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A PUBLICATION OF THE TURLOCK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

SUMMER 2020

ISSUE 42


Your Health Can’t Wait A COMMUNITY BUILT ON SAFETY Taking care of your health is as important as ever. Don’t ignore your symptoms or downplay your pain. Taking care of your health now may prevent greater health risks in the future. Our doctors and staff are equipped to take care of all patients safely. We’re here to care for you and your loved ones. Here’s what to expect- everyone in the hospital wears face masks and practices physical distancing, spaces are frequently cleaned and there are COVID SAFE care pathways. For more information, visit EmanuelMedicalCenter.org or call 209-667-4200

Your Safe Care is Our #1 Priority COVID  SAFE  CARE

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1926

2020 EST. 1926

2020

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Home of the SMITH FAMILY LIFETIME WARRANTY New & Preowned vehicles limited power train, see dealer for details

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CALL US TODAY! 209.632.3946 www.SmithChevroletCadillac.com • www.SmithCadillac.com

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C O N T E N T S W.A.C.E. AWARD WINNING PUBLICATION OF THE TURLOCK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

www.turlockchamber.com

115 S. Golden State Blvd. Turlock, CA 95380 209-632-2221 Hours: Mon. - Fri. • 10am - 2pm info@turlockchamber.com BOARD CHAIRS Gina Blom & Nathan Dabulewicz EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Sue Micheletti

MEMBERSHIP COORDINATOR

Irene Holmes

EVENTS COORDINATOR

Sharon Berry

Feature Open for business

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Our Purpose The Turlock Chamber of Commerce is the business advocate for its members by focusing efforts on promoting a positive business environment, economic development, a legislative voice and costeffective programs and services.

On the cover Open for business Design by Sharon Hoffman

Published by The Turlock Journal 121 S. Center St., 2nd Floor Turlock, CA 95380 209-634-9141

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Chamber Board of Directors Chamber Ambassadors Turlock Young Professionals Economic rebound report Small business economic relief California resilience Covenant Living in Turlock Penguin Telecommunications Balanced Book, LLP Turlock Town Center Cal/OSHA Regulations Legislative Scoreboards Chamber Members for 50+ years/ New Members

SUMMER 2020


CHAMBER BOARD CHAIRS & CEO

GINA BLOM CO-CHAIRMAN Rembrandt & Rose’

NATHAN DABULEWICZ CO-CHAIRMAN Nathan Dabulewicz Insurance

SUE MICHELETTI EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Turlock Chamber

Warm summer greetings, to all! When last we published the Business News, no one could have anticipated that 2020 was soon going to become the year that we’d all like to forget — and how! The economic impact of the worldwide coronavirus pandemic is unprecedented in our country, and across the globe. We have watched, in desperation, as so much of our economy came to a screeching halt, and while small and large business owners alike struggled to keep their heads above water. Almost immediately upon much of the State of California being subjected to mandatory closures and shelter in place restrictions, we recognized that it was incumbent upon us to do what we could, not just for our member businesses, but for the entire business community. We set about sharing every bit of information we could get our hands on, providing guidance and resources in an effort to help ease the financial burdens most local businesses were facing. Information regarding federal, state, and local relief programs were shared as quickly as they were announced. We have remained open for business, albeit with limited hours, for those that need our services almost daily. The Chamber became active in promoting “Take Out Tuesdays” to support local restaurants highlighted in a popular new Facebook Page, called “Turlock to Go.” The Chamber also became an administrator of another page that was born of the pandemic, “Turlock Still Open,” a place where all businesses could post information about their hours of operation, and any special messages they wanted their customers to see. We converted a scheduled in-person Lunch and Learn to a webinar, so that the show could go on while we remained physically distanced. We have held “virtual” board meetings via Zoom, to keep your Chamber board informed and engaged, offering their unique and shared ideas for helping local businesses. After what seemed an eternity, many businesses are reopening, and many more are to come, following the guidelines that have been set forth. In our hearts, we want all businesses to survive but, alas, we know that some will not make it. Your Chamber leadership remains focused on how to help businesses through the recovery process, and, while the future remains uncertain, it is our hope and belief that we will get through this together. For the time being, we are not gathering for ribbon cuttings, monthly mixers, nor for other traditional Chamber events. We will, however, begin planning these events as soon as we possibly can, with the knowledge that all of you, like all of us, want to return to some sense of normalcy sooner rather than later. We do have new members joining the Chamber, which gives us hope for the future and strengthens our desire to serve you well. This issue of the Business News is devoted to survival! We encourage you, and the entire community, to support local businesses and one another. We are in the middle of a marathon but with perseverance, creativity, flexibility, and innovation . . . together, we can prosper.

Gina Blom & Nathan Dabulewicz Co-Chairs of the Board Sue Micheletti Executive Director

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CHAMBER

2020 CHAMBER BOARD OF DIRECTORS

GINA BLOM CO-CHAIR Rembrandt & Rose’

NATHAN DABULEWICZ CO-CHAIR Nathan Dabulewicz Insurance

SAM DAVID Assyrian American Civic Club

MATTHEW DAVIS GDI Insurance Agency, Inc.

MOLLY AMANT HONORARY Downtown Turlock

AARON MEDEIROS TYP PRESIDENT

STEPHEN BACKUS Two Guys Catering/ Red Brick

DEVINDER SINGH BAINS Turlock Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram

CRYSTAL STAPLETON Balanced Books

JAMIE CIMOLI Turlock Direct

ALAN EIGHMEY Strategic Legal Group

EILEEN HAMILTON Hamilton Farms

PAUL PORTER

JERRY POWELL The Udder Place

CHRIS HARRINGTON US Cold Storage

TOMAS GOMEZ-ARIAS, PHD College of Business Administration CSU Stanislaus

STEVE GEMPERLE Gemperle Family Farms

JOSH PITAU AMBASSADOR CO-CHAIR Thorsen’s - Norquist, Inc.

BRANDI LOFORTI AMBASSADOR CO-CHAIR InsureCAL Insurance Agency

CRAIG PITAU PAST CHAIRMAN/ TREASURER Thorsen’s Plumbing, Heat & Air

2020 TURLOCK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE STAFF

SUE MICHELETTI EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

IRENE HOLMES MEMBERSHIP COORDINATOR

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SHARON BERRY EVENTS COORDINATOR


TURLOCK CHAMBER AMBASSADORS Brandi LoForti

Josh Pitau

Lisa Amaral

Teresa Vines

Co-Chair InsureCal Insurance

Co-Chair Thorsen’s-Norquist, Inc.

Winton-Ireland, Strom & Green Insurance Agency

Bank of Stockton

Christopher Rivera

Taunya Martinez

Jilbert Gevargizi

Kathy Hobby

Hampton Inn by Hilton

Steele Insurance Agency

Nathan DabulewiczFarmers

Mario Herrera Tri Counnty Flooring

Sarah Baskins AgIS Capital

Jason Laughlin Kiwanis Club

Denny Silva

The Education Foundation of Stanislaus County

US Bank

Fernando Beltran

Denise Haflich Fairfield Inn & Suite

Exit Realty

It is the mission of the Turlock Chamber of Commerce Ambassador Team to promote member commitment and relationships by: •  Raising awareness of Chamber activities and benefits • Informing and involving new Chamber members to promote strong continuing membership •  Encouraging meaningful and beneficial participation in the Chamber’s programs •  Serving as a liaison between the Chamber staff and membership

AMBASSADOR HIGHLIGHT TAUNYA MARTINEZ Hampton Inn by Hilton

Taunya Martinez is the assistant general manager for the Hampton Inn by Hilton in Turlock. She has been in the hotel industry for the past 20 years. “My journey started when I was 18 and I lived in Las Vegas and got hired at the Las Vegas Club Casino Hotel. From there I quickly moved up from front desk to reservations. I had to move back to California, but my journey just began. When I moved back to California, I quickly started applying for more hotel positions and again I was hired at the Holiday Inn in Salida. I literally went from hotel to hotel to where I finally found where I belong here at the Hampton Inn in Turlock.” Martinez has been a Chamber Ambassador for a year and half. “I love everything about being a part of the Chamber! I have never been a part of such an inspiring team. I love meeting all the new people and all the new business and my number one reason is to help others. I completely thrive off of being able to support others. I love being a leader and I love to inspire others as well. I love all the open opportunities that the Chamber has to offer and I am so blessed to be able to be included in such a great group of people. We are all one big happy family and I would never change a thing about it! I wish to continue to grow with the city of Turlock and the Chamber in hopes one day I will be able to move up and possibly become one of directors of the Chamber Board. “I have never felt so blessed than I do now in this chapter of my life and I owe it all to the Hampton Inn and the Chamber of Commerce.” BUSINESS NEWS

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CHAMBER

WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT

Turlock Young Professionals (TYP) provides people who live and/or work in Turlock with a setting to build relationships and develop their careers. The organization also helps cultivate Turlock's future leaders by providing opportunities to engage with political, civic and business leaders to shape the future of Turlock.

HOW TO JOIN

EXECUTIVE TYP BOARD MEMBERS

This dynamic group is open to anyone interested. You can join the program anytime throughout the year. The membership is $100 annually for working professionals and $50 annually for college students.

Aaron Medeiros, President Claudia Ducheneaux, Vice President Victoria Morad, Secretary Denny Silva, Treasurer Tyler Flaherty, Marketing Chair Kara Bottler, Event Coordinator Scott Dignan, Professional Development Chair Nick Antrim, Past President

WHAT’S IN IT FOR YOU

• Gain exposure in the business community • Connect with like-minded people • Enhance your professional development • Mix and mingle with experienced business professionals in a variety of industries • Opportunity to promote business in quarterly Business News magazine

ACTIVITIES

• Look on our Facebook page for monthly meeting locations • Professional development workshops • Social and networking events specifically designed for TYP members • Behind-the-scenes tours of Turlock businesses

TYP MEMBERS Cassandra Abram Adrenna Alkhas Michael Allen Ellie Alverion Nick Antrim Vito Chiesa Dinah Copple Odis DeHart Lauren Denton Scott Dignan Claudia Ducheneaux Alisha Fitzgerald Tyler Flaherty

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Caleb Fontes Jocelyn Hackett Adrian Harrell Lori Hooper Kadi Ingram-Porter Jessica Irish Valeria Jimenez Lacey Kiriakou Jessica Lemus Ninfa Lopez-Smith Sandra Loza Rafael Martinez Aaron Medeiros VIctoria Morad

Melissa Nunnemaker Paul Porter Jeff Quigly Doris Ramos Holly Rasmusson Steven Rivera Dennis Silva Irene Silveira Gary Soiseth Heath Sousa Danny Thompson Joe Torres Yelena Tsymbal Josh Weimer


ECONOMY

Report points to economic rebound in coming months

By ANGELINA MARTIN

Masks critical to region’s recovery, according to economist

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ow quickly the region’s have one thing in common: the wide- definitely see a lower employment this economy recovers from spread wearing of masks. In a new year than the year before because the the coronavirus pandemic study by the University of California, economy has been slowing for quite depends entirely on how well the San Diego, trends show that mandated some time,” Soydemir said. community follows public health mask coverings in Italy and New York The combination of the virus and guidelines, according to one local City between April 6 and May 9 sig- the downturn already taking place expert. nificantly reduced the number of caused the predicted magnitude of the The San Joaquin Valley Business infections compared to social distanc- recession to be significantly exceeded. Forecast report was released by Stan- ing and shelter-in-place measures. The national unemployment rate is islaus State last month, detailing the Soydemir said the best way to see expected to grow between 15 and 30 extreme economic hardship occur- the local economy prosper once more percent in the second quarter, and the ring in Central California due to the is by contributing to its recovery safely, Valley’s unemployment rate is genCOVID-19 outbreak. The pandemic is especially as the Valley sees a recent erally double that of the rest of the referred to as a “Black Swan” in finance increase in cases. nation. In addition, the region’s recovliterature because of its extremely “You want to be part of the solution, ery is expected to be a bit slower than rare and devastating nature, the nationwide rebound due to according to the report’s lead the less-developed structure of author, Foster Farms Endowed its labor markets. Professor of Business EconomCategories of employment ics Gökçe Soydemir. in the Valley that have been hit As businesses throughout the hardest by the pandemic the Valley begin to reopen include leisure, hospitality and following a three-month retail services, while education shutdown mandate from the and health services have been state, an economic recovery impacted the least. In addition, is expected during the secthe Valley’s ag-centric sectors ond half of 2020 — as long as are impacted less than other a spike in coronavirus cases categories of employment. doesn’t cause them to close Projections point to a recovFoster Farms Endowed Professor of Business Economics once more. ery with an annualized growth Gökçe Soydemir said the best way to see the local “We’re just seeing places economy prosper once more is by contributing to its of 1.05 percent in total employsafely, especially as the Valley sees a recent beginning to reopen, which we recovery ment from the second half of increase in cases. indicated in the report would 2020 to the first half of 2021, happen in May or June. From falling behind the Valley’s typithat standpoint, we’re on track and not the problem,” he said, adding that cal growth of 1.19 percent. However, seeing an increase in economic activ- stores in some states are closing for the projections also anticipate that from ity. It’s only partial, but it’s going in the second time as cases surge. “We have the second half of 2021 to the second right direction,” Soydemir said. “The to be responsible in order to get rid of half of 2022, total employment will worry I have is that when I go out, I this virus in a quicker manner.” exceed typical growth at an average see a lot of people not wearing masks Soydemir’s report indicates that any rate of 1.26 percent. and I think that’s a big problem.” delay or restart in the reopening of the Despite having anticipated a quick, The Valley has been slow to adhere economy will alter the timing of its “V-shaped” recovery curve in March, to mask recommendations compared recovery. Prior to the pandemic, the Soydemir said he now anticipates the to other regions, Soydemir added, fall 2019 Business Forecast had already Valley economy’s rebound to resemble like the Bay Area. On Thursday, Gov. predicted a decline in local economic a slower, “U-shaped” curve if the pubGavin Newsom mandated that all activity for the first time in the report’s lic continues to reject mask mandates. Californians are required to wear face nine-year history. Had the pandemic “That's what’s critical. If everyone masks in public — one day after the not occurred, Soydemir said, the does what they’re supposed to do as state registered a record spike in coro- Valley would still be experiencing individuals, I think this recovery is navirus cases. significant employment loss this year going to take place at a faster pace,” he Soydemir said countries that have compared to previous years. said. “I keep saying this over and over slowed the curve of coronavirus cases “The unemployment numbers again: we have to be smart about this. and thus seen their economies begin to wouldn’t be as large because it’s The economy depends on us and how recover, like South Korea and Japan, all exceptional right now, but we would we respond to the virus.” 

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GOVERNMENT

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Economic relief for $mall businesses

he Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act was passed by Congress with overwhelming, bipartisan support and signed into law by President Trump on March 27, 2020. This over $2 trillion economic package contains $376 billion in relief for American workers and small businesses. The U.S. Small Business Association offers multiple funding options for those seeking relief, including: — Paycheck Protection Program: This loan is designed to provide a direct incentive for small businesses to keep their workers on the payroll. SBA will forgive loans if all employees are kept on the payroll for eight weeks and the money is used for payroll, rent, mortgage interest, or utilities. Businesses can apply through any existing SBA 7(a) lender or through any federally insured depository institution, federally insured credit union, and Farm Credit System institution that is participating. The loan will be fully forgiven if the funds are used for payroll costs, interest on mortgages, rent, and utilities (due to likely

high subscription, at least 75% of the forgiven amount must have been used for payroll). Loan payments will also be deferred for six months. No collateral or personal guarantees are required. Neither the government nor lenders will charge small businesses any fees. — Economic Injury Disaster Loan Emergency Advance: This $10,000 Economic Injury Disaster Loan advance is designed to provide economic relief to businesses currently experiencing a temporary loss of revenue due to COVID-19. At this time, only agricultural business applications will be accepted due to limitations in funding availability and the unprecedented submission of applications already received. Agricultural businesses include those businesses engaged in the production of food and fiber, ranching, and raising of livestock, aquaculture, and all other farming and agricultural related industries (as defined by section 18(b) of the Small Business Act (15 U.S.C. 647(b)). — SBA Express Bridge Loan: This program allows small business owners who

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currently have a business relationship with an SBA Express Lender to access up to $25,000 quickly. These loans can provide vital economic support to small businesses to help overcome the temporary loss of revenue they are experiencing and can be a term loans or used to bridge the gap while applying for a direct SBA Economic Injury Disaster loan. — SBA Debt Relief: As part of the SBA’s coronavirus debt relief efforts, the SBA will pay 6 months of principal, interest and any associated fees that borrowers owe for all current 7(a), 504, and Microloans in regular servicing status as well as new 7(a), 504, and Microloans disbursed prior to Sept. 27, 2020. This relief is not available for Paycheck Protection Program loans or Economic Injury Disaster loans. Borrowers do not need to apply for this assistance, it will be automatically provided if applicable.  For more information about these programs, visit https://www.sba.gov/funding-programs/ loans/coronavirus-relief-options


GOVERNMENT

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California Resilience Roadmap

ocal businesses have slowly begun to reopen since the issuance of a statewide stay-at-home order by Governor Gavin Newsom on March 19 due to the coronavirus pandemic. The Governor’s Office released a Resilience Roadmap with four stages of reopening the economy: — STAGE 1 allowed only essential businesses to be open. — STAGE 2 sees the reopening of “lower-risk” workplaces including retail, manufacturing, offices, outdoor museums and limited personal services. — STAGE 3 will allow for “higher-risk” workplaces to open such as personal care businesses and recreational venues. — STAGE 4 is the end of restrictions on what businesses can be open and allows for larger gatherings such as nightclubs, concert venues and live audience sports. California moved into Stage 2 of the roadmap on May 8, with county variances on

specific businesses allowed to reopen and industry guidelines mandated to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Before reopening, the state is mandating all businesses to: Perform a detailed risk assessment and implement a site-specific protection plan; Train employees on how to limit the spread of COVID-19, including how to screen themselves for symptoms and stay

• •

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home if they have them; Implement individual control measures and screenings; Implement disinfecting protocols; and Implement physical distancing guidelines.  Additional mandates apply that are specific to each industry. Those guidelines can be found at: https://covid19.ca.gov/industry-guidance/

• • •


FEATURE

Turlock W

hen the coronavirus pandemic first forced the community into their homes over three months ago, one Turlock resident took it upon herself to help ensure the city’s restaurants would survive. Thanks to the creation of a Facebook page called Turlock To Go, foodies throughout town and surrounding communities have connected with each other while promoting local businesses. California and states throughout the country were first put under strict shelter-in-place orders in an attempt to curb the spread of COVID-19 back in mid-March — measures that also prohibited restaurants from serving customers inside of their establishments, instead requiring the businesses to only offer curbside pickup or delivery of meals. While some eateries closed altogether, many opted to completely modify their businesses into a “to go” operation, switching to smaller menus, offering family-sized meals, featuring daily specials and providing other creative meal ideas, like take-and-make pizzas or cookie decorating packages. When she thought of the idea for a Facebook page, Turlock resident Kadi Ingram-Porter was having trouble keeping up with customer needs as a sales representative in the wine and spirits industry. Restaurants were no longer just trying to survive a week or two — they now had to find a way to make ends meet for as long as the shelter in place order lasted, which ended up being until the end of May. As for consumers, Ingram-Porter noticed people were tired of cooking and began posting their “to go” meals on social media. Soon enough, the Turlock To Go Facebook group was born. “With Facebook algorithms, it was difficult to see what posts were current and I kept thinking how nice it would be to have one place with all of the information. I decided to create Turlock To Go to be the place. I wanted it to be a place where restaurants could post their hours, menus and specials and a place where the community could go for all of this information,” Ingram-Porter said. “It is important to me that this page is

To Go

By ANGELINA MARTIN

Turlock To Go member Cirenia Valencia shares a photo of her family having fun at home with a pizza kit from Rico’s Pizza in March.

for all to go services in Turlock (and nearby surrounding areas) and supports the community as a whole. It is my first priority that it is a positive page.” Since the Facebook group was created on March 24, it has amassed nearly 10,000 members — a majority of whom utilize the virtual space to post photos from restaurants that are open, share special deals with each other and discover new places to dine that they didn’t know of before. “My routine was the same until I was added to this group. I intended on cooking at home more, but have eaten out a little more often to support these small businesses,” Brianna Perez said in April. “I’ve learned of so many small businesses that I wouldn’t have otherwise heard of, so I try a few times to order to go from new places to support these businesses! I also love it because people post photos, which entices me to go try a new place.” For others, Turlock To Go offered a sense of escape while they were confined to their homes. “We feel it puts money back into the local businesses, but really it gives us a sense of normalcy. We look forward to getting in the car and making that drive around our town we love so much,” Sandra Avila said. “This group is a great source of info of restaurants we would have never known about. It really is the highlight of our week.” No matter how Turlockers choose to supBUSINESS NEWS

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port their favorite eateries or grocery stores, for those who eat at home, there’s one thing they have in common, Ingram-Porter said — their love of food. “Food is one of the few things we have left during a time when we can no longer engage in so many of our usual activities. Food has always brought people together, even now, when we can’t really be together,” IngramPorter said. Thanks to the Turlock To Go group’s success, she’s also started pages for Modesto and Oakdale. She hopes that the pages can help business owners increase their takeout orders and stay afloat during the crisis, as well as learn from each other and cheer each other on. Michelle Peterson of Dust Bowl Brewing Company offered a heartfelt “thank you” to Ingram-Porter for creating the Facebook group. “What a wonderful reflection on our caring community!” Peterson said. “It’s a platform that’s not only informative, it’s bringing families and businesses together in a very personal, authentic way.” Since stay-at-home orders were lifted and restaurants received the go-ahead to offer dine-in services once more, the Turlock To Go page is now called Turlock To Go and Dine In. This allows those whose dining rooms are now open to advertise that they are while still allowing businesses who are still hesitant to open the opportunity to promote their businesses as well. For Ingram-Porter, seeing the community come together to help local eateries no matter the circumstances has been inspiring. “I am so happy to hear that Turlock To Go has helped so many businesses during this difficult time. I have enjoyed watching the progression of this group,” she said. “It has been fun to watch more and more restaurants reopen for both to go and dine in, to see the creativity in the specials and meals that they have offered and it’s been very exciting to see brand new businesses open successfully during this time.” 


FEATURE

Stan Buy Me a light for business during dark times S

mall businesses and their employees have always been there for their customers — especially in the era of COVID-19 — so Opportunity Stanislaus called on the community to stand by them during tough times through their media campaign Stan Buy Me. Meant to help shoppers find out what businesses were deemed essential and open during the coronavirus pandemic, the Stan Buy Me campaign has kept the community informed over the past few months as mobility throughout the county was limited by stay-at-home orders. Through their social media accounts and website, Stan Buy Me not only kept locals up-to-date on who was open, but also provided them with information on how to support nonessential businesses during the troubling time. “We wanted to let people know that all of these businesses have been there for them all these years. We wanted people to continue supporting them and their employees,” Opportunity Stanislaus Director of Marketing and Communication Amber Edwards said. “It was so important because by the time things go back to normal, there’s the chance that they might not exist.” According to Stan Buy Me, the impact of COVID-19 on the local economy was felt deeply by businesses owners: 99,000 jobs were put at risk, there were 287,000 initial unemployment claims and $4.2 million in total annual estimated wage loss. Despite these staggering numbers, Stan Buy Me was able to help. In a report presented to the Stanislaus County Board of Supervisors in May, the campaign reported 993 likes and nearly 400,000 unique users reached on Facebook. The Stan Buy Me Instagram account and

By ANGELINA MARTIN

Opportunity Stanislaus’ Stan Buy Me campaign delivered balloons to small businesses who were open during the pandemic to help them attract customers.

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website received plenty of traffic as well, and the campaign even took their efforts outside of the internet by placing balloon columns in front of open small businesses in order to attract more customers. “I think it was a very confusing time with a lot of conflicting information. Sometimes it was still evolving and there were some feardriven messages,” Edwards said. “We wanted to create something with just resources and facts to help people understand plain and simple they have to support businesses and here's how to do it safely.” As businesses have begun to open in Stanislaus County over the last few weeks, Opportunity Stanislaus has stepped away from the Stan Buy Me campaign and focused on Stanislaus County Good 2 Go, pushing out information about businesses opening up safely through their various mediums. The Stan Buy Me campaign achieved what it set out to do, Edwards said, which was to help businesses survive one of the most sudden and devastating economic downturns in recent decades. It remained a positive movement during a time where there seems to be plenty of division, she added. “Stan Buy Me remained apolitical. Everyone appreciated it because there was something for everybody on both the consumer side and the business side. There wasn’t too much positivity going on for them and there wasn't a lot of hope, so to get $50 in free balloons and get people to say they support you on social media was something cool and a bright light in a dark time,” Edwards said. “This is a good place to do business and a place where there’s a lot of community support for business. This was just proof that we are a community who cares.” 


MEMBER SHOWCASE

Covenant Living of Turlock

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he Covenant senior living campus has been a vital part of Turlock and the surrounding communities for over four decades. What started as Covenant Village, a nonprofit ministry of the Evangelical Covenant Church in 1977, has since rebranded as Covenant Living in 2019 — but has retained its core mission to “create joy and peace of mind for residents, employees, and their families by providing a better way of life.” The senior community includes independent living, assisted living and skilled nursing options. “Older adults often move into Independent Living. As their needs change, they are able to move to Assisted Living or Skilled Nursing and still remain part of the same community. The relationships they build here are constant through their changing needs,” said Covenant Executive Director Ryan Hust. Hust is relatively new to Covenant Living of Turlock, becoming the executive director in June 2019, but he worked at other Covenant Living campuses across the country for seven years prior The Lodi native said coming to the Central Valley and Turlock was “like coming home.” The past several months has seen a new challenge for the Covenant Living community. “In the midst of COVID-19 we have needed to adapt to a new way of fulfilling our purpose. We serve some of the most vulnerable members of our community. Our highest priority has been ensuring their continued

1977

By KRISTINA HACKER

health and safety,” said Hust. He said that Covenant residents have participated in COVID-19 response in several ways, including a group of retired nurses making a video showing other residents how to properly wear masks and residents using their sewing skills to make masks for employees and residents to wear. Covenant Living has also provided opportunities for people to stay active and engaged in creative ways through COIVD-19. There was a campus wide photo scavenger hunt in the spring. In June, they offered a virtual road trip, with a new destination featured each day accompanied by food that corresponds to the destination. For instance, one day the road trip was to the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk and everyone got cotton candy delivered to their apartment. Covenant Living has a history of keeping residents active. One nonagenarian Covenant Living of Turlock resident was a participant in the senior living community’s “Road Hog Race,” BUSINESS NEWS

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a year-long cycling challenge that saw 74 teams across the nation log as many miles as possible on tech-savvy stationary bikes known as CyberCycles. Richard Winkler didn’t just compete in the competition, however — he dominated. While the Covenant Living team as a whole cycled their way to a national championship by logging a total of 13,255 miles in 2019, Winkler alone accounted for 5,200 miles. That earned him the title of champion for the single challenge category, beating out 198 other competitors throughout the country. “It was just a case of keeping track of what other people were doing and making sure they didn’t get to far ahead of me. I kept tallies,” Winkler said earlier this year. “I was probably the oldest person and I worked the hardest.” Covenant Living received its first CyberCycle in March 2016, ushering in a new, stimulating form of exercise for its residents. Much like any other stationary bike, the CyberCycle allows the rider to pedal in place. What sets the piece of equipment apart from other bikes are the virtual environments that the rider can navigate. Covenant Living residents not only are able to exercise their bodies while riding, but their minds as well thanks to the motivating and interactive scenery that they can steer through.  To learn more about Covenant Living of Turlock, visit covlivingturlock.org or call 209-585-3805.


MEMBER SHOWCASE

Penguin helps businesses communicate

2020

By ANGELINA MARTIN

Penguin Telecommunication Company has provided local businesses with cutting edge phone, internet and information security solutions for nearly two decades, but their services have never been needed more than during the coronavirus pandemic. What first began as an intellectual property consulting business about 15 years ago has since evolved into a full-fledged communications company in Turlock which offers exclusive phone services. From cloud-based, private telephone networks known as a Voice over Internet Protocol, or VoIP, systems to simple dial-tone only services, businesses’ phone models have been able to adapt and change to evolving technologies — especially during these unprecedented times. “The wonderful thing about phone service is that everyone needs it and we can craft our system to work for a variety of different businesses, from your typical office setting, insurance agency or call center all the way down to an entertainment facility or restaurant,” Penguin Vice President Alethe Denis said. By utilizing Penguin-hosted phone systems, local businesses are able to offer up-to-date information and hands-on assistance to callers thanks to services like an auto attendant, message or music for callers on hold, virtual extensions, call screening and call queues. As stay-at-home order forced many local restaurants to switch to to-go orders, Denis said call queues and other phone services provided by Penguin became vital for many businesses. “Restaurants started seeing a lot of customers and potential customers calling the restaurant and not being able to get through. They weren't able to understand or find out whether or not the place was open or what their options were, so we tried to come up with a way that we could help,” Denis said. Penguin’s services have helped restaurants make sure they don’t miss a customer, with call queues that provide an audio waiting room where customers can listen to the business’ hours, menu or anything else the restaurant owner chooses. Not only does the service keep customers informed, but also frees up restaurant employees to complete other tasks during a time when they are likely understaffed. “They’re now able to handle higher volume of calls, they won’t miss any orders and it frees them up to do the actual business of running a restaurant,” Denis said. “It’s less than the cost of a traditional phone bill. We want to help restaurants save money, keep them in business through these times and also give them the ability to become more cost efficient and keep their communication line open with customers.” According to Denis, the feedback Penguin has received from local businesses during the pandemic has been “incredible,” with clients expressing gratitude for services that allow them to keep customers informed in such uncertain times. It doesn’t stop with restaurants, BUSINESS NEWS

either; Penguin’s services translate to other retail sectors as well, like clothing stores who want their customers to stay updated on ever-changing hours when they call. Now, Denis said, store owners don’t have to go through clusters of voicemails and worry about calling customers back so that they have the correct information. “Getting that feedback is what really has fueled our desire to push boundaries and create new products offering solutions exclusively for this situation, giving businesses the opportunity to get out of things they felt were holding them back,” Denis said. “These services have taken so much stress off of these business owners. Being able to help relieve that tension and stress when businesses are grappling with so much right now makes us feel really good that we can be involved and help that way.” For more information about Penguin Telecommunication Company, visit www.callpenguin.com or call 209-585-1375.

15

SUMMER 2020


MEMBER SHOWCASE

2014

C

By KRISTINA HACKER

rystal Stapleton founded Balanced Books in 2014 with one goal in mind — to help clients achieve bookkeeping freedom. She has achieved that and much more in the past six years, taking advantage of advancements in technology and helping clients focus on profit generation while Balanced Books keeps the accounting in order.

do, but do and how it’s important to make bookkeeping deadlines and stick to them. “A lot of times (new business owners) think they can do it themselves, but they don’t carve out the time for it,” Stapleton said about bookkeeping for small businesses. This will not be the first time that Balanced Books, LLP has given back to the community. The company offers special programs for nonprofits and sponsor local philanthropic organizations including Advancing Children of Turlock (ACT) and Letters to Santa Charity. Stapleton is also an active member of the Turlock Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors.  To learn more about Balanced Books, LLP visit getbalancedbooks. com or call 209-634-4099.

Stapleton partnered with Wahl, Willemse & Wilson, CPAs, LLP to form Balanced Books, LLP in 2015. This partnership allows clients more access to financial expertise, including tax preparation. Stapleton and her Balanced Books, LLP team have drastically streamlined bookkeeping processes over the last couple of years due to advancements in technology and the movement toward cloudbased accounting programs, such as QuickBooks Online. In recent years, they’ve also benefited from process automations and adapting to a paperless bookkeeping system. Balanced Books, LLP works closely with clients to make sure they are in compliance with all rules, regulations and deadlines. This service has been highlighted recently with many of Balanced Books, LLP’s clients taking advantage of the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) through the Small Business Administration, which provides a loan for small businesses to keep workers on the payroll during the coronavirus pandemic. Stapleton said she and her team have been keeping on top of all the requirements for these loans, which hasn’t been easy as the regulations change daily. “Every day it’s something new,” Stapleton said. “We watch out for you. Every client who wanted a PPP, got a PPP. We made sure everybody was covered.” In the coming months, Stapleton will be sharing some of her knowledge through a Valley Sierra Small Business Development Center class, “Bookkeeping Bootcamp.” In the course she will share some bookkeeping ‘do’s’ and ‘don’ts,’ things people don’t think they need to BUSINESS NEWS

Senior living, with promise. To learn more, call (877) 364-1459 or visit CovLivingTurlock.org.

Covenant Living is a ministry of the Evangelical Covenant Church. RCFE License #500301453 COA #133

16

SUMMER 2020


MEMBER SHOWCASE

Grocery returns to Turlock Town Center

T

he revitalization of the Turlock Town Center is nearly complete as its newest tenant, Smart & Final Extra!, held a grand opening in June. Things began to move and shake in the Golden State Boulevard shopping center two years ago, when owner Gary Pinkston of Meridian Pacific purchased both Rite Aid as well as the rest of TTC. Pinkston specializes in purchasing older shopping centers and sprucing them up with updated exteriors and modern retailers in order to meet the needs of the surrounding community. He’s done just that with TTC, shifting things around to build a brand-new Rite Aid and open a much-needed grocery store in the area. “When Turlock Town Center was in its inception 25 or 30 years ago, it was a very vibrant shopping center with Albertsons and Rite Aid as the anchor tenants. Then, as often happens, there was a move out of the anchor tenant Albertsons,” Pinkston said. “So, the shopping center has probably run at about 50 percent of its capacity in sales for the past 15 years.” In order to increase TTC’s value, Pinkt-

2020

son spent tens of thousands of dollars on improvements to the center’s landscaping and other aesthetics before enticing Smart & Final Extra! to move in. The store combines the high-quality, fresh produce of a farmer’s market, the low prices of a discount grocer and the large club size products of the company’s traditional stores and is moving into Rite Aid’s former space. Rite Aid has downsized into a smaller, but newer location where Goodwill, Klassy Kuts and Rainbow Fabrics used to be. The three businesses in turn moved to the north end of the center by Jura’s Pizza Parlor and where Popeye’s Louisiana Chicken will soon open. Pinkston could not confirm the additional fast food restaurant for the space, but plans

By ANGELINA MARTIN

on the City of Turlock’s website show that McDonald’s is planning to open another location in the TTC. Pinkston believes the new anchor and exterior improvements, in addition to the other number of small businesses the center has attracted over the last two years, will double retail sales activity in the shopping center. Now, residents on the same side of town as the TTC won’t have to drive to other shopping centers that are further away from their home in order to get the essentials. “What we find particularly in Central California is that there are residential areas which were initially well-served with modern retail, then more growth happens...everyone wants to dance with the new girl at the party,” Pinkston said, referring to newer shopping centers on the north side of town. “Now people don’t have to drive as far. We’ve got the services right in the middle of town now.” With the grand “reopening” of the TTC, Pinkston hopes to see the community view the center as a vital piece of the community, whether that means hosting an event in the parking lot or utilizing “pick up” spaces during the coronavirus pandemic. 

HELPING VALLEY BUSINESS GROW

Dianna Bettencourt Branch Manager Turlock 633.2867

Mike Garcia Commercial Lending 343.7607

Call Us About Your Next Project Today! At OVCB, we’re committed to supporting the borrowing needs of the communities we serve.

Victoria Gaffney Commercial Lending 343.7601

Rafael Martinez Commercial Lending 633.2859

241 West Main Street • www.ovcb.com BUSINESS NEWS

17

SUMMER 2020


SAFETY

BE INFORMED:

Cal/OSHA regulations

OUTDOOR HEAT ILLNESS REGULATION California employers are required to take these four steps to prevent heat illness:

•  Train all employees and supervisors about heat illness prevention. Provide enough fresh water so that each employee can drink at least 1 quart per •  hour, or four 8-ounce glasses, of water per hour and encourage them to do so.

Provide access to shade and encourage employees to take a cool-down rest in • 

the shade for at least 5 minutes. They should not wait until they feel sick to cool down.

Develop and implement written procedures for complying with the Cal/OSHA •  Heat Illness Prevention Standard.

When temperatures reach 95 degrees or above, the employer must ensure that the employee takes a minimum 10-minute net preventative cool-down rest period every two hours. The preventative cool-down rest period may be provided concurrently with any other meal or rest period required by Industrial Welfare Commission Order No. 14 (8 CCR 11140) if the timing of the preventative cool-down rest period coincides with a required meal or rest period thus resulting in no additional preventative cool-down rest period required in an eight hour workday. If the workday will extend beyond eight hours, then an additional preventative cool-down rest period will be required at the conclusion of the eighth hour of work; and if the workday extends beyond 10 hours, then another preventative cool-down rest period will be required at the conclusion of the tenth hour and so on.

Greg Harrison, Warehouse Manager (209) 656-5301 • Fax (209) 656-5322 w782mgr@costco.com www.costco.com 2955 N. Tegner, Turlock BUSINESS NEWS

18

SUMMER 2020


SAFETY

OUTDOOR AGRICULTURAL OPERATIONS DURING HOURS OF DARKNESS STANDARD The new Outdoor Agricultural Operations During Hours of Darkness standard (Sections 3441 and 3449, or “Outdoor Ag Lighting Reg”) will be going into effect soon. In 2019, the Standards Board passed the Outdoor Ag Lighting Reg, effective on July 1, 2020. When in effect, the Outdoor Ag Lighting Reg will require that if agricultural work is taking place before sunrise or after sunset, the employer must provide specified lighting across the workspaces, rest areas and maintenance areas, among others. A table of different lighting intensity and height requirements for different areas is provided in Section 3449, which is the center of the regulation. Though many employers are already doing this, for some agricultural employers, compliance will require the purchase or rental of new generators and new lighting equipment — which could get costly and scarce. As to the employers who are covered — it will hit any agricultural employers working in post-sunset and pre-sunset hours. That includes more crops than you might expect, including among others, such staples as wine grapes, tomatoes, onions, garlic, melons and corn. Usually, they’re harvested during the early morning or early evening in order to keep workers out of the heat and improve the crop.

WILDFIRE SMOKE PROTECTION REGULATION With exceptions, emergency regulation section 5141.1, Protection from Wildfire Smoke, applies to workplaces and operations where the current Air Quality Index (AQI) for PM2.5 particulate is 151 or greater ("unhealthy") and where the employer should reasonably anticipate that employees may be exposed to wildfire smoke. The regulation requires employers to determine employee exposure to PM2.5 for worksites covered by this section, before each shift and periodically thereafter as needed. Employers must take the following measures to protect workers when the current AQI is 151 or greater: Implement a system for communicating wildfire smoke hazards in a form readily • 

understandable by all affected employees, including provisions designed to encourage employees to inform the employer of wildfire smoke hazards without fear of reprisal.

Implement engineering controls, when feasible, to reduce employee exposure to •  PM2.5 to less than a current AQI of 151 (or as low as feasible if less than a current AQI of 151 cannot be achieved). Examples include providing enclosed structures or vehicles for employees to work in, where the air is filtered.

Whenever engineering controls are not feasible or do not reduce employee • 

exposures to PM2.5 to less than a current AQI of 151, implement changes to work procedures or schedules when practicable. Examples include changing the location where employees work or their work schedules.

Provide proper respiratory protection equipment, such as disposable filtering facepiece respirators (dust masks), other half •  facepiece respirators, or full facepiece respirators.

The employer must provide respirators for employee use on a voluntary basis when the current AQI for PM2.5 is equal to or • 

greater than 150 but less than 500. The employer must require employees to use respirators when the current AQI for PM2.5 is greater than 500.

If the current AQI is less than 151, the employer may provide filtering facepiece respirators (dust masks) to employees or allow employees to bring their own. More information on the regulations is available at Cal/OSHA website, dir.ca.gov.

BUSINESS NEWS

19

SUMMER 2020


SCOREBOARDS

DISTRICT 4 BECKY ARELLANO

DISTRICT 3 ANDREW NOSRATI

DISTRICT 2 GIL ESQUER

COUNCIL AGENDA ITEM

DISTRICT 1 NICOLE LARSON

MEETING

MAYOR AMY BUBLAK

TURLOCK CITY COUNCIL VOTING RECORD

N Y Y Y Y

1.

1/14/20 APPROVING THE REGIONAL SURFACE WATER SUPPLY PHASE 3 PROJECT DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION FUNDING.

2.

1/28/20 ADJUSTING THE MEETING SCHEDULE OF THE PARKS, ARTS AND RECREATION COMMISSION TO A QUARTERLY BASIS.

3.

2/11/20 AMENDING THE TURLOCK MUNICIPAL CODE TO PERMIT CANNABIS USES IN N Y Y Y Y THE WESTSIDE INDUSTRIAL SPECIFIC PLAN.

4.

2/11/20 IMPLEMENTING THE CITY OF TURLOCK’S LAST, BEST AND FINAL OFFER TO THE TURLOCK ASSOCIATED POLICE OFFICERS AND TURLOCK FIREFIGHTERS LOCAL #2434.

5.

3/10/20 GRANTING A CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT TO FIRE HOUSE DISPENSARY TO OPEN AT 1601 WEST MAIN STREET.

N

Y Y Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

DISTRICT 5 JIM DEMARTINI

DISTRICT 4 TOM BERRYHILL

DISTRICT 3 TERRY WITHROW

BOARD AGENDA ITEM

DISTRICT 2 VITO CHIESA

MEETING

DISTRICT 1 KRISTIN OLSEN

STAN. CO. BOARD OF SUPERVISORS VOTING RECORD

1.

3/31/20 APPROVING A RESOLUTION EXERCISING THE COUNTY’S POLICE POWER TO IMPOSE SUSTENTATIVE LIMITATIONS ON RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL EVICTIONS THROUGH MAY 31, 2020, IN RESPONSE TO THE NOVEL CORONAVIRUS EMERGENCY.

Y Y Y Y N

2.

4/7/20 ESTABLISHING A SMALL BUSINESS RELIEF PROGRAM TO PROVIDE A MICRO GRANT PROGRAM TO QUALIFIED SMALL BUSINESSES.

Y Y Y Y Y

3.

5/5/20 ADDED A NEW CLASSIFICATION OF SENIOR MEDICAL INVESTIGATOR.

Y Y Y Y Y

BUSINESS NEWS

20

SUMMER 2020


AGENDA ITEM 1.

AB 257

SOLID WASTE: WOODY BIOMASS: COLLECTION AND CONVERSION

ASSEMBLYMAN FLORA

SENATOR BORGEAS

STATE LEGISLATURE VOTING RECORD

N/A Y

WOULD CREATE A 5-YEAR WOODY BIOMASS RURAL COUNTY COLLECTION AND DISPOSAL PILOT PROGRAM, TO BE ADMINISTERED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF RESOURCES RECYCLING AND RECOVERY, CONSISTING OF AWARDING FUNDING TO PARTICIPATING COUNTIES WITH A TOTAL POPULATION OF LESS THAN 250,000 FOR THE PURPOSE OF CONDUCTING COMMUNITY COLLECTION DAYS AT WHICH INDIVIDUALS CAN DISPOSE OF WOODY BIOMASS FREE OF CHARGE. THE BILL WOULD REQUIRE A COUNTY AWARDED FUNDING UNDER THE PROGRAM TO CONTRACT WITH A LOCAL BIOMASS CONVERSION FACILITY TO COLLECT AND DISPOSE OF CONVERT THE BIOMASS IN A WAY THAT RESULTS IN FEWER GREENHOUSE GASES EMITTED THAN IF THE BIOMASS HAD BEEN DISPOSED.

2.

AB 417 AGRICULTURE AND RURAL PROSPERITY ACT WOULD AUTHORIZE THE SECRETARY OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE TO CREATE WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE FUND THE RURAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ACCOUNT, CONSISTING OF PUBLIC AND PRIVATE MONEYS THAT ARE DEPOSITED IN THE ACCOUNT, AND WOULD MAKE MONEYS IN THE ACCOUNT AVAILABLE, UPON APPROPRIATION BY THE LEGISLATURE, TO CARRY OUT VARIOUS ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT RURAL COMMUNITIES AND FURTHER THE DEVELOPMENT OF RURAL AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIES IN CALIFORNIA, INCLUDING, AMONG OTHER THINGS, CONSULTING WITH GOVERNMENT AGENCIES AND MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTORS TO IDENTIFY OPPORTUNITIES AND PARTNERSHIPS TO FURTHER THE DEVELOPMENT OF RURAL AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIES, AND DISSEMINATING INFORMATION ON THE DEPARTMENT’S INTERNET WEBSITE.

3.

AB 1195

C ALIFORNIA GLOBAL WARMING SOLUTIONS ACT OF 2006: LOW-CARBON FUEL STANDARD REGULATIONS

Y Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

WOULD REQUIRE THE STATE AIR RESOURCES BOARD, THROUGH A PUBLIC PROCESS, TO CONSIDER BEFORE JAN. 1, 2023, ALLOWING RENEWABLE NATURAL GAS OR BIOGAS THAT IS DELIVERED VIA A COMMON CARRIER PIPELINE TO A CRUDE OIL PRODUCTION OR TRANSPORT FACILITY FROM A SOURCE THAT THE STATE BOARD DETERMINES DIRECTLY REDUCES EMISSIONS OF METHANE IN THE STATE TO GENERATE SPECIFIED CREDITS UNDER THE LOW-CARBON FUEL STANDARD REGULATIONS.

4.

AB 1564 CONSUMER PRIVACY: CONSUMER REQUEST FOR DISCLOSURE METHODS WOULD PROVIDE THAT A BUSINESS THAT OPERATES EXCLUSIVELY ONLINE AND HAS A DIRECT RELATIONSHIP WITH A CONSUMER FROM WHOM IT COLLECTS PERSONAL INFORMATION IS ONLY REQUIRED TO PROVIDE AN EMAIL ADDRESS FOR SUBMITTING REQUESTS FOR INFORMATION REQUIRED TO BE DISCLOSED, AS SPECIFIED. THE BILL WOULD, IF THE BUSINESS MAINTAINS AN INTERNET WEBSITE, REQUIRE THE BUSINESS TO MAKE THE INTERNET WEBSITE ADDRESS AVAILABLE TO CONSUMERS TO SUBMIT REQUESTS FOR INFORMATION REQUIRED TO BE DISCLOSED, AS SPECIFIED. BUSINESS NEWS

21

SUMMER 2020


CHAMBER

The Turlock Chamber of Commerce would like to recognize businesses that have been members for 50+ years!

We thank you for your continued support! 50 Years Gemperle Family Farms Stanislaus County Fairgrounds Western Valley Insurance

62 Years Smith Chevrolet Cadillac, Inc. 66 Years Garton Tractor, Inc.

51 Years Wally Falke’s Heating & Air Conditioning

68 Years Allen Mortuary Woods Furniture, Inc.

52 Years AAA Bonander Buick GMC

69 Years Kirkes Electric, Inc.

53 Years Turlock Unified School District

70 Years Thorsens-Norquist Inc. Turlock Fruit Company Turlock Journal Turlock Sales Yard

54 Years Emanual Medical Center 60 Years United Equipment Sales/Rentals

The Turlock Chamber of Commerce would like to welcome our new 2020 members!

The world is

Kaitlyn & Ashlee's Kitchen, Inc.

Your business should be, too.

Smart & Final Thank you for supporting your Business News magazine and for being a Chamber Member since: Emanuel Medical Center. . . . . . 1966

Brenda Athletic. . . . . . . . . . . . 2005

Smith Chevrolet Cadillac . . . . . . 1958

Covenant Living . . . . . . . . . . . 1977

Turlock Auto Plaza. . . . . . . . . . 1993

Costco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000

Balanced Books, LLP. . . . . . . . . 2014

Turlock Journal. . . . . . . . . . . . 1950

Oak Valley Community Bank. . . . 2003

Allen Mortuary. . . . . . . . . . . . 1970

209BUSINESSJOURNAL.COM

MNC Digital Services

New website coming soon.

Keeping businesses connected.

BUSINESS NEWS

22

SUMMER 2020


Fashion Travel Destinations Book Reviews Historical Places Trends

@209magazine We’ve got the 209 covered. 2 0 9 M A G A Z I N E . C O M BUSINESS NEWS

23

SUMMER 2020


i ng t a e br a r s l e C 8 Ye 6

Profile for 209 Multimedia Publications

Business News 42  

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