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Special Warfare Group

First Division

Third Division

Fourth Division

Second Division

Fifth Division

United States Joint Task Force “Tip of the Spear” USJTF FCFM 2 v2.0 Specialized Units


FCFM 2 SPECIALIZED UNITS The FCFM 2 deals with the various specialized units available within the USJTF formations that are not included in the Special Warfare formations. It contents Surveillance & Target Acquisition (STA), Ordnance, Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV), and Vehicle Crew units.

Contents FCFM 2-1 -

FCFM 2-1.1 FCFM 2-1.2 FCFM 2-1.3 FCFM 2-1.4 FCFM 2-1.5

FCFM 2-2 -

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FCFM 2-2.1 FCFM 2-2.2 FCFM 2-2.3 FCFM 2-2.4

Surveillance & Target Acquisition (STA) Generalities STA Strike Group STA Strike Section STA Company How to use STA units Ordnance Generalities Ordnance Strike Section Ordnance Company How to use Ordnance units

FCFM 2-3

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Vehicle Platoon (Transportation)

FCFM 2-4

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Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV)

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FCFM 2-4.1 FCFM 2-4.2

Generalities UAV Strike Section

FCFM v2.0


FCFM 2-1.1 SURVEILLANCE & TARGET ACQUISITION GENERALITIES Surveillance & Target Acquisition, STA The STA are specialized in deep reconnaissance and target neutralization. The basis of STA warfare is the couple Scout-Sniper. Members of STA units never work alone, always two if not three... Another task of these units is to give accurate long range fire support to other USJTF operators on the battlefield; however Sniper must not be used as Designated Marksmen. STA units do not belong to one Infantry or else Strike Team, Strike Group, etc. They belong to all USJTF operators on the battlefield. In order to avoid non optimal use of these men, STA units answer only to its Intelligence Officer, or to an officer having received the authority from the Intelligence Officer responsible for STA units.

STA Training Course Scout and Snipers are specialized units of the USJTF. They are the best of what USJTF can give as long range accurate fire support. Their shot represent the fire accuracy of USJTF; they must not miss their target. All Scout and Sniper must have attended the USJTF Scout Sniper Course Training.


FCFM 2-1.2 STA STRIKE GROUP Generalities Size: nine men. One Group Leader and eight STA operators. The STA Strike Group is the smallest STA units. All of its members are qualify to serve as both Scout and Sniper. It allows this formation to break in teams of two or three men according to the mission they have to attend (see FCFM 2-1.5). STA Group Leaders are responsible for the training of their men. It is a great responsibility as the Scouts and Snipers represent the accuracy of fire of the USJTF.

STA Strike Group


FCFM 2-1.3 STA STRIKE SECTION Generalities Size: twenty men; A Section Leader, an Assistant Section Leader and two STA Strike Groups. The STA Strike Section falls directly under the Brigade Intelligence Officer orders. Whatever it belongs to a greater formation (Company, Battalion, etc) it always acts as an independent unit. It means that the Section Leader do not have to obey an order unless it has been approved by the Intelligence Officer. This is to prevent non optimized use of STA Strike Section elements.

STA Strike Section


FCFM 2-1.4 STA STRIKE COMPANY Generalities Size: at least twenty one men; A Commanding Officer (BDE Intelligence Officer), and one or more STA Strike Sections. STA Strike Company is an administrative name given to the gathering of one or more STA Strike Sections under the Brigade Intelligence Officer command. The Section Leaders, usually First Lieutenant, also play the role of Executive Officer for their own STA Strike Section. The BDE Intel Officer is responsible for collecting data for STA missions. His ability to do it determines the success or the failure of the mission. If needed, the BDE Intel Officer can dispatch STA Strike Section to smaller formations such as battalions or companies.

STA Company


FCFM 2-1.5 HOW TO USE STA UNITS Generalities The primary audiences for this section of the FCFM 2-1 are Brigade Intelligence Officers, STA Section Leaders and Assistant Section Leaders. Secondary audiences include Brigade Operation Officers, Battalion Commanding and Executing Officers, Company Commanding and Executive Officers. These officers have to fully understand how STA units work in order to optimize its uses on the battlefield. Example: -

NOT OPTIMIZED USE BDE Ops Officer asks the BDE Intel Officer to send a STA Strike Section to locate and neutralize an enemy officer. BDE Intel Officer sends the STA Strike Section. A Special Warfare unit, having a mission in the area, asks BDE Intel Officer a STA support. STA Strike Section is already on a mission, the Special Warfare unit will not have support. Moreover, an entire STA Strike Section is too much for this kind of mission, two or three men may have done it.

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OPTIMIZED USE BDE Ops Officer asks the BDE Intel Officer to send a STA unit to neutralize an enemy officer. BDE Intel Officer asks a STA Section Leader to select the correct amount of men needed for the mission, according to the intelligence data. If another unit in the area needs STA support, there are still Scouts and Snipers that can be deployed.

Role of BDE Intelligence Officers concerning STA units Brigade Intelligence Officers are responsible for collecting data for the missions STA units will have to attend. By data we mean: map (asked to the DIV Cartographic Service and/or collected by the BDE units on the theater of operation), satellite images (DIV Cartographic Service), UAV video or images (Brigade UAV units), photos of the targets, data about the targets (last location known, supposed current location, name, rank and role in the enemy dispositive, etc). The Brigade Intelligence Officer ability to gather Intel makes easier the task of STA units on the battlefield. The success or failure of a STA mission falls on him most of the time. If needed, the BDE Intel Officer can dispatch STA Strike Section to smaller formations such as battalions or companies.

Role of STA Section Leaders & STA Assistant Section Leaders The STA Section Leader, usually a First Lieutenant also acts as Executive Officer for the men under his command. Is responsibility, according to BDE Intel Officer orders, is to select the correct equipment and amount of men needed to accomplish a mission. To do so, he receives from the BDE Intel Officer the data concerning the mission.


The STA Assistant Section Leader provides advice to his superior has Senior NCO of the STA Strike Section. Indeed, as a veteran Scout Sniper, he knows what is needed for most of the mission. He is also, as First Sergeant of the Strike Section, responsible for the training of is men.

Dispatching of STA operators USJTF members who attended the Sniper Training Course but who are not in a STA team (understand here, an Airsoft sniper team) can play with their team but they must be out of the team organization so they can be resectioned with other STA operators during USJTF event in STA units without disturbing the organization of their original team.

Giving order to a Surveillance & Target Acquisition unit Asking for STA support: following their chain of command, USJTF commanders (from Company to Battalion) can ask their Brigade Intelligence Officer or their Battalion Commander (only if a STA unit has been placed directly under his command) for Scout Sniper support. BDE Ops Officer can also ask for STA support. Preparing mission: the CO of the concerned STA unit makes his WARNO. Then he sends it to the STA unit leader. The leader briefs the men he chose to accomplish the mission and they select the correct equipment. Mission: Leader makes contact with the USJTF member who asked for the mission. STA operators attend the mission then report to their leader the failure or success of the mission. STA Leader reports to the STA support applicant.

Equipment When preparing for a mission, STA operators have to choose the correct equipment they will need to succeed. FCFM 2-1.5 proposes two different organizations for the STA Strike Group (FCFM 2-1.2). One for the use of common Sniper rifles (as M700) in two man teams, and one for the use of caliber .50 rifle (as M200) in three man teams. 

Using Cal. 0.50 rifles (three rifles)


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Using common Sniper rifles (four rifles)

In this last formation, the Group Leader does not really remain alone because generally all the ScoutSniper couples are not deployed at the same time.


FCFM 2-2.1 ORDNANCE – GENERALITIES Ordnance objectives Ordnance is an innovation of the FCFM v2.0. This new unit has three main objectives. -

Secure areas: working as Explosive Ordnance Disposal, Ordnance unit are supposed to secure the path for other USJTF units

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Forbid access: working as engineers, they will have to place minefields, traps, etc.

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“Explosive assaults”: as Assault Sappers they will be on front line with more Airsoft grenades and other than “conventional” USJTF units (Infantry, Reconnaissance, and Special Warfare) to merely blow up the enemy formations in lightning assaults.

Ordnance units command The ordnance units fall under the Brigade Logistic Officer orders. Just like the STA units, it are independent from other Brigades units unless if the BDE Log Officer has placed them under the command of another Commanding Officer.


FCFM 2-2.2 ORDNANCE STRIKE SECTION Generalities Size: sixteen men; An Ordnance Section Leader, an Assistant Ordnance Section Leader, and two Ordnance Strike Groups (Strike Group Type I, see FCFM 1-2.2). Ordnance Strike Sections are units specialized in the three missions of USJTF ordnance: secure areas, forbid access, and “explosive assaults”. Even if this specialized Strike Section knows how to fight as an Infantry Strike Section, it must not be use like this, for this is not its mission. USJTF Commanders may keep for more important purposes.

Ordnance Strike Section


FCFM 2-2.3 ORDNANCE COMPANY Generalities Size: at least seventeen men; A Commanding Officer (BDE Logistic Officer), and one or more Ordnance Strike Sections. Ordnance Strike Company is an administrative name given to the gathering of one or more Ordnance Strike Sections under the Brigade Logistic Officer command. The Section Leaders, usually First Lieutenant, also play the role of Executive Officer for their own Ordnance Strike Section. If needed, the BDE Log Officer can dispatch Ordnance Strike Section to smaller formations such as battalions or companies.

Ordnance Company


FCFM 2-2.5 HOW TO USE ORDNANCE UNITS Generalities The primary audiences for this section of the FCFM 2-1 are Brigade Logistic Officers, Ordnance Section Leaders and Assistant Section Leaders. Secondary audiences include Brigade Operation Officers, Battalion Commanding and Executing Officers, Company Commanding and Executive Officers. These officers have to fully understand how Ordnance units work in order to optimize its uses on the battlefield. Example: -

NOT OPTIMIZED USE BDE Ops Officer asks the BDE Log Officer to send a Ordnance Company to secure an bridge where enemy airsofters placed Airsoft mines. BDE Log Officer sends the Ordnance Company. An Infantry Company, having to secure a residential area, asks BDE Log Officer a Ordnance support. The Ordnance Company is already on a mission, the Infantry Company will not have support. Moreover an Ordnance Company is too much to secure just one bridge, a three men Ordnance Strike Team may have done it.

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OPTIMIZED USE BDE Ops Officer asks the BDE Log Officer to send an Ordnance unit to secure an bridge where enemy airsofters placed Airsoft mines. BDE Log Officer asks an Ordnance Section Leader to select the correct amount of men needed for the mission, according to the support applicant report. If another unit in the area needs Ordnance support, there are still Sappers that can be deployed.

Role of Ordnance Section Leaders & Ordnance Assistant Section Leaders The Ordnance Section Leader, usually a First Lieutenant also acts as Executive Officer for the men under his command. Is responsibility, according to BDE Log Officer orders, is to select the correct equipment and amount of men needed to accomplish a mission. To do so, he receives from the BDE Log Officer the support applicant report concerning the mission. The STA Assistant Section Leader provides advice to his superior has Senior NCO of the Ordnance Strike Section. Indeed, as a veteran Sapper, he knows what is needed for most of the mission. He is also, as First Sergeant of the Strike Section, responsible for the training of is men.

Giving order to an Ordnance unit Asking for Ordnance support: following their chain of command, USJTF commanders (from Company to Battalion, and also the BDE Ops Officer) can ask their Brigade Logistic Officer or their Battalion/Company Commander (only if a Ordnance unit has been placed directly under his command) for Ordnance support. Preparing mission: the CO of the concerned Ordnance unit makes his WARNO. Then he sends it to the Ordnance unit leader. The leader briefs the men he chose to accomplish the mission and they select the correct equipment.


Mission: Leader makes contact with the USJTF member who asked for the mission. Ordnance operators attend the mission then report to their leader the failure or success of the mission. Ordnance Leader reports to the Ordnance support applicant.

Explosive Ordnance Disposal When the mission is to secure an area where some explosive devices have been placed by enemy airsofters, the Ordnance Section Leaders may just send a three men Strike Team to do the EOD work. If the area to secure is an Airsoft mine field, perhaps it is better to send an entire Ordnance Strike Group.


FCFM 2-3 Vehicle Platoon Generalities Vehicle Platoon Vehicle Platoons are transport brigade units. The platoon is led by a Captain, assisted by a Sergeant First Class, and resections many USJTF Operators and NCOs. These operators and NCOs are organized in vehicle crews, its number depend on how many vehicle the brigade has and how many men are needed to drive them.

Vehicle Crew A vehicle crew is generally a two or three men team. Here are the organization of the two men crew and three men crew. 

Three men Vehicle Crew

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Two men Vehicle Crew

Organization


USJTF Forces Combat Formations Manual (Special Attachments)