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You’re 200 miles from home and the sun is going down. In front of you is a large semitruck crawling its way up a hill that never seems to end. There’s only one thing to do: put your foot on the pedal and gun it. Fortunately, that’s not a problem for the aerodynamic engine

Prototype shown with optional equipment. Production model may vary. *268-horsepower V6 engine available on SE and XLE models only. ©2011 Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc.

2012 Toyota Camry. Because with an available 268-horsepower

ready and willing, you’ll have all the power you need to get ahead of trouble and back on schedule.

toyota.com/camry


In this Issue

Our Notes:

DEPARTMENTS Notes from the Publishers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 A Message From The Chair of the Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 TACC Board of Directors & Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Chamber Exec’s Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

HEALTH AND WELLNESS Rechanneling Energy to Awaken the Body’s Natural Healing Powers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Healthy Residents Equal A Healthy Community . . . . . . . 7 Make a Commitment to Walk for Your Life . . . . . . . . . . . 8 PTN’s New Sensory Partners Initiative . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Music Uplifts the Spirit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Early Orthodontic Intervention Can Avoid Problems Later . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 How to Set and Keep Fitness Resolutions . . . . . . . . . . . 14 A Culture of Health at ExxonMobil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Using Yoga to Better Your Posture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Early Detection is the Best Defense Against Breast Cancer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 How to Tell When Mom or Dad Need Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Being a Pharmacist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Losing Weight for the New Year and Keeping it Off . . . . . 22 Health and Fitness—Movement is MedicineTM . . . . . . . . . 23 Swim for Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 It’s EVERY BODY’s Pilates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

FROM THE CIT Y OF TORRANCE CERT—Helping Residents and Business Members Safeguard the Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26

FROM THE TORRANCE UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT Superintendent’s New Year Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27

FROM THE TORRANCE CENTENNIAL “Lights, Camera, Action” Event — Postcards Now Available! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28

RIBBON CUTTINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28-29 CHAMBER EVENTS 2011 Business Expo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Veterans Career and Resource Fair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 TACC & Japan Business Association Mixer . . . . . . . . . . .31 Women in Business — Global Girlfriends . . . . . . . . . . . .32 The Mentor Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32

NEWS BRIEFS Announcing Fong & Associates, CPA’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Mary Kingston Named CEO of Providence Little Company of Mary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Entrepreneur Mom of the Year Candy Messer . . . . . . . . . .34 Torrance Memorial Shines A Light For Those Grieving Loss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Local Bankers Head Up Premier Business Bank . . . . . .35 Alcoa Foundation Will Provide Tuition-Free Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Torrance Memorial’s Holiday Festival Brings in $14.5 Million for New Patient Tower . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 San Pedro’s First Church Finds a New Home at Green Hills Memorial Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 PTN’s 16th Annual Halloween Ball . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Providence Little Company of Mary’s 10th Wellness Conference—The Power of Pink . . . . . . . . .39

CHAMBER BENEFITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40

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Happy 2012! We are thrilled to bring you tried, true, and positive insight from contributing professionals for this January Health and Wellness issue. This issue of Torrance Magazine is loaded with great and timely information to help Sue Moylan and Pat Sandt, someone very special (you and Green Ink Marketing yours) learn and make long term healthy choices, including New Year, New You: How to set and keep fitness resolutions (pg. 14) - the importance of setting “realistic” goals; Losing Weight for the New Year and Keeping it Off (pg. 22) with warnings against unrealistic testimonials and dangerous advertised gimmicks; Early Detection as the Best Defense Against Breast Cancer (pg. 19); Senior Living Alternatives at Brooksdale Pacific Inn (pg. 23); and at KDI (pg. 11), where music is not just for entertainment. We live in a truly rich community with opportunities broadened by being a Chamber member. Being a Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce member is like owning a master key to many doors that lead to yet other doors; that’s networking; that’s sharing; that’s learning and exercising your rights as community leaders. Thank you TACC, and thanks to all of our advertisers who understand the importance of educating the community on the many values your business offers. Our April 2012 issue of Torrance Magazine will focus on the always important and hot topic of Education. Please know we are honored to start the new year with you as our reader. Make a point and make a difference: Advertise! —Sue Moylan and Pat Sandt, Co-Publishers of Torrance Magazine

UPCOMING DEADLINES For the April 2012 Issue: Education for Business Article/Advertising Space Reservation: February 24, 2012 Distribution Date: April 2, 2012

CONTACT US: Advertising: See www.Torrance-Magazine.com or Contact AdSales@Torrance-Magazine.com or 310.317.0841 Articles: Pat Sandt, at Submittals@Torrance-Magazine.com or 310.373.2880 General Information/Marketing Services: Sue Moylan, at info@GreenInkMarketing.com or 310.539.2235 TACC Contact: info@TorranceChamber.com or 310.540.5858 The Torrance Magazine focuses on business stories, events, and who’s who profiles that are of interest to Torrance Chamber of Commerce members and others doing business in the South Bay area. The editorial is positive, information-packed, exclusive news: a diverse mix of feature stories on Torrance and South Bay movers and shakers, businesses, events, local industries, government and business economic development strategies and outlooks.


A MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR OF THE BOARD

Thriving Business Builds a Healthy Torrance Thank you for taking time to read the January issue of Torrance Magazine. I hope you and your loved ones had a restful holiday season. I enjoyed meeting many new faces (and reconnecting with good friends) at the Japan Business Reception, the Holiday Mixer, the Women In Business Tea, and many other outstanding Chamber events held in the past few months. Recently we’ve hosted ribbon cuttings for new businesses that have joined the Chamber. I always enjoy the opportunity to celebrate the growth of our local economy and to meet owners and staff members who are passionate about their businesses. I discovered these new Torrance businesses while attending Chamber ribbon cuttings in the past few months: —This charming wine bar Amore Vino (1441 Marcelina Ave.)— features an excellent selection of wines to enjoy in-house or take home. I tasted a sampling of great wines and even picked up a few bottles of microbrew beer to bring home to my husband. — Warehouse Discount Center (20901 Hawthorne Blvd.)— I was impressed with the high quality appliances offered at this nicely appointed discount appliance store. A sleek, cabinet-depth refrigerator with stainless steel French doors caught my eye as I toured the spacious showroom.

Are you thinking about ways to get more visibility for your business in the New Year? The Chamber’s 2012 Leadership Torrance program launches January 19. If you want to build relationships in Torrance, grow your network of contacts or TARA O’BRIEN develop new leadership skills, 2011-2012 TACC this program is for you! Over Chairwoman of the Board several months, Leadership Torrance participants will gather for day-long meetings to learn about the past, present and future of the Torrance area. This fee-based program also includes a trip to Sacramento to meet with elected officials and learn about how government affects business. The best way to grow your business is to build strong relationships within the Torrance community. Give yourself and your business a jumpstart in 2012. Call the Chamber at (310) 540-5858 for program details and registration information.

— I toured this new South Bay Aquatics (2433 Moreton St.)— swim school at a November ribbon-cutting. After meeting the wonderful staff and seeing the six indoor pools that are heated year-round, I signed my daughter up for swim lessons on the spot! I’d love to hear about your favorite places to do business in Torrance. Go to the Chamber’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/groups/TorranceChamber, and tell us about your favorite retail stores, restaurants, service providers and other businesses.

The best way to grow your business is to build strong relationships within the Torrance community. Give yourself and your business a jumpstart in 2012. TO R R A N C E M A G A Z I N E

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TACC Board of Directors and Staff 2011-2012

Carmen Freeland Daily Breeze

CHAIR OF THE BOARD Tara O’Brien Kaiser Permanente

Judy Gibson Strategic Technology Sources

Executive Board of Directors

Michael Herrera Boys & Girls Clubs of the South Bay

CHAIRMAN ELECT Aaron Aalcides Aalcides Enterprises

Peter Issa CapitalSource Bank

VICE CHAIR OF FINANCE Cathy Towers Bank of Manhattan, NA VICE CHAIR OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS Charles Gale, Jr. Metropolitan Water District of Southern California VICE CHAIR OF TACC FOUNDATION Sherry Kramer Continental Development Corporation

Robert Katherman Katherman Co. Water Replenishment District of Southern California Dan Keeton Torrance Community Church of the Nazarene Craig Leach Torrance Memorial Medical Center Marcella Low Southern California Gas Co

VICE CHAIR OF PROGRAMS Heidi Cunningham Kelly Services VICE CHAIR OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Linda Amato DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Torrance - South Bay

Ellenmary Michel Pelican Products, Inc. Sue Moylan Crest Marketing, Inc Shirley Pe South Bay Yellow Cab Cooperative, Inc.

VICE CHAIR OF MEMBERSHIP Dan Thomas Telepacific Communications

Pam Ryan Torrance Marriott

IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIRMAN Mark Waronek Ek & Ek

Greg Saks CSU Dominguez Hills

General Counsel Karl Schmidt Parker, Milliken, Clark, O’Hara & Samuelian

2011-2012

Pat Sandt Green Ink Marketing Theresa Stanberry Stanberry Laundry LLC Joshua Thomas South Bay Equity Lending

Board of Directors Joe Ahn Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems Sector Communications

TACC Staff

Karin Baker American Honda Motor Co., Inc.

Donna Duperron President and CEO

Pablo Borgnino Exxon Mobil Corporation

Kelly Hernandez Membership Manager

Scott Easterday Outback Steakhouse

Shatera Luna Administrative Assistant

Deborah Fehn Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Center

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Lisa Rodriguez Event Coordinator

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About Torrance Magazine Torrance (ISSN #0194-5491) Published by the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce with Green Ink Marketing. Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce 3400 Torrance Blvd., Ste 100, Torrance, CA 90503. (310) 540-5858; Green Ink Marketing, Sue Moylan and Pat Sandt, Mailing Address (No Deliveries Accepted): 2785 Pacific Coast Hwy, Ste. 312 Torrance, CA 90505 310.539.2235. Subscription rates: $20.00 per year. E-mail: Info@GreenInkMarketing.com Send address changes to: Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce c/o Torrance Magazine 3400 Torrance Blvd, Suite 100 Torrance, CA 90503 Tel: 310.540.5858 All rights reserved. Trademarked. ARTICLES: Torrance Magazine is published quarterly and mailed to TACC members and distributed to selected businesses in the community. The publishers welcome written queries regarding articles for possible publications. Articles are subject to editing and are included on an “as space permits basis” at the discretion of the Publisher, Editors and Editorial Board. ITEMS: Material and photos for inclusion must be received 30 days in advance of the quarterly publication date. Reproduction, in whole or in part without written permission, is prohibited. Photos and articles not returned. DISCLAIMER: All reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in Torrance Magazine. The publisher accepts no responsibility for damage arising directly or as a consequence of the use or publication of inaccurate or missing information. The opinions and/or claims expressed by contributors and advertisers are their own, and are not necessarily shared or supported by Torrance Magazine, Green Ink Marketing, its staff, TACC, Board of Directors, or management. Editorial content is intended as general information, and not as specific legal or financial advice; for such, readers are advised to consult professionals in the appropriate field. The Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce and Green Ink Marketing assume no responsibility resulting from the advertising contained in the publication. Printed on FSC Certified Paper with Soy-Based Inks.


CHAMBER EXEC’S MESSAGE The Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce is an organization about ‘commerce.’ It is the purpose of this organization to aid its members in commerce through activities that will improve the awareness of their products or services, attract customers, and find others who can provide goods and services. The Chamber is also a resource to help increase members’ own knowledge by providing a platform for opinions and increasing members visibility within our community.”

‘Veterans Career & Resource Fair; a successful Business Expo and Showcase featuring over 75 Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce members; the excellent monthly programs consisting of HR Professionals, Green Torrance, Ambassadors and Professional Roundtable of Financial Services; and the ‘State of the Region Address’ provided by Congresswoman Janice Hahn, in association with SBACC; we are providing an active voice for our business members.

Frequently, the Chamber facilitates a crossover from business to community activities. The accomplishments of our Chamber during our most recent quarter is an indication of our efforts in facilitating ‘commerce.’ These accomplishments could not have occurred without the volunteers from our membership, and in many instances, without our corporate sponsorships provided by various business members.

Additionally, the 31 business partners through the Chamber’s Adopt-A-School program were honored in December by Mayor Frank Scotto for their incredible support of the students in our community. Anne Trinh, with M Advisory Group, spearheaded our new ‘Women in Business’ group that presented a “Global Girlfriends Holiday Tea”. The mission of ‘Women in Business’ is to bring together the collective energies and abilities of local women to learn, share, network, and reach out to our community. “The goal is to advance businesses and the local community, as well as to make a meaningful and positive impact for the world at large.”

Examples of our activities during the last quarter include: our very active Government Affairs Policy (GAP) group, which has been our source for adopting positions and responses on over a dozen legislative issues; the very successful

The programs and activities listed above are about ‘commerce’, some more directly than others, but each event, each committee meeting, each individual moment of networking, is about conducting commerce in some fashion. Should one or more of these items be of interest to you, let us know; we welcome your participation. After all, ‘commerce’ is what we are about!

The goal is to advance businesses and the local community, as well as to make a meaningful and positive impact for the world at large.

DONNA DUPERRON President and CEO Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce

CO N TAC T I N F O R M AT I O N Ambassadors Mentoring new chamber members Theresa Stanberry stanberrylaundry@yahoo.com

GAP Government Affairs Policy Group Charles Gale Jr. - cgalej@mwdh2o.com

Green Torrance Committee Pat Sandt - Pat@GreenInkMarketing.com

HR Professionals Human Resources Professionals of Torrance Heidi Cunningham cunniha@kellyservices.com

Networking at Noon Our most popular networking lunches TACC - info@torrancechamber.com

PROFS Professional Roundtable of Financial Services Candy Messer - Candy@abandp.com

Tech Pros Technology Professionals of Torrance Dan Thomas - danthomas@telepacific.com

To maximize your exposure in the community, or, to request more information, call the Chamber at (310) 540-5858. We will personally meet with you to create a customized plan to help your business train for success. We want you to succeed and we are able to provide the tools to help you do just that! TO R R A N C E M A G A Z I N E

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H E A LT H A N D W E L L N E S S

Spring Forest QiGong: Rechanneling Energy to Awaken the Body’s Natural Healing Powers BY COLLEEN FARRELL, TORRANCE MEMORIAL MEDICAL CENTER As Albert Einstein once said, “Energy cannot be created or destroyed; it can only be changed from one form to another.” Jacy Jenkins repeats this quote often. She strongly believes tuning into one’s personal energy and transforming it into something positive is a matter of health, and quite possibly life or death. Jenkins, a gang intervention specialist for the Long Beach Unified School District, first turned to eastern methods for stress reduction to cope with witnessing “sad and horrible situations with kids” on a daily basis. She was introduced to the spiritual practice called reiki, developed in 1922 by Japanese Buddhist Mikao Usui. She has since become a third-degree reiki master. The practice works to transfer universal energy (reiki) in the form of ki (pronounced chee), also known as life energy, through the palms of the hands, which allows for self healing and a state of equilibrium. Impressed by how the method had improved her sense of energy and well being, she decided to embrace a newer healing art called Spring Forest Qigong (pronounced cheegong). Qigong is an ancient Chinese practice of aligning breath, movement, healing and meditation. In 1991, after studying Qigong in China for more than 20 years, Master Chunyi Lin decided to combine and simplify the most powerful aspects of the practice. He joined Qigong with the words “spring” (the season of awakening, new life and rebirth) and “forest” (as in seeing the forest as a whole, not

ping into “unconditional love energy” that draws upon spirituality, but not any particular religion.

just as individual trees), to create Spring Forest Qigong. His mission: to share his new practice with the west and make a “healer in every family, and a world without pain.” According to Jenkins the practice compliments other healing arts, including reiki, t’ai chi ch’uan, and yoga. Spring Forest Qigong is comprised of four parts that work in tandem: breathing techniques, gentle movements called active exercises, mental focus, and sound (mainly in the form of chanting or repeating mantras). Jenkins learned the techniques, first through a demonstration video, and then by attending a retreat with Master Lin himself. “At the retreat I could feel this current of energy moving through me. I really felt as if I was in the presence of a highly developed spiritual being,” Jenkins said. “When I left the retreat I felt incredibly at peace. I felt like I was in love with everybody,” she continued with a laugh. According to Jenkins, the techniques guide practitioners to get to the root of what is causing their stress. It teaches them to balance their emotions by tap-

Jenkins now teaches Spring Forest Qigong through Torrance Memorial Medical Center’s HealthLink’s health education program. She also uses elements of the practice to help gang members learn to manage anger and resolve conflicts. By guiding them with simple tools, such as deep breathing techniques and reminders to unclench their hands, she has seen visible transformations in their demeanor that help prevent impulsive and violent behavior. In 2000, Jenkins believes Spring Forest Qigong contributed to her own mother’s recovery from cancer. After her mother was diagnosed with leukemia, she began to learn the practice at her daughter’s urging. One year later, and coincidently the night following a guided telephone meditation with Master Lin, her mother’s blood test came back normal, indicating she was in remission. “I really believe practicing Spring Forest Qigong provided the boost of healing energy she needed to unlock good health,” Jenkins said. At Torrance Memorial, Jenkins leads level 1 Spring Forest QiGong classes. Still lesser known than other healing practices such as yoga and t’ai chi ch’uan, it’s seen a slow, but steady growth in popularity. The next eightweek class session begins the first week of March. For more information, to receive a complete class schedule, or to register for a class, call 310-517-4711.

Spring Forest Qigong is comprised of four parts that work in tandem: breathing techniques, gentle movements called active exercises, mental focus, and sound (mainly in the form of chanting or repeating mantras). 6

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H E A LT H A N D W E L L N E S S

Healthy Residents Equal A Healthy Community BY LIZ WEST ODABASHIAN, SOUTH BAY FAMILY HEALTH CARE You probably think your neighbors from the affluent beach cities are all insured – think again! In the South Bay area alone, one in four individuals is uninsured, of these, most are employed. As our state and national economy face ongoing challenges these staggering numbers continue to increase. Many are desperately searching for a place they can call their medical home; and increasing numbers are finding it at South Bay Family Health Care (SBFHC). A woman with a 40 year career in education and private medical coverage, suddenly found herself ineligible for Medicare and in need of a medical home. Time was of the essence; she had blood pressure medication to refill and couldn’t afford the costly burden of emergency room care. A family member recommended SBFHC. Later she wrote, “We cannot thank you enough for helping us make this transition. We can truly see how your community clinic is a medical home for so many in need. The staff was so nice and she loves her new doctor!”

and counseling, lab services (to include radiology), and even an onsite pharmacy. SBFHC has four health centers located in Redondo Beach, Gardena, and two in Inglewood. They maintain a school-based clinic at Carson High School, the Healthy Kids Express (a mobile health van), and serve more than 20,000 uninsured and underinsured children, men, and women throughout the South Bay and South Los Angeles County. SBFHC’s vision is to have a community in which we have healthy individuals and families— in mind, body and spirit. You may never meet that person you helped, but your support will never be forgotten. Impact a life today, and help your community grow with your support. As a 501(c) (3) nonprofit Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) SBFHC receives philanthropic support from corporate and private donors to maintain the highest level of care.

LIZ WEST ODABASHIAN Director of Development, South Bay Family Health Care

To find out how you can help contact Liz West Odabashian, Director of Development for SBFHC, at 310.227.8100 or lwest@sbclinic.org.

Formerly South Bay Free Clinic, SBFHC is one of the best kept secrets in the south bay. Honoring the same mission since 1969 to provide access to quality health care for individuals and families, regardless of their ability to pay, SBFHC’s patient base has grown to more than 71,000 visits annually. As a medical home to our patients, SBFHC provides a full range of medical services, including pediatric and adult care, chronic disease management, women’s health, prenatal care, dental care, health education, HIV/AIDS testing

You may never meet that person you helped, but your support will never be forgotten. Impact a life today, and help your community grow with your support. TO R R A N C E M A G A Z I N E

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H E A LT H A N D W E L L N E S S

Make a Commitment to Walk for Your Life As 2012 unfolds, make a commitment to yourself and to your employees or co-workers to walk for good health. You don’t have to have fancy fitness equipment or hours of free time to improve your health; all you need are a pair of comfortable walking shoes and 30 minutes every day. Our bodies are made to walk. Walking 30 minutes a day has a significant impact on our health. The best news is that two 15-minute walks have the same health benefits as one 30-minute walk. You can walk 15 minutes in the morning and 15 minutes at night, or try fitting in a 15-minute walk during your work break or lunch. Do you need more motivation to walk? Research shows that walking has countless health benefits: Walking protects you from disease, illness and injury. People who walk are less likely to catch colds, and when people get colds, walkers have a 46 percent shorter symptom time from their colds. Walking also significantly lowers the risk of hip fractures. Walking cuts the rate of people becoming diabetic by more than half — and it cuts the risk of people over 60 becoming diabetic by almost 70 percent. Women who walk have a 20 percent lower likelihood of getting breast cancer and a 31 percent lower risk of getting colon cancer. In addition, women with breast cancer who walk regularly can reduce their recurrence rate and their mortality rate by over 50 percent. Men who walk thirty minutes a day have a significantly lower level of prostate cancer. Men who walk regularly have a 60 percent lower risk of colon cancer. For men with prostate cancer, studies have shown that walkers have a 46 percent lower mortality rate. Walking protects your heart and blood. Walking cuts the risk of stroke by more than 25 percent and reduces the risk of blood clots in your legs.

Walking also improves the health of our blood, as well. Walking boosts your “good cholesterol”, or HDL levels— and people with high HDL levels are less likely to have heart attacks and stroke. Walking reduces hypertension. A single 30-minute walk can reduce blood pressure by five points for more than 20 hours. Walking is good for your mind. The body generates endorphins when we walk. Endorphins help us feel good. So, it should be no surprise that walking helps prevent depression, and people who walk regularly are more likely to see improvements in their depression. In one study, people who walked and took medication scored twice as well in 30 days as the people who only took the medication. Another study showed that depressed people who walked regularly had a significantly higher level of not being depressed in a year compared to depressed people who did not walk. Walking can have more of an impact on your health than “dieting”. Research shows that walking half an hour a day has greater health benefits than losing 20 pounds. Walking speeds up metabolism and burns calories. Walkers often find that their eating habits change, resulting in weight loss. Walking generates positive neurochemicals—the substances that control our central nervous system, including our emotions and thought—while dieting can trigger negative neurochemicals. Walking feels good. It helps the body heal, and it keeps the body healthy. It improves our physical and emotional health. Walking can literally add years to your life. Are you convinced that it’s time to start walking? For more information and health resources, go to www.kp.org/thrive. Or, visit www.everybodywalk.org to learn more about a new Android and iPhone app that helps you create a walking plan, track your progress, and meet up with other walkers in your community.

Our bodies are made to walk. Walking 30 minutes a day has a significant impact on our health. 8

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We believe in a healthy Torrance We believe health isn’t an industry—it’s a cause. And there’s no better feeling than knowing we’re growing to meet the needs for a healthier South Bay. Kaiser Permanente facilities nearby: Torrance Medical Offices South Bay Medical Center 20790 Madrona Ave. 25825 S. Vermont Ave. Torrance, CA 90503 Harbor City, CA 90710 For more information about Kaiser Permanente, give us a call at 1-800-4644000, or at 1-800-777-1370 (TTY for the hearing/speech impaired). You may also visit us online at kp.org.


H E A LT H A N D W E L L N E S S L I V I N G L I F E S E N S AT I O N A L LY:

Pediatric Therapy Network’s New Sensory Partners Initiative Most people know about senses and their effects (sights, sounds, smells, etc.). What is not as commonly known is how critical our senses are for learning, coordinating movements, feeling comfortable and organized, and for getting through all of life’s situations both successfully and productively. Pediatric Therapy Network (PTN), a nonprofit child development and therapy center in Old Torrance, offers services locally and globally with the mission of helping children and families reach full capabilities through innovative therapy, education, and research programs. One new and innovative program aimed at enhancing wellness for all people is the Sensory Partners

Initiative. Through a very long history of serving children and families struggling with sensory issues, PTN understands the importance of increasing awareness about the role of the sensory systems within the general population. We all know of people especially sensitive to specific clothing or food textures, certain odors, or someone bothered by motion or height. Conversely, some need and crave sensations like deep muscle pressure (felt during activities like yoga), or even need the thrill of a fast amusement park ride. By increasing awareness about both the better and lesser understood senses, PTN hopes to enhance development for children and promote comfort and satisfaction in the life of adults as well.

PTN hopes to enhance development for children and promote comfort and satisfaction in the life of adults as well. Beginning in 2012, PTN will name 7 Sensory Partners each year; one for each sense. The five best known senses, Sight, Sound, Taste, Smell and Touch, and the two lesser known senses of Position Awareness and Movement and Balance will be highlighted. Each partner is a business who is dedicated to social responsibility in making the world a more comfortable and accessible place for all people. In addition, the partners will benefit by sharing educational information about their designated sense with their own customers and employeed. As an example, Torrance based YogaFit will be the 2012 Sensory Partner for Proprioception (the Sense of Position Awareness). PTN and YogaFit hope to promote an understanding on how to access and use the calming and organizing aspect of position awareness through activities like yoga, and add more healthy choices to a daily routine. The 2012 Sensory Partner for Smell, Snooty Roots, a company whose candles remove the lingering smell of cooking odors, knows that by creating a

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H E A LT H A N D W E L L N E S S clean and fresh aroma in an environment, a sense of well-being, reduction of irritation, and increase in attention and participation can follow. Goodbites (the Sensory Partner for Taste) will share wellness information supported and encouraged through a diet inclusive of healthy fresh and dried fruit, and nut snacks. PTN hopes to remove the concept of disability and concentrate on variability in the way we all develop, grow and move through life. Life is sensational, even when ‘pleasant’ or ‘uncomfortable’ varies from person to person. The more we all know and understand about our senses, the better we can understand ourselves and each other. For more information about Pediatric Therapy Network and the Sensory Partner Initiative see www.pediatrictherapynetwork.org.

“Doctors can heal the body, but it is music that uplifts the spirit.” M O T HE R T ERE S A —M

M

other Teresa was no stranger to sickness and disease. Her organization had 610 missions in 123 countries, including hospices and homes for people with HIV, leprosy and tuberculosis, and yet with all of her firsthand knowledge of life and death, she still understood and believed in the therapeutic power of music. Music is used in pain management, for relaxation, meditation, sleep disorders, hypnosis, and to relieve stress; used in cancer therapy, depression, and PTSD. We are all affected by music in ways often difficult to measure, and with results that are too hard to miss. Music brings us together and has the ability to erase the lines that separate gender, religion, culture, age, and race. Whether you are making the music or taking in the notes, you are sure to be transformed.

Remember, it’s never too late to learn how to play an instrument, make new friends that share your interests, and never too late to enjoy. Consider learning to play and instrument for recreation, or hone on skills for mastery and performance. There are many instructional books and DVDs on how to get started. Visit us at www.kdimusic.com , or contact us at support@kdimusic.com to learn more about our instruments from beginner to professional level woodwinds and brass.

At KDI, we want music to be contagious and hope our passion spreads; it is definitely worth catching.

“A Passion For The Perfect Sound”

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USA Educator Instruments Vintage Posters & T-Shirts Music Accessories

www.kdimusic.com The Premier Internet Store For Great Deals for more information please email us at: info@kdimusic.com

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H E A LT H A N D W E L L N E S S

Early Orthodontic Intervention Can Avoid Problems Later

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When we think about orthodontics, we tend to envision teenagers with braces; but earlier orthodontic intervention may also be necessary and beneficial to children’s oral health.

atric dentist can work with parents to help avoid habits that may cause problems, such as thumb sucking or overuse of pacifiers.

If your child is seeing a pediatric dentist as recommended every six months, any nascent problems can be spotted early on. If problems are minor, a children’s dentist may decide to monitor the situation, but if there are more severe irregularities, then early orthodontic intervention can have enormous benefits for the child, including correct jaw growth for appropriate alignment and spacing of adult teeth and increasing self-confidence.

Ages 6-12: The aim is to correct crossbites and start realigning teeth as necessary; the pliant nature of tissues makes this age the perfect time to begin correcting alignment.

Dentists typically identify three key stages in orthodontic treatment:

13 and beyond: This stage may involve the fitting of either fixed or removable braces to straighten permanent teeth and enhance the child’s smile. Many teenagers will be suitable candidates for Invisalign or Incognito; these systems make braces almost invisible, thus eliminating a great deal of teenage resistance to the treatment.

Ages 2-6: The focus is to ensure there is sufficient space for the permanent teeth to erupt properly. A pedi-

For more information on Dr. Louis Mascola, visit MascolaOrthodontics.com

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Meet our extraordinary team.

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310-784-3014

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H E A LT H A N D W E L L N E S S

New Year, New You: How to Set and Keep Fitness Resolutions! It’s a brand new year, which means we get the chance to start over, finally become that healthy, happy and productive person we always strive to be. But our enthusiasm over New Year’s resolutions always seems to fade, especially when it comes to exercise and diet. In order to make your resolutions work all year long, and in turn make lasting changes, it’s important to set realistic goals that will truly lead you on a path to success. We’ve called upon the experts at UFC Gym, the fitness facility that combines the best of traditional fitness with the innovation of the MMA, to provide some advice in getting in tip top shape. Their brand new Torrance location provides members the opportunity to not only work out like a world-class athlete, but learn cutting edge training techniques suited for any age or fitness level. Dustin Holcomb, Personal Training Manager at UFC Gym Torrance, says “In order to get in shape and stay in shape, it’s all about training differently.” So for those of us whose fitness routine usually involves a bicep curl to sip your coffee and walk to the printer, here’s Holcomb’s tips for getting a kick start to those fitness resolutions:

Don’t target just one big goal - Set realistic monthly targets of 6-8lbs with a long-term goal on the back burner. This will keep you more focused and motivated every day. Don’t weigh every day, once per week is plenty. Move more 30/30/4 - 30 minutes of efficient resistance training followed by 30 minutes of cardio 4 days per week. Use multi-joint (compound) exercises in a total body circuit style format to maximize the calorie burn for your resistance training. Go through a few sessions with a Certified Personal Trainer to learn a good workout plan customized for you if you’re not sure where to start. This will save you a lot of frustration in the long run! Keep a food log - Keep track of everything you consume that has calories. Write it down even if you don’t how many calories are in it. You’ll start to think twice before making poor choices if you have to account for it later. No fad diets - Choose a meal plan that you will be able to follow for a lifetime. Small portions of healthy choices of the foods you like. Try a supplement - Use a fat loss product from an FDA recognized supplement company to burn more calories in everything you do. Thermogenic (caffeine based) is the most common and is very effective when used properly in conjunction with regular exercise and a smart meal plan. www.dotFIT.com is a great resource and has other options for those who are sensitive to caffeine. For more information about UFC Gym’s 40,000 sq. foot facility, including resistance and cardio equipment, personal training, MMA instruction, UFC Kid’s Training Studio, and complete group class schedules visit www.ufcgym.com or call 1-877-2UFCGYM.

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H E A LT H A N D W E L L N E S S

A Culture of Health at ExxonMobil Helps Torrance Thrive A long-term study of 177,000 former and current U.S. ExxonMobil employees reveals an overall favorable health outlook. The study – the largest of its kind for the petroleum industry – was conducted by comparing employees’ public death records to what would be expected among Americans in general. Studies of this kind guide decisions about future health and safety studies, programs, and activities. Among the ExxonMobil population studied, death rates from cancer were more than 20 percent lower than that found in the comparable U.S. population, and deaths from heart disease and from all external causes (such as accidents) were more than 30 percent lower than what would be expected in the general population. These positive findings are partially attributed to a commonly accepted notion called the “healthy worker effect.” That is, people who are able to seek, gain, and maintain employment, are generally healthier than the overall population. Additionally, employed persons tend to have access to health care and generally lead healthier lifestyles. As a member of the Oil and Gas industry, which experienced an 80 percent increase in jobs since 2003, ExxonMobil contributes to the “healthy worker effect” through employment opportunities and strong traditions to keep its workplaces safe and healthy. Further, it creates a culture of health that extends to the community through employee participation in local organizations that support health and wellness initiatives.

According to Torrance Refinery Manager Pablo Borgnino, “We care about our employees’ well-being because health and safety are tied to each other. Health is aligned with our safety culture, and here in Torrance, that culture is alive. Employees take advantage of the programs, activities and services we offer so that they can thrive.” As an example, the Torrance Refinery with its 700 employees is served by a Health and Wellness committee, which coordinates programs to promote healthy habits. It is common for the leadership team and employees to exercise at the newly updated gym or enjoy lunch-hour soccer and basketball games. It supports a value that physical fitness is critical to safe job performance. ExxonMobil also recognizes the shared health benefit of volunteerism. With personal health as a foundation, employees go beyond the refinery and participate in community outreach to organizations that contribute to Torrance’s well-being. Pediatric Therapy Network and South Bay Children’s Health Center are just a few of the organizations that are supported by the refinery. This kind of engagement creates the mutual benefit of enhancing employees’ emotional health, while serving the needs of the community. For more information on ExxonMobil, please visit our website www.TorranceRefinery.com.

We care about our employees’ well-being because health and safety are tied to each other. Health is aligned with our safety culture, and here in Torrance, that culture is alive. Employees take advantage of the programs, activities and services we offer so that they can thrive. 16

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Using Yoga to Better Your Posture BY BETH SHAW, PRESIDENT/FOUNDER, YOGAFIT, INC. Poor posture is becoming more prevalent in our society. With how much time people spend sitting hunched over at desks and computers, or stuck in traffic on their commutes to and from work, it’s no surprise when we see a client with poor posture. Not only does poor posture lead to back pain that BETH SHAW limits one’s ability to perform President/Founder ordinary daily tasks, but it can YogaFit also contribute to improper execution of exercises, which is why it’s important to spend time focusing on strengthening core and back muscles during your work out. There are many yoga postures that can enhance good posture; but let’s first look at Yoga’s overall benefits. Yoga is the 6,000-year-old secret to health and vitality. Yoga can be considered technology for getting back in touch with our true essence and ourselves. It is a way of remembering the health and wholeness that is our natural state of being. Yoga, when broken down to its most simple form, is breathing and feeling. Through this breathing and feeling, we learn to control our reactions to

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events and people. It is not the “events and people� in our lives that give us stress; it is the way we react to them. Yoga postures, combined with deep breathing, facilitate deep relaxation that combats stress. Yoga massages the skeletal system which supports bone mass and growth while taking the stress away from the supporting muscles and tendons. Yoga mechanically removes tension from the muscles through stretching. The steady/even yoga breathing, reduces stress levels in the body. Stress response, is accompanied by rapid, shallow breathing. Yoga encourages deep diaphragmatic breathing activating a relaxation response. Yoga also massages the internal organs reducing high blood pressure, stress in the cardiovascular system at the level of the heart, arteries, and blood. The nerves are massaged and stretched through yoga, conducting messages throughout the body. Yoga teaches a whole set of patterns which are helpful in reducing stress. Including simply opening up the body and creating good posture. Yoga can be truly a multifaceted cure. For more information, visit www.yogafit.com


H E A LT H A N D W E L L N E S S

Early Detection is the Best Defense Against Breast Cancer Until there is a cure, early detection is the best defense against breast cancer. When found in its earliest stages, there is a 95% cure rate. Knowing this startling statistic should serve as a wake-up call to each of us to do all we can to catch breast cancer in its earliest stages; it is up to us. In addition to annual clinical exams and mammography, breast self-exams are one of the most effective tools available in detecting changes in the breast tissue, yet so few of us perform them. Statistics show that only 10% of women perform monthly breast self-exams. Many of us go on the assumption that what we don’t know can’t hurt us, but now we know just how untrue that thought truly is! Who’s at risk? Anyone, male or female can develop breast cancer, but simply being a woman significantly increases the risk of breast cancer. • 1 in 7 women are expected to develop breast cancer in their lifetime. • Currently, a new case of breast cancer is diagnosed every two minutes! • 1,907 men were diagnosed with breast cancer in 2010. • There are 2.5 million women living with breast cancer in the United States. • Breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women age 20-59. Because performing breast self-exams is so important in the defense against this disease, and the fact that so few women perform them, it is our job to encourage and promote this strategy. You don’t need health insurance or a doctor’s visit, just the time and knowledge to perform selfexams effectively and consistently every month. The more familiar you become with your breast tissue, the easier it will be to detect abnormalities. Consistency is the key. It is recommended to perform breast self-exams three to four days after

the menstrual cycle – for men and women that do not go through this cycle, it is recommended to perform self-exams at the same time each month. There are devices on the market today to assist in making breast self-exams more effective and comfortable, known as breast self-exam aids. One such device is called the Liv, co-developed by breast cancer survivor Olivia Newton John, along with Dr. Ernie Bodai, a world renowned Breast Cancer Surgeon. The LIV® breast self-exam aid works by enhancing the sense of touch, with routine use over time, it can assist with noticing changes in the breast tissue. Often a lump that is noticed with the LIV® is not found with a bare hand. Learn more about the LIV® breast self-exam aid, view videos, related topics, and download a free guide to performing breast selfexams by visiting www.liv.com

Spread the word on the importance of early detection. Through sharing our knowledge, we can change the way breast cancer is viewed and treated. Let our goal be to enable more people to catch breast cancer in the earliest stages. To review a variety of products related to health, business, and gifts, contact Carrie Lautner from Geiger West at 310.937.0996, or www.GeigerMall.com/ CARRIE LAUTNER CLautner. For more Geiger West information on the LIV®, please visit LivGeiger.com/CL25.

Breast self-examination is not a replacement for a mammogram or clinical breast exam by your doctor. It is very important that you have regular clinical exams and mammograms as advised by your doctor. Report any changes to your doctor found either with your bare hand or the LIV® aid exam for proper evaluation. If you discover a lump, puckering, or discharge during either a bare-handed breast exam or a LIV® aid exam, it is important that you see your doctor as soon as possible. We can change the course of breast cancer. Love yourself. It begins with you. Beginning at age 20 protect your breast health: • Make a commitment to yourself to do breast self-exams once a month, every month. • See your doctor for annual clinical exams. • Mammography - once you reach the age of 40 or at the recommendation of your doctor. TO R R A N C E M A G A Z I N E

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H E A LT H A N D W E L L N E S S FA M I LY C A R E G I V I N G :

How to Tell When Mom or Dad Need Help Sometimes the realization comes suddenly and unexpectedly. Your elder parent needs help and you wonder, “How did I not see this? What do I do now?” “It’s easy for a busy adult to overlook the sometimes subtle signs that a senior loved one needs assistance,” says Farrah Benedict, General Manager of the Home Instead Senior Care office in Torrance. “It’s important to be on the lookout for any red flags.” One way you can be prepared for the eventuality of a parent who needs help rather than facing a sudden crisis, is to be vigilant about recognizing some of the signs. They include: • Dirty or unkempt clothing or clutter, such as piles of magazines • Spoiled food in the refrigerator, or stacks of unpaid bills • Personal indicators, such as

episodes of confusion or unfilled prescriptions If it becomes obvious that an elderly loved-one needs assistance, there are several questions that should be answered, starting with the level and kind of care that will be needed. How much can you afford? Does your parent have long-term care insurance? What will it cover? The list goes on. It’s also important to know that you are not alone. The senior population in the United States is increasing at an astonishing rate, and an estimated 44 million Americans, age 18 and older, currently provide unpaid assistance and support to older people and adults with disabilities. The cost value of this unpaid labor force is estimated to be at least $306

billion annually, nearly double the combined costs of home health care and nursing home care. “Lifestyle choices are fairly extensive these days,” adds Benedict, “ranging from aging- in-place and family care, to adult day care centers and assisted living facilities. An assessment of your parent’s needs is always the first step.” The ideal option for most seniors is to live at home surrounded by treasured belongings. This is often possible, with help from family members as well as some assistance from an in-home nonmedical caregiver who can provide anything from meal preparation and light housekeeping to local transportation and companionship. When seeking a caregiver, some of the questions to ask are: • Is the caregiver an agency employee, an agency contract employee, or working on her own? It is important to know the difference. Agency employees are recommended, since they have insurance coverage and other protections for both client and caregiver that a full-time employee would have. • Have the caregivers been trained and by whom? • Have the agency’s caregivers passed background checks and has the agency secured personal references on all caregivers? Help or advice is just a phone call away. For more information, call Home Instead Senior Care of Torrance at 310542-0563 or visit http://www.homeinstead.com/286.

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H E A LT H A N D W E L L N E S S

Being a Pharmacist If you think about it, the pharmacist is the most available and accessible of health professionals. People come to us with all kinds of questions ranging from What is the best blood pressure machine? to Should I see my doctor about this mole? But ask most individuals on the street What do Pharmacists do? and they will most likely tell you: They count pills. Yes, we count pills, and do so much more.

if the drug is new to the patient, the pharmacist must (by law) consult with the patient. The pharmacist will explain what the drug is for, how to take it, and what side effects might be expected; even how to store it. Often problems can be caught at the counseling window. If the pharmacist says This drug is used for blood pressure, and the patient says I’m supposed to be getting something for my cholesterol, then red flags go up. Questions need to be asked and answered.

Aside from the traditional pill counting (which nowadays is done mostly by technicians), pharmacists are responsible for checking and overseeing the technicians’ and typists work. He or she must verify that what the doctor ordered is what is on the label and inside the bottle. This means making sure that everything was typed correctly, the right drug was chosen and filled, the quantity is correct, and the appropriate auxiliary labels are all on the bottle. But that’s not all. In addition, the pharmacists must check for drug interactions and contraindications that might occur because of a person’s age, gender, or medical condition.

Pharmacists keep themselves very busy; it is a dynamic profession that includes past, present, and future.

A pharmacist will call the physician if he/she feels the dosage prescribed is incorrect or that a contraindication exists. Once a pharmacist is satisfied that everything is correct, the prescription is released to be sold. Furthermore,

and B are only a few of the immunizations pharmacists stock and administer. Pharmacists go through rigorous practical and continuing education courses. The actual practice of pharmacy is not limited to retail or hospitals; there are pharmacists in education, industry, research, and even in nuclear medicine. Pharmacists must stay up to date to keep patients healthy and to answer the many questions sure to come up. Tony Dikdan has been a pharmacist since 1971. He is currently practicing as Pharmacy Manager at the Torrance Costco.

Prior to the 1950s, pharmacists compounded almost all medications; some pharmacies still do compounding. A physician may require two or more liquids or creams to be mixed, or an extra drug to be added to them. Some pharmacies still compound capsules, tablets, and suppositories. Hospital pharmacies might compound IV liquids. Many hospital pharmacists now go on rounds with the physicians and may even suggest a course of drug treatment for the patient. The latest in retail pharmacy is immunizations. Even though immunizing in the retail setting is only a few years old in California, it has already become commonplace. Nowadays, immunizing pharmacists can give many types of injections. Flu, pertussis, diphtheria, tetanus, shingles, pneumonia, and hepatitis A

Pharmacists keep themselves very busy; it is a dynamic profession that includes past, present, and future. TO R R A N C E M A G A Z I N E

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H E A LT H A N D W E L L N E S S

Losing Weight for the New Year and Keeping it Off BY DANIEL LINARES, MD, PROVIDENCE MEDICAL INSTITUTE It’s that time of year, when millions of people make New Year’s resolutions to lose weight. Unfortunately, a majority of those who manage to shed a few pounds gain it right back. The big questions: How do we keep the weight loss resolutions throughout the New Year? and, How do we commit DANIEL LINARES, MD ourselves to that lifestyle change? Providence Medical Institute

Those most likely to lose weight – and keep it off – are those who seek help from professional programs with proven track records. The biggest problem is that people who want to lose weight most often don’t have a plan, or they don’t have a plan that works. People must stay away from diets that allow little variety or not enough food to feel satisfied. A successful weight loss plan includes a lifestyle change, not just a diet. Without a plan, you set yourself up for failure. Stay away from gimmicks and testimonials from people who claim they lost weight using powders, pills or some other “magic weight loss plan.” A lot of these products are not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and consumers don’t have the information they need to determine if the product will work. In fact, some products can be very dangerous to your health. Before you try to make any changes to your habits, you must find out what your body mass index (BMI) is and compare it to what your healthy BMI should be. It’s also important to eat light and right, and keep a record or daily journal of snacks and meals as well as how much exercise you get. The next step is to make a long-term commitment with realistic and specific goals: If you’re going to change your

eating and exercise habits, you can’t set a finish line after the first three months; you must be motivated to make changes that will last for the rest of your life. Weight loss is not about what you do in one or two days, it’s what you do next week and in the months to follow. Adding exercise not only will reduce your risk of several chronic conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, osteoarthritis and some forms of cancer, but it will improve your health even before the numbers on the scale begin to change. A good program should include a dietary plan with educational guidelines, an exercise regime, medical supervision, and support from your family. Don’t get discouraged if you fall off track and gain a few pounds; most people are able to immediately make adjustments to get back on track. It is very important that you seek support from your family, friends, and group therapy such as Overeaters Anonymous, where members will help you maintain your regime and offer a place where you can discuss the challenges you are facing. Keep eating well and continue exercising to maintain the healthy life you deserve! Daniel Linares, MD, is a family practice physician at Providence Medical Institute, a group of more than 55 primary care physicians dedicated to providing the highest quality medical care to the community. Composed of family practitioners, internal medicine physicians and pediatricians, Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Institute has more than 10 local neighborhood locations. If you are looking for a physician referral please contact the Health Resource Center at Providence Little Company of Mary’s at 1-866-909-DOCS or visit http://www.providencemedicalinstitute.org/.

A good program should include a dietary plan with educational guidelines, an exercise regime, medical supervision, and support from your family. 22

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H E A LT H A N D W E L L N E S S

Health and Fitness— Movement is MedicineTM Many people are looking for the “Fountain of Youth.” Sadly, it does not exist. But, the good news is that regular physical activity is the closest resource available to mirror the effects of a fountain of youth. The American Medical Association and the American College of Sports Medicine have started the “Exercise is Medicine™” campaign, which encourages physicians to make exercise a part of every discussion and to write exercise prescriptions for their patients. With the same school of thought, Brookdale Senior Living has branded its program “Movement is Medicine” to illustrate the point that there are many ways to accomplish the recommended goal of 30 minutes of moderate activity most days of the week. “Even if exercise has not been a part of someone’s regime until later in life, it is never too late to start and reap the benefits it provides,” said Dr. Kevin O’Neil, Medical Director for Brookdale Senior Living. Older adults are encouraged to speak with their physicians before implementing an exercise program. For those less physically active, a doctor may recommend less strenuous activity to start with, such as resistance training and/or walking. Keep in mind that there are many fun, unique ways to get moving, including walking, dancing, gardening, participating in yoga or water aerobics class and many more. Once exercise becomes a regular part of a person’s life, he or she will begin to feel the positive effects immediately. Exercise is credited to prevent or reduce

the risks for many ailments, including: • Heart disease • Weight gain • Immobility • Hypertension • Diabetes • Osteoporosis • Sleep disorders “Regular physical activity is as powerful as any prescription that I can write,” said Dr. O’Neil. “Older adults will have better health outcomes and quality of life as a result of integrating movement into their lifestyles.” “In fact, no other single life change is capable of having impact in so many

areas of health and wellness as is moderate activity for 30 minutes on most days of the week,” said Dr. O’Neil. For more information on living a healthy lifestyle, please call Susie at Pacific Inn (310-543-1174) or visit us on the web www.brookdaleliving.com.

Don’t Underestimate Me. Seniors today enjoy vibrant lifestyles accompanied by an independent spirit that says, “Don’t underestimate me.” That’s why our community provides the kind of lifestyle we know they want and appreciate. We encourage our residents to be as active, social and independent as they choose. And we never underestimate the power of their spirit – or yours.

Call or visit us today to learn more. Independent Living Exceptional Experiences Every DaySM 5481 W.Torrance Blvd., Torrance, CA 90503

(310) 543-1174 Your story continues here... www.brookdaleliving.com Exceptional Experiences Every Day is a Service Mark of Brookdale Senior Living Inc., Nashville, TN, USA 00968-ROP01-1211-VH

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H E A LT H A N D W E L L N E S S

Swim for Life‌and it’s a lot of fun, too! Learning to swim is imperative to prevent drowning incidents but it is also a lifetime sport that has many physical, psychological and social benefits. Infants, children, adults, seniors and people with disabilities can all gain from the many health benefits that swimming provides. Swimming has been shown to improve coordination, strength, and lung capacity in infants and toddlers. Baby and me classes create a strong bond with family while helping children socially develop as they interact with other kids and adults in a new environment. Learning to swim boosts confidence and independence while improving fitness levels. Children competing on a swim team learn the importance of teamwork, sportsmanship and goal setting while building relationships with teammates and socializing with their peers.

Anyone can do it! Regardless of your age, weight, skill level or fitness ability, swimming is regarded as one of the safest exercises, with very little risk of injury. Swimming requires the use of several muscle groups, improving overall strength and endurance. Swimming is an excellent form of cardiovascular exercise, but many consider it a form of strength exercise as well since movement in water is twelve times more resistant than movement on land. Many doctors promote swimming for those who suffer from injury, have limited mobility or arthritis. The buoyancy of water reduces impact, minimizing stress to joints and muscles, allowing the body to recover while improving strength and flexibility. In addition, swimming also helps persons with disabilities develop coordination, as it involves movement from just about every muscle in the body. Dive right in! Find a local pool that offers programs that meet your individual needs and get started today. If not being able to swim prevents you from

gaining from the many health benefits that swimming offers, then inquire about adult swim lessons and find out what you have been missing! Although swimming offers great health benefits, we must be aware of the dangers as well. According to the Center for Disease Control, drowning is the second leading cause of unintentional deaths in children ages 1 to 14. Parents and other adults must take measures to reduce risk of drowning by providing layers of protection including: constant supervision of children regardless of swimming ability, installation of four-sided isolation fences around home pools, learning to swim, never swimming alone, and maintaining CPR certification. Safety first and swim on! Karen Holmes is the Executive Director of South Bay Aquatics and may be contacted at Kleigh.holmes@gmail.com or 323-599-1078

Regardless of your age, weight, skill level or fitness ability, swimming is regarded as one of the safest exercises, with very little risk of injury. 24

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H E A LT H A N D W E L L N E S S

It’s EVERY BODY’s Pilates “Pilates saved my life.” That’s not something you hear every day, but Jill Carlton from Every Body’s Pilates is living proof of the profound benefits of Pilates. Jill was hit by a car and not expected to even make it to the hospital, but she did, and to this day she thanks her Pilates body!

FUNctional Fitness For Your Body!

pilates

yoga

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310-533-1778 EveryBodysPilates.com

Her surgeons called it “medically reportable,” which is the doctor’s way of saying “Who would have thought?” In fact, due to the severity of the numerous fractures, especially to her demolished pelvis, Jill wasn’t expected to survive, let alone ever walk again. After further evaluation, the physicians agreed that the fitness level she achieved from Pilates had been the key to her survival and ability to make it through the multiple surgeries, months of hospitalization and two full years plus of rehabilitation. Jill’s story is a testament of the numerous benefits Pilates offers. Pilates can be incorporated into a person’s life and routine to make them look, feel and move better in everyday activities. Pilates is much more than just another fitness program. Inspired from yoga, martial arts, body building and anatomy, Pilates is an integrative mind/body program that uses movement and breathing patterns to strengthen and stabilize deep core muscles. Some of the benefits include improving balance, flexibility, joint mobility and coordination, while at the same time, it decreases levels of stress and pain. The bottom line is, by adding Pilates into your life, your body will move more

booty barre

1530 Cravens Ave, Old Torrance

efficiently during daily activities, be they work or play. Jill says, “Teach your body to work for you, not against you, when you sit at meetings, drive in traffic, bend over to pick up the kids, hit the fairways, etc.; use it! Hopefully, your testimonial will not be as dramatic as mine, but the positive effects on your life will be just as important.” Every Body’s Pilates in Old Torrance is a charming loft-style Pilates studio with high open-beamed ceilings, warm usedbrick walls, and plenty of natural light. It is the perfect place to feel comfortable, energized and ready for profound mind and body connections. In addition to private and semi-private sessions, they have a wide selection of small group classes, including Pilates mat and reformer, Zumba, Yoga, and Booty Barre. For more information, please visit EverybodysPilates.com, call 310-5331778, or visit the studio at 1530 Cravens Avenue in Old Torrance.

Pilates is much more than just another fitness program. Inspired from yoga, martial arts, body building and anatomy, Pilates is an integrative mind/body program that uses movement and breathing patterns to strengthen and stabilize deep core muscles.

Teach your body to work for you, not against you, when you sit at meetings, drive in traffic, bend over to pick up the kids, hit the fairways, etc.; use it! TO R R A N C E M A G A Z I N E

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FROM THE CIT Y OF TORRANCE

CERT—Helping Residents and Business Members to Safeguard the Community in Case of Emergency Ranked among the top 25 safest cities with a population of 100,000500,000 in United States, the City of Torrance takes the business of public safety and emergency preparedness very seriously. As we know, a large component of public safety involves a city’s ability to respond to emergency situations in a timely and efficient manner. Through the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT), the City of Torrance aims to train

and maintain a dynamic community force consisting of resident volunteers and business members to respond to emergency situations. Torrance is one of the few California cities on the frontier of emergency management. Through emergency preparedness programs like the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT), the City strives to provide assistance to local residents and

Once volunteers are trained, CERT members become community partners in ensuring the public safety and emergency preparedness.

businesses in the most cost effective and timely manner. CERT provides basic skills and information necessary to cope and recover from both manmade and natural disasters. Torrance Fire Department instructors train volunteers to assist themselves, their families, neighbors and the City in the event of a major emergency or disaster. Not only does it provide emergency relief for the community, CERT also helps the City to leverage effective spending through the utilization of community resources. Once volunteers are trained, CERT members become community partners in ensuring the public safety and emergency preparedness. Over the years, Torrance Police have activated CERT for numerous non-emergency assistance roles, such as monitoring first-aid stations or traffic barricades for public events, partnering with police and Torrance Memorial Medical Center to host free CPR training, and neighborhood lighting patrols. All of these activities would have cost the City and Police Department a considerable amount of money, but now, it only costs Torrance under $25,000 annually, thanks to volunteers of the Community Emergency Response Team. Today, police and CERT are continuing to work together to promote Neighborhood Watch and Business Watch networks, and to further ensure emergency preparedness for local residents and businesses. The CERT training covers basic skills that are important in a disaster when emergency services are not available. Volunteers complete a nine-module training course that covers topics including, but not limited to, disaster preparedness, medical operations, search and rescue, and disaster psychology. After only 24 hours of training, trainees gain experience in the areas of earthquake awareness, fire

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F RO M TO R R A N C E U N I F I E D S C H O O L D I S T R I C T F RO M T H E O F F I C E O F D R . G E O R G E M A N N O N

Superintendent’s New Year Message… suppression, team organization and management, simulated disaster drill and the like. As long as you are over the age of 18 and live or work in Torrance, you are eligible to join Torrance CERT. Once you have successfully completed the training, you will be able to register as a Torrance Disaster Service Volunteer (DSV). As a new DSV member, you will receive a hard hat, disaster response supplies and an identification card. In order to ensure that your skills and knowledge are up to date, you will attend two refresher courses annually thereafter. If you are interested in attending an upcoming CERT Basic Training Course, you may register by contacting the Community Services Department at (310)618-2720 or online at www.torranceca.gov/CERT. The 28th CERT Academy will be held on Friday, March 2nd, 2012 from 6:00PM-10:00PM, Saturday, March 3rd, 2012 from 7:00AM-5:00PM, and Sunday, March 4th, 2012 from 7:00AM-5:00PM. In case you cannot make it to this session, you may register for the 29th Academy, which consists of eight consecutive Tuesday evenings from May 1st to June 19th, 2012, from 6:30PM-9:30PM.

I would like to take this opportunity to wish all of our Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce business partners and friends a very happy New Year! On behalf of Torrance Unified and the Board of Education we hope you have a successful and prosperous 2012! TUSD is dedicated to not only fostering academic excellence in our students, but making sure they are equipped with the tools to grow up into happy and healthy adults. Several years ago we adopted a Health and Wellness Policy, doing away with soda machines and unhealthy foods on our campuses. Instead, we offer our students a wide variety of food options, including salad bars and grilled foods that are healthier options for growing children. Additionally, students are encouraged to walk daily and engage in healthy activities whenever possible. The District is very fortunate to include Kaiser Permanente, Providence Little Company of Mary, and Torrance Memorial Hospitals as business partners. Not only do these renowned health organizations provide their respective school sites with resources such as CPR and First Aid training, but they have been instrumental in providing extensive resources to our students. This year, at Towers Elementary, Kaiser Permanente will be hosting a series of activities designed around healthy snacks. A dietician will be on hand to speak with parents and provide examples of healthy snack alternatives to students. Also, Kaiser health professionals are hosting a trip for third graders to the Torrance Farmers market which will include a lesson on nutrition. Providence Little Company of Mary’s Creative Opportunity for Physical Activity (COPA) program provides

Lincoln Elementary with a physical education specialist who works with teachers on developing activity programs to help students stay motivated and engaged. The eight week program was DR. GEORGE MANNON designed to develop a Torrance Unified School District Superintendent progression of skills in students from simple to more complex. Torrance Memorial Medial Center has been very active on the Calle Mayor Middle School campus. During Red Ribbon Week, Torrance Memorial provided counselors to speak to eighth graders about various health related topics. They have also hosted study trips for students, helping to foster interests in different health care professions. This real-life access to health professionals is an invaluable experience for our students. Torrance Unified School District is part of a community with a very active business sector. Torrance businesses are not only interested in making a profit, but are very keen on finding ways to give back to the community, especially through education. Having businesses from so many different industries provides our students and teachers with a plethora of opportunities to enhance classroom learning with real-life tangible examples of success and resources. I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce and its members for helping us educate the whole student, mind and body. For more information on Torrance Unified, please visit www.TUSD.org.

Having businesses from so many different industries provides our students and teachers with a plethora of opportunities to enhance classroom learning with real-life tangible examples of success and resources. TO R R A N C E M A G A Z I N E

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F RO M T H E TO R R A N C E C E N TE N N I A L CO M M I T TE E

“Lights, Camera, Action” Event—Postcards Now Available!

On November 6th, nearly 3000 gathered at twilight, flashlights in hand, to kick-off the City’s Centennial. Aerial photographs captured the sparkling group, lighting up the sky and making history! Postcards for purchase are available: Five scenes (8.5x5.5)- $1. Five Individual scenes/postcards (4x6) - $2. To view and purchase please visit www.TorranceCentennial.org/store. ©2011 CITY OF TORRANCE PHOTO BY DAVID MOYLE www.DavidMoyle.com

RIBBON

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Let the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce Celebrate with You! For details and to schedule a ribbon cutting, grand opening or ground breaking ceremony, please contact Kelly Hernandez at 310-792-3808 at the Chamber no later than one month prior to the event and provide two preferred dates.

Bank of Manhattan, NA 2141 Rosecrans Ave., Suite 1160 El Segundo CA 90245 (310) 606-8012 (310) 606-8090 Fax www.bankofmanhattan.com

ITT Technical Institute Rene Renteria 2555 W. 190th Street, Suite 125 Torrance CA 90504 (310) 965-5900 (310) 965-5950 Fax www.itt-tech.edu 28

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Nu Kitchen Design Eric Deng 2223 Torrance Blvd. Torrance CA 90501 (626) 383-9392 (626) 589-0571 Fax www.nuimagestone.com

South Bay Aquatics Christine Wolf 2433 Moreton Street Torrance CA 90505 (310) 325-7946 (424) 237-1075 Fax www.southbayaquatics.com

Special Events & Wedding Planning Center Rosanna Torres–Pardo 1311 Sartori Torrance, CA 90501 (310) 378-1018 Photo by www.CaughtintheMoment.com

Stacked Restaurants, LLC Paul Motenko 3525 W. Carson Street, suite #172 Torrance, CA 90503 (310) 542-5068 www.stacked.com

Systemic Health & Wellness Consulting David Broome 21151 S. Western Ave #172 Torrance CA 90501 (310) 747-4683 www.mysystemicwellness.com

Tony Roma’s/Capricciosa Italian Chuck Stott 24301 Crenshaw Blvd. Torrance CA 90505 (310) 326-7427 www.capritalian.com TO R R A N C E M A G A Z I N E

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2011 Business Expo It’s a whole new ballgame for businesses in this economy. The Business Expo is just one way to assist businesses thrive. This year’s theme ‘Winning Advantage’ created an opportunity for the community to network with area business professionals while learning about their innovative products and services. Both long standing chamber members and new members alike participated in the football theme by dressing in their favorite team jerseys as they rallied new business. “We’ve been members since 2001. A great opportunity to meet and greet and get our word out there,” says Karen of StorQuest. “Really high energy – gets better every year. People seem to be more involved and having fun,” states Bob of Lomita Torrance Airport Rotary Club. “Lots of good contacts – a chance to interact with the community face to face,” said Brandon, Farmers and Merchants Bank.

Tara O’Brien participates in Expo representing Kaiser Permanente

Over 75 companies participated with 300 community members attending. The kick off took place on October 20th sponsored by the Torrance Marriott South Bay, Kaiser Permanente and Daily Breeze. The Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce looks forward to this event each year.

Veterans Career and Resource Fair The Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce, in partnership with Green Hills Memorial Park , held a ‘Veterans Career and Resource Fair’ on November 11th. Over 70 businesses who offered a product, a service, or a job opportunity greeted veterans as they visited the Fair. Appreciation is extended to event chair Jennifer Frew from Green Hills Memorial Park, and to the committee for coordinating this worthwhile event. Pelican Products provided lunch for those in attendance.

Mayor Frank Scotto, second from the left, welcomed and thanked military personnel for attending the event.

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State Senator Ted Lieu, far right, presents a certificate to event chair Jennifer Frew, Green Hills Memorial Park and Mark Applegate, past Chairman of the Board.

(Left to right) Chair of the Board Tara O’Brien, State Senator Ted Lieu, Chair elect Aaron Aalcides and Immediate Past Chairman Mark Waronek.


CHAMBER

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Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce & Japan Business Association Celebration Mixer American Honda Motor Co., Inc. hosted the 13th annual mixer of the Torrance Chamber of Commerce and Japan Business Association at Honda Collection Hall on November 16th. This was to be the company’s first red carpet event for the community to preview past collections of motorcycles, racing vehicles, and historical automobiles chronicling the growth and innovation in the United States, with special appearance from Asimo, Honda’s prototype robot who displayed his sophisticated capabilities and advancements. The Honorable Frank Scotto, City of Torrance Mayor; the Honorable Jun Niimi Consul General of Japan; along with Tara O’Brien, Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce; Koichi Kinoshita, President of JBA; and Takashi Horie, President of the JBA Foundation all welcomed guests and gave recognition to the evenings’ sponsors. “As an advocate for business, the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce helps foster relationships that support economic growth. We value our partnership with the Japanese Business Association, and we appreciate the opportunity to bring together business leaders from both organizations” stated Tara O’Brien, Chairperson for Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce. Mr. Hirohashi, Chair of the JBA South Bay Regional Committee adds, “while the ongoing partnership between JBA and Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce has always been strong, its tremendous value needs to be recognized in particular this year given the wonderful business community response to the devastating earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan this past March. The generous outpouring of financial and moral support was overwhelming and we are very grateful.” Over 300 community members and guests from both organizations attended and experienced traditional Japanese and American customs. An especially

unique event this year as it served as an official Centennial event for the City of Torrance. A highlight was the Sake Barrel Opening Ceremony “Breaking the barrel” accomplished together by the Honorable Mayor Frank Scotto; the Honorable Consul General Jun Niimi; Ms. Tara O’Brien; Mr. Koichi Kinoshita; Mr. Takahashi Horie; Mr. Hiroto Kobayashi, Chief Executive Director of JETRO; Mr. Daisuke Tonai, Executive Director of JETRO; Mr. Tom Brewer, City Council for Torrance; and Ms. Donna Duperron, President & CEO for Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce. Entertainment was provided by “The Three of Us” band, a trio of Japanese performers played Beatles-type music and sounds from the 60’s. Fantastic prizes were raffled to many lucky winners. The most coveted prize was a Roundtrip Business Class on Delta Airlines to Tokyo for 3 Night Stay at Sheraton Miyako Hotel. Special appreciation is extended to American Honda Motor Co, Inc. for hosting this year’s event; to Cheri Davis (General Manager of Miyako Hybrid Hotel) for presiding over the ceremony, to Outback Steakhouse and Gonpachi Restaurant for providing the food tastings, to Baby Cakes Baking Company for desserts; to Ozeki Sake and Hakutsura Sake USA for serving the sake tastings; and to Kirin Brewery of America for delighting the guests. Other contributors to the success of the event include Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Center Torrance, Torrance Cultural Art Center, Torrance Unified School District, Japan Foundation, Japan National Tourism Organization, Japan External Trade Organization, and Japanese American National Museum. Heartfelt thanks extended to the Nisei Week Queen and Princess, and to the students from North High School Japanese Club.

Japan Business Association Mixer

1. “Breaking the Barrel” 2. Gary Kessler of American Honda Motor Co., Inc. welcomes guests to the event 3. North High School Japanese Club

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Women in Business — Global Girlfriends Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce presented the inaugural event of WOMEN IN BUSINESS, a Global Girlfriends Holiday Tea & Boutique. Group co-founder Anne Trinh, CFP® stated, “Our mission is to bring together the collective energies and abilities of local women to learn, share, network, and reach out to our community. Our goal is to advance businesses and the local community, as well as to make a meaningful and positive impact for the world at large.” Over 150 women took part in the first annual Women In Business (WIB) event in December. The guest speaker for the event was an extraordinary woman who made it her business to help women in poverty worldwide. With a two thousand dollar tax return, Stacey Edgar, founder and president of Global Girlfriends, started the fair trade business as a stayat-home mom and has grown it to a multi-million dollar enterprise.

Global Girlfriends now brings fair trade products made by women from third world countries to American retailers such as Whole Foods. Edgar shared how her “dream accomplished” successfully provides economic security for women in need by creating a sustainable market for their products.

Event sponsors included Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Center Torrance, Kaiser Permanente, M Advisory Group, Doubletree Hotel Torrance by Hilton, Daily Breeze, and Exxon Mobil Corporation.

The event included a boutique featuring fair trade businesses, and great deals as well as interesting holiday gifts. “Judging from the enthusiastic comments we received from the participants, our inaugural event was a huge success. It is important to bring women in our Torrance community together to discuss career and personal growth opportunities. The event marked the first step of a program to help foster greater social and economic development in our local community,” stated Barbara Burgett, from Exxon Mobil Corporation.

THE MENTOR PROGRAM The Mentor Program, a partnership between the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce, Toyota Financial Services and North Torrance high School kicked off year six of the program this past October. Sherry Kramer, Vice Chair of the Foundation, welcomed speakers Terri Nishimura (Pediatric Therapy

Sargent Major Duran and Sargent Graham coordinated a Tailgate Bar-B-Q for mentors and students.

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Network), Leslie Cortez (City of Torrance) and Allison Tanaka (Richstone). Nishimura, Cortez and Tanaka spoke to the mentors and students on the importance of giving back to your community through community service. The North High School JROTC program prepared a tailgate barbecue for mentors and students prior to a Varsity football game on campus in November. North High School principal, Dr. Matt Horvath, welcomed alum Dean Mayeda, keynote speaker for the December session. Mayeda spoke to the mentors and students about passion. He elaborated on the various levels of passion that individuals have throughout their life.

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GLOBAL GIRLFRIENDS 1. Susan Reuter (left) Reuter and Reuter and Sue Moylan, Crest Marketing.

2. Torrance Area Chairman of the Board Tara O’Brien (right) with keynote speaker Stacey Edgar. 3. Donna Duperron, President & CEO Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce thanks ‘Women in Business’ committee members (left to right) Stephanie Yee, Doubletree Hotel Torrance by Hilton; Anne Trinh, M Advisory Group, Terri Nishimura, Pediatric Therapy Network, Barbara Burgett, Exxon Mobil Corporation and Pam Miseroy. Not pictured is committee member Dawn Shepard, M Advisory Group.


NEWS

BRIEFS

Announcing Fong & Associates, CPA’s Merrietta Fong, CPA, formerly the Managing Partner of Rosenthal Pearson, Fong & Frew, LLP, is pleased to announce the establishment of Fong and Associates, CPA’s in Torrance. “We are poised for continued growth, serving our closely-held corporate and MERRIETTA FONG family-owned business clients,” said Principal, Merrietta, past Torrance Area Chamber of Fong & Associates Commerce Chair, and a CPA since 1982, practicing in the Torrance area since 1988. “We have a new image, but the core group has been part of the Torrance area landscape for a long time — most of our principal team members have been together for more than ten years.”

nonprofit organizations, and individuals with challenging tax situations.” Fong and Associates, CPA’s, is a full service accounting firm. Their team currently includes six CPAs with a strong and diversified support staff. Fong and Associates will serve individuals and businesses with utmost care, while providing the same high quality services on which their reputation was built. “We will continue to be Trusted Advisors to Tomorrow’s Leaders Today,” said Fong. For more information, Fong and Associates can be reached at 310-539-9400.

Fong maintains the same guiding principles of integrity and professionalism which have earned her a prominent and respected place in our community. “Our clients’ entrepreneurial spirit and financial opportunities demand creative strategies, practical solutions, and rapid response to business and personal financial events. We are well positioned to serve the needs of new and growing businesses,

Mary Kingston Named Chief Operating Officer, Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Center New CEO Mary Kingston is an innovative health care executive with more than 20 years’ experience, and is responsible for the development and integration of the hospital’s organizational strategic plan with operations. She will ensure that patient centered, efficient services are designed to meet the needs of patients, physicians, the community and the MARY KINGSTON Chief Operating Officer hospital’s staff. Additionally, Kingston Providence Little will integrate strategy and leadership Company of Mary across the hospital to assure operational Medical Center excellence. Kingston is the former system vice president of performance improvement and clinical excellence for St. Joseph Health System (a 14 hospital system) in Orange, CA. Additionally, she spent five years as executive director of performance improve-

ment and patient safety at Anaheim Memorial Medical Center. She also worked at Memorial Health Services at Saddleback Memorial Medical Center for 18 years, culminating in serving as nurse executive. Kingston has extensive teaching experience, including 16 years as an adjunct professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, and two years with the University of Southern California. Kingston graduated from Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL and earned her master’s degree in nursing administration from UCLA. She is married to Robert Kingston MD, a practicing emergency physician and medical director for the Advanced Wound Healing Center. They have six children and four grandchildren.

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Entrepreneur Mom of the Year Candy Messer Candy Messer, President of Affordable Bookkeeping and Payroll, was awarded the Entrepreneur Mom of the Year at this year’s Success Summit. This recognition is well deserved for a hard working woman who began as a home based business in late 2002 while also being a devoted mother. Affordable Bookkeeping and Payroll Services brings peace of mind to business owners by removing the burden of the bookkeeping and payroll processing. Candy has successfully

yoga

built a business based on integrity and great relationships with her clients. AB&P specializes in small to mid-sized business bookkeeping and payroll. Just some of the services offered to clients include: filing sales tax returns, balance sheet and general ledger reports, monthly P&L/income statements, customized payroll processing, and state and federal payroll tax reporting. Candy is extremely involved in the community through charity organizations and is the current chair of Torrance Chamber PROFS. Some of the groups she has assisted include Walk with Sally, Networking Matters, and American Business Women’s Association. Candy is grateful for the recognition of the Entrepreneur Mom of the Year award and shares it with her family and friends. For additional information please visit www.abandp.com or call 310.534.5577.

Torrance Memorial Shines A Light For Those Grieving Loss, Event Raises $64,000 for Those in Need In honor of National Hospice & Palliative Care Month in November, Torrance Memorial Home Health & Hospice hosted the 16th Annual “Light Up a Life” tree lighting ceremonyand fundraiser on Sunday, November 20 at Torrance Memorial Medical Center’s Health Conference Center. The heartwarming event raised $64,000 for hospice patients who are unable to afford care. During the holidays grief over lost loved ones is often heightened. “Light Up a Life” provides a warm, intimate atmosphere to celebrate the lives of those loved with the community through a healing and memorable ceremony. The event included a reading of those remembered and musical entertainment. “The “Light Up a Life” ceremony is a powerful and moving dedication to our loved ones,” said Terri Ferry, Administrator, Torrance Memorial Home Health & Hospice. “Seeing the beauty of the tree reminds us of the importance of family and friends and gives us a chance to stop and be thankful for those precious memories. It’s also a valuable fundraising event to help those lacking the resources for hospice care.”

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Donations raised will assist those who cannot afford hospice care and will help to provide services when a patient’s financial resources fall short. These services include skilled nursing care, bereavement and spiritual counseling.


NEWS

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Local Bankers Head Up Premier Business Bank John Polen, President and CEO of Premier Business Bank is heading up the six year old community bank headquartered in downtown Los Angeles, and has assembled an experienced management team to take the bank to the next level. The management team includes Randall Hata, EVP and Chief Financial Officer; Debbie Richardson, SVP Corporate Development; Kristy Smith, SVP Compliance/Operations Officer; and Eiji Yamanishi, SVP Regional Loan Manager. Mr. Polen and his team LOCAL BANKERS are long-time residents of the South Bay with extensive backgrounds as executives in local community banks including Malaga Bank and Bay Cities National Bank. Premier launched its second office in April 2011 in Torrance as an alternative credit resource for small to mid-sized businesses, real estate investors, entrepreneurs and individuals seeking business credit and real estate financing. They believe every person is different, as is every loan request. Their unique approach to lending involves looking at each loan transaction with an open mind focusing on the client’s goals in order to find them the right product.

$20,000 Grant from Alcoa Foundation Will Provide Tuition-Free Scholarships for STEM Majors: STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) Scholarship recipients will receive up to $5,000 each (near annual tuition cost at CSUDH) beginning in the spring 2012 semester. The scholarship will be open to junior and senior-level undergraduates with a minimum GPA of 3.0 who demonstrate financial need. Considered a key sector for growth are Latinos, African Americans, and women, which are historically underrepresented in the sciences. As one of the most diverse campuses in the West and in close proximity to STEM industry leaders, CSU Dominguez Hills is uniquely positioned to play a regional role in addressing this national problem. Alcoa is headquartered in Carson.

“All of our decisions are made locally. We don’t try to fit you into a box and we don’t like to say NO,” stated Mr. Polen. Premier is a client centric bank – centered on service. “We proactively partner with our clients to learn about their businesses, goals, and industries so we can offer creative solutions to help them achieve their goals. It is rewarding to be a reliable strategic resource they can count on,” commented Ms. Richardson.

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Torrance Memorial’s Holiday Festival Brings in $14.5 Million for New Patient Tower The 28th annual Torrance Memorial Medical Center Holiday Festival raised a record $14.5 million toward construction of the hospital’s new $450 million patient tower. More than 5,000 community members enjoyed the six-day event. At Friday evening’s Gala Dinner Torrance Memorial announced the largest collective donation in the history of the hospital, a $13.5 million gift. Donald and Priscilla Hunt of Manhattan Beach provided a gift of $11.5 million as a thank you to the hospital for its dedication to caring for the community. In recognition of the gift, the Donald and Priscilla Hunt Cancer Institute and the Donald and Priscilla Hunt Nuclear Medicine Center will be named and housed within the new patient tower upon its completion in 2015.

The hospital’s 850-member volunteer group, the Auxiliary, announced a separate $1 million multi-year pledge, the largest gift from this group in its 60-year history. This gift will be allocated toward the Healing Garden in the new main tower. Long-time hospital supporters Melanie and Richard Lundquist made a matching $1 million gift as honorary cochairs of the $200 million main tower capital fundraising campaign in the hopes of inspiring the generosity of others.

each came forward with a donation of $100,000. Sam and Rose Feng of Manhattan Beach contributed $50,000. As a bonus to the week’s festivities, Toyota Motor Sales, USA, Inc. donated a Lexus CT 200h as the Opportunity Drawing Grand Prize, with an estimated value of $35,000.

On the heels of these announcements, an additional $436,700 was raised through a live auction. Auction highlights included the heartwarming “Gifts from the Heart” opportunity for guests to come forward with donations starting at $1,000. As the excitement grew, Ralph and Sigrid Allman of Rancho Palos Verdes and the Graziadio Foundation

TORRANCE MEMORIAL’S HOLIDAY FESTIVAL 1. Richard Lundquist (left), Craig Leach, president and CEO of Torrance Memorial Medical Center (second from left), join Melanie Lundquist (far right) in thanking Priscilla Hunt (second from right) for the $11.5 million donation made by Priscilla and her husband Donald Hunt.

2. Barbara Boughton, a long-time Auxiliary member, makes the winning bid for a 2012 Chevrolet Sonic Sedan LT donated by Chevrolet of Montebello and the Teague Family of Palos Verdes Estates. 36

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San Pedro’s First Church Finds a New Home at Green Hills Memorial Park Built in 1883, the historic St. Peter’s Episcopal Church was the first house of worship in San Pedro. It stood on Nob Hill at Beacon Street, between Second and Third Streets, overlooking the then-infant port. For twenty years, the church’s steeple was a landmark and a beacon for those on land or sea. Its construction featured a Carpenter’s Gothic style with hand-hewed pews. Its lectern was held by an intricatelycarved wooden angel made of redwood.

enjoy.” The church was relocated in the early morning of October 24, 2011. The restoration includes a place to house San Pedro’s own Reverend Bartlett’s ashes. The stained glass will be restored, and a burial yard featuring headstones will be developed surrounding the church, overlooking the San Pedro Harbor. This historic and passionate endeavor will come to be known as “The Churchyard” at Green Hills Memorial Park.

By the turn of the century, San Pedro’s population began to shift towards the south. In 1904, the building was relocated to the Vinegar Hill section of the city. During the move, the church’s steeple was damaged and replaced with a belfry. At this new location, the little church served its congregation for another fifty years, until its capacity was deemed too small.

To learn more about this historic development, contact (800) 506-4155 or visit www.GreenHillsMemorial.com.

In 1956, an ecumenical group of citizens joined to find a new site for the church. San Pedro’s first church was deconsecrated and rededicated as a memorial chapel in the town’s cemetery on West 24th Street, amid many of its original citizens and as a monument to those who fought to preserve its history.

This is our chance to preserve a part of this community’s spiritual and cultural heritage.

Over the years, however, the church fell into a state of disrepair and was a target of looters and vandals. Once named a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument, the City lacked the resources necessary for its upkeep, and the church’s original beauty, distinguished stained glass, dignity and heritage, became an opportunity for crime and disease. The Preservation and Future: After years of planning, the City of Los Angeles and Green Hills Memorial Park finalized an agreement to donate the church to Green Hills for it to be restored and used for historical tours, funerals, weddings, and other appropriate services. “Green Hills Memorial Park is committed to preserving the heritage of the individuals who are memorialized here on our grounds,” shared John Resich, chairman of the board for Green Hills. “This is our chance to preserve a part of this community’s spiritual and cultural heritage. We’re anxious to restore this beautiful part of our local history for others to TO R R A N C E M A G A Z I N E

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PTN’S 16th Annual Halloween Ball Benefiting Pediatric Therapy Network The Depot’s, PTN’s 16th Annual Halloween Ball, hosted by Chef Michael Shafer of The Depot and Buffalo Fire Department Restaurants, and co-hosted by Miss California, Noelle Freeman, was held on Sunday, October 16, 2011. More than 700 costumed guests supported this year’s fundraiser. The celebrated annual event took place in front of the Depot Restaurant at 1250 Cabrillo Ave in Torrance in an immense white tent and included dancing to a live band, martini bar, costume contest, live and silent auctions and a delicious dinner prepared by The Depot Restaurant’s Chef Michael Shafer. All proceeds went to support PTN’s programs for children with special needs. For more information, visit www.pediatrictherapynetwork.org.

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1. (Inset left) Spirit of Caring Sponsor Supervisor Don Knabe 2. PTN’s Executive Director’s Zoe Mailloux, Gina Coleman and Terri Nishimura with PTN’s Jr. Ambassador Brandon Tanioka with Miss California, Noelle Freeman


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Providence Little Company of Mary’s 10th Wellness Conference The Power of Pink - Presented by Honda Breaks Records with $400,000 for Women’s Health Providence Little Company of Mary Foundation’s 10th Women’s Wellness Conference – The Power of Pink presented by Honda generated a record $400,000 to benefit Providence Little Company of Mary women’s health programs. Over 500 guests gathered for the full-day conference at the Torrance Marriott, with comedic actress Vicki Lawrence as the luncheon keynote and best-selling author Sarah Ban Breathnach. Along with the generous presenting sponsorship of American Honda Motor Co., Inc. which included the raffling of a 2011 Acura MDX, platinum sponsors included The Centofante Family, The Jacqueline Glass Family, Ralphs and Wells Fargo. Driftwood Healthcare Center was a gold sponsor. The 2011 Mary Potter Humanitarian Award which honors an individual whose personal and professional accomplishments reflect the spirit of the foundress of the Sisters of the Little Company of Mary, was presented to Virginia Schneider, who established the George W. and Virginia Schneider Institute for Nursing.

Steve Morikawa of Presenting Sponsor American Honda Motor Co., Inc.; Co-Chair Shelley Joyce, R.N.; Co-Chair Cathy Alessandra; Keynote Speaker Vicki Lawrence; Sr. Terrence Landini, L.C.M.; Co-Chair Linda Wenglikowski and Opening Speaker Sarah Ban Breathnach.

For more information visit: www.plcmfoundation.org or www.facebook.com/plcmfoundation.

Thank You! TORRANCE MAGAZINE thanks its 2011 contributors for the many informative articles and advertisements submitted. Together we were able to successfully deliver a quarterly magazine that provides value, information and opportunities to the South Bay business community.

Let's continue to grow in 2012!

TORRANCE MAGAZINE & Green Ink Marketing info@Torrance-Magazine.com www.Torrance-Magazine.com

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CHAMBER

BENEFITS

What are the benefits of being a member of the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce? GAP (Government Affairs Policy group) GAP is comprised of Chamber members who act as legislative and regulatory analysts for local business by reviewing bills on local, county, state and federal levels and lobby for support or opposition to proposed legislation.

Green Torrance The City of Torrance and the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce partner to promote and introduce environmental initiatives and eco-friendly companies in the South Bay.

Human Resources Professionals Human Resources Professionals network and are presented with information on current compliance laws and trends.

Networking at Noon Networking at Noon is offered monthly at local Chamber member restaurants. This event allows members to promote their business, introduce themselves and their company with a 30 second self introduction and possibly be chosen as a spotlight speaker for a future Networking at Noon.

Political Action Committee (PAC) Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce Political Action Committee seeks, endorses and supports candidates to run for public office at the city, county, state and federal levels, whose views represent the business of this region.

P.R.O.F.S. (Professional Roundtable of Financial Services) PROFS is a monthly meeting that gives opportunities to network with others in the financial field, as well as expand your education within the industry.

Tech Pros Tech Pros brings together technology related companies and professionals (Hardware, Software and Services) as well as those wanting to be educated in making their business tech savvy. Members grow and benefit through networking, support, education and have opportunities for group presentations.

‘MEMBERS ONLY’ BENEFITS • Credibility as a Chamber member • Free Business listings in the Membership Directory/Business Resource Guide • Free Business listed in web directory at www.TorranceChamber.com • Access group meetings, events and business leaders • Free editorial submissions in Torrance Magazine ( quarterly) • Daily office referrals of TACC members via phone, fax, e-mail or walk in visitors • Advertising opportunities in the Torrance Magazine, TACC website and Member Directory • Advertising access to E-mail blasts • Sponsorship and hosting opportunities at Chamber events • Opportunity to participate in annual Premier Investors program • Enhancement of visibility with a ribbon cutting to commemorate a Grand Opening or Anniversary • Free SCORE counseling; once a week and by appointment only • Free and unlimited Certificate of Origins

TO R R A N C E A R E A C H A M B E R O F CO M M E R C E 3 4 0 0 To r ra n c e B l vd . S u i t e 10 0 , To r r a n c e , C A 9 0 5 0 3 T ( 3 10 ) 5 4 0 - 5 8 5 8 F ( 3 10 ) 5 4 0 - 7 6 6 2 w w w. To r ra n c e C h a m b e r. c o m • I n f o @ To r ra n c e C h a m b e r. c o m

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The inspiration behind our New Main Tower:

You.

Growing for Our Community. With your support, undertakings as monumental as the New Main Tower will grow the hospital into a new, comprehensive reality. • New 390,000 sq. ft. Main Tower, replacing Torrance Memorial’s original Central Tower, built in 1971. • Effective bed capacity will increase 25%, providing sufficient hospital beds for the community, particularly in light of the aging population and the closure of five area hospitals in recent years. • Seven stories with building connectors to existing hospital buildings. • 256 private patient rooms and 18 new surgical/interventional treatment rooms. • Seismically compliant to new hospital building codes. • Modern design to offer more patient and family privacy. • Project will be finished in 2015. • The existing Central Tower will be used for various outpatient and general support services.

3330 Lomita Boulevard, Torrance, California 90505 | www.TorranceMemorial.org | 310-325-9110


Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce 3400 Torrance Blvd., Suite 100 Torrance, CA 90503

PRST-STD U.S. Postage

PAID

Torrance, CA Permit No. 54

A Waterfront Treasure for 50 Years, Celebrating 50 Years of

i

Fabulous! 1961 - 2011

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2011

310 -833-3553 BERTH 76 LA HARBOR

PORTSOCALLDINING . COM

20th Annual Readers Poll

|

310 -548-8080 BERTH 77 LA HARBOR

SPIRITMARINE . COM


Here’s our January 2012 issue. For comments and submittals, contact submittals@Torrance-Magazine.com or call 310.373.2880 For advertising opportunities, contact AdSales@Torrance-Magazine.com or call 310.317.0841 For TACC information and Calendars Visit www.TorranceChamber.com or call 310.540.5858

Our April 2012 theme is—

Education for Business


Torrance Magazine - January 2012