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University of Lethbridge

Destination Project Science & Academic Building Design Development Report January 29th, 2016


Table of Contents “The Destination Project will be a place to inspire research, learning and creativity. It will reinforce connections not only on the campus but with the community at large, invoking pride of place and taking the University sustainably into the future, built on a solid foundation, respectful of its past.” Mike Mahon, President & Vice-Chancellor

Overview

1

Designing for the Future

7

Meeting the Charter Goals: Transdisciplinary Learning + Research Sustainable Design Supportive Environment Connection to Campus + Community Signature Architecture

9 13 21 27 35

The Integrated Design Process at Work

43

Appendix: Floor Plans

45

Consultant Team

54

Cover Image: South Elevation/Winter Garden 2

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Overview

This Design Development Report forms the basis of design

The Charter Goals, established during Pre-Design, continue to

as of December 10, 2015. These documents also form the

drive the design of the Destination Project, specifically:

basis for a costing analysis by the project team, the result of which may ultimately impact the final product. This

Enable Transdisciplinary Learning and Research

summary provides an overview of the project’s philosophy

Incorporate Sustainable Design

and design approach, and outlines the development

Provide a Supportive Environment

of the various building systems, sustainable goals and

Connect to Campus and Community

environmental strategies.

Create Signature Architecture

The Design Development Phase took place between

The building’s design is outlined in terms of these five Project

May and December 2015. The Integrated Design

Charter categories as a means of measuring the project’s

Team continued to advance the project design through

success to date.

collaborative discussion, extensive computer modeling and simulations, a physical mock-up and program-focused

Synopsis of Design Development Phase: Milestones

user meetings to test and confirm decisions made during

Physical scale model created by design team to study the building’s façade, interior and exterior spaces,

the previous design phases. Cost, constructability, and

Enhancement of the sustainable initiatives

the approach to materiality and systems were discussed in

Furthering of design to meet charter goals

detail with PCL, the Construction Managers. In addition,

Deletion of Energy Centre

ongoing costs were monitored by Altus Group, a third

Relocation of greenhouse to Level 7

party Quantity Surveyor.

Relocation of lab expansion space to Level 6

Optimization of stairs and elevator locations

The consultant team for this phase included the following

Confirmation of controlled access routes

specialties:

Consolidation of Major Instruments on Level 6

Right-sizing wet bench teaching labs

Architectural

Acoustics

Refinement of generic lab module concept via mockup

Structural

Greenhouse

Optimization of upper level science layouts

Mechanical

LEED

Development of room data sheets and equipment lists

Electrical

Vibration

Development of building systems design

Energy/Climate

Vertical Transportation

Development of massing, exterior systems and landscape

Landscape

Audio Visual

Civil

Quantity Surveyors

Building Code

Vivarium Consultant

Wind + Microclimate

Construction Manager Geotechnical

via physical models and studies •

Development of physics observatory

Refinement of strategies for public spaces and social hubs

Rationalization of service cores

Refinement of Vivarium footprint and layout

relationship to University Hall and landscape.

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Designing for the Future

The primary challenge of Schematic Design was moving toward transdisciplinarity. Extensive user and IDP team engagement, research and simulation which allowed us to solidify our approach during Schematic Design, were replaced by more focused and intensive meetings during Design Development. Our focus became more technical and the development of building systems and sustainable initiatives was emphasized. Science buildings are complex and energy-intensive. It is incumbent upon the IDP group, as scientists, designers, engineers and stewards of the environment, to continue to challenge, benchmark and innovate in our response to the design of this building. Sustainable initiatives must be wholly integrated into the project and an essential part of the whole, rather than superficial additions included to achieve the perception of sustainability. Designing for significant energy reduction is no longer an option but a necessity; the demands put on the environment must be met without reducing the capacity of the environment to allow all people to live well, now and in the future. Low energy buildings, when approached thoughtfully and holistically, provide superior comfort, enhanced user control, and improved user satisfaction within the overall work and study environment. Our goal is to minimize energy use, emissions and life cycle costs, while providing an optimal research, teaching and learning environment that contributes to happier, healthier and Typical double exterior faรงade @ perimeter offices in open configuration

more productive people.

The images to the left show a typical double faรงade at the perimeter offices with louver blinds in open (upper) and closed (lower) configurations. Fully automated shading devices within the cavity of the double faรงade minimize the need for active cooling, reducing both the size of the mechanical system and the amount of energy used. Passive solar heating of this space in winter and the shoulder seasons reduces the energy required for heating and helps meet sustainability objectives.

Typical double exterior faรงade @ perimeter offices in closed configuration using fully automated louver blinds 6

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Enabling Transdisciplinarity Support working between, across and beyond individual disciplines Encourage collaboration and sharing

Research Neighbourhood

Integrate teaching and research

science on display

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light and view transparency

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The building must support a change in culture that

support space ensures connectivity within and between

encourages the possibility of transdisciplinary research.

research neighbourhoods. The service “spine” running

It was essential to test the assumptions made during the

parallel to and above the utility corridor is envisioned

Schematic Design Phase on more detailed room layouts.

as an organizing element for lab services, sinks, storage

Intensive user group workshops provided the design team

and entrances to support spaces. Vertical and horizontal

with further insights into how research and teaching

circulation pathways within the building were optimized

happen at the University of Lethbridge.

and controlled access routes between research, teaching and support spaces has been analyzed, discussed and

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Maximize student engagement and research capabilities collaborate

lity

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WE L A T BE B Z NC ON H E

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Create unique and engaging spaces that promote discovery

A plan “reset” instigated by the deletion of the energy centre resulted in revised program layouts that provide enhanced adjacencies between research groups and

The modularity of the teaching and research spaces will

greater opportunities for shared support and research

support a spectrum of research styles. Flexible, adaptable

space. A wet bench zone located at the intersection

and generic labs will accommodate future renovations

of the Biology and Biochemistry research spaces

quickly, easily and economically. Expansion and

has the potential to be developed and utilized as a

contraction of project teams can occur with a minimum

transdisciplinary project area. Open wet bench areas were

of disruption to building services and other researchers.

maintained wherever possible to reduce the number of

Opportunities for collaboration occur within the lab

physical divisions between research groups.

modules, within each research neighbourhood, between

Organizational diagram of a portion of a research neighbourhood showing modular labs and shared support space connected by a utility corridor, enclosed offices, and adjacent public spaces. Opportunities for collaboration within labs and public space are indicated, as are views between research groups, into research spaces from public space, and out to the landscape.

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refined throughout the Design Development process.

neighbourhoods and at the scale of the whole building. The development of open and enclosed wet bench areas has resulted in a more consistent layout in all wings and improved transparency, while allowing natural light to enter research space through the office corridor. The utility corridor linking open bench space and adjacent

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Lab Strategy and Internal Circulation

CONTROLLED ACCESS ROUTE UTILITY CORRIDOR PRIMARY LAB ENTRANCE SECONDARY LAB ENTRANCE

SERVICE ELEVATOR SCIENCE ELEVATOR PUBLIC ELEVATORS

OPEN RESEARCH CLOSED RESEARCH OFFICE & MEETING ROOMS PUBLIC SPACE BUILDING SERVICES

Flexible, Generic, Open Lab Space

This diagram illustrates the open, generic and flexible research space in each lab neighbourhood. It shows the typical circulation routes through a building research wing and primary and secondary entrance points to each research neighbourhood. Utility corridors link users within research groups, controlled access corridors and elevators provide access between neighbourhoods and to teaching and support spaces elsewhere in the building. The renderings opposite represent the current concept for the open wet bench research space.

Typical Utility Corridor 10

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Sustainable Design Support economic, environmental and social sustainability Capitalize on opportunities afforded by climate and site Design for long-term value Strive for simplicity, ease of maintenance and resilience Provide an exceptionally comfortable and safe environment Maximize opportunities for comfortable outdoor spaces Respect the ecosystem and preserve campus wildlife

The systems design of the Science and Academic

defined by their energy use. Low intensity spaces include

Building are driven by four priorities: Reducing energy

dry labs, offices, classrooms, meeting rooms and public

demand, maximizing passive systems, efficient delivery

spaces. High intensity spaces include wet bench teaching

of services, and ensuring user comfort. The design team

and research spaces, shared major instrument suites and

leveraged the unique climate of Lethbridge to deliver

the vivarium. Energy use will be optimized by aligning

the most effective sustainable initiatives. The wind

supply and demand between the two types of space.

makes passive natural ventilation viable. Relatively low

Since the volume of air required for the building exceeds

humidity allows for extensive energy recovery systems

what can be provided by natural ventilation, supply air is

and makes radiant heating and cooling particularly

supplemented by high-efficiency air handling units.

effective. Passive conditioning of incoming air through the double façade and winter garden is made possible by the high number of sunny days. A highly efficient

Conventional versus Cascade Air System

envelope with extensive perimeter glazing and rooftop

AIR IN

AIR IN

clerestories above the primary public spaces provide

AIR HANDLING

excellent daylight penetration and spectacular views to the unique and beautiful landscape.

% 0 AIR IN 6 # &

AIR HANDLING

GLOBAL VENTILATION CONCEPT Conditioning and distributing ventilation air can

' " $ " % &

OFFICES

WINTER GARDEN

ATRIA MIXING PLENUM

AIR IN

MAKEUP AIR OFFICES

LABS

ATRIA

LABS

HEAT RECOVERY

represent up to 80% of the energy demand for this type of facility. The design aims to address this with a highly effective strategy referred to as a “cascade” system. Spaces within the building are split into two categories Winter Garden - Facing East 12 KPMB I STANTEC

EXHAUST

Conventional System

EXHAUST

Cascade approach utilizing natural ventilation and a central mixing plenum

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DOUBLE FAÇADE & WINTER GARDEN

lower and tilt to optimize the balance between solar heat

Critical to the passive ventilation system, the double

gain and daylight penetration. The passive solar heating

façade at the perimeter of all east and west-facing

occurring in the two façade systems allows for effective

offices moderates the harsher aspects of the Lethbridge

natural ventilation to be extended from 30% to 70% of

climate, while maximizing daylighting and acting as an

the year.

air collection system. Winds are slowed by the pressure

The Winter Garden, located on the south façade of

offset provided by the double façade, reducing strong

the building, functions much the same way as the

gusts and allowing airborne particulate to settle in the

double façade. Its large southern exposure passively

double skin instead of entering the building. Automated

preconditions large quantities of incoming air that are

venetian blind systems are informed by sensors located

routed to the central mixing plenum and then distributed

throughout the building and controlled by the central

throughout the building.

Building Management System. They automatically raise,

Conceptual Diagram of Double Façade 14

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Above is a conceptual diagram showing a section of the double façade and offices. Air enters the building through fully automated exterior vents which are controlled by the Building Management System. The percentage of windows open is altered to suit exposure, time of day, wind speed and direction, and interior temperature and humidity. Radiant heating and cooling integrated into the concrete floor slab, and perimeter radiators further condition the air to provide a comfortable office environment. Internal blinds and the manual windows into the double façade can be controlled by the occupants.

Model of Double Façade and West Canopy UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE DESTINATION PROJECT DESIGN DEVELOPMENT REPORT

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HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEMS

be flushed with fresh air if ambient levels of contaminants

In the Science and Academic Building, all heating or

exceed predetermined thresholds.

cooling energy is removed from exhaust air before it leaves

Convection/induction units that use chilled water and fans

the building. Energy captured through this process is used

to cool and recirculate air are used in high intensity lab

to condition incoming air. General lab exhaust passes

spaces. Known as “chilled beams”, they require far less

through an “Enthalpy”, or “Heat Recovery” wheel which

energy and air volume than traditional “all-air” cooling

extracts energy and latent humidity from the outgoing

systems and minimize problematic drafts.

air with up to 80% effectiveness. Heat from fume hood

Fume hoods equipped with variable flow fans and

exhaust is captured with a highly efficient glycol loop

automated sashes constantly monitor and trim air flow

system. For reasons of safety, energy recovery systems

to appropriate levels, ensuring that lab spaces are safe

are not used for certain applications such as perchloric

and effectively ventilated. Fume hood exhaust is expelled

and radioisotope hoods.

directly from the building through an array of high velocity

Daylight Diagram

SUMMER SUN

fans so that it is not re-entrained through the windows LOW ENERGY INTENSITY SPACES

and active HVAC systems. Fan use can be tailored to

Low intensity spaces have a low and consistent heating

accommodate the required exhaust capacity at any given

and cooling demand. By separating the heating and

time.

cooling systems from the ventilation air in these spaces, a dramatic reduction in the volume and velocity of supply

DAYLIGHTING

air can be realized. A thermally active structural concrete

Daylighting is an essential component of the current

slab provides radiant heating and cooling that is more

scheme. In order to bring light as far into the footprint

consistent, evenly distributed and quiet. Air is either

of the building as possible, a “light scoop” has been

supplied into the offices through the operable windows

introduced into the space between each lab block,

or at floor level through a low-velocity diffuser. Return

directly above the building’s public spaces. Each light

air is exhausted into a plenum above the corridor ceiling

scoop consists of clerestory glazing and a sloped ceiling

and circulated back up to a central mixing plenum in the

plane that reflects and diffuses light downward into the

mechanical penthouse.

public space. Clerestory glazing is more economical to

WINTER SUN

build and maintain than the skylights developed during HIGH ENERGY INTENSITY SPACES

the Schematic Design phase, and the quality of the light

High intensity spaces are typically located inboard to

delivered is softer and more uniform. As the sun moves

minimize exposure to the exterior and to enhance the

over the course of the day, light conditions will subtly

critical relationship between research and social space.

change, animating the building interior.

Through the use of sensors that constantly monitor air quality, air exchange rates are minimized while still meeting building code requirements and guaranteeing personal safety. An alarm will sound and the space will

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Above is a daylighting diagram showing the “light scoop” in the main atrium. Daylight enters the space at a low angle during the winter months, penetrating deep into the floor plate. During the summer the atrium is more shaded in order to mitigate excessive solar heat gain.

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WIND AND MICROCLIMATE

Water flume testing of the scale model was used to

In order to investigate the impact of the strong Lethbridge

simulate and analyze potential snow loads. This study

winds on pedestrian comfort and safety, a wind and

allows the structural engineers to minimize the cost of the

microclimate engineer analyzed the effect the design of

structure by designing specifically for the predicted snow

the building has on the surrounding area. A scale model

loads. The testing also predicts where snow will drift on

of the Science and Academic Building and its immediate

the ground which permits the design team to integrate

environment was constructed and tested in a wind tunnel.

solutions early in the design process.

Sensors were placed on the model at primary building

Wind rose showing directional distribution of winter winds greater than 15km/h in Lethbridge

entrances, walkways, outdoor terraces, parking lot and

SUMMARY

roofs to determine conditions at various times of year.

The deletion of the Energy Centre at the beginning

Wind conditions that exceed the established criteria

of the Design Development phase has allowed for a

were identified and control measures incorporated into

purpose-built mechanical design that uses more efficient

the current design. In addition, the wind tunnel was used

low-temperature systems throughout, while providing

to identify and provide recommendations to mitigate

the design team with additional latitude to define our

any potential re-entrainment of exhaust air on existing

approach and develop unique and highly efficient building

buildings.

systems.

Wind Direction

Scale model of the Science and Academic Building in a water flume testing simulation for snow accumulation and scour patterns at RWDI’s testing lab. 18

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Scale model of the Science and Academic Building in a wind tunnel testing simulation at RWDI’s testing lab. UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE DESTINATION PROJECT DESIGN DEVELOPMENT REPORT

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Supportive Environment Support a liberal education Create a building that is vibrant and alive, with access to natural light and views Provide places for both collaboration and solitude The building must be adaptable to support future change Use durable materials and systems Put scientific activity on full display Create state-of-the-art research and training facilities

Key to creating a supportive working, teaching and

potential furniture layouts and uses. Specialized support

learning environment is to test the assumptions made

spaces, such as testing rooms, have been removed from

during the previous Schematic Design phase against the

within the dry lab areas (where possible) and centralized

Charter Goals. The design team worked intensively with

so that they can also be shared.

the various user groups to ensure that research spaces were located appropriately and were properly sized, with

ACCESS TO LIGHT AND VIEWS

optimal adjacencies. Circulation routes, both public and

Each lab neighbourhood has access to natural light and

controlled, were studied to ensure that researchers had

exterior views. Enclosed offices and open graduate

direct access to support and teaching spaces as well as to

workstations are located at the perimeter of each lab

adjacent science neighbourhoods and public amenities.

neighbourhood with views to the surrounding landscape. Alternating bays of enclosed support space and

FLEXIBLE, ADAPTABLE RESEARCH SPACE

strategically located open, more transparent support

An emphasis was placed on providing flexible, adaptable,

space provide the labs with a sense of connection to

and generic open wet bench research space capable of

the offices and natural light beyond, and foster user

supporting a diverse range of research and requiring

interaction. Neighbourhood lounges, with spectacular

minimal renovation to support new researchers and

views over the coulee landscape, are located at the tip

the expansion or contraction of research groups.

of each lab block. These spaces have direct access to

Customization of spaces to meet specific researcher

kitchen and washroom facilities and are furnished with

needs, such as enclosure and specialty equipment, was

white boards and comfortable group seating to encourage

only considered for specific reasons such as safety or

collaboration.

security. These unique areas occur in the highly serviced support spaces adjacent to the open labs, the majority of which are shared by multiple users. Dry bench research space is divided into large rooms that support a variety of

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North Atrium Student Commons and Undergraduate Student Precinct - Level 7

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SCIENTIFIC ACTIVITY ON DISPLAY Glazing at the perimeter of lab neighbourhoods emphasizes a visual connection between the research environment and adjacent public spaces. Scientific activity in the labs is put fully on display. Circulation space between the benches and the glass becomes an area for collaboration and acts as a buffer between the researchers and the public space. Translucent white boards integrated into the glazing system demarcate this collaboration space. They partially screen the labs from the public areas while simultaneously displaying ongoing work. TEACHING SPACE Teaching spaces are carefully incorporated into the fabric of the building. Advanced teaching labs are integrated into research neighbourhoods with good proximity to the public lounges on Level 9. The “Undergraduate Precinct” on Level 7 is a student hub situated at the base of the North Atrium. It co-locates both wet and dry bench undergraduate teaching labs and general purpose classrooms. With generous corridors, access to the north terrace, a variety of quiet and group study rooms, informal common space, access to lockers and other amenities, it provides undergraduate science students with a home base within the larger facility. The proximity of the undergraduate labs to the main atrium and the transparency of the research labs above put scientific activity on display and provide visual connectivity to the student commons and informal study spaces throughout the building. MATERIALITY Along with the development of sustainable and highquality building systems, a durable and economical palette of materials has been proposed. Dark metals, glass and precast concrete connect the Science and Academic Building with the rest of campus. The warmth of wood and colourful accent walls will contribute to the building’s vibrancy and connect it to the stunning landscape. Its unique identity will become a destination within the greater campus and the community.

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Living Room with research labs beyond, Level 9

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Typical Neighbourhood Lounge

Typical Office Corridor (cut-away view) 24

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Central Auditorium - Level 7 / 8 UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE DESTINATION PROJECT DESIGN DEVELOPMENT REPORT

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Connection to Campus + Community Create a hub for science Improve pedestrian connections on campus Capitalize on the unique natural environment Contribute to the long-term vitality of the campus and the community Link to University Hall to support its revitalization Make science visible Enable community outreach and entrepreneurship

The Design Development Phase advanced the concepts

Short-term parking for approximately 70 cars is provided

of campus connections and associated program elements

to the north of the building and access is provided for

that were established during Schematic Design. These

both school buses and emergency vehicles at the front

elements include the link to University Hall, the pedestrian

door. To the south, one storey below the main entrance, a

bridge, the outreach spaces and the landscaping of the

substantial loading dock is concealed below a planted roof.

site. Critical to providing a robust connection to the campus and greater community, the design of each of

ASTRONOMICAL OBSERVATORY

these elements was tested and advanced.

The public astronomical observatory program was refined and simplified. The impact of vibration on

LANDSCAPING

the public telescope was studied and an economical

Landscape geometries have been harmonized with

structural solution was developed to accommodate it. Its

the architecture to create a cohesive experience on

envelope and that of the adjacent sky lab has been fully

approaching the building. The landscaping of the entry

integrated into the form of the mechanical penthouse and

court is inspired by the natural landscape to the east of

accessibility concerns for the public have been addressed.

the building. Strategic landscaping mitigates the impact of wind and snow on pedestrians.

COMMUNITY OUTREACH Visible from the front reception desk and centrally located

The east terrace is an ideal place to view the coulee

at the base of the main atrium and winter garden on Level

landscape. Its protected micro climate makes it a great

7, the Outreach classrooms are flexible and full of light

place to teach outdoor classes and for overflow from the

and warmth. Secure, yet transparent and visible from the

main atrium during special events.

public and research spaces, the fully-equipped teaching labs accommodate grade school children from the community during field trips and summer camp.

West Faรงade, at Main Entrance 26

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PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE

LINK TO UNIVERSITY HALL

The location of the pedestrian bridge has been modified

The link to University Hall has been refined to

to connect the open plateau directly opposite the walkway

accommodate well-proportioned, tiered general purpose

to the north of Markin Hall, bridging over Coulee Trail, and

classroom space and a generous corridor sized to

creating a link to the upper campus. Its design has been

accommodate large groups of students travelling between

simplified to incorporate the most cost-effective structure

buildings.

possible while remaining an elegant element within the landscape. Glass guards provide views over the lower campus while weathered steel guards screen pedestrians from the wind.

Pedestrian Bridge from Upper Campus

Sectional Perspective, through University Hall and Coulee Quad showing Link 28

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CAMPUS CONNECTIVITY Diagram showing pedestrian routes to the Science and Academic Building from the greater campus

valley road w.

prairie quad

the grove

pedestrian br

the hub

idge

co ule et l rai

university hall

w.

coulee quad

library

aperture drive

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View of Main Entrance Arrival Court

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Signature Architecture Connect and integrate with the unique landscape and its history Be a unique expression of both its users and its use Be an expression of sustainability Respect and enhance the original vision for University Hall Establish a strong, contemporary architecture Elevate how the campus is perceived and improve connections locally, nationally and internationally Aid in attracting and maintaining the highest calibre faculty, staff & students

With an emphasis on maintaining the horizontal

four “light scoops�; clerestory windows that direct natural

lines of the Erickson Building, the architectural design

light into the public spaces below. The use of acoustic

progressed through the Design Development stage. The

wood panels in and around the auditorium and general

continuous precast bands that reference the precast

purpose classrooms, as well as the wood on the stairs and

concrete panels on University Hall are maintained. The

suspended meeting rooms in the main atrium, provide a

two canopies linking the four lab blocks and unifying

sense of warmth. Strategic use of colour will contribute

the footprint were reconceived as curved elements to

vibrancy and depth to the palette and becomes part of the

respond more directly to the surrounding topography.

wayfinding strategy of the building. The extensive use of glass required to achieve transparency and day-lighting is

Featuring precast and polished concrete, wood, glass

softened by the use of a variety of glazing strategies such

and dark metals, the material palette was refined

as clerestories, glass with a translucent interlayer, and

to better align with the materiality of the campus.

adhesive film, that serve to diffuse the light while providing

Corrugated metal cladding unifies the large penthouse.

varying degrees of privacy. Solid planes clad with pre-cast

The vertical corrugations act to break down the mass

panels define the primary building entrances and main

and the light silver colour of the cladding will help it to

atrium, blur the line between the interior and exterior, and

blend with the sky under certain lighting conditions.

strategically focus the view.

The penthouse cladding curves into and around the

North West Corner of Science and Academic Building - View South Toward Main Entrance 34 KPMB I STANTEC

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The cladding on the north end of University Hall

with the Science and Academic Building. Ultimately, new

must be replaced. Clad with cement board panels,

bands of horizontal windows, a continuation of the existing

installed to mimic the pattern and tone of the original

horizontal window bands that carry around the rest of the

pre-cast panels of Erickson’s design for University

building, will provide access to daylight and views. An

Hall, the new cladding will provide the non-

interim solution will be installed as part of the scope of the

combustible façade required by the Alberta Building

Science and Academic Building project. The significant

Code. The proposed solution aligns itself closely

disruption that installation of the more permanent design

with the character and spirit of the original building

entails needs to be considered when University Hall is

while simultaneously providing a strong relationship

renovated.

University Hall North End - Proposed University Hall Recladding (Glazing not included in the scope of the SAB project)

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Main Atrium - Facing East at Level 7

Main Atrium - Facing West 38

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The Integrated Design Process at Work The deletion of the energy centre created an opportunity for the design team to “reset� the design by critically evaluating the decisions made during Schematic Design and either confirming or improving upon them. The user meetings were undertaken with the following questions in mind: 1. 2. Full scale lab mockup under review by researchers and the project team

3.

4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Is the lab module, the width and length of the lab blocks right? Have we optimized the architectural relationship of the SAB to University Hall? Have the day-to-day movements of people within the building been properly accommodated? Are the stairs and the elevators in the right place? Have we provided spaces that will facilitate transdisciplinary research? What are the implications of deleting the EUC on the mechanical systems? Are the program elements in the right place? Can we reduce the footprint of the building? Have we met the project charter goals? Have we met the project budget?

Results: 1.

Design options for the Science and Academic Building are discussed during a public open-house

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

The building shifted north and west. A gap equal to one bay of University Hall was maintained between University Hall and the Science and Academic Building (equivalent to one structural bay of Erickson’s uncompleted building). The loading dock was reduced in width. The building footprint was minimized. Public spaces and corridors were optimized, a secondary living room space was introduced on L9. The extent of exterior public space was refined. Lab expansion space was moved to basement. The greenhouse moved outside the building footprint. Elevator and stair locations were optimized. The upper level teaching labs were relocated to allow for contiguous generic lab space. Major Instruments facilities were co-located and centralized. Chemistry teaching labs were enlarged to meet benchmarking standards. The vivarium footprint was regularized and the planning of the Vivarium fit-out was advanced. Service core configurations were optimized. A strategy was developed for the public observatory.

The IDP team was directed by the University of Lethbridge to ensure space allocation metrics that are justifiable from the perspective of government funding. It is critical to the ultimate success of the project to develop a fundamentally flexible design with labs that are primarily generic and support space that can be shared. A highlight of the Design Development stage was a fullscale mockup of a generic lab neighbourhood built by the University and displayed in the University Centre of the Arts Atrium for several weeks. An object of interest to all who encountered it, it consisted of three lab modules complete with fixed benches, cabinetry and shelves, moveable sink benches and fume hoods, whiteboard collaboration space, and enclosed support spaces. Adjacent rooms were taped out on the floor to demonstrate the relationship between open benches, enclosed support space and offices. The lab mockup played a critical role in all of the lab user sessions by allowing researchers to properly visualize both the amount of space being provided in a typical lab module and the proposed furniture layout. Moveable pieces of furniture and equipment allowed users and the design team to engage in a very successful hands-on exercise to further refine and optimize the design of a generic lab module. Interim user meetings were held via teleconference. These meetings provided opportunities for the design team to confirm decisions with the users, and gave the users opportunities to comment further on the material introduced during face-to-face meetings and integrated into the drawings. A series of integrated workshops were held by the consultant and construction management teams to develop and refine approaches to structural, mechanical and electrical systems and building code compliance. A particular emphasis was placed on confirming and developing the sustainable initiatives introduced during Schematic Design. The project team participated in benchmarking studies to compare sustainable initiatives with other institutions of similar type and size. Tours of local institutions and meetings with their respective Facilities Groups were held to understand the benefits and drawbacks of their approach to building systems, particularly as they pertain to maintenance requirements, life expectancy, reduced operational costs and estimated payback.

The project team gathers around a working model of the proposed design in Toronto 42

KPMB I STANTEC

UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE DESTINATION PROJECT DESIGN DEVELOPMENT REPORT

43


Floor Plans

Appendix Level 6 general classrooms technical services workshop multi-sensory theatre maker space major instruments MR centre vivarium mechanical/electrical space phytotron neuroscience informal learning space

VIVARIUM

MECH

MEETING ROOM

MRCENTRE PHYTOTRON

MAJORINSTRUMENTS

Department Legend

FUTURE EXPANSION

INFORMALLEARNING SPACE

A1_Main Entry

INFORMALLEARNING COMMONS

A2_General Classrooms B1_Technical Services B2_Innovation Maker Space

ELECTRICAL

FUTURE EXPANSION

MACHINESHOP

MAKER SPACE

B3_Major Instrument Facilities LINK LOUNGE

TIEREDLECTURE CLASSROOMS

B5_Vivarium Building Gross Electrical EUC EUC future EUC Support Mechanical

UNIVERSITY HALL

NOTE:

44

Plan Not to Scale

These plans are shown as of December 10, 2015 and are subject to ongoing review and

KPMB I STANTEC

analysis. They they will continue to be revised as design and budget limitations evolve.

UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE DESTINATION PROJECT DESIGN DEVELOPMENT REPORT

45


ANIMALMUSEUM

NORTHTERRACE

Level 7

UNDERGRADUATE BIOLOGY TEACHINGLABS

CLASSROOM

GROUPSTUDYROOMS

CLASSROOM

NORTH ATRIUM

food service kiosk auditorium catering support outreach general classrooms informal learning commons teaching labs animal museum herbarium central stores loading dock / service entry informal learning space group study rooms building manager

PHYSICS TEACHINGLABS

UNDERGRADUATE CHEMISTRY TEACHINGLABS

PSYCHOLOGY TEACHINGLABS

INFORMALLEARNING COMMONS

GREENHOUSE

LOADING DOCK OPENTOBELOW

AUDITORIUM

UP

TECHNICAL SERVICES& CENTRALSTORES MAINATRIUM

EASTTERRACE

Department Legend

INFORMALLEARNING SPACES

A1_Main Entry

FOOD SERVICES OPENTOBELOW

A2_General Classrooms OPENTOBELOW

B1_Technical Services B3_Major Instrument Facilities OUTREACH INFORMALLEARNING COMMONS

HERBARIUM

B4_Greenhouses, Herbarium, Animal Museum

ROOF

Building Gross C1_Administrative Support WINTERGARDEN

C2_Chemistry

BUILDINGMANAGER

C3_Life Sciences - Bio/Biochem C4_Psychology C5_Physics UNIVERSITYHALL

Mechanical

NOTE:

46

Plan Not to Scale

These plans are shown as of December 10, 2015 and are subject to ongoing review and

KPMB I STANTEC

analysis. They they will continue to be revised as design and budget limitations evolve.

UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE DESTINATION PROJECT DESIGN DEVELOPMENT REPORT

47


NEIGHBORHOODLOUNGE

MEETINGROOM

Level 8

NEIGHBORHOODLOUNGE

main entry auditorium neuroscience physics psychology chemistry administrative support meeting rooms science display area teaching labs

NEUROSCIENCE

opentobelow

opentobelow

MAINENTRY

DN

GREENROOF

AUDITORIUM

CHEMISTRY

MEETINGROOM opentobelow

Department Legend A1_Main Entry A2_General Classrooms MEETINGROOM

PHYSICS

B3_Major Instrument Facilities C1_Administrative Support

PSYCHOLOGY NEIGHBORHOOD LOUNGE

opento below

C2_Chemistry ROOF

C3.2_Life Sciences Neuroscience C4_Psychology

NEIGHBORHOODLOUNGE

C5_Physics

WinterGarden

Mechanical PEDESTRIANBRIDGEBELOW

UNIVERSITYHALL

NOTE:

48

Plan Not to Scale

These plans are shown as of December 10, 2015 and are subject to ongoing review and

KPMB I STANTEC

analysis. They they will continue to be revised as design and budget limitations evolve.

UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE DESTINATION PROJECT DESIGN DEVELOPMENT REPORT

49


NEIGHBORHOODLOUNGE

Level 9

NEIGHBORHOODLOUNGE

NORTH ATRIUM

BIOͲCHEMISTRY

biology biochemistry physics chemistry iGem administrative support meeting rooms living room teaching labs

BIOLOGY

opento below

opento below

LOUNGE NORTHLIVINGROOM MEETINGROOM

PHYSICS

opentobelow

COMP. CHEMISTRY

BIOCHEMISTRY TEACHINGLABS

MEETING ROOM

MEETING ROOM opentobelow

Department Legend A1_Main Entry BIOLOGY TEACHINGLABS

B3_Major Instrument Facilities C1_Administrative Support C2_Chemistry SOUTHLIVING ROOM

PHYSICS TEACHING LABS

PHYSICS

NEIGHBORHOOD LOUNGE

C3_Biochemistry C3_Life Sciences - Bio/Biochem C5_Physics Mechanical

NEIGHBORHOODLOUNGE

WINTERGARDEN opentobelow

PEDESTRIANBRIDGEBELOW

NOTE:

50

Plan Not to Scale

These plans are shown as of December 10, 2015 and are subject to ongoing review and

KPMB I STANTEC

analysis. They they will continue to be revised as design and budget limitations evolve.

UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE DESTINATION PROJECT DESIGN DEVELOPMENT REPORT

51


extentofcorebelow

Level 10

extentofcorebelow

physics sky lab public observatory mechanical space

NorthAtrium below

MixedAirPlenum ShaftatL10 Mezzaninelvlabv. lightscoop opentobelow

lightscoop opentobelow

MECHANICALPENTHOUSE

lightscoop opentobelow MixedAirPlenum ShaftatL10 Mezzaninelvlabv.

Department Legend C5_Physics Mechanical PHYSICSSKYLAB+PUBLIC OBSERVATORY

lightscoop opentobelow ObservatoryDeck

Extentof MixedAir Plenumon LV10

extentofcorebelow

OpentoWinter Gardenbelow

NOTE:

52

Plan Not to Scale

These plans are shown as of December 10, 2015 and are subject to ongoing review and

KPMB I STANTEC

analysis. They they will continue to be revised as design and budget limitations evolve.

UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE DESTINATION PROJECT DESIGN DEVELOPMENT REPORT

53


ARCHITECTS

ENERGY/CLIMATE

KPMB / Stantec Architects

TRANSSOLAR Inc.

322 King Street West, Toronto, ON, M5V 1J2

Curiestr. 2, 70563 Stuttgart

Bruce Kuwabara, Co-Project Director Michael Moxam, Co-Project Director Justin Saly, Project Manager Mitchell Hall, Project Architect Stephen Phillips, Design & Academic Planning Lucy Timbers, Associate Kael Opie, Associate Nic Green Rich Hlava Andrew Hill James Strong Amin Monsefi Mahtab Ghashghaii Chris Onyszchuk Wilfred Lach Matthew Emerson

Thomas Auer, V.P. Civil Eng, Principal Joshua Monk Vanwyck Jochen Lam

Consultant Team

LANDSCAPE PFS Studio 1777 West 3rd Ave, Vancouver, BC, V6J 1K7 Jennifer Nagai, Partner Maureen Hetzler, Associate

CIVIL Stantec Consulting

GREENHOUSE

The Sextant Group

Greenhouse Engineering

11301 West Olympic Boulevard, Suite 348, Los Angeles CA 90064

290-220 4th Street South, Lethbridge, AB, T1J 4J7

STRUCTURAL Entuitive

Mark Bellamy, Principal in Charge Lloyd Madge

86 Glenview Avenue, Toronto, ON, M4R 1P8 Alex Turkewitsch

Mark Valenti, President David Davis

LEED

QUANTITY SURVEYOR

13900 Maycrest Way, Suite 145, Richmond BC, V6V 3E2

Stantec Consulting

Altus Group

200 - 325 25th Street SE, Calgary, AB, T2A 7H8

2020 - 4th Street SW, Calgary, AB, T2S 1W3

Keith Calder, Technical Director Luc Cormier

Markous Gad

David Crane

209 8th Avenue SW, Suite 300 Calgary, AB T2P 1B8

BUILDING CODE Brock Schroeder, Project Executive David Fox Greg Riewe

MECHANICAL Wiebe Forest Engineering 3613 - 33rd Street NW, Calgary, AB, T2L 2A7 Marc Kadziolka, Vice President Damian Kilroe, Project Manager Zdenek Zitko

ELECTRICAL smp engineering 234 - 13th Street North, Lethbridge, AB. T1H 2R7 Brian King, Partner Dale Krall, Associate Neil Popson

Jensen Hughes

WIND + MICROCLIMATE RWDI Suite 1000, 736 8th Avenue S.W. Calgary, AB, T2P 1H4 Simona Besnea, Senior Engineer Aimee Smith, Senior Specialist Monica Montefiore, Project Manager Harry Baker

ACOUSTICS RWDI Suite 1000, 736 8th Avenue S.W. Calgary, AB, T2P 1H4 Sonia Beaulieu, Principal Russ Lewis, Principal Jessie Roy

54

KPMB I STANTEC

Vivarium CONSULTANT

VIBRATION NOVUS ENVIRONMENTAL 906-12th Avenue SW, Suite 600, Calgary, AB, T2R 1K7 Craig Vatcher, Project Manager Nick Walters Brad Pridham

The ElmCos Group PO Box 321, Station Main, Nanoose Bay, BC Chris Cosgrove

CONSTRUCTION MANAGER PCL Construction Management Inc 2822 - 11th Street NE, Calgary, AB, T2E 7S7

VERTICAL TRANSPORTATION Soberman Engineering Inc.

Paul Walker Daryll Campbell Martin Baxter

55 St. Clair Avenue West, Suite 205, Toronto, ON, M4V 2Y7

GEOTECHNICAL Jonathan Soberman, P. Eng

Tetra Tech EBA

AUDIO VISUAL

442 - 10 Street N, Lethbridge AB, T1H 2C7 Marc Sabourin UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE DESTINATION PROJECT SCHEMATIC DESIGN REPORT

55


KPMB Architects

Stantec Architecture Ltd. rd

322 King Street West, 3 Floor Toronto, Ontario M5V 1J2 T. 416. 977. 5104 www.kpmb.com

200-325 25th Street SE Calgary, Alberta T2A 7H8 403.806.1576 www.stantec.com


Destination Project: Science & Academic Building