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SPRING 2014  /  Connecting the University of Maryland Community

diagnosis

hope leader

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surgery

chordoma hospitals

cane persevere

determined trailblazer

professor

incurable

family 10 / WORLD CUP TERPS

28 / ESTATE OF THE STATE 32 / M APPING THE WORLD’S FORESTS

physicist

life paın champion

The Things He Carries DIAGNOSED WITH RARE CANCER, HONORS DIRECTOR OFFERS LESSON IN LIVING FULLY P. 22

tumors uncertainty

honors college injections

cancer superman

mentor

rare neuropathy

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experimental tria


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Departments SPRING 2014  /  VOL. 11, NO. 3

PUBLISHER

Peter Weiler VICE PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY RELATIONS A DV I S E R S

Brian Ullmann ’92 ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT, MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS

Margaret Hall EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CREATIVE STRATEGIES M AG A Z I N E S TA F F

Lauren Brown UNIVERSIT Y EDITOR

John T. Consoli ’86 CREATIVE DIREC TOR

Amy Shroads ART DIREC TOR

Liam Farrell David Kohn Karen Shih ’09 WRITERS

Megan Blair Jasmine Byers Joshua Harless Jeanette J. Nelson M.b.a. ’14 Catherine Nichols ’99 DESIGNERS

Kelsey Marotta ’14 INTERN

Gail Rupert M.L.S. ’10 PHOTOGRAPHY ASSISTANT

Letters to the editor are welcomed. Send correspondence to Managing Editor, Terp magazine, 2101 Turner Building, College Park, MD 20742-1521. Or, send an email to terpfeedback@umd.edu. The University of Maryland, College Park is an equal opportunity institution with respect to both education and employment. University policies, programs and activities are in conformance with pertinent federal and state laws and regulations on non-discrimination regarding race, color, religion, age, national origin, political affiliation, gender, sexual orientation or disability.

EMAIL

terpfeedback@umd.edu

ONLINE VIDEO NEWS

terp.umd.edu

terpvision.umd.edu

Cancer went easy on me. Four days after I was diagnosed with Stage II colon cancer, a surgeon cleanly removed the tumor along with 12 inches of my large intestine. In the interim, I barely had time to panic. Two weeks into chemotherapy, though, my long, curly hair began falling out. How lucky I am that baldness was the worst part of my worst year ever, 2008. The other side effects—mostly fatigue and neuropathy in my fingers and feet—never forced me to take even one day off from work. I’m fine now, and I don’t think about that period much anymore. Then I started spending time with Bill Dorland, executive director of Maryland’s Honors College, for the cover story in this issue of Terp. (See page 22.) For nearly 15 years, he’s been fending off a rare and particularly insidious cancer called chordoma. Amid all the surgeries, rounds of radiation and experimental treatments, Dorland is determined to not let cancer keep him from living. A noted physicist, he still pumps out new research, advises graduate students and teaches at Oxford in the summer. He runs the college of 4,000 whip-smart undergrads. He takes exotic vacations with his family. He’s practically the poster child for can-do spirit. The advancing neuropathy in his feet, however, has become so painful that he now requires a cane, and he’ll soon need additional “assistive mobility devices,” as one doctor put it. A cane, scooter or wheelchair is a megaphone yelling that Dorland is sick. The thought twists his ever-ready smile into a grimace. He doesn’t want pity. He wants solutions. So he focuses on the long view, on the clinical trials that might cure his and others’ chordoma. I followed him around as he patiently waited between appointments at the National Institutes of Health for the latest trial. Blood draw. MRI. Update with doctors. Injection in the trying-to-be cozy chemo room that made me shudder, still. Science matters, Dorland says—in not just his research or classes, but his very life.

2 IN BRIEF 5 ASK ANNE 6 CLASS ACT 10 CAMPUS LIFE 16 INNOVATION 19 FACULTY Q&A 20 CENTERPIECE 36 PARTING SHOT

3

A Rome Away From Rome

16

Virtual Students, Real Experiences

20

Shout-out on Big Ten Benefits

umdrightnow.umd.edu

FAC E B O O K .C O M /UnivofMaryland F L I C K R .C O M /photos/wwwumdedu

Lauren Brown University Editor

T W I T T E R .C O M /UofMaryland V I M E O.C O M /umd YO U T U B E .C O M /UMD2101

COVER PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

Correction: In the Winter 2014 issue of Terp, the story "A LEAP Forward" included the wrong phone number. To learn more about the speech and language preschool, contact Director Becky Lower at ralower@umd.edu or 301.405.4228.

FROM TOP: JOHN T. CONSOLI; COURTESY OF GREGORY STALEY; COURTESY OF JADE WEXLER


Features 22 COVER STORY: THE THINGS HE CARRIES

Ten years after being diagnosed with a rare cancer, Honors College Executive Director Bill Dorland holds his head high—even when the rest of his body betrays him. By lauren brown

28

PHOTO COURTESY OF KIPLIN HALL

ESTATE OF THE STATE

32 S EEING THE FOREST AND ALL ITS TREES Geographer Matthew Hansen has broadened our understanding of global forest cover by mapping how much has been lost in the last decade. By liam farrell

Architecture students and faculty have helped revive a 17th-century estate built by the founder of the state of Maryland. By karen shih ’09


IN BRIEF

Clearing the Field

MARYLAND HELPS FARMERS NAVIGATE CHANGING LAWS

Weber’s Cider Mill Farm in Parkville, Md., is a much different operation than when the family first started raising chickens a century ago. Fruits and vegetables are now sold directly from the farm instead of hauled to Baltimore, a bakery and gift shop were added along with autumn hayrides, and everything from directions to a harvest calendar is listed on a website. “You can’t do things the way your great-grandfather did,” Stephen Weber Jr. says. “We’ve kind of adapted to our surroundings. We’re a little farm surrounded by houses.” Beyond operational changes, Maryland farmers today also face a host of new and complicated legal requirements, along with nuisance complaints, environmental regulations, banking rules, immigration issues, and food safety, patent, and intellectual property law. In response, the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources joined up with the University of Maryland Carey School of Law and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore School of Agricultural and Natural Sciences to start the Agriculture Law Education Initiative. It's part of the MPowering the State collaboration between the two universities. The idea for the project started with the General Assembly asking the University System of Maryland to help preserve the state’s family farms and help their owners nav-

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igate complex legal issues and reguAN ESTIMATED lations. The government estimates 350,000 Marylanders are employed MARYLANDERS ARE in some aspect of agriculture, which EMPLOYED IN SOME makes it the state’s single largest ASPECT OF AGRICULTURE commercial industry. More than two million acres, encompassing MORE THAN nearly a third of the state, are used for farming. Work began last year with ACRES (NEARLY A THIRD assembling resources and holdOF THE STATE) ARE ing stakeholder meetings and USED FOR FARMING now more extensive outreach is planned, including a telephone call-in service for expert advice, legal curriculum, and new professional, degree, certificate and other course programs for agricultural law. Paul Goeringer, a research associate for Maryland’s Center for Agriculture and Natural Resource Policy, says the initiative is meant to spur a conversation among farmers. A lawyer with a master’s in agricultural law who grew up on a farm in Oklahoma, Goeringer wants to establish a foundation of knowledge so the farming community is ready when an unanticipated issue comes along. “It does fill a big vacuum that was existing in the state,” he says. “We’re trying to develop some sort of baseline. Then when the next fire comes up, it doesn’t take long to educate people on that.” Weber, who is part of the project’s advisory panel, hopes it can become a clearinghouse for Maryland farmers. “That’s a major part of this state,” he says. “You appreciate the environment. But you also want to be able to run your business.”—LF

350,000

2 MILLION

ILLUSTRATION BY JASMINE BYERS


The “Apotheosis of Washington,” a fresco painted in 1865 by Italian artist Constantino Brumidi in the dome of the U.S. Capitol, is heavily Romaninfluenced. It depicts George Washington as a god rising to the heavens, surrounded by goddesses and 13 maidens representing the colonies.

WASHINGTON: ROME REBORN New Classics Grant Funds Research of Roman Influences on U.S. Founding ROMAN INFLUENCES permeate our nation’s capital, from Latin inscriptions in federal buildings and the classical design of the Capitol to the mural of George Washington surrounded by Roman gods in its dome. The new $500,000 Ernest L. Pellegri grant from the National Italian American Foundation (NIAF) to the Department of Classics will fund research to further understand the links between ancient Rome and the founding of the United States, as well as scholarships for undergraduate and graduate students. “We saw an opportunity to really encourage younger generations to study this topic and to really understand the civilization that provided the fundamentals for the founding of America,” says Anita McBride, chair of NIAF’s Education and Scholarship Committee. Classics scholars have long worked to show that ancient Greece and Rome are part of the contemporary world, and this major

grant validates and demonstrates that point, recognizing the scholarship and teaching of UMD’s department. “In Roman mythology, the god Janus has two heads,” says classics Professor Gregory Staley. “He looked forward and backward. Our grant does the same things: We look forward to America to understand its identity as the new Rome and look back at Rome to explain that connection.” Staley, for example, will explore why paintings in the Capitol are modeled on the ancient wall paintings of Pompeii. Classical art often contains open portrayals of sexuality, which seems at odds with the United States’ Puritan roots. This dichotomy is also seen in the semi-nude sculpture of Washington (right) modeled after Zeus and created by Horatio Greenough, who studied in Italy. It was supposed to be installed in the Capitol in

the mid-1800s, but because of widespread controversy and criticism, it wound up in the National Museum of American History. The grant, named for an NIAF donor, will also support as many as 20 students per year seeking to study abroad or conduct research in Italy. “In hero myths, heroes regularly have to leave home, to go on a quest, to discover themselves and to gain new talents,” Staley says. “Studying abroad is simply a modern version of that mythical pattern.”—KS

WE LOOK FORWARD TO AMERICA TO UNDERSTAND

ITS IDENTITY AS THE NEW ROME

AND LOOK BACK AT ROME TO

EXPLAIN THE CONNECTION.”

PHOTOS COURTESY OF GREGORY STALEY

— CLASSICS PROFESSOR GREGORY STALEY

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Virtual Reality, Made More Real Amitabh Varshney dreams of sprinkling digital data like pixie dust throughout your daily life. The director of the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies (UMIACS) and some of his colleagues have started work on an “augmentarium,” a project to devise new ways to add information onto what we see. Most augmented reality systems under development use goggles to deliver digital data. The UMIACS team plans to develop goggle-based systems, but is focusing first

on projectors to superimpose information directly onto the outside world; this will allow multiple users to simultaneously share the data via the naked eye. One tool would allow surgeons to overlay X-rays and MRIs directly onto a patient’s body. Varshney is also working with astronomers and geographers to help them better visualize the fine details of large data sets. In addition, the technology could help soldiers process information from drones to determine where the enemy is hiding. Another app could

streamline supermarket shopping, overlaying products with different colors to alert consumers about what they should or shouldn’t buy—useful to someone on a diet, or with peanut or gluten allergies. With seed funding from the College of Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Sciences, the scientists are setting up a projection room for testing; they hope to begin experiments this summer. “What makes this so exciting,” Varshney says, “is that as we move forward, we will find more and more ways to use this technology.” —DK

See full visual representations of how this technology might work at terp.umd.edu. Visualization tools being designed by UMD researchers could be used in settings including (clockwise from top) operating rooms, where digital images could be superimposed on patients; battlefields, where soldiers could use real-time information on weather, equipment and enemy positions; stores, where shoppers could choose what products fit their needs and budgets; and art galleries, where background information appears alongside the work of art.

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ILLUSTRATIONS BY BRIAN G. PAYNE


Q:

I S IT TRUE THAT ELEANOR ROOSEVELT VISITED THE UNIVERSITY TWICE?

—NANCY CHOW ’09

A: Y es, though under very different

circumstances. In 1938, she became the first first lady to visit campus, when she addressed a crowd of 6,000 students at Ritchie Coliseum, speaking about education, civic responsibility and community engagement. Her second visit, during World War II, was a surprise. The United Nations had set up its Relief and Rehabilitation Administration on campus to train relief workers, and in 1944, Roosevelt unexpectedly dropped in on a SerboCroatian language class at the Rossborough Inn.

Q: W ORLD WAR I BEGAN A CENTURY AGO THIS YEAR. HOW DID IT AFFECT THE UNIVERSITY? —ETHAN DOWNING

A: S ince the U.S. was in the war only from April

6, 1917, to Nov. 11, 1918, the actual impact on what was then called the Maryland State College of Agriculture was limited. Records show that of the nearly 200 men and women enrolled during this period, 64 students enlisted. In 1918, UMD created the Student Army Training Corps as an emergency measure (supplanting the ROTC) and trained 600 men as officers. In addition, the college served as a training ground for more than 250 members of the U.S. Signal Corps, who learned codes, radio operation and repair, and physics of the wireless—some even took carrier pigeon training!

ASK ANNE

Questions for Anne Turkos, the university archivist

Q:

SSED I’VE PA ONTNT OF M IN FRO T O P S S E , AND THIS NY TIM ALL MA H IT? Y R E HAT IS GOM ING, W ONDER IGIW R S O A IW ITS AT WAS O R, W H ? E RPOS NAL PU XTER A B —JIM

A : Today, it’s known primarily as an “echo spot.” Orientation grou ps often stop th ere, and if you stand in just the right spot in th e middle of it, you can hear your own echo. Originally, it was the base for a pr oposed statue of Charles Benedi Calvert, founde ct r of the Marylan d Agricultural C UMD’s predeces ol le ge, sor. The base w as built in the ea 1970s before ob rly jections were ra ised about havi a statue of a slave ng holder on campu s, which stoppe the process and d left just the “ech o spot” today. It’s unclear whe ther the statue w as actually created and not erected, or if it was never crea ted.

➸ Questions may be sent to terpmag@umd.edu or @UMDarchives on Twitter. ONLINE

lib.umd.edu/univarchives

BLOG umdarchives.wordpress.com FAC E B O O K

PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI; ROOSEVELT COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES; PIGEON COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA.ORG

University of Maryland University Archives

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CLASS ACT   ALUMNI PROFILE  /  CINDY DAVIS M.B.A. ’84

The Accidental Golf Czar As an All-American golfer at Furman University, Cindy Davis could have gone pro back in 1984. Instead, she swung for a career on the business side of the green. With an M.B.A. from Maryland in hand, Davis has risen from leadership positions at the Ladies Professional Golf Association, the Arnold Palmer Golf Co. and the Golf Channel to become president of Nike Golf, a $700 million-ayear operation that’s aiming to become as ubiquitous in golf as it is in basketball and football. Last year, Sports Illustrated named her the 46th most powerful person in sports (ahead of a more famous Nike employee, Michael Jordan). “I really didn’t think I would combine golf and business,” she says. “It was unplanned.” Her introduction to golf was similarly accidental: When she was 13, Davis’s family vacationed in Myrtle Beach, S.C. She was bored, so her parents suggested that she try golf at the course across the street from where they were staying. “I got hooked,” Davis says. “I just became obsessed with it.” She loved the discipline of the game, the mental and physical precision required to succeed. Back home in Bowie, Md., she practiced constantly (even in her house, where she shattered windows and lamps). She played on the boys’ team in high school, and often won. Her golf coach at Furman, Mic Potter, says it was clear 30 years ago that Davis was singular. “She’s one of the best leaders I’ve ever had,” says Potter, now a national championship-winning coach at the University of Alabama. “She wasn’t a rah-rah kind of person. Her style was quiet and encouraging. But she really made the team better.” Davis says she found business school at Maryland relatively relaxing: After spending four years as an elite student-athlete, either practicing or studying, she had more time for herself. At Nike, she made news by signing golf ’s newest superstar, Rory McIlroy, to a 10-year contract last year worth as much as $250 million. Earlier this year, the company unveiled a new driver (to good reviews) as well as a variety of high-tech apparel designed to keep golfers comfortable and dry. Davis travels constantly between Nike Golf ’s headquarters in Beaverton, Ore., and its worldwide offices; recent itineraries included stops in Toronto, Amsterdam, Stockholm, Manchester, Frankfurt, Bangkok, Tokyo and Shanghai. It’s grueling, but she loves it. “We’re building a business in an area that I have a lot of passion about.”—DK

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PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY JEANETTE J. NELSON


ALUMNI TRAVEL

CLASS NOTES Submit your class notes and read many more at terp.umd.edu.

’00s

JOHN ’05 and STACY SMITH JOWERS ’06 of Silver Spring, Md., welcomed the arrival of daughter Carina Joy on Jan. 28. They report that Carina is already looking forward to cheering on the Terps this fall.

’90s

Maryland Del. JOLENE IVEY M.A. ’92 is running for lieutenant governor. The Prince George’s County Democrat will be on the primary ballot June 24 with Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler, who is seeking the gubernatorial nomination. She’s now chair of the county’s House delegation.

’70s

TED OFFIT ’77 (left) and DON SCHAAF ’85 (right) are board members for the U.S. Olympic Committee’s National Federation for Bobsled and Skeleton, whose athletes brought home six medals from the 2014 Winter Games in Sochi, Russia. Schaaf is president and CEO of ds+f Inc., an ad and brand agency, and is a former ski instructor. Offit in his day job is managing partner of the law firm Offit/Kurman.

Putt Together Like wearing red, black and gold when you're on the green? Show your Terp pride by teeing up with Maryland gear. Find all these items and much more at the University of Maryland Golf Course’s pro shop (golf.umd.edu/shop), the University Book Center in the Stamp Student Union (umcp.bncollege.com) or the Comcast Center store (shop. umterps.com).

FLAVORS OF NORTHERN ITALY Tour centuries-old wineries, taste handmade cheeses and dine in homes of chefs and artisans as you explore the region and discover Italy’s cultural connection to farm and table. For more about this and other trips, visit alumni.umd.edu/travel or contact Angela Dimopoulos ’07 at 301.405.7938/800.336.8627 or adimop@umd.edu.

S ep t . 13–21

This large waterproof bag has six pockets, five dividers for clubs and new, patent-pending backpack-style straps. A smaller size is available, too.

Drive for success using golf balls with a screenprinted Maryland logo.

You’ll look above par in this comfy hat, which also comes in white and black in four sizes.

GOLF PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

Cover up with this gold leather model that comes in two sizes, for a blade putter and mid-mallet, with a black synthetic fur interior and magnetic clips. It's also available in white, red and black.

Stay dry even when your game’s all wet with a 62-inch fiberglass-shaft golf umbrella with the UMD logo.

Make your mark in this glove of soft cabretta leather with terry cotton around the wristband for moisture absorbency.

SPRING 2014 TERP 7


BOOKSHELF

 ALUMNI PROFILE  /  ANTHONY CASALENA ’05

DANIEL COOGAN ’04 explores the complex relationship between race and the mass media in Understanding Racial Portrayals in the Sports Media: Why Is Michael Vick So Fast and Peyton Manning So Smart? He analyzes factors that might influence stereotyping in the media, such as the sport, the level of competition and characteristics of the commentator.

A Site for Sore Eyes ALUM’S DESIGN-FOCUSED WEB PLATFORMS SET SQUARESPACE APART In just a decade, Anthony Casalena ’05 (above) has taken his company from a one-man operation in his Maryland dorm room to one that can afford a $4 million Super Bowl ad. Squarespace was born of frustration, when the computer science major wanted to create a website for himself in college during the pre-Facebook era. “I wasn’t trying to create a business originally, but I wasn’t happy with what was out there,” he says. He had to get page-building software from one company, photo gallery software from another and statistics counters from yet another. A programmer and designer since he was 15, he set out to build his own platform, patenting it with the help of the Hinman CEOs living and learning program. After a few months of creating website templates, he decided not to offer them for free, distinguishing him from his competitors. “We wanted to be the place you go when you want to take this seriously,” he says. “Your website is like your online clothing—it’s how people see your ideas out there. We’ll offer 20 carefully curated, fully customizable templates instead of 20,000.” Squarespace grew slowly at first. He spent every moment outside of class handling helpdesk tickets and troubleshooting. Casalena convinced his dad to lend him $30,000, then he fed early profits back in to the company, not taking any external funding until 2010. Now the New York City-based company has hundreds of thousands of paid users, including HBO, Sony and luxury fashion brand Bottega Veneta. Casalena has been named one of Forbes’ “Most Promising CEOs Under 35.” And in February, he aired Squarespace’s first Super Bowl commercial to 111 million TV viewers. Casalena manages a team of more than 250, and the guy who’s always been more comfortable coding at the keyboard has had a steep learning curve in management. He gave up writing code just last year, though he still participates in “hack weeks” at the company, when the engineering and design teams can work on anything they want. Sometimes that’s where the best ideas come from. “Solve your own problems and be your own customer,” Casalena says. “I’m not much of a fan of people starting with wild business ideas just to make money. You should be wishing the world were a certain way.”—KS 8 TERP.UMD.EDU

ASHLEY (HAHN) CALVERY ’05

has written My Mom the Miracle: 1 Woman, 2 Cancers, 3 Years, 4-Ever Grateful, about how her mother, Kathi, battled the disease twice and how her family struggled alongside her. They appeared on “The Today Show” to talk about the book.

November’s Gladiators by TERRY BAXTER ’68 is the inside story of the advance teams that produced Ronald Reagan’s presidential campaigns. It captures the grit of the democratic process and the often-hilarious highs and lows that accompany the road warriors as they invade towns across America.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ANTHONY CASALENA


 ALUMNI PROFILE  /  SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON ’85

Witness to History FROM WRITING about sludge on

Maryland’s Eastern Shore to covering protests in Cairo’s Tahrir Square, journalist Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson ’85 (top right) has witnessed the gamut of human experience. But no matter the location or the language, Nelson has found the everyday and the historic share common ground. “People are people. They want to be happy, they want to be healthy. It’s heartening,” she says. “I’m really glad I’ve had the chance to see that.” Nelson, now based in Berlin for National Public Radio (NPR), has spent two decades giving readers and listeners a window into events around the world. She started at the Easton Star Democrat and went on to outlets like Knight Ridder and Newsday, where she shared a Pulitzer Prize for covering the 1996 crash of TWA Flight 800. The daughter of a German mother and an Iranian father, Nelson was steered away from pursuing medicine by an introductory journalism class at Maryland. An interest in foreign affairs was solidified by a 1994 trip with Army doctors to Haiti that provided a frontrow seat to what she calls the “intensity of the human condition.” “Intense” is the word to describe Nelson’s career. In Iraq, a militia captured her and had a warrant for her execution as a spy before releasing her. She speculates that her Iranian background may have been why they let her go. “In the worst situation, I tend to be calm. That doesn’t mean I’m not afraid,” she says. “No matter how many preparations you make, you have to be ready for the unexpected. I was lucky.” Nelson switched from print to radio in 2006, when she opened the Kabul, Afghanistan bureau for NPR. Print outlets have shifted from the international coverage she values; in Kabul, she battled

NELSON PHOTO COURTESY OF NPR; AP IMAGES

“ IN THE WORST SITUATION, I TEND TO BE CALM.

harsh winters and scarce resources, and covered her head with a blanket to keep the sound of electric generators from interfering with recordings. Like many journalists, Nelson has seen a lot of pain. She interviewed a Palestinian mother who murdered her own daughter in an “honor killing,” and documented opium addiction among Afghan women and children. “I still cry at certain stories,” she says. “I really hope that doesn’t stop because I wouldn’t be a really good storyteller.” Nelson credits her husband and 24-year-old son with giving her the strength to take such challenging assignments. Erik, a 1987 Maryland graduate, met his wife at The Diamondback, and says being a journalist himself has been a big help. “I’ve seen her go through all different levels of risk and it’s been a challenge getting used to it,” he says. “A lot of these places kind of make the last place look more inviting.” About a week after he said that, Nelson was broadcasting from the violent protests in Kiev, Ukraine.—LF

THAT DOESN’T MEAN I’M NOT AFRAID. NO MATTER HOW MANY PREPARATIONS YOU MAKE,

YOU HAVE TO BE READY FOR THE UNEXPECTED.” –SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON ’85

EGYPT

Listen to Nelson’s recent stories at npr.org.

UKRAINE

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CAMPUS LIFE

World Cup May Runneth Over With Terps COACH CIROVSKI TO CHEER ON FORMER PLAYERS IN BRAZIL This month, several billion soccer fans Cirovski, who as a boy immigrated around the world will be stationed in front with his family to Canada from a village of TVs and computers to watch 32 teams in Macedonia, is passionate about his vie for the World Cup. Among those bilwork. He was coaching youth teams even lions will be one Sasho Cirovski, coach of as a college player, and he recruits players Maryland’s men’s team. He’ll be watching from coast to coast. not just because he loves the sport, but “Sasho has done an incredible job of because as many as four of his former creating an environment that attracts the players are likely to be on the U.S. team. best players,” says Rob Vartughian, a (The final 23-member team was chosen coach for the Philadelphia Union, who after this issue went to press.) worked with Cirovski for seven years at With Graham Zusi, Omar Gonzalez, Maryland. “He has an amazing ability to Clarence Goodson and Maurice Edu all get players to buy in. He gets his older making the 30-man roster for training guys to understand it, and they help teach camp last month, Terps are set to be the younger guys.” overrepresented on the squad. But it’s Cirovski is flying to Brazil to see a few not surprising: Since arriving on camof the World Cup matches. His heart and pus 21 years ago, Cirovski has built his head will be at odds: He’s rooting hard Maryland’s team into one of the titans for his former players, but he admits that of college soccer. It routinely ranks he’s picking Brazil to win it all. among the nation’s top contenders, This could be a good year for the won national championships in 2005 U.S.; the team has looked strong in recent and 2008, and last year lost a close tune-up matches. But in the opening game in the finals to Notre Dame. round, it plays three dangerous teams: During Cirovski’s tenure, 49 Ghana, Portugal (which has perhaps the Terps have played in Major League world’s best player, Cristiano Ronaldo) Soccer (MLS), including 20 currently, and Germany (one of the favorites to win and eight have played overseas. Cirovski the whole thing). expects this level of excellence from “We are in a tough group. But really, players; Zusi says this culture was crucial every group is tough,” says Zusi, who for his development. plays midfield for Sporting Kansas “I’m so grateful for my time at MaryCity, winner of the 2013 MLS championland,” says Zusi, who played for the Terps ship. “We can compete with any team in from 2005–07. “Sasho provides the world.” such a professional atmosphere. Zusi has loved the World Cup He demands excellence. He can since he was a kid in Florida. be a tough guy, but this is a When he was 8, he was on the Watch Watch Cirovski Cirovski share share very detail-oriented sport. You field as part of the opening cerhis World Cup picks his World Cup picks at terp.umd.edu. need that to make it, and he emony for the 1994 World Cup, at terp.umd.edu. puts that into you.” which took place in Orlando and

YEARS OF

Extension’s Cultivation 10 TERP.UMD.EDU

A HUNDRED YEARS AGO, when farmers across Maryland were isolated from each other, the Maryland Cooperative Extension Service was created to share vital information about agriculture and homemaking. Now the University of Maryland Extension, based in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, has a much broader focus, offering education and support on topics such as health and wellness and environmental preservation. Here's a look at its century of service:

PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI; ILLUSTRATIONS BY KELSEY MAROTTA


See more artist’s renderings of the new center at terp.umd.edu.

other American cities. “For me, every four years can’t come soon enough,” says Zusi, who is expected to be a key scoring threat for the U.S. “It’s the biggest sports event in the world.” Gonzalez, a Terp in 2006 and 2007, had his own 1994 World Cup moment. He grew up in Dallas, and that year his parents took him to the Cotton Bowl to see a game. He was all of 6, but he told his mother that one day he’d be out there himself. A 6-foot-5-inch defender who plays for the Los Angeles Galaxy in the MLS, he gets a bit touchy when asked if he’s awed to be facing such famous players as Ronaldo: “I’m not going there for the experience. I’m going there to win. I can think about the experience when I’m old.”

A midfielder, Edu played for Cirovski from 2004 to 2006. He was a member of the 2010 U.S. World Cup team, and scored a goal that was disallowed by a controversial referee call. Edu—and many other people—say it should have counted; he wants another chance. “Hopefully I’ll have the opportunity to right that wrong,” he says. Goodson, a defender who competed at Maryland from 2000–03 and now plays for the San Jose Earthquakes, was also on the 2010 World Cup team that made the quarterfinals in South Africa. He says his four years under Cirovski prepared him for such high-pressure moments. “He’s a very demanding coach, a very intense person. He takes his job very seriously.”—DK

HE DEMANDS EXCELLENCE.

HE CAN BE A TOUGH GUY, BUT THIS IS A VERY DETAIL-ORIENTED SPORT. YOU NEED THAT TO MAKE IT, AND

HE PUTS THAT INTO YOU.”

— GRAHAM ZUSI

From left: Graham Zusi, Clarence Goodson, Maurice Edu and Omar Gonzalez.

1916–17: During World War I, helped beekeepers increase honey crops to compensate for sugar shortage. Established community kitchens to encourage canning.

1914: Following an act of Congress establishing a nationwide network of extensions, Thomas B. Symons is named director of Maryland’s extension—a post he held for 39 years.

1918: Held first tractor demonstrations.

Teaching Center Seeking “A” in Innovation CONSTRUCTION WILL BEGIN in June on the Edward St. John Learning and Teaching Center, designed to be a national model of collaborative learning. Its 13 classrooms, along with other small-group spaces, will feature technology including video projection and capture for Web streaming, distance learning and audiovisual recording. In the ultra-modern lecture halls, wheeled chairs will allow students to seamlessly work together, while moving lecterns will allow faculty to teach from multiple locations. The 186,415-square-foot building will also include nine labs in a new chemistry wing. Named for the Baltimore developer, philanthropist and 1961 alumnus who donated $10 million to the project, the center will be centrally located on McKeldin Mall with a face on Campus Drive. When it opens in 2017, it will also house the Academy for Innovation and Entrepreneurship and the Teaching & Learning Transformation Center.

1939: Dedicated new poultry, dairy and livestock facilities at UMD to improve instruction and research.

1919–20: Began community 4-H clubs to develop head, heart, hands and health.

1941–45: Helped place 5,000 workers, mostly POWs, on Maryland farms to boost production during World War II. Improved nutrition education after finding a high percentage of draft rejects were malnourished. SPRING 2014 TERP 11


FROM PLOT TO PLATE STUDENTS GROW FOOD FOR CAMPUS, NEEDY AT NEW TERP FARM UMD’S APPETITE for locally grown food has planted the seed for a new campus-run farming operation. Terp Farm, located 15 miles south of the university on its crop research facility in Upper Marlboro, will grow vegetables year-round. The kale, tomatoes, peppers, herbs and more will be incorporated into select dishes in the dining halls and on the Green Tidings mobile food truck and will be distributed to people in need on campus and in the College Park community. While students already have some opportunities to grow food at the Public Health Garden and on the dining hall rooftops, this project is unique because of its scope, says Allison Lilly M.P.H. ’12, sustainability and wellness coordinator for Dining Services, who is managing Terp Farm.

1975: Co-sponsored the first MidAtlantic conference on no-till farming as part of its leadership in introducing the then-revolutionary technique.

1954: Launched program promoting better construction of farm structures after Hurricane Hazel destroyed 700 tobacco barns and 2,000 poultry houses. 12 TERP.UMD.EDU

“We’re not only saying we want to buy food locally,” she says. “We want to have our community engaged in the production of that food.” The three-year pilot project, funded by a $124,400 grant from the UMD Sustainability Fund, brings together Dining Services, the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and the Office of Sustainability—and a lot of students. Seniors majoring in plant science and landscape architecture helped design the layout of the farm, which takes up two acres of the 202-acre former tobacco farm. They provided recommendations on crop selections, planting schedules, post-harvest handling and food-safety measures. Other students in an Institute of Applied Agriculture course helped determine which crops would be most

1983: Came together with state and federal government to act for the first time to improve the quality of the Chesapeake Bay.

1978: Began Master Gardeners program to train people- and plantloving citizens (including 1,850 active today) to help others create sustainable gardens and landscapes.

profitable. Communication students organized a kickoff celebration event for the farm in April. Professor Chris Walsh will hold his horticulture course lab on the site, and some students are lobbying for an agriculture mechanics class there. The farm’s lead agricultural technician, Guy Kilpatric (below center), hopes to offer specialized training for students planning careers as independent farmers. “This is going to be a great opportunity for students—it’s going to be heavily used,” says Associate Professor Scott Glenn. He was on his hands and knees there on Earth Day, April 22, helping a dozen plant science seniors create the farm’s first native pollinator

2000: Initiated the Food Supplement Nutrition Education program to educate food stamp recipients about healthy eating on a limited income. (In 2013, more than 30,000 people participated.)

2002: Kicked off Operation Military Kids to provide support and organize outings and events for children of deployed National Guard members. PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI


School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies Director Leigh Wilson Smiley, third from left, rehearses with UMD and High Point High School students at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center.

garden. The black-eyed susans, lavender, aster and sedum will attract beneficial insects. Then the students planted mountain mint, rye grasses and other flowers (all cultivated in the campus greenhouse) outside a scrubbed-up old poultry barn that will be used for cleaning and packing the harvested vegetables. “Students are really going to respond to getting locally grown food,” said Katie Litkowski ’14, wearing garden gloves and dirt-stained sneakers. “I want to come back in 10 years and see how this has grown, and think, ‘I was a part of that.’”—LB

MASTERPIECE

Hidden Histories CLASS CREATES BILINGUAL PERFORMANCE TO SHARE IMMIGRANT STUDENTS’ STORIES

2012: Organized the Health Insurance Literacy Initiative, which spread to other states, to help people evaluate their options for health insurance.

2008: Started Annie’s Project, an education program to empower women in agriculture to successfully run their operations.

One spoke of traversing most of Central America, Colombia and three U.S. states by the time he was in high school. Another revealed her shame at being kicked out of restaurants because her family was too big. Another spoke of her struggles translating for her parents while she was learning English herself. Immigrant teenagers from a nearby Prince George’s County high school shared such memories, in many cases for the first time, through a new partnership this semester with the School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies (TDPS). “Many of these youth have been through pretty harrowing times,” says TDPS Director Leigh Wilson Smiley, who teaches the class called “Community Partnership in the Performing Arts.” “Our students can’t even imagine that. This is an opportunity to learn something about the world and give back.” The students, eight from UMD and around 15 from High Point High School, developed a bilingual performance of poetry, music and dance, performed both at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center and at Langley Park Day in May. One of TDPS’ goals is to teach students

to turn life experiences into art. “I feel safe, like I can say anything here,” says ninth-grader Enma Paola Licona, who came to the United States from Honduras when she was 5. “I never thought people would have the same experiences as me.” For the college students, most of whom have immigrant parents, sharing their own struggles was cathartic. “I’ve never shared this much with this many people at the same time,” says Moriamo Akibu ’15, who talked about her father abandoning her family when she was young. “It’s liberating.” The course was funded in part by the Foxworth Creative Enterprise Initiative, the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, and Smiley, who also drove the bus to pick up the high school students twice a week. “They call me Miss Frizzle,” she says, referring to the adventurous teacher in the “Magic School Bus” books. She hopes having the High Point students at the university this semester has inspired them to go to college. “We want these students to think about education as a wonderful place to grow their own potential,” Smiley says.—KS SPRING 2014 TERP 13


Pieces of UMD DID YOU KNOW that the university once had a working dairy? Or that the bronze Testudo in front of McKeldin Library is modeled after a real terrapin (now preserved)? Or that maids used to clean students’ dorm rooms? You can learn all that, and more, from the University Archives, which holds hundreds of important, fun and quirky items from UMD’s history:

SHOOTING TO THE TOP Rifle was the only intercollegiate sport offered to UMD women in the 1920s, and the team was outstanding, winning numerous intercollegiate championships from 1922 to 1941. This target belonged to individual champion Irene Knox.

THE RIGHT STUFF(ING) This is the original Testudo, which helped unveil the first statue on Class Day in June 1933. It died shortly thereafter and was stuffed. Today, it’s kept in a customdesigned display case at the Archives at Hornbake Library. Just ask to see it!

WORN BY A LEGEND This football jersey belonged to Geary F. Eppley ’20, for whom the recreation center is named. The football and track star-turned-professor, coach and administrator guided the development of the student union and Memorial Chapel and managed the influx of students after World War II.

WE DRINK TO HISTORY This milk bottle came from the Dairy, which opened in 1925. For many years, the campus kept cows and produced butter, cheese and ice cream from their milk. Today, UMD produces ice cream with milk from other sources, since only a few cows are left on campus. You can try Dairy ice cream at the Stamp Student Union.

Visit terp.umd.edu to see more examples of Terp artifacts.

14 TERP.UMD.EDU

FROM AN ENDING, A START This cornerstone box was salvaged from the ruins of the Barracks in the aftermath of the Great Fire of 1912, which burned down the heart of the campus.

“TO DO OR NOT TO DO” These booklets, offering guidelines on behavior for female students, were distributed by the Maryland Women’s League around 1940. Helpful tidbits include: “Be a good sport about sitting where the head waiter places you. You may discover that the meek little fellow on your left is a potential Prince Charming.”


A Head Covering With a Cause NEW SCHOLARSHIP HELPS STUDENT HELP MUSLIM WOMEN SOPHOMORE OMAR GOHEER’S burgeoning attempt to change the world began with rainstorms and a wet headscarf. After hearing a friend complain about the solubility of her hijab, the traditional Islamic head covering, Goheer (right) started on an entrepreneurial path and can stay on it, thanks to the new TerpStart Matching Scholarship program. A Muslim himself, Goheer surveyed fellow Terps and other friends and their classmates across the country to gauge the market for a waterproof hijab. Instead, he discovered a second frustration: They’re uncomfortable in warm weather. Now Goheer, a double major in economics and chemistry in the Honors College’s Entrepreneurship and Innovation Program, is developing a hijab that can breathe a little easier and then be sold by Muslim women in their own countries, à la Mary Kay. He named his company K. Sultana after his mother, but the symbolism goes beyond that. “Sultana,” which means “Queen” in Arabic, reflects Omar’s belief that women in Muslim countries and around the world deserve to be treated like one. “(They) deserve the right to an education, equal rights in society,” he says. With Maryland students annually facing approximately $80 million in unmet financial need, TerpStart donors create an endowment of at least $30,000 to fund students from any college, school, major or department. The university matches the income generated each year from those endowments to exponentially increase their reach. Goheer says it offers “peace of mind.” “I can definitely just focus more on (the project) than worry about any financial problems.” He’s one of the students benefitting from a scholarship established by Ryan L. Dearborn ’90, chief executive officer and chairman of the real estate firm Wood Partners and a member of UMD’s board of trustees. Dearborn says students are at a critical point to start getting entrepreneurial experience. “It’s a period when you can make mistakes,” he says. “It just helps you get to the next stage. This is a way to experiment, to learn, to try things.” Goheer hopes to have a sellable product by the Islamic Society of North America’s summer convention, and thinks sheer georgette fabric may be the sweet spot between lightweight but slippery silk and tough but hot wool. Beyond that, he is looking forward to more chances to take advantage of Maryland’s innovative atmosphere. “You view the world’s problems as an opportunity,” Goheer says.—LF

TerpStart DONORS CREATE AN ENDOWMENT OF AT LEAST

$30,000 TO FUND STUDENTS FROM ANY COLLEGE, SCHOOL MAJOR OR DEPARTMENT.

For more information on TerpStart, visit terpstart.umd.edu.

PHOTOS PHOTOS BY JOHN BY JOHN T. CONSOLI; T. CONSOLI PHOTO CREDITS

Hanifah Batool ’12, chief financial officer of K. Sultana, models an SPRINGprototype. 2014 TERP 15 early headscarf


INNOVATION

Talk About Digital Firepower MARYLAND FACULTY , researchers and students are learning how to use a new suite of software with a commercial value of $750 million, courtesy of Siemens Corp. Jim Zahniser, UMD’s executive director of engineering IT, says the software streamlines the product design process, allowing students to use one system to go from conception to manufacture. He says experience with the tool, which is actually a bundle of nine pieces of software widely used in industry, will give students a leg up as they apply for jobs. A computer-aided design course incorporated the software last fall, and this spring, undergraduates on the Terps Racing Team used it to design their racecar. “Sometimes it’s a little bit overwhelming, with so many different pieces,” says Zahniser. “But it’s a great opportunity to see what we can do.”—DK

16 TERP.UMD.EDU

Teachers in training get experience with common challenges such as angry, withdrawn or overly eager students— digital avatars in the new TeachLivE technology being tested by Assistant Professor Jade Wexler.

Virtual Classroom, Real Teaching SIMULATION PROJECT TRAINS TEACHERS TO FACE STUDENT CHALLENGES MEGAN TAYMAN was about to begin teaching visceral but controllable training: “It feels real to when she noticed a student texting on her phone. the teachers, but there are no humans, so they Tayman asked her to stop. The eighth-grader shot don’t have to practice on flesh-and-blood stuher a look and, with maximum teen petulance, dents. It’s the best of both worlds.” said: “Hold on a minute, lemme finish my text.” Wexler, who collaborates with researchers at Such situations aren’t easy for novice teachers the University of Central Florida, has been experisuch as Tayman. In this case, though, the student menting with the system since 2011. This year, wasn’t real. She was a digital avatar, who existed dozens of her students have interacted with a only on a large-screen TV in a classroom in the range of avatars aged 12 to 17, who present a variBenjamin Building. ety of challenges: They are confused, withdrawn, The simulation, called TeachLivE, is an innovasullen, angry, overly eager, and so on—the kind tive experiment to help teachers learn to handle of behavior that may confound new teachers. difficult classroom scenarios. TeachLivE is part of a trend in education, using “It’s very realistic,” says Tayman M.A. ’14, immersive computer simulation to prepare teachwho solved the problem by walking over to ers. Wexler recognizes that the approach is not the student, repeating her request and calmly yet proven, and so she and her Central Florida waiting for her to put the phone away. “You can’t colleagues are conducting a randomized trial of always take what you learn in lectures and TeachLivE. They are testing 240 Maryland practice it in the classroom. With the middle school and high school biology avatars we can do that.” teachers to find out whether the avatar The project is run by Jade Wexler, an method changes how they teach, Watch the TeachLivE assistant professor in the Department and how well their students learn. technology in action of Counseling, Higher Education, and Preliminary results should be out by at terp.umd.edu. Special Education. She says it provides this summer.—DK ILLUSTRATION COURTESY OF JIM ZAHNISER; PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI; OPPOSITE PAGE INFOGRAPHIC BY JASMINE BYERS


Crowd(funding) Control YOUR EXTRA $10 IS MORE POWERFUL THAN YOU THINK, thanks to the booming trend of crowdfunding. Instead of one person giving $10 million to a cause, now a million people with $10 can do a lot of good. Joe Bailey, a research associate professor of finance and executive director of the QUEST honors program, walks us through how pooling our money can turn a mini-investor into a movie producer, a banker, a mortgage lender, a venture capitalist or a philanthropist.

NO

YES

DO YOU WANT TO INVEST IT?

YES

YES YES

EAT LUNCH AT PANERA.

NO

WHY BE SUCH A GROUCH?

WANT TO DO SOCIAL GOOD?

NO

WILLING TO ASK? YES

WANT TO FEEL LIKE BILL GATES?

YES

DO YOU WANT TO BORROW IT?

YES

ARE YOU HIGH RISK?

GO TO A BANK! DUH.

NO

YES YES

NO NO

WANT TO EARN MONEY ON YOUR INVESTMENT?

NO

HELP PEOPLE IN NEED OVERSEAS? NO

YES

NO

BUY A LOTTERY TICKET.

HELP A CREATIVE VENTURE?

LIVE OUTSIDE OF THE U.S?

YES

A NONPROFIT that allows people with as little as $25 to make loans, and ultimately reduce poverty, through microfinance institutions in 70 nations.

A WEB PLATFORM where people post descriptions of their creative projects, and anyone can fund them and get rewards for it.

A BANKING ALTERNATIVE that connects people who need loans with investors, who get repaid with interest.

KIVA

KICKSTARTER

PROSPER

kiva.org

kickstarter.com

prosper.com

PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI; PHOTO CREDITS

UMD debuted its own crowdfunding site in April, Launch UMD. Starting this fall, it will showcase more student- and faculty-led projects needing your support. For more details, visit www.launch.umd.edu.

SPRING 2014 TERP 17


NEWSDESK University of Maryland faculty are the source news media turn to for expertise.

App to Keep Athletes on Track PROFESSOR AIMS TO IMPROVE ATHLETES’ HEALTH

“This won’t help if you went to too many rock concerts. But if this works in people, it might be useful for auditory processing disorders.” —PATRICK KANOLD, biology, on his study

that found putting mice in the dark improved their hearing, NPR.org, Feb. 5.

“The idea was just to trust that nature has designed a good way to do this.”

Kinesiology Professor Jim Hagberg is fairly dismissive of the time he spent as a distance runner—“I was a terrible one”—but he believes his latest research may hold the key to turning good athletes into great ones. Hagberg is the lead developer of the Training Optimization System (TOPS) app, which was a finalist in an Under Armour competition this spring to further develop its Armour39 workout tracking system. Through a module and chest strap, the Armour39 monitors an athlete’s biometrics and movement. Hagberg believes the science behind his company's app separates it from other products on the fitness market. TOPS starts by calculating maximum oxygen consumption based on personal data like birthdate, gender and heart rate, and also incorporates what sport and position a user plays. From there, the app tracks the water, glycogen, carbohydrates and fat burned or lost in workouts

and formulates a rehydration plan to restore the athlete to top shape. It even sends reminders to his or her phone. “If you can make athletes 5 percent better able to train, somewhere down the road that is going to pay off,” Hagberg says. “If you can prevent one stress fracture a year on a team, it could be huge.” Hagberg says the idea was born from his work with Maryland’s track and field and cross country teams, whose athletes didn’t always properly hydrate or take enough calcium to help prevent injuries—after all, an 18-year-old athlete still sometimes eats and drinks like an 18-year old. He is also currently working with men’s soccer, women’s field hockey and the men’s basketball teams. Future plans for the app include creating team packages to help coaching staffs and adding the ability to monitor calcium, vitamin D and iron.—LF

—KERSTIN NORDSTROM, physics, on her

efforts to build a robotic clam that mimics the underwater digging ability of the razor clam, Los Angeles Times, March 5.

“One of the biggest problems for bitcoins is people don’t understand how they are created and that’s not going to lead a lot of people to adopt it.”—HENRY C. LUCAS, information systems, on why bitcoin needs a marketing campaign, CNBC, April 20. HEAR FROM MORE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND EXPERTS IN THE MEDIA AT TWITTER.COM/ UMDRightNow.

4% Dehydration: Generate personalized rehydration plan.

85% Of maximal oxygen consumption (average exercise intensity).

Gra m s / M i n u te : Rate of fat u ti l i z ati o n .

65% Glycogen depleted: Generate persona lized repletion pla n.

18 TERP.UMD.EDU

1.2

What Does the App Say?


FACULTY Q & A

Steve Heston Goes All In FINANCE PROFESSOR STEVEN HESTON ’83 is well known for his formula that gives the value of an option when a stock’s risk fluctuates randomly. But Heston, whose experience includes faculty positions at Yale and Columbia and private-sector jobs with Goldman Sachs, is better known in some circles for a series of books applying game theory to no-limit Texas hold ’em poker. Initially published under the pseudonym Kim Lee (until Heston got tenure), the “Kill Phil” books outline a strategy to beat professional players like Phil Hellmuth. Heston donates all royalties to an orphanage in Haiti.­—BU

Q: HOW DOES A FINANCE PROFESSOR GET INVOLVED IN WRITING BOOKS ABOUT POKER THEORY? A: My co-authors, Lee Nelson and Blair Rodman, sought me out to develop simplified computer-based strategies. I explained that equilibrium calculations would be computationally infeasible because we don’t know the opponents’ strategy. My co-authors, who earn their living playing poker, told me, ‘We actually do know the rough strategies our opponents use!’ That real-world poker knowledge made it possible. I got involved for the fun and intellectual challenge. Q: CAN YOU EXPLAIN YOUR BASIC POKER THEORY? A: In order to fit into a book, the strategy is simplified to go all-in or fold every hand. We analyzed all possible head-to-head hand matchups on a 169 by 169 grid (169 represents all possible two-card combinations vs. 169 possible combinations of an opponent’s hand). Going all in may seem risky, but sometimes the biggest risk is not taking one at all. An advantage of this all-or-nothing strategy for a beginner is that it intimidates other players and neutralizes the professional player’s skill advantage. It’s like challenging a martial arts expert to a duel at two paces with hand grenades. Q: IF YOU HAD $10,000 TO INVEST, WOULD YOU INVEST IN THE OPTIONS MARKET BASED ON THE HESTON MODEL OR IN A POKER TOURNAMENT, BASED ON YOUR MATHBASED POKER STRATEGIES? A: (Laughs) It’s hard to make money without risk. Financial markets are very efficient, and my option formula is widely available to option traders through Bloomberg systems. Similarly, the higher levels of poker have adapted to published strategies. Like most people who are smart enough to beat poker, I can make more money doing other things.

PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

Q: DO YOU USE POKER STRATEGIES TO TEACH YOUR STUDENTS FINANCE? A: Not specifically, but there are lessons we can learn from poker. A friend of mine was sometimes staked by other players. When he was playing with other people’s money, he played looser and took more risks than he would take with his own money. This resembles what happened in the housing market collapse. With the U.S. government implicitly insuring losses on “too big to fail” institutions, banks were encouraged to make riskier loans, until it all fell apart. When losses are subsidized, people just pay too little heed to risk. Options and poker theory are fun because they prove that math works in the real world. Watch Anthony Curtis, publisher of the three “Kill Phil” books, incorrectly apply Heston’s “all-in” theory against poker pro Sammy Farha with disastrous results at terp.umd.edu.

SPRING 2014 TERP 19


OPPORTUNITIES TO AIR STUDENT-CREATED CONTENT ON THE BIG TEN NETWORK

CENTERPIECE

“This is really an unparalleled opportunity for us to get even more broadcast content on the air. Students can learn how be journalists by doing journalism and getting it on the Big Ten Network.”—Lucy Dalglish, dean of the Philip Merrill College of Journalism

The Big Ten Network covers 90 million homes in the U.S. and 26 other countries.

CONFERENCE IMPACT TO EXTEND ACROSS CAMPUS On July 1, the university officially joins the Big Ten Conference, with team competition beginning in the fall. While the most visible elements of the move will be on the football field, basketball court and other sports facilities, this is more than a change in athletic conferences. “It’s an institution-wide integration with the Big Ten and the CIC,” the Committee on Institutional Cooperation, the conference’s academic arm, says UMD President Wallace Loh. “Arts, academics, research—all will be enhanced by this move.” Here’s a look at where the B1G changes are taking place:

VASTLY INCREASED ACCESS TO LIBRARY VOLUMES “What we had here before the CIC was access— beginning with our own collections—to about 5 million volumes. Now we have immediate access to the combined CIC libraries of more than 90 million volumes.”—Patricia Steele, dean of University Libraries

Through combined purchasing, this year the Libraries put $200,000 in funds into a common pot, and got back $1.2 million in benefits in databases.

A LOUDER VOICE IN STUDENT LOBBYING “We’re having Big Ten on the Hill, where all the Big Ten student governments around the country come to the capital. We lobby representatives on affordable textbooks and increased research funding and things like that. When we lobby together, it’s a lot more effective and we have more clout in getting meetings.”—Samantha Zwerling, president of the Student Government Association

PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI; ILLUSTRATIONS BY MEGAN BLAIR


STRENGTHENED SUPPORT FOR STUDENT-ATHLETES THE BIG TEN THEATRE CONSORTIUM’S INITIATIVE ENCOURAGING FEMALE PLAYWRITING “None of our departments could have commissioned a play with the amount of money required to pay a playwright, but together, we can do it. Being a part of the Big Ten lets us share resources and have a national dialogue to advance and transform the art.” —Leigh Smiley Wilson, director of the School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies

“Good Kids,” bringing together at least three CIC theater departments, will examine a notorious 2012 rape case in Steubenville, Ohio. It will premiere at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center in early 2015.

“There’s no question financially this is going to help our student-athletes tremendously. It will allow us to compete at the highest level academically and athletically.” —Kevin Anderson, director of Intercollegiate Athletics

LEADERSHIP TRAINING FOR UP-AND-COMING FACULTY ADMINISTRATORS “The CIC program brings together academic leaders to a series of seminars that help them see the bigger picture of higher education and give them a chance to interact with future leaders.”—Steven Marcus, director of faculty leadership

REAL-TIME SHARING OF RARE COURSES BETWEEN INSTITUTIONS “University of Maryland students this fall will have a chance to take a course in pre-modern Korean history that will be taught at the University of Michigan. It gives our students a chance to take a course that is not open at Maryland.” —Seung-kyung Kim, professor and chair of the Department of Women’s Studies

UMD's Amy Marquardt was one of only six recipients of the 2013–14 CIC Smithsonian Institution Fellowship. It provided a $30,000 stipend plus benefits so she could spend the year at the Smithsonian pursuing her doctoral research on bronze patinas. PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI; PHOTO CREDITS

A ONE-YEAR TRAVELING SCHOLAR PROGRAM FOR GRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCH “No single university can provide everything. This is a perfect solution for students who want, for example, to study a language that’s not offered across many universities. It also allows students to go to another campus where there are faculty who also work in their field.”—Chuck Caramello, dean of the Graduate School

SPRING 2014 TERP 21


cancer champion

hope inoperable

professor

chordoma

leader

physicist

rare 22 TERP.UMD.EDU

life

hospitals

determine

experime

tumo

uncertai

cru

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ca

fami

superman


pain eed Things The diagnosis high-dose radiation

independent

neuropathy

ental trial

mentor He DIAGNOSED WITH RARE CANCER, HONORS DIRECTOR OFFERS LESSON IN LIVING FULLY

Carries ors

inty

usader

BY LAUREN BROWN | PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN T. CONSOLI

AT FIRST , physicist Bill Dorland blamed the discomfort in his lower back on a

bad trip down the Tiny Timbers ride at Hersheypark. Now the executive director of Maryland’s Honors College, Dorland rode a figurative roller coaster for another five years as other symptoms piled up, everything from difficulty using the bathroom to searing pain when driving long distances.

screen, asked offhandedly how long he’d been following “this.” Dorland peered over, trying not to betray his panic, and asked if the bright blob was his liver. “No,” she said. “That’s your tumor.”

ane

ily

trailblazer

Finally, in July 2004, he was getting an MRI when the technician, glancing at the

rsevere

n

injections

This summer marks a decade since Dorland was diagnosed with chordoma, a rare and incurable form of cancer that typically kills its victims in seven to 10 years. In other words, Dorland, now 48, isn’t supposed to be alive today. But he decided back then to proceed matterof-factly like the scientist he is. Inquiry. Research. Analysis of data. His conclusion: He would keep living the life he already had. Now, he’s undergoing a clinical trial that has remarkably shrunk his most recent two tumors. The tradeoff: an inexplicable, devastating case of neuropathy in his feet that has forced him to start relying on a cane. And while he’s mostly kept quiet about a

decade of real-life drama, he volunteered to teach the opening class of a new “Deconstructing ‘Breaking Bad’” honors course by sharing his story with students. While a rotating cast of faculty led discussions such as whether entrepreneurship is always good, or the economics of the drug trade, Dorland’s topic was how a universal health care system could have changed the TV series. “As a meditation on whether we can control our lives to any extent, it’s a fantastic show,” he says later. “In season 4, episode three or four, Walt says to another cancer patient who’s worried about being tossed in the wind, Bull****, everybody dies. You get to decide how you live.”

surgery

incurable SPRING 2014 TERP 23


STAR OF SOMETHING NEW From the start, Dorland was an independent thinker, an overachieving crusader. He and his mother moved in their trailer 16 times by the time they settled in rural Arkansas when he was in fourth grade. His dad, he says easily, is a nudist who lives off the grid with llamas outside his trailer, and raccoons and ducks cavorting around inside. His parents married more than a dozen times, and he has had more step- and half-siblings than he can count. As a result of all that, he read a lot and learned to make friends fast. He spent a high school summer in Japan, so he was surprised upon his arrival at the University of Texas, with an enrollment of 51,000, that only eight students a year were studying abroad for credit through the institution. He and a friend mounted a campaign to expand scholarship funding to encourage UT students to study overseas and international students to come to Texas. The new student fee ultimately passed the state legislature (a year after Dorland graduated as UT’s top male student) and spread to the entire Texas university system.

His appetite for public service whetted, he told Princeton University that he would only pursue his doctorate in astrophysics there if he could simultaneously earn a master’s in public administration. He finished both in five years. Dorland focused his research on turbulent, magnetized plasmas, which means he tries to predict the properties of matter when it gets heated to temperatures of 100 million degrees. During an internship on nuclear policy at the U.S. Department of State, he got interested in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project, designed to generate power on a huge scale. Later, through computer modeling, he and three colleagues at Texas and Princeton discovered flaws in the engineering design, the equivalent of throwing a Molotov cocktail into the nuclear fusion community. Their findings, which appeared first in Science, reached a broad public in the New York Times in December 1996. The National Academy of Sciences called for a review, and the U.S. ultimately pulled out of the $10 billion project. Dorland joined Maryland’s faculty

in 2001. Professor Jordan Goodman, then-chair of the physics department, hired him as a full-time faculty member a few years later. He wasn’t looking to hire anyone in Dorland's specialty field, but, he recalls, “We saw Bill, and we said, This guy is sensational. Crap, we have no choice but to hire him.” The Department of Energy honored Dorland in 2009 for the body of research that began with ITER. By that time, he needed the cash prize that came with the award. CRITICAL MASS Dorland’s resume was irrelevant to doctors. When in the late 1990s he began suffering from constipation, doctors told him to change his diet and get more rest. His daughter, Kendall, was born in 1997, and doctors attributed his pain to lifting her improperly. “As a physicist who knows about force and levers, I was pretty annoyed,” he says. The MRI in 2004 changed all that. By the end of the day he was at Johns Hopkins Hospital, where a nurse took Dorland’s scans to Dr. Ziya Gokaslan,

persevere Dorland talks about his leg and foot pain with Dr. Christopher Heery, a National Cancer Institute staff clinician running a research trial at the National Institutes of Health. "This is the safe place to complain," another of his doctors, Harpreet Singh, had told him.

24 TERP.UMD.EDU


live large. “I HAD EVERY EXCUSE TO

BUT I WAS HAPPY WITH MY LIFE,  AND I DIDN’T WANT TO CHANGE ANYTHING.”

—BILL DORLAND

vice chairman of neurosurgery. The nurse popped back 10 minutes later with the news that Dorland had chordoma. Dorland, ever the optimist, recalls his relief at finally having an authoritative diagnosis—but it was a bleak one. Only one person in 2 million has chordoma, a form of cancer that occurs along the spine. There is no cure—after treatment, more tumors just grow back. Gokaslan, the nation’s foremost expert on this disease, said Dorland’s tumor, along with four vertebrae and his coccyx, needed to be removed right away. He asked for four weeks to assemble the seven-surgeon team—and for $50,000 up front to pay for the operation, which Dorland’s health insurer had deemed “experimental.” (Dorland can’t help but feel a connection to “Breaking Bad’s” antihero, Walter White, who transformed from mild chemistry teacher to drug kingpin after being diagnosed with terminal cancer that required a costly surgery.) Dorland quickly sought a second opinion, and a loan—he and his wife, Sarah Penniston-Dorland, now an associate professor of geology at Maryland, could scrape together only $15,000 on such short notice. An aunt said not to worry, that a distant family member he’d never met could take care of the rest. He soon discovered via online sleuthing that this man was defending himself against multiple federal criminal charges. Maybe, he wondered, he should refuse a loan from such a person. But maybe

such principled stances aren’t for people whose lives are at stake. The man generously sent all $50,000, which the Dorlands later repaid. CARRY ON The surgery was a success, though definitions of “success” with cancer tend to change. While the rest of us might mind having a three-inch scar on our chin caused by lying facedown for a 12-hour operation, Dorland brushed it off as a “dimple.” Simultaneous vomiting and fainting as he stood for the first time post-op? Sarah can smile about that now. Permanent incontinence, however, was not so easily dismissed. Thus, Dorland’s famous backpack. As head of the Honors College, home to 4,200 of the university’s brightest undergraduates, Dorland is an administrator as well as a faculty member, mentor and researcher. He’s a big shot. But he often wears Hawaiian shirts or tees and loose-fitting khakis instead of a suit, and he always carries a black Under Armour backpack rather than a briefcase. The common explanation on campus is that Dorland is exceptionally approachable. That’s true. It’s also true that he requires urinary catheters, colostomy supplies and more. The “accoutrements,” as he calls them, fill the backpack. “A backpack blends right in on a college campus,” he says. “I do put my laptop in there so people can think it’s just for work.” His uncertain future also made him

much more reflective. Go to Disney World? Get a new car? he recalls half-jokingly. “I had every excuse to live large,” he says. “But I was happy with my life, and I didn’t want to change anything.” The exception: A close Maryland colleague suggested that without mobility and continence, Dorland would belong in a nursing home. Dorland then promised himself this: He would from that point on work closely only with people he likes. Which he does. But it made him reticent to talk about his struggles or miss work. Through seven surgeries and treatments over the years, Dorland estimates he’s taken off a total of six weeks. At Honors, which he’s led since 2008, he’s barreled ahead, launching four additional living and learning programs, doubling the size of the faculty, adding dozens of creative new classes, and cultivating a culture of intellectual engagement as well as a stronger sense of community. Meanwhile, he’s published another 35 physics papers, supervised scores of Honors 100 courses, and advised several doctoral students at Maryland and Oxford University, where he’s a visiting professor. “At the end of a long day, Bill is still sitting at a table with his graduate students,” says Cathy Barks, associate director of the Honors College. “He always puts a good face on what must be incredibly painful, physically and emotionally. “The way Bill copes makes it much easier for the rest of us to cope. It’s an incredible gift.”

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incredibly pa “B ILL ALWAYS PUTS A GOOD FACE ON WHAT MUST BE

PHYSICALLY AND EMOTIONALLY.” —C ATHY BARKS, ASSOCIATE

DIRECTOR

OF THE HONORS COLLEGE

INTO UNKNOWN TERRITORY Dorland hates references to people “fighting” cancer because, he says, that implies that succumbing to the disease means they didn’t fight hard enough. Nobody can accuse him of that. An MRI in 2005 found several more tumors, and another surgery followed, to remove them and rearrange his gastrointestinal tract. The following year, he underwent a bombardment of high-dose radiation therapy at Massachusetts General Hospital, commuting back and forth to his Catonsville, Md., home and campus, and to conferences around the country. Dorland, whose career is based on quantifying uncertainty, had to learn to live with total uncertainty. He managed the disease for a few years, with another golf ball-size tumor taken out in 2009. Sarah

Dorland, flanked by his wife Sarah and daughter Kendall, traveled to Morocco last summer to camp in the desert and ride on camels. Despite his disease, the family also counts recent trips to Catalina Island, Hawaii and Italy.

26 TERP.UMD.EDU

compared the scars on his backside to a right-lateral slip fault. Geologist humor. But in 2012 two new tumors were deemed inoperable because of their hard-to-reach positions around his spine. Worse, they couldn’t be irradiated, because he’d previously received the maximum amount permitted. “This is where we were getting really worried,” Sarah says. “Nobody wanted to treat them.” He, Sarah and Kendall started family medical crisis counseling sessions. He wrote the 36 students running Honors 100 classes with him to reveal for the first time he had cancer. The physics department took up a collection for his expenses in New York. His students made him a card that portrayed him as Superman. Hundreds of Honors

students participated in a 5K run to fund research for rare diseases. These gestures lifted his spirits immeasurably. “At every moment,” he says, “someone was there for me.” That November, Dorland became only the fourth person to enroll in an experimental trial at Hopkins using injections of bacteria in hopes that they would start fighting the tumors (“sort of like ‘War of the Worlds’ crossed with ‘Alien,’” he told Facebook friends). In March 2103, at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, he was the ninth person to undergo six rounds of a super-targeted radiation treatment that relied on “temporary organ displacement.” In other words, before a beam delivered high-dose radiation to the tumors, doctors moved nearby organs out of the way to ensure they didn’t get zapped, too. The radiation still wrecked his digestive system, though, and he was hospitalized for another week last May. Dorland is now in a third clinical trial, this one for patients with all kinds of cancers, at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., again getting immune therapy injections. His tumors have shrunk a remarkable 30 percent, says Dr. Christopher Heery, the National Cancer Institute staff clinician who is running the study. (By volume, the tumors are only one-third of their largest size.) Dorland is the only person with such results. It’s raised the question of whether the combination of radiation and the cancer vaccine might be the answer. Heery and the Chordoma Foundation, which Dorland

m


ainful,

A FOUNDATION FOR A CURE

Dorland leads a meeting of faculty, postdocs, graduate students and undergraduates interested in plasma turbulence. Besides running the Honors College, Dorland has continued to advance research and mentor doctoral students in this field.

mentor helped launch (see sidebar at right), are starting to plan a new trial that mimics his radiation-immunotherapy pairing. “The amount of tumor shrinkage is impressive—whether it was from the vaccine or not,” Heery says. “It would be unusual for this to happen with radiation alone.” Meanwhile, Dorland, Sarah and Kendall went to Morocco last summer, after he taught at Oxford again. Kendall is about to go off to college. The empty nesters are thinking of moving closer to campus and considering an apartment with an elevator for Bill.

The excruciating pain in his heels, a side effect of who-knows-which treatment, prompted doctors to approve handicapped parking for him. It took him two more months, and two falls on campus, to acknowledge he needed it, and the cane. Now he’s fending off recommendations that he consider a wheelchair. Instead, Dorland keeps walking, gingerly. In the “Breaking Bad” class, he’s the first one up to get the lights whenever it’s time to show a clip. And when the class ends, he still smiles as he talks to students, his backpack slung over his arm. TERP

A major reason there are clinical trials for chordoma patients like Bill Dorland? He helped start the national organization that has successfully advocated for them. The nonprofit Chordoma Foundation also encourages collaboration among the few researchers studying the rare disease and supports patients, including providing information about treatment options. An informal alliance of six or seven patients came up with the idea for the foundation around a table at a 2006 conference of the National Organization for Rare Disorders. “It was so great to meet someone with chordoma who wasn’t on the way to the emergency room,” Dorland recalls. Since then, says Executive Director Josh Sommer, the foundation has raised more than $5 million and established a “biobank” of frozen chordoma tissue and cell lines so critical for research. It also connects patients and researchers, such as the NIH’s Dr. Christopher Heery, who may struggle to recruit people with such a rare disease for their clinical trials. Sommer credits Dorland with pushing for the first conference that brought together chordoma patients and researchers, and calls him a trusted authority in the patient community. “He’s influenced our thinking, he’s supported us financially, and he has been a major champion for the foundation within the patient community,” Sommer says. “Bill’s a true example of the influence that one patient can have.”

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E S T A T E of the

S T A T E UMD STUDENTS, FACULTY BRING NEW LIFE TO MARYLAND FOUNDER’S HOME IN ENGLAND BY KAREN SHIH ’09

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PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, PHOTOS BY JOHN PLANNING T. CONSOLI; ANDPHOTO PRESERVATION CREDITS


If

you’re looking for the University of Maryland’s oldest landmark, you won’t find it nearby at Morrill Hall or the Rossborough Inn—or even at Riversdale Mansion, former home to the university’s founder. Instead, you’ll have to cross the Atlantic and travel the winding roads of the northern English countryside, past grazing lambs and ruined abbeys, to a 17th century estate. Kiplin Hall, a magnificent country home, is the ancestral seat of the powerful Calvert family that founded not just the university, but also the state of Maryland. In 1987, a UMD professor brought a group of students to the hall for the first time, reconnecting the university with its founding family. Since then, hundreds of other Terps have arrived to study its unique architecture and help improve the estate, Maryland’s version of Downton Abbey.

PHOTOS BY JOHN T. CONSOLI; PHOTO CREDITS

The Calvert Legacy George Calvert, the first Lord Baltimore, was a Catholic who never quite fit in in Protestant England, and the hunting lodge he had built on 800 acres near his childhood home reflected his individuality. The three-story house was constructed of red brick, rather than traditional Yorkshire sandstone. Its four towers were arranged in the middle of each wall, instead of at the corners, giving the building from a bird’s-eye view the sense of having a cross through it. The house, built in the 1620s, was a testament to the influence he’d gained at the English royal court. Calvert came from modest means, but his gift for languages caught the eye of James I, who named him secretary of state. While at court, Calvert had to convert to Anglicanism. But in 1624, he reaffirmed his Catholic faith and resigned. James I, to reward his years of loyalty, bestowed on him his title.

Calvert turned his eye to the New World, hoping to create a colony for religious freedom, as well as to discover new economic opportunities. After a failed attempt in Newfoundland, he looked to the rich tobacco fields of Virginia, just north of the Potomac River. Calvert died just before Charles I granted the charter, but his son, Cecil, was able to realize his dream. The Ark and The Dove, carrying about 200 settlers, landed in Maryland in 1634. Leonard, Cecil’s younger brother, became Maryland’s first governor. Two centuries later, their descendant Charles Benedict Calvert provided the vision and the land to create what became UMD. In 1851, he proposed a plan for the Maryland Agricultural College, and he sold the college his 428acre Rossborough Farm, part of his vast Riversdale estate, to serve as its home.

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Reviving Kiplin For years, students from the School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation painted, sawed and hammered each summer at the Chalfonte Hotel in the seaside resort of Cape May, N.J. Guided by architecture Professor David Fogle, they helped the oldest continuously operating hotel in the city—in business since 1867—maintain its Victorian charm. Their efforts, documented in a 1985 newspaper article, caught the eye of wealthy business owner Leonard Crewe, president of the Maryland Historical Society and a Kiplin Hall trustee. He had a proposition: Take your work to England. Kiplin Hall had been in steady decline over most of the last century. Its heyday was in the 1800s, when tenants farmed the 5,000 acres surrounding the house and provided the family with a comfortable living. But in the early 1900s, as the aristocracy lost its grip on power and money (much like the Crawley family on the PBS show), many moved to London and abandoned their expensive country estates. One of Kiplin’s last owners sold off most of the land and the valuable Italian art inside. The last blow came during World War II, when the Royal Air Force and army requisitioned the property for its troops. Bridget Talbot, the house’s final owner, tried—with only partial success—to stop them from using paintings for target practice and destroying furniture for kindling. Though unable to keep up with Kiplin’s maintenance, Talbot fended off its demolition in 1953. She tried to interest environmental, educational and social welfare organizations in using it, advertised it as a conference center and even traveled to Maryland to plead for financial help. Talbot died in 1971, leaving the house in the hands of the Kiplin Hall Trust. The trustees reached out to Crewe, who had first visited in the late 1960s, to see if he

Students conduct an archaeological survey this spring. Kiplin Hall sits in an area rich in prehistoric and Roman archaeological sites, and medieval industrial or ecclesiastical remains may also be on the grounds.

could help. In 1975 he arranged funding for its new roof, a crucial step in giving the house any chance of survival. But when Fogle and his students arrived in Yorkshire in the summer of 1987, it was apparent the house needed much more. Jim Shetler M. Arch. ’91 was in that first group. “The main rooms were maintained, but half the place was a mess,” he says. “There were rooms with furniture piled up, wallpaper falling down and stuff everywhere.” They focused on two rooms on the top floor, ripping out a bathroom and painting and repairing walls, trim and plaster. But they soon discovered mold had virtually taken over the house, so to avoid risking their health, the students stopped working in the main hall. (It should have been off-limits to them in the first place: Since 1953, Kiplin Hall had been designated a “Grade 1” building by English Heritage, the British

agency that oversees historic buildings, meaning only architects and contractors from an approved list were allowed to work on the house.) Instead, the students turned their attention to the former stables, where they replaced windows and put down slate floor, carrying out part of a design by an architect hired by the estate’s trustees. It became the Maryland Study Centre at Kiplin Hall, supported in part by the Maryland Foundation for Kiplin Hall and the state. It now includes a kitchen, several bathrooms and room for up to 20 students. Maryland students have returned there every year since. “When our students go to Paris and Rome, where they stay and what they look at applies to hundreds of universities over the ages,” says Fogle, now a professor emeritus. “But this was absolutely unique… It’s a connection that doesn’t exist anywhere else.”

T H E H A L L T H ROUGH T H E CE N T U R I E S 1722 Christopher Crowe buys the hall from his stepson, Charles Calvert the fifth Lord Baltimore.

1620s George Calvert, first Lord Baltimore, builds Kiplin Hall on 800 acres. 30 TERP.UMD.EDU

1720s Christopher adds a service wing and kitchens to the north, then a central staircase.

1818 Sarah (Crowe) Carpenter inherits Kiplin.

1820 The Carpenters build an extension, a Gothicstyle drawing room, to the south.

1878 Walter adds a new stable wing.

1722–1818 The estate increases to about 4,500 acres. 1868 Captain Walter Talbot, Sarah’s cousin, inherits the hall and changes his last name to Carpenter.

1904 Walter’s daughter, Sarah, inherits the hall; over the next three decades, she sells off all but 120 acres.


The Hall Restored Kiplin’s restoration limped along for years, relying on local volunteers and piecemeal donations. But in the early 1990s, a large gravel deposit was discovered on the property—and England had just started expanding a major northsouth highway. The quarry provided the revenues needed to ramp up the restoration. In 2001, after a decade of work, Kiplin Hall reclaimed its former glory and officially opened to the public. Today, Kiplin offers tours and activities primarily from April through October. The 16,000-square-foot house contains more than 200 paintings throughout its 19 rooms, 15 of which are open for viewing. They recall each era of its ownership, including a Gothic-style library and a room that’s been left as it was during World War II. An upstairs room illuminates Kiplin’s Maryland connection for visitors. Katie Irwin ’99, M. Arch. ’01 and her classmates created the exhibit in the summer of 1997. “Being there definitely strengthened my love of historic buildings and architecture,” says Irwin, who has since restored many ambassadors’ residences in Washington, D.C. Living, Learning, Designing Hundreds of Maryland students have spent summers at Kiplin, learning about the architecture and history of the idyllic estate and the surrounding area. But bustling summers always turned into quiet falls and winters, which didn’t seem right to architecture Professor Emeritus Karl Du Puy. “If you come for three weeks, you’re not taking advantage of the estate,” says Du Puy, who led many summer programs. “If you come for a whole semester, the students can live here and really be removed from all the comings and going of the real world and

World War II 1971 Kiplin is requisitioned for Bridget dies and army units and Royal Air bequeaths the hall to a Force officers. trust that she created.

1938 Bridget Talbot, Sarah’s cousin, becomes joint owner.

late 1970s The Kiplin Hall Trust demolishes part of the service wing and restores the north tower.

STUDENT PHOTO BY KARL DU PUY / DRAWING ROOM PHOTO COURTESY OF KIPLIN HALL

lose themselves in a beautiful place.” He created a semester-long program in 2010 in which around 10 undergraduate and graduate students live, learn and design at the center each spring. Students have presented proposals to the trustees for a new visitor center, enhancements to garden areas and the repurposing of outbuildings, and their ideas have been incorporated into projects throughout the estate. “There’s a lot of work left to be done on the grounds at Kiplin,” says Jeff McInturff M. Arch. ’13, who went in 2012. “Living there when you’re designing something,

you can go out five times a day and measure and take photos.” He stills refers to those photos and drawings in his work, even though he focuses on contemporary design. “Going to Kiplin was such an unbelievable opportunity,” he says. “It takes you a while to know how much you’ve learned.” TERP

See more photos of Kiplin Hall and read more about architect Katie Irwin at terp.umd.edu.

The Upper Drawing Room served as a sitting room for Royal Air Force officers during World War II. It includes portraits of Bridget Talbot's father and brother, a mid-19th century painting of the hall as viewed from the south, and Arts and Crafts cabinets designed by Walter Carpenter's wife, Beatrice.

   A FUTURE FOR KIPLIN AND MARYLAND  The University of Maryland has a unique, direct connection to the Calvert family, but that  doesn’t mean only UMD students should study at Kiplin, says Joe Scholten from the Office  of International Affairs, who became the Maryland Study Centre’s director last year.  “We’re trying to build out a network across the state,” he says. “We envision the study  center as a locus, a connection point between Kiplin’s historical past and its historical  progeny, the state of Maryland.”  He plans to expand UMD study abroad programs at Kiplin to departments including  anthropology, as well to as bring in other universities. The University of South Carolina 1987  UMD faculty and and Washington College in Chestertown, Md., also run programs at the house. A new  students arrive partnership with Anne Arundel County Public Schools will bring younger students to the  for the first time. center year-round.  “For programs that are keyed in to what the hall and North Yorkshire have to offer, it’s  a magical place,” Scholten says.   SPRING 2014 TERP 31  


32 TERP.UMD.EDU

PHOTO BY JOHN T. CONSOLI; PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY MEGAN BLAIR


SEEINGandTHE FOREST all its trees Professor Tracks Changing World with Revolutionary Map WITH A NOR’EASTER CRAWLING TOWARD his College Park office, Maryland

geographer Matthew Hansen is thinking about traveling into untouched tropical wilderness. On a computer screen is a large swath of green, a natural forest in the Congo, with a small black dot in the middle. Some of the forest has been burned along a nearby river, but the black dot—a lake—is in the ever-shrinking, unsullied portion of the world’s ecosystem. “Oh my God, if I go into a primary forest, it’s freaking awesome,” he says. “It’s the closest thing for me that comes to church.” In a sense, he says, going there would “almost be sacrilegious.” It’s the basic conundrum of the loving observer. Like a surfer regretting the impulse to slice his board through a perfect wave, there is the knowledge that enjoying nature inevitably changes it. The comparison is partially conjured by Hansen’s lanky frame, stubbled beard and casual voice, but it’s also because Hansen will be a big part of future efforts to preserve nature. The professor of geographical sciences recently created a first-of-its-kind digital map that represents a leap forward in understanding how the world’s trees are disappearing and is a cornerstone of efforts to get governments around the world reliable environmental data. “It’s the first time that we’ve seen global forest cover change in such fine detail,” says Chris Justice, chair of Maryland’s Department of Geographical Sciences. “This is really a breakthrough in our field.” The map, produced with more than 650,000 satellite images and a team of 15 researchers from Maryland and other universities, Google and the federal government, catalogued the amount of forest lost and gained between 2000

and 2012. What it shows is a net loss of 1.5 million square miles of forest. The destruction is personally disappointing to Hansen. Yet the former Peace Corps volunteer doesn’t parachute into other countries and hector the locals about saving their national resources. With so few doing accurate monitoring of their own, what’s needed first is a basic understanding of what’s happening to the world’s trees. “Just this idea that, man, there are very few forests that are left alone,” he says. “We’re really good at appropriating landscapes and bending them to our will.”

PATIENCE IN PERSONALITY Hansen feels comfortable under any circumstances in traveling to research forest cover, and the list of local dishes he has eaten—rats, snakes, crickets, termites and monkeys in the Congo—would impress even those with iron stomachs. “They were all good,” he says. “Give me something to eat, and I’ll eat it.” Hansen grew up outside Indianapolis in Carmel, Ind., and after a false start at Duke (“My dad didn’t like the return on investment”) ended up getting a degree in electrical engineering from his mother’s

BY LIAM FARRELL SPRING 2014 TERP 33


alma mater, Auburn (“You don’t know you’re a Northerner until you go there”). After graduating in 1988, he joined the Peace Corps and spent several years teaching fish farming in what was then known as Zaire. Hansen lived in a mud hut—“just way out there in the middle of nowhere”—and caught malaria immediately, the first of five bouts with the disease. He went months without talking to any Westerners. “I lived in this small village and the people there fed me for two years. They basically took care of me,” Hansen says. “I learned that we are peers with everyone around the world.” Needing a path after his Peace Corps service ended in 1991, he began to look into studying geography. Maps had always been a source of interest, and Hansen had often found himself immersed in atlases. After Hansen earned a master’s in civil engineering and a master’s in geography at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, John Townshend, now the dean of the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences and a professor of geography at Maryland since

1989, brought him to College Park to work on global maps of land cover. “It became quickly apparent to me, he is highly intelligent,” Townshend says. “He’s not a linear thinker. He’s highly innovative.” Tom Loveland, a senior scientist and codirector at South Dakota State’s Geographic Information Science Center of Excellence, has known Hansen for two decades. Loveland admired his “curiosity that knows no bounds” and eventually persuaded him to come to South Dakota so they could work together. “I love sitting down and talking books with Matt,” he says. “That’s part of his success. He’s not focused strictly on the core of his work. “I gave up trying to keep up with him.”

FINDING A BALANCE The continents are black and the oceans are gray on the computer screen, the better to see vibrant green showing the world’s forests and bright red, blue and purple, respectively, indicating losses, gains and places with both. Flicking over the map with his mouse, Hansen stops occasionally to share insights

In vibrant red, blue and purple, Hansen’s map shows the changes in the world’s forests. It allows users to zoom in to area’s like Paraguay’s Chaco woodlands (pictured), which are being developed for cattle ranches and experiencing the highest rate of deforestation in the world.

34 TERP.UMD.EDU

about nature, man and the intersection of the two. See that red wedge shape cleaving into the southwest part of France? The trees were knocked down by the winds of a powerful derecho. See that red streak in Alabama? That’s the path of the 2011 Tuscaloosa-Birmingham tornado. See those flecks of red along the west coast of Canada? Some of that is from a mountain pine beetle infestation sprung by mild winters. And the map has more: forest fires in Siberia; logging in Malaysia; the creation of cattle ranches in Paraguay. In a few minutes, Hansen shows the necessity of understanding our world in its smallest and largest parts. For all the conservation success of a country like Brazil, whose declining rainforest drew decades of intense scrutiny, the losses in other countries can make it a partial victory at best. Loveland says this is what makes Hansen’s work so valuable. Whereas some researchers would approach the map as an image-processing exercise, Hansen analyzes it through the lens of an “old-time geographer” as well. In other words, the human realities on the ground aren’t an afterthought to technological achievement. “Matt has shown we can start mapping at the scale that human decisions are made,” Loveland says. “No matter what area of the world you pop up, Matt’s got a story.” Hansen’s goal is getting everyone to have the same factual foundation. It’s important that a hydrologist in Vancouver can find out that a privately owned part of a watershed is being logged or a national park ranger in Cambodia can get accurate pictures for a meeting with the minister of the environment. His next steps are delineating what exactly caused tree loss in different areas, be it fire, disease, logging or storms, and then updating the map to reflect the latest data. The next step for locals, Hansen hopes, is using the map to get involved in preserving what’s left. “Because I lived in a village in Congo, I understand that there have to be livelihoods,” he says. “But, you know, let’s make them sustainable—let’s do it intelligently.” TERP

MAP COURTESY OF MATTHEW HANSEN


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