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UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE VOLUME 1 | ISSUE 1

SOUTHERN ALBERTA MAGAZINE


SAM I Am HMMM… SO WHAT IS IN A NAME? Well, to put it bluntly – everything. The process of coming up with a name for this new magazine was laborious, yet hilarious, and I could go on about the copious options we considered, but I’d rather just explain our choice.

SO WHY SAM?

At the U of L’s 1977 Homecoming celebration, the University’s first president, Sam Smith, flanked by “bodyguards,” Owen Holmes and Neil Holmes, re-enacted a 1968 City Hall scene where Sam Smith, Neil Holmes and Russ Leskiw stormed a city council meeting to present their argument for a west-side location for the University.

As an acronym it stands for many things – starting another magazine, sharing academic moments, serving alumni members... The list goes on. We liked them all, but Southern Alberta Magazine seemed to be the most fitting. SAM is a testament to all those who helped build, and who continue to build, this comprehensive university in southern Alberta. As a name – Sam is the name of the first official president of the University of Lethbridge, W. A. S. (Sam) Smith. Smith was part of a group of strong academic mavericks, educational pioneers really, who persevered to establish this university here in southern Alberta 42 years ago. That same innovative spirit is still very much a part of everything the University does today. With SAM we celebrate all that is unique to the U of L. We hope you enjoy this magazine as much as we have enjoyed producing it. Tanya Jacobson-Gundlock, Editor

What does SAM mean to you? Send your reply to: sam@uleth.ca

ON THE COVER: WIND AND CLOUDS, PAINTED BY CATHERINE PEREHUDOFF, 1986 Born in Saskatoon, Sask., Catherine Perehudoff grew up amidst the activity of the Regina Five and the Emma Lake Summer workshops. She began to develop as an artist under the guidance of her mother Dorothy

Knowles and father William Perehudoff, but later she developed her own distinct take on combining the imagery of the prairie landscape with the influence of modernist approaches to painting.


features 3

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EPI-WHAT?

PERSONA GRATA

Epigenetics – in Latin it means “beyond genetics.” At the University of Lethbridge it means a new up-andcoming field of research that could dramatically change our lives.

Who am I? What does it mean to be First Nations? One artist personally explores her identity.

in every issue 23 |

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UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE

ART GALLERY

This fall, U of L alumnus Darcy Logan returns to the

NON-PROFIT PAYBACK

University to present his recent paintings with a selection of works from the Art Collection.

Mary Runté never imagined she’d end up in management when she was out on the streets of Vancouver.

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SIGNIFICANT AND MENTIONABLE Take a look at what’s been going on over the past few months: snapshots from moving day, planning for upcoming performing arts events, the impact of the High Level Bridge on the U of L, some people with close ties to the U of L en route to the Olympics, and….

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ALUMNI NEWS & EVENTS Find out about a new chapter, a new alumni benefit, a new association president and a new alumna of the year. Notice a theme?

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TREND-TRACKING IN ACTION

GOOD MORNING VIETNAM!

Research shows that today’s teens are changing their reputation – and it’s in ways you might least expect.

On one student’s experiences overseas.

EDITOR: Tanya Jacobson-Gundlock ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Alesha Farfus-Shukaliak Jana McFarland DESIGNER: Stephenie Karsten FEATURE PHOTOGRAPHER: Rod Leland ILLUSTRATOR: Dale Nigel Gobel

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ALMA MATTERS

WHAT’S OUT THERE?

Ever wonder what happened to the guy who sat

A new technology breakthrough is giving us a greater picture of our universe.

next to you in geography? Or where life took your

FEATURE WRITERS: Bob Cooney Caitlin Crawshaw Natasha Evdokimoff Trevor Kenney Kali McKay Stacy Seguin PROOFREADER/ FACT CHECKER: Betsy Greenlees ALUMNI LIAISONS: Lynette LaCroix Jaime Morasch Maureen Schwartz

roommate from residence? News and notes from your former classmates will give you some answers.

PRINTING: PrintWest SAM is published by University Advancement at the University of Lethbridge three times annually. The opinions expressed or implied in the publication do not necessarily reflect those of the University of Lethbridge Board of Governors. Submissions in the form of letters, articles, story ideas or notices of events are welcome.

SAM is distributed free of charge to a controlled circulation list. To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your address, please contact us. SAM – University Advancement University of Lethbridge 4401 University Drive W Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4 Toll-free: 1-866-552-2582 E-mail: sam@uleth.ca www.ulethbridge.ca


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SPOTLIGHT ON RESEARCH

Epi-What? IT’S NOT GENETICS, IT’S EPIGENETICS – THE STUDY OF THE PROCESSES THAT TURN GENES “ON” OR “OFF.” AS LEADERS IN THIS BURGEONING FIELD OF RESEARCH, FACULTY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE ARE MAKING STRIDES TO OPEN THE ALBERTA INSTITUTE FOR EPIGENETICS, WHICH WILL BE THE FIRST OF ITS KIND IN CANADA. IN THE FOLLOWING PAGES, YOU’LL READ ABOUT THE VISION AND PEOPLE MOVING THE INSTITUTE FORWARD, WHY EPIGENETICS IS NOVEL AND HOW IT COULD CHANGE SCIENCE AND THE LIVES OF CANADIANS.

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S AM | So u t h e r n A l b e r t a M ag az i n e | U n i v e r s i t y o f Le t h b r i d g e


SPOTLIGHT ON RESEARCH

Academic couple works toward Alberta’s first epigenetics institute Scientists Drs. Igor and Olga Kovalchuk came to Lethbridge knowing next-to-nothing about the city. Now, eight years later, they’ve happily set down roots and are pushing the U of L’s epigenetics research program into the limelight. When the reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant caught fire in 1986, a plume of radioactive particles descended over Ukraine. While only two people initially died from the explosion, many thousands have since become ill from the resulting radiation. “When it happened, it was a major disaster for the whole country. It was the biggest disaster, impacting millions of people. Everyone in the medical industry got very interested in how they could help,” says Dr. Olga Kovalchuk, who grew up in Ukraine and did her undergraduate degree at IvanoFrankivsk National Medical University (IFNMU), just 600 km from the site of the nuclear blast.

Not surprisingly, the radiationcancer connection was a big focus at IFNMU. Several of her professors were collaborating on a tool that could detect radiation levels quickly and efficiently, to prevent people from unknowingly exposing themselves to harm. “The problem with radioactive contamination is that you don’t feel it – it’s not hot, not cold, you don’t see it and it doesn’t hurt,” says Olga. While radiation wreaks havoc on DNA, creating harmful mutations that can lead to cancer, genetics itself fails to fully explain how cancer manifests. But another phenomenon, which also works on multiple levels in the cell, is helping fill in the gaps. Epigenetics is the study of how genes are expressed or “turned on” by environmental factors. “People say that if genetics is the alphabet of life, epigenetics is the grammar,” explains Olga, whose research focuses on the epigenetics of cancer.

Since 2001, Olga has pursued her research at the University of Lethbridge, just across the hall from her husband Igor, whom she met at IFNMU. While both work within the realm of epigenetics, Igor focuses on DNA repair in plants. For him, plants offer an excellent platform for study because, unlike animals, they can adapt to changes in their environment within a single generation. “They’re a better organism to study the flexibility of epigenetic changes, especially for understanding the role epigenetics plays in evolution and adaptation,” he explains. While epigenetics isn’t a household word, the field isn’t brand new, either. When Watson and Crick published their findings about DNA in 1953, proving a genetic component of heredity at long last, most clambered onto the genetics bandwagon. But a tiny minority realized that genetics didn’t explain all the mysteries of life. However, it wasn’t until the early ’70s that the majority of scientists began to

seriously consider that the responses of plants to stress couldn’t be explained entirely with DNA. Slowly, ideas like gene silencing came to the fore, and in the last 10 years, epigenetics has emerged as a strong discipline. Recognizing the importance of epigenetics to many fields, the Kovalchuks have helped lead a charge for an epigenetics research institute at the U of L. In June 2009, the University received $3.2 million from the Canadian Foundation for Innovation (CFI) to build the equipment core for the Southern Alberta Group for Epigenetics Studies (SAGES). This fall, this funding was matched by the province, providing U of L neuroscientist Dr. Robert Sutherland and collaborating researchers with more than $2.8 million for research related to epigenetics. The combined funding provides a solid foundation for the future creation of the Alberta Institute for Epigenetics, which will harness the prowess of U of L researchers, including the Kovalchuks, who both hold U of L

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SPOTLIGHT ON RESEARCH

“WE THOUGHT SOME KIND OF UNIFYING SCHEME WOULD GET THE TOOLS THAT ARE NEEDED, BRING THE PEOPLE TOGETHER WHO SHARE AN UNDERSTANDING AND INTEREST, ALLOWING US TO BE REALLY EFFICIENT, SHARE TOOLS AND KNOWLEDGE, AND START GROWING TOGETHER.”

Board of Governors Research Chairs. Olga also holds a Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR) Chair in Gender, Sex and Health. The pair says the institute will be the first of its kind in Alberta and, to their knowledge, the only one in Canada. At the moment, there are few labs that even have the basic technology needed to conduct this kind of research. In fact, both Igor and Olga often send samples to American and European labs for analysis. “We thought some kind of unifying scheme would get the tools that are needed, bring the people together who share an understanding and interest, allowing us to be really efficient, share tools and knowledge, and start growing together,” says Olga. The institute will focus on six overlapping research areas: epi-cancer, epi-neuroscience, epi-plant, epi-cell, epi-toxicology and epi-technology. These areas have been chosen according to existing expertise at the University and the likelihood of current

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DR. OLGA KOVALCHUK

international collaborators relocating to Lethbridge, explains Igor. While epigenetics sounds abstract, the outcomes have direct relevance to our everyday lives, according to Olga. In terms of health issues, epigenetics is helping scientists understand how diseases of all kinds – not just cancer – occur. It also offers new ways of analyzing experimental therapies and may yield information on how people can prevent disease. Unlike genetic changes which are rather rare, epigenetic changes happen constantly. Knowing which external factors can trigger expressions of genes in DNA will help people make healthier decisions to lower risks of developing certain health issues. Epigenetics also has direct relevance to southern Alberta and the agriculture industry. For instance, the field offers new ways to improve the quality and quantity of agricultural products without any genetic modifications. This could have a tremendous impact on Canadian agriculture.

As the scientific visionaries for the institute, the Kovalchuk duo is confident it will attract researchers from around the globe. “Basically, it will allow people to see that there is a dedicated research centre here with a group that studies approaches to stress tolerance, evolution, genome stability, creating more and better food, making people healthier – you name it. It will basically work as a centre that attracts like-minded people to do research here,” says Igor. It is hoped that a physical building will eventually provide space for associates to collaborate directly, but for now, the institute will be established in the lab space the Kovalchuks currently use. In time, Igor hopes to establish a techtransfer wing for the institute that will focus on commercializing discoveries that emerge. “It will help show people that we’re not only satisfying our curiosity – we’re actually doing research for the public.”

S AM | So u t h e r n A l b e r t a M ag az i n e | U n i v e r s i t y o f Le t h b r i d g e

The institute is a coup for the U of L and the city of Lethbridge, say the Kovalchuks. It is also a tremendous development in the evolution of the couple’s careers. The institute will allow greater collaboration and technology, and inject a new sense of possibility. “We are creating something that’s really new. And when you’re working in a new area, it’s very exciting – you’re exploring new avenues. That in itself is pretty motivating,” says Olga. For Igor, who compares research to gambling, the new institute offers new tools that level the playing field for epigenetics. “Scientists are healthy gamblers. What drives most of us is this curiosity and hope for a rare reward. Designing an experiment in such a way that you can finally get an answer is the best reward you can get.”


SPOTLIGHT ON RESEARCH

Filling in the gaps genetics leaves behind The University is working toward establishing the Alberta Institute for Epigenetics, a centre that will support a critical mass of researchers and technologies to better understand everything from cancer to agriculture. While genome mapping has provided crucial blueprints for scientists, it doesn’t explain all of life’s mysteries. That’s because genetics supplies the nature in the nature-nurture dichotomy. Epigenetics helps explain the nurture half, offering insights into how and why genes are expressed.

A wide range of environmental factors are involved in “turning on” genes (partly through epigenetic regulation). Ultimately, understanding this better will shed light on conditions like fetal alcohol syndrome, diseases like cancer and diabetes, mental illnesses, droughtresistance in plants, the biological impacts of pollution and almost anything under the sun. When formed, the Alberta Institute for Epigenetics will be the first centre in Canada focused exclusively on epigenetic study and one of a handful of similar institutes in the world. It will unite the research talent at the University of Lethbridge, Alberta’s other major universities, and research establishments across Canada and beyond. The first step toward establishing the institute took place this June thanks to $3.2 million from the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI). The next step

occurred this fall when the Alberta Science and Research Investments Program (ASRIP) committed more than $2.8 million to an epigenetic study led by U of L neuroscientist Dr. Robert Sutherland. Over the next 10 years, it is expected that the institute will accumulate approximately $60 million in internal and external funding and grow to 20 principal investigators from three academic departments (Neuroscience, Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Biological Sciences), more than 50 graduate students and doctoral-level researchers, and 25 technical staff. Drawing on the U of L’s areas of greatest strength in research, the institute will focus on six main areas: epi-cancer, epi-neuroscience, epi-plant, epi-cell, epi-toxicology and epi-technology.

Epi-cancer

Epi-technology

As cancer rates continue to rise, the need to pinpoint the causes and most effective treatments becomes increasingly important.

Like genetics and genomics, epigenetics requires cutting-edge technologies and skilled personnel to support the work of researchers. And because of the speed at which research moves, new technologies are always needed to help researchers probe deeper.

Recent discoveries in the epigenetics of stress response and cancer show that tumour cells are very different from normal cells in terms of their epigenetic profiles. If researchers can understand the stage at which epigenetic changes occur, then they can work toward preventing those changes, which in turn could have tremendous impacts on cancer treatments. And, unlike genetic research that can take many years, epigenetic research may yield useful findings sooner rather than later.

The institute will present an excellent opportunity for researchers working in the realm of bioinformatics. Here, new technology platforms will be developed to support institute researchers as well as create new avenues for technology commercialization at the University.

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SPOTLIGHT ON RESEARCH

Epi-toxicology

Epi-neuroscience

Epi-plant

Epi-cell

As economic development continues, the environment becomes increasingly saturated with a wide range of chemical by-products from industry and daily life. These pollutants are absorbed by people through air, water and food, and are appearing in higher concentrations in animals and plants.

Home to the Canadian Centre for Behavioural Neuroscience (CCBN), the U of L is internationally known for its expertise in neuroscience. At the CCBN, researchers have long investigated the role of epigenetics in areas such as stroke, brain injury, agerelated memory decline, fetal alcohol syndrome and stress. The research emerging from CCBN is helping scientists better understand how neural networks in the brain process information and how these networks are shaped by epigenetics.

It takes animals and human beings many generations to adapt to new environmental factors, but changes occur rapidly in plants.

Epi-cell researchers will look at epigenetics on the cellular level and the fundamental mechanisms within the cell such as chromatin arrangement and regulation of small RNA molecules. One of the research directions of this group will be to create drugs that interact with the epigenetic mechanisms in the cell to turn genes “on” or “off.”

Not surprisingly, these chemicals can make us sick. Part of the reason for this is that certain pollutants can create epigenetic changes in our bodies, making them epi-toxic. The U of L is on the forefront of toxicology research and established the Alberta Water and Environmental Science Building in 2008 to support faculty members like Canada Research Chair Dr. Alice Hontela. Now those researchers working in the realm of toxicology and epigenetics will also be able to use the resources the Alberta Institute for Epigenetics will provide. This division will look at the epigenetic means of detoxifying polluted ecosystems such as the tar sands. It will also develop biological models for predicting the toxic effects of chemical exposure and low-dose radiation caused by industry, particularly nuclear power facilities.

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The epi-neuroscience unit will harness the strength of the U of L’s current neuroscientists, while drawing on the expertise from the province’s other research universities.

The epi-plant division will focus on the epigenetic mechanisms that control a plant’s stress response, with the goal of creating hardier varieties of common agricultural crops. This research offers an alternative to genetically-modified crops, which remain controversial in many countries. By understanding the epigenetic regulation of certain genes, plant researchers in the division will find new ways to improve yield, as well as understand how plants respond in different ways to stresses like drought and disease.

The epi-cell division will unify the world-class cellular research taking place at the U of L and Alberta’s other research universities. In addition, the institute will boost research efforts by providing improved instrumentation and technical support.

“BY RECOGNIZING THIS SIGNIFICANT RESEARCH OPPORTUNITY AND, MORE IMPORTANTLY, MAKING IT POSSIBLE FOR MANY RESEARCHERS AND STUDENTS TO WORK TOGETHER, RESEARCHERS AT THE ALBERTA INSTITUTE FOR EPIGENETICS WILL ACHIEVE MUCH MORE THAN INDIVIDUALS WORKING IN ISOLATION.”

RICK CASSON, FEDERAL MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT FOR LETHBRIDGE

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SPOTLIGHT ON RESEARCH

Curiosity drives young

epigenetics scholar

At a time when most kids were glued to TV shows about talking purple dinosaurs, Kristy Kutanzi was exploring the inner workings of the world around her. “I have always had a curious mind,” she explains. “As a child, I loved to experiment. My parents bought me a

book with basic science experiments and explanations for general phenomena – a book that I read from front to back countless times.” They also bought her a microscope to indulge her fascination with “things too small to be seen by the human eye,” says the Grassy Lake, Alta., native.

But it wasn’t until she began her undergraduate degree at the U of L and had an opportunity to work in the lab of Dr. Olga Kovalchuk for her honours program, that Kutanzi realized her sights were set on becoming a scientist. “The practical training that I received in labs during my undergrad was a

turning point for me,” says Kutanzi. “Dr. Kovalchuk fostered my interest in science and encouraged me to pursue a higher level of education in the field. Undoubtedly, she has provided and continues to provide me with invaluable tools and advice to succeed in my research career.”

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SPOTLIGHT ON RESEARCH

“THE PRACTICAL TRAINING THAT I RECEIVED IN LABS DURING MY UNDERGRAD WAS A TURNING These days, Kutanzi is well on her way to realizing her ambitions. She’s now in the MSc/PhD transfer program, which allows students with research potential to enter the PhD program without defending their master’s thesis. She continues to work with Kovalchuk on a project to unravel the epigenetic changes that precede the development of cancer. While traditionally researchers have studied the genetic influences of cancer, Kutanzi is working to understand the epigenetic factors that “turn on” cancer genes. Through funding from the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation (Prairies-NWT chapter) and the Alberta Cancer Research Institute, Kutanzi is looking at how estrogen may trigger genes that cause breast cancer, the leading cause of death for women 30 to 55 years of age. Kutanzi’s work on the topic has not gone unnoticed and her amazing

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POINT FOR ME. DR. KOVALCHUK FOSTERED MY INTEREST IN SCIENCE AND ENCOURAGED ME TO PURSUE A HIGHER LEVEL OF EDUCATION IN THE FIELD. UNDOUBTEDLY, SHE HAS PROVIDED AND CONTINUES TO PROVIDE ME WITH INVALUABLE TOOLS AND ADVICE TO SUCCEED IN MY RESEARCH CAREER.”

aptitude for science has earned her high praise. In addition to being an Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research scholar, Kutanzi recently earned a prestigious Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship, valued at $50,000 per year for up to three years.

KRISTY KUTANZI

The Vanier program, launched by the Government of Canada in 2008, aims to attract and retain world-class doctoral students who demonstrate a high standard of scholarly achievement in graduate studies.

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The prestigious award is a big boost for Kutanzi’s burgeoning career. Not only does the funding allow her to focus on the research, but it allows her to present her results at international scientific conferences. There, she’ll develop research collaborations and investigate current and future prospects in her field. But perhaps most importantly, the award brings recognition to a dangerous disease. “Receiving the Vanier reflects the merit of my field of research,” Kutanzi explains graciously. “It brings national attention to the value of researching breast cancer development, particularly during the early stages when there’s a greater chance for us to discover a successful treatment.”


School of Graduate Studies

Dr. Stacey Wetmore and Lesley Rutledge

What makes graduate studies at the U of L different? University of Lethbridge PhD student Lesley Rutledge is conducting research

“As a graduate student at a smaller university, I have the

in biophysical chemistry using high-level computer calculations to better

opportunity to work closely with Dr. Wetmore and obtain

understand how damaged DNA is repaired.

first-class research training. Additionally, the professors on

During her graduate studies, Rutledge has published one book chapter and six referenced articles – one of which was featured on the cover of

my supervisory committee constantly provide feedback,

the Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation. In addition, Rutledge

which allows me to direct my research goals while

has presented her research findings at local, national and international

complementing my research interests.”

conferences as far as Australia and has co-supervised eight undergraduate students – experiences that have all helped develop communication,

Lesley Rutledge

teaching and managerial skills. It’s a long list of achievements for any PhD student, but it’s something made possible at the U of L where a unique learning environment allows expertise and experience to translate into mentorship, theory and practice.

www.ulethbridge.ca/sgs


IN HER EXHIBITION PERSONA GRATA, ARTIST AND U OF L PROFESSOR TANYA HARNETT PRESENTS 16 LARGE-SCALE DIGITAL SELF-PORTRAITS. IN THESE PIECES, SHE EXPLORES VARIOUS ASPECTS OF HER IDENTITY WHILE SHIELDING HERSELF FROM THE CAMERA’S LENS IN A VARIETY OF WAYS, INCLUDING

flag | Digital print on BFK Rives paper 53.5“ x 40” 2006

COVERING HERSELF IN MUD, OBSCURING HER FACE WITH A BLANKET AND HIDING BEHIND A SHEET OF CANVAS. HARNETT RECENTLY SHARED HER THOUGHTS ON HER UNIQUE ARTISTIC VISION.

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Q: What were your intentions when you started this project?

a medium like this because I am out there on display.

A: The University had a staff exhibition called Alter Ego several years ago, and I contributed two pieces that dealt with self-portraiture and identity. At the time, I wasn’t comfortable dealing with the idea of identity that publicly, so it was really difficult for me. I figured if it was that scary, then I’d better approach it head-on and examine it more closely.

For example, steam was the first one I did, and I decided to hide a little and not show very much of myself. I brushed my hand across the glass to let the audience see my gaze, but I didn’t want to give much more than that. This work subtly reveals bits of myself, but I’m trying to stay away from overt explanations.

In persona grata, I really wanted to represent myself in a realistic way, but not in a way that was pretentious or selfinvolved. There are autobiographical elements to the show that I don’t necessarily want to talk about but I do want to emote. It’s more about being poetic than actually descriptive.

Q: How does persona grata explore different aspects of your identity? A: These pieces look at identity and the reality of being human, an artist and a First Nations person. There are a lot of people of mixed race, although they’re often defined in very restrictive ways. In flag, for example, I looked at myself as part of a social group rather than as an individual. This piece comments on the ridiculousness of a binary identity: they are Indian or they are white. By wearing the Canadian flag I examine being part of a country and embracing that, but also questioning how that’s embodied.

steam | Digital print on BFK Rives paper 53.5“ x 40” 2005

Q: You are the subject in these portraits, but we don’t see much of you. Why is that?

PHOTOS SUBMITTED

persona grata appeared at the Southern Alberta Art Gallery (SAAG) and at the Art Gallery of Regina. The Alberta Foundation for Arts recently purchased a portfolio edition of the work, which exhibited in September at the Alberta Foundation for the Arts. In addition, one of the pieces from this exhibition was selected for the 6th International Graphica Biennale and appeared in Novosibirsk, Russia, in September.

Q: As an artist, what attracted you to southern Alberta? A: The U of L has a great reputation in the art world. The collection here is fantastic and that was obviously a huge draw. Also, the Art Now lecture series brings in some of the top artists in Canada. The exposure to the national presence in art is unlike that of any other institution. In addition, I’m in a unique position at the University because I’m part of two faculties. I teach Native American Studies in the Faculty of Arts and Science, and Art in the Faculty of Fine Arts. This position reflects my First Nations background, and that’s something I am very proud of, but it also reflects how I can integrate that part of my identity into a contemporary artistic practice. The Southern Alberta Art Gallery (SAAG) is another thing that attracted me to southern Alberta, and it continues to attract artists from all over. Many people don’t realize that it’s one of the more important art institutions in Canada and that there are artists, nationally and internationally, who want to show there.

A: Truthfully, I don’t think that I want exposure. I realize this is kind of ironic in

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NONPROFIT PAYBACK There have been many nights over the last 16 years that Dr. Mary Runté has gotten little, if any, sleep. Raising two children has been no small factor in the equation, but even before Runté took on motherhood – the role by which she admittedly defines her life and holds most dear – she sacrificed shut-eye while out on the streets of east Vancouver, up at all hours of the night to do what she could to ease the plight of drug addicts, pregnant prostitutes and anyone else she encountered who was living their lives on the fringe of society. It’s not exactly the professional history you might expect a professor of management to have, but then again, Runté isn’t your average management professor. Prior to 1998, Runté had no inclination at all to study anything remotely related to business. Her heart was then, as it is now, in the notfor-profit sector – although she also came to love management in a rather roundabout way. Initially, Runté wanted to be a teacher, and was enrolled in the Bachelor of Education program at the University of Alberta en route to that goal. It was during that course of study that Runté

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discovered the impact she wanted to have on students went beyond teaching them the finer points of Shakespeare.

bad world of business. Debunking the myth that all business is bad was, and still is, very important to me.”

“You know how there are people who are into extreme sports? I’m into extreme jobs,” Runté says with laughter. “I wanted to work in the inner city, so I was teaching kids who were dealing with huge life issues – drugs, gangs, various kinds of abuse. I quickly realized that I wanted to make a different kind of impact on their lives. That’s when I went into social services.”

Determined to remain true to her non-profit roots, Runté chose York University for her MBA because, at the time, it was one of the only business schools in Canada that researched nonprofit organizations.

Runté abandoned the BEd and instead pursued a BA in psychology, all the while working in the non-profit sector. After graduating, she spent more than a decade willingly subjecting her professional self to some of the grittiest and most challenging circumstances imaginable, and moved up the ranks of social work with expediency. While she loved the work, Runté found that she lacked many of the basic management skills necessary to run the programs. Suddenly, and unexpectedly, earning an MBA became a logical move. “A lot of people were absolutely shocked and even viewed me as a traitor,” Runté says reflectively. “In the non-profit sector, management is seen as the big

“YOU KNOW HOW THERE ARE PEOPLE WHO ARE INTO EXTREME SPORTS? I’M INTO EXTREME JOBS.” DR. MARY RUNTÉ

“It was extraordinarily positive for me to interact with faculty who understood that business has power, and that the power can and should be used carefully,” says Runté. “It’s possible to prioritize people over dollars, the environment over profitability – or at least find a respectful blend of both sides.”

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Runté graduated from York in 2000 and began teaching sessional classes at the U of L that year. She completed a PhD through Saint Mary’s University in 2005. Today, on track to become a tenured faculty member, Runté feels fortunate to be able to combine both of her professional disciplines, teaching business courses within the area of social responsibility – a declared minor that the Faculty of Management has now offered for a few years. “It’s core in the Faculty’s vision to promote social responsibility in business. Every student takes a required course in it. In recent years, social responsibility has become more fashionable in business schools, but the U of L was one of the first universities to make a demonstrated commitment by offering a minor in the subject,” says Runté. “I’m absolutely blessed to be teaching here.” A segment of the required course Runté teaches in social responsibility in business deals with non-profit management. Students must complete a minimum of nine hours of volunteer work and are free to choose any nonprofit organization they wish to support. Runté says that it’s very common for students to become impassioned with volunteerism and continue to be active within the organizations indefinitely. “They intend to do nine hours of volunteering, and at the end, they’re treating it almost like a part-time job,” says Runté. While Runté continues to champion the non-profit sector, emphatically pointing out that it’s a significant employer within the country (constituting 13 per cent of the labour force) and contributes a surprisingly large percentage of the gross domestic product (seven per cent in 2003), she is quick to balance her view. “Business isn’t evil. It’s important to our society. It has power, and that power gives us resources to do great things. It can help shape a more positive world. That’s what I teach my students.”


You may not like their asymmetrical hairdos, nose piercings or ironic t-shirts, but today’s teenagers aren’t turning Canadian culture on its head, as per the prevailing stereotype. On many levels, today’s youth are actually looking better than previous generations, says sociologist and trend-tracker Dr. Reginald Bibby. The notion of teenagers as threats to the well-being of Canadian society is a prejudicial stereotype that unfairly generalizes all teens. “There seems to be such a pervasive mindset that teens are simply not that likable and lovable,” says Bibby. In reality, quite the opposite is true, according to the University of Lethbridge

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researcher who has been monitoring the attitudes and habits of Canadian teens and adults for three decades. Today’s youth are solid citizens and are adjusting well to the new Canada, Bibby reports in his latest book, The Emerging Millennials: How Canada’s Newest Generation is Responding to Change and Choice. Working on Project Teen Canada, a series of national surveys that have examined Canadian teenagers’ behaviour and values since 1984, Bibby and Associate Director James Penner completed the most recent installment in 2008. The survey of 5,500 teenagers across the country shows that the millennials are doing well. They’re generous and polite. They report the most positive relationships with parents in three decades. The prevalence

of vices like smoking, drinking and marijuana use have declined, as have depression, suicide and bullying. Also on the decline is young people’s interest in professional sports, including the beloved National Hockey League (NHL). Only about 50 per cent of young men and 20 per cent of young women follow the NHL. According to Bibby, their lack of interest demonstrates the acceleration of choices, but for an allegedly hockey-crazed country, it’s a rather startling discovery that caught the attention of media outlets ranging from the National Post through Canada AM to the New York Times. All in all, the baby boomer generation’s “social experiment” of having both parents employed outside the

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home has known increasing success as older boomers and post-boomers have improved on how they balance careers and family life. To quote a famous baby boomer lyric: the kids are all right. While the large majority has been receptive to Bibby’s overall good-news findings, not everyone is convinced. Bibby has found that invariably there are those who are down on teenagers, people who “don’t want to be confused by the facts.” But such responses don’t phase him. Dismantling tired stereotypes is important to the researcher who has explored social trends since coming to the U of L in 1975. Bibby’s areas of


FOR DECADES, DR. REGINALD BIBBY HAS DEBUNKED CULTURAL MYTHS AND UNVEILED SURPRISING SOCIAL TRENDS IN CANADA

myth-breaking have included attributing much teen-adult conflict to adults; questioning the extent to which people are abandoning religion; the importance of not only praising but tapping into our cultural diversity; documenting the limited growth of interest in the National Football League and National Basketball Association and the ongoing interest in the Canadian Football League; and making his most recent case for the elevation of the quality of teenage life in Canada.

“Therefore, a survey that is carried out well is simply a good conversation with people. It results in learning what Canadians are thinking – rather than telling them.”

Bibby’s research philosophy has always been that it doesn’t make sense to study trends abstractly; rather, it’s essential to question Canadians directly.

His commitment to public awareness has not gone unnoticed. This fall, Bibby will receive the 2009 Distinguished Academic Award from the Confederation of Alberta Faculty Associations (CAFA), an award that recognizes the success of academics bringing their scholarly work to the broader community.

“In my mind, if one wants to understand what people are thinking, there’s no substitute for asking them,” he says.

Disseminating the research is also an important aspect of Bibby’s work. Over the years, he’s consciously shared and explained his findings with Canadians through his books, media coverage and public presentations across the country.

Not surprisingly, this isn’t his first accolade. Bibby holds a U of L Board of Governors Research Chair in Sociology, has an honorary doctoral degree from Laurentian University and in 2006 was appointed an officer of the Order of Canada in recognition of his research contributions to the country. In the aftermath of the 2008 survey, the prolific researcher plans to take a breather from his survey-research. “I want to sit on a rock in some beautiful place and write poetry,” he jokes. Instead of focusing on data collection, Bibby plans to spend more time analyzing the data he has accumulated and turn his attention to a new book on religion in Canada – Beyond the Gods and Back.

And, of course, he’ll continue to hold up that mirror to Canadians. “I really have been fortunate not only to do research but also to teach and make presentations that allow me to see to what extent people recognize themselves in the findings. It has made the research come alive.”

Bibby is the author of 12 best-selling books with total sales of close to 150,000 copies. His research has received extensive media coverage and has been seen as the feature story on the cover of Maclean’s on several occasions.

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PHOTOS SUBMITTED


Vietnam! Good Morning

Fourth-year U of L management student Brady Mah spent his summer traveling through Vietnam – dodging motorbikes, touring pagodas, learning a new language and discovering a culture completely different from his own. Interested in international development, Mah received funding from ConocoPhillips Canada that allowed him to accept a unique co-op placement in Hanoi, Vietnam, with World University Service of Canada (WUSC), an organization that fosters human development and global understanding through education and training. “I was initially intrigued by Vietnam’s rich history,” says Mah. “I was also interested in observing how a developing nation, one that had just entered the World Trade Organization, operated. I wanted to be a part of that.”

Once in Vietnam, Mah took on the role of project manager and was responsible for co-ordinating the placements of eight other student volunteers.

“I’VE HAD A CHANCE TO EXPLORE THIS CRAZY COUNTRY FROM NORTH TO SOUTH, MOUNTAIN TO SEA. I’VE MET A LOT OF INTERESTING PEOPLE ALONG THE WAY AND LEARNED SOMETHING NEW FROM EACH OF THEM.” BRADY MAH

“I routinely met with each student and their partner organization to ensure that things were going smoothly and that we were on track to reach the goals we’d set at the start of the internship,” explains Mah. “I was actively involved in all of the placements, which covered a diverse range of sustainability and development projects including environmental policy and law, national park preservation, eco-tourism, agricultural development and public health.”

Mah recently returned to Canada and, as he looks to the future, he admits a change in perspective. “I have grown to appreciate how good I have it in Canada. Some of the Vietnamese people have very little, but they are still living very meaningful lives. I hope to incorporate their sense of purpose, their work ethic and their persistence into everything I do.”

As part of his work with WUSC, Mah visited eight cities in Vietnam. “I’ve had a chance to explore this crazy country from north to south, mountain to sea,” reflects Mah. “I’ve met a lot of interesting people along the way and learned something new from each of them.” In addition to his official responsibilities, he travelled to Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand.

Mah was one of more than 20 students selected to receive funding from ConocoPhillips Canada to take part in worldwide, national and regional work placements in such diverse locations as Hong Kong, South Africa, Costa Rica and Alberta.

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What ’s out there?


FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS, PEOPLE HAVE TURNED THEIR EYES UP TO THE NIGHT SKY, GAZED UPON BILLIONS OF TWINKLING STARS AND QUESTIONED WHAT LIES IN THE VAST, UNKNOWN EXPANSE. SO, IT’S ONLY NATURAL TO GET EXCITED WHEN YOU TALK TO U OF L ASTRONOMER DR. DAVID NAYLOR ABOUT SPACE EXPLORATION AND THE THOUGHT OF CLEARLY VIEWING THE UNKNOWN STARS AND GALAXIES.


“IT DOESN’T SEEM FAIR – LIGHT TRAVELS BILLIONS OF YEARS TO REACH US, For the last 15 years, Dr. David Naylor has been working to develop SPIRE (Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver), an instrument that currently sits 1.5 million km from Earth, bolted securely to the Herschel space telescope. Launched last May from, the European Space Agency (ESA) Herschel mission enables astronomers to observe stars and galaxies at wavelengths far beyond the limit of human vision, known as the far-infrared or terahertz spectral region. While the radiation in this region is invisible to the human eye, it contains a wealth of information on the composition and physical environment of the sources under study. Through the Herschel mission, astronomers are seeing, for the first time, stars and entire galaxies previously undetected in the night sky. Apart from the obvious challenges associated with observing objects billions of light years away, the biggest problem with ground-based observations is absorption by water vapour in the earth’s atmosphere. “It doesn’t seem fair – light travels billions of years to reach us, containing precious information on the nature of the early universe, and the hardest part of the journey is the last kilometre or few microseconds,” explains Naylor. To solve this problem, infrared telescopes are placed in space. The Herschel is the first observatory class mission to be sent to L2, a location far removed from the earth’s atmosphere.

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CONTAINING PRECIOUS INFORMATION ON THE NATURE OF THE EARLY UNIVERSE, AND THE HARDEST PART OF THE JOURNEY IS THE LAST KILOMETRE OR FEW MICROSECONDS.” DR. DAVID NAYLOR

As the lead Canadian researcher for the Canadian Space Agency’s contribution to the eight-nation Herschel project, Naylor has played a key role in the big science of space imagery by working with a team to design SPIRE, one of three devices attached to the Herschel space observatory. SPIRE was made to function at a chilly -270 C, collect data from the far infrared end of the electromagnetic spectrum and turn it into valuable information and images of stars and galaxies. While one might envision SPIRE to be of epic dimensions, the device is actually about the size of a toaster oven. Mind you, it did cost $100 million to develop. But for SPIRE to be of any use, it first had to prove its worth. In mid-June, Naylor and his partner researchers collectively held their breath to see if the device would in fact help them see more clearly into space. “The mission control operators started the telescope up in stages,” recalls Naylor. “Our instrument was the first brought online for performance verification, and it worked flawlessly.” The next step, which also passed without a hitch, was to pop open the hatch – officially called a cryocover, or

the equivalent of a camera lens cap – and reveal the giant 3.5 m telescope mirror to the outer reaches of space. Then it was activated. It was only then that the Herschel mission shone brightest, providing images of space much quicker and with more accuracy than any telescope ever launched. “The initial images reveal a level of detail never before seen from the ground or from space through the Hubble telescope,” says Naylor. “By nature, physics researchers don’t get too excited, but to see these images and know that we’re looking at them in a whole new way, and to further know that we’ll be able to share this information with our students and the public so they can learn about the origins of the universe, is truly exciting.” For Naylor, it’s only the tip of the iceberg, or in his case, the galaxies. “This isn’t even the telescope operating at full capacity. These are initial ‘test’ images – like driving a race car very slowly around the track… you know it works and is quite impressive, but wait until the driver opens the throttle!”

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Also gratifying – and possibly a bit overwhelming – are the unique research collaborations that Naylor sees happening in the future, as data from the Herschel mission start to flow. Researchers get time to use the telescope to study a variety of objects, and Naylor and other U of L researchers are among a select few to have direct access to the research data. “We see the images and data here in Lethbridge before anyone else does,” says Naylor. “Scientists will be seeking our help in analyzing information, and the U of L group will be an important Canadian and international resource.” With an estimated output of up to 7,000 hours per year of data, there should be enough information to keep researchers busy collaborating on both current and future projects for years. What’s next? According to Naylor, more research that refines his current SPIRE device to make it suitable for yet another space mission, the Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA), which is currently under review by the Japanese, European and Canadian space agencies. Naylor will also continue to work as a cofounder of the recently formed Institute for Space Imaging Science (ISIS), a joint collaboration with the University of Calgary, that enables researchers from the two institutions and their partner researchers worldwide to share technology and other resources to more efficiently research ground-based or atmosphere-based projects.


U N I V E R S I T Y O F L E T H B R I D G E A RT G A L L E RY

Knowing/

Gnawing DARCY LOGAN NAGLFAR IN DRYDOCK, 2008 Acrylic, rust, resin and encrusted earth on canvas

art + people = x series


U N I V E R S I T Y O F L E T H B R I D G E A RT G A L L E RY

art + people = x series

WILLIAM MACDONNELL RUDOLPH HESS AND THE QUESTION OF AESTHETICS II From the University of Lethbridge Art Collection; gift of Norcen Energy Resources Ltd., 1996

Knowing/

Gnawing Participating in the art + people = x series has given me the opportunity to use the University of Lethbridge Art Collection as a research tool and allowed me to move my art practice in new directions. Initially, I began to navigate the archive by looking for work that connected with my current body of work, titled Know/Gnaw/Naglfar. In this series, I use the Scandinavian myth of Naglfar, a ship being constructed in the underworld from the fingers and toenails of the dead, to explore the nature of knowledge and ideas. During my first search of the U of L Art Collection, I was looking for works that engaged with history and the passage of time because these concepts are central to my own work. The more I thought about it, the more I began to realize that this project could provide a chance to reflect on the process of artistic production in a larger sense outside the scope of just my practice. I could begin to think about the idea of artistic praxis rather than the production of objects and attempt, as James Elkins states, “to think in paint, rather than about paint.” I began to consider art making beyond the creator’s intent and to think about it as a material archive of ideas, time and labour. In the end, I decided to approach the combination of my work and my selections from the U of L collection from the idea of corpus or the body. These works are records of the bodies that created them and are bodies of knowledge.

DARCY LOGAN SUSPENDED NAGLFAR, 2009 Acrylic, collage, resin and encrusted earth on canvas

Darcy Logan (BFA ’02)

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U N I V E R S I T Y O F L E T H B R I D G E A RT G A L L E RY

REBECCA ANWEILER POPULAR SCIENCE, VOL. 6, 2001 From the University of Lethbridge Art Collection; gift of the artist, 2002

ABOVE: (A & C) ALLAN HARDING MACKAY | UNTITLED (ALTERED NOTEBOOK), 1980 From the University of Lethbridge Art Collection; gift of Luke Stebbins, 1995 (B) DARCY LOGAN | PRIMA MATERIA Mixed media on altered encyclopedia Acquiring and preserving works of art in a public collection are only worthwhile if the public can access those works. One obvious means is through exhibitions, but there are other ways to connect with the art works and with the information associated with them. I started the art + people = x series to highlight the importance of the University of Lethbridge Art Collection as a resource for research by artists. This key function of a public collection usually happens behind the scenes and the public is often not aware of this role. Whether at the beginning of their careers when they are students or later on as their art practice matures, artists study contemporary and historical works of art as a means of developing their own

esthetic. The art + people = x series provides an opportunity to broaden the understanding of why public art collections matter. Local artist and U of L alumnus Darcy Logan first worked with the U of L Art Collection when he was a student. For Knowing/Gnawing, he has selected works from the collection that connect with his current body of work. The project will be displayed in the Helen Christou Gallery from Oct. 30, 2009, to Jan. 3, 2010. Josephine Mills Director/Curator, University of Lethbridge Art Gallery


U N I V E R S I T Y O F L E T H B R I D G E A RT G A L L E RY

Knowing/

Gnawing

RENEE VAN HALM STRUCTURAL VULNERABILITY, 1984 From the University of Lethbridge Art Collection; purchased in 1985

DARCY LOGAN SAILING TO VIGRITH, 2008/09 Acrylic, rust, resin and encrusted earth on canvas

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“As alumni, we are so grateful for all that we experienced at the U of L. We believe it’s important to give back to the university that helped start our careers and life together in so many ways.” Tina (BASc ’83) and Ray (BASc ’82) Bonetti

Giving Back

Alumni generosity helps ensure the strength and vitality of the U of L for years to come. It’s a gift that extends beyond the University and changes our community. Every gift makes a difference.

www.ulethbridge.ca/giving


Significant AND MENTIONABLE

ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL HONOURS THE UNIVERSITY The University of Lethbridge took centre stage at the 2009 Mayor’s Luncheon for Business and the Arts on Sept. 10 when the University was honoured as the winner of a 2009 Allied Arts Council (AAC) Award for Excellence as the local service organization that has significantly enhanced the arts in the community of Lethbridge. In total, three awards were handed out, including one to an individual, one to a service organization and one to a local business. (ONCE AGAIN) STEACY DUO WINS In August, U of L track and field star Heather Steacy won gold at the Canada Summer Games in Charlottetown, P.E.I. With the furthest throw of 59.92 metres, Heather dominated the hammer throw competition, winning by more than six metres. Also this summer, Heather’s brother Jim Steacy added to his international track resumé, winning the silver medal in the hammer throw at the 2009 Universiade in Belgrade, Serbia.

entrepreneurs and researchers to use realtime geographical information to address global challenges in resource management. The new centre, Tecterra, is one of five Alberta Ingenuity Centres for Research and Commercialization that focuses on technology and research to build more sustainable industry practices. Built on a partnership between the provincial and federal governments, the University of Calgary, the University of Lethbridge and the University of Alberta, Tecterra will tap into the research excellence across the province, allowing resource companies to work with innovative technology companies and the research community to develop world-class solutions to industry challenges. The more than $50 million investment includes: $21.6 million from the Alberta government, $11.6 million from the federal government, as well as a further $20 million anticipated from industry and other partners. AMONG ALBERTA’S 50 MOST INFLUENTIAL PEOPLE

Jim completed his Pronghorn career as one of the most decorated track athletes in Horns history, compiling nine Canada West and nine Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) medals, including 16 gold, and was undefeated in the weight throw versus CIS competition over his career. NEW INGENUITY CENTRE BOOSTS INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY The first of its kind in the world, Alberta’s newest Ingenuity Centre is working with

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Dr. Bruce McNaughton was named one of Alberta’s 50 most influential people by Alberta Venture magazine in July.

McNaughton, one of the world’s experts in neurophysiology, joined the U of L’s Canadian Centre for Behavioural Neuroscience (CCBN) last fall as the inaugural recipient of the Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research Polaris Award – a 10-year, $20 million research grant. A STERLING PAST, A GOLDEN FUTURE This year the School of Graduate Studies celebrates 25 years. When the School first emerged, it offered a single master’s degree in education. Since then, it has developed into a centre for graduate studies in the arts, health sciences, humanities, sciences and social sciences. This fall, the School implemented two new graduate degree programs in the creative arts through a Master of Fine Arts and a Master of Music. On Oct. 16, the School will celebrate this milestone with a special dinner with guest speaker Son Soubert, who is currently a member of the Constitutional Council of Cambodia and a professor at the Faculty of Archaeology of the Royal University of Phnom Penh. Soubert has worked to establish responsible politics in Cambodia and has worked extensively to help children, including the establishment of two orphanages. CHARTING A NEW COURSE Dr. Daniel J. Weeks assumed the position of vice-president (research) in July, a position Dr. Dennis Fitzpatrick held for the last 10 years. Weeks joins the University of Lethbridge after more than a decade at Simon Fraser University, where he was a professor and Chair of the

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Department of Psychology, and operator of the Psychomotor Behaviour Laboratory located on the Burnaby campus. Weeks brings a well-constructed plan for research development to the U of L, with a particular interest in raising the profile of the institution through strategic partnerships and projects. “There’s a tendency for many institutions in Canada to chase available research funding. The University of Lethbridge has taken a much more thoughtful approach,” says Weeks. “The initiatives the U of L has pursued are significant and will have staying power. There’s true leadership here and careful consideration about the direction the University should go – which tells me that Lethbridge is a place where big ideas can come to fruition.” TO STAY UP-TO-DATE ON WHAT’S HAPPENING AT THE UNIVERSITY, VISIT THE U OF L’S OFFICIAL ONLINE NEWS CENTRE AT: WWW.ULETHBRIDGE.CA/UNEWS


SIGNIFICANT AND MENTIONABLE NEW COMMUNITY SPORTS STADIUM KICKS OFF The spirit of the Pronghorn is legendary. It’s a spirit that lives inside everyone who has ever worn our blue and gold, and it now lives within the new Community Sports Stadium – a place that fosters a healthy community and team pride. Built on a partnership between the City of Lethbridge, the Government of Alberta and the U of L, the estimated $12 million multi-purpose, public-access facility, officially opened on Sept. 25 and 26. Equipped with an artificial field for football and soccer, a natural practice field, a synthetic 400-metre track and bleachers for 2,000 fans, the stadium will meet the sporting needs of the University’s athletic programs and those of southern Alberta for many years to come. The late Dr. Yosh Senda with wife Florence

LASTING LEGACY: YOSH SENDA On Sept. 9, 2009, the University community mourned the loss of Dr. Yosh Senda (LLD ’89), a respected leader, long-time member of the University community and legendary supporter of judo in Canada. Senda is credited with establishing judo in Lethbridge. He was instrumental in developing the Lethbridge Judo Club and the U of L Judo exchange program with Japan. He remained an active coach at the Lethbridge Judo Club and served as coach and manager of the U of L Judo Club. With a ninth degree black belt, Senda was the highest-ranking judo black belt in Canada. He instilled in his students that judo is more than just a physical exercise for the body – judo is a way of life. His philosophy: “You can better yourself by always showing respect for others, and to always give it your best in whatever you do.” In addition to a long list of awards and achievements, Senda was appointed as a member of the Order of Canada in 2007 in recognition of his contributions to the development and expansion of judo in Canada as a coach, mentor and role model for more than five decades.

PHOTO: LETHBRIDGE HERALD/IAN MARTENS

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In the last few days of August, a fresh set of first-year students came from far and wide, eager to start a new chapter. With boxes in tow, hopes set high and a little bit of nervous anticipation thrown in for good measure, they moved into residence and unpacked. With just over 8,200 students registered for classes, the University set a record-high enrolment this fall.


SIGNIFICANT AND MENTIONABLE

Performing Arts Events THEATRE OCTOBER 20 to 24 • Hay Fever by Noel Coward 8 p.m. | University Theatre 30 • Breakdance for Solo Cello 8 p.m. | University Theatre With Montreal’s Solid State Breakdance Company NOVEMBER 5 to 7 • Positive Space by Ian McFarlane 8 p.m. | Nov. 7 matinee: 2 p.m. David Spinks Theatre 24 to 28 • Festen by David Eldridge 8 p.m. | University Theatre DECEMBER 5 and 6 • Amahl and the Night Visitors by Menotti Dec. 5: 1, 3 and 7 p.m. | Dec. 6: 2 p.m. University Recital Hall JANUARY 21 to 23 • TheatreXtra #3 8 p.m. | Jan. 23 matinee: 2 p.m. David Spinks Theatre 24 • Tono 8 p.m. | University Theatre Toronto’s Red Sky with musicians and dancers from Mongolia and China FEBRUARY 9 to 13 • Hair by Gerome Ragni & James Rado, music by Galt McDermot 8 p.m. | Feb. 12: 7 p.m. and midnight University Theatre 26 and 27 • Dialogue of the Carmelites 8 p.m. | University Theatre

MUSIC

OCTOBER 23 and 24 • Opera Goes to the Movies! 8 p.m. | University Recital Hall NOVEMBER 7 • Dale Ketcheson and Friends 8 p.m. | University Recital Hall Classical guitarist and U of L music professor Dale Ketcheson performs with special guests 23 • Lethbridge Symphony Orchestra 8 p.m. | Southminster Church With special guests and U of L music majors, pianist Matthew Blackburn, LSO Young Artists Competition winner, and arranger Jesse Plessis 27 • Wind and Song 8 p.m. | Southminster Church Featuring U of L Wind Orchestra and Vox Musica 28 • Season of Joy 8 p.m. | Southminster Church With the U of L Singers and Women’s Chorus DECEMBER 2 • U of L Jazz Ensemble 8 p.m. | University Theatre 4 • Classical Percussion 8 p.m. | University Theatre U of L Percussion Ensemble performs 18 • Sing-a-long Messiah 7:30 p.m. | St. Augustine’s Anglican Church With Vox Musica 19 • Lethbridge Symphony Orchestra Holiday Favourites 7:30 p.m. | Southminster Church With guest artists U of L Conservatory Choirs and LCI Singers

ART JANUARY 15 • Opera Goes to the Movies with U of L Opera Workshop | 7 p.m. Gem of the West Museum Coaldale Tickets $15 at Coaldale Giftware & Antiques 23 • Big Band Cabaret 8 p.m. | U of L Ballrooms (Students’ Union Building) Enjoy a silent auction, door prizes and dancing to the Lethbridge Big Band

SEPTEMBER TO FEBRUARY Head Shots Sept. 11 to Oct. 23 Helen Christou Gallery Allyson Mitchell: Ladies Sasquatch Sept. 18 to Oct. 30 U of L Main Gallery To Mark on Surface Nov. 6 to Jan. 8 U of L Main Gallery

29 • Lethbridge Symphony Chamber Series 8 p.m. | Southminster Church Features U of L Faculty Brass Quintet: Trudi Mason, trumpet; Keith Griffioen, trumpet; Thomas Staples, horn; Gerald Rogers, trombone; Nick Sullivan, bass trombone

art + people = x series Oct. 30 to Jan. 3 Helen Christou Gallery

30 • Schumann & Chopin: Hearts Alive at 200 8 p.m. | University Recital Hall

Snap, Crackle, Pop Jan. 15 to Feb. 26 U of L Main Gallery and Helen Christou Gallery

31 • Schumann & Chopin: Hearts Alive at 200 2 p.m. | Medicine Hat Esplanade FEBRUARY 5 • How Do I Love Thee? 7:30 p.m. | Lethbridge Public Library Theatre Presented by music faculty and students Free admission 8 • Lethbridge Symphony Orchestra 8 p.m. | Southminster Church Guest artist Glen Montgomery, piano 12 • Sing, Sing, Swing with U of L Jazz Ensemble | 7 p.m. Gem of the West Museum, Coaldale Tickets $15 at Coaldale Giftware & Antiques

Public-Site Project by Tor Lukasik-Foss Nov. 17 to 21 U of L Atrium

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ANY OF THESE EVENTS, PLEASE VISIT: WWW.ULETHBRIDGE.CA/ FINEARTS/EVENTS. TO PURCHASE TICKETS FOR MUSIC OR THEATRE PERFORMANCES, CALL THE BOX OFFICE AT 403-329-2616. GALLERY HOURS: MONDAY TO FRIDAY 10 A.M. – 4:30 P.M. AND OPEN UNTIL 8:30 P.M. ON THURSDAYS. ADMISSION IS FREE.

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Still standing strong one hundred years


“STANDING THERE ON THE FAR EDGE OF THE COULEE I SAW ETCHED AGAINST THE SKY THE LIGHT TRACERY OF AN OLD IRON RAILWAY BRIDGE, 300 FEET IN THE AIR, SPANNING A MILE ACROSS THE RIVER.” DR. ARTHUR ERICKSON

THIS YEAR, LETHBRIDGE CELEBRATES THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY HIGH LEVEL BRIDGE – A LANDMARK THAT HAS INSPIRED MANY, INCLUDING UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE ARCHITECT DR. ARTHUR ERICKSON.

“The coulees offered extraordinary opportunities: dramatic heights and depths unusual in the prairies, and the possibility of outlook, proximity to the river and a microclimate milder than the windswept flatlands. Standing there on the far edge of the coulee I saw etched against the sky the light tracery of an old iron railway bridge, 300 feet in the air, spanning a mile across the river. I came to the conclusion that though

any building upon the exposed flatland should be interred in earth berms so that they would become part of the land, the academic building could span the coulees and, like the old bridge in its rigid flatness, reveal the rich contours of even the most level prairie. It seemed to me that the top storey of the university should lie below the tableland in an uncompromising straight line spanning the haunches of the prairie.”

Dr. Arthur Erickson The Architecture of Arthur Erickson With text by the architect Tundra Books, 1975


“ARTHUR WAS A BRILLIANT MAN AND AN AMAZING ARCHITECT.”

DR. VAN CHRISTOU

PHOTO: STUART DAVIS/VANCOUVER SUN

Dr. Arthur Erickson (1924-2009)

Renowned Canadian architect Arthur Erickson (LLD ’81) died on May 20, 2009, at age 84. University Hall, the University of Lethbridge’s main building, is one piece in a legacy of architectural masterpieces that he leaves behind. Erickson was also responsible for a number of key Canadian buildings such as Simon Fraser University in British Columbia and the Vancouver

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Law Courts complex as well as many other significant structures worldwide, including the Canadian Embassy in Washington, One California Plaza in Los Angeles and the Kuwait Oil Sector Complex in Kuwait City. Erickson was made an Officer of the Order of Canada in 1973 and then was promoted to Companion of the Order in 1981. In 1986, he was the first Canadian to win the prestigious American Institute of Architects Gold Medal.

Erickson and his business partner, Geoffrey Massey, designed University Hall and the University’s campus plan in the late 1960s. Their design, which was considered quite radical at the time, set the U of L apart in architecture and academic circles alike and brought the southern Alberta landmark international recognition. “Arthur’s whole way of thinking was that there were no limits as to what could be done,” recalls his long-time friend

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Dr. Van Christou (LLD ’84), who was a founding member of the U of L Board of Governors and the person responsible for connecting Erickson with the University in the ’60s. “Arthur was a brilliant man and an amazing architect.” Erickson’s work has left a lasting imprint on the University of Lethbridge and southern Alberta that will live on well into the future.


PHOTOS COURTESY OF DETROIT RED WINGS

well-rounded Well-grounded,

MIKE BABCOCK, COACH OF THE 2010 CANADIAN OLYMPIC MEN’S HOCKEY TEAM AND THE DETROIT RED WINGS, IS SO MUCH MORE THAN HIS BENCH PERSONA We think we know Mike Babcock by who we see on our television screens. He comes off as a steely-eyed competitor, a taskmaster who pushes and prods his players to strive for an on-ice perfection that, by the nature of the game, is unattainable. In the end, we see a hockey

coach and a man who has won at virtually every level of the sport – a champion. That Mike Babcock is for public consumption. He is the button-down, blazer-wearing Stanley Cup champion and coach of Canada’s 2010 Canadian

Olympic Men’s Hockey Team. He is just a sliver of the true Mike Babcock. For as much as Babcock strives to be at the pinnacle of his sport, his upbringing and family values tell him that true success is measured off the ice.

“My wife always laughs — she sees me wearing a suit behind the bench and wonders who that is because I’m wearing shorts and a t-shirt and ball hat most of the summer; I’m just like everybody else,” says Babcock. “It’s just that when people see me, they have me

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“IT’S ALL ABOUT LIFELONG LEARNING. THE THINGS I DID AT THE U OF L, TECHNICALLY I MIGHT NOT DO ANYMORE, BUT BELIEVING IN PEOPLE AND GETTING THEM TO WORK HARD, TO COMMIT TO ONE ANOTHER AND TO THE TEAM ARE EXACTLY THE SAME THINGS WE TALK ABOUT TODAY IN DETROIT.”

MIKE BABCOCK

Cup final and in the five years since, he’s been to two more Cup finals with the Detroit Red Wings, capturing hockey’s Holy Grail in 2007-08. “You have to get better each and every year if you’re going to be successful in all walks of life,” he says. “It’s all about lifelong learning. The things I did at the U of L, technically I might not do anymore, but believing in people and getting them to work hard, to commit to one another and to the team are exactly the same things we talk about today in Detroit.” With the 2010 Olympic opportunity just around the bend, Babcock’s approach will not vary. Why would it?

in that different light – my kids don’t know who that guy is, either.” That guy is the one who never saw himself as a hockey coach but rather an academic and educator. He’s the guy who resurrected a seemingly stalled coaching career by rejuvenating an on-the-ropes hockey program at the University of Lethbridge and guided the Pronghorns to an unlikely 1994 national title. “I never dreamed I was going to be a coach in the first place. I thought I was going to be in the college world the rest of my life. I thought I’d go on and get a PhD and teach,” says Babcock, who has an undergraduate education degree and graduate degree in sports psychology from McGill University. “I liked being in the college environment. I thought it’d be

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a great job to be around young, excited people getting better and going places. I thought I’d always be a part of that.” After previously taking Red Deer College to a national final, Babcock accepted a coaching challenge at the U of L. The 1993-94 Pronghorns were not considered a championship contender. The program itself was in trouble and faced the prospect of being cut from the U of L athletic landscape. The Horns had never made the playoffs or even finished a season above the .500 mark. “When I came to the U of L I had a pretty strong belief in how I thought hockey should be played and what we needed to do to have success; we instilled that from day one,” says Babcock.

“I believe there’s a right way to play the game and there’s a right way to approach life, and I tell that to my kids all the time. I’m not a very cautious person; I’m not a very careful person. I believe in living and getting the most out of every day, and I believe that’s also how you play the game.” It’s a philosophy that has stood the test of time. Following his one-year stint with the Horns, Babcock guided the Spokane Chiefs for six seasons, twice advancing to the WHL championship series. In 1997, he led Canada to a World Junior Championship gold medal. Two years later, after a brief stop in the American Hockey League, he was coaching the Anaheim Mighty Ducks in the National Hockey League. In his first season he took the Ducks to the Stanley

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“What a great thing, eh? I’m excited like you can’t believe. It’s a dream come true to have the chance to be an Olympian,” Babcock says, relishing the expectations of, and pressure from, a nation of rabid hockey fans. “The reason we have expectations is because we have a chance. The tournament now is going to be closer than it’s ever been, everybody has a chance to win; we’re just big believers that we’re going to find a way to get it done. I don’t know exactly how we’re going to do that, I just know we are.” It’s been 15 years since Babcock guided the U of L Horns to that national title, and while everything around him has changed, he still sees himself essentially as the man he was in the fall of 1993, hunting in the foothills every day following practice, looking after his family and striving to be a better person and coach. “I’ve always been a little fearful of not being good enough, so that gives me a


little bit of drive to try and be better,” says Babcock. Born in Manitouwadge, Ont., Babcock spent much of his childhood in the Northwest Territories, where his father worked as a mining engineer. When Babcock was 12, his family moved to Saskatoon, Sask., where his father still lives today. In the off-season, it’s also the area where Babcock, his wife and three children call home.

“I want my kids to be grounded,” says Babcock. “My kids are growing up different than I did, but in saying that, we’re hoping to raise really good people who are confident and who are going to be difference-makers in the world. That’s how my mom spoke to me, and that’s how I speak to my kids.” He lost his mother to cancer in 1992, but the lessons she taught still resonate with him today. They are part of the values with which he raises his family

and that he also takes to the rink. “I always say I learned to work hard from my dad, and I learned to talk to people from my mom,” says Babcock. His growth as a coach has garnered the respect of the hockey world and allowed him to work with the most talented players and personalities in the game. Still, despite his rise in professional status, he manages to stay true to the principles by which he was raised.

“It’s been a work in progress, and I like to think that I keep getting better, and I’m going to be a better coach next year than I was last year,” says Babcock. “You have to be in a constant stage of development if you want to be the best you can be. “Am I still the same person? I’d sure like to think so. I tell people all the time, the measure of me as a man isn’t going to be about the number of games I win, it’s going to be about the family I raise.”

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“I WANTED TO BE A PSYCHOLOGIST AND OBVIOUSLY LOVED SPORTS, BUT I WAS A HOCKEY PLAYER, I SWORE IN THE DRESSING ROOM, DRANK BEER IN THE PUB AND NEVER REALLY THOUGHT I HAD THE RIGHT MATERIAL TO BE A PSYCHOLOGIST.” DEREK ROBINSON


Here’s a thought – Vancouver Gold

PHOTO: BERNIE WIRZBA/GLENDA MOULTON

U OF L ALUM DEREK ROBINSON HAS CANADA’S OLYMPIC ATHLETES THINKING THEIR WAY TO SUCCESS

Canada’s Olympic athletes work tirelessly to create strong bodies but what can’t be overlooked is how mental strength can make the difference in reaching the medal podium in Vancouver. That’s where University of Lethbridge alumnus Derek Robinson (BA ’00, MEd ’03) makes his contribution to the Olympic effort.

effective, so that on a personal level, as human beings, they are able to be at their absolute best,” says Robinson. “That’s where my background in counselling education really comes in. Athletes have to know themselves extremely well so they can make the right choices in many of the situations they encounter.”

Robinson, a mental training consultant at the Canadian Sport Centre in Calgary, works primarily with Canada’s national long track speed skating team. It is one of Canada’s strongest groups and presents a variety of medal hopes, but to optimize performance, the athletes need to be in a perfect frame of mind. Robinson’s role is to help each of them find a mental balance that will allow for success.

Robinson, a former U of L Pronghorn men’s hockey player (1995-2000), knows of what he speaks, having been an athlete before he was a psychologist. In fact, his athletic past almost prevented him from pursuing his interest in psychology.

“I try to really personalize the mental training for the individual so it is more

“I was always an analytical player and had a huge interest in the mental aspect of performance,” he says. “I wanted to be a psychologist and obviously loved sports, but I was a hockey player, I swore in the dressing room, drank beer

in the pub and never really thought I had the right material to be a psychologist.” Now, that common bond he shares with his athletes is a huge benefit. “My background in sports has really helped me communicate with the athletes because we’re on the same page; we speak the same language,” he says. And when an athlete stands proudly on the podium, Robinson shares in the thrill of that moment. “There’s a lot of satisfaction in seeing them succeed,” Robinson says. “The reality is that it’s the athlete who ultimately has to perform, but it’s a team effort. The coaches and support team at this level are phenomenal, and we’re all working together to help athletes achieve their absolute best.”

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ALUMNI NEWS & EVENTS

2009/2010

U OF L ALUMNI ASSOCIATION COUNCIL President Don Chandler BASc ’73 Vice-President Kathy Lewis BN ’83, MEd ’99 Treasurer Lanny Anderson BMgt ’06 Secretary Rachel Yamada BMgt ’07

NEW CHAPTER FOR EDMONTON ALUMNI On June 17, 2009, the University of Lethbridge Alumni Association (ULAA) Council unanimously supported the motion to establish an Edmonton chapter of the Alumni Association. To build on the momentum of this new initiative, volunteer alumni hosted a reception on Aug. 20 and an annual general meeting on Sept. 10. “I became involved in initiating the Edmonton chapter so there would be a vehicle for U of L graduates to

connect with each other in this city,” says Kelly Kennedy (BMgt ’08), one of the organizers. “We will have speaker events, wine-and-cheese events, as well as family events. These opportunities will be great ways for U of L Alumni to network and to re-establish a connection with their alma mater.” If you are interested in becoming involved with the Edmonton chapter, please contact: 1-866-552-2582 or uofledmontonalumni@uleth.ca. Visit the Edmonton chapter website at: www.uleth.ca/alumni/edmonton.

EDMONTON ALUMNI GATHERING 5:30 p.m. | Nov. 24, 2009 Royal Glenora Club 11160 River Valley Road RSVP by November 18, 2009. For more information, e-mail: uofledmontonalumni@uleth.ca

A FEW PERKS OF MEMBERSHIP • Assistance from the U of L Career and Employment Services centre in job searching, career planning, interviewing techniques and moral support • Reduced membership fees at the U of L Library and fitness centre • Exclusive group rates through the TD Meloche Monnex home and auto insurance program • Help in reconnecting with lost classmates • Invitations to special alumni events • A free subscription to SAM

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Directors Grant Adamson BSc ’03 Ted Likuski BEd ’74 Cheryl Meheden MgtCert ’97 Jeff Milner BFA ’06 Rebecca Remington BSc ’90 Shaun Serafini BMgt ’02 Faisal Shaffi BMgt ’03 Jan Tanner BA ’04, MA ’06 Board of Govenors Reps Don Chandler BASc ’73 Kevin Nugent BMgt ’88 Senate Reps Robert Christiansen BMgt ’07 Holly Debnam BA ’97 Students’ Union Rep Jeremy Girard

Alumni Benefits & Services As a graduate of the University of Lethbridge, you have earned a free lifelong membership into the Alumni Association.

Past President Sheila McHugh DipEd ’84, MEd ’97

First Nations, Métis and Inuit Chapter Chair Leroy Little Bear BASc ’72, DASc ’04 INTRODUCING BMO U OF L ALUMNI MASTERCARD Show your pride with the new BMO University of Lethbridge Alumni MasterCard. With every purchase you make, BMO Bank of Montreal makes a contribution to the University to support student awards, alumni programming, special events and services. E-MAIL FOR LIFE Did you ever wish you could have kept your U of L e-mail account? Now you can with E-mail for Life. Re-activate or create a U of L e-mail account, free of charge, for life. LEARN MORE ABOUT YOUR ALUMNI BENEFITS www.ulethbridge.ca/alumni

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Calgary Chapter President Karen Filbert BMgt ’90 Edmonton Chapter President Kelly Kennedy BMgt ’08

The University of Lethbridge Alumni Association 4401 University Drive West Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4 Phone: 403-317-2825 Toll-Free: 1-866-552-2582 E-mail: alumni@uleth.ca


ALUMNI NEWS & EVENTS

Sweeping up to the challenge

DON CHANDLER TAKES ON ROLE AS NEW PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

With no wins, two losses and a very difficult match still to come at the 1982 Southern Alberta Curling Playdowns, Don Chandler (BASc ’73) was taken aback when people shook his hand, thanked him for coming and said goodbye. “I remember thinking, wait a minute, the game isn’t over until it’s over,” says Chandler. “We took that as a challenge and ended up winning our next four games before losing in the final.” Years before this seemingly impossible come back, Chandler’s natural determination would lead him to become one of the pioneering students at the University of Lethbridge. “I began my degree in geography in 1969. The University, only two years old at the time, was very small, only about

800 students, so you got to know your professors very well. It challenged me to do my best,” Chandler remembers. When he took on the presidency of the campus curling club during his second year, Chandler uncovered a new passion: community involvement. “While I was president, I found out that I had the ability to organize groups and events and make them successful. I have done a lot of that since then.” After receiving his chartered accountant designation in Edmonton in 1977, Chandler, currently a partner at Meyers Norris Penny LLP, returned with his wife Nadine to Lethbridge, where he would begin both his accounting career and his many years of involvement with the Lethbridge Curling Club, Little League, McMan Youth Services and

numerous other organizations. “I believe that, as a professional, when you live in a community and the community is good to you, you have an obligation to give back,” Chandler says. Described by his peers as a man of integrity, Chandler practises what he preaches. He has never forgotten that a large part of his community includes the University. With his second term on the University Senate at an end, Chandler joined the University of Lethbridge Alumni Association in 2008 and was elected president in June 2009. “The challenge will be to continue the association’s growth of the past few years. Our objective is to expand the committee structure to get alumni involved in actually running the activities that were previously run

by the council,” Chandler explains. “By expanding, we hope to make the organization more visible and provide opportunities for alumni to network, connect with mentors, learn more about the University and ultimately help maintain the University’s role as a vital part of our community.”

“I BELIEVE THAT, AS A PROFESSIONAL, WHEN YOU LIVE IN A COMMUNITY AND THE COMMUNITY IS GOOD TO YOU, YOU HAVE AN OBLIGATION TO GIVE BACK.” DON CHANDLER

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ALUMNI NEWS & EVENTS

PHOTO: JASON JONES

D R . C H E RY L M I S A K – A L U M N A O F T H E Y E A R 2 0 0 9

Dr. Cheryl Misak (BA ’83) never intended to go into academia. When she began her education at the University of Lethbridge, Misak’s goal was to become a lawyer. As fate would have it (if fate does in fact exist – a question Misak has certainly pondered and discussed at length with hundreds of students over the course of her long and illustrious career) Philosophy 1000 was the only course that fit a gap in her schedule that first semester. You could say the rest is history, but in Misak’s case, it’s far more appropriate to ask whether certain things in life are just meant to be. Taking a look at Misak’s resumé, which brims with esteemed accomplishments,

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culminating in her current position as vice-president and provost at the University of Toronto, it’s easy to buy into the notion that things have a way of working out the way they should. That first course in philosophy that Misak added to her schedule simply out of practicality, set her life on an extraordinarily successful and interesting trajectory that she might not otherwise have pursued. “I was immediately taken by it,” Misak says of philosophy. “I agonized over what to do – it seemed that degrees in philosophy wouldn’t lead to much of a career, but eventually I took the plunge.”

“PHILOSOPHY IS ABOUT WORKING THROUGH PROBLEMS, GETTING TO THE BOTTOM OF THINGS AND TRYING TO COME TO AN UNDERSTANDING ABOUT CONCEPTS SUCH AS TRUTH, KNOWLEDGE, JUSTICE AND THE GOOD.” DR. CHERYL MISAK

Misak followed her passion, earning a BA in Philosophy with great

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ALUMNI NEWS & EVENTS

distinction, and the coveted Faculty of Arts and Science Gold Medal to go along with it. While she had her sights set on a Rhodes Scholarship that year, it was at Columbia University that Misak earned an MA. Even so, Oxford was never off the radar. Misak reapplied for the Rhodes Scholarship while in New York, was accepted and went on to earn her PhD in England. Since then, it’s been one step after the other for Misak. She’s been a lecturer at Oxford, graduate co-ordinator and assistant professor at Queen’s, and then steadily moved up the ranks at U of T, advancing from professor to chair to dean to VP and principal – all the way to the top of the institution as vice-

president and provost. It’s an impressive succession that even Misak herself sometimes has trouble recognizing as her own career. “It’s a constant object of amazement to me,” Misak says. “I had to be convinced to do each successive job. Each time I moved on, I found I was enjoying it more and more. People kept asking me to do things, and I just kept saying yes.” While the position of vice-president and provost at U of T is more than a full-time job, Misak makes a point of keeping her hand in research and teaching. She is currently working on research for a book titled The American Pragmatists – a subject matter very much in line

with work Misak started while still an undergrad at the U of L. It is fittingly full circle – especially for a philosophy buff. “Philosophy is about working through problems, getting to the bottom of things and trying to come to an understanding about concepts such as truth, knowledge, justice and the good. Ask a question about an old problem, and you’re bound to learn something, if not new, then at least important.”

The University of Lethbridge Alumni Association Distinguished Alumnus of the Year award recognizes individuals for exceptional professional achievements, academic excellence or contributions to society. At Fall Convocation 2009, the Alumni Association will recognize Dr. Cheryl Misak for her outstanding career as a philosophy educator and researcher.

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS The Alumni Association is now accepting nominations for the 2010 Distinguished Alumnus of the Year and Alumni Honour Society awards. To obtain a nomination form, contact Alumni Relations: e-mail alumni@uleth.ca or call toll free 1-866-552-2582. The nomination deadline is Feb. 1, 2010. 43


Alma MATTERS 1970 Clark Sloan BASc ’73, MEd ’89 Sloan obtained a PhD in applied psychology from the University of Calgary in 2000. He is a psychologist and rehabilitation counsellor for the Canadian Paraplegic Association. Jim Olsen BEd ’75 “I enjoyed 35 years of teaching and retired in June of this year. As a guidance counsellor and teacher for the past 15 years, I encouraged many of our students to attend the U of L and many of those students have done just that.” Tineke Solberg BASc ’75 Solberg is the director of the Creation Discovery Centre in Bow Island, Alta. She has three children and four grandchildren. Judith Snowdon BEd ’75 Snowdon is owner, operator and a professional trainer for Shadowbar Shepherds Elite Training and Boarding Kennel. She is also a half-time learning support teacher at Crowsnest Consolidated High School. Eleanor Swanson BEd ’75 “After teaching and coaching at Lethbridge Collegiate Institute for 33 years, I retired in June 2005.” Thomas Snell BEd ’76 “Since graduating, I have completed a master’s in educational administration and a doctorate in educational leadership. I taught special education between 1974 and 1980 with the Calgary Board of Education and then moved to Mount Royal College as the co-ordinator of a special needs student department. I then taught business courses at the University of Calgary and Mount Royal College before becoming president of a public college. In 1986, I became the founder and president of Columbia College in Calgary. The college offers pre-career and professional programs to about 2,000 adult students per year.”

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Keltie Paul BASc ’77 After graduation, Paul finished a master’s degree at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale and in 2005, graduated from the Alberta Heritage Foundation’s Swift Efficient Application of Research in Community Health (SEARCH). She and her husband live in Fort McMurray, where she is the supervisor of counselling services for the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo and a regional advisor for the Alberta Electric System Operator (AESO). Paul is also busy with volunteer work and travel. Noella Little Mustache BEd ’77 Little Mustache received a master’s in education in 1991 from the University of British Columbia. Mary Jane Tomcala BEd ’77 “I have been teaching for more than 30 years with the Calgary Catholic School District. I am currently teaching biology and science at St. Mary’s High School.”

1980 Linda Shieff BASc ’80 “Following graduation, I obtained a master’s degree in interdisciplinary studies from the University of Texas at Dallas in 1986. I worked for Nortel for a number of years and have now been teaching English at Wake Technical Community College for the past eight years. Every summer, I still return to our cabin at the lake, just outside of Flin Flon, Man.” Neil Herbst BASc ’82 After graduation, Herbst moved to Edmonton and later opened the Alley Kat Brewing Company in 1994. Alley Kat keeps a roster of five flagship beers and contract-brews for establishments such as the Cheesecake Café and the Chateau Louis. David P. Burchill BASc ’83 Burchill received an LLB from Queen’s University in 2005. After several years

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Alumni Relations University of Lethbridge 4401 University Drive West Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4 Phone Toll-Free: 1-866-552-2582 E-mail: alumni@uleth.ca

Submissions chosen for publication may have been edited for length and clarity. The requested information is collected under the authority of the Alberta Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, for the purpose of managing the alumni records for use in University of Lethbridge publications. Questions concerning the collection, use and disposal of this information can be directed to University Advancement.

in private practice, he has accepted a position as a policing services consultant with the Nova Scotia Department of Justice in Halifax, N.S. Rebecca Holand BEd ’83 Holand opened her first solo exhibit, entitled Narratives, briefly, at the Lebel Mansion in Pincher Creek, Alta. A poet and artist, she has painted consistently for the last 30 years. When she’s not in her studio, Holand runs the Beaver Mines General Store.

transpersonal studies with the Institute of Transpersonal Psychology in San Francisco. As part of my studies I achieved a specialization and certificate in transformational life coaching. I opened a private practice in life coaching, InnerWorks Consulting, in Kelowna this spring. Blessings and best wishes to all alumni!” Susan Shigehiro BMgt ’85 Shigehiro is the manager of finance for the County of Newell No. 4. Mirella Trozzo-Baillie BMgt ’87 “I’m married with one son and living in Chicago. I am a CGA and a member of the Alberta CGA.”

Leslie Latta-Guthrie BASc ’83 “I have been working in the Alberta library, museum and archival community throughout my career. Since December 2004, I’ve been executive director/ provincial archivist with the Provincial Archives of Alberta.”

Corinne Schiller BSc ’88 Schiller received a PhD in atmospheric chemistry from York University in 1994.

Daniel Seitz BEd ’83 Seitz completed a master’s in leadership and training through Royal Roads University. He is a principal at Wildwood School.

Gayle Strikes With A Gun BEd ’88 Strikes With A Gun is an assistant superintendent for the Beaufort Delta Education Council.

Diane Shanks BN ’84 Shanks is the program director of emergency/critical care for Alberta Health Services.

Sam Tang BA ’88 “I moved from Hong Kong to Perth in 2005 and have settled in well here with my wife, May, and daughter, Emily, who is in Grade 3 this year. I am currently an associate professor in economics at the University of Western Australia.”

Janice Larson BASc ’85 “After graduation from the U of L, I moved to Vancouver and obtained a BEd and a law degree from the University of British Columbia. I was called to the B.C. bar in 1991. I’ve since enjoyed a fulfilling career in energy policy with the B.C. government, and I am currently the director of renewable energy development with the B.C. Ministry of Energy in Victoria. My husband, Brent Bowyer – an erstwhile airline pilot and fellow flatlander hailing from Piapot, Sask. – and I were married in England in 1999. Last summer he humoured my spirit of wanderlust (after fitting me with a GPS satellite tracker) as I cycled solo from Sidney, B.C., to Sydney, N.S. Best wishes to all of my U of L friends!” Lori Pinnell BMgt ’85 “I was recently awarded a master’s in

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Lorne Whittles BASc ’88 “After graduating from the U of L, I travelled for one year to Australia and Southeast Asia and then pursued an MBA at the U of C.  Following graduation from the U of C, I worked for three years as GM of Aero Dynamics of Calgary. I moved to Ann Arbor, Mich., in 1994 to take the position as the managing director of Cameron Balloons, the world’s largest manufacturer of hot-air balloons (we built the first balloons to fly around the world non-stop). I had the opportunity to travel to Bolivia with National Geographic/the Byrd Institute in 1997 for a special project to lift ice cores off an extinct volcano with a specialpurpose hot-air balloon that Cameron built. In 2000, I moved to Chicago, Ill.,


ALMA MATTERS to work in consulting and then made another move to Boise, Idaho in late 2001, joining EPCOR. My current position is Director, Western US for Capital Power USA (formerly EPCOR).” 

Mary (Greenfield) Tesan BEd ’90 Robert Tesan BA ’92 Robert and Mary Tesan live in Wellington, New Zealand. Robert is a real-estate agent and Mary is a teacher at Scots College.

Sheri Rhodes BA ’94 “I received an MEd from the University of Calgary in 2004 and am a curriculum co-ordinator for international education at Mount Royal College.”

Sandra Umpleby MEd ’89 Umpleby is an instructor in the Faculty of Education, Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies at the University of Victoria.

Tamara Miyanaga BA ’91 “I am enjoying life on a potato farm in southern Alberta with my husband and three daughters. I work part time for an outreach school in Taber. My degree has served me well on numerous boards and committees. I am very grateful for my experience at the U of L and the opportunity I had to serve on the students’ union.”

Rob Crow MgtCert ’95, BMgt ’97, MSc ’04 Crow recently completed the Blood Tribe Economic Impact Study project, which validates the tribe’s enormous contribution to the southern Alberta economy.

1990 Rodney Potrie BASc ’90 “I am working as a professional city planner and am starting the ‘giving back’ part of my life. I created a business that builds starter homes for the homeless in underprivileged areas of the world. Through a company called Doves International we work with the Canada-Costa Rica foundation to provide 300 homes (our first project) to the homeless of Costa Rica. As we grow, we hope to be able to provide basic living for 40,000 locals in Costa Rica and then expand to provide similar assistance to many others of the world’s needy.”

Pat Neufeld BFA ’91 “I live in Brooks, Alta., and work at the abattoir (Lakeside Packers). I am also the organizer of the Brooks Friends of the Library, which is a fundraising arm of the library board.” Rick Siemens BSc ’91 Siemens is the pharmacy manager of London Drugs in Lethbridge and the president of the Alberta College of Pharmacists. Randy Ross BA ’92 Ross is a manager with Children Family and Youth Services, Region 7.

Todd Shury BSc ’95 Shury is a wildlife health specialist for Parks Canada. Ramona Big Head BA/BEd ’96 “I just completed an MEd at the U of L and am currently a secondee for Alberta Learning in the curriculum branch. I am the First Nations, Métis and Inuit arts education program consultant. I will be back with the Kainai Board of Education on the Blood Reserve next fall.” Cheynne Sayers BMgt ’96 “I am a certified financial planner and have been in investment services since graduation.”

Sandra Vielle BA ’96, BEd ’98 “I have been working with high-school students and teaching them the Blackfoot language, along with other classes. I enjoyed learning at the University of Lethbridge. My daughter is planning to attend the University in the near future.” Donald Leffers BSc ’97 Leffers is an MA candidate at Carleton University in the Department of Geography and Environmental Studies. Michael Sera BA/BEd ’97 Sera is the athletic director and senior men’s basketball coach for Bert Church High in Rockyview, Alta. Bobbie Shippobotham BA ’97 “I work at the Galt Museum in visitor services.” Krista Weir BMgt ’97 Weir is a practice leader of human resource consulting services with Meyers Norris Penny’s Calgary office. She has worked as a consultant for a wide range of clients, including those in the oil and gas and technology sectors.

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ALMA MATTERS Shane Petry BSc ’98 “I am married with three children and am a senior biologist with Fisheries and Oceans Canada.” Betty Shigehiro BMgt ’98 Shigehiro is a mortgage associate with ProLink Mortgage Inc. Kevin Stengler BMgt ’98 “I still live in Lethbridge and own Water Pure & Simple – a bottled water company. I started out in 2000, just after completing my BMgt degree. We’ve grown from a two-man operation to 16 employees.” Shefali Somani BA ’99 Somani is the owner and president of Shef’s Fiery Kitchen Inc. in Calgary.

2000

Wendy Comeau MSc ’03, PhD ’08 Comeau is a postdoc at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in the Faculty of Medicine, Department of Physiological and Cellular Sciences. She is also a sessional instructor for the UBC psychology department.

Todd Savage BMgt ’00 In April, Savage took on the position of contracts manager for drilling services for Blackwatch Energy Services Corp. He is responsible for contracting Blackwatch’s rigs and expanding the current fleet as opportunities arise. He brings nearly a decade of contract experience.

Terry Lister BMgt ’03 “I am one of the owners of Brainstorm Media Solutions Inc., a marketing and media service dedicated to small- to medium-sized businesses in need of marketing specialists who do not have the budget for an in-house marketing department.”

Mike Simpson BA ’00 “I am the director of caucus, Government Members, in Edmonton. While at the U of L, I was on the students’ union executive as the vice-president of internal affairs in 1999-2000.”

Adrienne Matheson BA ’03 Matheson received a PhD at Ottawa University.

Jill Hume BMgt ’01 Hume is the director of human resources for the University of Calgary, Qatar Campus. Jana Miceli BSc ’01 “After graduation, I moved on to Davenport, Iowa where I completed a doctorate of chiropractic in 2005. I met my husband, also a chiropractor, and we opened the Miceli Family Chiropractic in 2006. We have been practising for three years now and loving every minute of it! We speak in the community on various topics, including nutrition, raising healthy kids and natural childbirth. We have travelled to Costa Rica and set up chiropractic clinics with the Red Cross where we delivered care to the local people.”

46

Jen McLean BA/BEd ’02 “After graduation, I taught high school in Grande Cache and then in Calgary. I finally decided to move back to Grande Prairie (where I did my first two years of university transfer). I applied to Grande Prairie Regional College (GPRC) and became the learning support co-ordinator. I am now the academic advising co-ordinator for GPRC and look forward to working with the U of L advisors! I want to express my gratitude to the U of L. It is a fabulous school that helped me become the person I am today, and, of course, to have a wonderful career in the post-secondary field.”

Rob Morgan MEd ’03 Morgan has been named as the founding coach of the St. Norbert College women’s hockey team. Prior to this, he spent the last six years as the associate head coach at Dartmouth College, helping the Big Green to the NCAA tournament in each of the last three seasons. During 2001/02, Morgan was head coach of the Medicine Hat Hawks and was later selected to coach one of eight teams at the Alberta Winter Games, where his team went undefeated and won the gold medal. In 2000/01, Morgan led the University of Lethbridge team, which finished fourth in the Canada West Universities Athletics Association, and he was named Canada West Hockey Coach of the Year. Jarom Olsen BA ’03 “Apart from being married and having two daughters – ages three and five – I also graduated in May with an MBA in

marketing from the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University.” Kimmy Shade BMgt ’03 Shade is employed with Alberta Environment as an Aboriginal relations advisor for Treaty 7 First Nations. Amanda Payne BA/BEd ’04 “I have been teaching since graduation and am currently teaching at the Young Offender Centre in Edmonton. I also taught high school art and drama in Whitecourt for two and a half years; Grade 7 and 8 language arts, social studies and art in Airdrie for two years; and have taken graduate courses at the University of Alberta this last year. I have plans to complete a master’s degree within the next couple years.” Erin Sproule BA/BEd ’04 “I was hired right out of university by Yellowknife District No. 1. This is my fifth year, and I am department head and teaching senior English. Yellowknife is great!” Bobbi-Lee Copeland BA ’05 Copeland, who has been working as an adult literacy instructor for the Lillooet Area Library Association, has been accepted to the University of Saskatchewan Indigenous Education Master’s Program. Angelo Mussi BMgt ’05 “Following my graduation from the U of L, I started my professional undertakings with PricewaterhouseCoopers Calgary as an auditor. During my stay with the firm, I completed the Master of Professional Accounting program with the University of Saskatchewan and module six of the Chartered Accountant School of Business, which enabled me to challenge the 2007 uniform evaluation (UFE). The U of L and the MPAcc program prepared me well as I passed the UFE on my first attempt! From there, I decided to explore other career opportunities that would lead me to my roots in Italy. I accepted a secondment position with PricewaterhouseCoopers Rome in order to obtain international financial reporting standards exposure for Canada’s 2010 transition and to re-connect with family and friends. Overall, I miss the Alberta prairies and mountains, but I also appreciate Italy’s intriguing history, fine cuisine and beautiful weather.”

S AM | So u t h e r n A l b e r t a M ag az i n e | U n i v e r s i t y o f Le t h b r i d g e

Lorraine Nicol MA ’05 Capitalizing on the grants secured by the U of L research group she works with, Lorraine Nicol will return to her studies this fall. She has been accepted into the PhD program, in a branch of biosystems and biodiversity, at the U of L. The research group, headed by Dr. Henning Bjornlund, was awarded two large Alberta Water Research Institute (AWRI) grants – one for $1.7 million and the other for $600,000. Nicol will turn the work she will be doing over the next three years, studying attitudes and values of waters, into her PhD thesis. Jarrod Olson BMgt ’05 “I got married in July 2009 and am working as a research assistant for Canada Research Chair David Castle at the University of Ottawa. I am enrolled in the Faculty of Law at the University of Ottawa, class of 2012.” Amy Roy Gratton BMgt ’05 “While studying at the U of L, I volunteered at the Career Resources Centre with Pat Tanaka where I helped co-ordinate the volunteers for the 2004 job fair. After graduating with a BMgt with distinction in April 2005, I travelled to Europe for four months with my husband, Jason. As a new graduate backpacking through Europe, I took my job search very seriously. At internet cafés, I researched organizations and sent targeted resumés based on advertised job postings. I also took the Career Resources Centre’s advice and sent unsolicited targeted e-mails to organizations I had a strong interest in, but were not hiring. While in Turkey, I received an e-mail back from CAPS: Your University of Alberta Career Centre. My unsolicited e-mail was well received, and I was invited to apply for an upcoming vacancy that had not yet been posted. For the past four years, I have been working as the events co-ordinator at CAPS. Jason and I continue to travel the world together. Our most recent travels include China and Egypt. In April 2009, I was back in Lethbridge for a conference and was able to thank Pat and my favourite professor, Dan Kazakoff, personally for their support and volunteer opportunities. Thanks for the memories!”


ALMA MATTERS Taressa Waye BSc ’05 “After graduating from the U of L, I completed a BSc in nutrition and food science with an integrated dietetic internship at the University of Alberta in 2009. I am currently working as a community dietitian in Brooks, Alta.” Stephanie Kenny BMgt ’06 “I had a baby girl named Maya in March. I’m on parental leave from the Deline Land Corporation as chief administrative officer.” Brett Williams BSc ’06 “I graduated from the McGill Master of Library and Information Studies program in May 2008. I am now the systems librarian for the College of the North Atlantic - Qatar in Doha, Qatar.” Caley Martin BSc/BEd ’07 “I have been living and teaching in a small Arctic community for a year and a half. I’m enjoying it very much and have taken part in many unique experiences!”

Scott Mackinnon BA ’07 Mackinnon runs the Scotty Mac Youth Basketball Camps in the Comox Valley community. Internationally, Mackinnon is working with a Filipino benevolent organization to fund and construct a selfsufficient basketball court in the Smokey Mountain garbage dump community outside of Manila. “The court will provide the youth of Smokey Mountain with a positive social outlet, an opportunity to exercise, the freedom to just be kids and play, an idea that many of us take for granted here in Canada,” says Mackinnon.

Ian Mailhot BA ’08 “Upon graduation I obtained permanent, full-time employment with the Canada Revenue Agency. My credentials from the U of L were no doubt a huge help.”

Melissa Wall BA ’07 “I have completed a bachelor of social work from the University of Calgary and am now employed with the Government of Alberta and Children’s Services.”

Audrina Poepping-Steciw BMus ’09 Poepping-Steciw placed first in the Provincial National Voice Class in the Kiwanis Music Festival in Edmonton. She also represented Alberta in the National Class at the competition in Saskatoon, Sask., in August.

Quincy Gerein BN ’08 Gerein is a registered nurse for the Saskatoon Health Region.

Gord Oliver BMgt ’08 Oliver started an environmentally friendly chemical distribution company called Bio Protection Solutions. The company specializes in asphalt and concrete products. He is married to Brandi and has two children, Cooper and Peyton, with another child due in November.

In July, Leroy Little Bear (BASc ’72, DASc ’04) and Raymond Romses (BASc ’75) were honoured with keys to the City of Lethbridge by Lethbridge Mayor Robert Tarleck. “This recognition is well deserved for all these recipients who, from many different walks of life, serve their community in a variety of ways,” says U of L President Dr. Bill Cade. “These awards also show the remarkable connections and effect the University has on the community. Our congratulations go out to the entire group, in particular our employees, alumni and friends who are honoured.” In June, Little Bear was recognized with the Urban Aboriginal Lifetime Achievement Award by the Aboriginal Council of Lethbridge for his dedication to education, the community and for advocating for youth and families.

The University of Lethbridge wishes to extend its sincerest condolences to the families and friends of the following members of the University community: Debbie Kullman passed away on April 28, 2009. Larry Knibbs BEd ’79 passed away on May 1, 2009. Arthur Erickson LLD ’81 passed away on May 20, 2009. Howard Forsyth passed away on May 20, 2009. Martin Whittles BASc ’87 passed away on June 10, 2009. Tyler Hewitt passed away on June 11, 2009. Ludvik Pahulje Sr. LLD ’03 passed away on June 25, 2009.

Alumni Honours Congratulations to Danny Balderson (BA/BEd ’01), Don Chandler (BASc ’73) and Dori Johnson (BASc ’87) for being inducted into the Lethbridge Sports Hall of Fame in 2009.

In Memoriam

Nancy Walker (BMgt ’82), University of Lethbridge vice-president (finance and administration), received the 2009 Canadian Association of University Business Officers (CAUBO) Outstanding Contribution Award in June 2009. CAUBO promotes professional management and effective leadership in administrative affairs in Canadian universities. Being part of CAUBO is a great resource for institutions and a benefit that Walker recognized immediately during her first conference in 1990. Since that time, Walker has played a significant role in establishing CAUBO as a leader in best practices for academic institutions. Jeremy Schmidt (BA ’05), a doctoral student in the Department of Geography at the University of Western Ontario, has received a scholarship from the prestigious Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation. His research focuses on recent calls of global experts who argue that the growing water crisis is rooted in a systematic failure to connect water policy and management to ethics. Schmidt conceptualizes, and makes operational, a new ethic for water by uniting three domains: po-

litical economy, environmental management and ethics. His research represents some of the first empirical work on ethics and water policy in Alberta. Spencer Croil (BA ’06), a planner with the Municipal District of Foothills No. 31, was honoured by the Rothney Astrophysical Observatory and the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada for his effort in creating a bylaw for responsible lighting and his work with light pollution. Marc Demers (BMgt ’06) is the studio manager at Blatant Films. In May, his company received the Music Video of the Year award at the 2009 Leo Awards in Vancouver. The winning video was for Morphine by Tupelo Honey. Kelly Andres (BA/BMgt ’05, MA ’08), who will begin her PhD program at Concordia University, was recently awarded a doctoral Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC). At the U of L spring 2008 convocation, she was awarded the Governor General’s Gold Medal for Graduate Studies and the MA Medal of Merit.

Kenneth Gregus BEd ’76 passed away on June 29, 2009. Ineke Johanna BA ’89 passed away on July 8, 2009. Andrew (Jim) Campbell BEd ’71 passed away on July 21, 2009. Elijah De Guzman BFA ’07 passed away on July 24, 2009. Cornelius (Corne) Martens LLD ’96 passed away on July 29, 2009. Mackenzie Kearl BSc ’06 passed away on Aug. 1, 2009. Larry Gedrasik BEd ’75 passed away on Aug. 13, 2009. Timothy Willis BASc ’86 passed away on Aug. 16, 2009. Robert Michael Popson BEd ’70 passed away on Aug. 20, 2009. Krista (Robson) Heidinger BA/BEd ’01 passed away on Aug. 30, 2009. Dr. Yosh Senda LLD ’89 passed away on Sept. 10, 2009. Chi Ho Chan BSc ‘09 passed away on Sept. 15, 2009. 47


Pronghorn Athletics 2009-2010 Home Schedule

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SUNDAY JAN. 22 FRIDAY 23 Y JAN. SATURDA 30 Y JAN. SATURDA FEB. 5 FRIDAY 6 Y FEB. SATURDA . FEB 19 FRIDAY

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For more information contact Shawn Stead @ 403.380.1898 Hours Open for Registration: 8am-8pm Phone: 403.329-2706

ing Swimm Event Monday through Sunday e t a D WEST 31 JAN 29

CANADA NSHIPS CHAMPIO

S AM | So u t h e r n A l b e r t a M ag az i n e | U n i v e r s i t y o f Le t h b r i d g e


Ben Goresky (BHSc ’09) studied addictions counselling at the U of L – the only baccalaureate program of its kind in Canada.

I experienced a lot of personal growth throughout my education – both in the classroom and out. At the U of L, I found small classes, great professors and an atmosphere that was conducive to building relationships. For my senior internship, I spent a full semester working at Crossroads Centre, Antigua, a first-class treatment centre in the West Indies. I can’t say enough about my time there. I learned so much from the counsellors and had a great time learning about the local culture. Through my degree, I’ve learned a different way of thinking, a kind of open-mindedness that directs me to look at all facets of any problem. I’ve learned never to assume that I know everything about any subject because there is always more, there is always another take on it, another way of seeing things, more to discover.


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