Issuu on Google+

TOURISM AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT IN THREE CLUSTERS IN JIAJU VILLAGE

Jiaju Village

5 August 2011 Virginia Werner • Joming Lau • Zeya He College of Built Environments University of Washington • Sichuan University


TABLE OF CONTENTS Regional Context 1 Methodology 2-3 Study Areas 4 General Cluster Characteristics 5 Cluster 1 - Guest Houses 6 Cluster 2 - Guest Houses 7 Cluster 3 - Guest Houses 8 Appendix A: GIS/GPS Methodology A.1.-2 Appendix B: Water Systems B.1.-2

LIST OF FIGURES

All photographs are by authors

1 Jiaju Context Maps 1

2 Jiaju Village 2 3 Jiaju Village Divisions 4 4 Public versus Private Space 5 5 Growth of Houses 5 6 Familial Spatial Relationships 5 7 Cluster 1 - Guest Houses 6 8 Cluster 2 - Guest Houses 7 9 Cluster 3 - Guest Houses 8 B-1 Internal Plumbing B.1 B-2 Rain Drainage B.1 B-3 Solar Water Heater B.2 B-4 Irrigation, Drainage and Water Features B.2

Jiaju Village

5 August 2011 Virginia Werner • Joming Lau • Zeya He College of Built Environments University of Washington • Sichuan University


REGIONAL CONTEXT

Fig. 1 Jiaju Context Maps

Located at 30°92’N 101°87’E, at an upper altitude of approximately 2610m to a lower altitude of about 2122m, Jiaju village is located in Danba County, Sichuan Province, China and comprises 3 production teams.

Jiaju Village 甲居 Chengdu 成都

Jiaju Village has experienced growing numbers of tourism, especially after their designation as a Tibetan village tourism zone, and while parts of the village have prospered as a result, the tourism dollars coming into the village have not been distributed equally throughout the village, with villagers nearest to the main paved road benefitting

Jiaju Village 甲居

5 mi 5 km

Jiaju Village 甲居

1000 ft 500 m

Source: Google Maps with modification by authors

most, as they are the most visible to tourists, and easiest to access by tour buses. At the same time, while most villagers were welcoming and interested in interacting with us, not all villagers seemed interested in partaking in tourism; they either were not set up to accommodate tourists, or did not appreciate tourists intruding into their lives.

Jiaju Village

5 August 2011 Virginia Werner • Joming Lau • Zeya He College of Built Environments University of Washington • Sichuan University

1


METHODOLOGY Fig. 2 Jiaju Village

Jiaju Village boundary Main Road

River

River

Source: Google Earth with modification by authors

Jiaju Village is divided into three parts: Jiaju 1, Jiaju 2, and Jiaju 3. We chose to study a cluster of five to seven households in each section of the village. We chose households based on their general proximity to each other, shared space and paths, and the presence of guest houses. Each cluster has its own character, which has been influenced by vehicular and pedestrian accessibility, slope of the site, where on the overall slope it is, vegetation, and the governmental designation as a mass tourist destination (resulting in more government investment into the cluster) or a “deep” tourism destination. “Deep” tourist locations are those that are not easily accessible by car or bus and do not receive the same level of governmental investment. After defining the study area comprised of these three clusters, the next step was in using the Trimble Juno GPS handheld devices with Arcpad 7.1. The GPS tracking software was used to delineate roads and trails, as well as to collect data on locations of buildings, and other points of interest (e.g. water features, temples, etc.). A more extensive description of how this was done can be found in Appendix A: GIS/GPS Methodology. Shapefiles were created with associated Quickforms, which enabled quick data entry in the field. Buildings were numbered sequentially,

Jiaju Village

5 August 2011 Virginia Werner • Joming Lau • Zeya He College of Built Environments University of Washington • Sichuan University

2


METHODOLOGY

with each building having information collected on building use (residential, store, guesthouse, etc.), age of building, number of residents, presence of guest houses, number of guests per year, average length of stay of visitors, number of rooms, and cost per person per night. Information was also collected on water infrastructure and energy as a collaboration with the water team. Information on internal plumbing, rain catchment systems, and solar hot water heaters was also gathered and can be found in Appendix B: Water Systems. This information was gathered through a combination of short informal interviews and observation. Notebooks were also used to provide detailed notes on buildings, with sketches of building footprints, orientation, and number of stories. Small site maps were also drawn to show relationships between buildings. Photographs were taken to document building characteristics and other relevant information. All the information gathered from the Trimble GPS units was consolidated within ArcMap 10 and then exported into a PDF basemap. Using Adobe Illustrator, the basemap was expanded upon using the details from the field notebooks to show building footprints and associated information.

Jiaju Village

5 August 2011 Virginia Werner • Joming Lau • Zeya He College of Built Environments University of Washington • Sichuan University

3


STUDY AREAS Fig. 3 Jiaju Village divisions ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! !!! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! !! !! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! !! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! !! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! !! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! !!! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! !!! !! ! ! ! ! !!! !! !! ! ! ! ! !!! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !!!! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! !! ! ! !!! ! ! !! ! !! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !!!!! !! !!! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !!!! ! ! ! !! ! !!!!! ! ! ! ! ! !!!!! ! ! !!!!!! !! !!! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !!!! !! !! ! !! !!! !!! !!! !! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! !! !! !! !! !! !! !! !! !! !! ! !! ! ! ! !!! !!! ! ! !! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!!! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! !! !! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !!!!!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!!!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! !!!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! !! !!!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! !!! ! ! !!!!!! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!!!! ! ! ! !!!! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!!!!!!! ! !! ! ! ! !!!!!!! !!! ! !! ! !!!!!! ! !!! ! ! !! ! ! !!!!!! ! ! !!! !! !! ! ! !!! !!!!! ! !!!! ! !! ! ! !!!! !!!!! ! ! !! ! !! ! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ! ! ! ! !!! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !!! !! !! ! !! !!!! ! !!! ! !!! !! ! !! ! !

2434-plaQue watchtower

! ( ( !

temple

( first! ! ( ! (tower

JIAJU 3

Cluster 2

Cluster 1

Cluster 3

C7

C2 C1

JIAJU 1

JIAJU 2

¯ 0

0.5

1

2 Kilometers

Source: Google Earth with modification by authors

This map shows the three clusters in relation to the village boundaries (in pink) and the main roads and paths through the area. The black lines are the routes that our studio teams walked and mapped with either the Trimble GPS unit or the GPS logger. The blue line indicates the main paved road. The yellow line indicates the main dirt road to Cluster 2, and is also accessible by vehicles. The purple line indicates paved pedestrian pathways. The pathways were not mapped comprehensively due to time and resource constraints.

Other team members contributing to data collection: Josh Vitulli, Tricia Dietz, Alejandro Solano, Travis English and Ross Doll.

Jiaju Village

5 August 2011 Virginia Werner • Joming Lau • Zeya He College of Built Environments University of Washington • Sichuan University

4


GENERAL CLUSTER CHARACTERISTICS Fig. 4 Public versus Private Space

FIELDS

SLOPE DN

Source: authors

Fig. 5 Growth of Houses

Source: authors

Fig. 6 Familial Spatial Relationships

SLOPE DN

The spaces that act as public are the southern sides of the houses, where the entrances and paths are. To the north are the fields and where the latrines are located. The interior courtyards and rooftops also act as a semi-public space.

The original house is built with the tower oriented to the north and the entrance to the south. The tower is three stories and the rest of the house is one or two stories. Additions are constructed as the family expands and with guest houses.

Most of the clusters are related through blood or marriage, and will rebuild in the same area, outside the landslide area, to stay near their family.

LANDSLIDE AREA

Source: authors

Jiaju Village

5 August 2011 Virginia Werner • Joming Lau • Zeya He College of Built Environments University of Washington • Sichuan University

5


Fig 7 CLUSTER 1 - GUEST HOUSES

° A7

A6

A5

A4

A8 A2

A1

Legend Buildings Use Guest House Residential 0 5 10

20

30

Unknown

Meters

Source: authors

Cluster 1 is part of the 2006 officially designated tourist area for mass tourism, and has received governmental assistance to pave paths and generally improve the area. The households were encouraged to build additions to accommodate guests and to modernize with such luxuries as running water and toilets. According to the 2006 aerial image and the government maps, there used to be another building in the center of the cluster, where the paths converge, but it has since been B7 demolished in the past five years. It seems like the center of the cluster would be a natural gathering B8 or social space, but it does not function that way at all - it only has crops and the paths. The slope on B5 this site is fairly gentle B6 and lends itself to crop-growing. It feels quite open and welcoming.

°

B4

B3 B2 B9

B1

Legend Buildings Use

Jiaju Village

5 August 2011 Guest House Virginia Werner • Joming Lau • Zeya He Residential 0 5 10 of 20 Built 30 College Environments University of Washington • Sichuan University Unknown Meters

6


0 5 10

20

30

Unknown

Meters

Fig. 8 CLUSTER 2 - GUEST HOUSES

° B7 B8 B5 B6 B4

Like Cluster 1, B2 Cluster 2 is part of B9 B1 the 2006 officially designated tourist area for mass tourism. However, Legend upon interviewing Buildings Use the residents, we Guest House discovered that Residential they are very 0 5 10 20 30 Unknown Meters unhappy because Source: authors they invested in building these new guest houses, but the government has not improved the road to their area. They claim this inaccessibility has greatly reduced their potential earnings as guest houses. During our visit, we saw that the paths were still under construction. Most of their business occurs only during C7 C6 the National Holiday, the first week of October. While some of the households are not officially designated as guest houses, they function as overflow during this time. Cluster 2 feels more private than Cluster 1, as it is farther off the main road, is in a more wooded section, has a steeper slope and the buildings are more tightly knit, creating tighter sight lines. The paths do not cut through fields, C5 C4 and have stone half-walls on parts. they hug the buildings B3

°

C2

C3

Legend C1

Buildings Use Guest House

Jiaju Village Residential

5 August 2011 0 5 10 20 30 Unknown Meters Virginia Werner • Joming Lau • Zeya He College of Built Environments University of Washington • Sichuan University

7


Guest House Residential 0 5 10

20

30

Unknown

Meters

Fig. 9 CLUSTER 3 - GUEST HOUSES

° C7

C6

C5 C4

C2

C3

Legend C1

Buildings Use Guest House Residential

0 5 10

20

30 Meters

Unknown

Source: authors

Unlike Clusters 1 and 2, Cluster 3 is not part of the 2006 officially designated tourist area for mass tourism, but part of the area for “deep” tourism. Only one household claimed to be a guest house, even though two other households had additions under construction. The roads are all dirt, but some of the paths have been paved. It is clearly less developed for tourism, and the residents were not particularly friendly towards us. It was difficult to see more than two houses at any one point in time due to the dispersed layout, the trees, and the topography. This site is hilly, but the overall slope is not very steep.

Jiaju Village

5 August 2011 Virginia Werner • Joming Lau • Zeya He College of Built Environments University of Washington • Sichuan University

8


APPENDIX A: GIS/GPS METHODOLOGY

Hardware Computer (either desktop/laptop) Handheld GPS unit (we used a Trimble Juno Handheld SB) Software ArcPad7.1 for Windows Mobile Google Earth Adobe Photoshop ESRI ArcMap A. Creating Georeference points 1. In order to georeference your aerial photos, you will need to create points using your GPS device that you can match up to an aerial image. 2. Using your GPS device, create points on a layer that correspond with easily identifiable landmarks (i.e. corners of streets, trees, centers of courtyards, etc), and provide enough data when doing data collection so that you will recognize what the point is referring to. It is also useful to make sure you have a sizeable number of points (5-10) that are spread out so that the georeferencing process can be more accurate. 3. Using the tracklog to trace roads and paths is often helpful, as they are often quite visible, and are relatively easy to georeference. You can later create polylines by following the tracklog, in order to create a road layer. B. If you do not have georeferenced high resolution aerial imagery: 1. Go to Google Earth and find your study site. 2. Zoom into sections of your study site, click ‘file: save save image as,’ saving your images as TIFF files. 3. Using Photoshop, stitch the aerial images back into an composite aerial image, saving the file as a TIFF file. Doing this will result in a higher resolution image that will be suitable for working with on a GPS unit. The photomerge function merges the aerial images into one file, either automatically using the ‘auto’ setting, or it can also be done manually. 4. In ArcMap, start a new map, add the point and tracklog layers and then add the high resolution aerial image. 5. Select your point/tracklog layer, and click ‘zoom to layer’

Jiaju Village

5 August 2011 Virginia Werner • Joming Lau • Zeya He College of Built Environments University of Washington • Sichuan University

A.1


APPENDIX A: GIS/GPS METHODOLOGY

6. Open the georeferencing toolbar, and after selecting the aerial imagery layer from the dropdown box, click ‘fit to display,’ to create an approximately correctly scaled aerial photo. 7. Using the ‘control points,’ match your aerial imagery to your point/tracklog layer by first clicking the identifiable landmarks in your aerial imagery, and then clicking the point/ tracklog layer. This will make ArcMap attempt to match the points together. Once you have high resolution aerial imagery, you are ready to put it onto your handheld GPS device. C. Preparing data for ArcPad 1. Zoom into sections of the map in ArcMap until sufficient image quality is obtained, and then using the ‘file export map’ command, export the maps as TIFF files. Ensure that under the ‘general’ tab the resolution is 150dpi, and under the formatting menu that ‘Write GeoTIFF Tags’ is checked. This will ensure that the georeferencing information created will be retained for each section of the overall map. Name the files accordingly in a manner that will allow for easy organization afterwards. 2. Plug in your GPS handheld unit and move these aerial photos into the appropriate folders 3. Using ArcPad, add the aerial photos as layers. 4. It is a good idea to add the point layer shapefiles to double check that the aerial photos are correctly georeferenced. You are now ready to use your handheld GPS unit to collect data!

Jiaju Village

5 August 2011 Virginia Werner • Joming Lau • Zeya He College of Built Environments University of Washington • Sichuan University

A.2


APPENDIX B: WATER SYSTEMS

Fig. B-1 Internal Plumbing

Fig. B-2 Rain Drainage

°

° A7

A6

A7

A6

A5

A5

A4

A8

A4

A8

A2

A2

A1

A1

Legend

Legend

Buildings

Buildings

Internal Plumbing

Rain Drainage

Yes 0 5 10

20

Unknown

30

Yes 0 5 10

20

No

Meters

°

Unknown

30

No

Meters

° B7

B7

B8

B8 B5

B5

B6

B6 B4

B4

B3

B3 B2

B2

B8

B8

B1

B1

Legend

Legend

Buildings

Buildings

Internal Plumbing

Rain Drainage

Yes 0 5 10

20

Unknown

30

Yes 0 5 10

20

No

Meters

°

Unknown

30

No

Meters

° C7

C6

C7

C6

C5

C5

C4

C4

C2

C3

C2

C3

Legend C1

Legend

Buildings

C1

Internal Plumbing 0 5 10

20

30 Meters

Source: authors

Unknown No

Buildings

RAIN

Yes

Y 0 5 10

20

30 Meters

N

Source: authors

Jiaju Village

5 August 2011 Virginia Werner • Joming Lau • Zeya He College of Built Environments University of Washington • Sichuan University

B.1


APPENDIX B: WATER SYSTEMS Fig. B-4 Irrigation, Drainage and Water Features

Fig. B-3 Solar Water Heaters

°

°

A9

Waterfall (small)

Water main Irrigation pond

Drainage junction

Drainage junction Beginning of stream

A5

Drainage junction

A5

Irrigation pond (dry)

Irrigation pond

A4

A8

A4

A8

Waterfall

A7

A6

A7

A6

Irrigation pond

Waterfall

A2

A2

Change in elevation in irrigation

Change in elevation of irrigation

Change in elevation in irrigation A1

A1

Legend

Legend

Cluster Boundary

Buildings

Points of Interest

Solar Water Heater

Irrigation/Drainage

Yes Unknown 0 5 10

20

30

Trails 0 5 10

20

°

Buildings

Meters

No

Meters

Agricultural Fields

30

°

Drainage junction

Drainage junction Drainage junction B7

B7 B8

B8

B5 B6

B6

B5 Drainage junction

B4

B4

B3

B3 Irrigation pond

B2 B9

B2

Water main

B1

Drainage junction B1 Drainage junction Irrigation entry to field Irrigation entry to field

B8 Water feature

Legend Cluster Boundary

Legend

Points of Interest

Buildings

Solar Hot Water

Waterfall

Yes 0 5 10

20

Unknown

30

0 5 10

20

°

Trails Agricultural Fields

30

Buildings

Meters

No

Meters

Irrigation/Drainage

Communal irrigation pond (Cluster 2)

°

Waterfall (white pipe for water)

C7

C6

C7

C6

C5

Waterfall

C4

C5 C4

Drainage junction under road

C2

C3

Drainage junction Irrigation pond C2

Water main

C3

Spring?

Legend

Legend C1

Cluster Boundary

Buildings

Points of Interest

Solar Hot Water Yes 0 5 10

20

30 Meters

Source: authors

C1

Unknown No

0 5 10

20

Irrigation/Drainage Trails Agricultural Fields

30

Buildings

Meters

Source: authors

Jiaju Village

5 August 2011 Virginia Werner • Joming Lau • Zeya He College of Built Environments University of Washington • Sichuan University

B.2


TOURISM AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT IN THREE CLUSTERS IN JIAJU VILLAGE