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Removal of barricade on Hwy. 6 could take weeks DONNA DURIC

donna@tworowtimes.com

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The removal of a threemonth long barricade on the Hwy. 6 bypass in Caledonia is up to the OPP and not Six Nations people, says a spokesperson for the "Land Back Lane" housing development reclamation in Caledonia. Skyler Williams announced last week that Six Nations supporters of Land Back Lane agreed to allow the removal of barricades, opening up the Hyw. 6 bypass for the first time in three months. But the removal, which was expected last week, remains up in the air, said Williams. "It's all hanging on the cops and MTO (Ministry of Transportation)," said Williams. "We've been off there for five days. They have not made any attempt so far to fix anything." OPP Spokesperson Rodney Leclair said repair crews are being prevented access to the Sixth Line overpass and that's causing the hold up. "Repairs are required on the bypass and the Sixth Line overpass in order

The roadblock removal may take longer than a few days accordPHOTO BY DONNA DURIC ing to a source.

to re-open the bypass. Demonstrators continue to prevent access to the Sixth Line overpass which is causing a delay in the safe re-opening of the bypass." He said the MTO has completed their assessment and repairs are scheduled to start this week. "I don’t have a timeline as to when it will be completed but I have been told it will take weeks as opposed to days to complete. Road repairs on Argyle Street in front of the church are completed and access is limited to the church only. Argyle Street remains closed due to significant and further damage to the roadway just north of Sixth Line caused by demonstrators overnight on Jan. 20." McKenzie Road also remains closed between

Fuller Drive and York Road due to damage to the roadway. Repairs will need to be completed before the roadway can be safely opened for through traffic, he said.  "Once demonstrators cease to prevent access, plans will be put in place to repair the roadway." Williams said Land Back Lane supporters want to reopen the bypass to ensure area residents can get to work or medical appointments without having to take a long detour as they've been doing for the past three months. The roadblock on Argyle Street between Braemar Ave. and Sixth Line will remain but it will be moved back slightly to allow access to the parking lot at Caledonia Baptist Church, said Williams.

The roadblocks were set up in response to OPP spraying Land Back Lane supporters with rubber bullets, said Williams. Last July, a small number of Six Nations people stopped construction of a former housing development site in Caledonia known as McKenzie Meadows, saying the property sits on unceded Six Nations land. Since then, a number of supporters have been arrested for defying a court injunction barring anyone from setting foot on the former construction site. Three months ago, supporters of Land Back Lane shut down the bypass and Argyle Street in response to those arrests, said Williams.  He said police used rubber bullets on the protesters at Hwy. 6 and Sixth Line on Oct. 22 and in response, roads were shut down for the safety of Land Back Lane supporters. "One guy was shot in the back of the leg and another guy had taser darts in his back but was able to pull away," said Williams. "The barricades went up as a means to keep our people safe. It was a crazy time to see those rubber bullets

flying by and for me that was the second time I've been shot at. It's high time that we find some peaceful resolution. I think folks on both sides (Six Nations and Caledonia) are quite sick of this going on." Caledonia Mayor Ken Hewitt said the cost of fixing the roads will be about $250,000 to $450,000. He said the roads have been "destroyed" adding they were "completely dug up." "My position has always been consistent. I don't believe roads should be blocked. I don't believe they should be destroyed." He said he was looking forward to the roads reopening. "I'm excited for the road to be open but there's an expectation that all the roads in this community should be open. I'll be a lot more excited for both communities when we can see some common ground between and the ability to help our communities get to where we want to be rather than staring at an old junky school bus on the side of the road." An old school bus lays across Argyle Street as part of the barricade structure keeping the road closed. PM42686517

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January 27th, 2021

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Six Nations Cannabis Commission seeking to incorporate DONNA DURIC

donna@tworowtimes.com

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Six Nations Elected Council is holding off on incorporating the Six Nations Cannnabis Commission, citing taxation concerns and the need to seek a legal opinion first. "I'm totally against incorporation simply because...we all know the issues we've had with the (economic) development corporation," said Coun. Helen Miller at a political liaison meeting Monday. The Six Nations Cannabis Commission sought council approval to become a corporation, saying it would provide them with legal protections, among other benefits. The commission is also looking to establish a trust to hold community funds gleaned from the cannabis industry on Six Nations. But Coun. Miller had concerns about the trust, as well, after commission members provided an update to council at Monday's meeting. "I see from the presentation they want to set up a trust. We've already got two trusts in our community that don't seem to be

working out too great for our community. I have a lot of concerns with this." Jeremy Burke, a legal advisor for the SNCC, said it's important to be incorporated, "so that commissioners and staff will have same types of protections that legal corporations have." Without incorporation, individual commission members face legal liability. "That type of legal liability is not appropriate for anybody," said Burke. The commission said council had the option to incorporate as a for profit or not-for-profit entity. The for-profit option means revenues are subject to tax and the not-for-profit is shielded from taxation, said Burke. "In either case, the shareholder or the member would be SNGR (Six Nations of the Grand River) elected council and there would be articles of incorporation and a by-law for governing the corporation," he said. A not-for-profit corporation is exempt from taxes, he explained, because it doesn't operate for the benefit of its members. "It has certain rules about what it can and can't do with revenues

generated and the idea is that all of the commission's revenues, above what it requires for operating, would be put back into the community as a community contribution." Burke also recommended council set up a trust arrangement for community contributions from cannabis revenues where the commission, council and community would have say in how community contribution is used. The SNCC was created almost two years at arm's length from elected council to develop regulations for a cannabis industry on Six Nations. Council funds the commission. The commission also asked for council support in choosing a financial institution to conduct its banking. Commission Chair Nahnda Garlow said they are currently looking to acquire equipment to test cannabis quality. "We've hit a couple of snags in trying to get the equipment to facilitate our own testing facilty," she said. The commission contacted suppliers who are hesitant to supply to anyone in Canada unless they have a Health

Canada license to be a tester. The commission is not licensed under Health Canada and is looking to create its own regulations outside of federal or provincial cannabis regulations. "We are looking at a testing lab in Manitoba that is for sale," said Garlow. "They're closing up. We may be able to secure the equipment from that facility and bring it to Ontario." She said the commission has been approached by two business owners in community to fund the testing facility as a way to give back.  Garlow said the commission needs council representatives as it moves toward discussions with Health Canada and the province, "to chart a path forward so that we can acquire that testing equipment without having the Health Canada license." The commission is looking to launch its retail sector soon but it needs to ensure it has testing equipment in place first. "We need to secure safe product for dispensaries (on Six Nations) to sell in their shops. We are looking to issue

(a proposal) to Health Canada-licensed producers to find out if anyone will be willing to supply dispensaries on Six Nations without the federal government's approval." "I have a lot of concerns with these recommendations," said Coun. Miller. "I really think council needs to sit down and have a good discussion on them."  Coun. Audrey Powless-Bomberry agreed and added they should get a legal opinion on incorporation, as well.  "They're major decisions and we need time to think about it and discuss." Coun. Hazel Johnson said historically, elected council has hesitated to incorporate any organization on Six Nations and that they need to further discuss the possibility of incorporating the SNCC. Only a handful of councillors were present at Monday's meeting.  "All previous councils have been very reluctant with regard to incorporation," said Johnson. "That tax issue is a real big scare for many people. I think we really need to discuss this in depth before we make any decision on it."

Burke said elected council still have the right to appoint commissioners and be the sole shareholder of the commission after incorporation. "The elected council would still have the right to appoint commissioners. Council could replace and elect directors of corporation. Technically, the commission would still be under the full control of council. Council still has the ability to hold the reins, even if they're not pulling on them." Coun. Miller said the issue needed further discussion. "Cannabis is going to be a big safety issue in our community. I think council has to be on top of that and be heavily involved in this cannabis. If something happens, if somebody got bad weed from somebody and got sick, it's council that's going to be getting sued. Because it's a safety issue, council has to be involved and that's another reason I don't agree with incorporation." The commission is expected to hold an online community meeting in February.

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Affordable housing needed for Indigenous people in Brantford By Donna Duric BRANTFORD — Brantford just got funding for four tiny homes to help with the city's homelessness crisis, but the city has yet to address the lack of housing for its Indigenous population. The federal government announced last week it was providing $200,000 for a tiny housing project on Stirton Street that will consist of four, 300 sq. foot self-contained housing units. And even though the

city is facing a housing crisis - with over 1,700 households on a waiting list for affordable housing - no funding has been provided for Indigenous people, who make up roughly 10 per cent of the population in Brantford. That's despite Ontario announcing $1.5 billion in funding to help alleviate housing issues in the province. Liberal MP Adam Vaughan, parliamentary secretary to the Minister of Family, Children and Social Development, and

Conservative MPP Will Bouma both said during the funding announcement last week that Covid-19 has made the province's pre-existing housing crisis even worse. "We know the impact Covid is having on the most vulnerable people in our communities, including those who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless," said Bouma. They hope to work with federal and municipal partners to find specific solutions for Indigenous housing in Brantford.

"I look forward to working with the city on that," said Bouma. Brantford Mayor Kevin Davis said the city identified affordable housing as one of its top three priorities during a special council meeting last fall. "The reality is that 10 per cent of our population is Indigenous by background," said Davis. "We are in discussions with aboriginal housing - there are some projects we are considering. It's very much in the early planning stages that would be

more intended towards indigenous housing." Bouma said the project takes advantage of the tiny home trend, which allows for more cost-efficient construction. "If we are to tackle Ontario's housing crisis, then we need to look to innovative solutions like tiny homes and modular housing. We're tailoring our approach for different categories of housing providers, including Indigenous Housing providers, smaller providers with capacity challenges

and larger ones who are further along in their planning...to ensure that all providers get the help that they need." Mayor Davis said affordable housing is a "pressing need" in Brantford. "The need for affordable housing in our community has never been greater and exacerbated by the pandemic. Even before this pandemic we had over 1,700 households on our community housing waitlist.

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January 27th, 2021

'Your Land'? Some question Biden's inaugural song CANADIAN PRESS

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On the first day of Joe Biden's presidency, Native Americans had reason to celebrate. Biden halted construction of the border wall that threatened to physically separate Indigenous people living on both sides. He also revoked a permit for the Keystone XL oil pipeline that tribes fought in court for years, and he agreed to restore the boundaries of the first national monument created specifically at the request of tribes in southern Utah. Inaugural events showcased tribes across the country in traditional regalia, dancing and in prayer. But amid the revelry, some Native Americans saw a glitch in Wednesday's swearing-in ceremony. The only mention of Indigenous people came in the benediction delivered by the Rev. Silvester Beaman. And then there was the mishmash of songs sung by Jennifer Lopez that included lyrics

from ``This Land is Your Land.'' The folk tune is popular around campfires and in grade schools, but it also called to mind the nation's long history of land disputes involving tribes. ``Oh, I love J.Lo,'' said Kristen Herring, who is Lumbee and lives in Austin, Texas. ``It wasn't super disappointing that she sang it. But I was like, `Oh, why did that have to be on the list of things to sing?''' Woody Guthrie, who wrote the song in the 1940s, meant it as a retort to ``God Bless America'' and a rebuke to monetizing land at a time of economic crisis, said Gustavus Stadler, an English professor and author of ``Woodie Guthrie: An Intimate Life.'' Lopez put a twist on it, throwing in part of the Pledge of Allegiance in Spanish that translates to ``justice for all.'' The Guthrie song has been a symbol of equality, inclusion and unity. Lady Gaga sang a rendition of it at the Super Bowl months after Donald Trump took office. It was part of Barack Obama's

inaugural programming, with a trio of singers, including Bruce Springsteen, adding back some of the original, more controversial verses. But arriving amid an effort by some tribes to be recognized as stewards of ancestral land, a movement known as Land Back, the lyrics hit the wrong note for some tribal members. ``It's a nice little sentiment that America is this mixing pot,'' said Benny Wayne Sully, who is Sicangu Lakota and lives in Los Angeles. ``But does anybody believe this land was made for you and me? Or was it made for white folks? People forget this land was made of brown people before it was colonized.'' Rep. Deb Haaland, who is from Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico, acknowledged that perspective in a virtual welcoming to the inaugural events over the weekend. She's been nominated to lead the Interior Department, which oversees tribal affairs. If confirmed, she would be the first Native American in a Cabinet post.


TWO ROW TIMES

January 27th, 2021

Six Nations COVID-19 Update

Six Nations COVID-19 Update

-19 Update

Date

Total Cases

1/26/21 13:00

New Lab many confirmed cases

146

Total Deaths

131

1 146146

-

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-

14

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4

1/22/2021

3

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3

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=

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2 4

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1

0

14

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1

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How many people have become infected with COVID-19 in total?

=

1

Sep 2020

Date reported

10May 2020

Jul 2020

0

Sep 2020

Nov 2020

Jan 2021

Nov 2020

Jan 2021

50

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=

Nov 2020

5

14 1

14

Jan 2021 0

14

May 2020

100

0

Jul 2020

2

Jul 2020

1/22/2021

Date reported

1/23/2021

4 2020 Sep 3 0

1/24/2021

3

May 2020 1/25/2021

Jul 2020

Total (Last 7 days) Sep 2020

100

1

0 1/21/2021 May 2020

1

Date reported 14

Nov 2020

Sep 2020

Nov 2020

Jan 2021

Date reported

May 2020

2

1/23/2021

1/20/2021

0 1/21/2021

1

3

4

1/24/2021

1/22/2021

3

1/25/2021

1/23/2021

1 1/24/2021

0

14

3

3

1/25/2021 14

1

Total (Last 7 days)

50

Sep 2020

50

0

May 2020

Jul 2020

Date reported

Sep 2020

Jul 2020

Date reported

0

May 2020

Jul 2020

Date reported

50

0

1/19/2021

Total (Last 7 days)

Jan 2021

Date reported

Jul 2020

1/22/2021

100 How many people have become infected with COVID-19 in total?

How many people have become infected with COVID-19 in total? May 2020

New Lab confirmed

4

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-

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New Lab confirmed

0

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3

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100

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5

Date

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New Lab confirmed

1/26/21 13:00

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10

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1/21/2021

100

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New Lab confirmed

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the last Six Response Nations COVID-19 Response Black This page is a Level: snapshot of the cases at 7 thedays? Update as of: 1/26/21 13:00 Six Nations COVID-19 Level: Black 1/19/2021 1/19/2021 2 Six Nations COVID-19 Update time of the last update. Date Updated daily. New Lab 1/20/2021 1 1/26/21 13:00 confirmed 1/20/2021

Total Cases

131

How many cases have we had in the last 7 days?

1/26/21 13:00

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Six Nations COVID-19 Response Level: Black

Total Resolved

Update as of:

This page is a snapshot of the cases at the time of the last update. Updated daily.

This page is a snapshot of the cases at the time of the last update. Updated daily.

Update as of:

This page is a snapshot of the cases at the time of the last update. Updated daily.

5

Sep 2020

Sep 2020


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OPINION

January 27th, 2021

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Bill C-15 and the debate around UNDRIP becoming Canadian law RACHEL A. SNOW

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An act respecting the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) is being prepped to go “under” Canadian law. Across this land, First Nation Indigenous are hotly debating what this means. Clearly, the only thing these debates show is that non First Nations, mainstream media and some of our own Indigenous people do not understand the distinct arguments being pushed into one federal act. First of all, UNDRIP was a good concept - argued and written at the UN level. But if you read Charmaine Whiteface’s, “Indigenous Nations’ Rights in Balance: an Analysis of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples”, you will see the haggling that emerged when Indigenous voices were diminished in the final document. The inclusion of Section 46 in the UNDRIP negates all other words. Section 46 is the veto of the Western World. Why then, is there such a debate about Bill C-15? Different First Nations have distinct arguments but Canada keeps trying to put all First Nations, Metis and Inuit under one pan-Indigenous approach. The historic Treaty groups (Treaties 1-11) continue to argue that their treaties pre-date Canada. From the eastern door, the peace and friendship

treaties also argue from a pre-existing Canadian stance. This is why the Mi’kmaq are currently having issues with fisheries. Their treaty stipulates that their people have a right to trade. Canada knows this. Canada argued against Donald Marshall Jr. all the way to Supreme Court. But the pre-existing relationship and contractual agreement held. Canada does know there are First Nations who have a higher standing in whiteman made law then the little state of Canada. Canada recognizes that their existence is predicated on a contract between Britain and the original peoples that were “here first”. Canada has been trying to erase this contractual agreement that made “Canada” possible. Canada drew up the Indian Act to “control and manage” their international treaty obligations. Canada attempted to break the relationship by controlling every aspect of Indian lives through this Act. The Indian Act was, is and continues to be Canada’s legislation that breaks the spirit and intent of the treaties or the intended international relationship between nations. The Indian Act forced residential school attendance, controlled elections on reserve, forced economic underdevelopment, and set membership rules for who is and who is not an Indian. For decades, Indian Agents controlled who was allowed to leave the reserve for specific purposes for limited time.

Through the Indian Act, Canada disallowed traditional practices, and made it illegal to hire a lawyer if the Indians felt Canada was breaking treaty promises. Canada had the Indian Act in place to exonerate and extinguish what John A. MacDonald called “the Indian problem”. Similar to MacDonald, Pierre Elliot Trudeau believed all Canadians are “equal”. So he wanted to legislate out the “special status” of Indians. Pierre Trudeau used the 1969 White Paper to begin this process. When First Nation leaders fought back, Pierre Trudeau publicly retreated. Then Pierre Trudeau wanted Canada to stand on its own with a Canadian constitution. Some Indian leaders lobbied the British Crown. After significant Indian and public pressure, Pierre Trudeau had to stand down and allow Section 35 into the Canadian Constitution. At this time, First Nations were split on their inclusion into the constitution with a Coalition of First Nations opposing the patriation process. Canada included a Section 37 process of First Ministers’ Conferences on Aboriginal Matters: the First Ministers and national chief/ indigenous groups attended First Ministers’ Conferences in the 1980’s to discuss an agenda about the meaning of Aboriginal and Treaty rights in Section 35 of the new constitution. The main issue discussed was whether “self-government” is an “Inherent right” or a

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“conditional right” dependent on reaching agreements with the federal, provincial and territorial governments. The First Ministers’ ran out the clock on these conferences. Since 1987 Canada has done nothing. Periodically Canada tries to introduce some legislation that alters the nation-to-nation relationship but Treaty First Nations are quick to strike back with their international standing. Pierre Elliot Trudeau’s son, Justin Trudeau is now Prime Minister. Over the past few years Justin has already passed similar deceptive legislation for Indigenous Peoples, including First Nations. A new federal UN Declaration Bill C-15 now purports to bring in a framework of “affirmation” of UNDRIP through a federal “Action-Plan” over a threeyear period that will use a domestic law definition of UNDRIP to lower UNDRIP international standards. Doesn’t this delay tactic sound familiar? Doesn’t Bill C-15 echo the failed First Ministers conferences time line and process? Trudeau the younger can once again “run out” the clock. He has given even less time that his father did in the 1980’s! Meanwhile mainstream media reports federally funded organizations like the Assembly of First Nations (AFN), mainstream provincially and federally elected “Indigenous” politicians (MLAs and MPs) and some “Indigenous” lawyers, Human rights groups,

religious orders and the Unions represented by the Canadian Labour Congress - all support Bill C-15. All of these voices work under Canadian systems whether as an incorporated lobby group, non-government organization, or as members of a primarily non-native government or political party or as legal society members upholding mainstream law. Where is the Indian voice? Mainstream reporting of the Wet’suwet’en, Secwépemc blockades, 1492 Landback Lane in Haudenosaunee Territory or the Mi’kmaq fishing crisis, was not able to distinguish that different First Nations have different agreements. In Wet’suwet’en and Secwépemc Territories there are no treaties but there are Aboriginal Title and Rights issues of representation that Canada does not want to acknowledge. In Mi’kmaq territory, Canada does not want to have its own federal department of fisheries follow through on its own Supreme Court decision to protect Mi’kmaq fishermen. Canada knows that various original treaties predate the existence of their state. Canada’s solution is to ignore these agreements and force all First Nations and other Indigenous groups into one pan-Indigenous approach where Canada narrowly defines their rights. Canada continues to bully First Nations into settling for fourth level types of ethnic local governments.

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The speaking voice matters. Metis, Inuit or non-historic treaty holders cannot speak for Treaty First Nations. To this end, mainstream media, non First Nations and our own people are failing to critically look at the voice that is speaking and who they represent. The AFN is merely a lobby group. There is no such thing as a chief or leader of fifty-eight different linguistic groups and nine hundred thousand Indians. Perry Bellegarde cannot speak on the collective rights held by each individual First Nation person. MLA’s and MP’s are speaking from within a compromised system where their token offerings are encouraged. “Indigenous” lawyers had better be treaty lawyers from historic treaty nations if they want to speak, and even then, they have to answer to their peers in whiteman made law societies. First Nations who are sovereignty thinkers are questioning Bill C-15. Simply stated, we are nations, we agreed to share the land and resources. We did not and will not agree to Canada defining our rights. It is clear from the Indian Act, the failed talks at the constitutional level, the federal legislation directed at Indians (First Nations) and now at “Indigenous Peoples”, including the federal UNDRIP Bill C-15 that Canada wants to uphold the appearance of reconciliation, not reconciliation itself.

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7

1492 Land Back Lane Community Survey This survey had been created by the team at 1492 Land Back Lane to hear more from community while respecting social distancing rules. In November of 2020, we hosted a series of community meetings. Through these discussions, three themes emerged: • securing our lands • community safety • addressing governance issues Utilizing these three themes we are seeking further community feedback. The results from this survey will be compiled by our team and distributed to the community, the Haudenosaunee Confederacy Chiefs Council and Six Nations Elected Council. Email addresses and any personal information will be kept confidential. If you have any questions or concerns, you can reach us at 226-387-9527, landback6nations@gmail.com, or write your questions at the end of this form and someone from the team will contact you. 1. Where do you live? (On/Off Reserve) _________________________________________________ 2. Are you Haudenosaunee from Six Nations? (please circle) Yes

7. Do you support litigating land claims through the Canadian court process/Specific Claims process? Yes No

No

Comments: ________________________________________

3. Please provide your Nation and Clan if you know: ________________________________________ Securing our lands:

Community Safety

Community members stated that they want to secure our lands from development. This has two parts: protecting 1492 Land Back Lane from development and a moratorium on development that would pause all new development in our territory to ensure that our community has the space and time to address internal governance issues free of encroachment on our lands.

1492 Land Back Lane is extremely concerned that police will use deadly force, seriously injuring or killing a member of our community if they enforce the injunctions in place. We have taken many steps to ensure the safety of people on the ground including keeping open communication with police, appealing the injunction proceedings, and implementing active safety measures at camp.

4. A moratorium on development should cover (Please rank your top 3 preferences):

Check statements you agree with:

Brant to Dunn (South)

I support the use of barricades to protect community members from police violence

I support the peaceful occupation of our territory

I support the land defenders at 1492 Land Back Lane

Entire Haldimand Tract

Addressing Governance Issues 1492 Land Back Lane is in regular communication with the Haudenosaunee Confederacy Chiefs Council and the Six Nations Elected Council. While our camp does not have the ability to resolve the underlying governance issues that impact our community, we will continue to bring the community feedback we get to both Councils. Please share your thoughts on how our community can begin to resolve governance issues. What first steps should be taken?

Brant to Dunn (North and South)

Brant County and Haldimand County

8. How have you been keeping up to date with what is happening at 1492 Land Back Lane? (circle) Facebook Twitter News (television) HCCC Moratorium Zone (2007)

Six Miles around the Reserve

News (articles/newspapers) Family/Friends Mail-outs from the camp

Other: _______________________________________ 9. What other ways would be effective in reaching community members? ________________________________________________________________________ 10. Do you have any additional comments?

5. How many years should a moratorium be in place for? (please circle one) Five years

Ten years Indefinitely

Other: ______________

11. If you would like someone from the camp to follow up with you, please include the best way/time to contact you:

6. If the developer is to be compensated, how do you think that should take place? The Province should compensate the developer The Federal government should compensate the developer Other: ____________________________________________

How to submit your survey:

Surveys can be submitted by contacting 226-387-9527 and someone from our team will arrange pick-up, or you can email your survey to landback6nations@gmail.com. You can also drop off your survey at 2687 5th Line, Ohsweken or at the 6x6 Safety Zone near the corner of Argyle Street and Sixth Line. You can also request additional copies of this survey if there are multiple people in your household. Please call to arrange drop-off or pick up copies at the 6x6 Safety Zone.

Nya:węh for your support and participation!


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10

SPORTS

TWO ROW TIMES

January 27th, 2021

know the score.

Oneida’s Sage Doxtater ranked top ten in latest edition of CFL draft rankings NEIL BECKER

neil@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

Oneida’s own Sage Doxtater is a name that CFL fans will soon get to know. This hulking six-footseven New Mexico State University offensive linesman, who weighs a solid 330 pounds, has reason to feel proud and excited about the future as he found out January 20 that he was ranked eighth overall and third at his position in the CFL’s Scouting Bureau second edition of the top 20 projected prospects for the upcoming 2021 CFL draft. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Doxtater hasn’t been able to play football for over a year as New Mexico State Aggies didn’t play this year in the NCAA

New Mexico Aggies offensive lineman Sage Doxtater, who is six-foot-seven and a solid 330 pounds, found himself ranked an impressive eighth and third among offensive linemen in the second edition of the CFL draft top 20 rankings, which is according to the league’s central scouting bureau. Playing for New Mexico, Doxtater wears uniform number 76. PHOTO BY NEW MEXICO STATE UNIVERSITY ATHLETICS WEBSITE

Division 1 season. However, Doxtater should be in action next month as the program is putting together a three-game spring schedule which will be kicking off on February

20. The CFL Scouting Bureau comes out with its official player ranking three times a year starting in the fall and again in winter and finally a third

edition in the spring. This Bureau who comes out with the rankings consists of experienced CFL scouts, general managers from the league’s squads and player personnel.

Doxtater, who is in his senior year studying sociology, played his high school football at Canada Prep Academy. There he had the privilege of learning from coach Geoff McArthur, who has quite the proven playing resume including being a former NFL wide receiver and Cal Hall of Famer. During his senior year Doxtater battled lingering injuries only making four games with three being starts. Still, he was a big asset in helping the offence which averaged 217.6 passing yards and 143.5 rushing yards per game. Make no mistake, it’s only a matter of time before this New Mexico State University offensive lineman makes his mark in the CFL.

NHL goalie Carey Price logs 350 career wins

NEIL BECKER

neil@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

Montreal Canadiens goalie Carey Price showed why he is affectionately known as Mr. Saturday Night. Price made 23 saves at Vancouver’s Rogers Arena on Saturday night in what was a 5-2 win against the Canucks, giving him 350 career wins. His best save came halfway through the second, when he showcased his athleticism by sliding across the crease and robbing Canucks forward Jake Virtanen for one of his many highlight reel type saves. Price, who was drafted fifth overall by

Montreal in the 2005 NHL Entry Draft made his NHL debut two years later when in October 2007, he made 26 saves in earning his first NHL career win which came in a 3-2 win against the Pittsburgh Penguins. “It hasn’t really hit me yet,” Price said after that first win. “It’s pretty exciting.” Heading into the season Price was the 23rd winningest NHL goalie of all time five behind former Canadiens goalie and Hockey Hall of Famer Rogie Vachon. For 21 on the all-time list. This abbreviated 56 game season has seen the Ulkatcho First Nations veteran goaltender get off to a respectable 2-0-0-2 record with a 3.14 G.A.A.

Montreal Canadiens veteran goaltender Carey Price lived up to his nickname ‘Mr. Saturday night,’ as he was turned in a tidy 23 save performance during a Saturday 5-2 road win against the Vancouver PHOTO BY NHL.COM Canucks..

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Brandon Montour gets first point NEIL BECKER

neil@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

Buffalo Sabres defenceman Brandon Montour played a big factor in helping his Sabres earn their first win of the young season. After starting the 56game abbreviated 2021 NHL season with consecutive losses, the Sabres managed to grab some much-needed momentum as Montour had five shots on goal and registered a big assist in what was a crucial 6-1 road win against the Philadelphia Flyers. Coming off loses against the Washington Capitals, Buffalo managed 37 shots against Philadelphia in a game which saw the smooth skating Montour register two hit and three blocked shots while taking a two-minute penalty and logging 18:40 of ice time. No doubt the Sabres were feeling relief after registering that first win. Heading towards February, the Sabres have now played six games and have a 2-3-1 record, while Montour has a -5 plus/ minus rating along with four penalty minutes and 15 shots on goal in those six games played.


January 27th, 2021

TWO ROW TIMES

11

Former Maple Leafs captain George Armstrong dies NEIL BECKER

neil@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

TORONTO — George Armstrong, who captained the Toronto Maple Leafs to four Stanley Cups in the '60s and wore the blue and white his entire career, has died. He was 90. The Maple Leafs confirmed the death Sunday on Twitter. Armstrong played a record 1,188 games with 296 goals and 417 assists over 21 seasons for the Leafs, including 13 seasons as team captain. The right-winger added another 26 goals and 34 assists in 110 playoff games. Known as the Chief, Armstrong was one of the first players of Indigenous descent to play professional hockey. Armstrong was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1975. Some 41 years later, Armstrong was voted No. 12 on the franchise's list of 100 greatest Maple Leafs in its centennial season. ``George is part of the very fabric of the Toronto Maple Leaf organization and will be deeply missed,'' Maple Leafs president Brendan Shanahan said in a statement. ``A proud yet humble man, he loved being a Maple Leaf but never sought the spotlight even though no player played more games for Toronto or captained the team longer. Always one to celebrate his teammates rather than himself, George couldn't even bring himself to deliver his speech the day he was immortalized on Legends Row.'' A young Armstrong met Syl Apps when the Maple Leafs star came to his bantam team's annual banquet. Armstrong would go on to wear No. 10, the first Leaf to do so after the retirement of talismanic Cup-winning captain Apps. Armstrong would also become one of a select number of Leafs honoured with a banner at Scotiabank Arena and his number was officially retired in October 2016 at the team's centennial anniversary home opener. In 2015, Armstrong and

Apps were added to the Leafs' Legends Row. The Leafs released a statement on Sunday with the words from Armstrong's unread speech that night. ``Hockey is a great game and I love it. I am part of a fading generation that you will never have again. Every one of us is one of a kind, that will never be repeated. To all of my friends and acquaintances, thank you for your advice and direction, that helped make me who I am today ? a very, very happy person.'' An hour and a half before Sunday night's Maple Leafs-Flames game, where the Leafs won 3-2, Leafs coach Sheldon Keefe shared a video of Armstrong and discussed his impact on the organization with his players. ``Leaf Nation is as strong as it is because of the efforts of people like George and in particular that era when they were winning the Stanley Cups. Generations only fans were bred through through those efforts,'' Keefe said. ``We feel the efforts of people like George and the efforts they put forth in that era. We feel that every day with the Leafs and grateful for that.'' Maple Leafs forward Auston Matthews also spoke highly of Armstrong. ``George was an incredible ambassador for the City of Toronto,'' Matthews said. ``He paved the way for guys like us that are obviously trying to accomplish something big here.'' NHL commissioner Gary Bettman also paid tribute Sunday to the former Leafs' captain. ``The National Hockey League family is saddened to learn of the passing of George Armstrong,'' Bettman said in a statement. ``For 70 years, he represented his beloved Maple Leafs and the entire NHL with class and distinction as a player, coach, executive and ambassador. ``A humble man and revered leader, Armstrong captained the Leafs for 12 seasons _ including to three straight Stanley Cups in 1962, 1963 and 1964 and the stunning 1967 title _ and scored the

final goal of the Original Six Era in Game Six of the '67 Final. ``Our game will miss him dearly. The NHL extends its deepest sympathies to George's wife Betty, their children, grandchildren and the entire Armstrong family.'' After hanging up his skates in 1971, Armstrong coached the Toronto Marlboros to Memorial Cup victories in 1972-73 and 1974-75 before accepting a scouting position with the Quebec Nordiques in 1978. He spent nine years with Quebec before returning to the Toronto fold as assistant general manager and scout in 1988. Armstrong served as interim coach for the final 47 games of the 1988-89 season after John Brophy was fired after an 11-20-2 start. The next year, Armstrong returned to his role as a scout for the Leafs. Armstrong scored 20 goals four times during his career but was better known for his leadership and work ethic, helping restore the franchise's winning touch. A smart player and talented backchecker, he worked the angles to get the best shot at his opponent and formed a formidable penalty-killing tandem with Dave Keon. A humble man, Armstrong was quick to deflect praise. He credited his players for his Memorial Cup wins as coach. ``It wasn't because I was a great coach, it was because I had some great players,'' he said in a 1989 interview, listing off the likes of the Howe brothers, John Tonelli, Mark Napier and Mike Palmateer. And he offered a typical response when inducted into the Leaside Sports Hall of Fame in 2015. ``I don't know whether I deserve it or not but I sure am happy to get it,'' said Armstrong, who lived in several areas of the city before making Leaside his Toronto home. Born in Bowland's Bay, Ont., to an Irish father and an Iroquois mother, a young Armstrong honed his hockey skills in Falconbridge near the Sudbury nickel mines where his father worked.

The Boston Bruins were interested but Armstrong waited until the Leafs put him on their protected list while he was playing with the Copper Cliff Jr. Redmen of the NOHA in 1946-47. After winning the Eddie Powers Memorial Trophy as the OHA's leading scorer with Stratford next season, the Leafs sent him to their main junior affiliate, the Toronto Marlboros. He was elevated to the senior Marlies for the 1949 Allan Cup playoffs and helped the team win the title over Calgary the next year. It was during the Allan Cup tournament, specifically a visit to the Stoney Indian Reserve in Alberta, that he got his nickname. When the band heard of Armstrong's ancestral background, they made him an honorary member with the name ``Chief Shoot-the-Puck'' and presented him with a ceremonial headdress. It was a different era and ``The Chief'' nickname stuck. Armstrong, who was proud of his mother's

heritage, would become the first player of Indigenous descent to score in the NHL. He spent most of two seasons in Pittsburgh with the Leafs' American Hockey League farm team before making the big league. He made his NHL debut in December 1949 and became a full-time member of the Leafs in time for the start of the 1952-53 season. ``It looks as if he's going to be here for quite a long time the way he handled that puck,'' legendary broadcaster Foster Hewitt said after Armstrong scored his first NHL goal in a 3-2 win over Montreal. Taking a pass from future Hall of Famer Max Bentley, Armstrong beat defenceman Butch Bouchard and beat goaltender Gerry McNeil. ``I did a little war dance that night and I think everybody in Maple Leaf Gardens was pretty happy about it as well,'' Armstrong recalled 15 years later. Toronto owner and

GM Conn Smythe named Armstrong his captain before the 1957-58 season. Smythe would later call Armstrong ``the best captain, as a captain, the Leafs have ever had.'' The Leafs won the Stanley Cup in 1962, the first of three straight championships. Armstrong was 36 when the veteran Leafs won the franchise's last championship in 1967. His insurance empty-net goal with 47 seconds remaining in the clinching 3-1 Game 6 win proved to be the final goal of the Original Six era. The six-foot-one, 204-pounder played a few more seasons, but suffered a knee injury during the 1969-70 campaign that forced him to retire. Armstrong was convinced to come back for the 197071 season before quitting for good at age 40. At the time, Armstrong had played more seasons and more games as a Maple Leaf than any other player, and was second in career points.

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12

TWO ROW TIMES

January 27th, 2021

Military to support vaccination efforts in northern Ontario reserves CANADIAN PRESS

editor@tworowtimes.com

TWO ROW TIMES

TORONTO — The Canadian military is set to help with COVID-19 vaccine distribution in Indigenous communities in northern Ontario. Federal Public Safety Minister Bill Blair says on Twitter the Canadian Armed Forces will support vaccine efforts in 32 communities of the Nishnawbe Aski Nation. The move comes after a request from the province for assistance in getting vaccines to First Nation communities. The Canadian military has already helped with vaccines in the community of Nain in Newfoundland

and Labrador. Ontario is reporting 2,417 new cases of COVID-19 today and 50 more deaths related to the virus. Health Minister Christine Elliott says there are 785 new cases in Toronto, 404 in Peel Region, 215 in York Region and 121 in Niagara. Over 48,900 tests have been completed in Ontario over the past 24 hours. The province is reporting that 4,427 doses of a COVID-19 vaccine were administered since the province's last report, and 1,436 are hospitalized with the virus. A total of 280,573 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine have been administered in Ontario so far. Since the pandemic began, there have been

255,002 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Ontario. Of those, 225,046 have recovered and 5,803 people have died. The numbers are slightly up from Saturday's 2,359 cases, though deaths declined by two from previous figures. Officials say a male teen who worked in a long-term care home is among the three deaths reported on the Middlesex-London region's COVID-19 case site in southwestern Ontario on Saturday. A spokesman for the Middlesex-London Health Unit says they can't provide the exact age or any other details about him, but added he is the youngest person with COVID-19 in the county to have died from the virus.

SIX NATIONS POLICE Constable - Contract Position Applications for a contract position for Constable with the Six Nations Police are now being called for. All applicants must fill out a standard application form available at the Six Nations Police Station. CRITERIA for applicants are as follows: Minimum Requirements to be considered for a career in First Nations Policing with the Six Nations Police Service, you must: -

Be 19 years of age or over and able to provide an official birth certificate or proof of age; Be physically and mentally able to perform the duties of the position having regard to your own safety and the safety of members of the public Have successfully completed at least 4 years of Secondary School education or its equivalent (official transcripts and diplomas will be required) Be of good moral character and habits, meaning that you are an individual other people would consider being trustworthy and having integrity, with no criminal record; certified by a physician to be fit for duty as a front line Six Nations Police Constable and able to pass physical tests which are required in the recruiting process Possess a valid driver’s license with no more than 6 accumulated demerit points, permitting you to drive an automobile in Ontario with full driving privileges Be able to pass a security clearance as well as background investigation, credit card and reference checks

If you have any criminal convictions under a Federal Statute you must obtain a pardon. Special Requirements – for the Six Nations Police Service, in order to address the unique and at times urgent needs of the Six Nations of the Grand River Community and Haudenosaunee culture, additional requirements include: -

Extensive knowledge of the unique social dynamics of the Six Nations of the Grand River Territory A sound understanding of Haudenosaunee culture, customs, traditions and social political issues of the Six Nations of the Grand River Six Nations of the Grand River Band Membership/Citizenship and residency is considered a preferred asset and Membership or extensive working experience with any Indigenous Nation will also be considered an asset

Desirable Qualifications: · Six Nations Band member preferred Assets: · Previous policing related experience · Law and security courses, etc. Closing Date: Applications must be received by 3:00 p.m. Friday, February 19, 2021 Applications in complete form are to be mailed or hand delivered to: Six Nations Police P.O. Box 758 2112 4th Line Road Ohsweken, Ontario N0A 1M0 Attention: Policing Administrator For further information, please contact the Policing Administrator at 519-445-4191.


TWO ROW26 TIMES

January 27th, 2021

TWO 13 ROW TIM

ATTN: ATTN:

J O B Position

Employer/Location

B O A R D Term

Salary

send notices to ads@tworowtimes.com send notices to ads@tworowtimes.com

Closing Date

SIX NATIONS COUNCIL Finance Accounts Receivable Finance, Central Administration Full-time TBD January 27, 2021 Personal Support Worker Personal Support Services, Health Services 6-month contract TBD January 27, 2021 School Caretaker School Maintenance, Public Works Department Contract TBD January 27, 2021 Personal Support Worker Personal Support Services, Health Services 1-year contract TBD January 27, 2021 Director, Financial Planning and Analysis Finance, Central Administration Full-time TBD January 27, 2021 Registered Nurse Diabetes Education Program, Health Services Contract TBD January 27, 2021 Executive Assistant to the SAO Central Administration Full-time TBD January 27, 2021 Community Support Worker Community Support Services, Health Services Part-time TBD January 27, 2021 Finance Control Officer Finance, Housing Department Full-time TBD January 27, 2021 Manager of Resources Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Department Full-time TBD January 27, 2021 Political Advisor Administration, Central Administration Contract TBD February 1, 2021 Health Transformation Project Assistant Administration, Health Services Contract TBD February 3, 2021 Registered Practical Nurse Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Full-time TBD February 3, 2021 Project Manager Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Contract TBD February 3, 2021 Administrative Assistant – Finance Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Contract TBD February 3, 2021 Secretary/Receptionist Fire Services Full-time TBD February 3, 2021 Data/Inventory Clerk Fire Services Full-time TBD February 3, 2021 Registered Early Childhood Educator Child Care Services, Social Services Full-time TBD February 3, 2021 (multiple positions) COVID Response Nurse (multiple positions) School Nurses, Health Services Contract TBD February 3, 2021 Personal Support Workers (2 positions) Personal Support Services, Health Services Part-time TBD February 3, 2021 Supportive Housing Case Manager Mental Health, Health Services Contract TBD February 3, 2021 Mental Health Nurse Case Manager Mental Health, Health Services Contract TBD February 3, 2021 Release from Custody Case Manager Mental Health, Health Services Full-time TBD February 3, 2021 Food Service Manager Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Full-time TBD February 3, 2021 Activity Supervisor Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Full-time TBD February 3, 2021 Land Based Helper Egowadiya>dagenha Land Based Healing Centre, Health Services Full-time TBD February 3, 2021 Child and Youth Worker Egowadiya>dagenha Land Based Healing Centre, Health Services Full-time TBD February 3, 2021 Benefits Coordinator Human Resources, Central Administration Contract (maternity) TBD February 3, 2021 Staffing Officer Human Resources, Central Administration Full-time TBD February 3, 2021 Occupational Therapy Assistant Child and Youth, Health Services Contract TBD February 3, 2021 Senior Finance Analyst Finance, Central Administration Full-time TBD February 3, 2021 Accounts Payable Supervisor Finance, Central Administration Full-time TBD February 3, 2021 Social Media Specialist Child and Family Social Services Contract TBD February 10, 2021 Child and Family Well-Being Child and Family Social Services Contract TBD February 10, 2021 Project Coordinator Cannabis Outreach Worker Mental Health and Addictions, Health Services Full-time TBD February 10, 2021 Urban Unit Assistant Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Full-time TBD February 10, 2021 Unit Assistant Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Full-time TBD February 10, 2021 Maintenance Worker Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Contract TBD February 10, 2021 Administrator Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Full-time TBD February 10, 2021 Intake Team Member Ogwadeni:deo, Social Services Full-time TBD February 10, 2021 Personal Support Worker (Part-time) Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Contract TBD February 10, 2021 Personal Support Worker (Full-time) Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Contract TBD February 10, 2021 Registered Nurse – Charge Nurse Iroquois Lodge, Health Services Contract TBD February 10, 2021 SIX NATIONS AND NEW CREDIT Casual Bus Driver’s GRETI, Ogwehoweh Skills and Trades Training Centre Part-time $20.00-$30.00/hour On-going recruitment Etiyatakenhas Shelter Counsellor Ganohkwasra Family Assault Support Services Full-time $50,000 February 5, 2021 Ahsehsawa:doh Community Counsellor Ganohkwasra Family Assault Support Services Full-time $50,000 February 5, 2021 Community Counsellor – Ohahiyo Facilitator Ganohkwasra Family Assault Support Services Full-time $50,000 February 5, 2021 Gayenawahsra Counsellor – Ganohkwasra Family Assault Support Services Full-time $50,000 February 5, 2021 Next Step Housing Sexual Violence Child & Youth Counsellor Ganohkwasra Family Assault Support Services Full-time $54,500 February 4, 2021 Peacekeeper’s Coordinator Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation Full-time, contract $21.25/hour February 4, 2021 Minute Taker Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation Full-time, contract $16.89 - $23.49 February 4, 2021 Post Secondary Education Counsellor Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation Full-time, permanent $43,696.50-$62,329.50 February 4, 2021 Finance Intern Six Nations of the Grand River Development Corporation Internship TBD Until filled Onkweshona Development Coach The Everlasting Tree School Full-time $58,000 Until filled Occasional Support Staff The Everlasting Tree School Part-time TBD TBD BRANT COUNTY, KW REGION, LONDON Substitute Teacher Six Nations Polytechnic Institute Contract TBD On-going recruitment Development Officer – Six Nations Polytechnic Institute Full-time, permanent TBD January 29, 2021 Institutional Advancement Officer Cleaner Brantford Native Housing Part-time TBD Until filled Digital Learning Coordinator The Woodland Cultural Centre 35 hours/week TBD January 29, 2021 HAMILTON, TORONTO, NIAGARA, AND SURROUNDING AREA Manager, Marketing and Communications Indigenous Sport & Wellness Ontario (ISWO) Full-time, contract TBD Until filled Program Coordinator Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business (CCAB) Full-time, contract TBD Unknown Street Outreach Worker (2 positions) Native Men’s Residence Full-time $48,000 January 29, 2021 The GREAT Job Board is brought to you by Employment Ontario and Service Canada. For more positions in the surrounding area please visit our website: www.greatsn.com. To apply for funding, book an intake appointment with an ETC @ 519-445-2222 (Toll-Free long distance at 1 888 218-8230) or email us at info@greatsn.com.

Job descriptions are available at GREAT Weekdays... Monday through Friday from 8:30 - 4:30 pm 16 Sunrise Court, Ohsweken

Phone: 519.445.2222 • Fax: 519-445-4777 Toll Free: 1.888.218.8230 www.greatsn.com

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14 37

TWO ROW ROW TIMES TIMES TWO

January28TH, 27th,2018 2021 NOVEMBER

ATTN:

send notices to ads@tworowtimes.com Obituary

Obituary

MONTOUR: Patricia Anne March 9, 1946 - January 19, 2021 In her 75th year, surrounded by family, Patricia Anne Montour “Patsy” passed peacefully on January 19, 2021 to rejoin her husband, the late Sherwin “Herm” Montour. She will be forever cherished by her “boys” Troy (Sue), Curt (Jen), Pat (Erika) and Bill (Trudy) and lovingly remembered by her grandchildren Rebekah, Monika, Al, Sara Faith, Rosie, Timmy, Dayah, and Patrick Jr. She is survived by her 10 great grandchildren. Pat will always be treasured by her brothers and sisters, Dan Montour (Judy), Marion Garlow (the late Ron), Ross Johnson (Joanne), Bonnie Derouchie, Joyce Longboat, John Johnson (Judy), Jane Garrow (Chuck), Freeman Johnson (Suzie), Wendy Johnson, and precious Uncle Tom Montour. She will be missed by many nieces, nephews, cousins and wonderful friends. Pat is predeceased by parents Ross and Muriel (Montour) Johnson, sisters Wanda Horvath, Marcia Skye, and brother Tim Johnson. Pat was a strong resilient woman with a heart of pure gold. The sheer strength of her heart kept her with her children, grandchildren, great grandchildren, sisters, brothers, family and friends, to share her love and comfort. Pat was best known for her love of baking, “Auntie Pat’s pies”, cookies and donuts. She shared her recipes and taught many, but her legendary baking can’t be matched. She also loved cheering for her favourite teams, Toronto Maple Leafs, and Blue Jays. Pat was the #1 fan in the stands, never too busy to cheer on her family. She was incredibly generous and kind and was an avid volunteer in her community. Her joy and laughter was infectious with everyone she encountered. The family is so thankful for the love, devotion and personal care provided by Rosie, and the many others. Patricia Anne will be resting at her home at 2343 Third Line, Ohsweken (house at the far back) on Friday January 22, 2021. Following strict COVID-19 protocol, visitation will be allowed from 4:00pm – 6:00pm on Friday. Burial will be held at the Delaware Church on Saturday January 23, 2021. Arrangements by Styres Funeral Home, Ohsweken. www.rhbanderson.com

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Darren K. VanEvery August 21, 1967 - January 3, 2021

Donald R. VanEvery April 12, 1958 - January 16, 2021

Both survived by Siblings: Deb Karl, Kathy, Greg, John. Predeceased by Parents: Ira D. VanEvery, Janet (nee MacDonald)VanEvery & Grandparents Pete & Effie VanEvery, Claude & Pearl MacDonald. Predeceased by Siblings: Randall Ira, Darryl Lance, Jeffrey Dean. Darren was youngest of 10, died suddenly after fighting diabetes for years in Buffalo, New York. Widely known as Buffalo Bills - Bandits super fan. Don was the 5th of 10, died in hospital after contracting covid 4 days prior. Don was husband to Marianne Jamieson, Stepdad of 6, Step Grand Dad to Brianna, father to DJ, Jarrod & Junior. Grandfather of Jy Quinn Sage, Jarrod Seth, Shaya Rayne & Silas Ira Ross. Great grandfather of Jordon Jrue Atkins, Arlo Kalvin Atkins, Zepplin Ross VanEvery, Kindley Quinn Hill. MARTIN: Essie nee: Jamieson Peacefully at home on Sunday, January 24, 2021 at the age of 78 years. Wife of the late Hubert “Gil” Martin. Loving mother of Terry, Tracey & Eliana, Carla & Wes, and Kim & the late Richard. Dear grandmother of Kayla, Alyssa, Damon, Aurora, Layla, Thovias, Tandy & Derek, Marty & Jessica, Sibby & Mike, Katie, and several great grandchildren, and great great grandchildren. Sister of Joanne & Michael, and James Seneca. Also survived by many cousins, nieces, and nephews. Predeceased by mother Ruth, and brother Joseph. Cremation has taken place. A Celebration of Life will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to Jay Silverheels complex. Arrangements by Styres Funeral Home, Ohsweken. www.rhbanderson.com

Notice

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Six Nations Arrows Annual General Meeting February 7, 2021 - 10:00 am Email: gingersmith 0820@gmail.com for registration *Must register by Feb. 4-NOON to receive TOLLfree dial-in number

Wednesday January 27, 2020 | 11AM & 1PM Join the live discussion about the Oneida Battery Storage Project. Ask questions and get real time responses from project representatives. Future sessions include: Feb 3, 10, 17 and 24. Register by email info@snfuture.ca https://linktr.ee/OneidaEnergyStorage


January 27th, 2021

TWO ROW TIMES

15

DECEMBER 19TH, 2018

TWO ROW TIMES

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CLUES ACROSS 1. Gather a harvest 5. Federal Republic of Germany 8. Bravo! Bravo! Bravo! 11. “The Little Mermaid” 13. The common gibbon 14. Volcanic island in Fiji 15. Mother of Perseus 16. Egg cells 17. Teams’ best pitchers 18. Credit associations 20. Advance 21. Hair styling products 22. Benign tumors 25. Arriving early 30. Called it a career 31. __ Paulo, city 32. Avoid with trickery 33. Easter egg 38. Veterans battleground 41. Lack of success 43. Thing that causes disgust 45. Deep, continuing sound 47. Ancient kingdom near Dead Sea 49. You might put it in a fire 50. Partner to “oohed” 55. Actor Idris 56. Slippery 57. Plant of the bean family 59. One point north of northeast 60. Patti Hearst’s captors 61. Places to hang clothes 62. Midwife 63. Of she 64. S. Korean statesman CLUES DOWN 1. Cool! 2. Amounts of time 3. Aboriginal people of Japan 4. Popular veggies 5. Wedding accessory 6. Deep, narrow gorges 7. Dry cereal 8. Competitions that require speed

ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, it is not often that you feel compelled to be a people-pleaser, but you’ve been a lot more cautious about what you say or post online lately. That can be a good thing.

TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, certain things aren’t adding up and someone close to you is being rather evasive. You may want to do some investigative work and get to the bottom of the situation. GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, even though you detest drama, unless you are careful this week you could put yourself right in the middle of some. Watch your words and actions carefully.

9. Cain and __ 10. Snake sound 12. Type of amino acid (abbr.) 14. Pattern of notes in Indian music 19. Satisfy 23. Misfire 24. Nearsightedness 25. Indicates before 26. Increase motor speed 27. When you hope to get there 28. Indicates position 29. Where rockers perform 34. Substitute 35. __ juris: of one’s own right 36. Earliest form of modern human in Europe: __-magnon 37. Adult female bird

Answers for January 27th, 2021 Crossword Puzzle

39. Do away with 40. Lens 41. Flattened appendage 42. Post or pillar in Greek temple 44. A medieval citizen of Hungary 45. Spiritual leader of a Jewish congregation 46. Abba __, Israeli politician 47. Sew 48. Evergreen trees and shrubs having oily one-seeded fruits 51. Swiss river 52. Grayish-white 53. A way to illustrate 54. College basketball superpower 58. Midway between south and southeast

SUDOKU

CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22 You are known for adding your personal touch to everything, Cancer. Just don’t push this so far as to have the final word on everything; otherwise, you could ruffle feathers.

LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, you’re often focused on the bigger picture but don’t consider the small details. When financial issues become a concern, you have to learn to scrutinize data. VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22 You can’t resist helping other people who are close to you, Virgo. However, this week is a time when the roles are reversed. Don’t hesitate to accept help. LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23 Libra, you are normally upbeat and passive. However, you may have to be a little more forceful if you want to get your point across and be heard in the days ahead.

SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22 You don’t mind defending your opinions or your ideals, Scorpio. In fact, you are highly skilled at constructive conversation. Your negotiation tactics may be put to the test.

SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, it is not your job to solve a group issue on your own. This needs to be a democratic process with all opinions included in the discussion. You may act as moderator. CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20 Is there something going on in your life right now that could benefit from a little more investigation, Capricorn? Personal problems may involve delving a little deeper.

AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, it seems that for each step you take forward, you move two or three steps back. Break this cycle and develop a contingency plan so you don’t miss a beat.

PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20 The distance between you and someone you love keeps widening, Pisces. Take the time to mend this fence.

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TWO ROW TIMES

January 27th, 2021

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