Issuu on Google+

Task: Standardized Communication Procedures USJTF Task 12 Effective Date: 2011 NOV 6 Enlisted / NCO / Officer All Levels

STP: USJTF Troop Manual USJTF Task 12

Conditions: As a Task Force Member moving in a tactical environment with a Map, Pen or Pencil, and a Radio, Operators are able to record and call in enemy movements, talk with each other in code, and relay radio traffic in a standardized uniformed fashion that is understood by all USJTF Forces. Standards: Operators are able to use the radio with all procedures and have a general understanding of all reports and use of call signs and code words given over the radio by ALL members of the USJTF. ENGLISH is the only official language that can be used on USJTF radio network except for members of the Fifth Division. Fifth Division members CAN use their local language outside the United States when working in their home countries but must use English when working with USJTF forces in the United States.

How to work a Radio Follow the four golden rules of Radio conversation. Clarity: Your message should be clear enough. Speak slower than normal speed so that people can understand you better, do not shout. Simplicity: Your message should be simple for everyone to understand. Brevity: Your message should be precise and to the point (give max info in a short period of time). Security: Follow the security procedures; do not transmit confidential information on the radio. Important: Remove all roger beeps, check all batteries before use, carry extra batteries for your radios, and wear a headset if possible to eliminate noise (If you can’t silence them to the most minimal noise possible). All radios MUST BE CHECKED for full power, working order, and silencing methods BEFORE exiting the start AREA! Using the radio is not like talking on the phone, it is a two-way communication, meaning you cannot speak and listen at the same time or break into the conversation. NEVER interrupt if you hear other people talking. Patiently wait until their conversation is finished unless it is an emergency, in which case you must inform the other parties that you have a very urgent emergency message. Do not respond to others' calls if you aren't sure it is for you. Never transmit sensitive or confidential information in a radio communication, it could be heard by anyone on the same frequency.


SUPPORTING TASK ONE: Memorize the phonetic alphabet BELOW as you will have to use it in your conversations. Following is a table showing the international phonetics used for the alphabet.

Example: If you spelled AIRSOFT over the radio it would sound like Alpha, India, Romeo, Sierra, Oscar, Foxtrot, Tango. Use this to code or make messages more clear in sending. SUPPORTING TASK TWO: Team Call-Signs In wartime, monitoring an adversary's communications can be a valuable form of intelligence. Consistent call signs can aid in this monitoring, so in wartime, military units often employ tactical call signs and sometimes change them at regular intervals. In peacetime, some military stations will use fixed call signs in the international series. Tactical call signs, when used properly by well-trained and practiced operators, can prevent confusion, save a great amount of time, and also aid in making a net or operation run smoothly and efficiently BY IDENTIFYING THE UNIT OR PERSON THAT NEEDS TO BE CALLED OR WHO IS CALLING. When used improperly, or with poorly-trained and inexperienced operators, they will usually cause delays and confusion. The USJTF uses MODIFIED radio procedures adopted by the U.S. Army. All USJTF Teams are required to use the same series of call-signs to relay radio traffic in a standardized and uniformed fashion. Examples of the Team call-signs procedures are the following:

COMMAND ELEMENT (Example here: Viper is the Team Name SUB your company name to complete yours) VIPER 6 - VIPER TEAM COMMANDER VIPER 6R (SIX ROMEO) – VIPER TEAM RADIO OPERATOR VIPER 5 - VIPER TEAM EXECUTIVE OFFICER VIPER 7- VIPER TEAM FIRST SERGEANT


FIRST STRIKE GROUP VIPER 1 – STRIKE GROUP LEADER VIPER 1S (ONE SIERRA) – STRIKE GROUP SERGEANT FIRST STRIKE GROUP - ALPHA TEAM VIPER 1A (ONE ALPHA) - ALPHA TEAM LEADER VIPER 11 - RIFLEMAN VIPER 12 - DESIGNATED MARKSMAN VIPER 13 - SUPPORT GUNNER FIRST STRIKE GROUP - BRAVO TEAM VIPER 1B (ONE BRAVO) - BRAVO TEAM LEADER VIPER 14 - RIFLEMAN VIPER 15 - DESIGNATED MARKSMAN VIPER 16 - SUPPORT GUNNER

SECOND STRIKE GROUP VIPER 2 – STRIKE GROUP LEADER (2LT) VIPER 2S (TWO SIERRA) – STRIKE GROUP SERGEANT (SSG) SECOND STRIKE GROUP - ALPHA TEAM VIPER 2A (TWO ALPHA) - ALPHA TEAM LEADER VIPER 21 - RIFLEMAN VIPER 22 - DESIGNATED MARKSMAN VIPER 23 - SUPPORT GUNNER SECOND STRIKE GROUP - BRAVO TEAM VIPER 2B (TWO BRAVO) - BRAVO TEAM LEADER VIPER 24 - RIFLEMAN VIPER 25 - DESIGNATED MARKSMAN VIPER 26 - SUPPORT GUNNER


Important point: More Strike Groups can be added to the UNIT by adding “3 or 4” in front of the callsigns however they will hold the same configuration. Call signs will be used at all times. No “handles, nicknames, or real names” are authorized on the battle net at any time. Higher ranking formations such as Brigades, Divisions, and the USJTF also use call-signs to identify themselves on the radio such as (EXAMPLE: USJTF 6 “USJTF Commander” and USJTF 7 “USJTF Command Sergeant Major”). They hold the same numerical standards as Company leadership above.

SUPPORTING TASK THREE: USJTF radio reports Communications between land and air forces of the USJTF are critical in the coordination of both large and small groups of airsoft forces. All USJTF teams will follow the standard guidelines below for

radio reports. The formats are the following and can be used at the individual to command level:

1) SITUATION Report: Called by your unit or higher to determine what you have available by a percentage or by individual leaders to tell higher what they have available. This gives leaders a key indication of their strengths in troops, weapons, and ammunition. Situation Report Example (You in black (VIPER 1), person receiving (VIPER 6R) in red) (DO

NOT SAY LINE used for reference)

LINE 1: VIPER 6 ROMEO this is VIPER 1 SITREP Follows, OVER

LINE 2: Roger, VIPER 1 Send your traffic, OVER

LINE 3: Roger, Location GRID G4, Personnel Green, Equipment Green, Ammo Green, OVER

LINE 4: VIPER 1, this is VIPER 6 ROMEO, Roger I copy, Continue mission, OVER

LINE 5: This is VIPER 1, Roger, OUT Status Symbols your strength in each subject by percentage Green (100-75%), Yellow (74-50%), Red (49-25%), Black (24-00%)


2) SALUTE Report: When reporting any intelligence information to Headquarters or other USJTF Units the S.A.L.U.T.E. format should always be used. This will ensure all information is accurate and complete.

S=SIZE of enemy force. Actual numbers if possible. A=ACTIVITIES of the enemy. (If moving, give direction and method of transportation. Take your time. Be specific. Include small details, even if they seem insignificant.) L=LOCATION. Use the USJTF Map Grid Coordinates, or clear description. U=UNIT IDENTIFICATION. (Markings, symbols, uniforms, vehicles, or Team Patches. Don't give up until you are sure about this one...) T=TIME and DATE of sighting. Give the current Military 24hr time or am/pm. E=EQUIPMENT carried by the enemy. (To include: type weaponry, webgear, electronics, night vision, body armor, vehicles, tents, etc.) SALUTE Report Example (You in black (VIPER 1), person receiving (VIPER 6R) in red) (DO NOT

SAY LINE used for reference)

LINE 1: VIPER 6 ROMEO this is VIPER 1 SALUTE report follows, OVER

LINE 2: VIPER 1, this is VIPER 6 ROMEO, send your report, OVER LINE 3: Roger,(Size), (Activity) (Location),(Unit)(Time),(Equipment),OVER LINE 4: This is VIPER 6 ROMEO, I copy, continue mission, OVER LINE 5: This is VIPER 1, roger, OUT

IMPORTANT: Before you send the SALUTE message write it all down so it is clear, sent fast through the radio, and has all the information desired. Also on line 3 do not stop sending unless the receiver asks you to repeat a certain segment of information.


3) Contact Report: You have made contact with the enemy and you need to call back your report to higher headquarters (DO NOT SAY LINE used for reference) Contact Report Example (You in black (VIPER 1), person receiving (VIPER 6R) in red)

LINE 1: VIPER 6 ROMEO this is VIPER 1 contact report, engaging troops north of Grid Bravo six, Over!

LINE 2: VIPER 1 this is VIPER 6 ROMEO, roger, OUT

During the fight you will send further details when you can to the command on the following 1) Number of troops in area and location (Enemy) 2) Your situation and progress 3) Report if you are breaking contact or need backup After the firefight send a SITREP to command to tell them your Units status.

SUPPORTING TASK FOUR: “FLASH” Traffic FLASH is designated for commanders of Companies and above. When “FLASH, FLASH, FLASH” is called on the net all USJTF radio traffic will stop to listen to the message until complete. This is for Command Broadband communications ONLY!

SUPPORTING TASK FIVE: USJTF Alternate and contingency signals Although we rely primarily on radio communications, all USJTF members must be prepared to institute alternate and contingency signal methods. The USJTF SOP states the following alternate and contingency signals. Alternate Signals: Hand and arm signals designated by the team SOP Whistle blasts Use of TAC lights, chemlights, and signal mirrors for signaling Contingency Signals: Challenge and passwords, Verbal communications.


Whistle Blasts: While in contact, the order for shift fire is 1 whistle blast, lift fire is 2 whistle blasts, fall back is three whistle blasts In an ambush position, the contingency signal for commencing fire is 1 whistle blast, 2 whistle blasts to assault through, and three whistle blasts to fall back.

Verbal Communications: While in contact, the order for shift fire is “Shift fire Left, Right”, lift fire is “lift fire”, and fall back is “Orange” When flanking right, the order “Flank BLUE” is given. When flanking left the order “Flank RED” is given In an ambush position, the contingency signal for commencing fire is “commence fire”, assault through is “Assault through”, and to fall back is “Orange”.

TAC Lights and Chemlights: When necessary, members will use their TAC lights to signal friendly elements and inform them of their positions. This will be sent by flashing the individual once, and the receiver will confirm with two flashes Chemlights will be used at night in the same fashion. This will be sent by flashing the individual once with the chemlight, and the receiver will confirm with two flashes of the chemlight.

Challenge and Password: The enemy may come from any direction, especially when you are engaged in Airsoft operations and might try to mix and intermingle with your group to try to sneak in friendly lines. Keep watch in all directions at all times. Halt and identify personnel you do not know or have a definite indication that they are friendly before they are close enough to be a danger to you. This precaution is even more important at night and during periods of poor visibility such as heavy fog. A challenge and password is two words that DO NOT relate to each other (Example BLUE, MOON) and will be given to you by your chain of command for games and events. DO NOT FORGET THE TWO WORDS! To use the challenge and password if you are the challenger you say in this example BLUE, if the person you are responding to is friendly in this case he or she will say MOON. If you are being challenged you will hear the word BLUE which you respond by saying MOON. Use challenge and password at any time when you cannot identify if the person is enemy or friendly!


Performance steps 1. In a classroom setting teach the students the four golden rules of Radio conversation and silencing/Operations procedures. If necessary teach them how to use team radios. 2. Memorize the phonetic alphabet with the students until understood. 3. Review and if necessary adopt Tactical call signs by USJTF SOP for your team until understood. 4. Review and practice all three USJTF Radio Reports until understood. 5. Review and practice Alternate and Contingency Signals until understood. 6. Review Challenge and Password procedures until understood.

Evaluation Preparation: Set up two tables one for the operators (2) using the radios and one for the receiving end out of earshot acting as higher using radios. If you require the Operator to write the reports provide paper and pen or pencil. Talk through all radio procedures as in real time and then have the operators explain USJTF alternate and contingency signals. BRIEF OPERATORS: You will now go through the testing phase of USJTF Communications procedures. Performance Measures

GO

NO GO

1. Operator has a full understanding of the four golden rules of the Radio

_______

_______

2. Operator has a full understanding of silencing procedures and operation

_______

_______

3. Operator has a full understanding of the phonetic alphabet

_______

_______

4. Operator has a full understanding of the USJTF Call-sign Format

_______

_______

5. Operator has a Conducted a full SITREP Report successfully

_______

_______

6. Operator has a Conducted a full SALUTE Report successfully

_______

_______

7. Operator has a Conducted a full CONTACT Report successfully

_______

_______

8. Operator has a full understanding of the alternate and contingency signals

_______

_______

9. Operator has a full understanding of “Flash� Traffic

_______

_______

10. Operator has a Conducted a full Challenge and Password successfully

_______

_______

Evaluation Guidance: Score the Operator GO if all performance measures are passed. Score the Operator NO GO if any performance measure is failed. If an Operator scores a NO GO, show him or her what was done wrong and how to do it correctly until shown that the Operator can accomplish the task.


USJTF Battle Drill 12 (Standardized Communication Procedures)