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Triangle

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020

Arts &

ARCHITECTURE

PLUS:

IN THE STUDIO WITH EMILY ANNE FARRELL COLOR CRUSH: CHARTREUSE


contents

February / March 2020

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DETAIL ORIENTED Builder Rudy Upton and designer Jennifer Frost team up to construct and design a family’s dream home on a private lot inside the beltline.

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THE BOLD & THE BEAUTIFUL Transplants from San Francisco hire designer Lindsay Speace to renovate their traditional home in Raleigh, bringing in art, color, and pattern.

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FRESH START Designer Susan Tollefsen works with a newly married couple to update their ’90s home, seamlessly merging pieces and styles to create a dramatic transformation.

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LEFT: DUSTIN PECK; RIGHT: CATHERINE NGUYEN

features

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DESIGN FOR THE TRADE CHARLOTTE 2122 Freedom Drive, Suite A Charlotte, NC 28208 704.358.0277

RALEIGH 1405 Capital Blvd Raleigh, NC 27603 919.832.5555

ahokelimited.com


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CULTURE Looking for an artistic escape? We scoured the Triangle culture scene to find this season’s must-see exhibitions. MARKET From painting to furniture-making, you’ll want to see these select pieces from true artisans who are bringing their craft to the masses. SPOTLIGHT Raleigh artist Emily Anne Farrell’s creative journey began as a child during a time-out, and she continues to delight in bringing joy and making spaces a little bit brighter.

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DESIGN BOARD Designer Jessie Short believes that nothing should be too precious. She shares her inspirations and her design approach.

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KITCHEN COLOR TRENDS Ready to give your kitchen a fresh look? Markraft Cabinets shares the kitchen color trends on the horizon.

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RECYCLE, REUSE, RESTORE Invest in the local community by donating to Habitat for Humanity ReStores—and also shop for unique, one-of-a-kind finds.

PALETTE Packing a powerful punch, the avant-garde and unconventional hue of chartreuse is a most confident and lively color choice.

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contributor 86

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BUILDING A BETTER HOME: Jon Rufty Whistle While You Work

spotlight 10 90 94

FROM THE EDITOR ARTS AND CULTURE SPOTLIGHT ADVERTISER INDEX

LEFT: ANNA ROUTH; RIGHT: GEOFF WOOD.

dwell

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On the Cover: Employing her love of art, colors, and patterns, designer Lindsay Speace transforms a traditional Raleigh home into a bold and beautiful space (page 52).

T

here’s something about change that’s exciting. Perhaps it’s the anticipation of what’s to come that is terrifying yet exhilarating. As we enter into this new year, we also welcome a new decade, a new era. I find myself trying to get out of the smog of maternity leave and back into the work groove—old routines but with new approaches. And don’t we all want to evolve into better people? Whether quitting a bad habit or starting a good one, it’s this idea that we can change into a superior version of ourselves that excites us. For me, this issue is bittersweet, as I will be taking a back seat from my role as editor in chief. While it’s been a thrill to be at the helm, I must now pass the torch to more capable hands (hands that aren’t changing three sets of diapers at a time!). So don’t be surprised if you see my name in future issues. Sometimes it’s hard to let go! With that said, it’s not always easy to do the things we strive to do. Finding the inspiration is what helps to motivate us. In this year’s annual Arts & Architecture Issue, we set out to discover the beauty that surrounds us, to discover what inspires. Throughout our pages, we highlight some of the city’s most inspirational people, places, products, and events. When artist Emily Anne Farrell began painting again, she found herself back where she started, and she continues to create beauty and joy in each piece (page 26). It’s always uplifting to see people you know achieve success. For Raleigh native Laura Park and Chapel Hill–based Liane Ricci, they’ve expanded their portfolios by transferring their designs into home goods (page 22). And what better place to view incredible work than in a museum? We highlight three exhibitions taking place this season that showcase some of the most interesting works around town (page 18). To build upon our past is to create new beauty. With the help of some of the city’s most talented designers, each of our featured homes is an embodiment of just that. Designer Susan Tollefsen had a unique opportunity to work with two of her previous clients, but this time they were married to each other. Tollefsen was able to transform the couple’s outdated home by using pieces from their past and incorporating new items, giving her clients a fresh start (page 66). Interior designer Jennifer Frost teamed with builder Rudy Upton to construct and design a family’s dream home filled with interesting architectural details throughout (page 40). And Lindsay Speace worked with California transplants to renovate their traditional home into one filled with vibrant color, art, and pattern to reflect her clients’ love for both new and old (page 52). Whatever goal you set for yourself this year, just remember, it’s the process, the journey that you should appreciate—not necessarily the result. Thank you all for your kind words and support over the years. It’s been an absolute privilege to represent the area’s design community. As I take a step back (but not too far back, as I will still be around), I will join you in anticipation of what’s to come. Cheers to a bright and beautiful future!

Ashley Hotham Cox Editor in Chief @ashleyhcox on Instagram

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PORTRAIT: CHRIS EDWARDS; ON THE COVER: BRIE WILLIAMS.

from the editor


X Yourself

E PRESS FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020

VOL 8 NO 1

Publishers Michael Mayer Susan V. Mayer

Editor in Chief Ashley Hotham Cox  Associate Editor Karin Simoneau

Photography Lissa Gotwals Catherine Nguyen Dustin Peck Brie Williams

Travel Editor Blake Miller Art Director Harriet McDowall PageCreations

5634 Durham Chapel Hill Blvd., Durham, NC

Beauty, Artistry & Tradition FOR OVER 40 YEARS

www.persiancarpet.com

Phone 704-585-8025

Email: comments@homedesigndecormag.com Website: www.homedesigndecormag.com

facebook.com/TriangleHDD

TurnYour Floor Into

AWORK OF ART

Contributor Jon Rufty

President Mark Herrmann Urban Home Publishing

Writers Anne Marie Ashley Virginia Brown Blake Miller Christina Spratt Spencer Dana W. Todd

e u q i Un

Production Support Stacy Long Cats Up Graphics

Sales Sue Mooney Cheryl Nelson

Creative Director Sarah Mann

Be

Production Coordinator Shelley Kemper

@homedesigndecor_triangle

All contents copyright 2020, Maps Media. Inc. and Urban Home Publishing Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part without the express written consent from publisher. Mention of any product or service does not constitute endorsement from Home Design & Decor® Magazine. The information contained in this publication is deemed reliable from third party sources, but not guaranteed. Maps Media. Inc. and Urban Home Publishing Inc. do not act as an agent for any of the advertisers in this publication. It is recommended that you choose a qualified remodeling, home furnishings or home improvement firm based on your own selection criteria. Maps Media. Inc., d.b.a. Triangle Home Design & Decor® Magazine, will not knowingly accept advertising for real estate which is a violation of the Fair Housing Act. All real estate advertising in Maps Media. Inc., d.b.a. Triangle Home Design & Decor® Magazine, is subject to the Fair Housing Act which states “We are pledged to the letter and spirit of U.S. policy for the achievement of equal housing opportunity throughout the nation. We encourage and support an affirmative advertising and marketing program in which there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Maps Media. Inc., d.b.a. Triangle Home Design & Decor® Magazine, does not act as an agent for any of the realtors or builders in this publication. It is recommended that you choose a qualified realtor to assist you in your new home purchase.

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This dinner

started here.

The Sub-Zero, Wolf, and Cove Showroom will help you create a kitchen that’s uniquely yours. On-site chefs, product experts, and inspiring designs will help you envision the possibilities for your home – and all of the delicious moments to come.

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dwell The people, places, and things that elevate your home and living

Photography by Lissa Gotwals.

Culture

Market

Spotlight

Palette

Design Board

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culture

CAPITAL CITY: INSPIRED Three must-see exhibitions in Raleigh this season.

FRONT BURNER: HIGHLIGHTS IN CONTEMPORARY NORTH CAROLINA PAINTING

NORTH CAROLINA MUSEUM OF ART A locally inspired exhibition opens in March at the North Carolina Museum of Art. Front Burner: Highlights in Contemporary North Carolina Painting features a sampling of the most relevant and engaging painting currently being made in the state. Featuring the work of twenty-five emerging, mid-career, and established artists, including Raleigh’s own Ashlynn Browning, Hannah Cole of Asheville, and Charlotte’s Carmen Neely, the exhibition showcases a wide variety of media and styles. ncartmuseum.org

Carmen Neely, In an Alternate Reality, 2018

Mario Marzan, Environmental Identities no. 5, 2016 Cynthia Bickley-Green, Entoptic Shapes/Downstream Animas, 2015

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: PHOTOGRAPHY BY SEAN FADER, COURTESY OF CARMEN NEELY AND JANE LOMBARD GALLERY; COURTESY OF MARIO MARZAN; COURTESY OF CYNTHIA BICKLEY-GREEN.

Written by Virginia Brown


culture

ALL THAT GLITTERS: SPARK AND DAZZLE FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION GREGG MUSEUM OF ART & DESIGN

RALEIGH FINE ARTS SOCIETY: NORTH CAROLINA ARTISTS EXHIBITION 2020 CONTEMPORARY ART MUSEUM RALEIGH

Don’t miss some of the state’s finest at the Raleigh Fine Arts Society as it presents the North Carolina Artists Exhibition 2020 in the Main Gallery of CAM Raleigh in March 2020. What started small in 1964 has evolved into the largest all-media juried exhibition in the state. With inspiring, contemporary works on display at the downtown exhibition space, CAM also offers receptions and talks with the artists, plus popular First Friday gallery walks. This year’s exhibition is juried by one-time North Carolinian Nat Trotman, who currently serves as curator of performance and media at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York. camraleigh.org

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROGER MANLEY. PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRIS CICCONE.

From the eye-catching churches of the Byzantine era to flashy Native American shell-adorned baskets and dance masks, plus the Rhinestone-clad nature of the Roaring ’20s and well beyond, it’s safe to say that throughout history our culture has been enamored with shiny, sparkly things. In January, the Gregg Museum of Art & Design features All That Glitters: Spark and Dazzle from the Permanent Collection, which includes shimmery pieces from the museum’s own collection. Aluminum dresses, a Burmese marionette doll, a fan fashioned from peacock feathers, and a holographic shirt from the ’90s all make appearances in this inventive exhibition. Bonus at the Gregg: The work of industrial and jewelry designer Mary Ann Scherr (who taught at the Craft Center at North Carolina State University and whose work is among the museum’s holdings) debuts in February. gregg.arts.ncsu.edu


6125 SIX FORKS ROAD | RALEIGH, NC 27609 919-230-8643 | WWW.SUMMERCLASSICS.COM


market

FROM ARTISTS TO ARTISANS When design studio Space Copenhagen embarked on their design journey, their mission was simple: to create duality in everything they produced. The Lunar Collection, designed for Stellar Works, is no exception, blending contemporary Nordic simplicity with ancient Chinese legend. The Lunar coffee table is made with solid-wood legs and stainless-steel caps plated in brass. The wood-veneer top is warm and oddly circular, giving instant familiarity and modernity to any space. stellarworks.com

Whether the form is painting, writing, textiles, or furniture-making, these artisans are true artists, bringing their craft and its many forms to the masses. Written by Anne Marie Ashley Produced by Ashley Hotham Cox

FRESH FRESCOS

When Chapel Hill–based artist Liane Ricci went to Vittorio Veneto, Italy, in 2016 to study traditional fresco painting, she came back with a renewed sense of purpose. Previously experienced in commissioned paintings, original designs for rugs and fabrics, and custom finishes and gold leafing for high-end furnishing companies, she opened Ricci Studio and shifted her gaze to handpainted wallcoverings. “My experience in Italy inspired me to translate my paintings into wallcoverings,” she explains. “In our digital age, I believe the synthetic can become overwhelming, and I’m attracted to designs that harken back to the touch of the human hand.” The collections from Ricci Studio are bold and expressive, with rich, soothing colors and oversized repeats. “I want to provide options that are art-driven and have the integrity of true craftsmanship. It’s imperative to me that my materials and processes meet high standards of environmental responsibility,” Ricci says. lianericci.com

GOING SHAGREEN

With sustainability at the forefront of its design process, EcoFirstArt produces only eco-friendly furniture, lighting, rugs, accents, and fine art. All pieces are made with some combination of reused products, recycled material, or ecologically sustainable resources, but made by skilled artisans with high design in mind. The St. Honore Writing Desk features Shagreen mixed with bronze and other exotic materials to create a one-of-a-kind piece inspired by the modern-vintage appeal of Art Deco architecture. ecofirstart.com

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF STELLAR WORKS; RICCI STUDIO PORTRAIT BY GEOFF WOOD; VIGNETTES COURTESY OF RICCI STUDIO; COURTESY OF ECOFIRSTART.

LUNAR LANDING


Boutique Drapery & Design Creating extraordinary window fashions throughout The Carolinas for 30 years.

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DECORDRAPERY.COM


market

DRUMROLL, PLEASE

— book club —

Raleigh native and artist Laura Park has teamed up with interior-design house Wildwood to literally illuminate her art with a new line of lamps and garden stools. Park’s playfully abstract yet sophisticated paintings are transferred easily to Wildwood’s sleek designs, coming to life in these beautiful pieces. With bright patterns and rich pastels, each piece is undoubtedly unique and equally eye catching. greenfront.com

CECIL BEATON: THE ART OF THE SCRAPBOOK

EASTERN ACCENTS

Roxy Te grew up amidst her family’s furniture factories in North Carolina, learning the business from soup to nuts and spending her falls and springs at High Point Market. Nearly forty years after growing up in those furniture factories, she is proud to continue that family tradition with her own next-level flair. In 2011, Te founded her own online marketplace, Society Social, selling a line of customized furniture. She led the charge for revitalizing the bamboo furniture trend, and today Society Social is one of the most recognized brands in the furniture industry. And now, Te has opened Society Social’s first brick and mortar, the new flagship in Charlotte. It’s full of color, patterns, and design—her brand “on steroids,” as Te puts it—and a perfect place to shop, sit, and pull up a chair at their pagoda bar. The design plan of her flagship store was catalyzed by New Yorkbased interior designer Sasha Bikoff, who is regaled for her use of color and an uncommon combination of styles. “Sasha was able to take the brand DNA and bring it to life,” Te says. “She’s over-the-top, and we knew she wouldn’t hold back. We already had a very strong sense of what the design should look like, so we were able to quickly work with Sasha in dreaming up colorful renderings. Our team took it from fabrics and paint selections to vetting and coordinating all our local and wonderful tradesmen and artisans to the final install.” shopsocietysocial.com

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MOMA NOW: 375 WORKS FROM THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK moma.org

WALLS OF CHANGE: THE STORY OF THE WYNWOOD WALLS assouline.com

GARDEN STOOLS: COURTESY OF WILDWOOD HOME; VIGNETTES: COURTESY OF SOCIETY SOCIAL; BOOKS: COURTESY OF ASSOULINE, MOMA, ASSOULINE.

assouline.com


spotlight

THE NATURAL One local Raleigh artist rediscovers a passion within her and allows it to take her in new directions. Written by Anne Marie Ashley Photography by Lissa Gotwals When Emily Anne Farrell was about six or seven, she was sent to time-out, as children often are. After a while, her Aunt Robbins came to check on her and discovered Emily finishing a beautiful crown she’d made for herself—full of color, different materials, and, above all, ingenuity. An artist herself, Aunt Robbins praised Farrell for her creation, and it was in that encouragement that Farrell found comfort in loving art. She even began learning the basics from her aunt. Instead of going outside to play, she would sit and craft, color, and paint. In time-outs, she would create. In math class, she would doodle. For gifts, she would craft. The creating made her feel calm, at home, and, most of all, herself. 26 HOME DESIGN & DECOR TRIANGLE | FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020

When she was accepted to North Carolina State University, Farrell wanted to apply to the graphic design program. But when she realized that she needed a full portfolio of work to present to get in, she opted for another major—after all, art was a passion, not necessarily a career path. So after high school, the creating, the crafting, and the painting faded into the background. “After I got married in 2011, I didn’t have the space to create, so I just didn’t,” Farrell says. About four years ago, however, Farrell felt that her home needed some art, so she commissioned two watercolors from her favorite local artist, Caroline Boykin. “Something about that


spotlight

process awakened something in me, and I wanted more art. I just didn’t have the wallet for it. I felt pulled to create it myself,” Farrell recalls. So she went to Jerry’s Artarama and picked up some canvases, went home and pulled out paints and brushes she hadn’t used in a decade—and she got to work. “The whole time I was painting, I think my husband thought I was nuts,” Farrell says. “He had no idea that was in me, and so he was sending pictures to my friends, saying, ‘Did you know she could do this?!’ All I got back was encouragement.” After a few months, Farrell wanted to get some unbiased reactions to her artwork, so she took to her Facebook “moms’ group” and posted images of all she’d been working on. “The group was largely focused on home decor, and mostly located in Charlotte, so I felt it was a safe space to post where not many people would know me if my work was horrible,” Farrell says. She sold all of her work in four days and got several commissions from strangers. “It was the perfect motivation I needed to keep going,” she says. And just like her Aunt Robbins, these people gave her space to find comfort in her artwork, to pursue it naturally. Her process, much like her passion, just comes to her. She begins by sketching out her piece with pencil or paint, just to get a starting point. From there, she layers acrylic paint and pastels. “I use acrylics because that’s all I knew, but now it’s practical because it dries fast,” Farrell laughs. “I added pastels for mark-making a while back, and earlier this year, I began using oil sticks. I love the texture they bring to my pieces.” She underpaints with “something 28 HOME DESIGN & DECOR TRIANGLE | FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020


spotlight

“I ENJOY THE SURPRISES THIS JOURNEY BRINGS ME.” —EMILY ANNE FARRELL fun” like hot pink, just to get warmed up, and from there, she paints “what feels right.” She adds, “It’s hard to know when to stop sometimes, but I’ve gotten better and more confident at making those decisions. The best is the butterfly feeling I get when I’m particularly happy with how something finished.” Farrell says her favorites change pretty regularly, but at the moment, it’s a piece called The Stories We Tell, which is on display now at ArtSource Fine Art in Raleigh, where Farrell is represented. “I love the colors and the style—it’s a bit different from my usual style, which I seem to be leaning into more,” Farrell explains. As for what’s next, any goal she has for her painting lies squarely and comfortably in just bringing joy. “I enjoy the outlet, but most of all, I love knowing I’m making someone’s space a little bit brighter and bringing some happy to the world for that person. I have no plans or expectations, and I’m OK with that,” Farrell shares. “I enjoy the surprises this journey brings me.” 30 HOME DESIGN & DECOR TRIANGLE | FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020


palette

CITRUSY CHARTREUSE The cast of limelight evokes a neon nostalgia in this stand-alone hue. Written by Christina Spratt Spencer

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Elizabeth Chequer Hendee of Chequer Interiors creates a chartreuse vignette at Lloyd and Ida Antiques’ “Celebration of Birds” event in Essex, Connecticut.

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1. Stray Dog Designs Arlo Chandelier / $1,995 / straydogdesigns.com 2. Schumacher Blair House Palm / to the trade / karensaks.com 3. Annie Selke Gemini Bowl / $488 / annieselke.com 4. Heath Ceramics Classic Field Tile / starting at $24 per square foot / heathceramics.com 5. Knoll Womb Chair / $4,034 / designwithinreach.com 6. Schumacher Betwixt / to the trade / karensaks.com

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY SHANE MALK.

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A mélange of lemon and lime, this electric elixir nearly glows with a sharp and brilliant tension that is impossibly invigorating in its vivacity. Its acidity is sharp, crisp, and cutting edge, making it fiercely attention-seeking in its truest potency yet still amiable and refreshingly lively. This avant-garde and unconventional hue is a powerhouse prima donna, always taking center stage. But, fear not, it plays well with an equally lively supporting cast like magenta, teal, or vermillion, or subdued charcoal gray, inky blue, or maroon. A slight tinge of more green quenches and placates, whereas an undertone of brown or gray can take this hue from lightning-bolt electric to ever-so-slightly earthy in its range while still maintaining its powerful punch. Chartreuse is, without a doubt, a most confident color choice.


Your house isn’t a home unless you make it your own.

(919) 460-8550 | www.Rufty.com


design board

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JESSIE Short 2

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1. Bunny Williams Home Pheasant Feather Lamp / $1,050 / bunnywilliamshome.com 2. Sister Parish Dolly Fabric in China Blue / to the trade / sisterparishdesign.com 3. Richard Ginori Oriente Italiano Malachite Platter / $193 / shopquintessentials.com 4. Byredo Tree House Candle / $85 / nordstrom.com 5. Union Camp Collective Antique Nesting Tables / $1,495 / chairish.com

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANNA ROUTH.

When it comes to design, nothing should ever be too precious, says designer Jessie Short of Oak City Interiors. “Kids and pets make a home just as much as furniture and pretty fabrics,” she says, “and they can all live together.” The elegant coupling of functionality with style and sophisticated design is Short’s calling card. Her mantra: “A house is meant to be lived in, not looked at.” “Lately, I have been really inspired by English homes. Often referred to as the ‘insouciant home,’ they embody the idea that you should not be afraid to live in your home.” How does she achieve the delicate balance between everyday living and elegant interior design? “I embrace the imperfections. When everything is new and shiny, you lose a little bit of soul.” This explains why the designer loves pieces that weather and age gracefully over the years. “I am drawn to finishes that get better with time, like unlacquered brass, marble, and pine floors,” she says, adding that she looks for inspiration in “old design books from ParishHadley and Elsie de Wolfe.” No matter what the project or who the client, though, Short always maintains the same approach: “The goal is to make everything warm and inviting.”


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CASE GOODS, UPHOLSTERY, LIGHTING, ACCESSORIES, RUGS AND OBJETS DE VERTU!


Home Design

Photography by Brie Williams.

Detail Oriented

The Bold & The Beautiful

Fresh Start

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DETAIL ORIENTED A RALEIGH FAMILY HIRES DREAM TEAM BUILDER RUDY UPTON AND INTERIOR DESIGNER JENNIFER FROST TO BUILD THEIR HOME INSIDE THE BELTLINE.

Interior Design by Jennifer Frost |Text by Anne Marie Ashley | Photography by Dustin Peck 40 HOME DESIGN & DECOR TRIANGLE | FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020


The family room is built for comfort. Ceiling details were designed by interior designer Jennifer Frost of JSF Designs, LLC, and a sectional by Vanguard is kid-friendly with a comfortable Crypton fabric. A custom rug by Stark Carpet grounds the space, and artwork from Art & Frame Source completes the room.

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Designed by Frost and her team, this curved floating-glass rail staircase greets guests with impact. Grid-patterned molding on the walls and a chevronpatterned hardwood floor add drama to the space. OPPOSITE: Frost added dimensional molding to the hallway wall leading to the master bedroom and painted it the same color as the wall for added texture. A cabinet from Bernhardt Interiors adds presence to the space, and sconces from Visual Comfort light the way.

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hen interior designer Jennifer Frost of JSF Designs, LLC teamed with builder Rudy Upton of Upton & Co. for the Parade of Homes in 2016, they won the silver in the category of homes between $1.3 and $1.4 million. Their chemistry was undeniable, which created a magic that earned them the recognition they needed to place in the Parade of Homes that year. Flash forward to 2018, and the pair teamed up again to help a family build their

dream home, one just under 8,000 square feet on a large lot inside the beltline. Having seen Frost’s work and discovering the award-winning team, the clients requested that the duo unite again to work with them. “The couple has three children and already lived in the area,” Frost says, “so they purchased this private lot and asked Rudy and me to help design and construct their new home.” Over the next eighteen months, they all worked together to make it happen. Frost immediately started by tweaking the chosen floorplan a little to create more FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 | HOME DESIGN & DECOR TRIANGLE 43


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Custom built-ins designed by Frost, along with custom-designed ceiling details, create a truly sophisticated and original office space for the homeowner. Bookcases painted in Sherwin-Williams Gauntlet Gray provide a moody and masculine feel, while Interlude Home ottomans add modernity. OPPOSITE: Sherwin-Williams Black Magic paint covers the custom vanity in the pool bathroom. A double thickness countertop with a stone pattern adds some extra oomph, while mixed metal fixtures and hardware create interest.

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 | HOME DESIGN & DECOR TRIANGLE 45


functional spaces for the family and choosing fixtures, finishes, and exterior selections. “They wanted big impacts in subtle ways, and every room had to have a memory point,” Frost says. “I pulled this off with a mix of fine details and a few wow factors.” The fine details can be found in moldings and ceiling features in many rooms. “People often forget about the ceiling details, but I find they add so much unexpected interest and beauty to a room,” Frost says. “I love the stained wood recess above the breakfast table and the beams and herringbone pattern in the office.” 46 HOME DESIGN & DECOR TRIANGLE | FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020

Aside from the unexpected details, Frost also designed and presented a few big-impact elements, particularly in the foyer. A staircase with floating-glass rail walls is paired with rich hardwood floors laid in a chevron pattern for added interest. “Many people with small children might flinch at all that glass on the staircase—just the thought of having to keep it clean—but the homeowner loved it so much and couldn’t resist the beauty it added to her home,” Frost states. Though everything had to be kid-approved and family functional, Frost was able to bring the home to life with


interesting fabrics, luxurious architectural details (with the help of Upton, of course), and plenty of pretty, yet practical, layering. “Every bathroom has its own custom-designed cabinetry, which I was able to draw up,” Frost explains. “Plus, I connected my clients with an art vendor I work with and got some pretty, but subtle, art for layering. They aren’t big collectors, so we kept it low-key, but beautiful.” Working with mostly neutrals, Frost used a combination of black, white, neutrals, and navy while mixing metals, adding gold touches where she could. “The homeowner

LEFT: Countertops in the kitchen are covered in double-thickness quartzite that were sourced from ROCKin’teriors. Pendants from Circa Lighting add presence over the island, and bar stools are covered in vinyl fabric from Kravet for easy care. Frost designed a custom hood for the range, adding a dose of architectural detail. RIGHT: Frost designed a custom stained-wood ceiling above the table in the breakfast room, one of her favorites in the home. Chairs from Bernhardt Interiors surround a mahogany breakfast table from Noir. Circa Lighting and artwork from Wendover Art Group complete the room.

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 | HOME DESIGN & DECOR TRIANGLE 47


In the master bedroom, simple ceiling details add a touch of interest. A pair of hair-on-hide nightstands from Bernhardt Interiors flank the bed, with Robert Abbey lamps perched atop. Frost’s team created the bolster pillow on the bed with fabric from Romo. OPPOSITE: The master bathroom creates a spa-like atmosphere with a walk-in shower adjacent to a stand-alone tub. The statement wall features tile from Triangle Tile & Stone and artwork from Wendover Art Group.

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wanted a tailored look with a mixing of textures. She also wanted to incorporate gold accents wherever possible, so I tried to do it in a way that would stand the test of time,” Frost says. She always tries to mix metals in her designs because it gives a home a layered and lived-in look, especially when paired with texture and layers. “It really brings a room to life, so that it doesn’t fall flat.” The finished home truly speaks to what makes Frost such an interesting designer: an appreciation for architecture and historical architectural details combined with a clean, tailored, and sophisticated aesthetic joined in the same space.

Having lived in Chicago for many years and traveled quite a lot, she likes to bring that inspiration home to her projects and carries the interesting details she finds among the buildings back home to client residences. “I love mixing historical styles with tailored and simple looks,” she says. “I think less is more, and I don’t like a lot of fuss. Larger pieces can bring such a presence to a room without much ado. Don’t be afraid to be bold, even in small doses. Mixing patterns, textures, metals—go for something personal and different.” u

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THE BOLD & THE BEAUTIFUL TRANSPLANTS FROM SAN FRANCISCO ESTABLISH ROOTS IN RALEIGH AND ENLIST HELP FROM DESIGNER LINDSAY SPEACE TO BRING A TOUCH OF THE BOLD AND THE BEAUTIFUL TO THE EAST COAST.

Interior Design by Lindsay Speace | Text by Anne Marie Ashley | Photography by Brie Williams | Styling by Kendra Surface


The bold blue kitchen was a standout with a patterned backsplash from Walker Zanger. Pendants from Niermann Weeks for Visual Comfort add presence to the kitchen island, and barstools covered in custom Cowtan & Tout fabric round out the space. PREVIOUS PAGE: In the entry, a gallery wall of art, all collected by the homeowner, carries your eye from piece to piece. A console table with inlaid bone detail was snagged from Hunt & Gather, and the vintage lamp and mirror are from the homeowner’s collection.

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hen Kate Boes and her husband, Matthew, moved from San Francisco to Raleigh in 2009, they decided to rent a space for a year to get acquainted with the city and its varied neighborhoods. It didn’t take long for them to fall in love with the area, and in 2010 they purchased a home just a mile from their rental that checked all the boxes. The traditional Georgian home had great interior bones, a nice-sized lot, plenty of space for a growing family (they were three months away from having their first child), and a garage—a sticking point for her husband. The home was on a quiet tree-lined street in a cul-de-sac, and it was still close to downtown, which pretty much made it the perfect home for the Boeses and their new baby. When her previous designer went on hiatus, Boes was connected with Lindsay Speace, a local interior designer with a love for colors and patterns. “I scoured her website and Pinterest boards, and after about ten minutes, I knew she would be

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 | HOME DESIGN & DECOR TRIANGLE 55


a perfect designer for us. A brief phone call only sealed the deal—we instantly connected, and her calm, confident tone made me feel calm and confident in her,” Boes says. “Kate and I were on the same page pretty much from the get-go,” Speace says. “We share a love of art, color, and beautiful textiles. In so many ways, it was a dream project.” The pair worked together to envision impactful, layered spaces, and Boes encouraged her designer to be bold with the selections. “Design concepts can be watered down in the process, which I can understand because taking risks can be 56 HOME DESIGN & DECOR TRIANGLE | FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020

scary,” Speace explains. “But this project was the opposite. We both pushed each other, and we can’t be more thrilled with the result.” The Boeses took their time getting comfortable in their home and welcoming their new baby into the world. In 2016, Speace began working on their design and enlisted the help of architect Carter Skinner to flesh out architectural changes. Renovating the kitchen was a top priority. The space occupied by the original kitchen was transformed to include a butler’s pantry and a wet bar. Large cased


openings were added between the living, kitchen, and dining rooms. This created an expansive feeling while still maintaining separate rooms, which, in turn, allowed Speace to be bolder in her selections than in an open-concept floor plan. The design process began, as it always does, with Speace pulling samples of anything and everything that excited her and felt authentic to her clients. After some editing, a cohesive theme began to take place. With the rest of the home shaping up to be so richly saturated, the kitchen needed to hold its own. Speace sourced a

LEFT: Grasscloth wallcoverings from Phillip Jeffries add texture to the living room, and drapery fabric from Carleton V brings a punch of color. The custom sofa is covered in John Robshaw fabric, paired with custom chairs covered in St. Frank fabric. A Madeline Weinrib rug sits underfoot, paying homage to the draperies, while a Coleen & Company lantern calls to the furnishings. RIGHT: Antique chairs reupholstered in Kravet leather surround the dining-room table. The chandelier from Visual Comfort creates some drama, a rug from Stark Carpet adds texture to the room, and art that the homeowners commissioned provides interest.

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A painting by Laura Deems hangs above an heirloom chinoiserie desk from the homeowner. OPPOSITE: Speace designed the tile floor pattern in the foyer and butler’s pantry, choosing tile from Mirth Studio. Bright Schumacher wallcovering matches the custom-painted cabinetry.

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gorgeous hand-painted tile for the backsplash that became the catalyst for the rest of the kitchen. “To complement the tile, I selected a deep blue for the cabinetry,” Speace explains. “The kitchen gets a ton of natural light, which keeps it feeling open and airy, even with the darker color.” To make the counter stools extra family-friendly, Speace had a lamination treatment applied to the light-blue ticking stripe prior to upholstery.

The space gained from expanding the footprint of the kitchen allowed for renovations on the second floor of the home. A spacious bath and walk-in closet were added to the master suite, and the homeowners’ youngest daughter acquired a larger bedroom and bathroom. Speace knew she wanted to highlight the Boeses’ fantastic art collection, as well as their chinoiserie antiques inherited from Boes’ grandmother. As she was out antiquing or FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 | HOME DESIGN & DECOR TRIANGLE 59


traveling, Speace would pick up pieces she had an “inkling” Boes would love and bring them back to show her. “Kate and I are both collectors, so accessorizing the home came very organically,” Speace says. In the living room, Speace used a playful mix of color and pattern. “I started by bringing texture to the walls with a neutral raffia wallcovering,” she says. “On the floor, a sisal rug acts as the foundation for the room with a striped 60 HOME DESIGN & DECOR TRIANGLE | FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020

Madeline Weinrib dhurrie layered on top.” A classic tuxedostyle sofa covered in a blue-and-white John Robshaw fabric floats in the room and pulls in the kitchen colors, just beyond. A pair of comfortable swivel chairs can easily be turned to watch the television, and a Coleen & Company lantern in a verdigris finish tops off the space. The resulting new multipurpose room off the kitchen that now includes a butler’s pantry and a wet bar is also the family’s


Opposites attract in the den, with both chairs covered in specially chosen fabrics from Kerry Joyce and Brunschwig & Fils. Drapery fabric from TylerGraphic adds another layer of pattern. OPPOSITE: A bold blue Poppy wallcovering makes a statement in the powder room, paired with a mirror from Bungalow 5 and art by Renee Bouchon.

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A vintage rug grounds this eclectic and cozy office, leather chairs from the homeowner offer a place to perch while playing guitar, and Roman shades in Penny Morrison fabric add a touch of sophistication. OPPOSITE: Quadrille wallcovering and draperies in the daughter’s bedroom take things from boring to fun in an instant. A mix of colors and patterns keeps things interesting while a capiz chandelier adds a touch of sophistication.

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main point of entry to the home, and a room from which several other rooms shoot off—here, Speace was directed to be most creative. “From the outset, Kate and Matthew wanted this space to be a showstopper, and I really ran with it,” Speace says. “We landed on a patterned floor, lacquered millwork with antiqued mirror, and the most beautiful vining chinoiserie wallcovering.” The patterned floor proved to be a challenge for Speace, but one that she mastered. She designed a custom hexagonal pattern with sixteen wood floor tiles, which she laid out and had installed. “It was challenging, but it

completely makes the space,” she says. She finished the space with an unexpected pop of modernity and color in a yellow tie-dye fabric for the skirted table. “I love every room, but this one is my very favorite,” Boes says of the butler’s pantry. “It’s bold and packs a serious punch, from the chinoiserie wallpaper and teal-lacquered cabinets to the antique mirror backsplash and thick walnut countertops—and, of course, that floor! It’s a perfect blend of masculine and feminine—exactly what we wanted to achieve.” u FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 | HOME DESIGN & DECOR TRIANGLE 63


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Tollefsen transformed the one-time beige dining room with a metallic Cowtan & Tout grasscloth wallcovering and a Kate Spade dining table. A burl-wood sideboard, Visual Comfort chandelier, and Charles Stewart chairs swathed in a contemporary velvet dot fabric by Osborne & Little complete the look.

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FRESH START DESIGNER SUSAN TOLLEFSEN TRANSFORMS A DATED ’90S HOME INTO A COMFORTABLE AND SOPHISTICATED MODERN SPACE.

Interior Design by Susan Tollefsen | Text by Blake Miller | Photography by Catherine Nguyen FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 | HOME DESIGN & DECOR TRIANGLE 67


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t was a unique situation for Susan Tollefsen. The Raleigh-based interior designer was enlisted to help a newly married couple overhaul their new home. Only this time, Tollefsen had worked with each spouse separately on their homes before they were married. “It was a project that involved meshing different aesthetics together to create one cohesive look,” she says. “I had helped the wife on three previous projects before I worked on the husband’s townhome in downtown Raleigh.” That previous experience with both clients on an individual basis proved to be beneficial to the designer. “Most women don’t love what their husband brings to the table in terms of design,” Tollefsen laughs. “But in this case, since I’d previously worked on the husband’s home, it made it much easier to combine things gracefully.” But before Tollefsen could even start installing any interior design, she had to update a lot of the spaces. The home, which the couple had chosen for its proximity to downtown, was dated and in dire need of updating. “The home was built in the late ’90s, so it had cherry cabinets and light oak flooring throughout,” Tollefsen says. “The goal was to go in and customize the home as best we could 68 HOME DESIGN & DECOR TRIANGLE | FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020


The breakfast dining area consists mainly of pieces from the husband’s previous residence, including the Worlds Away chairs. Tollefsen accessorized with an Arteriors candelabra and a Visual Comfort chandelier. OPPOSITE: A Lucite console in the foyer was purchased from Darnell & Company in Charlotte. The stools underneath were custom made to be table height with casters on the bottom so they could be used for extra seating in the dining room.

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RIGHT: In keeping with the mid-century modern vibe in the back den, Tollefsen added the round burl-wood side table she purchased at auction. The pair of Lucite side tables are from Interlude Home, and the lamps are from Visual Comfort.

without doing anything structurally.” To that end, the floors were refinished and stained a darker color and the walls throughout painted white versus the original beige. Tollefsen also hired Robert Corprew to paint all of the doors and kitchen cabinets in Benjamin Moore White Dove to “make them feel fresh and new.” Elsewhere, Tollefsen removed the chair rail because there was an excessive amount of it, then painted the stair rail. “It gave us a solid foundation to start incorporating the furniture, artwork, and accessories.” From that point, the design was about combining both the husband’s and the wife’s existing pieces to create a seamless, sophisticated look. “I had always been involved with antiques as an antique collector and dealer,” the wife says. “Slowly, I started to sell off those pieces and move toward a more contemporary look and feel. I like the clean, modern style. Susan was helpful in guiding me and showing me various things that were mid-century modern and how they could work in our home.” In the main living room, Tollefsen reworked some of the wife’s existing pieces to make the space more conducive to entertaining. “It’s a really small space, so that 70 HOME DESIGN & DECOR TRIANGLE | FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020


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To ensure that the master bedroom was calm and soothing, Tollefsen kept the color palette neutral and the room light and bright. A Made Goods mirrored headboard reflects light into the space. OPPOSITE: Tollefsen added a Made Goods chest of drawers to the master bedroom to complement the other transitional touches such as the sunburst mirror.

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whole area was tricky,” she says. “But I think the way we laid it out, it’s very cozy and comfortable. It doesn’t feel cramped. The thing most people probably would’ve tried to do is neutralize the color palette to keep the room open. But it is such a small space that I took the viewpoint that you should make it interesting for that very reason.” A vintage coffee table, a Kravet sofa, and a pair of Schumacher chairs were given new life with throw pillows in bold patterns and colors by Schumacher and Manuel Canovas. Originally a bedroom, the back room was transformed into another den area using the husband’s mid-century modern pieces from his previous residence. “A lot of those pieces had a vintage vibe to them, so that’s what dictated the design we went with,” Tollefsen says. She scooped up the vintage round burl-wood table at auction, and the lamps are from Visual Comfort. The Lucite coffee tables by Interlude Home add a dose of modernity to the space. By making slight changes to the architectural details and finishes of the home, Tollefsen was able to transform a once-dated ’90s home into a more modern, comfortable space for the couple. “It truly was a dramatic transformation,” Tollefsen says. Adds the homeowner, “Susan is just so talented. She took something that wasn’t great and turned it into something remarkable.” u FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 | HOME DESIGN & DECOR TRIANGLE 73


Resources

Photography by Dustin Peck.

Kitchen Color Trends

Recycle, Reuse, ReStore

Contributor

Arts and Culture Spotlight

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Featured Advertiser Editorial

DECORATING

KITCHEN COLOR TRENDS The tried-and-true now mixed with black and blue. Written by Dana W. Todd

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hite and gray kitchens with chrome or nickel finishes have been a constant in the design world for a few years now. That isn’t changing, according to designer Rachel Booth of Markraft Cabinets, but new

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trends on the horizon will cause a subtle shift in kitchen color schemes. Booth says bolder colors like blue and black are making their way to base cabinets, such as those that anchor kitchen islands and show up in smaller “showcase” powder rooms. It’s no surprise consumers are in love with blue. Pantone named Classic Blue as its 2020 Color of the Year, and


“OUR DESIGNERS WILL HELP HOMEOWNERS WITH PRODUCT SELECTION AND CUSTOM DESIGN, AND THEY’LL ALSO OVERSEE INSTALLATION FOR A SEAMLESS EXPERIENCE.” —DAVID TALLEY

Sherwin-Williams named a bold navy color, Naval, as its 2020 Color of the Year. They both blend well with the classic kitchen colors of gray and white.

“Gray is such a flexible color because it easily blends with both the warm and cool colors of the spectrum,” Booth says. “Although blue and black can be bold colors when added to a room, they often read neutral on cabinetry, especially base cabinetry that can ground the room. This year, we will even see green tones popping up in cabinetry product lines.” Depending upon the shade chosen, green can also function like a neutral. Think fun, but classic. Color is an enhancement when used on cabinetry hardware and plumbing fixtures, such as this year’s trend toward matte black and matte champagne gold fixtures. Booth says the hardware and plumbing industries have coordinated their product offerings so homeowners can coordinate their kitchen and bathroom designs. If you’re having trouble deciding which colors to mix and match on cabinets, tile floors and backsplashes, plumbing fixtures, hardware, countertops, sinks, and lighting, look no further than Markraft’s design team. Markraft’s remodeling department handles complete kitchen and bath renovation projects, encompassing all of the industries listed above, and its designers have intimate knowledge of design trends and new products on the market. “We work with leading manufacturers to integrate the newest products into design trends,” says David Talley of Markraft, which has been in business since 1985. “Our designers will help homeowners with product selection and custom design, and they’ll also oversee installation for a seamless experience. The first step is to visit our design studio and get teamed with a design professional dedicated to your project.”u

Visit MARKRAFT’S APEX DESIGN STUDIO at 1051 Schieffelin Road or call 919-362-7979. FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 | HOME DESIGN & DECOR TRIANGLE 79


e

REPRESENTING OW LEE and TEN OTHER QUALITY MANUFACTURERS

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Featured Advertiser Editorial

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

RECYCLE, REUSE,

RESTORE

Habitat for Humanity ReStores are open for public shopping and enable shoppers, donors, and volunteers to invest in the local community. Written by Dana W. Todd

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emodeling or redecorating soon? The ReStores want your donations of furniture, appliances, cabinets, excess building materials, and other home goods. With ten Habitat for Humanity ReStores in the community, there’s always a store nearby ready to accept your donations, and if they are too hefty to fit in your car, the ReStores will pick them up for free. 82 HOME DESIGN & DECOR TRIANGLE | FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020

“In addition to homeowners who donate items, we also have interior designers who are redecorating someone’s home and sometimes donate high-end furnishings to our ReStores,” says Olivia Bowler, spokesperson for Habitat for Humanity of Wake County, which operates the stores. “Other special finds have included antique mid-century furniture, a player piano, and gorgeous chandeliers. You never know what one-of-a-kind find you’ll see at the ReStores.”


Bowler says the ReStores are open to the general public for shopping. “Shop daily if you’re looking for a particular item,” Bowler advises, “as donations come in all the time and are cleaned, priced, and moved to the showroom floor the same day they arrive. There is no secret time for shopping, but Saturday is always a big day both for donations and retail sales.” Of course, there is a charitable side to both donating and shopping at the ReStores—both benefit the local community. The ReStores’ profits fund Habitat for Humanity’s mission to help hardworking people in the community purchase affordable homes. By donating to the ReStores, donors are also helping to keep items out of landfills. The ReStores diverted more than 5,000 tons of reusable materials from the landfills last year. “We always want to emphasize that our program participants are purchasing their homes with an affordable mortgage,” Bowler says. “People’s donations to the ReStores benefit Habitat, and our program sets people up for success by empowering them to be homeowners. The process is really transformational.” ReStores make it easy to donate: Pull up at the loading dock of any of its ten local stores, where volunteers and staff will unload the car, or call for a home pickup by one of ReStore’s trucks if there are several large items for donation.u

“YOU NEVER KNOW WHAT ONE-OF-A-KIND FIND YOU’LL SEE AT THE RESTORES.” —OLIVIA BOWLER

Visit WAKERESTORE.ORG to find the ReStore nearest you. FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 | HOME DESIGN & DECOR TRIANGLE 83


How sweet it is to be loved by you!

N at u r a l. M od er n . C la s si c .

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Featured Advertiser Editorial

CONTRIBUTOR | BUILDING A BETTER HOME

WHISTLE WHILE YOU WORK By Jon Rufty Photography by Dustin Peck

Custom luxury touches make everyday activities pleasurable in mudrooms and laundry rooms. Mudrooms and laundry rooms used to be the functional but forgotten parts of a home and were not part of the overall design plan. Fine architectural features were reserved for the house’s main areas. But today’s mudrooms and laundry rooms have materialized into spaces that incorporate the luxury features once reserved for the more formal living areas of a home. Despite the hardworking, practical nature of mudrooms and laundry rooms, homeowners enjoy getting their work done amidst beautiful arrangements. In the wide variety of luxury homebuilding projects and custom remodeling jobs completed for our clients, we have noticed that homeowners want to treat all of their rooms with extra-special attention. It’s a good fit for Rufty Homes since we specialize in making our clients’ dreams a reality through custom design and construction. Luxury touches once reserved for other rooms have made their way into mudrooms and laundry rooms, which have become multi-functional areas, serving as a home-organization hub, a craft area, a pantry, a party prep space, and a pet center in addition to their more obvious uses. We expect certain luxury laundry-room trends to continue into 2020, including special attention to appliances and finishes. No longer home for plastic washtubs or metal sinks, farmhouse sinks are showing up in laundry rooms, nestled into high-end countertops such as marble and Dekton—a highquality sintered stone. Creative color combinations expressed through paint, wallpaper, and tile turn bland cabinets, walls, and floors into fresh and unconventional styles. Double washers and dryers can handle the loads of large families, while built-in desks and craft islands let parents handle

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duties and hobbies in style. Light fixtures and custom window treatments, previously reserved for main living areas, are beautifying functional spaces, many times residing in the same room as special pet features like pull-out food bins and doggie showers.


“MUDROOMS ARE WHERE FAMILY MEMBERS START AND END THEIR DAYS WITH THE OUTSIDE WORLD.” For many, mudrooms are where family members start and end their days with the outside world. Luxurious additions and high-end details in these rooms help ease the transition from a stressful day to home’s comforting and familiar atmosphere. No matter the room size, attention to detail reigns, with built-in cubbies, custom bins, crown molding, and high-end hardware such as coat hooks and cabinetry pulls hiding clutter and blending with the rest of the home’s interior design scheme. Although it may be a separate room or merely a hallway, the new focus is on merging this transitional room with the rest of the home. Coordination between your custom builder and interior designer is essential, ensuring that these functional rooms work well in your home. At Rufty Homes, our designers play a vital role in our projects’ success. Together, we can customize the smallest details to fulfill Rufty Homes’ commitment to building our clients’ dreams.u

Contact RUFTY HOMES at 919-460-8550, visit their website at RUFTYHOMES.COM, or email JON@RUFTY.COM. FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 | HOME DESIGN & DECOR TRIANGLE 87


Let us take that off your hands.

Redecorating or remodeling? Schedule your free donation pick-up today. The ReStores collect new and gently used cabinets, appliances, building materials, furniture and more. When you donate to the ReStores, you’re supporting Habitat’s mission to build more affordable homes in the Triangle.

wakerestore.org/donate-now • 919.374.8631


arts and culture

To the East

SPOTLIGHT

Sydney Steen: Fault Lines

The Centerpiece February 7–29 thecenterpiece.com

21c Museum Hotel Through October 2020 21cmuseumhotels.com

To the East includes a selection of established and emerging contemporary artists with ties to eastern North Carolina. By combining media, textures, and artistic styles, To the East aims to bring a little bit of the east right here to Raleigh. This selection, organized by Ben Knight, includes Knight’s own vibrant abstracts, the bold metal sculptures of Jordan Parah and Brandon McCullar, and the textured acrylic works of Kinston’s Joseph Hood, among others. The opening reception is Friday, February from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Fourth Annual Big Frosty Beer Festival Raleigh Beer Garden February 15 eventbrite.com

Luces y Sombras: Images of Mexico North Carolina Museum of Art Through February 23 ncartmuseum.org

SUMMER: The Donna Summer Musical Durham Performing Arts Center February 25–March 1 dpacnc.com

Bring History Alive! Harriet Tubman The Halle Cultural Arts Center February 29 apexnc.org

Marcy Gregg & Rob Logic ArtSource Fine Art March 12–April 10 artsourcefineart.com

Toy Boom! Toys from the 1950s and ’60s North Carolina Museum of History Through January 3, 2021 ncmuseumofhistory.org

Before Black Lives Matter: The Stage Play

The Baby Boomer era was a time of great abundance for middle-class America. Economic prosperity was at an all-time high, and the influx of television helped propel a new middle-class into a consumer-driven society. Additionally, a soaring birthrate made the country a child-focused culture. These children, however, grew up in a time of great dramatic change, and parents were caught between a familiar past and a complex future. Toys would help children find their correct place in society, or so parents wanted to believe. These toys reflected the energy, ambition, and abundance of a prosperous era, but they also channeled the uncertainties of the period.

Burning Coal Theatre March 14 trefloyd.com

Michael Bublé PNC Arena March 20 pncarena.com

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 | HOME DESIGN & DECOR TRIANGLE 90


Find Your Sanctuary

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From Raleigh: I-440 W to exit 1C - Jones Franklin Road. Left on Jones Franklin Road. Travel 2.1 miles then Left on Tryon Road. Right on Yates Mill Pond Road. Right on Theys Road. Right on Milner Drive into community.

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Redefining Surfaces. Redefining Kitchens.

Homes evolve by becoming social spaces in which we do not only cook, but we live in. We have created a resistant and durable material with unlimited designs to create spaces without boundaries.

New Dekton X-Gloss

Flooring Dekton Industrial Lunar Kitchen Island Dekton Stonika Bergen

Find out more about the 25 years transferable Dekton warranty. Look for inspiration and ďŹ nd resources at cosentino.com

COSENTINO CENTER RALEIGH 221 S. Rogers Lane, Raleigh, NC 27610 | Ph: 919.231.8941


advertiser index

A. Hoke Ltd. ..........................................................................................7 Apex Cabinets, A Division of Markraft...................................78–79, 89 Art Source ...........................................................................................75 Avalaire............................................................................................. 100 Baker Residential................................................................................ 65 Bardi Designs...................................................................................... 27 Bev’s Fine Art......................................................................................31 Beyond Blue Interiors........................................................................ 93 Blue Heron Signature Homes.............................................................74 Bost Custom Homes...........................................................................19 Boutique Drapery & Design............................................................... 23 Brentwood Flooring America..............................................................97 Carolina Garden Company................................................................80 Carolina Glass & Mirror..................................................................... 99 Closet Factory..................................................................................... 98 Closets by Design...............................................................................50 Cosentino............................................................................................ 92 CQC Home...........................................................................................51 Ferguson Bath, Kitchen & Lighting Gallery....................................... 36 Garden Suppply Company................................................................. 35 General Shale.................................................................................... 4–5 Greenfront Interiors & Rugs......................................................... 14–15 Habitat for Humanity ReStore...............................................82–83, 88

Home & Garden Landscapes.............................................................. 84 Hopper Piano & Organ Co................................................................... 11 Hunt & Gather at High Park Village................................................... 96 Jordan Pointe...................................................................................... 37 Kitchen & Bath Galleries.....................................................................76 Nest Interiors.......................................................................................16 Old North State Landscape Development, Inc................................... 64 Patio Pro..............................................................................................80 Paysage Home.................................................................................... 85 Pigfish Lane Antiques & Interiors...................................................... 29 R. Jacobs Fine Plumbing & Hardware................................................. 2 ROCKin’teriors..................................................................................... 3 Rufty Homes........................................................................... 33, 86–87 Sanctuary at Yates Mill........................................................................91 Steven Shell Living.............................................................................. 38 Sub-Zero, Wolf and Cove.....................................................................13 Summer Classics ................................................................................21 Sunburst Shutters & Window Fashions............................................ 96 The Centerpiece................................................................................. 95 The Persian Carpet..............................................................................12 The Warehouse 1924............................................................................ 9 Triangle Tile & Stone of NC, LLC....................................................... 25 Woody’s Furniture..............................................................................81

Please support our advertisers. To advertise with us, please contact sales@homedesigndecormag.com.

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Visit www.homedesigndecormag.com for additional photos from all of our feature homes and our local design resource guide. FEBRUARY/MARCH 2020 | HOME DESIGN & DECOR TRIANGLE 94


COMMEMORATE YOUR LOVE AND ALL ITS MEMORIES.

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Call for free design consultation or visit us online at closetfactory.com Visit our Showroom: 2031 Production Dr., Apex, NC 27539 closets | garages | home offices | entertainment centers | wall units | wall beds pantries | craft rooms | laundry rooms | mud rooms | wine rooms ©2019 Closet Factory. All rights reserved.

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Profile for Home Design & Decor Magazine

Triangle HDD February/March 2020  

The most widely-read home and garden magazine in the Triangle and surrounding areas.

Triangle HDD February/March 2020  

The most widely-read home and garden magazine in the Triangle and surrounding areas.