save Our Food Summer Festival will be held July 24.

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Cultivate FEBRUARY 2011

SaveOurFood.org


NEW FOR 2011

MemberMarketplace New for 2011: Use online Member Marketplace to find farm events and fresh, local foods If you’re looking for fresh, Virginia-grown foods and plants, services related to rural living or a family outing opportunity on a local farm, Virginia Farm Bureau’s new Member Marketplace will be a good place to start. Farm Bureau will expand its online classified advertising opportunities in 2011 to help members promote their farm products and special events on their farms. In addition to classified ads in Farm Bureau News and Cultivate magazines, members will be able to place free classified ads on the organization’s website at VaFarmBureau.org. They can be placed in the categories that currently appear in the magazines—crops, farm equipment, hay and straw, livestock and livestock equipment—as well as in the following new categories: • Agritourism; • Agricultural event notices; • Agricultural services; • Community-supported agriculture; • Horses; • Nursery and greenhouse; and • On-farm sales.

Members who have on-farm sales or community-supported agriculture businesses will be able to list their operations in a searchable Fresh Food Locator directory. Internet-only ads will have a 45-word maximum and will have to be placed via the Farm Bureau website. Only members with paid 2011 memberships will be able to place ads.

2011 magazine classified ad schedule and policies Members of Virginia Farm Bureau will receive one free 15-word classified ad per membership per year in Cultivate, which is mailed to associate members, or in Farm Bureau News, which is mailed to producer members. Ads of 16 to 30 words must be accompanied by payment of $20. Any additional ads placed by members in the same calendar year must be accompanied by payment of $10 for 15 words or fewer, or $20 for 16 to 30 words. Ads submitted without payment will be returned. We do not invoice for classified ads or provide proofs or tearsheets. Ads with more than 30 words and ads from nonmembers will not be accepted. Check your February 2010 issue of Cultivate for the form for placing ads in 2011. Or use

Answers to Horse Breed Round-Up from page 27 M Q F A I C A A Z T E C A B M

Y U U A H Y A J V S X R T B C

A A F L O X I S H J J Q N X T

S R L T Y N A E P C Q E E I P

O T M L E T T Y O I R I H B Z

VirginiaFarmBureau.com

O L A P P A D O C I E R H O R S E N L M A F E D Y M U I Y W E N N R O D P M D E E A D R I I R O E B L B G A Z H M L S H T A A A R D S A D S N E N L I D L P A L T N I P A U B G L E E P I W Q F B R E W A A R A B I A N E Z V N Z C C J C S M D R W Z N E X N I Y J T A P N S L R R L T R D N K F L Z C D U

the online form in the “Member Marketplace” section under the “Member Programs” tab at VaFarmBureau.org. No ads or cancellations will be taken by phone. Ads will be accepted only from members whose 2011 dues are paid. Ads can be placed in the following five categories only: • Crops; • Farm equipment; • Hay/Straw; • Livestock; and • Livestock equipment. Classified ads will be published in the following issues: • April Cultivate (mailed to associate members only) • May Farm Bureau News (mailed to producer members only); • July Cultivate (mailed to associate members only); and • August Farm Bureau News (mailed to producer members only).

Finding your member number When placing your ad, be sure to include your Farm Bureau member number, which can be found above your name on the mailing label of your copy of Cultivate. All member numbers will be verified.

Are your membership records current? If you’ve moved or acquired a new telephone number, please call or visit your county Farm Bureau office to update your membership records. E-mail addresses and cell phone numbers help your Farm Bureau agent reach you in instances where prompt communication is important.

Cultivate FEBRUARY 2011

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The Marketplace

How to place your classified ad Step 1 Use the form below to provide contact information and the text for your ad. • Ads will be accepted from Farm Bureau members only. • Classified ads are not transferable. • Please type or print. • Classified ads will not be accepted or cancelled over the phone.

Step 2 Indicate the issues in which you want your ad to run.

Step 3 Select the category in which you want your ad to run (Pick one only).

Step 4 Your first ad of 15 words or less is free with your membership.

• Ads longer than 30 words will not be accepted. • We do not invoice for classified ads or provide proofs or tearsheets. • Ads submitted without payment will be returned.

Step 5 Mail your ad (and payment) to: Virginia Farm Bureau News / Cultivate Classifieds P.O. Box 27552 Richmond, VA 23261-7552 • You also can fax your ad to 804-290-1096. • Or place it via the Virginia Farm Bureau Web site at VaFarmBureau.org.

Deadlines Ads and cancellations must be received (not mailed) by the following deadlines: Issue

Important: We are not responsible for typographical errors or errors due to illegible handwriting (No refunds available). Classified ads carried in Virginia Farm Bureau News and Cultivate do not constitute an endorsement by Virginia Farm Bureau Federation and its affiliated companies and organizations. We reserve the right to edit or reject ads, including ads that represent a business in competition with the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Company or any of our affiliated or affinity partners. We reserve the right to edit or reject any advertisement that makes reference to any particular political party or group, religious belief or denomination, race, creed, color or national origin.

Moving?

Deadline

Pricing for additional ads: 1–15 words $10/ad 16–30 words $20/ad

Mailed to producer members May April 14 August July 1

Additional ads must be accompanied by a check (no cash) for each issue in which the ad is to appear. • Make check payable to: Virginia Farm Bureau.

Mailed to associate members April March 4 July June 4

If your address or phone number has changed—or is about to—don’t forget to contact your county Farm Bureau office to ensure that your membership and subscription information stays current!

One free 15-word ad per membership per year; 2011 dues must be paid before placing ad.

NAME: _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ MEMBER NO.: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Category in which ad should run (select only one): ❑ Crops

COUNTY: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

❑ Farm Equipment

ADDRESS: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

❑ Hay/Straw

CITY: ______________________________________________________ STATE: ________________________________ ZIP: ___________________

❑ Livestock

DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER: ____________________________________________________ E-MAIL ADDRESS: ______________________________ Ads will not be accepted without the information above

ADVERTISEMENTT (one word per space; please type or print):

❑ Livestock Equipment No other categories available

1. ____________________________ 2.____________________________ 3. _______________________________ 4. ______________________________ 5. __________________________________ 6. ____________________________ 7. ____________________________ 8. _______________________________ 9. ______________________________ 10. _________________________________ ( ) 11. ___________________________ 12. ___________________________ 13. _______________________________ 14. _____________________________ 15. _________________________________ phone number

ISSUE IN WHICH AD SHOULD RUN:

❑ April (mailed to associate members) ❑ May (mailed to producer members)

* Ad placement available for these issues only 30

Cultivate FEBRUARY 2011

❑ Payment enclosed: $_______________ ❑ July (mailed to associate members) ❑ This is my one free 15-word ad for 2011 ❑ August (mailed to producer members) ❑ Please place my ad in The Delmarva Farmerr for 4 weeks at no additional cost to me

SaveOurFood.org


County Farm Bureau Offices Accomack

757-787-4208

Frederick

540-869-8650

Northumberland-Lancaster

804-435-0083

Albemarle

434-293-5775

Giles

540-921-1777

Nottoway

434-292-4389

Alleghany

540-962-3961

Giles

540-626-3201

Orange

540-672-3447

Amelia

804-561-2169

Gloucester-Mathews

804-725-3555

Page

540-743-5082

Amherst

434-946-5336

Gloucester-Mathews

804-642-3602

Patrick

276-694-7108

Appomattox

434-352-7851

Goochland

804-556-4119

Pittsylvania

434-432-2381

Augusta

540-886-2353

Goochland

804-290-1502

Pittsylvania

434-792-7484

Augusta

540-943-9820

Grayson

276-773-3091

Powhatan

804-598-3081

Bedford

540-586-9103

Grayson

276-236-7210

Powhatan

804-897-4989

Bedford

434-385-5239

Greene

434-985-7057

Prince Edward

434-392-3050

Bland

276-688-4341

Greensville

434-634-9471

Prince George

804-541-0559

Botetourt

540-992-2062

Halifax

434-572-4529

Prince William-Fairfax

703-368-6813

Brunswick

434-848-3542

Hanover

804-798-6534

Pulaski

540-674-5119

Brunswick

434-584-0290

Hanover

804-730-8730

Rappahannock

540-987-8225

Buckingham

434-983-2583

Henrico

804-270-6400

Richmond

804-333-4410

Campbell

434-332-5411

Henrico

804-737-4999

Roanoke

540-342-2626

Caroline

804-633-9825

Henry

276-638-7760

Roanoke

540-977-2196

Carroll

276-728-4103

Highland-Bath

540-468-2605

Roanoke

540-562-3710

Carroll

276-236-7210

Isle Of Wight

757-242-6730

Rockbridge

540-463-3603

Isle Of Wight

757-365-0400

Rockingham

540-434-6778

Charles City-James CityNew Kent-York

804-966-2310

King George

540-775-9650

Russell

276-889-1119

CC/JC/NK/YK

757-564-3929

King and Queen

804-769-2580

Russell

276-596-9036

CC/JC/NK/YK

757-595-7143

King and Queen

804-785-9431

Scott

276-386-7411

Charlotte

434-542-5822

King William

804-769-2580

Shenandoah

540-459-4019

Chesapeake

757-546-8000

Lee

276-346-2363

Smyth

276-783-6148 757-653-9341

Chesterfield

804-748-5467

Loudoun

540-751-1111

Southampton

Chesterfield

804-639-4070

Loudoun

703-858-0545

Spotsylvania

540-786-7575

Clarke

540-869-8650

Louisa

540-967-1370

Stafford

540-899-9454

Craig

540-864-6428

Lunenburg

434-676-2451

Surry

757-294-3285

Culpeper

540-825-0682

Madison

540-948-3311

Sussex

434-246-3531

Cumberland

804-492-4621

Mecklenburg

434-738-6141

Tazewell

276-988-6556

Dinwiddie

804-469-3726

Mecklenburg

434-584-0290

Virginia Beach

757-426-6115

Essex

804-443-3733

Middlesex

804-776-6886

Virginia Beach

757-467-0603

Fauquier

540-347-3172

Montgomery

540-382-8161

Warren

540-635-4074 276-628-7135

Floyd

540-745-2021

Montgomery

540-961-4086

Washington

Fluvanna

434-842-3411

Nansemond

757-934-2321

Washington

276-466-3987

Franklin

540-483-9225

Nelson

434-263-8328

Westmoreland

804-493-8004

Franklin

540-721-7047

Northampton

757-678-5158

Wise-Dickenson

276-328-8274

Franklin

540-483-4708

Northumberland-Lancaster

804-580-4422

Wythe

276-228-4042

Your county Farm Bureau office is your first point of contact for information on services and programs included in Virginia Farm Bureau’s Membership Advantage.

Dairy farmers start to make a comeback, on Down Home Virginia

Watch this!

To view Down Home Virginia, visit VaFarmBureau.org.

VirginiaFarmBureau.com

Two Rockbridge County farm families are bucking the trend and opening new dairies, despite tough economic times and strict environmental regulations. That story and more will be featured in the February edition of Down Home Virginia, Virginia Farm Bureau’s monthly cable and satellite television show. Also on the show, chef John Maxwell will prepare a recipe for sweet potato and corn fritters, and horticulturist Mark Viette will share tips for attracting butterflies to your garden. The award-winning show airs nationwide at 6:30 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month on RFD-TV, as well as on 48 cable systems and three broadcast stations in Virginia. It’s also available online at VaFarmBureau.org. Check local cable listings for the show times in your area, or visit VaFarmBureau.org g for a list of participating stations.

Cultivate FEBRUARY 2011

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Every year, 104,000 acres of Virginia farmland disappear forever. As a Farm Bureau member, you’re helping to stop this alarming trend. You can make an even bigger difference by telling your family and friends about Farm Bureau’s Save Our Food campaign and encouraging them to become Farm Bureau members as well. For less than $4 a month, each new membership will

Save 104,000 Acres of Virginia Farmland in 60 Seconds

help ensure that safe, fresh, locally grown foods remain accessible. So make a stand, and tell someone about Farm Bureau and Save Our Food today.

.org

®

©2010 Virginia Farm Bureau


February 2011 Cultivate