Page 1

T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 6 , 2 0 1 7 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

SPRING 2017

P TO: DAN PHO AN TOULGOET

PAGE 3

PAGE 4

PAGE 11

B1


editor

THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 6 , 2 0 1 7

FROM THE

SANDRA THOMAS | THOMAS@VANCOURIER.COM

We made it. Not only did we collectively survive “Snowmageddon” this winter, but Lifetime magazine also made it through its inaugural year.

Courier with much larger numbers.

What started out in 2016 as a glossy magazine with a small circulation has morphed into a pullout section within the ING: RETIREMENT LIV

WhatÕs New? pg 11

TRAVEL:

Sparkling Hill Resort

: GARDENING

Hobbs talks trends

We also learned some lessons with those early editions, including switching to a font large enough to actually read. Another lesson we learned is that when

SUMM

it comes to volunteers, this city is a treasure trove. Our first annual Lifetime Senior Volunteer of the Year Award was presented in October and something we learned while organizing that, is there are two types of volunteers in Vancouver: front-line community workers and the

16 E R 20

$%!"#&

pg 6

en it ourites, wh to play fav sons I have to sea comes to for summer all I’m16 L it20 F A Ladm the way. to enjoy

pg 18

place t better our And wha t here in than righ just summer of course, yard — you. I is up to own back er looks like a Vancouv what that to tell you from don’t have include anything can walking summer festivals, ic mus the hiking to g or visits from min g. And of to swim enin s to gard urite pass grandkid of my favo comes to n it course one ing. Whe ion times, read summertime vers t this some grea reading, includes ’t want of Lifetime for titles you won ns ing in the suggestio relax se is also Of cour Lifetime to miss. a copy of hour or two. with e an shad to spend plans a great way ask, what are your to So I have mer? for sum look for of Lifetime ited copy this -awa In on the long an update er seniors couv s, Van st Lorna Gibb Southea cover girl from centre from store fashions ent newest consignm update on the an aring to ity prep the HOB, l nt commun financia city, retireme the nd in ren break grou adult child helping Internet advice on e, tips for mortgag with their more. dating and hing anyt e’s , if ther ons Please note see in future editi to an email. you’d like drop me of Lifetime,

W I N T E R 2016

Death

! taxes FASHION:

That one signature piece

Monitoring seniors services

R.COM THOMAS SANDRA @VANCOURIE STHOMAS

T G ET LLGO OULG TOU TO AN T DA DAN O:: D TO TO: T OTO HOT H PH PHO

S P R I N G 2016

professionals who sit on boards and get things done from the top. To better reflect that diversity in positions, this year Lifetime will present prizes in both categories, with the overall winner receiving the grand prize. This year’s grand prize, sponsored by Element Opal Living, includes a gift certificate from Ageless

from the

OET LGO N TOU

B2

owne Cathy Br e lens th Behind

le ’ lifesty Seniorss+ tables talk

SPECIAL EVENT Adventures worth more than $5,000 and gift cards from Stong’s Markets. So watch for more details about our 2017 Senior Volunteer of the Year Award in the June edition of Lifetime, where we’ll include instructions on how to enter or nominate someone else for the grand prize, which will be awarded in September at the third annual Lifetime Seniors Talks & Tables event at VanDusen Botanical Garden, produced in partnership with Tapestry Foundation. So welcome to 2017, and as always, if there’s something you’d like to see in future editions or have a comment or question drop me a note at sthomas@vancourier.com.

P.M. 11A.M.-4 2016 • OCT. 5, CAL GARDEN SDAY, NI WEDNE DUSEN BOTA AN

Inspired, vibrant retirement.

Speaking of volunteers, Better at Home is hosting a free, two-day event dedicated to building skills, including supporting seniors at home, communication, cultural competency and mental health awareness. Volunteers who complete the Better at Home Caring Summit: Building a Caring Community with Seniors event will receive a certificate. The training is in English, but volunteers who speak other languages are also encouraged to attend. Free food and refreshments are provided and childcare is available with pre-registration. For more information call 604-555-6958 or visit betterathome.ca.

by e l e m e n t

You’ve earned it. All you have to do is imagine it, and we’ll make it happen. Over 30,000 square feet of indoor and outdoor intergenerational amenities programmed as a dynamic private clubhouse to actively welcome your friends and family. Opal will encompass the complete spectrum of lifestyles:

• Independent Living and Assisted Living: 44 condominiums, 56 rentals • Licensed Complex (Long-Term) Care: 30 suites

Located at King Edward and Cambie in the core of Vancouver’s premier neighbourhood, Opal is just steps to parks, a community centre, boutique cafes, gourmet restaurants and exclusive retail.

DISCOVERY CENTRE AT CITY SQUARE

555 West 12th Avenue, Unit 130, Upper Shops

Public hours: Noon-3:30pm 7 days a week Private appointments: 10am-noon Monday-Friday; 3:30-5pm Saturday and Sunday. Sales are happening fast: a limited number of 2 bedrooms and 1BR+dens remaining.

w w w. O p a l B y E l e m e n t . c o m

R E S I D E N C E OP E N S EA R L Y 20 1 9

pursue life.


T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 6 , 2 0 1 7 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

B3

Medical Tourism

JOHN KURUCZ | JKURUCZ@VANCOURIER.COM

It’s a phenomenon that has grown and shifted exponentially since Europeans first began flocking to therapeutic spas or others took to the jungles of South America for a spiritual awakening. Today, medical tourism is seen as a viable way to avoid long waitlists, limited availability or bureaucratic delays. Having worked in the healthcare field for more than three decades, Janet Bristeir has seen all of those factors in play and last year she decided to do something about it. The Vancouver resident published three books that serve as comprehensive companion pieces for anyone contemplating travelling internationally for surgery. “My main consideration is trying to keep people safe when they’re having any kinds of surgery,” she said. “People just have no idea what they’re looking at here because it looks easy at first. You can look at a website and think ‘I can do this, this is great and I can afford it.’ It

might not actually be what you think it is.” Released between January and September 2016, the titles include: Medical Tourism — Your Surgery Journey: A Journal of Your Experience; Medical Tourism Pre-Surgery Checklist and Workbook: What You Don’t Know Can Hurt You, and Medical Tourism — Surgery for Sale!: How to Have Surgery Abroad Without It Costing Your Life. Bristeir’s research suggests more than 800,000 Canadians travel abroad for medical and dental procedures not covered by provincial health plans. She noted typical candidates for medical tourism are 55 and older, have residual income and suffer from a nagging condition that’s having an impact on their quality of life — they may need a hip replacement or knee surgery

and want to forego the typical wait times of 18 months to two years. While the reasons and prices for those procedures

The Courier has a copy of Medical Tourism Pre-Surgery Checklist and Workbook: What You DonÕt Know Can Hurt You, and Medical Tourism Ñ Surgery for Sale!: How to Have Surgery Abroad Without It Costing Your Life to give away to the 10th person to email sthomas@vancourier.com. The winner must be able to pick the books up from the CourierÕs office.

express.stongs.com

place your order today! Weekly Deliveries to: - Burnaby

- North & West Van. - New West - Bowen Island - Port Moody - Richmond

and combine visiting family with undergoing surgery.

“The first question you have to ask is why do you feel the need to go abroad?” Bristeir said. “Pushing forward and getting the surgery may not be a good thing for you and that might be what your healthcare practitioner here may be trying to protect you from.” The back end of having a foreign procedure done also requires careful consideration: getting to and from the airport, ensuring mobility needs will be looked after and knowing that healthcare practitioners in Canada will be available for any follow-up work.

TRY our IMPROVED ONLINE SHOPPPING Site

- Vancouver

differ, there are some commonalities. Some B.C. residents tend to travel to Mexico for surgery. The west coast’s large Chinese and Indian communities travel back to Asia for care. Toronto residents may head to the Caribbean due to the relatively short flight. Those of European descent go home

- Port Coquitlam

Order By Phone - 604.630.3154

“You certainly don’t want to come back with any sort of complication and then there’s no one who can look after you apart from walking into an emergency department,” Bristeir said. “Then you impact our healthcare system as well, which is already stretched.”

Bristeir’s areas of speciality are in the fields of operating room nursing and instrument processing — she’s tasked with cleaning and sterilizing the instruments used in surgery. She’s currently employed by a local health authority, but declined to say which one. Bristeir insists her works aren’t a critique of Canada’s healthcare system, but rather a how-to guide of navigating international surgery. Bristeir is currently working on a series follow-up — ebooks that chronicle the experiences of some Canadians who have travelled abroad for surgery and medical practitioners in Canada who have helped patients when they’ve run into problems internationally. “The purpose of my book is not to tell people to go abroad and have surgery. If you’re considering this, these are the things you have to consider to keep yourself safe,” Bristeir said.


THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 6 , 2 0 1 7

SENIOR skate

PHO P PH OTOS O : DAN TOU OS ULGO GOET OET ET

B4

JANE MUNDY | JANEVM@TELUS.NET

Across the city older adults are taking to the ice for exercise — and friendship

Garth Patrick (in blue) is a regular at the Older Adult Skate at Kitsilano Rink.

More and more seniors are lacing up and circling Vancouver’s rinks.

we reverse skate [the opposite direction] for the last 30 minutes.”

While some are rekindling their love of childhood skating, others are gliding in from their ice hockey days and still more are revisiting the sport after a few decades off the ice — testament to the old adage: it’s never too late.

Rudolph, who used to play old-timers hockey, says it’s easy to meet people both lacing up and on the ice.

It’s 10 a.m. at the Kitsilano rink on a Wednesday morning in January and every skater is smiling as they circle the ice. Over the loudspeaker, the Animals’ “House of the Rising Sun” provides background music, but some choose to ignore the song and plug in their iPhones — one fellow is listening to his Walkman. They’re in the zone. Carrie Beavington, age 67, learned how to skate at Trout Lake rink more than 40 years ago. She later met a few guys at “Couples Skating” at Kerrisdale rink and then went on a few dates.

Featuring pianist, Gail Penny Kerrisdale's rrisdale's newest boutique boutiq residence reside for seni seniors wel welcomes you for a visit!

All Day Dining I Pet Friendly I Life Enrichment Designed for your quality of life, convenience and increased joy!

PLEASE RSVP

(604) 563-3540 Granville & 49th, Kerrisdale agm.granville@verveseniorliving.com

“One guy glided over to me and asked if I would like to skate, but I told him that I was already skating,” she says, laughing. “Well that floored him. We skated together and ended up dating for a few months.”

“I met Carrie on the rink and we get together for birthdays and other events,” he says. “You can skate every day at Vancouver’s community centres and it’s a great way to meet all kinds of people, share life experiences and travel stories. Some of us get together for $10 lunches at the community centres. We chit chat and talk about stuff.” Debbie Gregg came back to the rink after a 30-year gap. “When I was a kid we had family skating every Friday night in Coquitlam,” she says, “until teen skating kicked in and that was a big deal.” Now in her early 60s, Gregg skates three times a week. She rekindled the sport a few years ago when a friend wanted to take up skating. “I took my skates out of the box and brushed off the dust. When I first got on the ice it was nervewracking,” says Gregg. “The fear of falling was first and foremost, but muscle memory clicks in and right away it was a calming experience. To this day I skate to clear my head.”

ÒI took my skates out of the box and brushed off the dust.Ó

Unlike other sports such as skiing, when you’re by yourself on the ice it’s easy to make friends. Many of these skaters take part for the camaraderie alone. Beavington often skates with her friend George Rudolph, 73. “We inspire each other to skate the full 90 minutes and

Then there’s the exercise component. Gregg says skating helps with balance and coordination and if you pick up speed it’s a great lower body workout.


T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 6 , 2 0 1 7 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

B5

Esthetics Denture New Studio Dentures or a Creating Smile? the Art Natural of Nature Cosmetic Precision Denture System™ Baby boomers and seniors are taking to the ice in droves as part of the Older Adult Skate program offered at several city rinks.

“Gliding is good and I think some of the guys get their heart rate up,” she adds. Eighty-year-old Maury Shacker agrees. “Skating is the easiest exercise I know,” says Shacker, who started skating 14 years ago when he retired from teaching at BCIT. “I started out once a week and now I skate five times a week. It’s almost like a job — it’s also become a habit.” Shacker has a routine — Mondays at Kerrisdale, Tuesdays at Trout Lake and Wednesdays and Fridays Carrie Beavington and George Rudolph met years ago while skating and have been friends ever since.

at Kitsilano. Sometimes he skates at Robson Square. “But it’s smaller and more crowded and I worry that I might run over a kid,” he says, laughing. “But it’s fun because you get the illusion of going faster. And I see a few regulars there.”

You can pick up a skating schedule and inquire about lessons at any Vancouver Park Board community centre or check out the eight rinks offering “50 and Better Skate” at vancouver.ca.

The Art and Advantages of Cosmetic Precision Dentures:

Guaranteed for 5 years against breakage

For a self-proclaimed “lazy guy,” Shacker appears to be in good shape.

Esthetics Denture Esthetics DentureRD, Studio Inc. Studio Inc. Alex Hupka, RDT

Alex Hupka, RD, RDT

“Skating gives you a sense of freedom,” he adds. “It’s exhilarating, especially if you build up speed. It’s cool to do your own thing.”

Registered Registered Dental Alex Hupka,Denturist, RD, RDT CALLTechnician TO BOOK

(1 block block from from Richmond Richmond Centre) www.bcdenturist.ca YOUR FREE CONSULTATION (1 Centre) www.bcdenturist.ca #240-3671 Westminster Hwy., #240 – 3671 Westminster Hwy., Richmond BC V7C 5V2 604.279.9151 Richmond BC V7C 5V2

www.bcdenturist.ca

I can’t be there every minute for her. I’m glad MedicAlert can be.

Why Jennifer chooses MedicAlert: Reunites familiess quickly.

® M MedicAlert ssaves lives.

If it doesn’t say MedicAlert, it’s not MedicAlert.

MedicAlert Foundation Canada and Vancouver Police

join forces, offering a life-saving service. Vancouver Police now have quick 24/7 access to your loved one’s vital information if wandering or at time of emergency. To celebrate the new partnership, MedicAlert has a time-limited sign-up offer for Vancouver residents.

Sign up now to get a

FREE MedicAlert ID + 50% OFF your MedicAlert service plan*

Visit medicalert.ca/van or call 1.855.581.3798 | Use offer code VANCOUVER

ONLY MedicAlert service plans include: • Critical Assistance in Seconds with our 24/7 Emergency Hotline • Engraving Designed to Globally Accepted Medical Standards • Family Notification Service at Time of Emergency

*Offer includes a free MedicAlert ID valued at $39 or get a $39 discount on any MedicAlert ID, PLUS get 50% off the first year of your MedicAlert service plan, equivalent to $30 off any prepaid service plan of your choice. Offer valid for new subscribers only and cannot be combined with any other offers, some exceptions apply. Offer expires February 28, 2017.

EXPIRE Feb 28S


B6

THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 6 , 2 0 1 7

“I used to teach cooking and nutrition, now I’m the one who’s learning.” I taught cooking and nutrition at high school for 22 years, so I can appreciate the benefits of fresh, healthy food when it’s well prepared. The chef here at Tapestry is a master. I’m constantly impressed with his creativity and presentation skills. The food is exceptional and always a highlight of my day. It seems to me this same level of quality and caring extends to every aspect of my experience here at Tapestry. And like the wonderful food, it nourishes me.

To find out more about life at Tapestry, visit DiscoverTapestry.com or call to schedule a complimentary lunch and tour. For a tour at Tapestry at Wesbrook Village call 604.225.5000 and for Tapestry at Arbutus Walk call 604.736.1640.

DiscoverTapestry.com Tapestry at Wesbrook Village 3338 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver BC 604.225.5000 Tapestry at Arbutus Walk 2799 Yew Street, Vancouver BC 604.736.1640 ® Registered trademarks of Concert Properties Ltd., used under license where applicable.


health YOUR

CATHERINE ROSCOE BARR | CATHERINEROSCOEBARR@GMAIL.COM

10 simple ways to make 2017 your healthiest

Great news — being vibrantly healthy can be simple. Not easy — effort is required — but simple. The following tips can help transform your life when practised consistently, even in small doses. PRACTISE “BRAIN HYGIENE” Mindfulness practices — such as meditation, time in nature, quiet reflection, yoga, spa rituals, keeping a journal — promote brain hygiene. You can weave mindfulness throughout your day by slowing down to consider how your thoughts, words and actions make you feel. Simple!

JOURNAL WITH PARAMETERS By keeping a mood, food and fitness journal, you’re able to determine exactly what serves you and what doesn’t. How do you feel today based on your choices? How do you feel right after you exercise, or an hour after you eat? It’s like a science experiment for which you’re gathering data on how to live your best life. ASK CONSTRUCTIVE QUESTIONS Your brain is a problemsolving machine so it’s important to ask empowering questions versus destructive questions — because you get an answer to match. For example, “How can I solve

this problem?” versus “Why did this happen to me?” REDUCE AND TRANSFORM STRESS Our body’s stress response is an amazing system that allows us to mobilize energy in an instant to fight or flee, yet much of our modern stress is mental, nutritional and electromagnetic, not about physical danger. Now it’s been shown chronic stress is bad news for our health — but it’s a simple fix. Shift your mindset to transform mental stress, eat more unprocessed whole foods to reduce nutritional stress, and cut down on screentime (especially in the hours

T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 6 , 2 0 1 7 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

before bedtime) to reduce electromagnetic stress. SCHEDULE SERENITY Don’t have time to rejuvenate mind, body and spirit? Then schedule it. Every minute — whether it’s three minutes to breathe deeply or 30 for a hot bath — counts, by promoting the rest-and-digest response which benefits the mind and all body systems. CREATE RITUALS, SLEEP BETTER Try adopting evening rituals that focus on winding down (dim lights, turn off tech or write in a gratitude journal). A good night’s sleep is not only when the brain and body regenerate and repair — research shows that quality sleep affects self-regulation (our ability to make healthy choices) and cognitive function (our ability to reason, learn and remember). START AN ANTISEDENTARYREVOLUTION Movement is key to optimal health and has two main

components, exercise and physical activity. Even if you lift weights, run or practise yoga for an hour every day, 23 hours remain where you’re likely sedentary. Weaving physical activity (taking the stairs, housework, impromptu dance parties) throughout the day can reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes and increase your energy, physical health and cognitive function. CONSUME MIND-BODYSPIRIT NUTRITION It can feel wonderfully indulgent to focus on foods that nourish you — mind, body and spirit. In a ratio that leans heavily toward the former, indulge your mind and body with energizing, nutrient-dense foods and indulge your spirit with whatever you’re craving. GROW YOUR POSITIVITY ANTENNAE Our brain’s innate negativity bias is an important safety mechanism that has us on

constant alert for danger, whether it’s physical or mental — much like a super-sensitive antennae. You can balance this bias by growing your “positivity antennae” through the practice of daily gratitude (i.e. scanning your world for good). PRACTISE RADICAL SELF-LOVE Self-love is self-mastery. When you know, nurture, forgive and trust yourself — and strengthen these skills through practice — you can accomplish great things and feel a deep sense of fulfilment. Catherine Roscoe Barr, BSc Neuroscience, is founder of The Life Delicious, a global wellness coaching practice with retreats from Vancouver Island to London, England, and private clients worldwide via Skype. Catherine is a certified personal trainer and older adult specialist.

Our Communication Devices Showroom displays a variety of assistive listening and alerting devices to optimize communication and safety at home, in the workplace, and in social environments. The only place in BC that provides one-onone consultations to assist individuals in becoming comfortable with their devices.

CONTACT US PHONE: 604-736-7391

WIDHH’s Communication Devices Specialists go beyond selling a product!

TTY: 604-736-5819

BOOK YOUR CONSULTATION TODAY

WEB: widhh.com

EMAIL: info@widhh.com

“No more avoiding group situations, no more living in silence and seclusion” CHARITABLE REGISTRATION NUMBER: 108200098RR0001

B7


B8

THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 6 , 2 0 1 7

MedicAlert program expands MEGAN STEWART | STEWART@VANCOURIER.COM

Connect Protect is voluntary for adults and children with a cognitive impairment, disability or disorder who are at risk of ‘wandering off’

Discover your own Backyard!

Serving 55+ B.C. Seniors for 30 years

Guided tours with diverse sightseeing, comfortable accommodations, quality meals, smaller group sizes, home pick-up and drop-off.

More than 45 tours annually. 2017 tours include: Discover Your Own Backyard: • Fairmont Jasper Park Lodge Getaway • Canadian Arctic Adventure • Okanagan Wine Getaway • Whistler, Tyax, Quaaout Lodges • Sparkling Hill Resort Spa • Glacier National Park & Waterton Lakes • Canadian Maritimes: Nova Scotia, PEI & New Brunswick • Haida Gwaii • Yukon & NWT • Grizzly Bears of Knight Inlet • Newfoundland & Labrador • Autumn in Quebec • BC Waterways & Rail Tour • Wickaninnish Inn Experience Discover the U.S. & Beyond: • Maui & the Big Island • Portland Rose Parade • Oregon Coast • Incredible Iceland • Christmas in New York • Mexico’s Riviera Maya • Palm Springs & Scottsdale AZ. • Cuba

604-542-5566 or toll free 1-877-277-5577

agelessadventuretours.com 260-1959 152nd Street, South Surrey, B.C. V4A 9E3

A decade ago, Jim Mann was walking his chocolate Labrador in Surrey when a motorist pulled over and asked for directions. A retired administrator with a national airline, Mann knew the city’s streets from its avenues and many more details.

injury or autism and return them to their families as quickly as possible should they become lost, go missing, wander away or become involved in an emergent situation,” said the police chief at a news briefing.

Palmer said the VPD receives roughly 5,000 missing person calls each year. The Connect Protect service was spurred by the Vancouver Police Foundation, which will pay “I could tell her that street, for the service for the first but then couldn’t tell her 100 participants in Vancouver this street,” he said of his who are able to register here. conversation with the Subscribers to the service motorist. “Then I could tell her pay $60 a year to MedicAlert this street, but not that street.” Foundation Canada, a registered charity founded As Mann described the in 1961. experience to a reporter today, he directed his hands at the During the announcement, intersecting streets he could a boy rolled on the carpet in envision in his memory. front of the police chief at the “Then I realized I didn’t know podium, playing and speaking where I was or how to get loudly to himself as he took home,” he said. in the dozens of adults and television cameras around Soon after, Mann was him and held a stuffed Angry diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. Birds toy in each hand. As a But when he was lost that child with autism spectrum first time on a residential disorder, he was one of the sidewalk, he did his best first two Vancouver recipients to relax and figure out his of the new bracelet. His surroundings. His dog, mother flattened his hair and Bhreagh, led the way home. coaxed him to approach the “She basically helped me. I stage, asking, “Are you ready found that I could stand there for your present now?” The and calm the mind and we president of MedicAlert then worked it out,” he said. strapped on a bracelet as the boy sat in his mother’s lap. Mann immediately registered for a MedicAlert bracelet and The VPD have created has worn it since 2007. He has multiple internal databases never had to use it. to help with missing person But the basics of his own neighbourhood suddenly eluded him. He was not even 60.

“It’s the peace of mind it brings me,” he said. Recently he was present as Vancouver police chief Adam Palmer announced the city’s officers would be the first in Canada outside Ontario to have immediate and aroundthe-clock access to MedicAlert personal information in an effort to help identify a missing or wandering person and reunite them with family and care-givers. “We can lead the way in increasing the safety of people living with Alzheimer’s, dementia, cognitive brain

searches, but the partnership with MedicAlert allows them to tap into a system that is voluntarily supplied with information for selfidentified vulnerable people who offer pertinent personal information such as recent photographs, medical history, history of wandering, as well as contact information for spouses and parents and care-givers. A confused individual can also ask a bystander for help by presenting the bracelet. For more information and to register, visit medicalert.ca/ connectprotect.


T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 6 , 2 0 1 7 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Say Good Bye to Dentures, Say Hello to Teeth in One Day!

Losing teeth or in the process of losing all of dentists and certified specialists are very excited confident smile and the ability to eat all of your of your teeth? Struggling with loose or to offer this advanced procedure to all patients who favorite foods once again. Dr. Bobby Birdi (Certified want a fixed permanent solution. Dual Specialist in Periodontics & Prosthodontics) ill-fitting dentures? Ifyouarelosingyourteethorarecurrentlywearinga denture, this innovative treatment is now available and may be the answer you’ve been looking for. The Teeth in One Day treatment has over 25 years of research and success behind it! BC Perio’s team

The Teeth in One Day (All on 4TM) treatment is an amazing procedure that allows you to come in with a denture or failing teeth and leave the same day (ONE DAY) with a new set of fixed-in teeth. No more dentures or painful, failing teeth. Just a new

is looking forward to helping you meet all of your dental goals and wishes! Smile and face the world with confidence again with BC Perio’s Teeth in One Day! Don’t wait another minute, book your consultation today!

How are Teeth in One Day different from traditional dentures?

Dr. Bobby Birdi

Periodontist & Prosthodontist

Teeth in One Day (All on 4TM) dental implants are a permanent set of teeth that look and feel like your natural teeth. They are teeth that will be brushed and cleaned like natural teeth. They do not have to be taken out. They do not need adhesives. They are comfortable because they do not press down on your gums. They also allow you to bite with increased force (up to 70% more), so you can eat all your favorite foods again!

your favorite foods again!

Vancouver Office Coquitlam Office Vancouver Office Coquitlam Office Street 501-777 West Broadway 250-1175 Johnson 501-777 West Broadway 250-1175 Johnson Street

604-872-0222 604-936-8244 604-872-0222 604-936-8244 Visit us online at www.bcperio.ca Visit us online at www.bcperio.ca

B9


THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 6 , 2 0 1 7

VIRTUAL reality SANDRA THOMAS | STHOMAS@VANCOURIER.COM

Sitting in a chair in a common room at Tapestry Retirement Community at Wesbrook Village, Yvonne Leversage donned a headset, complete with what looked like a black, oversized scuba-diving mask that covered much of her face.

WANTED:

30 PEOPLE WHO HAVE DIFFICULTY HEARING Crystal Hearing is excited to introduce the first

HEARING AIDS with 24-HOUR BATTERY LIFE Imagine Never Needing Batteries Again! We are seeking 30 people who have difficulty hearing, to evaluate the exciting new breakthrough in hearing aid technology. Crystal Hearing will perform a comprehensive hearing screening and in-clinic demonstration FREE OF CHARGE. The selected candidates will be able to purchase the hearing instruments at TREMENDOUS SAVINGS for their participation. Call now to be one of the 30 selected who get the chance to wear these hearing aids home, RISK FREE, and hear for yourself the amazing difference this product could make. Official provider for: Veteran Affairs, NIHB, Blue Cross, Social Assistance aring Centre He l a

CALL TODAY!

604-428-4327

Cry st

B10

* Some restrictions apply. See in-store for details.

Visit us in Vancouver!

#103-777 West Broadway | 604-428-4327

www.cvoh.ca

And while the contraption resembled some kind of medieval torture machine, the immediate smile on Leversage’s face demonstrated it was anything but. Leversage was one of about 20 seniors gathered to experience a virtual reality series created by Perspective Films, a Vancouver-based live-action, virtual reality production agency and laboratory. Dubbed VR Wonders of the World, the virtual reality series transports the viewer to extraordinary destinations around the world and offers adventures that can be customized and interactive. Leversage experienced the first two episodes of the series, which feature journeys to the Grand Canyon and Northern Lights. “My husband and I used to mountain climb and hike places like Strathcona Park on Vancouver Island,” said Leversage. “I can’t hike anymore, but it’s very heartwarming to see this. I think it’s wonderful that people can see these places even if they can’t get to them.” Perspective Films specializes in creating 360-degree videos for use online, on smart devices and with their own virtual reality equipment. Company founder Chris Bedyk created this series of travel videos and developed the speciality cameras required to view them. Prospective Films is also responsible for creating the Vancouver Canucks first virtual reality/360-degree experience.

Lina Saba, marketing consultant at Tapestry, said when Perspective approached the retirement community with a plan to bring virtual reality to the tenants, she was immediately intrigued. “Part of what we do is look for new technology to use and so we take advantage of every opportunity to participate,” said Saba. “It’s a way for us to gauge what kind of interests our residents have.” Saba noted travel was once an important part of the lives of the majority of Tapestry’s residents, but for many mobility issues have made getting around more challenging. She added virtual reality offers seniors an opportunity to experience far-off lands once again. Retired dentist Lionel Jinks also jumped at the chance to try the virtual reality headset. Jinks said he’d always wanted to see the Grand Canyon, but for some reason never made the trip. “And now I got to see it,” said Jinks, who still regularly travels with his wife, opera singer Carole Jinks. “I think this is the greatest. I could have watched it for another 30 minutes.” Besides its entertainment value, Jinks believes the virtual reality experience has a second, even more important purpose. “Maybe it will encourage some of them to actually get out there and see these places for themselves.”


taxtime SANDRA THOMAS STHOMAS@VANCOURIER.COM

Top 8 tax breaks for seniors While some days you might bemoan the fact you’re getting older, there are in fact a few perks to reaching retirement age. To that end, Canada Revenue Services has compiled a list of credits and benefits that could help you save money on your taxes this year. PENSION INCOME SPLITTING If you receive a pension, you may be eligible to split up to 50 per cent of your eligible pension income with your spouse or common-law partner. GUARANTEED INCOME SUPPLEMENT If you receive the guaranteed income supplement or allowance benefits under the old age security program, you can renew your benefit by filing your return by the filing deadline. REGISTERED RETIREMENT SAVINGS PLAN (RRSP) Deductible RRSP contributions can reduce your tax bill. You have until Dec. 31 of the year in which you turn 71 to contribute to your RRSP. REGISTERED DISABILITY SAVINGS PLAN (RDSP) This savings plan can help families save for the financial security of a person who is eligible for the disability tax credit. RDSP contributions are not tax deductible and can be made until the end of the year in which the beneficiary turns 59.

GOODS AND SERVICES TAX/ HARMONIZED SALES TAX (GST/HST) CREDIT You may be eligible for the GST/ HST credit, a tax-free quarterly payment that helps your offset all or part of the GST or HST you pay. To receive this credit, you must file an income tax and benefit return every year, even if you did not receive income. If you have a spouse or commonlaw partner, only one of you can receive the credit. The credit will be paid to the person whose return is assessed first.

MEDICAL EXPENSES You may be able to claim the total eligible medical expenses you or your spouse or commonlaw partner paid for you, your spouse or common-law partner, or you or your spouse’s or common-law partner’s children who were born in 1999 or later, provided the expenses were made over any 12-month period ending in 2016 and were not previously claimed. This can include amounts claimed for attendant care or care in an establishment. AGE AMOUNT If you were 65 years of age or older on December 31, 2016, and your net income was less than $83,427, you may be able to claim up to $7,125. PENSION INCOME AMOUNT You may be able to claim up to $2,000 if you reported eligible pension, superannuation or annuity payments on your tax return. For more tips, visit cra.gc.ca/seniors.

T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 6 , 2 0 1 7 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

B11


B12

THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 6 , 2 0 1 7

Sandra Thomas and Laurence Malley decided to tie the knot in Las Vegas, complete with a Blue Hawaii Elvis ceremony.

viva

The puck stops here. Vote for your favourite Canuck player & more in Vancouver Courier’s Readers’ Choice Awards. VOTING ENDS MARCH 11, 2017

LUXURY STAYCATION GIVEAWAY

Win a luxury overnight hotel stay, spa and dining staycation package for you and a friend. Visit vancourier.com/contests and vote for your Vancouver favourites for a chance to win! VOTE BEFORE MARCH 11, 2017 AND IN AT LEAST 25 CATEGORIES TO BE ELIGIBLE.

vancourier.com/contests

Las Vegas

SANDRA THOMAS | STHOMAS@VANCOURIER.COM

When two baby boomers decide to tie the knot after 15 years together, only an epic Las Vegas wedding would do. Standing in the lobby of the Viva Las Vegas Wedding Chapel in Downtown Las Vegas, where my long-time partner and I were soon to be married, a wedding coordinator handed me a bouquet of pink roses and pointed us in the direction of the main chapel with one simple instruction, “Just follow the hula dancer and Elvis.” To which my soon-to-be, son-in-law immediately quipped, “Said no one ever.” The fact that almost 30 of our closest friends and family members had made the trip to Las Vegas for the occasion made our day even more memorable, especially when it became quickly obvious they had all taken our suggestion to wear tropical-themed outfits very much to heart. And, located between a Super 8 Motel and a tattoo parlour, the Viva Las Vegas Wedding Chapel was everything we had hoped for and more — so much more. The chapel specializes in themed weddings and we had decided on the vintage-inspired, Blue Hawaii Elvis ceremony to mark our big day. Upon entering the chapel, my son and I were escorted to a side room while our guests were seated. Elvis, dressed in

a black and silver bejewelled jumpsuit, took to the stage. Then, following “Nancy” the hula dancer, my son and I entered the chapel, which by this time was filled almost waist high with fog drifting from a smoke machine to create the illusion of an “ocean mist.” Wading into the mist it was all I could do to stop from laughing as we walked towards the stage decorated with fabulously fake palm trees and flowers. But, as Elvis began to croon the first lines of “The Hawaiian Wedding Song,” — “This is the moment, I’ve waited for, I can hear my heart singing, soon bells will be ringing...” — I don’t think there was a dry eye in the place — and that had nothing to do with the fog belching out of the smoke machine. The chapel also live-streamed our ceremony so friends who couldn’t make the trip could watch from home. Following the ceremony, Elvis presented us with colourful, fabric Hawaiian-style leis, complete with flashing LED lights — adding to the dignity of the occasion — before we all spilled out of the chapel

into the sweltering afternoon sun. Even in late September, the temperature in Vegas hovered between 38C to 40C degrees during the day and not much cooler at night. But as we all gathered in the parking lot, my new husband and I quickly forgot the heat in the excitement of seeing our names up in lights on the marquis above the chapel door, with the message, “Just Married.” After posing for dozens of photos in front of the sign, we all piled back into the mini bus we had rented to shuttle everyone back and forth between our hotel and the chapel. We decided, in keeping with our vintageinspired theme, to stay at the Golden Nugget Resort and Casino on Fremont Street in Downtown Vegas — and what a great choice


T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 6 , 2 0 1 7 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

that turned out to be. We splurged and booked one of their two-storey Spa Suites for the wedding, which actually saved us money because we didn’t have to pay to rent a meeting room within the hotel (complete with bartender and wait staff), or go out for an expensive dinner. It also saved us a lot of headaches because, as we discovered, making a group reservation for 30 people at a restaurant on a weekend in Downtown Vegas is a lot more complicated than one might think. Besides, the Spa Suite came complete with a gold spiral staircase, two washrooms and enough room for everyone to comfortably sit or mingle depending on whether they were eating or gathered around the bar for shots of Fireball. (Don’t even ask.)

above and beyond in helping us make both events beyond special. The restaurant specializes in party platters and we went with a mix of comfort foods (individual chicken pot pies, chicken wings) that included vegetarian options such as macaroni and cheese — and salads so good even my veggieavoiding husband dug in. We also ordered two chocolate Motherlode cakes from the Claim Jumper to act as our wedding cake and they were equally delicious and gorgeous. The Motherlode cake was recently named one of the top five most decadent desserts in America by the Food Network. On the Friday before the wedding, we booked two cabanas at the Shark

That allowed us to host a cocktail party Friday night and the wedding reception Saturday, which we had catered by the Claim Jumper restaurant situated within the Nugget. I worked with manager Justin Mouzoon on the menu and he went

Tank Pool at the Nugget, famous for its clear Plexiglas waterslide that runs through a 200,000-gallon tank full of, you guessed it, sharks. Booking those cabanas turned out to be a highlight of the weekend. We had let all of our guests know ahead of time where we’d be so everyone who arrived late Thursday night or Friday eventually made their way to us and it turned into a daylong celebration complete with hugs and tears as we greeted family and friends, some whom we hadn’t seen in years.

WINTER DRAPERY SALE FREE THERMAL LINING

UPGRADE + 25% OFF CUSTOM MADE DRAPERIES Place any new order for lined drapes and receive 25% off on selected fabrics and thermal lining at no additional charge.

FREE CHILD SAFE UPGRADE FAUX WOOD BLINDS

Place any new order for Everwood Distinctions faux wood blinds and receive the simple lift feature at no additional charge. Some size restrictions apply.

$100 REBATE

It really set the tone for a weekend full of laughter, love and enough bad aloha shirts to dress the entire cast of the original Hawaii 5-0.

HUNTER DOUGLAS DUETTE HONEYCOMB SHADES

Place any new order for a minimum of four shades and receive a $100.00 gift card rebate from Hunter Douglas and $20.00 for each additional shade.

All savings off our regular prices. Savings valid January 16 to March 17, 2017

CALL TODAY

for your Free In-Home Consultation

(604) 291 6922 or 1-888-ARLENES Vancouver/Burnaby

4500 Dawson Street, Burnaby Langley - 103-19700 Langley Bypass

www.arlenes.com

Major University hearing study seeks participants. Connect Hearing, with a leading hearing researcher at Ryerson University, seeks participants for a hearing study investigating the factors that can influence better hearing. All participants will have a hearing test provided at no charge. Qualifying participants may also receive a demo of the latest hearing technology. The data collected from this study will be used to further our understanding of hearing loss and improve life-changing hearing healthcare across Canada.

Why Research Hearing Loss? Deep inside our ears are several thousand microscopic “hair cells.” These cells are arranged in rows and each cell is responsible for hearing a specific pitch, similar to the keys on a piano. As we age, some of these cells become damaged… from loud noises, chronic conditions, or the process of aging itself. Just like a piano with damaged keys, an ear with damaged hair cells will make things sound muffled and distorted.

B13

worsens this becomes increasingly harder to do. By studying those people having difficulty in noise or with television, we hope to identify key factors impacting these difficulties and further understand their influence on the treatment process. Interested people can register to be a part of this life-changing hearing study* by calling: 1.888.242.4892 or visiting connecthearing. ca/hearing-study. For some people this loss of clarity is only a problem at noisy restaurants or in the car, but for others it makes listening a struggle throughout the entire day. It is estimated that 46% of people aged 45 to 87 have some degree of hearing loss,1 but most do not seek treatment right away. In fact, the average person with hearing loss will wait ten years before seeking help.2 This is because at the beginning stages of hearing loss people often find they can “get by” without help, however as the problem

*Study participants must be over 50 years of age and have the option to participate. No fees and no purchase necessary. Registered under the College of Speech and Hearing Health Professionals of BC. VAC, WCB accepted.

1. Cruickshanks, K. L., Wiley, T. L., Tweed, T. S., Klein, B. E. K., Klein, R, Mares-Perlman, J. A., & Nondahl, D. M. (1998). Prevalence of Hearing Loss in Older Adults in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin: The Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study. Am. J. Epidemiol. 148 (9), 879-886. 2. National Institutes of Health. (2010).


B14

Food prices THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 6 , 2 0 1 7

TO RISE

SANDRA THOMAS | STHOMAS@VANCOURIER.COM

President of the Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers says it’s time for Canadians to consider alternative proteins, including ants The president and CEO of the Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers says the good food news for 2017, is that with the drought in California seemingly over, the price of imported fruits and vegetables could go down in B.C. The bad news? “The cost of protein will continue to go up,” said Thomas Barlow during a recent phone interview from Calgary. “That’s driven by the

price of crops going up so it costs more to feed them.” Barlow said another reason for the rising cost of protein is illness. When farmers are forced to destroy barns full of chickens due to avian illness, that shortage forces a rise in the cost. He added the high rate of exchange between the Canadian and U.S. dollar isn’t helping. “And when large companies like McDonald’s and A & W expanded to provide all-

Priv a f rom te su it inc $1550 es

hou ludes , s and ekeepin mea g ls!

THOMAS BARLOW

day breakfast, that put real pressure on suppliers and caused an egg shortage,” said Barlow. “That’s what happens when these large behemoths make a decision across the board like that.” Barlow said the expected rise in grocery costs in 2017, will particularly affect anyone living on a low or fixed income, including seniors. A recent study published by Canada’s Food Price Report is warning the average food bill could

increase by five per cent in 2017. How to deal with the rising cost of food is just one of the issues on the agenda during Grocery Specialty Food West Show 2017, which takes place March 20 and 21 at the Vancouver Convention Centre. The show is also an opportunity for grocers to network, identify new opportunities and gain insight on a business that influences household decisions every day.

they can if you only buy one pound at a time,” said Barlow, who noted it’s likely the cost of protein traditionally served in Canada will only continue to climb.

Barlow said retailers are trying to come up with ideas to help combat rising food prices, including the creation of online apps that give consumers immediate access to coupons. Offering lower-priced bulk sale is also an option.

Barlow said it could be time for Canadians to rethink just what it is they consider acceptable protein. He noted consuming protein from insects, such as ants, is not considered unusual in many parts of the world and it could be time for Canadians to consider these alternative options.

“They can offer larger discounts on bulks sales than

“The pressure on the food supply is not going down,”

said Barlow. “There was a time when people thought eating sashimi [raw fish] was W unusual, but now it’s the norm. Maybe it’s time for us to consider insects as protein.” Barlow said it’s easier than ever to try unusual foods at your neighbourhood grocery store because including an ethnic section has become common. “In many cases half the store is ethnic,” said Barlow. “There was a time you had go to the Korean grocery store to find W Korean ingredients, but that’s not the case anymore.”

VANCOUVER

Better at Home Caring Summit BUILDING A CARING COMMUNITY WITH SENIORS

MARCH 3 & 10 • 12PM-5PM

PROSPECTIVE VOLUNTEERS WELCOME! CHILDCARE AVAILABLE WITH PRE-REGISTRATION

REGISTRATION REQUIRED BY 4PM FEB. 24, 2017 TRAINING TOPICS: SUPPORTING SENIOR AT HOME COMMUNICATION SKILL BUILDING • CULTURAL COMPETENCY MENTAL HEALTH AWARENESS

Kitsilano Neighbourhood House, 2305 W 7th Ave., Vancouver www.tinyurl.com/BHCS17 • 604.655.6958 CONTACT YOUR LOCAL BH SITE TO REGISTER TODAY! Blenheim Manor is operated by Calling Ministries


T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 6 , 2 0 1 7 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

B15

Women’s retreat

SANDRA THOMAS | STHOMAS@VANCOURIER.COM

Sitting in a circle of women in a meeting room located within the Fairmont Chateau Whistler, one participant chokes back tears as she speaks about the gratitude she feels for her husband. The exercise is part of a workshop we’ve all gathered for called “Twisted Sister no More: Tips for breaking the busy cycle,” dedicated to teaching us some strategies to help change our priorities. Workshop coordinator Cheryl Wilson-Stewart says that by giving more appreciation for what really matters and letting go of what doesn’t, our priorities will eventually fall into place freeing up time. It’s obviously an issue that hits home for many of the women gathered because eventually almost every participant is in need of a Kleenex.

The goal of the weekend is to teach women something they often struggle with

— making themselves a priority. According to a new poll conducted by Insights West, nine out of 10 British Columbians who form part of the sandwich generation report they’re experiencing challenges in providing care. More than half of respondents (64 per cent) say they have difficulty in finding time to visit their aging parents due to work and busy schedules while a majority (60 per cent) also report challenges in keeping informed about the health status of a parent and affording the costs associated with caring (56 per cent). It’s a lot to deal with.

K W A N T L E N P O LY T E C H N I C U N I V E R S I T Y

DOCUMENTARYFILMFESTIVAL February 16-19, 2017 Vancouver International Film Centre 1181 Seymour Street Open to all! Opening night and closing night receptions, speakers, panels, Q&As, and more! For more information and to purchase tickets visit KDocsFF.com

A second All About Me Whistler Women’s Weekend takes place April 28 to 30. For full story, visit vancourier.com.

facebook.com/KDocsFF @KDocsFF | #KDocs FESTIVAL PARTNER:

PLATNIUM SPONSOR:

SILVER SPONSOR:

MEDIA SPONSORS:

BRONZE SPONSORS:

BC Region

PHOTO © Integra Architecture Inc.

The workshop was one option included in the All About Me Whistler Women’s Weekend held at the Fairmont last November — and it was

packed. The participants in this workshop are, of course, all women, mostly baby boomers, largely from Vancouver and in desperate need of some coping strategies in an all-too busy world. Many have stressful jobs and several are part of what’s commonly known as the “sandwich generation,” a term used to describe men and women with children who are also coping with elderly parents. Participants of the retreat had many workshops to choose from when taking part in the weekend, including sessions on yoga, belly dancing, nutrition, laughter through stand-up comedy, hikes, painting, wine tasting and more.

Live Here.

Now selling life leases from $299,900. Imagine a home, surrounded by green spaces with spectacular views, nestled in a peaceful neighbourhood that is close to everything.

Royal Pacific Realty Corp. Tom Spencer Personal Real Estate Corporation

I Jennifer Fan

EAST 4TH AVE

CASSIAR ST

For more information, call 604 312 5115 info@aspengreenliving.ca I aspengreenliving.ca

SUNRISE PARK

RUPERT ST

This is Aspen Green.

EAST 3RD AVE WINDERMERE ST

Featuring a mix of 46 two-bedroom and 8 one-bedroom residences, open-concept living, master ensuites, bright rooms, spacious storage and incredible amenities, this is Vancouver living at its best. Coming soon.

EAST 5TH AVE Y D HW HEE UG O L

Prices are subject to change without prior notice. This is not an offering for sale. Any such offering may only be made with a disclosure statement. E.&O.E.


B16

THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 6 , 2 0 1 7

Senior Lifetime Spring 2017