Summer 2023 Geode

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JUNE 2023

GE DE

VOICE OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE SINCE 1926

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSINPLATTEVILLE
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TABLE OF CONTENTS 4 Letter from the Dean 5 College Updates 9 Student Spotlights 12 Faculty and Staff Features 17 Industry Focus 21 Outreach Highlights 25 Alumni Corner 28 Donor List 35 Photo Gallery College of Engineering, Mathematics and Science 3

DEAR COLLEGE OF EMS ALUMNI AND FRIENDS,

I hope you enjoy this edition of the Geode. We are focusing on innovation within the college. Please enjoy hearing about our new building, Sesquicentennial Hall, one of the largest makerspaces in the country (Huff Family Innovation Center), new majors, and ways that our students and staff are embracing innovation.

This past year, I worked with faculty and staff in the college to define our values. I am inspired by what we have defined and excited to share them with you.

We, the employees of the College of Engineering Mathematics and Science, value being a key player in our undergraduate students’ success.

• We value teaching excellence, continuously improving our teaching skills, creating engaging learning environments, and implementing known best practices in STEM education.

• We value nurturing a culture of care toward our students and our colleagues.

• We value the university’s goal of serving students with a wide range of preparation, and meet our students where they are.

• We value high standards to prepare our students for the rigors of the STEM workplace.

• We value providing job-ready skills to our students through authentic, applied, and hands-on learning experiences.

As you read through this edition of the Geode, you will see many examples of us living out these values such as our NSF grant for civil and environmental engineering scholarships, student research projects, and examples of faculty members investing in their own development.

I welcome your feedback on our college values and hope you enjoy celebrating the achievements of our college from the past year.

Thank you, •

608.342.1561 | EMSDEANSOFFICE@UWPLATT.EDU LETTER FROM THE DEAN 4 go.uwplatt.edu/ems

WORDS FROM THE DIRECTOR

With a background in technology education, Bormann brings nearly two decades of teaching experience to UW-Platteville College of EMS as Director of the Huff Family Innovation Center. For the past seven years, he has worked with at-risk youth in Dubuque, Iowa, as a technology education teacher at Dubuque Community School District’s Alternative Learning Center. There, in collaboration with the local business community, he helped students imagine and develop a number of projects – from a gridless tiny house to a food truck.

"When a space is new and people haven’t toyed with it and people get in and learn its capacity, they realize the sky is the limit.”

“I am hoping to do more of that here,” said Bormann. “I want to unite the business community with our campus and educate and push for innovation here in Southwest Wisconsin.”

The Huff Family Innovation Center is uniquely poised to achieve this. Measuring nearly 20,000 square feet, the center offers tools and space for woodworking, metalworking, 3D printing, fabrication, robotics, textiles, and vinyl and more.

“We’re set for the tinkerers and people who want to craft, create, and develop concepts,” said Bormann. “But, we also have the type of equipment that allows us to take in a project and prototype it from the business community or local entrepreneurs or from those right here on campus. While you’ll find typical makerspace items like 3D printers, laser cutters, and textile support and video production pieces, you’ll also find high-end Tormach Mills for metalworking and machinery people generally don’t have access to – plasma cutters, full woodworking, an auto lift, and paint booth. We also have an 5-ton hoist to bring in larger projects.”

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COLLEGE UPDATES

ADAPTED FROM PAYING IT FORWARD: THE HUFF FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND

When you ask Bill Huff what motivated him to give back to UW-Platteville, he likes to answer the question with a story. “As a veteran discharged in 1955, I was aware that education was a license for a better life,” Huff said.

He enrolled in the Wisconsin State College and Institute of Technology, a school students would still be able to recognize today through annual traditions like the lighting of the M. “My freshman year was very easy for me, so I was offered a job at Deere's in Dubuque, Iowa. It was my intent to work full time and carry 21 units in my second year,” Huff said.

But Huff’s ambitious plan backfired. “I was failing miserably after three weeks, so Professor Spradling told me to quit work and stay in school. Thank God for that advice,” he said.

Huff’s graduation with a degree in mining engineering set him on a pathway to success. After working for a time as an engineer for Kaiser Steel Corporation and North American Rockwell, he launched the successful real estate investment company Huff Properties in 1962, investing in both commercial and residential properties across three counties in California.

Within Huff’s philanthropic endeavors, one organization remains particularly close to his heart: UW-Platteville.

In 2019, the Huff family sponsored the Huff Family Innovation Center.

WORD FROM STUDENTS

“The Huff Family Innovation Center means getting to the chance to bring my ideas life no matter my background. Being a biology major, I never thought I would have the chance to work in an area like this, but The Huff Family Innovation Center gives me the opportunity to feel welcome in an unfamiliar area.”

-Jamie Matthews, '23, Biology

“The Huff Family Innovation Center gives students like me, who have never touched many of the tools and machines that the center has to offer, an opportunity to learn from experienced professional staff and student assistants. It's given me the tools and opportunities to make my ideas come to life.”

-Andrew Jeanetta, '24, Biology

COLLEGE UPDATES
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COLLEGE UPDATES

More than 300 members of the UW-Platteville community and tri-state region gathered to celebrate the opening of Sesquicentennial Hall – UW-Platteville’s newest, $55 million state-of-the-art engineering building – at a ribbon-cutting celebration on Sept. 1, 2022.

“While showcasing our strengths in the recognition of more than 150 years of being Pioneers in education, Sesquicentennial Hall marks the beginning of a new era for UW-Platteville,” said UW-Platteville Chancellor Dr. Tammy Evetovich. “Sesquicentennial Hall will not only attract more students, but most importantly, it will provide more handson learning experiences that will forever change the future of our students and university.”

In addition to Chancellor Evetovich and Acting Dean Parker, speakers at the event included Senator Marklein, Representative Tranel, Department of Administration Secretary-Designee Kathy Blumenfeld and environmental engineering student Dani Goomey. The event was emceed by Dr. Jessica Fick, Assistant Dean of the College of Engineering, Mathematics and Science.

‘A NEW ERA’: UW-PLATTEVILLE CELEBRATED OPENING OF TRANSFORMATIONAL SESQUICENTENNIAL HALL College of Engineering, Mathematics and Science 7

UW-PLATTEVILLE UNVEILED NEW COMPUTER ENGINEERING PROGRAM

UW-Platteville College of Engineering, Mathematics and Science is offering a new undergraduate degree in computer engineering. The program launched last fall with several students already declaring the major. Previously, computer engineering was only offered as an emphasis under electrical engineering. According to Dr. Asad Azemi, Professor of electrical and computer engineering, the new program supports major themes in the university’s strategic plan.

“It provides another choice for incoming or current students and complements our existing electrical engineering, computer science, and software engineering degrees,” he said. “There are many jobs available in computer engineering, and this degree will enable us to better serve our constituents.”

Azemi calls the launch of the new major exciting. He explained how students have been asking for a computer engineering degree.

“The department started working on adding this degree a few years ago, and we are anticipating a growth in our overall enrollment,” said Azemi. “We have a hands-on approach that relies on team-based developments, ending with real-world capstone projects to provide students with the knowledge, skills and aptitude needed to contribute to the societal well-being and economic development of the state of Wisconsin, the tri-state region, nation, and world.”

As students enter the field of computer engineering, Azemi acknowledged how the industry is continuing to expand. He said professional opportunities are vast with employment being associated with designing, building, maintaining hardware in modern computers and maintaining operation for computer-based networking.

“As computers become more integrated into our everyday life, computer engineers are more in demand,” he said. “It’s another quality program added to the university. Computer engineering as a degree was needed. We fulfilled a need. Hopefully, we will contribute to the growth of the university and provide more opportunities to our students to explore different majors.”

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“IT PROVIDES ANOTHER CHOICE FOR INCOMING OR CURRENT STUDENTS AND COMPLEMENTS OUR EXISTING ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING, COMPUTER SCIENCE, AND SOFTWARE ENGINEERING DEGREES,” HE SAID. “THERE ARE MANY JOBS AVAILABLE IN COMPUTER ENGINEERING, AND THIS DEGREE WILL ENABLE US TO BETTER SERVE OUR CONSTITUENTS.”
- DR. ASAD AZEMI
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STUDENT SPOTLIGHTS

UW-PLATTEVILLE FIRST TO WIN VEX U WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP IN BACK-TO-BACK YEARS

The University of Wisconsin-Platteville Robotics Club’s VEX U team, WiscoBots, traveled to Dallas, Texas, to compete in the VEX Robotics World Championship April 27-29, where they won the VEX U College and University Competition and became the first team in VEX U history to win the world championship in back-to-back years.

“Being the first team to ever win back-to-back world titles is such a surreal experience,” said Max Van Rossum, a senior mechanical engineering major and president of the robotics club at UW-Platteville. “Winning this year was incredible and certainly more challenging to accomplish compared to last year, due to the higher number of teams competing and the nature of the game.”

The VEX Robotics World Championship celebrates STEM excellence as robotics teams compete in heart-pounding competition matches to showcase their game strategy, design and teamwork skills to be crowned champion. Every year, colleges construct two different robots, using custom parts and components. Colleges compete against other college teams in head-to-head matches on a 12-by-12-foot field. Matches start with an autonomous routine, where robots run off of pre-programmed instruction, followed by a driver-controlled period. At the end of the match, the field is scored, and a winner is determined for the match.

UW-Platteville’s team went undefeated in qualifications and eliminations at 16-0 to win the world championship. Additionally, they finished second in the college skills competition and won the Amaze Award.

“As a former high school competitor, it is always a dream to be holding the championship banners,” said Van Rossum. “It is crazy to think that due to us winning back-to-back world titles, we are leaving our mark on competitive robotics for years to come.”

Additional team members included Austin Attig, Jimmy McGovern, John Bertello, Agii Kerwin, Henry Hathaway, Scott McDermott and Nathan Sandvig.

According to its website, the VEX U College and University Competition has more than 300 teams competing annually. Based on the VEX Robotics Competition, VEX U teams are allowed more customization and greater flexibility than other grade levels while providing the effective costs and real-world limitations of a restricted development environment.

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ENGINEERING STUDENTS PRESENT CONCRETE DURABILITY PROJECT AT RESEARCH IN THE ROTUNDA

Two UW-Platteville engineering students studied the effects of anti-icing on concrete and presented their findings at the 19th annual Research in the Rotunda on March 8 in the state Capitol. Senior Dylan Notsch and sophomore Will Straka assisted Dr. Danny Xiao, Associate Professor of civil and environmental engineering, on the project titled, “Impact of Anti-Icing on the Durability of Concrete Infrastructure.”

“We’ve worked together with Dr. Danny [Xiao] for the last two years on the anti-icing project,” said Straka, a civil engineering major from Mineral Point, Wisconsin. “Our research includes both laboratory tests and field study. In the lab, we conducted three phases of freeze-thaw test on concrete samples. In the field, we placed concrete panels in MnRoad, the largest road-testing site in the U.S. Anti-icing solutions and traffic load have been applied since November 2021.”

Straka and Notsch became involved with the project after receiving the Undergraduate Research, Scholarly, and

Creative Activity Scholarship their freshman year. Notsch, who has been working alongside Xiao since 2019, said throughout his four years of research, he’s conducted a series of freeze-thaw tests on large concrete specimens and saw significant differences between deicing and anti-icing solutions. Anti-icing can clear winter roads faster, reduce overall salt use, and also cause less damage to concrete than deicing does. He’s also learned the technical side of research.

“We have learned report writing, how to draft a technical poster, correctly preparing research per ASTM [American Society for Testing and Materials], teamwork and the implications of salt on concrete durability,” said Notsch, an environmental engineering major from Sartell, Minnesota.

The project is scheduled to end in September 2023, but Straka states the group is also conducting other projects related to concrete durability such as surface treatment and hydrophobic concrete. Although Notsch graduated this spring, Straka will continue to work with Xiao.

“Undergraduate research is a unique opportunity that few students get to experience,” said Straka. “It helps develop great relationships with other students and faculty advisors while getting hands-on experience in the field that interests you.”

As the students wrapped up their research, they were excited about their Research in the Rotunda poster.

“We enjoyed representing UW-Platteville at the Capitol and hearing input and feedback from UW System peers and lawmakers,” said Notsch.

Straka added, “It gives us a chance to showcase our hard work over the past few years."

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT RESEARCH IN THE ROTUNDA, VISIT WWW.WISCONSIN.EDU/ RESEARCH-IN-THEROTUNDA/ OR SCAN THE QR CODE.

STUDENT SPOTLIGHTS
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STUDENTS PARTICIPATE IN ANNUAL HOLIDAY TOY HACK, DONATING 55 MODIFIED TOYS

Dozens of students from across all three colleges at UW-Platteville came together for the fifth annual Holiday Toy Hack, to modify electronic toys for children with special needs. The three-hour event took place on Nov. 19, 2022 at the new Huff Family Innovation Center in Sesquicentennial Hall. According to Dr. Hal Evensen, Professor of engineering physics and Holiday Toy Hack organizer, 50 students participated and ‘hacked’ 55 toys which were donated to area families, organizations, and clinics.

“We are working with Variety - the Children’s Charity of Wisconsin,” said Evensen. “They have three Christmas parties coming up on Dec. 3. We have volunteers taking a load of toys to each of those parties. I have one student who will be taking toys to Marshfield Clinic, and I will be taking toys to Arc of East Central Iowa.”

Garrett Sprouse, a senior engineering physics major, from Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, became involved with the project four years ago. He said students use soldering equipment to adapt the toys which allows children to operate the items with external switches and buttons. Once the toy is complete, it’s put back into the manufacturing box. Sprouse credits the Toy Hack with sparking his interest in the field of engineering physics.

“We ran out of toys really, really fast – everyone was happy and grabbing toys,” he said. “It’s the idea of taking your skills and bringing them to a good cause. Last year, one of the toys I modified was a Peppa Pig toy. It went to a child who had her feet amputated and her fingers, she only had her thumbs. It gives the precedent of purpose; these kids need these toys.”

The importance of giving back is one of the reasons the event continues to grow every year. Both Sprouse and Evensen acknowledged how students of all disciplines can participate,

no experience with soldering is necessary.

“The students tore into the toys. They did a great job. Some of the toys took the full three hours to modify, but they looked fabulous when they were done,” said Evensen.

Sprouse added, “What’s cool about the Toy Hack is everyone can do it. A lot of people participate who are not in the College of EMS. It’s soldering a button together; you can learn it within the period of the time.”

Evensen expressed how the afternoon was an opportunity to spend time with students while impacting the community.

“I was touched that the students – who are very busy – were willing to share their time working on this project,” he said. “They may have had some apprehension about their ‘hacking’ abilities, or the time they had available to them, but they saw this as important and fun enough to do, and for that I am really grateful.”

STUDENT SPOTLIGHTS
TO DONATE TO THE HOLIDAY TOY HACK, VISIT WWW.UWPLATT. EDU/GIVE OR SCAN THE QR CODE AND USE TOY HACK PROJECT #R1075 College of Engineering, Mathematics and Science 11

FACULTY AND STAFF FEATURES

ZOLPER HONORED FOR CREATING OPPORTUNITIES FOR ENGINEERING STUDENTS

Ask a student of Associate Professor of mechanical engineering Dr. Thomas Zolper about their research, and the answers will be quite varied. Some have worked side-by-side with scientists from the USGS to combat invasive aquatic species. Others are helping to examine the resilience of the Wisconsin energy and information infrastructure against natural or manmade failures. And a few are getting a taste of a different kind of research, as they attempt to scientifically measure what makes people like ice cream.

Zolper’s commitment to creating these hands-on opportunities for students – a hallmark of the University of Wisconsin-Platteville’s engineering education – is in part why he has been honored with the 2022 Dale Dixon Professor of Engineering Award. The award provides a total of $15,000 over a three-year period to be used for summer salary, professional development, research and/or student salaries.

Zolper plans to use the funds to assist in creating and continuing more research opportunities. This includes fitting universal thermodynamic models to diverse polymers; continued invasive species mitigation research with the USGS; and measuring of rheological properties of dairy products with the Dairy Innovation Hub. These opportunities enhance the student experience, he said, and will give them an edge when they enter the workforce.

“As part of our general education, we have introductory classes – like Introduction to Fluid Mechanics – and some students may surmise that’s really all there is to fluids,” he said. “But these three separate topics [that the award funding will support] show how those introductory topics can be expanded into advanced topics like non-Newtonian fluids and two-phase flow. They all have very valuable applications. For example, the USGS project benefits the environment, the polymer research advances important equations of state, and the Dairy Innovation Hub project benefits the Wisconsin dairy economy. The research takes introductory material and carries it into advanced applications that students may encounter in their careers.”

Zolper, who joined the UW-Platteville faculty in 2014, said it’s a privilege to receive the award, which was established by Dr. Dale Dixon, a former engineering department chair in the College of Engineering, Mathematics and Science, to celebrate engineering faculty excellence.

“I truly appreciate the generosity of the Dixon family in providing this award, and I am grateful to work for a university that supports and encourages my lifelong interests in the flow of material and energy,” said Zolper.

“I TRULY APPRECIATE THE GENEROSITY OF THE DIXON FAMILY IN PROVIDING THIS AWARD, AND I AM GRATEFUL TO WORK FOR A UNIVERSITY THAT SUPPORTS AND ENCOURAGES MY LIFELONG INTERESTS IN THE FLOW OF MATERIAL AND ENERGY.”
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- DR. THOMAS ZOPLER

SELENT SELECTED AS WISCONSIN TEACHING FELLOW

Dr. Douglas Selent, Assistant Professor of computer science and software engineering at UW-Platteville is bringing awareness to neurodiversity through his Wisconsin Teaching Fellows and Scholars Program Scholarship of Teaching and Learning project. The program, “offers faculty and teaching academic staff a unique opportunity to collaborate with other exceptional teachers from across the UW System and from various disciplines.” As a selected teaching fellow, Selent is finalizing his research on developing a game to be used in his algorithm course.

“I have a lesson to teach ‘Dijkstra’s algorithm,’ which finds the shortest path from one node to all other nodes in a graph. I will teach the students how to do that,” said Selent. “I want to make a game; the game is called Unicorn Land. It’s like a board game, but it mixes with some game elements from Mario Kart. All players have their unicorn, and they have to race down the Unicorn River using Dijkstra’s algorithm to find the shortest path down the river.”

According to Selent, the theme of the 2022–23 SoTL projects is diversity. Selent said he is focusing on the topic of neurodiversity and how it affects his students. Neurodiversity is a different way of thinking, which can affect how one learns or interacts socially.

“From my perspective, I don’t think many people know about neurodiversity or recognize it. I hope people become more aware of what neurodiversity is,” he said. “Personally, as educators, knowing a lot of our students are neurodiverse, we can help tailor their lessons a little bit towards them. Some things are very difficult for us, and certain ways of teaching are difficult for us to learn from.”

As Selent embarks on his study design this summer, he said it’s been beneficial to discuss his ideas with his peers in the program and receive their feedback. He acknowledged the importance of learning from each other. Selent is looking forward to sharing the final product with the WTFS group and his students.

“I’m most excited to see students learn from the game and have fun in my classroom. On the research side, I hopefully will have positive results to show,” he said. “The students are doing the algorithm. It’s hard to get distracted when you’re being prompted every minute for your turn. The students will have dice as their fidget toy. They can play with it at the same time. Some of the students are not as social, and this will get them to work together not as a team but in the game against each other. There are a lot of elements that work out well. There is chance involved in the game, which means less skilled players will have a chance to win; they don’t have to be the top student.”

While Unicorn Land is in its initial stages, there’s one thing Selent always wants for his students – for them to be inclusive, happy, and successful.

“I hope I’m making a positive impact in the students’ lives,” he said. “The number one goal is to teach them the skills they need to get them happily employed. I like seeing my students successful. If my students have a happy life, I will have succeeded.”

FACULTY
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“THE NUMBER ONE GOAL IS TO TEACH THEM THE SKILLS THEY NEED TO GET THEM HAPPILY EMPLOYED. I LIKE SEEING MY STUDENTS SUCCESSFUL.
IF MY STUDENTS HAVE A HAPPY LIFE, I WILL HAVE SUCCEEDED.”
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- DR. DOUGLAS SELENT

OWUSU-ABABIO HONORED FOR IMPACT ON STUDENTS AND ACROSS GLOBE

In his 30-plus years of teaching at UW-Platteville, Dr. Samuel Owusu-Ababio, professor of civil engineering, has had a transformational impact on the education of countless students. And by instilling in students the importance of using that education to engage in community and international humanitarian service, that impact extends far beyond campus. Owusu-Ababio will be recognized at UWPlatteville’s faculty and staff convocation on Thursday, Sept. 1, 2023 with the 2022 Nimocks Family Faculty Appreciation Award.

Created by former provost and vice chancellor of Academic Affairs Dr. Mittie Nimocks Den Herder, the award honors outstanding faculty at UW-Platteville who, among other traits, place a priority on creating opportunities for students to engage in high-impact practices. Over the years, OwusuAbabio has created a number of engaging opportunities for students – from founding the student chapter of the Institute of Transportation Engineers to collaborating with civil engineering faculty to attract nearly $1.2 million in highway research funding. But for many former students, it was his creation of the UW-Platteville chapter of Engineers Without Borders that was most impactful.

Since the chapter’s inception 15 years ago, more than 150 students have traveled with Owusu-Ababio to his home

country of Ghana to build six infrastructure projects. Prominent among them are five school buildings for two schools – which now provide education to 920 children – and a bridge that provides access to critical needs like a market, health services and education centers. OwusuAbabio estimates that over the years, the work students have done through UW-Platteville’s Engineers Without Borders chapter has already benefited 8,000 people.

“This is how the students get the practical aspect of what they are learning in the classroom,” said Owusu-Ababio. “When we are here and do engineering, everything is by the book. But, when you get out there, sometimes the things you prepare for are different and you need to be able to think on your feet. That’s something we love to see when we get together. Also, they see the impact they are making on underprivileged communities. Some of them have never traveled before, and so they discover the world in a new way.”

Alumnus Nick Confer was heavily involved in the Engineers Without Borders UW-Platteville chapter from its inception through his graduation in 2011, traveling to Ghana twice with Owusu-Ababio.

"The numerous lessons I've learned from Dr. Sam and

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Engineers Without Borders about project management, engineering, and entrepreneurship have been invaluable for me not only professionally but also in my personal life,” said Confer, who is now the director of Engineering, Research and Production at Axiom Energy. “My family operates a nonprofit, implementing projects in Kenya, and my experience has been key in making those successful.”

Drawing on his experience working with Owusu-Ababio, Confer led a group of volunteers in Kenya in building a sustainable chicken farm that supports a school in a displaced persons camp. He has also continued to stay involved with the Engineers Without Borders organization since his graduation and even mentored a group of students on a trip in 2019.

“Being involved in Engineers Without Borders for over 15 years now, I've consistently seen many young students develop into talented professionals and well-rounded, globally-minded citizens under Dr. Sam's guidance. Thousands of people in Ghana will directly feel the ripples of his involvement for generations."

Matthew Buffo was a 2020 graduate of UW-Platteville and is currently a Design Engineer at Electrical Consultants, Inc.

"Personally, I can say that my experiences with the Engineers Without Borders UW-Platteville chapter have taught me the most valuable lessons that I have learned during my time at UW-Platteville,” said Buffo. “Dr. Sam has created an environment where students can challenge themselves to do things they would have never thought they were capable of doing. The greatest lesson that I have learned from Dr. Sam is that you don't need to be an expert to make the world a better place. If you are willing to try your best, you can make a difference. Thanks to Dr. Sam, many generations of students, including myself, have learned what it takes to be a successful leader and have gained the confidence to stay ambitious in our future endeavors.”

Testimonials, like these, from his former students are what Owusu-Ababio says is most affirming when receiving this award.

“I love my students; they are dedicated to whatever they set their minds to do,” said Owusu-Ababio. “When they come back from trips to Ghana, they are never the same. They think, ‘how come people are so poor there, but they are happy, and why am I complaining about the little things here?’ My goal is to see students become successful in their

“WHEN WE ARE HERE AND DO ENGINEERING, EVERYTHING IS BY THE BOOK. BUT, WHEN YOU GET OUT THERE, SOMETIMES THE THINGS YOU PREPARE FOR ARE DIFFERENT AND YOU NEED TO BE ABLE TO THINK ON YOUR FEET. THAT’S SOMETHING WE LOVE TO SEE WHEN WE GET TOGETHER. ALSO, THEY SEE THE IMPACT THEY ARE MAKING ON UNDERPRIVILEGED COMMUNITIES. SOME OF THEM HAVE NEVER TRAVELED BEFORE, AND SO THEY DISCOVER THE WORLD IN A NEW WAY.”

future careers. When they are acknowledging that what I am doing is leading them to that goal, that is most important.”

Owusu-Ababio continues to work with engineering practitioners in Ghana. He was recently invited by the Ghana Institution of Engineering – the professional engineering body in Ghana – to lead efforts to reform engineering professional practice in Ghana. This includes developing a practice to engage Ghanaian students, modeled after the work of UW-Platteville’s Engineers Without Borders.

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FACULTY AND
FEATURES

XIAO COMPLETES FACULTY INTERNSHIP WITH STRAND ASSOCIATES, BRINGING HANDS-ON EXPERIENCE INTO THE CLASSROOM

Dr. Danny Xiao, Associate Professor of civil and environmental engineering at UW-Platteville learned firsthand about the inner workings of being an engineer in the private sector through a faculty internship with Strand Associates, Inc.® in Madison, Wisconsin. During his full-time internship this summer, Xiao was assigned to assist with several projects that cover a wide range of transportation engineering. These projects included the East-West Bus Rapid Transit project in Madison, the Flex Lane project on the Madison Beltline, the I-39/90/94 Study between Madison and Wisconsin Dells, the US 51 Corridor Improvement project between Stoughton and McFarland, and the West Court Street Safety Improvement project in Janesville. Xiao teaches courses in transportation, engineering, and construction materials and previously worked for the Arkansas Department of Transportation and Louisiana Transportation Research Center prior to joining UW-Platteville.

“UW-Platteville is known for its personal, hands-on, and teaching-focused education,” said Xiao. “Ninety percent of my students enter the industry after graduation, most often in the private sector. Since I went directly from undergraduate to graduate school, I did not have the chance to work in the private sector. As soon as I started my job at UW-Platteville, I wanted to do a faculty internship.”

Throughout the years, there’s been a long-standing partnership between UW-Platteville and Strand Associates. Xiao approached the company to see if he could conduct an internship over the summer. Xiao submitted his spring semester grades and embarked on his internship which ran from May 24–Aug 12, 2022.

“I asked Strand Associates to treat me like a regular intern. I started with curb ramp designs,” Xiao explained. “Doing the very detailed designs, you appreciate how the homework and small projects we do in class are being used in real life. It gives me the full picture of how I should prepare homework, quizzes and small projects for my classes to prepare my students with a solid foundation.”

Xiao joined UW-Platteville in 2015 and has watched his students become successful engineers, however a group of his former students weren’t expecting to see him in the hallways of Strand Associates.

“My former students were shocked to see me. We had a Pioneers reunion,” he said. “My former students have more knowledge in designing transportation infrastructure than me, now. I asked them questions. I feel happy that they know more than I do, it means they’re learning. They are doing great, working on a lot of projects and many are taking the responsibility of leading the projects. I’m proud and happy for them.”

Xiao described his internship as rewarding. He said he’s looking forward to adapting his new set of experiences into his courses.

“I always bring real world projects into the classroom. Students can connect to real life and see how transportation engineering is applied,” said Xiao. “We teach our engineering students knowledge, but knowledge is limitless. Therefore, we focus more on the training of engineering mindset, problem-solving skills, and lifelong learning.”

Xiao emphasized how thankful he is to Strand Associates for this faculty internship experience. As fall semester gets under way, Xiao is encouraging his students to participate in internships and gain industry experience.

“Hopefully, I can show my students, by my example, to keep learning.” he said. “When you solve a problem, no matter how big or small, that is the joy of engineering."

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SENIOR DESIGN TEAM CREATES PROTOTYPE FOR BOOGIE BIKES

UW-Platteville engineering senior design team rolled out a new solution to help a startup company stabilize their bicycles. Company sponsor Boogie Bikes, based out of Sheboygan County, asked group members Mackenzie Darkow, Max Kisting, Ryan Leskela, and Sierra Schellpfeffer to develop an electric bike more stable than a standard two-wheel bicycle. According to Schellpfeffer, Boogie Bikes has been receiving requests from senior citizens for a more balanced unit.

“The company wanted a trike design and bought a couple of trikes online. They are unstable, especially for the consumers who are having trouble keeping mobility,” explained Schellpfeffer, a mechanical engineering major, who graduated in December, from Mayville, Wisconsin. “We wanted to create a bike that attached to the current frame so when consumers buy Boogie Bikes, they now have an attachment. It’s a quad [bike] right now, it’s training wheels with suspensions. It’s the best way for consumers to feel confident. We made it compact so people can ride it anywhere. It’s small enough to put into a stall.”

The students presented their project, “Electric Bike Stability” to Boogie Bikes, faculty, staff, and community members at the Senior Design Open House on Dec. 19 at the Markee Pioneer Student Center. Throughout the fall semester, Schellpfeffer said they were able to meet with Boogie Bikes once in-person and presented their CAD drawings. The remainder of their project conversations were virtual.

“The company gave us free range for everything. It was all up to us as designers. We wanted to make a prototype and we did. It wasn’t expected. We wanted to go above and beyond,” said Schellpfeffer. “Not only were we able to make a design that is not on the market, we were able to think outside the box – our small project will help hundreds of thousands of people because it won’t only affect Boogie Bikes, it will affect the entire E-bike market.”

As the students developed their design, Schellpfeffer said she’s most proud of how well her team worked together. Throughout the process, she acknowledged how they realized it takes several small steps and altercations to produce the final product.

“There wasn’t any conflict within our team, even though we had different ideas on how to fix the problem,” said Schellpfeffer. “We all came together. It was easy once we explained the idea of what Boogie Bikes was looking for and having the constraint of shipping ability and cost. We were all making the prototype, we were all a part of the design process. We were working as a team.”

This hands-on opportunity is one of the reasons Schelpfeffer said she was hired as an undercarriage validation engineer with Caterpillar Inc. in Peoria, Illinois.

“UW-Platteville has a unique situation where not only does senior design model something up, but we also go ahead and manufacture it. The Boogie Bike prototype was completely inhouse. We were able to do everything here. The fact that students can make their product 100% is a huge bonus. It’s not only an education of learning how to design but the application,” said Schelpfeffer. “I can take my education and see it going even further with Caterpillar. I know all my concepts I have learned at UW-Platteville will be applied directly to my job.”

INDUSTRY FOCUS College of Engineering, Mathematics and Science 17

FACULTY, STUDENT RESEARCHERS TO CREATE MICROGRID CYBERSECURITY TESTBED

A group of faculty and student researchers at UW-Platteville are working to contribute solutions to the increasing threat of cyberattacks on critical infrastructure. With the help of the UW System Ignite Grant Program and several industry partners, including ABB Inc., UW-Platteville will soon be home to a smart microgrid cybersecurity testbed.

Microgrids typically serve a defined geographic area – as small as a single building or campus or as large as a small town. They can operate while connected to the traditional power grid, or independently, and they can employ fossil fuel generators or renewable energy sources, such as solar power or wind. Rather than a simple source-switching

control, modern communication technology is enabling a new generation of smart grids, which targets the overall benefits of load balancing, pricing, consumer integration, and various scenario-automation.

"The rise of smart technology in grids, however, comes with the increased risk of cyber-attacks," said Dr. Xiaoguang Ma, Assistant Professor of electrical and computer engineering at UW-Platteville.

“It’s not just the computer that makes the system smart but the information that makes it smart,” said Ma. “This information comes from the communication network. You need different kinds of sensors, strategies, and algorithms to control the smart grid. However, with these communications comes the threat of various cybersecurity problems.”

In collaboration with Dr. Yanwei Wu, Associate Professor of computer science and software engineering and Dr. Fang Yang, Associate Professor of electrical and computer engineering, Ma and students from several disciplines are building a prototype of a smart microgrid testbed that will enable research and development of smart microgrid and cybersecurity technologies. Students in more than a dozen courses across several programs will be able to work with the testbed – a hands-on opportunity that is rare among undergraduates and one that will develop skills that are increasingly in demand.

“More people are now required to understand the communication and cybersecurity areas; they are in really high demand,” said Ma. “We’ve also talked to our advisory board, and many of them said they wished that these skills were taught to students.”

The smart microgrid project will integrate the latest technologies and industrial products with the support of ABB Inc., an industry leader in smart grid solutions, through equipment donation, software donation, consulting, and training assistance. The testbed will serve as an example for local industry partners.

“It can also be customized as a digital twin,” said Ma, who explained that a part of the microgrid testbed can duplicate a company’s implementation and offer cybersecurity validation services.

INDUSTRY FOCUS
“IT’S NOT JUST THE COMPUTER THAT MAKES THE SYSTEM SMART BUT THE INFORMATION THAT MAKES IT SMART, THIS INFORMATION COMES FROM THE COMMUNICATION NETWORK. YOU NEED DIFFERENT KINDS OF SENSORS, STRATEGIES, AND ALGORITHMS TO CONTROL THE SMART GRID. HOWEVER, WITH THESE COMMUNICATIONS COMES THE THREAT OF VARIOUS CYBERSECURITY PROBLEMS.”
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- DR. XIAOGUANG MA

“On one hand, companies want to know and understand the threats in their network and put some security measurements in place,” said Ma. “But, on the other hand, they don’t want to touch it because the aftermath of any modification could be unaffordable. We can make a sandbox for these companies – a testbed that tries to mimic as close as possible their real setup. Then we’ll try cybersecurity intrusion detections and ways to hack it and patch it, all in the sandbox environment.”

The project team of faculty and students kicked off the project this summer by researching state-of-the-art technologies for smart microgrid cybersecurity with renewable energy sources. This will be followed by a period of collecting relevant information, before beginning the design of the smart microgrid system and the eventual creation of the prototype, which is slated to be finished in August 2023.

“Our research will be good for local business and good for students,” said Ma. “Also, we can promote this to the community to help them better understand the microgrid and cybersecurity.”

This research was supported by WiSys and University of Wisconsin System applied research funding (Ignite Grant for Applied Research). The views expressed herein are those of the authors and are not necessarily those of WiSys or the UW System.

“MORE PEOPLE ARE NOW REQUIRED TO UNDERSTAND THE COMMUNICATION AND CYBERSECURITY AREAS; THEY ARE IN REALLY HIGH DEMAND,WE’VE ALSO TALKED TO OUR ADVISORY BOARD, AND MANY OF THEM SAID THEY WISHED THAT THESE SKILLS WERE TAUGHT TO STUDENTS.”
- DR. XIAOGUANG MA
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INDUSTRY FOCUS

AMERICAN PLAYERS THEATRE CREDITS UW-PLATTEVILLE SENIOR DESIGN TEAM WITH RENOVATION PROJECT

In 2020, four UW-Platteville senior design civil engineering students were tasked with the project of solving the parking lot concerns at the American Players Theatre in Spring Green, Wisconsin. Together Ryan Henning, Drew Archie, Keegan Flynn, and Josh Hendrickson presented their findings to the company, not realizing a couple years later APT would be receiving a nearly $1 million Tourism Capital Investment Grant from the state to embark on those parking lot improvements.

The announcement came in February of 2022, from the governor’s office that APT would receive a $971,360 grant to, “expand and revitalize the theatre parking lot by replacing insufficient lighting with new LED lighting, expanding the parking lot to accommodate an additional 75 cars, installing a swale to manage storm water runoff and paving the portion of the lot that accommodates accessible parking.” Cari Stebbins, Operations Manager at APT said she was in disbelief when hearing the news.

“The state made a grant program available for shovel ready projects. We would not have been shovel ready without the senior design project,” said Stebbins. “We used that as our baseline and expanded upon that to apply for the grant. We are thrilled. This is a dream project. I’m not sure we would have been able to do it without the support of the UW-Platteville students and their work, the state, and this grant.” APT broke ground on Oct. 18. According to Stebbins, APT hopes to have the majority of the project completed by their 2023 season. “It’s incredible to see a project concept come to fruition,” said Henning, a 2020 UW-Platteville graduate, who also served as the senior design team project manager. “One of the best parts of working with the senior design team is that, while in school, we had the opportunity to take a real-world problem, develop solutions, and provide a professional recommendation to APT. And, now because of this grant, the project can happen.”

Henning is a Project Manager at WDS Construction in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, and still recalls working with his senior design team to find the main cause of what was deteriorating the parking lot. He said the group had four objectives: improve safety, increase the number of parking stalls, improve stormwater management, and provide a cost estimate. The group was able to pinpoint a solution, it came down to a watershed analysis.

“The watershed steered us toward the problem,” he said. “Once we had that correctly identified, we needed to determine how we could address it and show APT the importance of looking at the parking lot in a different way.” At the time of the project, Carrie Van Hallgren served as APT’s Managing Director. During her tenure with the company, she said the rain mixing in with the gravel parking lot caused challenging problems. “The grant would have never been possible without the work of the students,” said Van Hallgren. “It's a great example of the state, public higher education, and non-profit groups working together to solve problems. APT has a huge economic impact on Southwest Wisconsin. It’s the largest outdoor theatre in the state and one of the largest in the country. We welcome 100,000 people to the theatre each year. Improving the parking will make it a better experience for everybody.” The collaboration between UW-Platteville and APT was a beneficial experience for Henning; he discussed how the hands-on experience prepared him for his professional career.

“I learned the importance of critical problem-solving skills,” he said. “Working at WDS, my job isn’t to fix the issue in front of me, it’s to dig in, determine what’s causing the issue, and develop options for addressing the cause of the problem. I’m excited that APT is able to take the solution the senior design team created and make it a reality for their facility. It’s going to fix a big issue. It’s going to be beautiful.” As construction gets underway at APT, Stebbins is appreciative of the relationship she formed with the senior design team and the university.

“The students were very professional. It was informative in ways I was not expecting. For example, they told us we had 50 acres of watershed coming through our parking lot which we were not aware of – they had good ideas and were collaborative. It was an eye-opening experience to know our property in a different way,” said Stebbins. “It was a fantastic experience for us. I would like to engage with UW-Platteville with other projects in the future.”

INDUSTRY FOCUS 20 go.uwplatt.edu/ems

ENGINEERING ALUMNUS CREATES CSSE SCHOLARSHIP

FUND

UW-Platteville alumnus Dr. Ronald Meissen and his wife, Eileen, are supporting engineering students through their newly established endowed Computer Science and Software Engineering Scholarship fund. Meissen, a member of the UW-Platteville Foundation Board of Directors, presented his idea of creating the scholarship to the CSSE advisory board to help recruit and retain students to the program. After his announcement, an advisory board member matched the Meissens’ donation of $25,000.

“My wife and I are pleased to support the CSSE program. It’s one of the institution’s growing centers of excellence,” said Meissen, a 1971 civil engineering graduate. “We invite others to consider donating to this fund or a similar scholarship fund supporting another department. Together, we can quickly help more students overcome financial challenges.”

According to Meissen, although there are several scholarships available to students from the Foundation and outside sources, the CSSE Scholarship fund provides an additional funding opportunity to help students interested in those fields of study.

“These donations will allow us to double the number of scholarships available to CSSE students. The five new scholarships will be targeted at freshman students entering the computer science, software engineering, and cybersecurity programs,” said Dr. Afzal Upal, Professor of computer science and software engineering. “They will allow us to attract the best and brightest students to UW-Platteville. We are incredibly blessed to have generous donors such as the Meissens who are helping us provide high quality education to the next generation of students.”

Financial gifts are one example of giving back to the university, but Meissen explains how alumni can contribute to their respective programs in a variety of ways, from offering internships and co-ops to joining a department advisory board. Meissen said in his experience students are grateful for any support.

“UW-Platteville provided their graduates with an excellent education, which became the foundation of our careers. Interested alumni now have the opportunity to give back with their time, talent, and resources to help students pursue their dreams,” he said. “Alumni working together makes a big impact. The involvement with students and the university is very rewarding.”

Inspiration between alumni helped launch the CSSE Scholarship fund and Meissen hopes this initiative will encourage other alumni and friends to establish similar funds for other departments at the university. The area of computer science, software engineering, and cybersecurity is one of many occupations in high demand for UW-Platteville graduates.

“The CSSE program has achieved an excellent reputation with dedicated professors preparing students to excel in their CSSE careers,” said Meissen. “The individuals who have contributed to the scholarship fund are aware of the challenge many students face in funding their education. Together, we want students to pursue their studies in CSSE, be successful, and attain a rewarding career.”

OUTREACH HIGHLIGHTS TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE CSSE SCHOLARSHIP, SCAN THE QR CODE OR VISIT UWPLATT.EDU/GIVE . College of Engineering, Mathematics and Science 21

UW-PLATTEVILLE WRAPPED UP INAUGURAL SUMMER CODING CAMPS, INTRODUCED HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS TO GROWING FIELD

UW-Platteville held its inaugural summer coding camps and hackathon last summer, introducing nearly 60 high school students to the rapidly expanding computer science and cybersecurity fields. The camps – focusing on computer games programming, esports, and cyber defense – were the first of their kind to be offered in the region.

“We heard from so many parents a sense of happiness at seeing these camps offered and gratitude that they were offered in this area. They expressed that they had been looking for something like this for a long time,” said Dr. Afzal Upal, professor of computer science and software engineering. “The students were excited and genuinely interested and engaged.”

The first camp introduced students to programming in Python by designing computer games, the second camp taught students how to design their own esports games, and the final camp taught students the basics of cybersecurity and how to defend themselves in the cyberspace. The camps culminated with a hackathon event, during which students competed for scholarships of up to $5,000.

“During the hackathon, the students were made aware of various types of challenges in cyberspace,” said Upal. “For example, if you don’t use a strong password, how easy it is to break using automatic password breaking tools. The students were asked to crack a password or crack various encryption schemes. There was a series of challenges and whoever solved them first won.”

Upal said he created the camps, in part, because research increasingly shows students select their career path as early, or even earlier, than high school.

“There has been enough research that we now know that kids make decisions about their careers earlier than we think,” said Upal. “It’s not just when they are filling out their college applications. The earlier we can reach them, the better.”

This, combined with the growing demand for these careers in industry, makes it even more crucial to establish that pipeline of students coming into the programs.

“The demand in industry is huge,” said Upal.

According to Upal, the cybersecurity industry has experienced a zero percent unemployment rate since 2010, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates the cyber security sector is slated to grow by 31% from 2019-2029, and the private sector currently has up to 3 million unfilled cybersecurity positions globally.

“Those are stark statistics,” he said, adding that the increasing popularity of companies moving toward smart manufacturing is in part driving this need. “Our cybersecurity program came about because our industrial advisory board repeatedly asked us and told us about the high demand in industry for cybersecurity talent.”

The success of the summer coding camps was largely due to the hands-on opportunities they offered.

OUTREACH HIGHLIGHTS
“MORE PEOPLE ARE NOW REQUIRED TO UNDERSTAND THE COMMUNICATION AND CYBERSECURITY AREAS; THEY ARE IN REALLY HIGH DEMAND, WE’VE ALSO TALKED TO OUR ADVISORY BOARD, AND MANY OF THEM SAID THEY WISHED THAT THESE SKILLS WERE TAUGHT TO STUDENTS.”
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- DR. XIAOGUANG MA

OUTREACH HIGHLIGHTS

“The students are actually learning the techniques, not just the math that underlies the encryption schemes, for example, but we are actually showing them how to do it. That’s what we find they really get excited about.”

This hands-on approach is emblematic of the larger teaching philosophy of the College of EMS, and the recent move to Busby Hall of Engineering will enhance this. With the opening of Sesquicentennial Hall, which adjoins Busby Hall of Engineering, UW-Platteville offers a 200,000-squarefoot-complex to support interdisciplinary engineering and computer science.

“What distinguishes our program is the overall emphasis on teaching job-ready skills through hands-on experiences,” said Upal. “We’re really excited about being in our new building, where we’ll be able to hold all of our classes in computer labs, and students will always have the opportunity to try out things as the professor is teaching them.”

Upal said that plans are in the works to offer and possibly expand the coding camps in 2023.

UW-Platteville offers Bachelor of Science programs in computer science, software engineering, and cybersecurity, as well as the interdisciplinary Computer Science + X programs. UW-Platteville’s ABET-accredited Software Engineering program is the second largest in Wisconsin.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PROGRAMS, SCAN THE QR CODE OR VISIT WWW.UWPLATT.EDU/ STEM-POWER

College of Engineering, Mathematics and Science 23

OUTREACH HIGHLIGHTS

WE ENERGIES FOUNDATION SUPPORTS WOMEN IN STEM OUTREACH AND PROGRAMMING

The We Energies Foundation recently donated $5,000 to the UW-Platteville Women in STEM program to support outreach and programming efforts.

UW-Platteville’s nationally-recognized Women in STEM program offers many programs and events for young women and girls from fifth grade through college, in order to create a supportive community where women prosper at UWPlatteville and in their future.

“Women in STEM program individual and corporate partner support are essential in helping to create a diverse workforce for the future,” said Tammy Salmon-Stephens, Director of the College of EMS Student Success Programs at UW-Platteville. “Our students benefit greatly from the engagement with these partners.”

In a year and a half, the Women in STEM program has grown from serving 15 majors to 35 majors, doubling the number of women on campus who benefit from the program to more than 1,000.

“Initiatives designed to introduce students to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, such as the Women in STEM Career Day hosted by UW-Platteville, fully

align with our key focus area of education,” said Beth Straka, president of the We Energies Foundation. “By providing our girls and young women access to resources, mentoring, and hands-on, experience-based STEM learning programs, we are not only making an investment in our community, but also an investment in our future. The We Energies Foundation is proud to support these programs.”

The funds ensure that young women have the opportunity to participate in STEM programming that might not otherwise be available to those in rural communities.

“We are incredibly grateful for the support from the We Energies Foundation and We Energies employees, such as alumna Kris Ackerman, who has personally supported the Women in STEM program since 1997,” said SalmonStephens.

The We Energies Foundation supports initiatives for community and neighborhood development, health and human services, arts and culture, education, and environment.

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LETTER FROM EMS ALUMNI CHAPTER PRESIDENT

Greetings,

My name is Alex Zwart, and it has been a privilege to serve on the EMS Alumni Chapter Board as President these past few years. I appreciate all the help that the UW-Platteville Alumni Association staff has given me to help lead the EMS group.

The EMS Alumni Chapter Board is looking for one more member to join to fill out the Board. Please feel free to reach out to the Alumni Association if you have any interest in joining this group. Thank you again to Rayelle Berola and Jeff Smith for joining the group last year.

We want to thank you for your generous support of the UWPlatteville College of Engineering, Mathematics, and Science Alumni Chapter. Your support is invaluable as we move forward in graduating the next generation of professionals and continuing our legacy.

On behalf of UW-Platteville and the College of EMS Alumni Chapter, we thank you for your support and for helping to ensure the success of future Pioneers, thereby continuing our tradition of excellence.

Thank you.

College of Engineering, Mathematics and Science 25
ALUMNI CORNER

UW-PLATTEVILLE ENGINEERING EDUCATION HELPS RICKS’ AVIATION CAREER TAKE OFF

Andrew Ricks has always had a passion for aviation. He began taking flying lessons as a freshman in high school and earned his pilot’s license when he turned 17. But, his engineering education at UW-Platteville is what gave him the opportunity to turn his hobby into a career designing and creating airplane parts.

Ricks graduated from UW-Platteville in 2021 with a degree in mechanical engineering.

“I have always been really interested in aviation,” said Ricks. “I worked at an airport in high school, fueling planes. I enjoyed flying, but when I talked to some airline pilots, they told me that once you fly as a career, it loses some of the fun. So, I decided maybe I could keep flying for fun but also build airplanes.”

As a tool design engineer for Textron Aviation in Wichita, Kansas, Ricks creates component level parts for planes, ranging from small, single engine airplanes – like the first one he learned to fly – to large business jets and military aircrafts. He continues to fly for fun too, as a part of the company’s employee flying club.

Ricks, originally from Lodi, Wisconsin, knew from the start that he wanted to pursue mechanical engineering, at UW-Platteville an easy decision, after taking into consideration cost and its reputation for engineering.

“I had heard that UW-Platteville was the best education for the amount of money that you paid, and that was a big selling point for me since I was paying most of it myself,” said Ricks. “Also, my dad is a manager over a group of engineers, and a lot of the engineers he hired came from UW-Platteville, and he always found that they had a lot more hands-on experience.”

Ricks quickly discovered that another thing that set UWPlatteville apart was access to professors.

“The ability to have all professors know your name and be able to go in and ask them questions is what got me through those four years,” said Ricks. “I’ve talked to other friends who went to other schools, and that’s not always the case.”

Now, being in the field for more than a year, Ricks can fully attest to the value of his UW-Platteville education.

“I work with a lot of people who come from big name schools, and when they ask where I came from, they are always shocked when I tell them how much I paid per semester, compared to them, and here I am in the same position that they are in.”

“I HAVE ALWAYS BEEN REALLY INTERESTED IN AVIATION,I WORKED AT AN AIRPORT IN HIGH SCHOOL, FUELING PLANES. I ENJOYED FLYING, BUT WHEN I TALKED TO SOME AIRLINE PILOTS, THEY TOLD ME THAT ONCE YOU FLY AS A CAREER, IT LOSES SOME OF THE FUN. SO, I DECIDED MAYBE I COULD KEEP FLYING FOR FUN BUT ALSO BUILD AIRPLANES.”
- ANDREW RICKS
26 go.uwplatt.edu/ems
ALUMNI CORNER

ENGINEERING ALUMNUS TURNS IMAGINATION INTO REALITY WITH CUSTOM PLAYGROUNDS

UW-Platteville alumnus Tommy Jacobs spends his days bringing people’s imagination to life. As a custom lead design engineer at Landscape Structures, in Delano, Minnesota, it’s his job to take clients’ most creative ideas for playgrounds and turn them into reality.

“Every day is always different,” said Jacobs. “We are building a brand-new product in some fashion each day, so it’s never stagnant. But, it’s also one of the most rewarding jobs to have – building things for communities and kids to be able to interact, grow, and develop.”

Jacobs is originally from Hartland, Wisconsin, and graduated from UW-Platteville in 2010 with a bacheor's degree in mechanical engineering. He has worked with Landscape Structures for nearly five years and oversees a team of nine engineers.

“Sometimes we get designs that are bigger challenges –whether it’s manufacturing or structural. It’s all problemsolving. We get the picture of how it should look and we figure out how we can make it.”

Jacob estimates he has helped build at least 200 playgrounds in his time at Landscape Structures. Once his team receives a design, a typical turnaround time for manufacturing the structure is anywhere from four to 18 weeks. Jacobs has worked on international projects in Australia, Vietnam,

Spain, and South America. Some of his most memorable ones include Clement Park, in Littleton, Colorado — a music-themed park that features a trombone-shaped play structure; Lantana Ranch Park in Chandler, Arizona — an airport themed playground, complete with an air traffic control tower; and Margaret T. Hance Park in Phoenix, Arizona, with oversized custom animal structures that children can climb inside and interact with.

Over a decade into his career working with colleagues nationwide, Jacobs reflects on the advantages his UWPlatteville education gave him.

“In talking with others from [larger engineering universities], I think I got to experience a lot more handson interaction, instead of only theory,” said Jacobs. “There was opportunity for more intimacy with teachers; I didn’t deal with TAs. I got to be direct with professors who I was taking classes with and had a lot more tangible exploring of engineering, rather than just on a computer.”

“Engineering has always been super rewarding,” continued Jacobs. “I would encourage anyone who has a desire for problem-solving or sciences to get involved in the field. There is always such a need in the world for engineers, especially mechanical engineers, and the possibilities for work are so endless.”

College of Engineering, Mathematics and Science 27
ALUMNI CORNER

DONOR LIST

UW-PLATTEVILLE ALUMNI

The UW-Platteville College of Engineering, Mathematics and Science gratefully acknowledges the contributions of the following alumni, friends, and corporate sponsors from July 1, 2021 through June 30, 2022.

John Abrams 1969 Kris Ackerman 1992 Kurt Adler 1996 Michael Aird 1999 Amanda Aird 2000 Laura Alvarado 1998 Charles Anderson 1995 Kenneth Anderson 1971 Gerald Anderson 1966 Sheila Anfang 2006, 2014 Matthew Anfang 2007 Norman Arendt 1970 Robert Arndorfer 1982 Kyle Arndt 2006 Michael Aumann 1992 Kathleen Bahner 1985 Eric Bahner 1985 Peter Balousek 1974 Bradley Banfield 1998 Philip Baranowski 2002 Robert Barbuch 1969 Frederick Bartos 1973 Joanna Bartos 1972 Richard Baumann 1972 Sharonne Baylor 1991 Dean Bedford 1979 Travis Beek 2002 Andrew Behrend 2016 Janet Behrens 1973 Eugene Bekta 1987 Ann Bekta 1987 Bruce Belscamper 1960 Joseph Benbenek 1985 Charlene Bennett 1975 Janice Bennett 1980 Patrick Bergeman 1973 Todd Bergstrom 1986 Louis Bernabei 1983 Rayelle Berola 2003 Floyd Bethke 1970 Kevin Bierman 1994 Gregory Bies 1996, 2016 Justin Bilskemper 2006 David Bird 1963 Brenda Black 1985 Debra Blake 1992 Bryan Block 2010 Raymond Blum 1969 Theodore Blum 1980 Robert Bocher 1958 Jared Boerst 2016 John Boldt 1976 Barbara Boldt 1976 Robert Boldt 1970 Kevin Bonde 1978 Ryan Bonell 2006 Mark Boorse 1997 Scott Borroughs 1997 Rose Borroughs 1998 Gregory Boys 1994 Robert Brancel 1984 Nicholas Brazell 2016 William Bremer 1970 John Briesemeister 2015 Richard Briggs 1967 Charles Broers 1979 Dave Broihahn 1987 Matthew Bronson 2001 David Brooks 1986 Cheryl Brooks 1986 Jennifer Brooks 2000 William Browns 1969 Brett Bruckner 1995 Clyde Bryant 1962 Aaron Bubb 1999 Howard Buchanan 1961 Larry Buetzer 1976 Susan Buetzer 1978, 1984 Joseph Bunker 1996 Lance Burger 1984 Gerald Burns 1959 David Burroughs 1981 Dean Busch 1981 Paul Buschkopf 2019 Amber Bush 2017 Johanna Buss 2018 Nathan Capelle 2007 Nancy Carey 1966 Stephen Cecil 2016 William Church 1988 Joseph Clifton 1976 Gregory Cline 1980 Vernon Coenen 1970 Patrick Conard 1980 Evan Constant 2015 Brendan Conway 2010 Jeramie Cooper 2001, 2009 Lonnie Coppernoll 1971 Bryce Corrigan 2015 Kristine Corrigan 2015 Michael Court 1989 Ronald Crane Jr. 1982 Joseph Creelman 2021 Mariel Crisci 2021 Robert Crisp 1986 Brandon Cronce 2018 Steven Crouch 1976 Emily Crowe 2013 Ralph Curtis 1958 Trent Cybela 2015 Marcis Davidson 2009 Carrie Davin 1991 Ronald Davis 1962 Peter Davis 1980 David DeBruine 1976 Curtis DeKoning 2015 Christine Del Carmen 2020
*Deceased donors noted with an asterisk 28 go.uwplatt.edu/ems
ALUMNI

DONOR LIST

Priya Devaguptapu 1993 Emily Dhingra 2001 Chad Diedrick 1994 Frances Dieter 1958 Donald Dieter 1957 William Dixon 1971 Diana Dixon 1969 Dale Dixon 1969 Thomas Dobson 1967 Ruth Dobson 1965 Roger Dodds 1969 Mitchell Dolak 2019 Isaac Dolan 2011, 2022 Lindsey Dolan 2011 Brian Dorn 1979 Heather Dotzauer 2005 David Dotzauer 2005 Ashley Drasch 2015 Marilynn Dressler 1986 Kevin Ducat 1996 Christopher Duescher 2009 Christine Dulian 1988 Carol Dunlap 1968 Collin Durkin 2021 John Dutcher 1969 Rick Eagen 1990 Diane Ecker 1971 Lee Ecker 1973 Orlyn Edge 1961 Benjamin Effa 2020 Brittany Ehlen 2019 Bob Eichner 1982 Donald Erickson 1980 Joshua Ericson 2008 Sarah Ericson 2009 Stanley Ewing 1962 Daniel Fabian 1984 Edward Falk 1969 Alan Farrell 2000 Ryan Fecht 1996 Ryan Feldmann 2009 John Fick 2003 Jessica Fick 2003 Joseph Fiegen 2008 Darius Fieschko 2021 Donald Fish 1981 Corinne Fish 1981 Mike Fisher 1983 Austin Fitzgerald 2021 Christine Fleck 1987 Sidney Fletcher 1990 Stephen Flottmeyer 1990 Katherine Flug 1962 Thomas Foht 1989 James Fowler 1979 Barbara Foye 1974 Marcus Frana 2007 George Furey 1979 Joanne Gabrielski 1997 Jesse Gabrielski 1997 Jeffrey Gafner 1990, 2013 Roger Gagliano 1979 Ann Gagliano 1979 Martin Galantha 1967 Gerald Garbis 1965 Landon Gauthier 2017 Katherine Gauthier 2017 Joseph Geisler 1972, 1973 Lee Gibbs 2002 Rebecca Gibbs 2002 Mark Gibson 1981 Gordon Gimski 1968 Ryan Gitzlaff 2002 Larry Glass 1967 Jesse Gleason 2005, 2016 Curtis Gobeli 1970 Patrick Golden 1964 Terry Gorman 1973, 1978 Jerilyn Gorman 1972, 1977 Linda Govier 1976 Randy Govier 1976 Julie Gray 1994 Gary Grimm 1964 Loretta Gross 1990 Jodean Grunow 1963 George Gunderson 1970 Gerald Gunderson Estate* 1965 Robert Gundlach 1972 Ibrahim Hakim 1968 Sandra Halla 1991 Thomas Halla 1991 Edward Hancock 1976 Matt Hansen 1991 Larry Hanson 1971 Terri Harbort 1993 Don Harbort 1993 Craig Hardy 1989 Marjory Harker 1969, 1977 Lois Harr 1958 Emily Harrison 2016 Kyle Hartman 2017 Ann Hauser 1960 Jenny Heal 2001 Chris Heer 1982 James Hennings 1963 Ron Herro 1969 Eion Hess 2010 Ronald Hett 1970 Kyle Heywood 2019 Russell Hill 1996 Kari Hill 1999, 2003 Melissa Himmelmann 1996 Richard Himmelmann 1997 Larry Hinders 1965 Jerry Hinrichs 1970 Fred Hintz 1989 Michelle Hintz 1990 Leslie Hipenbecker 1969 Lyle Hird 1951 Mary Jean Hlavac Estate* 1951 Eugene Hoelker 1969 Jason Hoeppner 1992 Steven Hoffman 1971 Noah Hofrichter 2013 Kenneth Holte 1989 Jennifer Holte 1990 Albert Hooker 1980 Charley Hopp 2008 Alexander Horneck 2020 Matthew Hoslet 2017 Ralph Howard 1985 Dalton Howell 2018 Jane Howell Estate* 1965 William Huff 1959 Mary Huggins 1969 Richard Huggins 1971 Dan Hughes 1989 Edward Hui 1978 Barbara Huner 1971 David Hunt 1978 Michael Hurlbut 2015 Tracey Hustad 1991 Cathy Huttenhoff 2009 Kyle Hytry 2010 College of Engineering, Mathematics and Science 29
Jeffrey Ingebritsen 1977 Terrence Ingram 1961 Adam Iserman 2013 Stephanie Iserman 2013 Donald Iverson 1958 Danielle Izdepski 1996 Steven Jacobs 1998 William J. Jacobs, Jr. 1964 Brian Jacoby 1992 Harlow James 1963 Catherine Jellings 1989 Jeffrey Jetton 1980 Steven Jirschele 1978 Arlene Jobgen 1972 Mark Jobgen 1972 Ronald Johnsen 1968 Jane Johnsen 1968 Dick Johnsen 1968 Stephanie Johnson 2000 Griffin Johnson 2021 Tanika Johnson 2020 Timothy Johnson 1989 Brenda Johnson 1988 Judy Johnson 1979 Mark Johnson 1979 Douglas Johnson 1977 Paul Johnson 1959 Clarence Johnson, MD 1977 John Jones 1985 Douglas Jorgensen 1967 Adrian Kaiser 2017 Mark Keesey 1981 Susan Kellicut 1970, 1973 Robert Kelly 1975 Anthony Kemnitz 1986 Lawrence Kent 1973 Martin Kerkenbush 1988 Samantha Kevern 2005 John Kincaid 1980 Paul Kinsman 1979 Emilee Klaas 2022 Kay Klein 1967 Judy Klitzsch-Anderson 1967 Larry Kloepping 1985 John Klovning 1970 Robert Kluge 1969 Todd Knox 2003 Jerold Kobiske 1974 Van Komurka 1982 Evan Kooiman 2004 John Kortas 1972 Christopher Kosmicki 1987 Julie Koss 1973 Dale Kowalski 1972 Becky Kowalski 1997 Daniel Koziczkowski 1996 Gregory Krahn 1969 Donald Kratcha 1960 Geoffrey Krentz 2020 Jeffrey Kronser 1977 John Kuhl 1963 Perry Kuznar 1982 John Lambert 2017 Barry Lange 2017 Larry Larson 1962 Jason Laschinger 2012 Eugene Laschinger 1975 Elliot Latham 2020 April Laufenberg 2003 John Lauper 1998 Marcy Leach 1996 Carol Leannah 1980 George Lee 1973 Annabelle Lehman 2022 Richard LeMahieu 1976 Betty Leonhard 2000 Allyn Lepeska* 1967 Melvin Leskinen 1970 Paul Levendoski 1971 Thomas Liu 1974 Kent Locy 1993 Jolene Lofy 1991 Peter Lofy 1990 Matthew Loppnow 1994 Jack Losch 1972 Gary Loss 1971 Beth Lucey 1998 Troy Lucey 1998 Shirley Lueschow 1957 Joseph Lukaszewski 2016 Sean Lynch 1999 Bill Mahony 1983 Edgar Man 1973 Dennis Maney 1988 Brek Mankins 2019 Lindsay Mann 2019 Cynthia Marcelais 1971 Daniel Marcue 1994 Wanda Martinsen 1965, 1968 Robert Martinsen 1967 Pamela Marvel 1969 Tricia Mason 2009 Todd Matheson 1992 Jonathan Maxwell 1990 Bobbi Maxwell 2002 Ryan May 2004 Jeff Mazanec 1978 Robert McAuliffe 1984 Julia McDonald 1980, 1981 Austin Mcdonald 2018 Cole McDonald 2016 William McElroy 2011 David McIntosh 1974 Kevin McMullen 1986 Daniel McNaughton 1969 Michael McShane 2008 Ronald Meissen 1971 David Meister 1989 Danielle Meister 1992 Steven Mertins 1973 Beth Metcalf 1995 Jeffrey Metcalf 1990 Wayne Metzger 1989 Christopher Meyer 2005 Dale Meyer 1979 Samantha Meyer 2022 Mark Meyers 1981 John Mika 2014, 2021 Kenneth Mika 2008, 2015 Suzanne Miller 1978 Anthony Milliren 2005 Anthony Minotte 1994 Hannah Mohr 2017 Matthew Mohr 2018 Steven Montague 1980 David Moody 1974 Norma Moody 1974 Dale Moody 1966 Shannon Morgan 2000 Sid Mueller 1981, 1983 Harlan Mueller 1968
30 go.uwplatt.edu/ems
DONOR LIST
David Murphy 1970 Edwin Murray 1996 Robert Murray 1968 Thomas Nelson 1959 Ladd Nelson 1991 Donald Nelson 1970 Bradley Nelson 1977 Larry Nelson 1966 Cole Nelson 2020 Michael Newman 1971 Philip Nickson 1967 Adam Nielsen 2019 Jack Noble 1967 Mark Novak 1979 Robert Novak 1986 Steven Oakeson 1986 Zachary Obert 1998 Joseph O'Brien 2004 David Olson 1969 Daniel Olson 1988 Dennis Olson 1970 Stephen Oneyear 1971, 1973 Brendan O'Rourke 1990 Lukas Ortega 2010 Shawn Ortgiesen 1993 Elizabeth Osterholz 2015 Cary Palmer 1968 Bradley Pankow 1986, 2012 Jill Parker 1973, 1996 Stephen Parker 1997 Aaron Patterson 1996 Laura Patterson 1995 Donald Pauser 1961 Gary Pazdernik 1986 Michael Pechan 1971 Kathleen Pechan 1980 James Peek 1976 Anita Pelak 1991 Donna Perkins 1975 Shane Peronto 2019 Kenneth Pesch 1971 Richard Peters 1969 Mark Peters 1992 Timothy Peterson 1974 Terrence Peterson 1976 Michael Pfeiler 1988 Steven Piechowski 2012 Robert Ploof 2020 Brad Polzar 2007 William Pranghofer 2013 Richard Prieve 1969 Erin Prusha 2020 James Rabe 1996 Roger Rahlf 1972 Steven Rahn 2000 Erin Ralph 2003 Sally Ralph 1980 Katie Rash 2017 Ed Reichmann 1960 Robert Reisinger 1978 Richard Reisinger 1978 Joseph Renn 1977 Eugene Resch 1985 David Rice 1981 Alisha Richard 2008, 2013 Matthew Richards 1991 Raymond Richardson 1971 Jeff Richter 1984 Eleanor Richter 1983 Reese Riddiough 1962 Alan Riebe 1987 Rod Rinzel 1998 William Ripp 1973 Stephen Roake 1970 Phillip Roberts 1985 Corey Robinson 1996 Brent Roshell 1985 Lynnette Roshell 1985 Edward Roth 1968 Lawrence Rott 1971 Roxann Ruechel 1984 Dennis Runde 1986 Lee Rupnow 1971 Ruth Rupnow 1971 Michael Ryan 1971 Tammy Salmon-Stephens 1994, 2005 Gary Sander 1985 Jean Sanders 1970 Kimberly Sargent 2013 Anthony Schauer 2001 Jack Scheidegger 1960 Steve Schmidtknecht 1980 David Schmieder 1967 Don Schneider 1967 Nicholas Schneider 2008 Roy Schneider 1977 Michael Schroeder 1971 John Schroeder 1977 Carol Schumann 1980 James Schumann 1980 Jenna Schumann 1996 Matthew Schumann 1996 Judy Schuppner 1967 Matthew Schwalenberg 2014 John Sciborski 1964 Austen Scudder 2008 Dale Secher 1961 Scott Seely 1995 Jean Seely 2021 Duncan Seffern 2000 Aaron Shelman 2007 Elizabeth Shelman 2007 William Shinker 1969 Robert Shower 1970 Mark Shubak 1993 Scott Sievert 1990 Kelsie Simmons 2002 Jason Simmons 2002, 2008 Jeff Simon 1995 Jill Simons 1984 Randal Simons 1984 Robert Smick 1960 Daniel Solchenberger 1985 John Somerville 1963 Krista Sommerfeldt 2003 Sonya Specht 1985 Joseph Spellman 1980 Edward Spencer 1959 Keena Spencer-Dobson 2011, 2019 Jesse Stanton 2009 Lenita Stark 1972 Andrea Statz Lauper 1997 Joshua Steadman 2017 Stacia Stephenson 2010 Timothy Stephenson 2009 Thomas Stetzer 2005 James Stola 1971 William Stoltz 1983 Terry Strittmater 1982 Susan Strittmater 1981 Steve Stroshane 1992
College of Engineering, Mathematics and Science 31
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FRIENDS

James

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Carolyn Arndorfer

Holly Attenborough

Robert Bank

Lea

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Carol Baumann

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Thome 1994 Sydni Thompson 2022 Craig Timmerman 1997 Jane Tonelli 1967 Russell Tonelli 1968 Linda Trumm 1977 Brian Udovich 1997 John Unterholzner 1999 Corey Valaskey 2002 Thomas Varghese 1986 Marie Venne 2003 Bruce Venne 2004 Steve VerKuilen 1984 John Verzal 1974 Paul Villwock 2001 Jeannie Voegele 1995 John Volker 1970 Mary Pat Vosberg 1976 Robert Vosberg 1978 Janet Vosberg 1991 Ralph Vosters 1975 Eric Vosters 2016 Jack Wagner 2021 Jeremy Walker 2000 David Walker 1979 Andrew Walters 2005 Roger Walton 1981 Courtney Wand 2011 Philip Waterworth 1965 Allen Watrud 1973 James Weber 1995 Richard Weber 1979 Carol Weber 1989 Thomas Weber 1972 Tamra Wehrle 1994 Paul Weinberger 1986 Brandon Weis 2010 Jeff Weisensel 1982, 2007 Adam Welch 2022 Joshua Wellnitz 2021 Liz Wells 2012 Brad Werner 1987 Julie Whitcher 1999 Elizabeth Whiting 2021 Sheri Wideen 1995 Curtis Wilkins 1957 Elizabeth Williams 1993 James Winters 1996 Eric Wittwer 2008 Eugene Woehrle 2009, 2013 Erik Wolter 2013 Susan Wong 1968 Edison Wong 1967 Jesse Wulf 2021 Patricia Wunderlin 1976 James Wunderlin 1968 Christopher Yerges Kathyjean Young 1980 Brian Young 1986 Kay Young 1977 Thomas Young 1979 Theodore Zabel 1968 Margot Zahn 2014 Jonathon Zahn 2014 Mark Zapp 1984 Michael Zeigle 1974, 1988 Tammy Zeller 1985 Jeffrey Zeller 1985 Daniel Zielinski 2007 Aaron Zimmerman 1989 Brady Zink 2020 Alexander Zwart 2011 Andrew Zwieg 2006
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DONOR LIST 32 go.uwplatt.edu/ems

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Sharon Halsted

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Marjorie Hefty Estate

Amy Hein

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Stephanie Hubbard

Dori Hughes

Ruth James

Katie Jelacic

Sharon Johnson

Michelle Johnson

Stan Kabat

Terri Kabat

Margaret Keehn

Julie Keesey

Nicole Kerkenbush

Collin Kerkhoff

Robert Kern

Austin Kimler

Elizabeth Kincaid

Ann Kincaid

Jacob Kincaid

James Kincaid

Christine Kincaid

Alf Kirkeeng

Arthur Klingerman

Mac Klingler

Mary Kloepping

Brian Kolden

Janey Kortas

Jacquelyn Kuhl

Linda Labrake

Lisa Landgraf

Cathy Lanier

Jennie Larson

Susan Lawniczak

Sue Legois

Gary Lindahl

Susan Lindholm

Lea Ljumanovic

Valerie Lundberg

Denny Lundberg

Ann Kuai Man

Jamie Mathison

Stephanie Maury

Jeff Maxted

Kevin McCarthy

Scott McDermott

Sue Meinholz

Eileen Meissen

Douglas Meyer

Lynn Meyers

Trapper Mitchell

Hayedeh Montgomery

Patricia Montgomery

Amy Moore

Jim Moris

Deanna Moris

Barbara Moser

Beth Moster

Gregory Nelson

Kelly Nelson

Carol Nelson

Cory Noble

Peter Nordgren

Joann Novak

Jack Ottinger

David Owens

Lisa Page

Mary Palmer

Philip Parker

Audrey Parker

Robert Patterson

Geraldine Peek

Michael Peotter

Kevin Phelps

Debbie Plendl

Ryan Portman

Ann Post

Nancy Preston

Anthony Puntin

Cynthia Recker

Todd Reed

Fern Reinstein

Jesse Reinstein

Victoria Reuter

Emma Richards

John Riege

Jenny Ripp

Beth Rodwell

Jennifer Rudolph

Jeffrey Russell

William Sanders

Karen Sandvig

Elizabeth Scudder

John Seeck

Cynthia Seyer

Wendy Sievert

David Snook

David Stein

Courtney Straus

James Swenson

Cynthia Tang

Robert Thomas

Rodney Thorson

Jason Thrun

Terry Trumm

Linda Udelhoven

Abigail Urban

Elizabeth Vehige

Jason Voelker

Kathleen Volz

Denise Vosters

Larry Walters

Janice Walters

Brian Walther

Xiaohong Wang

Clark Wantoch

Martha Watrud

Amy Westby

Lois Wilkins

Sheryl Wills

Amy Woerpel

Marilyn Wolter

Linda Wright

Christine Wunderlin

Danny Xiao

Lori Ziegler

ORGANIZATIONS

Advanced Engineering Concepts

Alliant Energy Foundation

Alliant Energy Foundation Matching Gifts Program

Amcor

American Society of Civil Engineers

American Transmission Company LLC

College of Engineering, Mathematics and Science 33

DONOR LIST

Andersen Corporation

Ascendium Education Group

Ayres Associates

Baxter & Woodman

Belcan

Belcan Engineering Group LLC

BlueScope Foundation North America

Boeing Company

BWBR

Caterpillar Inc Public Affairs Support Services

Caterpillar Inc.

Clark Dietz Inc

Clopas LLC

CNH Industrial America LLC

Coenen Mechanical

Cummins Emission Solutions

Delta 3 Engineering Inc.

Driftless Traditional Tannery

Duke Energy

E.G. Harrell Fund

Eaton Corporation

ECK Industries Inc.

Emmi Roth Usa Inc.

Epic

EV Green Technologies

Faherty Inc.

Fidelity Charitable

First Contact Polymers & Photonic Cleaning Technologies LLC

Gauthier & Sons Construction

GEI Consultants Inc.

General Engineering Company Inc.

Georgia-Pacific Foundation

GRAEF

Grant County Economic Development Corp.

Greenheck Group

Greenheck Racing Inc

IMEG Corp.

Iowa Signal & Electric Co.

Jacobs

Jewell Associates Engineers Inc

John Barth Foundation Inc.

John Deere Construction & Forestry Company

John Deere Foundation

JP Cullen

JPC Foundation

Kern Family Foundation

Kimberly-Clark Corporation

KL Engineering Inc.

Klauer Manufacturing

Koch Companies Community Fund

Kohler Foundation Inc.

Kraemer North America

L.E. Phillips Family Foundation Inc

Mathy Construction Company

McGuire Contractors Inc.

Microsoft Corporation

MSA Professional Services Inc.

Netelligent Consulting Inc.

New Manufacturing Alliance

Origin Design

Oshkosh Corporation

Payne and Dolan Inc.

Pearson Engineering LLC

Pierce Manufacturing Inc.

Plexus Corporation

Portzen Construction Inc.

Prent Corporation

Presto Foundation

R.H. Batterman & Company

Rice Engineering

Royal Construction Inc.

Seats Incorporated

Sheltered Wings Inc.

Spectrum Brands

State Farm Insurance Companies

Stellar Enterprise LLC

Stenstrom Excavation & Blacktop Group

Strand Associates Inc.

Sub-Zero Group Inc.

Tau Kappa Epsilon Mu Nu Alumni Association

The Labcorp Charitable Foundation

The NSLS

Town of Lagrange

Trachte

TRANE

Trane Technology Co.

TRC Environmental Corporation

Tri-State Porta Potty Inc.

Unison Solutions

UW-Platteville Women in STEM

Vierbicher Associates

Wahlert Foundation

WDS Construction

We Energies Foundation

Weasler Engineering

Weir Minerals

William Charles Construction

Wisconsin Concrete Pavement Association

WR and Floy A Sauey Family Foundation

Zenith Tech Inc.

34 go.uwplatt.edu/ems
College of Engineering, Mathematics and Science 35
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