Issuu on Google+


“Daddy Like.” Available e du d al-vie i w ente ertaiinmentt ce c nter1 and lounge seating.2 Let the games begin.

16.4” LCD screen

94º ottoman2

The Sienna Minivan. Daddy Like. Search Sienna on Facebook and YouTube

Options shown. YouTube and the YouTube logo are trademarks of Google Inc. Facebook is a registered trademark of Facebook, Inc. 1A separate DVD player or compatible game system utilizing the center console’s video/audio inputs is required in order to use the split-screen function. 2Do not use the ottoman feature when the vehicle is in motion. See your Owner’s Manual and supplemental seat information tag for more information. ©2010 Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc.

toyota.com/sienna


Our Notes:

In this Issue DEPARTMENTS

Notes from the Publishers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Chairman’s Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 TACC Board of Directors & Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Chamber Exec’s Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

RETAIL & PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

Helping Retailers, Consumers & the Environment . . . . . . . 6 We Are Heroes to Business Owners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Sam’s Club: A Culture of Giving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Parties are Better on the Waterfront . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Don’t Take Privacy & Security for Granted . . . . . . . . . . .10 The Y: Ensuring a Brighter Future for Our Community . . .12 Alternatives to Reduction in Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Building Brands that Sell and Increase Revenue . . . . . . . . .15 Welcome to Costco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Malaga Bank: Meeting the Needs of Busy Professionals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Planning for Your Future with the Proper CPA Team . . . . .18 Elder Mediation in a Not so Perfect World . . . . . . . . . . .19 Landi Renzo Opens USA Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Recent Developments Affecting Businesses . . . . . . . . . .21 Saving Money at Your Company Holiday Party. . . . . . . .23

FROM CONGRESS

The Long Road Back to Economic Health . . . . . . . . . . . .24

FROM THE CIT Y OF TORRANCE

Redevelopment of Del Amo Fashion Center . . . . . . . . . .25 SHOP TORRANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26

FROM TORRANCE UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT SAVE OUR SCHOOLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 TUESDAYS FOR TUSD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27

CHAMBER NEWS Congresswoman Jane Harman & TACC . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27

RIBBON CUTTINGS/CELEBRATIONS

Torrance Businesses Celebrate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28-29

CHAMBER EVENTS

Wine and Food Festival at Honda for TMMC . . . . . . . . .28 TACC and Redondo Chamber Members Mixer . . . . . . . 29

This issue of TM gave us the opportunity to interact with a number of fabulous retailers and business professionals, all of whom were happy to share their insight into ways they can help fellow businesses and consumers. We have articles Sue Moylan and Pat Sandt, submitted from small organizaGreen Ink Marketing tions, all the way to national and multinational. We had an opportunity to welcome companies such as Landi Renzo USA who converts traditional automobile fuel systems into eco-friendly ones, and Flipswap that works with retailers creating ecological and financial incentives through electronic trade-ins. We connected with our retail giant friends at Sam’s Club and Costco who have a thing or two to share about retail success, and we introduced the membership to a number of professionals whose advise can influence our businesses and well-being. As co-publishers of Torrance Magazine, we are always looking at ways to empower Torrance Chamber members. We are happy to work with advertisers and article submissions to give local businesses great visibility. As Marketing professionals, we have also come to see how many local businesses have succeeded by 1) Showing themselves as leaders in writing; 2) Making themselves physically and/or interactively available and present; 3) Providing a great and relevant product, service, and/or experience. Torrance Magazine and the Chamber allow for all of these. Thank you to all who contributed articles and advertisements and shed a light on themselves for our benefit. The January 2011 issue of Torrance Magazine will focus on Leadership and Entrepreneurialship. Be part of it! Advertise! Communicate and Be seen! In addition, the Torrance Chamber offers great networking opportunities for providers of all products and services. Participate in meetings and events and share your expertise…and reap the rewards! —Sue Moylan and Pat Sandt

CHAMBER EVENTS

The 2010-2011 Mentor Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 A Picnic Potluck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Seniors Enjoy a ‘Swingin’ Night on the Town . . . . . . . . .31 Leadership Torrance Line-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31

UPCOMING DEADLINES For the January 2011 Issue: South Bay CEOs and Entrepreneurialship

UPCOMING EVENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32

Article/Advertising Space Reservation: November 19, 2010 Distribution Date: January 4, 2011

CHAMBER HIGHLIGHTS

CONTACT US:

TACC’S Young Professionals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33

NEWS BRIEFS

YMCA’s Volunteer and Recognition Dinner . . . . . . . . . . .33 IDEAL Upholstery & Interiors Marks 50th Anniversary . . . .33 Torrance Memorial Foundation Fund Transfer . . . . . . . .34 PTN 15th Annual Halloween Ball Fundraiser . . . . . . . . .34 Be A Santa To A Senior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Ralphs Supports Providence Little Company of Mary . . . .35 Novas Donate to Torrance Memorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 South Bay Teens Thank South Bay First Responders . . . .35

CHAMBER BENEFITS

How to Get Involved with the TACC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36

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Advertising: See www.torrance-magazine.com or Contact AdSales@Torrance Magazine.com or 310.317.0841 Articles:Pat Sandt, at Submittals@Torrance-Magazine.com or 310.373.2880 General Information/Marketing Services: Sue Moylan, at info@GreenInkMarketing.com or 310.539.2235 TACC Contact: info@TorranceChamber.com or 310.540.5858 The Torrance Magazine focuses on business stories, events, and who’s who profiles that are of interest to Torrance Chamber of Commerce members and others doing business in the South Bay area. The editorial is positive, information-packed, exclusive news: a diverse mix of feature stories on Torrance and South Bay movers and shakers, businesses, events, local industries, government and business economic development strategies and outlooks.


CHAIRMAN’S

MESSAGE

Business Motivated. Community Focused. I am still excited that, as a chamber, we are moving in the right direction in serving our members and our community! In the first few months of this fiscal year, the executive board and the board of directors have “rolled up their sleeves” and begun to work on making our programs and events stronger and better for our membership and prospective members. Our first “After Hours” Mixer with the Redondo Beach Chamber was a huge success at the Torrance Doubletree Hotel with over 150 business people in attendance. It was about networking and having a good time – it’s nice to work and collaborate with other chambers in our region. The 24th Annual Gourmet Food and Wine Festival at Honda was a fabulous event! I really enjoyed working on the event committee with hard working people from Honda, Torrance Memorial Medical Center, and our own chamber members. All the hard work from the committee and the many volunteers made this Festival a night to remember. I can’t wait until next year’s silver jubilee! In the next couple months, we are hosting some very important events. Coming on October 18th, the Torrance Chamber will once again have Congresswoman Jane Harman give her “State of the Region” address at our annual luncheon. I have worked closely with Congresswoman Harman on business issues over the years and she has been a wonderful representative for Torrance and the other cities in her district. In November we have two outstanding events – we will be partnering with the City of Torrance in a Torrance Area Job Fair and we will be working with the Japanese Business Association (JBA) on the Torrance/Japan Business Reception. Doing a job fair in our community and finding someone a job is so vital in today’s economy. With unemployment still on the rise, we as chamber need to be proactive and work with our members and our city to get those out of work a job, and partnering with the city, we are

MARK WARONEK 2010-2011 TACC Chairman of the Board

doing that. The Torrance/Japan Business Reception is another opportunity to engage our members with a thriving business association (JBA). The event will be a little different this year so please join us as we continue our strong relationship with the JBA. The Chamber is embarking on a new relationship with the Torrance Business Improvement District (TBID) which will be housed in the Torrance Chamber office. The chamber will be working closely with the TBID on events, programs and other opportunities. Again, it’s time for you to join a committee or Leadership Torrance, attend a networking at noon lunch or mixer, be present at an event or block party. Come by, visit the chamber, and be a part of something special – you are a member of the Torrance Chamber of Commerce. I want us all to be “Business Motivated. Community Focused.”

The Chamber is embarking on a new relationship with the Torrance Business Improvement District (TBID) which will be housed in the Torrance Chamber office.

Correction: Torrance Magazine apologizes for misspelling our Chairman’s last name in the last issue. Please make note of the correct spelling. TO R R A N C E M A G A Z I N E

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TACC Board of Directors and Staff 2010-2011

Michael Goguen Edward Jones Investments

Chairman of the Board Mark Waronek Ek & Ek

Michael Herrera Boys and Girls Clubs of the South Bay

Executive Board of Directors

Michael Hunn Providence Little Company of Mary

Chairman Elect Tara O’Brien Kaiser Permanente President and CEO Donna Duperron Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce Immediate Past Chair Dan Keeton Torrance Community Church of the Nazarene Vice Chair Finances Carlos Seraphim Citibank FSB

Robert Katherman Water Replenishment District of Southern California Alex Kim Field Deputy, Governor Schwarzeneggeer Rebekah Kim Field Deputy, Congresswoman Jane Harman Craig Leach Torrance Memorial Medical Center

Vice Chair Government Affairs Charles Gale Jr. Metropolitan Water District of So. Cal. Vice Chair of Internal Operations Jerry Say LandPoint Corporation

Marcella Low Southern California Gas Co. Dr. George Mannon TUSD Superintendent of Schools Mike Molina Los Angeles World Airports

Vice Chair of Membership Aaron Aalcides Malaga Bank

Sue Moylan Crest Marketing, Inc. Steven Napolitano Field Deputy, Supervisor Don Knabe

Vice Chair Education Foundation Sherry Kramer Continental Development

Max Ocansey Exxon Mobil Corporation

Vice Chair of Diversity Programs Liz Seong The Real Estate Group

Melissa Ramoso Field Deputy, Assemblymember Ted Lieu

Vice Chair of Community Affairs Linda Amato Doubletree Hotel Torrance/South Bay

Pam Ryan Torrance Marriott Pat Sandt Green Ink Marketing

Vice Chair of Programs Heidi Cunningham Kelly Services General Counsel Karl Schmidt Parker, Milliken, Clark, O’Hara & Samuelian

Dan Thomas TelePacific Communications / PhonBiz.com Richard Tsao New Century Properties & Investments Tracy Underwood Toyota Motor Sales USA, Inc.

2010-2011

Sharon Weissman Field Deputy, Senator Jenny Oropeza

Board of Directors Joe Ahn Northrup Grumman Aerospace Systems Karin Baker American Honda Motor Company, Inc. Scott Easterday Outback Steakhouse

Mary Giordano Assistant City Manager, City of Torrance

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Donna Duperron President and CEO Koko Kurakake Administrative Assistant

Judy Gibson Strategic Technology Sources

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About Torrance Magazine Torrance (ISSN #0194-5491) Published by the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce with Green Ink Marketing. Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce 3400 Torrance Blvd., Ste 100, Torrance, CA 90503. (310) 540-5858; Green Ink Marketing, Sue Moylan and Pat Sandt, Mailing Address (No Deliveries Accepted): 2785 Pacific Coast Hwy, Ste. 312 Torrance, CA 90505 310.539.2235. Subscription rates: $20.00 per year. E-mail: Info@GreenInkMarketing.com Send address changes to: Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce c/o Torrance Magazine 3400 Torrance Blvd, Suite 100 Torrance, CA 90503 Tel: 310.540.5858 All rights reserved. Trademark. ARTICLES: Torrance Magazine is published quarterly and mailed to TACC members and distributed to selected businesses in the community. The publishers welcome written queries regarding articles for possible publications. Articles are subject to editing and are included on an “as space permits basis” at the discretion of the Publisher, Editors and Editorial Board. ITEMS: Material and photos for inclusion must be received 30 days in advance of the quarterly publication date. Reproduction, in whole or in part without written permission, is prohibited. Photos and articles not returned. DISCLAIMER: All reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in Torrance Magazine. The publisher accepts no responsibility for damage arising directly or as a consequence of the use or publication of inaccurate or missing information. The opinions expressed by contributors are their own, and are not necessarily shared by Torrance Magazine, its staff, TACC, Board of Directors, management or advertisers. Editorial content is intended as general information, and not as specific legal or financial advice; for such, readers are advised to consult professionals in the appropriate field. The Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce and Green Ink Marketing assume no liability resulting from the advertising contained in the publication. Printed on FSC Certified Paper with Soy-Based Inks.


CHAMBER EXEC’S MESSAGE As we begin a new fiscal year with our Chairman’s theme, “Business Motivated. Community Focused.”, we set our sights on the needs of our businesses and working together to create a vibrant community. The Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce has incredible business representatives who have taken on leadership roles as board members, program chairs, and ambassadors to provide outstanding programs, resources, and benefits to our members. By taking advantage of your Chamber membership, you can find new business prospects, locate competitive suppliers, and promote your company both in the City and in the metropolitan area. Visibility, marketing, networking, and advertising are at your fingertips as you read this column, glance through your Chamber Membership Directory, or visit our website www.TorranceChamber.com The chamber has actively pursued several partnerships and other organizations to provide you with opportunities to showcase your business. We would like to highlight a few of the events that have recently taken place. This past August, American Honda Motor Company, hosted the 24th Annual Gourmet Food and Wine Festival “An Evening Under the Stars”, in partnership with the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce. This spectacular event raised an incredible $75,000 for the Torrance Memorial Medical Center. Steve Morikawa, Assistant VicePresident, along with his Corporate Community Relations Department and many other American Honda employees, provided a night to be remembered. Sherry Kramer, Vice Chair of the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce Foundation, is collaborating with Dr. George Mannon, Superintendent of Schools in Torrance, to coordinate a strong Adopt-A-School program. This brings all elements of the community together, and in so doing, provides role models for students, enhances public relations for businesses, assists the educators in expanding and making curriculum relevant to the world of

work, and generally establishes a reciprocal exchange among people in schools and community at large. With the support of the Chamber of Commerce Education Affairs Committee, Adopt-A-School began in 1983, with the adoption of South High School by Excellon Automation. Today, 28 of the 32 TUSD schools have business partners. TACC Chairman, Mark Waronek, Heidi Cunningham, Vice Chair of Programs, and Linda Amato, Vice Chair of Community Affairs, are partnering with Fran Fulton of the City of Torrance Economic Development Department and other organizations to provide a ‘Job Fair’ for residents and employers in the South Bay, on November 4th, at the Toyota Meeting Hall. Karin Baker, Vice Chair of Special Projects, worked along side representatives of Heal the Bay, City of Torrance, and American Honda Motor Co. Inc., to assist in planning the Coastal Cleanup that took place on Saturday, September 25th, at Torrance Beach. The Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce is partnering with the Redondo Beach Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Bureau in providing “After Hours Mixers.” The past three mixers held at the Doubletree Hotel, Seaside Lagoon, and Lucky Strike have averaged 125 attendees each. This past September, TACC, in collaboration with the Redondo Chamber, helped sponsor a Senior Dance at the Doubletree Hotel. Music was provided by the Beach Cities Swing Band. It was a huge success and very much appreciated by the seniors of the area. We hope this may be an example to other communities as well. This past September, TACC, in collaboration with the Redondo Chamber, helped sponsor a Senior Dance at the Doubletree Hotel. Music was provided by the Beach Cities Swing Band. It was a huge success and very much appreciated by the senior citizens of the area. It is our hope that doing this will convince other communities to provide this event as well.

DONNA DUPERRON President and CEO Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce

Now, more than ever, and especially in California, a Chamber of Commerce can ‘make a difference’ in their community. The Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce sends a message that “we are a leading business organization in the South Bay, and we will be an aggressive, independent advocate of business interests exercising its influence with government, business, and the community to ensure economic growth and vitality.”

CO N TAC T I N F O R M AT I O N Tech Pros Technology Professionals of Torrance Dan Thomas - danthomas@telepacific.com

PROFS Professional Round Table of Financial Services Jeff Wolfe - jwolfe4000@yahoo.com

Young Professionals For the young entrepreneur getting started Josh Thomas Joshua.thomas@homeinstead.com or Eric Takaki - eric@pelican-signs.com

HR Professionals Human Resources Professionals of Torrance Heidi Cunningham cunniha@kellyservices.com

Ambassadors Mentoring new chamber members Theresa Stanberry stanberrylaundry@yahoo.com

Networking at Noon Our most popular networking lunches TACC - info@torrancechamber.com

GAP Government Affairs Policy Group Charles Gale Jr. - cgalej@mwdh2o.com

To maximize your exposure in the community, or, to request more information, Green Torrance Committee call the Chamber at (310)540-5858. We will personally meet with you to create a Pat Sandt - Pat@GreenInkMarketing.com customized plan to help your business train for success. We want you to succeed and we are able to provide the tools to help you do just that! TO R R A N C E M A G A Z I N E O C TO B E R 2 0 1 0

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Helping Retailers, Consumers, and the Environment Based in Torrance, Flipswap is the global leader in managing consumer electronics buyback programs at retail. Flipswap is a technology enabled service company that helps retailers and consumers extend the life of their recently used products and at the same time get paid to do so. Flipswap manages over two million buyback transactions per year at over 10,000 locations in North America, Europe and South Africa. The company’s mission is to “Empower a world of sustainable consumer electronics” with the goal of making the trade-in/buyback process an easy and expected part of any retail transactions. With roots in the cellphone industry, Flipswap initially only managed cell phone buyback programs. Recently, they have found the requirement to support retailers desiring to compensate consumers for a broader set of electronics categories to include cellphones, e-readers, cameras, games, GPS devices, laptops and more. Flipswap has a menu of offerings for network operators and retailers. These are:

Flipswap works closely with retail chains network operators throughout the world to 1) help them develop their collection/buyback strategy, and 2) help them optimally monetize and environmentally dispose of collected devices. Flipswap provides their customers with a flexible and compliant approach to delivering advanced buyback programs which can return the products to the retailer for refresh/resale, to be sold-off to secondary markets, to be disposed of in a landfill-free manner or combinations of models that can vary by collection category. As a green partner, Flipswap ensures their customers that products collected are cleared of data and disposed of in a compliant manner that ensures landfill avoidance. Additionally, Flipswap provides key Green metrics relating to units/tons/ models of products collected that enable the retailer to establish and measure consumer electronics sustainability goals. We are happy to welcome Flipswap as a new TACC member. For more information, please contact www.flipswap.com

Retail Services – utilizing buyback programs to drive incremental sales. Post-Sales Services – utilizing buyback to recapture “residual value” and utilize recaptured products to drive warranty/ replacement programs. Green Services – helping consumer electronics retailers get actionable data and metrics relating to their sustainability goals/objectives.

Flipswap’s mission is to “Empower a world of sustainable consumer electronics” with the goal of making the trade-in/buyback process an easy and expected part of any retail transactions. 6

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We Are Heroes to Business Owners Companies today are faced with challenges that never could have been foreseen. The economy has wreaked havoc on everything from production, employment, and plunging retirement accounts. Add to that the desire for a good retirement, coupled with large losses in 401(k) plan accounts, and there are a lot of things to keep everyone up at night. Now is the time to take a step back from the tactics of survival, and bring retirement plans into the boardroom. A good retirement plan can be multifaceted, including the opportunity to attract and retain key personnel. Businesses large and small need to consider potential changes facing their owners or employees. Now is the time to consider the future and whether the retirement plan currently in place will work.

Small/Medium Business: • Are there children who are hoping to take over the business? • Are there associates who may become partners? • Is there enough money for the owner to be looking at retirement?

Depending upon age and demographics of a business, there are allocation methods in a retirement plan that will give the owners a larger share of a company contribution. There are plans that will allow them to make up the loss realized in their 401(k) plans with deductible dollars. These are areas to explore, for the businesses, and their families. Business owners’ jobs are to work hard at their business and do what they do best – make money. They need to surround themselves with advisors who will circle the wagons and help them achieve their dreams.

TOBI COGSWELL is the Director of Consulting Practice at Actuarial Consultants, Inc. For over 25 years, ACI’s Actuaries, Consultants, and Plan Administrators have been

Now is the time to take a step back from the tactics of survival, and bring retirement plans into the boardroom.

designing retirement plans that meet clients’ dreams. They are certified by the Centre for Fiduciary Excellence (CEFEX). Tobi can be reached at www.ACIbenefits.com or at 310.212.2600

All Businesses: • Are there missing statutory amendments, signed amendments, or errors in reporting? (these can cause serious sanctions) • Are all employees being properly reported? Are distributions for terminated participants accounted for? A good financial advisor who stays close to the client can make sure they know their client’s big-picture desires for the future. A good CPA will work hard to keep them on the right track. The right retirement plan can help them meet their goals for their life.

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A Culture of Giving: Promoting People and Communities When “Mr. Sam” Walton and Helen Walton started the Wal-Mart Corporation, they had visions of a membership warehouse to serve the needs of small businesses. In 1983 they opened their first Sam’s Club. The Waltons knew early on that community involvement is an essential component to success in a demographic area. It was Helen Walton who suggested Wal-Mart give back to those who helped the company become so successful. From her cavalier way of thinking, the company instituted a profit sharing program and benefit packages to give back to their associates and a community grant program to give back to non-profit associations within the community. The Waltons established a “Culture of Giving” within the company. As such, Sam’s Clubs across the nation participate in campaigns for the United Way, the American Heart Association, and the American Cancer Association. On a community level, all Sam’s Clubs have fundraisers for the Children’s Miracle Network. All funds raised for CMN go directly to the Club’s closest Children’s Hospital. For the Torrance location, all funds go to the Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles. The Waltons knew that giving back to the community would foster a strong bond between the Club and the community. The Torrance Club has been successful since 1994 because of

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the close relationship they have created with the community through local grants and volunteerism. Jason Okutsu (shown below top left) is the Club Manager of the Torrance location. He is the epitome of how hard work can move you up the corporate ladder. Jason started his Sam’s Club career at our Gardena location in 2001 as a part time cashier. Within 6 months, Jason assumed a supervisor position. He then went to the Long Beach location as a supervisor where he was quickly promoted into the Management In Training Program. In 2004 Jason came to the Torrance Sam’s Club as a management trainee and stayed to become a permanent manager at the club. Jason transferred to the Santa Clarita Sam’s Club in 2006, within 2 years he was promoted to Club Manager of the Fresno Sam’s Club where he received Club of the Year in 2009. Jason was highly committed to community involvement in Fresno and he attributes his success to his close bond with the city. As many things in life come full circle, Jason is now back at the Torrance Sam’s Club as the Club Manager. Sam’s Club Membership offers you savings on exclusive merchandise and outstanding Member Services. The Torrance Sam’s Club is located at 2601 Skypark Drive. Visit SamsClub.com for more information.

Jason Okutsu Store Manager

Sarah Yoshiyama Operations Manager

Javaid Farooqi Truckload Manager

Steve Buckland Marketing Manager

Neil Nitta Asset Protection Mgr.

Larry Haney Overnight’s Manager

Mona Liebsack Optical Manager

Nor Chiechin Hardlines Manager

Octavio Diaz Meat, Produce & Bakery Mgr.

Raul Razo Grocery Manager

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It’s Just Better...

On the Waterfront! Yes, the time is upon us to start considering Holiday iday 2010! 2010! $QGLWLVDYHU\JRRGWKLQJWRKDYHWZR´7ULHG DQG G 7UXHµ G 7UXXHµ ZLQQHUV DW \RXU GLVSRVDO )URP WKH WUDGLWLRQDO WRR WK WKH KH Waterfront ate terffro ront ntt XQLTXH IURP D SDUW\ RI  WR   Ports O’ Call Wa IRU RU \RRX Dining DQG Spirit CruisesKDVDFHOHEUDWLRQSODQIRU\RX LQ\RXUEXGJHWZLWKDQDVWRXQGLQJQXPEHURISDFNDJHV SDFNDJ JHV DQG RSWLRQV DYDLODEOH WR FKRRVH IURP 12: 6R ZKDWW DUH \RX ZDLWLQJ IRU" /HW WKH IXQ EHJLQ«

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Whether by land or by sea, let the idyllic ambiance of the magnificent waterfront create an experience that is sure to delight you and your guests this holiday season.

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Don’t Take Privacy & Security for Granted In this day and age it is easy for us to assume that there are safeguards in place to protect us from on-line threats. In reality, the threats to our security are getting more sophisticated and require us to be even more vigilant and informed. Many people know all too well the many viruses and malware that affect many PC users. In fact, one of the main reasons I purchased my first Mac was because I was getting fed up with viruses. Personally, not ever having seen a virus on a Mac has lulled me into a false sense of security. Yesterday, I got a wake-up call that I would like to share. I recently switched my car insurance to save some money. The new company sent me my proof of insurance ID card via email for me to print out. A day or so later another email came, seemingly from the same company. This subsequent email explained there had been a problem with my credit card and registration and that I should follow the link to resubmit everything. This specific attempt to gain sensitive information is called Phishing.

Using my mouse I moved the pointer to the link and let it just sit there for a second. Hovering over a link in this manner will make a small window pop up showing you where you will be taken if you click. I saw right away that it didn’t lead to an insurance company. Feeling suspicious I double checked to see from whom the email originated. It contained the name of my insurance company but not where it should have been; right in front of the .com and not anywhere after it.

The sender used a technique called Spoofing to hide the origin of an email. Scammers use Spoofing to make e-mails appear to be from someone other than the actual sender. In this case, the email actually appeared to come from my insurance company but in fact it came from someone else entirely. I knew exactly what to do. Rather than deleting the email I forwarded it to phishing@insurancecompany.com. By doing this, I alerted my insurance company to the fact that there are active security threats. Forwarding email allows the recipients to examine all the mail transfer agents contained inside the “headers.” They responded shortly thereafter with a thank you letter and within 1 day the website that linked to the fraudulent email was shut down. Christian Quilisch is the MacMall Store Manager, located at 22719 Hawthorne Blvd. If you would like to learn more about security for your business, see a MacMall Associate, or visit www.macmall.com

Etymology: The term phishing is obviously a variant of fishing where would-be computer hackers are fishing for your personal information. The “P” in phishing probably comes from the term phreaking which itself is a combination of the words phone and freak. The computerization of telephone systems is the reason for the association between phreaking and computer hacking.

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Refinery engineers and Torrance students with former astronaut Dr. Bernard Harris (extreme right), at the ExxonMobil Bernard Harris Summer Science Camp.

A Green Summer Summer may be over, but for many Torrance students, this was a summer to remember. Some of them spent it exploring the world of science at a two-week residential camp at the University of Southern California. Others learned valuable skills and received handson mentoring from experienced professionals, as part of a summer jobs program. By learning – and doing – they are getting ready to become tomorrow’s leaders. Supporting local education programs like the ExxonMobil Bernard Harris Summer Science Camp and Green Team is our way of helping them get there. torrancerefinery.com

“Green Team” students tour the refinery in August. Every year, the program gives 45 High School students from Torrance the opportunity to work in city or school district offices.


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The Y: Ensuring a Brighter Future for Our Community When Dick Yen’s doctor told him he needed regular exercise, a friend recommended the Torrance- South Bay YMCA. Five years later, Dick cannot imagine his life without it. Besides three times a week work-outs, Dick also enjoys the meals offered through the Y’s Senior program. And the 83-year-old has been able to share the Y benefits with another generation, his teenage grandson. “When school is out during the summertime, we really enjoy the pool together.” Mr. Yen’s story is just one of many that show how the Y brings families together, strengthening communities in the process. As one of the nation’s largest non-profits, the Y focuses on youth development, healthy living and social responsibility. The Y is accessible to all people, with financial assistance offered

to individuals and families who cannot afford membership or program fees. Bob Shafer has spent 13 years as Executive Director and knows firsthand what a difference the Y makes, “We’re here day in and day out to provide the resources that our community needs. I watch neighbors supporting neighbors. Parents bonding with their kids. Teens and seniors finding a place to belong.” The Y wouldn’t exist without the thousands of volunteers who give their time and talents every day, like Merrietta Fong, past Torrance Area Chamber of

TORRANCE-SOUTH BAY YMCA Choose the membership that supports your community’s well-being At the Y, we exist to strengthen community. Together with people like you, we nurture the potential of kids, help people understand and improve their health, and provide opportunities to give back and support neighbors. So join our cause. And create meaningful change not just for you, but also for your community.

Among our offerings: N N N N N

Child Care Health, Well-being and Fitness Senior Nutrition and Socialization Camp and Youth Leadership Volunteerism

JOIN IN Enjoy a Free 7-Day Pass: www.ymcala.org/PR570

The Y: We're for youth development, healthy living and social responsibility. 2900 W Sepulveda Blvd., Torrance 90505 (P) 310 325 5885 (W) www.ymcala.org/tsb

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Commerce Board Chair and current YMCA Board Member. “I’ve seen the contributions our non-profit organizations bring to our community. It’s vital that we support them however we can.” Beyond the facility walls, the Y experience extends into parks, camps and schools. The Torrance-South Bay YMCA partners with 14 school sites to provide quality child care, reducing fees for families in need. Dr. George Mannon, Torrance Unified School District Superintendent, appreciates the Y as a resource for his students during the California budget crisis. “The hardships of the economic downturn are hitting the education community in devastating ways. However, through the dedicated commitment of stakeholders, like the business community, we have continued to excel, even in these tough times. I am grateful to the YMCA for their ongoing support for the students of TUSD.” The Y is like a second family. Just ask Steve Fechner, President of Surf Management and Torrance-South Bay YMCA Board Chair. “When I was a kid, I bonded with my father in the Guides program. Now that I have 3 kids of my own, this same great program is there to facilitate my bonding with them. I will really miss it when my youngest finally outgrows the program, but fortunately the Y has helped us make memories that will stay with them forever.” To give, join, or volunteer with the Y, please visit www.ymcala.org/tsb


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As Economic Woes Continue: Alternatives to Reductions in Force Reductions in force and normal attrition have allowed employers affected by the recession and slow recovery to maintain some balance between controlling costs and retaining critical skill levels. But even some of these surviving employers are now having to consider (further) reductions in force or alternative means of reducing staffing costs as persistent uncertainty clouds their economic forecasting and inhibits planning.

be affected by a reduction in wages and hours worked. 2) The reduction in wages and hours worked also must be at least 10% (after considering any overtime work on the days when participants do work). 3) The employer must complete and submit a Work Sharing (WS) Unemployment Insurance Application which, if approved, will be effective for six months. 4) The employer must receive a letter of approval from the EDD Special Claims Office, which will include a mail claim packet for each participating employee and a ten week supply of weekly certification forms for each employee (to be issued to employees for each week of reduced hours). The employer and employee then complete the forms and submit the claims by mail.

Where owners and managers of such businesses believe they cannot cut staffing without seriously impairing their long term ability to compete and grow, their alternatives can be constrained by applicable wage and hour laws. For example, such an employer may want to simply reduce all employee hours by 10% to 20% for a several month period to maintain expertise while bringing staffing costs more in line with current revenues. As discussed more fully below, such employees have more flexibility, in fact even state assistance, in doing this with non-exempt employees than with exempt staff.

Through the use of this program an employee who is working a 20% reduced schedule may have almost ? of the income lost made up by unemployment insurance.

KARL SCHMIDT, Attorney Parker, Milliken, Clark, O’Hara & Samuelian

Exempt Employees. When the employer also needs to reduce the expense of its

Non-Exempt Staff. The California Employment Development Department includes among its unemployment insurance programs one for “work sharing” arrangements. This program allows eligible employees who are working part-time to receive a ratable portion of the unemployment insurance which otherwise would be payable if the employees had become totally unemployed. An employer makes its employees eligible for these EDD partial U.I. benefits by structuring its reduction along specified lines and submitting required paperwork to the EDD, generally as follows: 1) A minimum of two employees, comprising at least 10% of the employer’s regular work force or a unit of the work force, must

There are benefits to buying property prior to construction completion: Location, Family Options and Price. Dignity & Tradition •Above ground entombment dates back to the Pyramids, the Taj Mahal, and Tomb of the Unknowns •Always serene, beautifully maintained, and not affected by weather •Clear markings in beautiful natural stone surroundings Affordability •Significant savings when purchased prior to construction completion •Payment terms/credit plans available regardless of credit history •Pricing options available to meet a variety of budgets

Securing for tomorrow at today’s prices.

Life. Wishes. Memories. Honored with one phone call. Pacific Terrace Mausoleum

For tours or arrangements, call (310) 831-0311, or visit www.GreenHillsMemorial.com

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exempt employee staff, it cannot simply reduce hours or have furlough days. This is because an essential aspect of “exempt status” under both state and federal law is that the employee must be paid on a “salary basis.” Underlying this test is the concept that exempt employees are paid for the general value of their services (without regard to the quantity or quality of the work performed) rather than for each hour spent on the job. Thus exempt employees generally must receive full salary for a week in which they perform any work, without regard to the number of days or hours worked. Under this general rule employers may not dock exempt employees for (1) partial work days missed; (2) absences caused by the employer or operating needs of its business where the employee is ready, willing and able to work; and (3) absences during a portion of a workweek resulting from jury duty, attendance as a witness or temporary military duty. Exempt employee salaries can be docked in limited circumstances without invalidating the required “salary” status, such as where an employee is (1) absent from work for a day or more for personal reasons other than sickness or accident, (2) is being penalized in good faith for violation of important safety rules, or (3) is absent for a day or more on account of sickness or disability, if the deduction is made under a bona fide sick or disability plan, policy or practice which provides compensation for loss of salary which would otherwise result.

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It is advisable to consult with competent employment counsel before undertaking any such economy measures, to ensure that all relevant facts and circumstances have been considered and that the desired program is implemented with the least disruption to employee morale.

Where owners and managers of such businesses believe they cannot cut staffing without seriously impairing their long term ability to compete and grow, their alternatives can be constrained by applicable wage and hour laws.

Mr. Schmidt was recently honored by being again included in Los Angeles Magazine’s annual “Super Lawyer” recognition and by his continued inclusion in the publication “The Best Lawyers in America”. He is General Counsel to the Torrance Chamber of

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The employer is left only with the alternative of an overall salary reduction for exempt employees, with or without any expression of interest in or commitment to (a) restore lost salary or (b) reinstate higher salary levels, when economically feasible. While no more popular than furloughs and docked days, salary reductions are lawful absent contrary contractual provisions, and do not jeopardize the exempt status of those affected.

Karl Schmidt has practiced labor and employment law for over 30 years and currently is the Chairman of the Labor & Employment Department of the law firm, Parker, Milliken, Clark, O’Hara & Samuelian.

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portion of a week in order to dock their pay for time missed. These employees would presumably be “ready, willing and able” to work the full schedule and would thus remain entitled to a full week’s pay.

Under this statutory scheme an employer would destroy an exempt employee’s “salary” status if it simply furloughed exempt employees for a

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Commerce, a member of the Board of Directors of Goodwill Industries of Southern California and a 20 year member of the L.A. Rotary Club #5. He regularly lectures both professionals and client audiences on employment law and management topics, including sexual harassment, diversity, privacy, lay-offs and protection of employer confidential information. Karl and his wife Annie have four children and three grandchildren, and live in Rolling Hills. Karl can be reached at

(213) 683-6518, kschmidt@pmcos.com or www.pmcos.com.


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Building Brands that Sell and Increase Revenue How well your customers perceive your store or firm means everything in the race to attract and retain business. Consider how you are currently measuring up to the following four “pillars” towards building a strong foundation or brand: 1. Creating an exceptional client experience • Who are your clients? Ask them! • Focus on their needs and wants, not just your strengths

3. Focusing on expectations; with your clients and your team • Align to your high-value customers, not your organization chart • Create incentives that fulfill the company’s goals and culture, not just pockets 4. The right people focusing on Purpose • Ensure everyone responds to a higher purpose, not just a job description or a status quo

2. Aligning your actions to your business goals: Attracting and retaining business • How would you benefit if you kept focused on the most important things?

Green Ink Marketing focuses on an integrated marketing approach, including coaching, messaging, creative designs, eco-friendly printing, and traditional and online media. To learn more, contact 310.539.2235, 310.373.2880, or www.GreenInkMarketing.com

Green Ink Marketing is a proud sponsor of the Executive Briefing on Wednesday, October 13th, featuring social media expert David Nelson. See page 32 for more information.

Explore the tremendous small business opportunity of becoming a State Farm Insurance Agent. Enjoy the entrepreneurial freedom of running your own office with a stable, highly recognizable organization. B E N E F I TS I N C LU D E : • Start-up allowance • Paid training and licensing • Unlimited earning potential • Opportunity to represent a full range of insurance and financial services products • National marketing, sales and advertising support • Highest retention rate of agents in the industry

We are financially strong and able to take a long term view, keeping our focus on serving our customers, because consumers recognize State Farm’s quality service and relationships, mutual trust, integrity and financial strength.

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Welcome to Costco This is what you should expect to hear when you walk into the Torrance Costco. Since opening in the fall of 1998, the Torrance Costco has grown into one of the busiest Costco locations in the world. If you shop here, this should be no surprise, given the amount of traffic that flows through its parking lot. Thankfully, the employees at the Torrance Costco are also working to provide service that helps to quickly process members so they feel comfortable, welcome, and stress free in such a busy place. What is it that really makes the Torrance Costco so great? Is it the merchandise, the food demos, the prices? If you ask the management team there,

the answer would surely be the individual members that trust them to give consistent pricing on name brand merchandise in a way that other retailers don’t. Our loyal members are truly the lifeblood of Costco. With over 57 million cardholders worldwide to serve, Costco is always grateful to those who take the time to purchase goods, visit our Pharmacy, get their tires rotated, buy a $1.50 Hot Dog and Soda, and so much more. Costco currently has 572 warehouses throughout the world in eight countries. They also have over 150,000 employees. Again, to all of those customers, Costco shouts a big “Thank You!” Currently, the Costco Torrance has expanded its Seasonal selections to include preparations for the holidays of Halloween, Thanksgiving, and Christmas. As many of Costco’s members know, they must shop early for the seasonal items, because you never know when they will run out of the hottest items. If you unfamiliar with Costco, we are located at 2751 Skypark Dr. just West of Crenshaw and just South of Lomita Blvd. Costco is open only to members and offers three types of membership: Business, Gold Star (individual) and the Executive membership. Business members qualify by owning or operating a business, and pay an annual fee ($50 in

the U.S.) to shop for resale, business and personal use. This fee includes a spouse card. Gold Star members pay a $50 annual fee (in the U.S.), and is available to those individuals that do not own a business. This fee includes a free spouse membership. The Company also has a third membership level, called the Executive Membership. In addition to offering all of the usual benefits, it allows members to purchase a variety of discounted consumer services (auto and homeowner insurance, auto buying, event tickets, high-yield savings accounts & CD’s, identity protection, personal check printing, online investing, defensive driving, and/or business services (business phone services, merchant credit card processing, health and dental insurance, payroll processing, check and forms printing, small-business 401(k) plans, small-business web sites ) at substantially reduced rates. Executive Members also receive a 2% annual reward (up to $500) on most of their warehouse purchases. Executive Members pay an annual fee of $100. Please, feel free to call for detailed information on any products, services, or membership by calling Costco Torrance (310) 891-1020 and/or visit www.costco.com for more information. And again, “Welcome to Costco!”

Since opening in the fall of 1998, the Torrance Costco has grown into one of the busiest Costco locations in the world. 16

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Malaga Bank: Meeting the Needs of Busy Professionals Welcome to personalized service, local decision making and direct access to a business banker. Welcome to Malaga Bank. At Malaga Bank, we’ve designed our business banking products and services to meet the needs of today’s busy professional. Some of the perks include easy-to-apply lines of credit, the convenience of Electronic Deposit for Business, and a dedicated business banker that works with you every step of the way.

Bauer Financial and was recently rated the #1 Thrift in the U.S. by SNL Financial, as of March 31, 2010. Personalized service is our passion. We don’t just sell you a business checking account; we partner with you to ensure that the account meets your needs and work with you to help you achieve your financial goals. Malaga Bank, Torrance Branch 25700 Crenshaw Blvd., Torrance, CA 90505

Consider the peace of mind of having a business banking relationship with a Bank that offers the financial strength and success that you count on when running a successful business. Malaga Bank continues to receive a 5 Star rating from

Whether you’re a business professional or a non-profit organization we’re here to get you what you need to succeed!

Stop by any of our 4 branches, conveniently located around the Palos Verdes Peninsula and in South Torrance, or give us a call and we’ll even come to you. Visit www.malagabank.com.

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Planning for Your Future with the Proper CPA Team Waving goodbye to their last child to enter college, Beth and Larry wonder how they are going to manage their finances in conjunction with the needs of Larry’s parents who require more and more personal care. — Fernando looks at the pictures of his family and wonders how much of his life’s work will each of them receive when he passes and who will run the business. — Susanna reflects on her mother’s fall, hospitalization, and long-term care: what are her mother’s financial wishes and what has her mother planned in advance?

The examples left illustrate only three of the infinite situations that families may find themselves in. When plans have been made in advance, some of the difficulties that people endure are just that: endurable, survivable, and livable. Disasters, accidents, and (especially in the current economic climate), unemployment or slow business can all take their toll on a family’s finances across multiple generations. Plan for the future! A significant part of developing a fiscally responsible future begins with basic accounting and business management (if a business exists). The average CPA handles these elements of fiscal planning but sometimes, more is required than a 1040A with extra schedules. Wealth accumula-

tion needs to be discussed, estates need to be considered, and long-term issues need to be resolved. An accounting team, as found in most large accounting firms, can best handle a client needing advice in multiple areas of financial planning. An accounting team allows one-stop shopping for the client: business and personal accounting, consulting, tax planning, estate planning, future retirement, education savings, Social Security, Medicare, working together with your legal representative, and other areas of specialization can all be handled by one firm, but not by one accountant. All businesses and employees have a need for updated skills and knowledge and accounting is no different. The 40 hours per year required by regulatory boards does not actually take into account the mountain of regulations and laws that inundate CPA’s weekly. Suggestions for handling financial issues? If a solo accountant can’t handle the diversity of financial needs, get more players on the team. Be proactive and interview the accounting team. Make certain that the specialists are keeping up with their specialty. Hoping for the best, but planning for the worst: a strategy for succession guarantees dreams for future generations. Zdonek & Wolowicz has been providing a broad range of accounting services to both businesses and individuals for over 30 years, and is the largest privately owned accounting firm in the South Bay community. As a client of Zdonek & Wolowicz, you’ll receive the benefits of big league experience with the heart and soul of home team players. They can be reached at (310) 378-9911 or zw@zwcpa.com.

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Elder Mediation in a Not-So-Perfect World In a perfect world, seniors would be free to make all their own decisions about how best to cope with their current and future needs. But in the real world, when seniors disagree with those who care the most for them about what is right, what is fair, and what they want, conflicts often arise. Elder mediation can help. The process, facilitated by a neutral and highly specialized mediator, promotes communications among concerned people who are unable to resolve their disagreements when conflicts focus on care planning and financial security. Typical elder mediation themes include suitable living arrangements, necessary medical care, proper financial planning, and end-of-life options, avoiding court involvement.

Elder mediation may not always be a proper remedy and, after it has started, the mediator may sometimes need to withdraw. This might occur if the mediator questions whether a particular participant has the capacity to make decisions, has wrongful ulterior motives, or may have been coerced into agreeing to take part. Even if participants are not able to arrive at a consensus, the elder media-

tion process will have been beneficial if their opinions, concerns and empathies have not only been expressed, but are better understood. H.E.L.P. is now offering limited scope mediation services for seniors who, in confronting issues of care planning and financial security, may find themselves at odds with family members or others who care.

For more information, or to schedule a mediation session, call H.E.L.P. at 310533-1996. Esther Epstein, Esq., EMPH, is director of legal programs of H.E.L.P. A nonprofit information, education and counseling center for older adults and families, H.E.L.P. provides impartial information on elder care, law, finances and consumer protection. All services are free or low-cost. More than 90 percent of H.E.L.P.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s funding comes from private donations. To reach H.E.L.P., go to www.help4srs.org or call 310-533-1996.

Elder mediation has become an important alternative to relying on the courts. The mediator â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a neutral person â&#x20AC;&#x201C; tries to provide all participants with the opportunity to express and explain their issues and concerns. By encouraging openness and fairness, the elder mediator strives to empower each participant to better serve the senior whose best interests are at stake. Once mediation has commenced, elder mediators often advise individual participants to consult with geriatric care managers, health care professionals, financial planners, accountants, realtors or attorneys to ensure that expert information is used to clarify a central goal. California law protects everything expressed in mediation with rules of confidentiality. The elder mediator cannot be subpoenaed to testify as a witness in court and, since the process relies on team support, participants may seldom use information obtained through mediation in future legal proceedings to support a point of view. TO R R A N C E M AG A Z I N E

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Landi Renzo Opens USA Operation Landi Renzo, the world’s largest alternative fuel system manufacturer, officially marked its place in Torrance last month at a grand opening celebration of its U.S. office. Originally hailing from Italy, Landi Renzo specializes in the production of clean vehicle technologies, certifying and converting vehicles to eco-friendly alternative fuel systems. Now, it is among the newest members of the Torrance Chamber of Commerce. A global leader in compressed natural gas and propane alternative fuel systems design, installation and service, Landi Renzo executives hope to bring jobs to California and to capitalize on the growing ‘green’ economy in the United States.

Ribbon Cutting: Mayor Frank Scotto and Ted Lieu (left) meet Andrea Landi (center) grandson of the company founder Renzo Landi and the new U.S. President of Operations

Matt Weiss, vice president of sales and marketing, said that California, and specifically Torrance, is an attractive location for Landi Renzo because of its accessible natural gas fueling infrastructure, large automotive presence and reputation as a worldwide environmental trendsetter.

Ted Lieu, the 53rd District Assemblyman, was also in attendance with his wife, an Environmental Quality Commissioner for Torrance, Betty Chim. The Honorable Nicola Faganello, Italian Consul General, also spoke at the opening, wishing Landi Renzo luck as they bring Italy even closer to California.

“We of course are extremely interested in what is happening in the rest of the country,” Weiss said, referencing Landi’s choice of California for its first US location. “It just made sense to be here now.”

The company was honored with certificates of recognition, extended on behalf of the California Legislature, the Torrance Chamber of Commerce (presented by Chairman of the Board Mark Waronek), the US House of Representatives (presented by Congresswoman Jane Harman’s office), and from California State 28th district Senator Jenny Oropeza.

In addition to the many economic benefits of alternative fuel systems, including the cost savings on refueling that come with natural gas use, other benefits will include a reduction of carbon dioxide and pollution reduction and a decrease in North American dependence on foreign oil. The Landi Group promotes the use of modern and advance system to combat atmospheric pollution, negative environmental changes, and to improve the quality of life. On Sept. 9, the company celebrated its recent acquisition of California engineering-based company, Baytech Corporation. Landi Renzo executives greeted the Mayor Frank Scotto for a ribbon cutting, along with Torrance Chamber of Commerce members and Andrea Landi, grandson of the company founder Renzo Landi and the new U.S. President of Operations.

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According to Weiss, the company is taking it “one step at a time, one vehicle at a time.” Contact us at 310-257-9481, or visit www.LandiUSA.com

Landi Renzo executives hope to bring jobs to California and to capitalize on the growing ‘green’ economy in the United States.


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Recent Developments Affecting Businesses By Lee R. Petillon and Mark T. Hiraide “Dodd-Frank,” “Say-on-Pay,” “Proxy Access,” dominate today’s headlines in the financial media. The following is a quick overview of these and other recent regulatory developments and how they may affect small and medium size businesses. Shareholder Democracy: “Say-on-Pay” and “Proxy Access” The authority to oversee a corporation’s management is vested in its Board of Directors. With the rise of institutional shareholder activism, and a perceived lack of oversight over executive compensation by Boards of Directors, both Congress and the Securities and Exchange Commission have recently enacted laws that allow shareholders who have owned at least 3% of a public company for three years to nominate directors, and all shareholders to voice an opinion on executive pay. Regulations adopted by the SEC on August 25, 2010, pursuant to the DODDFRANK WALL STREET REFORM AND CONSUMER PROTECTION ACT, which became effective on July 22, 2010, require public companies, not less frequently than once every three years, to include in their annual proxy statement a resolution to approve or disapprove of the compensation paid to the company’s top executives (CEO, CFO and the three other most highly compensated executive officers). Although the resolutions are non-binding, we expect many compensation practices, such as guaranteed salary increases, non-performance based bonuses, perquisites for former and/or retired executives, excessive change-in-control payments and change-in-control payments without job loss or substantial diminution of duties, will come under increased scrutiny. Other provisions of Dodd-Frank that significantly increase regulation in the

financial services industry include: Private Equity Funds: managers/advisors to hedge funds and domestic private equity funds managing assets over $100 million are now required to register with the SEC under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, submitting to extensive record keeping and regulation; Insurance Companies: a new Federal Insurance Office will monitor the industry with rules designed to promote uniformity among the states in market regulation of specified types of insurance, and, for the first time, some of the largest insurance companies will be designated as “nonbank financial companies,” subject to oversight by the Federal Reserve (whereas insurance companies have traditionally been regulated by the states); Capital Markets: home equity is now excluded from the calculation of net worth for determining whether an investor is an “accredited investor” (under the Securities Act of 1933, the requirements for disclosure, the number of investors permitted and other limitations are relaxed for sales of securities to “accredited investors”); Consumer Finance: a new governmental authority, the “Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection” is given broad power to regulate retail financial products and services, and to promote the new prohibitions or restrictions on certain lending practices.

LEE R. PETILLON Partner Petillon Hiraide Loomis Zagzebski & Zagzebski LLP

MARK T. HIRAIDE Partner Petillon Hiraide Loomis Zagzebski & Zagzebski LLP

Continued on page 22

Both Congress and the Securities and Exchange Commission have recently enacted laws that allow shareholders who have owned at least 3% of a public company for three years to nominate directors, and all shareholders to voice an opinion on executive pay. TO R R A N C E M AG A Z I N E

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Recent Developments Affecting Business Continued from page 21 Liabilities Associated with Securities Offerings The issue of whether â&#x20AC;&#x153;findersâ&#x20AC;? who receive a commission for assisting in sales of securities are required to be registered as broker-dealers has long been a controversial and unclear legal issue. For the first time in many years, the SEC provided guidance on the issue by denying a no-action request to a â&#x20AC;&#x153;finderâ&#x20AC;? who received â&#x20AC;&#x153;transaction-based compensation,â&#x20AC;? i.e. compensation directly tied to successful investment in the issuerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s securities, otherwise known as a, â&#x20AC;&#x153;commission.â&#x20AC;? (Brumberg, Mackey & Wall, PLC (May 17, 2010)). The SECâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recent regulatory interpretations highlight the risk to companies that use unregistered broker-dealer â&#x20AC;&#x153;findersâ&#x20AC;? to help them find investors. Liabilities for securities violations are not limited to private and regulatory civil

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actions. On August 25, 2010, Attorney General Edmund G. Brown Jr., announced that a Laguna Niguel movie producer, and two agents who sold the investments, were criminally charged for selling unregistered notes in a movie production company. New Angel Groups In recent years, angel investor groups have been organized to provide entrepreneurs with a process to meet potential investors and facilitate compliance with securities law restrictions associated with raising capital. The Maverick Angels and The Monday Club are two local angel investing groups formed within the last two years. Maverick Angels is based in Westlake Village. The Monday Club, formed some years ago in Orange County by Dr. Fred Haney, a venture capitalist and advisor to technology companies, recently formed its South Bay Chapter, which meets once a month at the Community Room at the Palos Verdes Public Library in Rolling Hills Estates. (Note: Petillon Hiraide Loomis Zagzebski & Zabzebski LLP is a sponsor of the Maverick Angels and The Monday Club).

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Petillon Hiraide Loomis Zagzebski & Zagzebski LLP is a South Bay firm with an office in Los Angeles which brings together an exceptional combination of corporate finance, regulatory and litigation expertise. We focus our practice on advising businesses and entrepreneurs in two principal areas: CORPORATE Start-ups, emerging and middle market companies, private and public companies, private equity and venture capital funds, public and private offerings, including IPOs, corporate restructurings, and merger and acquisition transactions, joint ventures and strategic alliance transactions, including cross border and abroad. LITIGATION AND REGULATORY SEC reporting, corporate and securities fraud, director and officer liability, breach of fiduciary duty, private and public offering liability, disputes over corporate control, and related litigation in state and federal courts, private arbitrations, including FINRA arbitrations, internal investigations, and SEC and FINRA enforcement matters.

South Bay Office can be reached at (310)543-0500 or www.phizz.com


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Having a Company Holiday Party? Save Your Company Holiday $$$$ The holidays are just around the corner. We are always thinking that we have plenty of time to plan that famous company holiday party but it sneaks up on us. We then try to make it work and end up spending too much money booking at the last minute. This year, we face a challenging economy and you may be asking yourself, “Do we need to do it?” and “How much will it cost?” But you know, deep down inside, that you really want to do it, to honor your employees, staff, and company. Many of us business owners are thinking how we can honor our employees without much cost to the company. Here are some ways that you can have a great holiday party without that great expense:

normal. And if you want that extra protection, “Day of Event Insurance” can be purchased for a nominal fee. This can be a couple thousand dollars in savings for the company. I’m Rosana Torres, owner of Life’s Delicious Catering/Party Posies Floral & Event Planning. We specialize in creating events that satisfy your needs and budgets. Questions? Contact us at 310-378-1018, or visit www.partyposies.com

Just a Tip: October is a good time to start planning a holiday party. In November, restaurants and caterers start filling up & prices go up!

1. Choose a local restaurant. Many of our restaurants in the South Bay have private dining rooms or banquet spaces available. Tell them your budget. See if they can work with that budget for you. Let them choose your menu, that often can work within your budget. Choose a lower cost day, such as a Thursday night that may benefit you company’s savings. 2. Bring the holiday party to you. Have an office holiday party. You will be surprised how special you can make it in your own office. An Event Planner from a catering company can help you make it all happen. They can provide information from food, music to décor and any special treats, such as live music and talent. Again, tell them your budget. Great menus based on appetizers are always a big hit for office parties, easy bites but filling. A big saver is also if you are willing to provide your own alcoholic beverages (if deemed appropriate). A catering company can offer full service, set up, breakdown, clean up and wait staff. 3. Have your holiday harty at an employee’s private home. This holiday party is personal and brings employees together. The great thing about having it at a private home is that you can have it on a Saturday night without the cost of a food guarantee from a hotel or the hassles of parking costs. An Event Planner from a catering company can help you make it all happen. Catering companies can offer full service set up, breakdown and clean up and the home can be returned to TO R R A N C E M AG A Z I N E

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FROM CONGRESS

The Long Road Back to Economic Health By Rep. Jane Harman (D-Venice) While the national economy has continued to disappoint, the South Bay continues to be cushioned by its diverse economy. Deep roots in aerospace and technology have insulated us from the worst of the recession – but as I know from visiting employment and job training centers throughout the district, too many families are still hurting. That’s why I voted for the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) last year – to inject critically needed resources into the economy to create good jobs, spur innovation and repair aging infrastructure. Our area has received more than $200 million in ARRA funding for more than 100 different projects ranging from road and waterline repairs to biomedical research. You can track the projects on an interactive map on my website: harman.house.gov. Being a small business owner – particularly in the retail and professional services sector — is especially challenging these days. According to a recent economic report, California led U.S. states in small business bankruptcy in the first quarter of 2010. The Los-Angeles-Long Beach area had the dubious distinction of leading the state in this category with a 15 percent increase between 2009 and 2010. The professional service sector in Los Angeles County lost 2,300 jobs in

one month — from May to June 2010. That’s why I applaud the small businesses in our area that have seized on the Recovery Act as a way to build their enterprises and position themselves for future growth. Torrance Chamber member Luminit has been at work since December on a $150,000 ARRA contract to develop technology to make more efficient solar panels for satellites. A&P Development & Construction, also of Torrance, has completed a $310,000 ARRA construction project at Fort MacArthur in San Pedro, and will soon be breaking ground on another. These contracts created new positions for skilled electricians, carpenters and equipment operators. Redondo Optics, in Redondo Beach, is working on a prototype sensor to monitor the breathing of infants with acute respiratory disorders. The $150,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health, funded by the Recovery Act, could result in introducing an affordable, life-saving device not currently on the market. Kudos, too, to my friend and colleague LA County Supervisor Don Knabe, who proposed in 2009 creating 10,000 temporary jobs by tapping nearly $200 million in the Recovery Act set aside for the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Emergency Fund (TANF). The jobs are in county departments, private sector employers, non-profit organizations, and in cities across Los Angeles County. The newly employed

not only get paychecks – injecting money back into our local economy – they gain valuable work experience, develop new skills, and get reliable references, which improves the talent pool for local businesses. Knabe’s employment goal has been vastly exceeded: More than 11,000 people have been placed in temporary jobs, and another 10,000 students were placed in summer jobs using leftover funds. But the TANF program is in danger, and is set to expire at the end of September. The House voted in May to extend it, but the Senate has twice failed to muster the necessary votes. This program is simply too important to fall victim to partisanship. All our local officials – Democrat and Republican — support TANF. It is imperative that the Senate act, and soon. What our small businesses need more than ever is credit and loans, to cover monthly costs and expand their operations. Banks are still not lending to small businesses despite the federal government’s efforts to free up capital in the private market. To try to ease the credit crunch, earlier this summer I voted for and the House approved two pieces of legislation that, if they become law, will pump $30 billion in low interest capital into community banks to help them increase the number of loans they make to small businesses. The bills also provide $3.5 billion in tax benefits to make starting and operating small businesses more affordable. The Senate has not acted on

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FROM THE CIT Y OF TORRANCE

Planning Process Begins for Multi-Year Redevelopment of Del Amo Fashion Center Simon Property Group, Inc., the country’s largest owner, developer and manager of high quality retail real estate, announced today that it is embarking on the planning process for a multiyear, phased redevelopment of Del Amo Fashion Center. The 35-year-old, super-regional shopping center encompasses nearly 2.3 million square feet of retail space. The redevelopment has the support of not only mall ownership but also of Torrance city officials who have been actively engaged in the preliminary discussions. “Although it’s still early in the process, we’re committed to making Del Amo Fashion Center one of the key ‘transformational redevelopments’ in our company’s pipeline,” said Tom Schneider, executive vice president of development at Simon. “Our goal,” Schneider continued, “is to work with officials at the City of Torrance and come up with a master plan for the center to which the redevelopment will adhere and will be unquestionably attractive to shoppers and retailers alike.”

Torrance Mayor Frank Scotto said, “The process of redeveloping Del Amo Fashion Center has begun. Based on our strong market, the mall’s owners are taking steps which will revitalize Del Amo to achieve its potential as a regional fashion center. Del Amo’s future prospects are exciting. The City will work closely with mall ownership on project scope and timeline in creating a project to better serve the community with existing stores and new retailers.”

About Simon Property Group Simon Property Group, Inc. is an S&P 500 company and the largest real estate company in the U.S. The Company currently owns or has an interest in 393 retail real estate properties comprising 263 million square feet of gross leasable area in North America, Europe and Asia. Simon Property Group is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana and employs more than 5,000 people worldwide. The Company’s common stock is publicly traded on the NYSE under the symbol SPG. For further information, visit the Simon Property Group website at www.simon.com.

The Long Road Back to Economic Health — Continued from page 24 the bill but is expected to in the fall. If these bills become law, they will allow entrepreneurs — like the owner of a new sports management business in Playa Del Rey I recently learned about – to deduct up to $20,000 in start-up costs from his taxes. That’s $15,000 more than the $5,000 deduction currently allowed. The bills also close some appalling tax loopholes – such as a “biofuel” tax credit for crude tall oil, a waste product of the petroleum industry. It’s proving to be a long road back to the healthy economy we had, and there’s much more that needs to be done. With the input and advice of local business and union leaders, I will continue to do everything I can to increase available capital, help businesses create jobs and spur innovation. Please contact my office if you have ideas that can help. TO R R A N C E M AG A Z I N E

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This month, the City of Torrance is proud to launch its “Shop Torrance” campaign. Shopping locally yields immense benefits for the entire Torrance community. And with the multitude of stores and services provided here in Torrance, there is something here for everyone.

IMPORTANT FACT: Did you know that the City of Torrance receives $1 out of every $100 in taxable sales made within the City? Shopping in Torrance supports our community directly because this means that 1% of every purchase that you make in the city of Torrance goes right back into the General Fund, which can be used to fund vital city services, programs and service that benefit the community in which you live and work. The parks where our children play, the roads on which we drive, and the local community events that we enjoy year-round, are all paid for through resources in the General Fund. By shopping in Torrance, you help the City of Torrance in its efforts to maintain the community’s high quality of life that residents and visitors have become accustomed to. Unfortunately, the impact of these challenging economic times is becoming evident in the lower amount of resources coming into the General Fund. Specifically, revenues received from sales tax have fallen off dramatically during this recession. We realize that money is also tight nowadays, which emphasizes the importance of making necessary purchases within the city limits. When purchases are made in Torrance, it means that sales tax dollars stay in Torrance, and directly benefit the entire community. This revenue helps fund everything from police officers and firefighters to parks and recreation programs.

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Additionally, every dollar spent locally also helps to maintain streets, curbs, and sidewalks. —So, please shop locally!

Here are some easy ways that you can help beat the recession! • Purchase gasoline from stations within the City. • Shop at local shopping centers and the Del Amo Mall. • Consider buying your next car in Torrance.

Places to Shop in Torrance: • Del Amo Mall (Hawthorne Blvd. & Carson St.) • Downtown Torrance • Rolling Hills Plaza (Crenshaw Blvd. & PCH) • Torrance Crossroads (Lomita Blvd. & Crenshaw Blvd.) • Torrance Promenade (Hawthorne Blvd. and Del Amo Blvd.) • Torrance Towne Center (Crenshaw Blvd. & PCH) And many, many more… Whether one lives, works, or is simply visiting Torrance, every purchase makes a significant contribution to the City’s efforts in maintaining the quality of life in Torrance. Shopping locally helps strengthen our economy, and helps create new jobs for local businesses. And ultimately, the benefits return to the local community! So when shopping or filling up a gas tank, please pause and consider if a Torrance store can offer the same item for a comparable price. Come on out, find what you need in Torrance’s variety of national or local retail establishments. See what the Torrance Advantage is all about.

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Shop ’til you drop all over Torrance, including:

1. Del Amo Mall 2. Downtown Torrance 3. Torrance Crossroads


F RO M TO R R A N C E U N I F I E D S C H O O L D I S T R I C T

S AV E O U R S C H O O L S Public education funding has tremendously suffered at the hands of the state’s legislature. Four years ago, the Torrance Unified School District budget was about $200 million and now it is closer to $160 million with the possibility of more reductions to come. Ninety-two percent of District funding comes from the state and we have endured economic blow after blow. Most recently, to combat some of the budget reductions, we launched the Save Our Schools fundraising effort. We have partnered with our stakeholders, which include our PTAs, the Torrance Education Foundation, the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce as well as our teachers, classified employees, and administrators in order to raise much needed funds.

T U E S DAY S F O R T U S D One of the programs created under the SOS campaign is called “Tuesdays for TUSD.” Participating establishments have agreed to donate a percentage of Tuesday sales to the SOS campaign. Some of the Tuesdays for TUSD restaurants include – Red Car Brewery, Andre’s Restaurant, BFD, Outback Steakhouse, Mimi’s Café, Marie Calendar’s (both Torrance locations), The Roadhouse Bar and Grill, Ortega 120, The Counter Burger, and Bomball Frozen Goodies. Also included in the Tuesdays for TUSD promotion are a few retail businesses, including Stanberry Cleaners, Postal Solutions Inc., Salon del Sol, A to Z Scrapbooking, and PV Bowl. For more information regarding the Tuesdays for TUSD program and to find out how you can participate please contact Theresa Stanberry at stanberrylaundry@yahoo.com.

CHAMBER

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Congresswoman Jane Harman graciously meets with the Torrance Chamber on September 16th

Congresswoman Jane Harman (center) meets with Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce members Rod Guyon, Heidi Ashcraft, Arun Bhumitra, Dan Keeton, Chairman Mark Waronek and Jerry Say. TO R R A N C E M AG A Z I N E

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R I B B O N C U T T I N G S / C E LE B R AT I O N S

IDEAL Upholstery & Interiors Celebrates 50 Years in the South Bay! 24414 Hawthorne Blvd., Torrance CA 90505 Phone (310)375-7000 Fax (310)373-7970

Employee Savings Tickets 22410 Hawthorne Blvd., Suite 1, Torrance CA 90505 Phone (310)316-3115 www.employeesavingstickets.com

Fish Bonz Casual Seafood Grill 2599 Airport Drive, Torrance CA 90505 Phone (310)325-2669 www.fishbonzgrill.com Info@fishbonzgrill.com Hours: Monday – Sunday 11am-9pm

CHAMBER

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Wine and Food Festival at Honda, Benefitting Torrance Memorial Medical Center Members of the 24th annual Gourmet Food and Wine Festival Planning Committee shared an evening together at Napa Rose at the Grand Californian. They are shown here at the ‘World of Color’ inside Disneyland’s California Adventure. The ‘World of Color’ has 1,200 fountains, includes lasers, lights, fire and fog with high-definition projection on mist screens. Shown L to R: Larry Lenihan, Director, Corporate Alliances, The Walt Disney Company; Heidi Cunningham, Kelly Services; Karin Baker, Corporate Community Relations, American Honda Motor Co., Inc., Mark Waronek, Chairman of the Board; Judy Gibson, City of Torrance Planning Commission; Cheryl Celise, Hospitality Manager, Corporate Alliances, The Walt Disney Company; Steve Morikawa, Corporate Community Relations, American Honda Motor Co., Inc.; Donna Duperron, Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce.

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R I B B O N C U T T I N G S / C E LE B R AT I O N S

Landi Renzo USA Corporation 23535 Telo Ave., Torrance CA 90505 Phone (310)257-9481 Fax (310)257-9487 www.landiusa.com

U.S. Healthworks 1149 W. 190th Street, Torrance CA 90248 Phone (310)324-5777 Fax (310)324-6245 www.ushealthworks.com

Wells Fargo Bank 4135 Pacific Coast Highway, Torrance CA 90505 (310)791-8940 www.wellsfargo.com Hours: Monday â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Friday 9am-6pm, Saturday 9am-4pm

For details and to schedule a ribbon cutting, grand opening or ground breaking ceremony, please contact Kelly McLeod at 310-792-3808 at the Chamber no later than one month prior to the event and provide two preferred dates.

TACC Members Enjoy Poolside Mixer with Redondo Chamber at the Doubletree Hotel

Ken Freeman, Exxon Mobil Corporation and TACC Chairman Mark Waronek

Ron Martinez (State Farm Insurance) and Robyn Spencer (Lucky Strike/South Bay)

TACC Chairman Mark Waronek (far right) and Redondo Beach Chamber Chairman, Steve Goldstein (left) present certificate of appreciation to Doubletree Hotel Torrance General Manager Linda Amato.

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CHAMBER

EVENTS Chamber Board, Ambassadors, and City Officials Enjoy a Picnic Potluck

The 2010 - 2011 Mentor Program will kick off at North High School on Thursday, October 14th. Appreciation is extended to Chamber of Commerce members and employees of Toyota Financial Services who volunteer to be mentors to the students in this program. Entering its fifth year of existence, the Mentor Program has enabled students to receive one-on-one assistance in financial planning for college, career choices, community service opportunities and much more.

1. “Fun and Games” 2. Sue Herbers, City of Torrance Clerk and husband Jerry are greeted by Past TACC Chairman Richard Tsao and wife Christina. 3.TACC Chair Elect Tara O’Brien and daughter, Shannon, enjoying the picnic. 4. TACC Chairman Mark Waronek and Robert Pullen-Miles, field representative for CA Senator Jenny Oropeza. 30

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Seniors Enjoy a ‘Swingin’ Night on the Town

The Crystal Ballroom at the Doubletree Hotel in Torrance was the venue for a Senior Dance that included music by the Bay Cities Swing Band and an incredible meal. A partnership TACC and the Redondo Beach Chamber, enabled 250 seniors the opportunity to enjoy. Attended by City of Torrance Mayor Frank Scotto and City of Redondo Beach Mayor Mike Gin; Major sponsors of the event included Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Center, Toyota Motor Sales USA, Daily Breeze,

Adia, Home Instead and The Flower Pot, Beach Cities Health District and Silverado Senior Living. Committee members included Deborah Fehn, Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Center; Linda Amato, Doubletree Torrance; Judy Gibson, City of Torrance Planning Commission; Marna Smeltzer, Redondo Beach Chamber of Commerce and Visitor’s Bureau and Donna Duperron, Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce.

“My husband and I want to thank the chambers for the dinner/dance for area seniors. The room was alive with enthusiasm; obviously, your event was a huge success. We hope that it will be repeated next year…God willing.” —EVAN & DOROTHY HAZELTON

1. Fun for all! 2.Deborah Fehn, Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Center, welcomes guests to the dance. 3. Marge Miyamura and Tony Muccitelli share a dance. 4. Enjoying Big Band Sounds

LE A D E R S H I P TO R R A N C E is starting its 2011 recruitment and has a great line up. Sign up early for this very elite leadership program. Contact Heidi Cunningham (Kelly Services) at 310-543-3589 or cunniha@kellyservices.com

January 20: Mixer; 21: Retreat | February: 3 History Day; 17: Non Profit Day | March 3: City Day; 17: County Day | April 3-4: Sacramento | May 12: Education Day; 26: Health & Wellness Day | June 9: Business/Industry Day; 23: Diversity/Cultural Day | July 21: Graduation Leadership Torrance is starting its 2011 recruitment.

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UPCOMING

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Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce 2010-2011 CALENDAR OF UPCOMING EVENTS Wednesday, October 13th, Executive Briefing,

Thursday, November 4th, Job Fair,

2-5 pm followed by cocktail hour. Presented by the Leadership Torrance Alumni Association and sponsored by MacMall, Hunter Mason Realty and Green Ink Marketing. Aimed at CEOs/upper management. Keynote speaker, nationally recognized speaker/ author David Nelson on Social Media and Social Networking. $75. RSVP at TorranceChamber.com. Doubletree Torrance.

9:00 am, at the Toyota Meeting Hall.

Monday, October 18th, State of the Region featuring Congresswoman Jane Harman, 11:30 am, at the Torrance Marriott.

Wednesday, October 20th, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Good Morning Torranceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; featuring Fire Chief William Racowschi, 7:30 am, at the Torrance Marriott.

Wednesday, November 17th, Leadership Symposium. 7:30 am. Presented by the Leadership Torrance Alumni Association . Will focus on Multigenerational, corporate, and entrepreneurial leadership. Information on getting the best out of the City of Torrance and the Torrance Chamber. Before 10/20: $50 for Torrance and Redondo Chamber members/$65 non members. $85 after 10/20. RSVP at TorranceChamber.com. Torrance Marriott.

Wednesday, December 8th, Holiday Mixer, 5:30 pm, at the Torrance Marriott.

Friday, February 18, 2011, Black History Celebration, 10:30 am, at the Torrance Marriott.

The holidays are approaching and the Doubletree Hotel Torrance/South Bay has exciting plans for exceptional events. Call our catering professionals and make an appointment to see our rooms Also see our special rates for

For more information visit us on the web

overnight guests.

www.torrancechamber.com

Located just across from

3400 Torrance Blvd., Suite 100 Torrance, CA 90503 (310) 540-5858

and menus and plan your holiday event.

Del Amo Fashion Center, call us at 310-540-0500. 32

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CHAMBER

HIGHLIGHTS

TACC’s Young Professionals Torrance Young Professionals, a Group of the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce, is comprised of young professionals, entrepreneurs, executives, creative thinkers, and social people under the age of 40 who live and work in the South Bay area. TYP was founded in February 2007 and offers networking events and volunteer activities on a monthly basis to ERIC TAKAKI encourage the up and coming Pelican Signs leaders to get involved and help each other thrive in business and community service. TYP has its signature Morning Buzz coffee mixers from 8am-9am on the first, third and fifth Fridays of every month and offers a casual networking opportunity. It also has monthly meetings that include Happy Hour Mixers and Networking Luncheons.

been a member since 2006 and has served on the TYP Board since 2007. He has built great relationships within community by being an active supporter and link between other Young Professional groups from surrounding Chambers of Commerce. Josh has been involved since 2007 and shows that you can juggle both being a young professional as well as a new father.

JOSH THOMAS Home Instead Senior Care

The Events Chair is Jackie Vo from the Miyako Hybrid Hotel. Grace Ruiz from Piazza, Donnelly, & Marlette LLP is the Community Service Chair. The Ambassador Chair is George Ramos from Comerica Bank. For further information on this or other TACC programs, please visit TorranceChamber.com or call 310-540-5858.

The 2010-2011 Co-Chairs are Eric Takaki from Pelican Signs and Joshua Thomas from Home Instead Senior Care. Eric has

NEWS

BRIEFS

Celebrate our Torrance-South Bay YMCA’s success at the 64th Annual Volunteer and Recognition Dinner on Thursday, November 18th at the Torrance Doubletree Hotel. YMCA volunteers, Board members, and community and business leaders will gather to appreciate the Y’s significant impact on our community and to honor the people who are making a difference in our world. For more information, please e-mail melissavelasco@ymcala.org or call 310-325-5885.

IDEAL Upholstery & Interiors Marks 50th Anniversary in the South Bay On July 21, Anthony “Tony” Mancuso celebrated the 50th Anniversary of his business, Ideal Upholstery and Drapery Company in Torrance. “It is a personal achievement that fills him with pride,” says Mancuso, who over the past 50 years has beautified countless homes throughout the South Bay and Orange County. Originally from Messina, Italy, Mancuso started

as an upholstery cutter at a furniture manufacturing company. In 1960, he opened his first small upholstery shop in Inglewood and Two years later he relocated his shop to Torrance. Today, at 80 years of age, Mancuso says he would do it all over again. “I still love what I’m doing and I plan to work until the day I die,” he said.

To thank the community, IDEAL is hosting a Customer Appreciation Sale through December 31. A 20% discount offered on his large selection of fine upholstery fabrics from all over the world, and 10% discount on labor. Also, monthly Opportunity Drawings!

Visit him at 24414 Hawthorne Boulevard in Torrance. For further information, call (310) 375-7000.

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NEWS

BRIEFS

Torrance Memorial Foundation Announces Largest Fund Transfer In preparation for the building of the new 390,000-square-foot, seven-story patient tower, the Torrance Memorial HealthCare Foundation was pleased to announce the largest transfer of donations to Torrance Memorial Medical Center in its history. The $10.3 million check, representing the first cash transfer toward the $100 million new patient tower campaign goal, was presented to Craig Leach, president/CEO, Torrance Memorial Medical Center (and TACC Board member), at the site of the new construction on Lomita Blvd. The $100 million goal is part of a larger $200 million Capital Campaign, of which $63 million has been raised to date. Also present were Foundation Board members W. David McKinnie, III, Phil Pavesi, Katie Fulmer, Bill Collier, Jack Baker, Mark Lurie, M.D., Nadine Bobit, Michael Rouse (Toyota Motor Sales), Greg Geiger, and Capital Campaign Co-Chairs Melanie and Richard Lundquist (Continental Development Corp).

15th Annual Halloween Ball Fundraiser for Pediatric Therapy Network on October 17 Don’t miss the 15th Annual Halloween Ball on Sunday, October 17 from 4 to 9 pm in front of the Depot Restaurant on Cabrillo Ave, under a looming white tent. This “spooktacular” evening of gourmet food, hosted martini bar, live music and entertainment will benefit Pediatric Therapy Network, a non-profit children’s research, education and therapy center located in Torrance. The event, attended by over 700 costumed guests from all over Southern California, will also include a costume contest and live and silent auctions. Event tickets are $100 per person. For more information or to purchase tickets online visit www.PediatricTherapyNetwork.org.

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Sponsored by Home Instead Senior Care®

Celebrating it’s 7th Annual Holiday Gift Giveaway. Be a Santa to A Senior launches on November 1st when Christmas trees will go up in several locations. South Bay businesses, nonprofit organizations and agencies that serve older adults will once again partner with Torrance Home Instead Senior Care to ensure needy seniors receive gifts and companionship throughout the holiday season. The trees are decorated with ornaments that feature the first name of a senior and his/her respective gift requests. Businesses are encouraged to contact Torrance Home Instead Senior Care at 310-542-0563 about adopting groups of seniors. For more information go to www.beasantatoasenior.com. To learn more about Torrance Home Instead Senior Care, visit www.homeinstead.com/286.


NEWS

BRIEFS

Ralphs Continues Support of Providence Little Company of Mary Providence Little Company of Mary Foundation’s successful 9th Women’s Wellness Conference – The Power of Pink inspired a generous gift from Ralphs as part of their “Giving Hope a Hand®” campaign. Local Ralphs leadership presented the gift at the Providence LCM Breast Center. Continuing their commitment to the communities they serve, Ralphs is a platinum sponsor for Providence LCM Foundation’s upcoming Sellabration Gala on Saturday, November 6, 2010 at the Millennium Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles. Sellabration – an elegant black-tie dinner, dance and auction honors the 50th anniversary of the Little Company of Mary Sisters and their healing presence in Southern California. Sellabration supports Providence LCM charitable care and community outreach programs. For information and sponsorship opportunities, contact Leslie Chung in the Foundation at 310-303-5346 or leslie.chung2@providence.org.

Novas Donate to Torrance Memorial Novas, a high school volunteer support group for Torrance Memorial Medical Center recently donated approximately $4,200 in cash and donations to the hospital’s Pediatric Department, Burn Center, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Emergency Department and Surgery wait rooms. The Novas also contributed more than 4,485 hours of service to the medical center during 2009. High school teens who are children of Luminaries, a volunteer

support group for Torrance Memorial, make up the Novas. The Luminaries program began in 1990 with a small group of women volunteering to support the Woman to Woman Image Enhancement Center, a free support service for women who have disease- or treatment-related hair loss due to chemotherapy, surgery or radiation therapy. They also volunteer at a variety of special fundraising events for the hospital. LtoR: Gloria Schatz, Torrance Memorial Volunteer Services, and Gina Jones, Torrance Memorial Child Life Specialist, accept a $1,500 check plus $2,600 worth of donations to the medical center from Annie Bartholomew 2009-2010 Novas Fundraising Vice President and Dimitri Dimitriou, 2009-2010 Novas President

THEY GIVE EVERY DAY. TEENS GIVE TODAY. South Bay Teens Thank South Bay’s First Responders in Honor of September 11th On September 11, 2010, The Volunteer Center, South Bay-Harbor-Long Beach’s Volunteer Center Youth Coalition (VCYC) delivered copies of their Tribute Through Legacy and Creativity (TLC) Anthologies to South Bay’s first responders, thanking them for what they do for their communities every day. In honor of the 9/11 Day of Service, the teens from the VCYC held a literacy and fine arts contest. The submissions of this contest have been compiled and printed into the first annual Tribute of Legacy Through Creativity (TLC) Anthology. See at www.volctr-sobay.org /vcyc/9.11.10TLCAntholgy.pdf. For more information about the Volunteer Center Youth Coalition contact Katie Kang at (310) 212-5009 or visit www.volctrsobay.org. TO R R A N C E M AG A Z I N E

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CHAMBER

BENEFITS

How to Get Involved with the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce With many networking events and programs at the Torrance Chamber, you can connect with other business professionals for growth, contacts, and access to influential people.

Networking @ Noon

GAP- Government Affairs Policy

Offered twice monthly at local Chamber member restaurants. This event allows you to promote your business and make contacts while having lunch!

The Government Affairs Policy group is comprised of Chamber members who act as legislative and regulatory analysts for local business by reviewing bills on local, county, state and federal levels and lobby for support or opposition to proposed legislation

Young Professionals Group A group of chamber members 40 years of age or younger who meet once a month to network, learn about professional development, contribute to community services, and build relationships within the Torrance Chamber through events designed with their demographic in mind.

Tech Pros

Green Torrance Committee

Cultural Involvement

Green Torrance Committee meetings are open to all businesses interested in implementing, selling and/or supporting green solutions. The group’s goal is to provide Torrance businesses a comprehensive source for “Go-Green” information

Cultural involvement celebrates diversity of the business community and creates involvement opportunities through the following events: Japan Business Reception Dragon Circle Chinese New Year Celebration Black History Celebration

Human Resources Professionals of Torrance

Political Action Committee (PAC)

A group of human resources managers and generalists, who meet monthly over lunch to receive training on the latest HR trends, laws and policies in HR. The group focuses on networking, education and training Torrance Chamber businesses on important issues associated with human resources in business today.

P.R.O.F.S. Professional Roundtable of Financial Services This group meets monthly to develop long-standing and trustworthy networking relationships within the financial community and to increase their knowledge in all financial matters. With about 20 to 30 Chamber members at each meeting, this group is a diverse representation of professionals who come together to expand on services and practices.

Not-for-Profit Coalition The Not-for-Profit Coalition brings together the many dynamic not-for-profit organizations in the community to provide growth opportunities through leadership, networking, support, education, and community recognition.

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The Tech Pros group brings together technology related companies and professionals (Hardware, Software and Services) providing the opportunity to grow and benefit through networking, support, education.

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The Political Action Committee supports the election of officials and promotes laws at all levels of government that advance and support business issues and the free market and private enterprise system. PAC contributes funds to candidates for endorsement and/or for the support or opposition of issues, proposed laws and initiatives. Enhancing the business climate is critical to the economic vitality of the South Bay region and the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce PAC strives to achieve this.

Foundation The Chamber Foundation actively promotes collaboration between local businesses and Torrance Unified School District. The Foundation’s Adopt-ASchool program, Business for Day and the newly formed Mentor program provide a wide range of opportunities for local businesses and employees to get involved with the Torrance Unified School District and its students, faculty, and administration. The Foundation also presents the annual State of Education luncheon to provide the Torrance community with an opportunity to learn more about the current status of our schools. For information and Calendar, visit www.TorranceChamber.com For Membership, Contact Kelly McLeod at 310.540.5858


LAS AMIGAS PRESENTS 27th Annual

NOVEMBER 30 - DECEMBER 5, 2010 Torrance Memorial Medical Center Located in the parking lot at Medical Center Drive and Skypark Drive.

Enjoy this one-of-a-kind event that includes beautifully decorated holiday trees, a food court and local entertainment. Funds raised by the Holiday Festival support Torrance Memorial’s New Main Tower. Public Exhibit Hours • Tuesday, November 30 – Closed to the Public • Wednesday, December 1, 5 - 9 p.m. • Thursday, December 2, 4 - 9 p.m. “Senior Day” – Free admission to seniors 9 a.m. - noon • Friday, December 3 – Closed to the Public • Saturday, December 4, 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. • Sunday, December 5, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. $5 for adults, $2 for children 4-12 – Children 3 and under are free.

Special Events Festival Fashion Show – $100 per person – Tuesday, Nov. 30, 9 a.m - 3 p.m. Festival Night Dinner Gala – $250 per person – Friday, Dec. 3, 6 p.m. - 11 p.m. Santa Lunch – $10 per person – Sunday, Dec. 5, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Trees available for Pre-Sale – Tues., Wed., Thurs. (Nov. 30 - Dec. 2)

3330 Lomita Blvd., Torrance, CA 90505 • www.TorranceMemorial.org/HolidayFestival • 310.517.4606


Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce 3400 Torrance Blvd., Suite 100 Torrance, CA 90503

PRST-STD U.S. Postage

PAID

Torrance, CA Permit No. 54

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Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our October 2010 issue. For comments and submittals, contact submittals@Torrance-Magazine.com or call 310.373.2880 For advertising opportunities, contact AdSales@Torrance-Magazine.com or call 310.317.0841 For TACC information and Calendars Visit www.TorranceChamber.com or call 310.540.5858

Our January 2011 theme is:

South Bay CEOs and Entrepreneurialship


Torrance Magazine ~ October, 2010