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now PLUGGED into

TORRANCE. Chevy is proud to be a member of the Torrance Business Community and announce the recent 12,000square-foot expansion of our GM Advanced Technology Vehicle Center. This facility will not only focus on alternative fuel vehicles like Chevy Volt, the 2011 Motor Trend Car of the Year,® and the Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle, it will create new jobs for scientists, technicians and engineers. When it comes to having a positive impact on fuel economy1 — and the local economy — Chevy is definitely charged up.

1Fuel economy based on EPA-estimated 37 MPG combined (city/highway). To order Volt, see your participating dealer in CA, CT, MI, NJ, NY, TX and Washington, D.C. Quantities are limited.


WE KNOW HOW TO TREAT A LADY!

From state-of-the-art digital mammography to specialized treatment for high-risk pregnancies

We’ve Got You Covered Women’s Health • Mammography Screenings • Advanced Ultrasound • Bone Density Screenings • Award-winning Cardiovascular Care

Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Center Torrance 4101 Torrance Boulevard Torrance, CA 90503

Maternal Fetal Services • 24/7 on-site Obstetric Hospitalists • 24/7 on-site Neonatologists • Family-Centered NICU Suites • 24/7 Pediatric Hospitalists • Emergency Department Pediatric Specialists

To learn more about our Women’s Health services, call 1.800.618.6659 or visit us at www.providence.org/torrance


Our Notes:

In this Issue DEPARTMENTS Notes from the Publishers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 A Message From The Chair of the Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 TACC Board of Directors & Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Chairman’s Farewell Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Chamber Exec’s Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

BAL ANCE: LIFE & BUSINESS Function Better, Live Better . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Healthlinks Program Offers Menu of Classes . . . . . . . . . 8 Balancing Life’s Decisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Work Schedule Flexibility May Accommodate Lifestyle Choices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Healthy Employees, Healthy Bottom Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Pelican Products —Flourishing Both Personally and Professionally . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 The Benefits of Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Sunrider’s Balancing Act . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Success—It’s Not Just an Adult Challenge Anymore! . . . . 17

IN APPRECIATION OF OUR TROOPS AND VETERANS Torrance-South Bay YMCA Supports Our Military Families . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

FROM THE CIT Y OF TORRANCE City’s Permit Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

FROM TORRANCE UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 FROM THE TORRANCE CENTENNIAL COMMITTEE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-23 RIBBON CUTTINGS/CELEBRATIONS

. . . . .24

Sue Moylan and Pat Sandt, Green Ink Marketing

Most of us carry laptops and/or PDAs wherever we go, making the distinction between our personal and professional lives virtually impossible. How does this affect our health and our relationships? Are we actually more effective?

What we are certain of is that today’s stresses, as pointed out by Shamrock Tutoring on pg. 17, are not only affecting the adults in families, but also the children. In this issue, we tried to convey the realities of balancing life and business. We looked at the legal implications (see Karl Schmidt’s article pg. 10), and a variety of approaches used by individuals and companies to ease the impact (see Torrance Memorial’s article pg. 8, Pelican Products’ pg. 14, and Sunrider’s pg. 16) among others. Over the years, we have worked on creating a life mission statement, modeled after that which a business would write. What is our purpose? With what/whom in mind? What do we seek to achieve? By when? While the answers to these questions would vary greatly for each of us, we may suggest this exercise as a way to conceive (and explain) the way in which we conduct our days and lives. We have also found that leaving the office and networking with other professionals satisfies both our social and professional needs. No better place for that than the Torrance Chamber! We hope you enjoy the read, and please note that our October issue will focus on Professional Services. Advertise. Submit an article. Be part of it! —Sue Moylan and Pat Sandt

ADVANTAGE AWARDS RECIPIENTS . . . . . .24 DISTINGUISHED MEMBER AWARDS

. . . . . . . . .25

CHAMBER EVENTS State of the City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 State of Education Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Junior Leadership Torrance Graduation . . . . . . . . . . . . .28

UPCOMING EVENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 NEWS BRIEFS “TOYOTA 100 Cars For Good” Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Dr. Wendell Wong Retires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 For Our Children Fundraising Success . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Japanese Atomic Bomb Survivors Examined . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Toyota — Investing in Communities Where They Do Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Providence LCM 31st Annual Golf Classic . . . . . . . . . . . .35

CHAMBER BENEFITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36

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UPCOMING DEADLINES October 2011 Issue: Professional Services Article/Advertising Space Reservation: August 19, 2011 Distribution Date: October 3, 2011

CONTACT US: Advertising: See www.Torrance-Magazine.com or Contact AdSales@Torrance-Magazine.com or 310.317.0841 Articles: Pat Sandt, at Submittals@Torrance-Magazine.com or 310.373.2880 General Information/Marketing Services: Sue Moylan, at info@GreenInkMarketing.com or 310.539.2235 TACC Contact: info@TorranceChamber.com or 310.540.5858 The Torrance Magazine focuses on business stories, events, and who’s who profiles that are of interest to Torrance Chamber of Commerce members and others doing business in the South Bay area. The editorial is positive, information-packed, exclusive news: a diverse mix of feature stories on Torrance and South Bay movers and shakers, businesses, events, local industries, government and business economic development strategies and outlooks.


A MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR OF THE BOARD

Thriving Business Builds a Healthy Torrance I couldn’t be more pleased that this issue of Torrance Magazine is dedicated to balancing life. In this July issue you’ll find a wealth of information and tips on balancing life —including ways to improve your bottom line by investing in the health of your employees. Well-balanced employees are a critical part of your business success, just as a healthy business economy is necessary to the overall vitality of our community. In fact, my theme for the Chamber this year is “Thriving Business Builds a Healthy Torrance.” A healthy business environment ensures a fiscally sound local government, creates jobs for South Bay residents, and enhances our high-performing school district. This is what the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce is all about: creating economic growth in Torrance and its neighboring communities. We do this in many ways. We bring people together to make connections and help their businesses grow. We advocate for the interests of our business community. Our TACC Foundation pairs businesses with Torrance schools to ensure that we create the next generation of workers in the South Bay. And in the coming year, the board of directors and I will continue to help create a vibrant business economy. We have some ambitious plans, including strengthening our business advocacy efforts and partnering more closely with the City of Torrance to retain and attract business. Even if you can’t attend one of our many business and networking events, know that the Chamber is working for your interests each and every day.

I’d also like to thank the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce for this opportunity to serve the business community. I’m especially grateful to outgoing chairman Mark Waronek for his leadership of the Chamber this year. We’re a stronger organization today, thanks to his dedication and vision for the Chamber.

TARA O’BRIEN 2011-2012 TACC Chair of the Board

In addition, the Chamber is fortunate to have an incredibly committed and involved board of directors to set and carry out the vision of our organization. This year I’m proud to welcome the following business leaders to our 30-member board: Linda Lindus, Daily Breeze; Ellen Mary Michel, Pelican Products; Shirley Pe, South Bay Yellow Cab; and Cathy Towers, National Bank of California. I’d also like to recognize Chamber CEO Donna Duperron and her staff for working tirelessly every day in support of the Torrance area business community. It’s a true pleasure to embark on this year-long journey with them. Please let me know how the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce can help your business thrive. You can send your comments to me at taraobrien25825@yahoo.com. Thank you for your support!

I look forward to sharing more with you about the Chamber’s plans this year for building a strong local economy.

We have some ambitious plans, including strengthening our business advocacy efforts and partnering more closely with the City of Torrance to retain and attract business.

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TACC Board of Directors and Staff 2011-2012

Executive Board of Directors CHAIR OF THE BOARD Tara O’Brien Kaiser Permanente Medical Offices

Deborah Fehn Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Center Judy Gibson Strategic Technology Sources Michael Herrera Boys & Girls Clubs of the South Bay

CHAIR ELECT Aaron Aalcides Malaga Bank

Robert Katherman Katherman Co. Water Replenishment District of Southern California

VICE CHAIR OF PROGRAMS Heidi Cunningham Kelly Services VICE CHAIR OF FOUNDATION Sherry Kramer Continental Development Corporation VICE CHAIR OF FINANCE Cathy Towers National Bank of California

Dan Keeton Torrance Community Church of the Nazarene Craig Leach Torrance Memorial Medical Center Linda Lindus Daily Breeze

VICE CHAIR OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Linda Amato Doubletree Hotel Torrance/ South Bay

Marcella Low Southern California Gas Co. Ellen Michel Pelican Products, Inc. Mike Molina Los Angeles World Airports Sue Moylan Crest Marketing, Inc.

VICE CHAIR OF MEMBERSHIP Liz Seong The Real Estate Group

Shirley Pe South Bay Yellow Cab Cooperative, Inc.

IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIR Mark Waronek Ek & Ek

Pam Ryan Torrance Marriott

GENERAL COUNSEL Karl Schmidt Parker, Milliken, Clark, O’Hara & Samuelian

Andrea Sala CSU Dominguez Hills

2011-2012

Pat Sandt Green Ink Marketing

Board of Directors Joe Ahn Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems Sector Communications Karin Baker American Honda Motor Co., Inc.

Dan Thomas TelePacific Communications

TACC Staff Donna Duperron President and CEO

Pablo Borgnino Exxon Mobil Corporation

Kelly Hernandez Membership Manager

Scott Easterday Outback Steakhouse

TO R R A N C E M A G A Z I N E

Torrance (ISSN #0194-5491) Published by the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce with Green Ink Marketing. Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce 3400 Torrance Blvd., Ste 100, Torrance, CA 90503. (310) 540-5858; Green Ink Marketing, Sue Moylan and Pat Sandt, Mailing Address (No Deliveries Accepted): 2785 Pacific Coast Hwy, Ste. 312 Torrance, CA 90505 310.539.2235. Subscription rates: $20.00 per year. E-mail: Info@GreenInkMarketing.com Send address changes to: Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce c/o Torrance Magazine 3400 Torrance Blvd, Suite 100 Torrance, CA 90503 Tel: 310.540.5858 All rights reserved. Trademark.

VICE CHAIR OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS Charles Gale Jr. Metropolitan Water District of Southern California

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About Torrance Magazine

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ARTICLES: Torrance Magazine is published quarterly and mailed to TACC members and distributed to selected businesses in the community. The publishers welcome written queries regarding articles for possible publications. Articles are subject to editing and are included on an “as space permits basis” at the discretion of the Publisher, Editors and Editorial Board. ITEMS: Material and photos for inclusion must be received 30 days in advance of the quarterly publication date. Reproduction, in whole or in part without written permission, is prohibited. Photos and articles not returned. DISCLAIMER: All reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in Torrance Magazine. The publisher accepts no responsibility for damage arising directly or as a consequence of the use or publication of inaccurate or missing information. The opinions expressed by contributors are their own, and are not necessarily shared by Torrance Magazine, its staff, TACC, Board of Directors, management or advertisers. Editorial content is intended as general information, and not as specific legal or financial advice; for such, readers are advised to consult professionals in the appropriate field. The Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce and Green Ink Marketing assume no liability resulting from the advertising contained in the publication. Printed on FSC Certified Paper with Soy-Based Inks.


CHAIRMAN’S FAREWELL MESSAGE

Business Motivated. Community Focused. Wow! What a great year we had, from Temecula, CA (Board Retreat) to Kansas City, MO (All-America City Awards). Looking back on this year as Chairman of the Board, I can honestly say it has been a fun-filled, dedication-driven, productive year. We were “Business Motivated” and “Community Focused.” I want to thank my Executive Board, Board of Directors, Ambassadors, Chamber Staff, new Chairwoman Tara O’Brien, our President/CEO Donna Duperron, and all of those who volunteered to make this year successful. Our achievements were a team effort and I am so proud of what we accomplished together. Some of the goals I set at the beginning of the Chamber year were: To provide programs, services, and activities valuable to Chamber members and the community at large by increasing membership, developing stronger ambassadors, and holding regularly sponsored mixers and other networking events within our Chamber and with other Chambers;

We hit the ground running with a great board retreat in Temecula. Here are a few of the highlights that followed: Torrance-Redondo Beach Chambers Evening Mixer, Chamber-City Picnic, Torrance Beach Clean-up, Good Morning Torrance Breakfast, Chevron-LA Live Lunch, City-Chamber Job Fair, JBA Reception, Turkey MARK WARONEK Bowl, New Member Reception, 2010-2011 TACC Chairman of the Board Holiday Mixer, Adopt-a-School Ceremonies, Black History Celebration, Roundtable with Assemblymember Butler, Networking at Noon, Business Expo, Ribbon Cutting, JBA Gala, Torrance Advantage Awards, Leadership Torrance Sacramento Trip, Lunch with our Leader – Supervisor Knabe, LA Chamber Access DC Trip, Block Party, State of the City Address, Cal Chamber Summit Sacramento Trip, State of Education, Volunteer Recognition Lunch, All-America City Awards in Kansas City, MO, Installation Dinner… These highlights are only a glimpse of the 135 events we held throughout the Chamber year.

Thanks again for a wonderful year and I know our new Chairwoman Tara O’Brien will work hard for our Chamber and make this upcoming year even better. I would like to Chair Tara O'Brien and Past Chair Mark Waronek work the beer booth send a special thanks to our at the Torrance Block Party. President/CEO Donna Duperron for her dedication to the Chamber and To encourage a cooperative and favorable local, county, for making this a memorable year for me – I will always be state and federal government climate that promotes an grateful to you! understanding of the needs of the business community, to be visible to our elected officials and communicate with We all worked with a smile to make the 2010-2011 year: appropriate government officials/agencies, and to continue “Business Motivated. to involve government officials and city staff in Chamber Community Focused.” committees and other Chamber programs. To provide a positive community image for businesses and promote a business-friendly environment in Torrance and the South Bay by developing and maintaining events to showcase our members and our community;

We accomplished all of this and more!

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CHAMBER EXEC’S MESSAGE Time management experts often tell you to work harder, smarter, faster and more efficiently and then you’ll eventually gain control of your life. By trial and error, most learn this approach doesn’t work. To gain control of your life and business priorities, you must know the right direction to go and have a map or plan to get where you want. Speed is not an issue – only progress and balance are important. There are plenty of worthwhile causes in our community that need help, but how does one manage time between work, family and volunteering? The Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce offers an arena for networking and fostering business relationships which provide positive corporate exposure. We are fortunate that our Board of Directors, under the leadership of Chairman of the Board Mark Waronek, have been so passionate about providing quality programs for our members. From legislative advocacy to educational programs to economic development, our board continues to maintain a balance between life and business for our members. Our ambassadors, led enthusiastically by Theresa Stanberry, continue to give of themselves by attending ribbon cuttings, assisting at events and communicating with new Chamber members.

Heidi Cunningham has led this year’s Leadership Torrance program with the assistance of Jeff Kidd and Theresa Stanbury. Most recently, several of our members volunteered to plan and implement the Second Annual Torrance Block Party. Countless volunteer hours were provided toward the success of this event by Laurie Brandt, Marianne Brooks, Deborah Fehn, Kay Grundhaus, Debbie, Hays, Peter Issa, Heather Johnston, Kathryn Joiner, Lazaro Martin, Karen Matsuyama, Charlotte Melsh, Rich Mouton, John Negrete, Arnold Ng, Shirley Pe, Liz Seong, David Tannenbaum, Josh Thomas, Cathy Towers, Tracy Underwood, Jennifer Velasquez, Maira Villafana, John Wilkerson and Ted Yamada. Even in today’s economic pressure, companies are participating in philanthropy as well as establishing employee volunteer programs. Albert Einstein said, “Only a life lived for others is worthwhile.” The Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce is truly grateful for the businesses and individuals who consistently put others first.

To gain control of your life and business priorities, you must know the right direction to go and have a map or plan to get where you want. Speed is not an issue – only progress and balance are important.

DONNA DUPERRON President and CEO Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce

CO N TAC T I N F O R M AT I O N Ambassadors Mentoring new chamber members Theresa Stanberry stanberrylaundry@yahoo.com

GAP Government Affairs Policy Group Charles Gale Jr. - cgalej@mwdh2o.com

Green Torrance Committee Pat Sandt - Pat@GreenInkMarketing.com

HR Professionals Human Resources Professionals of Torrance Heidi Cunningham cunniha@kellyservices.com

Networking at Noon Our most popular networking lunches TACC - info@torrancechamber.com

Tech Pros Technology Professionals of Torrance Dan Thomas - danthomas@telepacific.com

Young Professionals For the young entrepreneur getting started Josh Thomas Joshua.thomas@homeinstead.com or Eric Takaki - eric@pelican-signs.com

To maximize your exposure in the community, or, to request more information, call the Chamber at (310) 540-5858. We will personally meet with you to create a customized plan to help your business train for success. We want you to succeed and we are able to provide the tools to help you do just that!

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BALANCE: LIFE & BUSINESS

Full Service Law Firm Specializing in Real Estate, Contractor/Subcontractor Matters and Lemon Law 2601 Airport Drive, Suite 105, Torrance, CA 90505 Tel 310.606.5400 Fax 310.606.5401 www.hblegal.com

Function Better, Live Better BY DR. KARA S. NANIA We all know that one person who seems to have it all together. They’re able to get the kids off to school, have a wonderful marriage and get to work looking DR. KARA NANIA like they just Chiropractor Advanced Family stepped out of the pages of a magazine. Chiropractic I write this for the rest of us. The balancing act between work and our personal life seems to be one of the biggest challenges we face as adults. The key isn’t trying to find more hours in the day, it’s doing more with the hours that we have. How do you do that? You be the best possible YOU, you can be.

To begin with, it’s as simple as what we fuel our bodies with. We have all felt that sluggish, slow feeling after eating something we know isn’t good for us. The fuel you put into your body will directly affect the energy you get out of it. Second, get moving. A study at California State University found that a 10 minute walk is enough to increase energy, alter mood and affect a positive outlook for up to 2 hours.* Lastly, get out of pain. You can’t be the best possible you if you are in chronic pain. Not only will it affect your attitude, but it can affect your sleep, your movement, and even your mental wellbeing. As a Chiropractor, I help people to get their lives back on a daily basis. We work to find the root cause of the problem and then fix it from there. Let’s face it, your pain is not from a lack

of pain medicine. Stop covering up your symptoms and finally get a life that’s free of pain. Getting yourself functioning at a higher level gives you the tools to better manage your life and leaves you with energy to put towards all areas. Howard Putman, former CEO of Southwest Airlines, once pointed out all the blades of the propeller must be perfectly balanced otherwise an airplane won’t fly. So go out there and make your airplane soar. *Stress: 63 ways to Relieve Tension and Stay Healthy. Inlander, Charles B. and Moran, Cynthia. Pg. 45

Dr. Kara S. Nania is a Chiropractor at Advanced Family Chiropractic. For more information, visit www.torrancechiropractic.com TO R R A N C E M A G A Z I N E

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BALANCE: LIFE & BUSINESS TO R R A N C E M E M O R I A L M E D I C A L C E N T E R ’ S

HealthLinks Program Offers Menu of Classes to Help People Find Their Center As a teacher who works with kids who need a little extra academic help at Wilmington Park Elementary School, Souri Jalali of Palos Verdes is no stranger to work-related stress. Validating Jalali’s experience, a 2010 list from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Careercast.com names teaching at an inner-city school the top most stressful job. Jalali’s saving grace is her daily meditation practice. She discovered meditation 20 years ago as a means for coping with the death of a good friend. “I was depressed and distraught. I started practicing meditation and yoga and noticed, ‘Ah ha, this is working!’” she said. “It’s made a tremendous difference in my well-being. Each time I start thinking ‘maybe I don’t need it anymore,’ I begin to have a tougher time concentrating and immediately start it up again.” Meditation is an ancient method for focusing the mind to cultivate awareness and achieve a higher state of

“Practicing meditation is simple, but not easy. The stereotype is that meditation must involve sitting in the lotus position chanting ‘om,’” Neal said. “What I instill is meditation, something one can do anytime, anywhere, including at a desk or on a bus.” 8

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BY COLLEEN FARRELL

consciousness. The purpose is to gain control over one’s attention to choose what to focus upon rather than being subject to the unpredictable ebb and flow of environmental circumstances. The exercise has proven benefits to physical and psychological processes. Studies link it to lowered respiration rates, blood pressure and muscle tension, leading researchers to conclude that meditators are better able to cope with stress and have more stable autonomic nervous systems. Psychological benefits include reduced test anxiety among school children, improved sleep behavior, decreased cigarette smoking, headache relief and a general state of positive mental health. Meditation is traditionally grounded in Eastern cultures (e.g., India and Tibet), but it has been popularized recently in Western cultures. Lakers Coach Phil Jackson is known to regularly incorporate meditation into team practice sessions. Two years ago, Jalali was pleased to discover a place in the South Bay to further cultivate her practice. Torrance Memorial Medical Center’s HealthLinks program offers a five-week Introduction to Mindfulness Meditation. Instructor Linda Neal, MA, MFT (Marriage and Family Therapist), guides students through mindfulness-based stress reduction techniques first developed by Jon Kabat-Zinn, M.D. Kabat-Zinn is

founding director of the Stress Reduction Clinic and the Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, Health Care, and Society at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. “Practicing meditation is simple, but not easy. The stereotype is that meditation must involve sitting in the lotus position chanting ‘om,’” Neal said. “What I instill is meditation, something one can do anytime, anywhere, including at a desk or on a bus.” “It’s not about closing off all thought. It’s natural for the mind to drift. The practice is noticing what the mind is doing and thinking, and in turn, training it how to respond to what we are experiencing in the world, instead of simply reacting to it.” After the introductory class, Jalali joined an ongoing weekly Meditation Circle offered through HealthLinks. The free group helps meditators further develop their skills, while feeding off the energy of others. For Jalali, 10-minute daily meditations during school recesses and lunch breaks provide the bursts of energy she needs to give her students the attention they deserve. “It’s not like a pill that you can take once and be cured; it’s something you have to do continually to reap the benefits,” Jalali said. HealthLinks offers a full menu of classes and workshops to meet individual needs in controlling stress and promoting work-life balance. Additional classes include a Caregiver Support Group, Stop Smoking Program, Reiki Exchange (a Japanese technique of stress reduction), Guided Imagery, Therapeutic Bodywork (Massage, Craniosacral, Lymphatic, Pregnancy, Acupressure, Reflexology, Healing Touch and Reiki), Spring Forest Qi Gong, T’ai Chi Ch’uan, PiYo (Fusion of Pilates and Yoga), Cardio Jam & Abs and How to B.E.A.T. Everyday Stress. For more information and

to register, please call 310-517-4711.


BALANCE: LIFE & BUSINESS

Balancing Life’s Decisions We have all heard the ironic and painfully true saying that the only guarantees in life are death and taxes. However, many of us still wait until April 14th to file, and most of us are left shocked and helpless at a time of loss. Sadly, this year I experienced the latter with the loss of my father. Last Thanksgiving, at the age of 76, my father was an active man still consulting internationally as a design engineer in the oil industry. Earlier that month, I had flown out to celebrate my birthday with my parents over fabulous Tapas and live entertainment; but on December 3rd, I received a call that Dad had been taken to the hospital with chest pains. What we thought would result in a stent or lifestyle change became two rounds of chemo and losing Dad seven weeks later to Acute Leukemia (AML).

light-hearted and much easier to conduct when we are younger and/or healthy. The minute we get “the call” is the moment we all shut down. But preplanning would have allowed my father to express his wishes in a private way and in writing while he was healthy. It also would have avoided doubts about our decisions even months later.

This letter was submitted by a friend of Green Hills Memorial Park. For further information on Green Hills, its properties, or to get a copy of their free 48-page “Personal Preference Guide,” contact (800) 536-6826 or www.GreenHillsMemorial.com

The conversations we have about our restingplace decisions are strangely light-hearted and much easier to conduct when we are younger and/or healthy. The minute we get “the call” is the moment we all shut down.

When my father-in-law passed away five years earlier after a two year illness, we had no plan in place. When my father passed in January, we were just as unprepared. Some lessons are hard to learn. The day after losing my father, I found myself with my sisters in a dark and humid cemetery office with my grieving mother making decisions and arrangements for eternity. It was overwhelming. The results were expensive, and again, it was a reminder of how unprepared we were. A few months have passed, accompanied by many pensive moments. Did we really know Dad’s wishes? When he expressed them, were they honest, or just a way to ease efforts and expenses for us? Having become more sensitive to this subject, I now understand what is meant by “the value of pre-planning.” The conversations we have about our resting-place decisions are strangely TO R R A N C E M A G A Z I N E

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BALANCE: LIFE & BUSINESS

Work Schedule Flexibility May Accommodate Lifestyle Choices BY KARL SCHMIDT

In difficult economic times employers may not be able to increase pay or benefits as often as they might like. However, where the nature of the work and necessary KARL SCHMIDT, supervision permit, Attorney an employer may Parker, Milliken, maintain some edge Clark, O’Hara in competing for & Samuelian talented employees by offering them flexibility in designing both their work schedules and other amounts of time off. Gen X & Y employees in particular often place significant value in having a work schedule which affords them wide options for leisure time. Flex Time. The simplest approach is by use of flex hours, where employees

who so desire may report for and complete the work day at a time earlier or later than the generally established work schedule. A nine to five schedule might in this way become a seven to three schedule. This can be accomplished on an individual basis with the approval of management. Alternative Work Weeks. The California Wage Orders offer a means for groups of employees to elect to work longer than 8 hour days without overtime pay in exchange for extra days off. These so called Alternative Work Weeks (“AWW”) may be adopted upon a secret ballot 2/3 majority vote of the affected employees in a “work unit.” The AWW’s typically chosen under authority of the Wage Orders are (1) four ten hour days each week with Fridays off or (2) a so called 9-80 two week

work period, in which employees are scheduled to work eight nine hour days and one eight hour day in a two week work cycle, and thus complete 80 hours of work while obtaining every other Friday off from work. No overtime pay is required under either schedule for the fixed hours established under the schedules. The Wage Orders contain detailed guidance for any employer who might be interested in exploring AWW’s, including: • The timing of required notices, disclosures and meetings to occur prior to the secret ballot election • The results of election report to be made to the Division of Labor Statistics and Research, • A required 30 day delay in implementing elected AWW’s for affected employees who so desire • Procedures for repeal of previously adopted AWW’s • “Work Unit” definition: Any division, department, job class, shift, separate physical location, or a recognized subdivision of any such work unit, including an individual employee, if he or she meets the “identifiable work unit” requirements. As AWW requirements are detailed and complex, it is recommended that counsel’s guidance be obtained to help ensure that all requirements have been met so that inadvertent exposure to overtime pay obligations can be avoided. Makeup Time and Comp Time. Two other flexibility techniques which are often confused are “Makeup Time” and “Comp Time”. Labor Code Section 513 provides that upon a signed, written request from an employee (which cannot be solicited by the employer) an employee may be permitted to make up work time which otherwise would be lost on account of the employee’s personal obligations if the makeup time is

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BALANCE: LIFE & BUSINESS C A L I F O R N I A

S T A T E

U N I V E R S I T Y ,

D O M I N G U E Z

H I L L S

Offering Limitless Opportunities for the Leaders of Tomorrow. We are proud to serve as an eminent educational and cultural center for the South Bay and the metropolitan Los Angeles region, featuring:

ΠOutstanding academic programs and faculty ΠConvenient location in the South Bay ΠExciting new majors including Global

HONORING OUR HISTORY. FORGING OUR FUTURE.

Logistics and Supply Chain Management ΠFinancial aid and scholarships available ΠBeautiful park-like campus

Office of Development | 1000 E. Victoria Street | Carson, CA 90747 | 310-243-2182 | giving@csudh.edu | www.csudh.edu/InvestInUs

As Alternative Work Week requirements are detailed and complex, it is recommended that counsel’s guidance be obtained to help ensure that all requirements have been met so that inadvertent exposure to overtime pay obligations can be avoided. performed in the same work week and does not cause the employee to work more than 11 hours in any day. Under Labor Code Section 204.3 compensating time off (“Comp Time”) works much differently. In lieu of earned overtime compensation, an employee who works at least a regularly scheduled 40 hours per week may request compensating time off at the rate of not less than one and one-half hours for each hour of overtime worked, up to a maximum accrual of 240 hours of compensating

time off. It is to be noted that federal wage and hour law does not make provision for any comparable “Comp Time” arrangement. Further, Code Section 204.3 includes many requirements, exceptions, limitations and directions and therefore should not be used without the advice and assistance of legal counsel.

Karl Schmidt has practiced labor and employment law for over 30 years and currently is the Chairman of the Labor & Employment Department of the law firm, Parker, Milliken, Clark, O’Hara & Samuelian. Mr. Schmidt was recently honored by being again included in Los Angeles Magazine’s annual “Super Lawyer” recognition and by his continued inclusion in the publication “The Best Lawyers in America”. He is General Counsel to the Torrance Chamber of Commerce, a member of the Board of Directors of Goodwill Industries of Southern California and a 20 year member of the L.A. Rotary Club #5. He regularly lectures both professionals and client audiences on employment law and management topics, including sexual harassment, diversity, privacy, lay-offs and protection of employer confidential information. Karl and his wife Annie have four children and three grandchildren, and live in Rolling Hills. Karl can be reached at

(213) 683-6518, kschmidt@pmcos.com or www.pmcos.com. TO R R A N C E M A G A Z I N E

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BALANCE: LIFE & BUSINESS

Healthy Employees, Healthy Bottom Line BY BARBARA CARNES, MD, ASSISTANT MEDICAL DIRECTOR KAISER PERMANENTE SOUTH BAY MEDICAL CENTER Healthy employees are not only happier, but they also create a healthy bottom line for your company. During the past few years, Kaiser Permanente South Bay Medical Center has fostered a healthier workplace environment and has reaped the benefits: improved employee morale, fewer work-related injuries, and improved attendance. Here are some free and low-cost tips for improving the health of your workforce: ENCOURAGE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Inactivity contributes to 15 percent of our nation’s overall health care costs, and people who are inactive are more likely to have costly chronic conditions such as diabetes and heart disease. For example, research shows that walking 30 minutes a day, five days a week, can cut new cases of Type 2 diabetes by nearly half and reduce the risk of stroke by 25 percent.

encourages healthy eating at work. But studies show that employees with poor eating habits miss more workdays than those eating healthy foods. Being overweight is associated with a number of costly chronic conditions, such as heart disease and diabetes. After trying more aggressive approaches to improving the nutrition of our cafeteria food, we learned that it was better to increase the number of healthy choices rather than taking away the less healthy ones. We offered more nutrient-dense snacks such as roasted nuts and protein bars in our vending machines, and we added options to the salad bar to make it more appealing. Then we began making small changes over time; we provided nutrition information on the entrees served in our cafeteria and began eliminating sugary drinks and sodas.

Consider the food you are serving at meetings and celebrations. Substitute fresh fruit, yogurt or hardboiled eggs for donuts at morning meetings. Start a potluck club where employees take turns preparing a healthy lunch for the group. At Kaiser Permanente we often rewarded and recognized staff with ice cream, and other Fall 5K Walk/Run & Thrive Fair at Ken Malloy Park calorie-laden treats. Now our Walking 15 minutes at a time, twice a day, has the same employees look forward to fruit smoothies instead. health benefits as walking 30 minutes once a day. Employees HELP MANAGE STRESS can fit 15-minute walks into their breaks. You don’t need a Stress is the single largest cause of health-related productivity company gym in order to encourage fitness. At Kaiser loss at work. Did you know that 58 percent of employee Permanente South Bay, we developed a one-mile walking ab-sences and 85 percent of workplace injuries are stresspath around our campus and promoted walking among related? The average worker’s compensation claim in California departments and colleagues. is $46,000, so it makes sense to manage your employees’ stress. Set up a lunchtime walking group, or ask your company It doesn’t take much time to combat stress. A couple of leaders to offer “walks with leadership” on a regular basis. times a day, departments or teams can take a five-minute Instead of meeting around a table, move your small-group “instant recess” by dancing to music, deep breathing, or meetings outside where you can walk together. Encourage doing light exercise. This simple activity eases stress, your staff to take the stairs. Gather a group of co-workers to improves alertness and wakes up the body. Our environmenparticipate in a walk for charity. tal services team—tasked with the physically-demanding job For more information on walking, visit everybodywalk.org. of cleaning our facilities—implemented instant recess and saw their workplace injury rate decline rapidly. SUPPORT HEALTHY EATING With vending machines, morning donuts and cafeteria service For more tips on creating a healthy workplace, visit in the workplace, it’s not easy to create an environment that www.kp.org/thrive9to5. One survey found that 79 percent of employees said they performed better at work on days they exercised, and a study concluded that people who exercise regularly are 23 percent less likely to catch a cold than inactive people. Healthy employees will have better attendance at work and will be more productive on the job.

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We believe in a healthy Torrance Kaiser Permanente Torrance Medical Office 20790 Madrona Avenue At our medical offices in Torrance, you’ll discover a wide range of services under one roof. That means better access to quality care right here in Torrance, and more peace of mind knowing that it’s close by. Ɣ Family medicine Ɣ Internal medicine Ɣ Pharmacy Ɣ Obstetrics/Gynecology

Ɣ Pediatrics Ɣ Podiatry Ɣ Laboratory Ɣ Radiology

For more information about Kaiser Permanente, give us a call at 1-800-4644000, or at 1-800-777-1370 (TTY for the hearing/speech impaired). You may also visit us online at kp.org.


BALANCE: LIFE & BUSINESS

Pelican Products — Flourishing Both Personally and Professionally Torrance-based Pelican Products, Inc. is the global leader in the design and manufacture of both high-performance protective case solutions and advanced portable LED lighting systems. Their products are used by professionals in the most demanding markets including firefighters, police, defense / military, aerospace, entertainment, industrial and consumer. Pelican products are designed and built to last a lifetime. The company employs 1,400 worldwide with 500 at their corporate headquarters in Torrance. It operates in 12 countries, with 22 offices and six manufacturing facilities across the globe. As the company has grown over the years, so have their employees. As a testament to this, 40% of their workforce has been with the company for more than 10 years. Many have actually retired from the company, which is a rare thing in this day and age. Pelican’s greatest resource is its employees and the company strives to create an environment in which employees can flourish both personally and professionally. Pelican has made several health and wellness activities available to all employees. They include company sponsored annual health screenings and flu shots, smoking cessation programs, on-site exercise classes, walking and bicycle clubs, softball and basketball teams, and health-based competitions to encourage employees to live active, healthy lifestyles. Pelican is now featuring increased numbers of healthy snack and drink offerings in their vending machines. In addition to health and wellness initiatives, Pelican offers several enrichment benefits that include educational reimbursement and a company sponsored employee service line which offers free-of-charge guidance and counseling on virtually any topic including legal,

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health and counseling questions. Employees are encouraged to participate in teams to help organize local school field trips as well as company picnics and holiday parties. Pelican annually provides anywhere from 2-6 weeks of paid vacation depending on an employee’s tenure with the organization. A wide range of company sponsored benefits are provided to employees and voluntary benefits include supplemental, short and long term disability, various types of life insurance, and access to long term care and adoption assistance. On a regular basis, the company also works with several charitable organizations that give back to a wide range of national and community causes. To this end, Pelican President and CEO, Lyndon Faulkner enjoys they’ve established a committee a light moment with employees at the Company’s of employees (the Pelican Torrance plant. Community Outreach Program) who organize and staff fundraising events throughout the sacrificed a limb in defense of freedom year. Organizations they’ve helped in Iraq and Afghanistan. Pelican is also include Heal The Bay, American Cancer involved with the USO’s ‘United Through Society, Alex’s Lemonade Stand, The Reading’ program, donating large American Red Cross and the Torrance transport cases to move recording Adopt-a-School-Program. Pelican has equipment and books to various partnered with Anza Elementary School military personnel in Southwest Asia. to support educational efforts. Most Since Pelican products are tailor made recently, Pelican has become an active for extreme situations, the company supporter of “A Better L.A.”, a collaboraalways stands ready to work with relief tive project between residents and law agencies to donate product to those enforcement to transform L.A.’s troubled who need it most. Product have been communities into safe places to dream, sent to aid victims of floods in Australia, work and play. earthquakes in Japan, Haiti and Chile In addition, Pelican’s charitable work as well as tornadoes in Springfield, doesn’t stop at the employee level. The Massachusetts and Joplin, Missouri. corporation actively supports wounded For more information, visit military service men and women across www.Pelican.com. the globe with their Pelican For Patriots program. It offers free cases to house the artificial limbs of those who have


Because your community is our community

We Care, We Volunteer: ExxonMobil volunteers at a beautification project for the non-profit, Pediatric Therapy Network.

Ask lots of questions and have fun! That was the advice given to more than 300 middle-school girls who participated in the refinery’s “Introduce a Girl to Engineering” celebration.

Torrance is our community. This is where we come to work every day. And this is where we volunteer. Whether it is performing habitat restoration at the Madrona Marsh, inspiring middle school girls to embrace math and science or beautifying our city, we are working with you every day to build a stronger Torrance community. www.torrancerefinery.com

2011 Earth Day: In April, 70 ExxonMobil volunteers and more than 150 community members performed habitat restoration at the Madrona Marsh during an ExxonMobil sponsored Earth Day event.


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The Benefits of Music At KDI Music, we believe balancing work and life is similar to writing music: it instills great work ethics. We work very hard to have quality instruments and accessories for sale in our internet store. We recognize the benefits of providing musical instruments to music lovers of all ages. As musicians ourselves, we all use the same musical instruments and accessories found on our website. We have over 40 years of musical knowledge, and can attest to the high quality of all the items we sell on this site. We are proud to be the Premier Internet Dealer for Rheuben Allen Saxophones, USA Educator Instruments, Zephyr Winds Brass, Larios8 Trumpets, Ronnie Laws Saxophones, Branded Woodwind Accessories, and the Kenny G “E-Series-II” and “E-SeriesIII” Saxophones. We believe they are the best on the market and are of great value to musicians of all levels, beginners to professionals.

By acknowledging the intrinsic value of giving back to our community, we feel that it is important to volunteer our time and talents to charitable organizations in order to make a difference in society.

We also support the Disneyland Alumni Club & Historical Society as Technical Advisors to help this great organization and remain, as their motto says, “always part of the magic”.

To honor this desire to help our community, we are privileged to sponsor the Annual Nisei Week Foundation Plaza Festival held each August in Little Tokyo, Los Angeles. We provide volunteers and lend a hand in the technical aspects of the Festival.

We are members of the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce, and Corporate Volunteer Council - South Bay.

Visit our website www.kdimusic.com and keep the arts alive!

Sunrider’s Balancing Act

Local Company Makes Business-Life Balance a Priority At Sunrider, everything revolves around balance. From the product lines and business opportunity it provides, to community involvement and philanthropic efforts, this Torrancebased global corporation understands that balance is good for business and the community. In fact, the blueprint for which Sunrider develops all its life-enhancing products, the Philosophy of Regeneration®, is wholly based on helping the body achieve balance and optimal health. Using this philosophy, Sunrider develops and self-manufactures herbal products for every segment of life—all to help the consumer reshape their body, have younger-looking skin, and be more energetic.

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Sunrider also seeks to create balance in the lives of those who sell its products. Sunrider’s Independent Business Owners (IBOs) have the ability to set their own hours, be their own boss, and develop an income stream from which they can do whatever their heart desires. There’s more to Sunrider, though, than business opportunities and herbal products. Sunrider is also committed to being a balanced and responsible corporate citizen. Since its inception in 1982, charity and philanthropy have been a top priority for this family-owned company. From disaster relief and education, arts and cultural involvement to

Sunrider’s World Headquarters

community outreach, Sunrider has given both time and money to those in need around the world. A recent crowning of the company’s philanthropic achievements was company founder Dr. Tei-Fu Chen’s March 2009 recognition as a

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BALANCE: LIFE & BUSINESS

Continued from page 16 Sunrider’s Balancing Act “Hero of Philanthropy” in Forbes Asia. Here in the United States, Sunrider sponsors and supports (just to name a few) the American Cancer Society’s “Relay For Life,” Tech Trek, which sends middle school female students to science camp each summer, and the Boston-based Franciscan Hospital for Children. On a more local level, Sunrider supports Junior Leadership Torrance (a program of the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce Leadership Torrance Alumni Association), AIDS Walk Los Angeles, Adopt-a-School, the Gang Alternatives Program (GAP), and many others. And it’s right here in Torrance at Sunrider’s World Headquarters where Dr. Chen houses his personal collection of Chinese art. Open and free to the public for tours, the Chen Art Gallery offers an impressive look at Chinese artifacts, many of which are thousands of years old. As the largest private collection of Chinese art in North America, this art gallery offers a welcomed cultural escape to the local community—another gateway for balance, if you will.

Success—It’s Not Just An Adult Challenge Anymore! Not only do we often struggle to maintain a healthy balance between our work and home lives, but now even our children are struggling to balance their extra-curricular activities, maintain their grades and find time to simply be children.

habits which help them better cope with daily stress in school.

Shamrock Tutoring has been in the South Bay for almost 25 years and can help you and your school age children (K-12) succeed in our increasingly complex world. At Shamrock Tutoring we believe it is important to establish not only a relationship with your child, but an understanding of their individual needs and goals. We work to ensure our students have the skills and tools necessary to comprehend and apply knowledge. Our students gain proficiency in areas they are struggling with and develop educational skills and study

This summer, let us help you help your children! We specialize in all levels of Math: K-12, Algebra 1 &2, Geometry, Calculus and Trigonometry; Spanish; Sciences: General Science, Biology, Chemistry and Physics; Honors/AP classes; Language Arts; Writing Skills and Reading Comprehension. Summer Session starts on June 20, 2011 and ends on September 3, 2011. Your child may come one week, or the whole time! For more information, see our ad (below) or call us at (310) 370-1901. Mention this article or the ad in this magazine and receive a one-time $25.00 discount.

With the constant chaos that surrounds us on a daily basis, it’s harder than ever to achieve balance in today’s world, but that only makes finding it even more important. And while the search for balance may be continual and ever changing, Sunrider is a good example of one company that’s ardently trying to achieve it and contribute to the community in the process. Operating in over 40 countries and regions, Sunrider develops and manufactures 400-plus herbal foods and beverages, supplements, cosmetics, personal care products, and household products in its self-owned and operated manufacturing facilities in Torrance, CA. The Chen Art Gallery is located in Sunrider’s World Headquarters at 1625 Abalone Avenue in Torrance and is open and free to the public.

To schedule your free tour, please visit Chenartgallery.org or Sunrider.com. TO R R A N C E M A G A Z I N E

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I N A P P R E C I AT I O N O F O U R T R O O P S A N D V E T E R A N S

Torrance-South Bay YMCA Supports Our Military Families counseling to military personnel and their families at the Y.

YMCA of the USA, the Armed Services YMCA, and the United States Department of Defense have launched the Armed Services YMCA and Department of Defense Outreach Initiative to address the needs of families of deployed military personnel. The Torrance-South Bay YMCA proudly participates in this initiative by providing families who are facing the hardship and uncertainty of military deployment with access to child development, family strengthening, and health and well-being programming. One of those families includes Doris and her teenage son. After Doris’s husband was deployed to Iraq several years ago and the family was unable to maintain their Y membership due to financial constraints, they were delighted to be able to return to the Y through the Armed Services Outreach Initiative last December. “The Y gives me a positive place where my son and I share a common interest and spend quality time together. Also, my Healthy Lifestyles Coach, Lori, has been very caring and supportive,” says Doris. To date, the Torrance-South Bay YMCA has sponsored 52 families through this unique program, whereby membership fees are underwritten and administered through Military OneSource, an information and referral service for military families. “We are happy to play such an important role in meeting the critical needs facing families of deployed military service members,” says Bob Shafer, Executive Director of the Torrance-South Bay YMCA. “Families are the most affected when a loved one gets deployed, so we are

“The YMCA has a long history of supporting military service members and their families – since the Civil War – so it was natural for us to join this initiative,” says Shafer. “During this time of conflict, it is more important than ever that we continue providing services and support to these families in the absence of a deployed spouse.”

deeply committed to providing them with the support they need.” Military families participating in the initiative receive YMCA memberships based on specific eligibility requirements: All interested families of joint deployed National Guard and Reserves of all military branches; Active Duty Independent Duty station personnel and their families; and Relocated spouses and family members of deployed Active Duty personnel. The Torrance-South Bay YMCA’s Board of Managers recently approved additional funding for military families, particularly those who may not meet the exact requirements above but who do need financial assistance. Further, the Torrance-South Bay YMCA is entering into a unique partnership with the University of Southern California’s School of Social Work and its Center for Innovation and Research on Veterans and Military Families, whereby graduate student interns will provide highly specialized individual and family

The Torrance-South Bay YMCA is one of the largest, most diverse non-profit community service organizations in the region. The Y partners closely with community members to promote the safety, health, and happiness of people of all ages, races, faiths, abilities, and incomes. No one is ever turned away for inability to pay. The Y provides a multitude of community enrichment opportunities including before- and after-school child care, preschool, healthy lifestyles coaching and fitness training, parent-child programs, swim lessons, activities for seniors, day and resident camps, individual and family counseling, teen programs, and much more involving more than 15,000 households in the South Bay. Please call Tina Caporaso at 310-325-5885 x7489 or visit www.ymcala.org/tsb for more information about support for military families at the Torrance-South Bay YMCA. Additional information about the ASYMCA-DoD Outreach Initiative may be found by visiting www.asymca.org.

We are happy to play such an important role in meeting the critical needs facing families of deployed military service members. 18

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FROM THE CIT Y OF TORRANCE CITY’S PERMIT CENTER

Helping Customers and Staff Save Time to Better Balance Life and Business BY GESUINA PARAS In a true effort to cut bureaucratic red tape and improve efficiency and customer service, on Monday, May 2, 2011 at 4:30 p.m., the City of Torrance cut the ceremonial ribbon and opened the doors to its new Permit Center at the City Hall East Annex located at 3031 Torrance Blvd. The City of Torrance Permit Center provides a central location for all development, building permits, business license, fire prevention and payment needs in one central location. Registrations for Oversized Vehicle Permits will also be handled at the Center. Mayor Frank Scotto commended the City’s vigilance, dedication and perseverance to complete this project, “Their [The City staff’s] dedication helped us listen to our customers, identify the need behind their feedback, then develop a compre-

hensive solution to improve what we offer and how to serve them. They [staff], welcomed the change knowing it would help serve the community more efficiently.” The Center entailed a facelift of the East Annex of Torrance’s City Hall between the existing City Treasurer’s and City Clerk’s Offices. Its development and construction involved closing six existing public counters and combining them into the new Center. In addition to structural work to a City Hall area that was originally constructed in 1956, the Permit Center also offered the opportunity to review existing processes, workflow, staffing and technology. The project gave the City the chance to implement best practices from each operational area for greater efficiency in serving the community’s needs. So, not only does the

establishment of the Permit Center allow City staff to provide better customer service, it allows staff to work more efficiently together. The idea of a permit center began during the development of its 10-year Strategic Plan in the 1990s. Through the years, various divisions identified a common need to provide better customer service by improving workspaces and assessing business practices. In time, the City stored up enough resources to undertake this significant construction project. The City allocated $1.9 million for this project, which was completed under budget. With its easy access from Torrance Boulevard, the new City of Torrance Permit Center offers a convenient, centralized location where one’s permitting needs will be met with greater efficiency.

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F RO M TO R R A N C E U N I F I E D S C H O O L D I S T R I C T F RO M T H E O F F I C E O F D R . G E O R G E M A N N O N

Superintendent’s June Message… Summer is here, teachers have wrapped up lesson plans and students have started enjoying their summers. Looking back at the past year, we accomplished so much. Three of our schools – Calle Mayor Middle School, Jefferson Middle DR. GEORGE MANNON School, and Torrance High Torrance Unified School School – all received the District Superintendent California Distinguished School recognition. Our students collectively raised almost $30,000 for those struck by tragedy in Japan. South High students received top honors at the L.A. County Science Olympiad. In addition to sweeping wins in the Academic Decathlon Competitions, West High students also came in first place in the Lego Mindstorm Mini-Urban Challenge and will have their winning robot displayed at the American History Museum in Washington D.C. Calle Mayor Middle School’s Wind Ensemble performed at the Kennedy Center. Also, Madrona Middle School hosted the first L.A. County Region Math Olympiad. These significant achievements are just a sample of the many remarkable successes our students attain each year.

the past three years we have raised almost $440,000. These funds have been used for much needed classroom intervention and enrichment teachers. Once again we have launched the SOS campaign, but this time American Honda has generously agreed to sponsor our efforts. Anyone donating to the SOS campaign will receive Thank You gifts courtesy of American Honda. Some of these gifts include tickets to Disneyland, the Honda Center, the Rose Bowl, and the Rose Parade. Donors will also be entered into a drawing to win a versatile Honda Portable Generator. American Honda is committed to help TUSD raise necessary funds needed to protect classroom teachers. For more details please visit our website at www.tusd.org. TUSD is fortunate to have passionate teachers, dedicated classified employees, and committed administrators, who work day in and day out to ensure our students receive the best education possible. Thank you for your service to our students. I hope everyone gets a chance to relax and have some fun during their summer holidays.

While our students continue to make exceptional gains in their academic endeavors, the State continues to strip us of much needed funds, funds we need to continue providing our students with the high quality education they deserve. According to State law, the Governor and Legislature are supposed to have an adopted budget in place by the end of June. This rarely occurs, and the State often does not have a budget approved until well into the fiscal year. However, school districts do not have this flexibility and must have an approved budget by June 30th. While we struggle to balance our books with uncertain budget information, law makers in Sacramento continue to attempt to balance their growing budget deficit. Because the State continues to take monies away from the classroom, the District has tried to fill some of that gap with funds raised through the SAVE OUR SCHOOLS (SOS) fundraising effort. Over TO R R A N C E M A G A Z I N E

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F RO M T H E TO R R A N C E C E N TE N N I A L CO M M I T TE E

Celebrating the Journey to “All-America City” Status— Twice in 100 Years BY KRISTIN J. MATSUDA In June, 45 delegates from the City of Torrance attended the All-America City Finals in Kansas City, Missouri. Torrance was one of 26 communities across the nation whom the National Civic League selected in 2011 to showcase their community strength before a jury of eleven civics experts. NCL bestows the honor of All-America City to 10 communities at the conclusion of the annual three-day event. For Torrance, it will be the second such journey to the finals in the city’s 100-year history. LOOKING BACK Torrance won the coveted award in 1956, with a letter-writing campaign run through Torrance Press. Student letters explaining why the city deserved the award were addressed to Mayor Albert Isen, who brought them to the finals in Memphis, Tennessee. Some letters offered personal reasons for supporting the city. General support included how Torrance “is smog-free, the home of many industries, close to the beach, and has good schools.” MOVING FORWARD Torrance revisited air quality issues in its 2011 award application, this time as one of two pressing community challenges. The city presented “Alternatives ‘Fuel’ Torrance,” an outline of the alternative fuels “industry” and programs in Torrance that work to advance technology, improve air quality, and help affect environmental change. The Torrance Transit Ambassador Program offered an answer to a second pressing challenge: how the city can help its burgeoning senior population. Pediatric Therapy Network was the third project named in the application for grassroots achievements benefiting youth and children.

ence for English-language learners and their families exemplified the Torrance Unified School District’s ability to embrace cultural changes in the city. The only coastal community of the five California cities vying for this year’s title, Torrance brought “the beach” to Kansas City. Discover Torrance distributed mini beach balls during NCL’s civic fair. All competing communities received the tourism group’s brochure, “The Real Fun Starts Here,” to promote Torrance as a travel destination. Delegates wore Hawaiian shirts to underscore the community’s festive spirit. Competing for this year’s All-America City finals was also serious business. In this trying economy, Torrance had to raise funds to support delegation expenses. Providence Little Company of Mary and Torrance Memorial together gave nearly 10 youth, community and cultural representatives the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to be part of Torrance’s delegation. Even if Torrance does not repeat an All-America City victory, there will be plenty to celebrate at the 7th Annual Rock-Around-the-Block party this year. Since 2004, the Torrance Historical Society has been raising awareness of the city’s past All-America City status while boosting activity downtown with an evening of 1950s-themed family fun, food, music and a fantastic array of classic cars. This year’s event will include a photo display from both the 1956 and 2011 AllAmerica City competitions. The public is invited to join the party in Old Torrance on Thursday, July 21, 2011, 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM.

Torrance’s “good schools” were mentioned once again in the city’s current All-America City quest. Highlighted for the city’s “diversity and inclusiveness,” the DELMAC mini-confer-

Torrance was one of 26 communities across the nation whom the National Civic League selected in 2011 to showcase their community strength before a jury of eleven civics experts. 22

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F RO M T H E TO R R A N C E C E N TE N N I A L CO M M I T TE E

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R I B B O N C U T T I N G S / C E LE B R AT I O N S April 7, 2011 GRAND OPENING OF

Lotus Pet Foods Inc. 2727 Maricopa Street Torrance, CA 90503 (310)212-1011

www.lotuspetfoods.com

May 5, 2011 GRAND OPENING OF

1321 Downtown Taproom Bistro 1321 Sartori Avenue Torrance, CA 90501 (310)618-1321

www.1321downtown.com June 7, 2011 GRAND OPENING OF

King Shabu Shabu 3525 Pacific Coast Highway Torrance CA 90505 (310)539-5464 (310)539-1888 Fax

www.kingshabushabu.com

A D VA N TA G E A W A R D S

Chamber Businesses Honored at the Fourth Annual Torrance Advantage Awards On March 24, 2011, the City of Torrance Office of Economic Development honored local businesses for their innovative economic development strategies for the year 2010. The fourth annual Torrance Advantage Awards ceremony was held at the new Toyota Automobile Museum. Chamber member Scott Robinson Honda was honored with the Enriching the Community Award which recognizes businesses for their excellence in contributing to the prosperity of Torrance through increase in revenue and tax base. Luminit and Miyako Hybrid Hotel shared the Quality of Life Community Investor Award that recognizes businesses whose products, systems, methods and services contribute significantly to the improvement of the quality of life for the Torrance community. The People to People Award which recognizes an organiza-

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tion’s excellence in enhancing employment opportunities in Torrance was awarded to YogaFit and Home Instead Senior Care for their organization’s commitment to its current employees by investing in their talents and skills. And the Long-Term Investor Award was presented to Lauridsen /South Bay Ballet Centre and Toyota Motor Sales, Inc. This award recognizes businesses that have demonstrated excellence throughout the years with sustained success through partnerships, innovative strategies and continuous effort toward progress. In its fourth year, the City of Torrance developed the Torrance Advantage Awards as a way of saying thank you to the invaluable contributions of Torrance businesses to Torrance’s strong economy. We salute our Chamber members who participated and whose businesses showed exemplary contributions. Congratulations!


DISTINGUISHED MEMBER AWARDS

Award Presented to Tracy Underwood Acknowledges Outstanding Leadership The 2011 George M. Whittlesey Memorial Award was presented to Tracy Underwood, National Manager, Corporate Contributions, Toyota Motor Sales USA, Inc. at the Installation Gala on June 23rd at the Doubletree Hotel.

Underwood has an extensive history of community involvement including the Pediatric Therapy Network Community Advisory Board the past five years, member of the Switzer TRACY Center Board of Trustees, UNDERWOOD six-year Board of Director for the Torrance Area Chamber of Underwood has earned this Commerce, assisted in the launch prestigious recognition by distinof Toyota Driving Expectations guishing herself as a leader in program, and she orchestrated promoting and fostering business Toyota’s first ever philanthropic enterprise in the Torrance area. social media campaign – ‘100 Cars She has clearly demonstrated qualifor Good’ which enlists the help ties of integrity and high personal of communities across the country standards that set an example for to help Toyota donate 100 cars to others. Underwood has donated 100 nonprofit organizations in much of her time, energy and 100 days. experience to others without regard for personal gain or reward.

Cindy Scotto Named J.Walker Owens Award Recipient Cindy Scotto was presented with the J. Walker Owens Award for Volunteerism at the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce Installation on June 23rd. The J. Walker Owens Award was named after a 24 year Executive Vice President of the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce. Cindy Scotto has served this chamber and business community far beyond the perimeters of volunteerism. Cindy is a member of the Torrance Centennial Committee, serving on the fund raising subcommittee; she co-created the City of Torrance ‘Students and Government Day’, now in the fifth year; she serves on the Torrance Cultural Arts Center Foundation; she volunteers as an assistant coach for the Torrance Little League, as well as a board member; serves on the boards of the Torrance Symphony Association and the Parent Teacher Association and she has been involved with AYSO for over 18 years where she was a coach, board member and referee. CINDY SCOTTO

2011 Distinguished Citizen of the Year Dean Reuter was presented with the 2011 Distinguished Citizen of the Year by the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce at the ‘State of the City’ luncheon this past May. Dean graduated from the University of Southern California School of Architecture and Fine Arts in 1974 and is a licensed architect in the state of California. He is a Vietnam era veteran, havDEAN REUTER ing retired from the Army Corps of Engineers with the rank of Captain with the Army Commendation Medal with oak cluster, and is a past member of the Society of American Military engineers. After a distinguished architectural career in the commercial field, Dean started his own company, Reuter & Reuter in 1990. Dean has been an active member of several local service organizations. He has been involved with Big Brothers of Greater Los Angeles for over 15 years, having been named ‘Big Brother of the Year’ in 1996. He served on the executive board of the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce for six years and served as the vice chair of the Foundation. He has also been a member of the YMCA of Torrance Annual Support Campaign fundraiser. Dean has been an active Rotarian since 2000 and was elected President of the Rotary Club of Del Amo in 2008 – 2009. He continues to serve as Senior Assistant for Membership for District 5280 and will serve as Lieutenant Governor for the years 2012 – 2013 for Rotary International District 5280. Dean also serves as Deacon for the Journey of Faith Church in Manhattan Beach.

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State of the City On May 12th, the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce celebrated the State of the City at the Doubletree Torrance Hotel. It was a fullhouse and an opportunity for Torrance Mayor Frank Scotto to update the business community on Torrance’s strides and challenges.

STATE OF THE CITY (from top left to right) 1. Mark Waronek, Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce Chairman of the Board, welcomes guests to the annual ‘State of the City Address.’ 2. Mayor Frank Scotto delivers the ‘State of the City’ address. 3. Michael Hunn, Senior Vice President, Chief Executive with Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Center provides the introduction of Mayor Frank Scotto. Providence was the title sponsor of the event. 4. Torrance Mayor Frank Scotto presents Dean Reuter with a Proclamation from the City acknowledging him as being named ‘Citizen of the Year’ by the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce. 5. More than 300 guests attended to the ‘State of the City’ luncheon at the Doubletree Hotel.

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Dr. George Mannon and Don Lee Deliver State of Education Address The Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce Sherry Kramer, Continental Development Foundation hosted the 29th annual State of Corporation. Education luncheon on Friday, June 3rd, 2011 Keynote presenters Dr. George Mannon, at the Doubletree Hotel. This year’s event Superintendent of Schools and Mr. Don Lee, celebrated 100% participation in the Adopt-aPresident, Board of Education discussed School program, exemplary partnerships current issues and topics pertaining to the between the business community and all schools and students in the Torrance Unified schools within the Torrance Unified School School District. Sponsors included American DR. GEORGE MANNON, District. Adopt a School “Partnerships of the Superintendent of Schools Honda Motor Co., Inc., First California Bank, Year” awards presented to Virco Manufacturing and DON LEE, Board of Kaiser Permanente, and Torrance Memorial & South High School, Outback Steakhouse & Education President Medical Center. The Foundation also awarded Jefferson Middle School, and Torrance Memorial scholarships to five distinguished high school recipients Medical Center & Calle Mayor Middle School for their within our community. outstanding achievements, with special recognition to STATE OF EDUCATION (from left to right) 1. Richard Peterson, Principal of Carr Elementary School, leads the Pledge of Allegiance. 2. Max Arnold, a fifth grade student at Carr Elementary School, plays the National Anthem. 3. Heartfelt appreciation is extended to the ‘State of Education’ sponsors; American Honda Motor Co., Inc., Kaiser Permanente, California National Bank and Torrance Memorial Medical Center. 4. Congratulations to the Adopt-A-School ‘Partnership of the Year’ recipients; Calle Mayor Middle School and Torrance Memorial Hospital; Virco Manufacturing Inc. and South High School and Jefferson Middle School and Outback Steakhouse. 5. Sherry Kramer, Continental Development Corporation and Vice Chair of the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce Foundation, presents scholarship checks to seniors attending South, North, Torrance and West High Schools. 6. Sherry Kramer is recognized by the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce for the time and effort she has provided in coordinating ten Adopt-A-School partnerships.

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Junior Leadership Torrance Graduates 24 High School Students On April 27, Sunrider welcomed 24 high school students, their families, TUSD Administrators, community members, and the Torrance Mayor and Council to witness the graduation of 24 students. Through the leadership of Pat Sandt, Rod Guyton and Tammy Khan (TUSD Public Information Officer), the Leadership Torrance Alumni Association (LTAA) developed a program to resemble that of Leadership Torrance, but for high school students. “We want to give these outstanding students an opportunity to learn more about their community and to put an extra item on their accomplishments list for universities to see,” said Sandt. “We also hope to foster a love for our city where someday these students will return with their new skills and continue to make this the outstanding place it is for business and residents.” Junior Leadership Torrance is in its fourth year, thanks to the generous financial support of Sunrider. This year’s program accommodated students from South and Torrance High Schools. Next year, it will welcome students from North and West. Sponsors of the program and graduation ceremony included Program Sponsor Sunrider, the Torrance Chamber, Green Ink Marketing, Life’s Delicious Catering and Party Posies. Additional Sponsors included the City of Torrance, Providence Health and Services, the Torrance Historical Society, Dominguez Ranch, Pelican Products, the Western Museum of Flight and Happy Hats for Kids, and Leslie Cortez.

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Junior Leadership Torrrance Graduates: SOUTH HIGH SCHOOL Connor Archambault Brittni Bonham Dianne David Grace Davis Josh Harris Richard Herrada Cassidy Hoopes Brandon Loera Kenji Nishimura Caylin Ofsanko Chad Simon Sheridan Wakimoto TO R R A N C E H I G H S C H O O L Jessica Cole Rahma Junaidean Kevin S. Kim Kaley Kubokawa Samuel M. Lee Joo Hee Pak Daniel W. Park Natasha Pimentel Mateen B. Qadri Mohammad Mehdi Razipour Colby DeVon Stewart Jason Valladares


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UPCOMING

EVENT

25TH ANNUAL GOURMET FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL SATURDAY, AUGUST 6, 2011, 7 - 10 P.M. On the grounds of: American Honda Motor Co., Inc. 700 Van Ness Ave, Torrance Chamber Presented by American Honda Motor Co., Inc. and Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce Festival to Benefit Torrance Memorial Medical Center Food tastings, wine samplings and live musical entertainment by jazz fusionist and six-time GRAMMY® winner Daniel Ho included in ticket price. Price: $125 per person ($200 per pair) For tickets information, please visit: www.Torrance Chamber.com Or call: (310) 540-5858 Dress code includes coat and tie or cocktail attire. No one under 21 will be admitted.

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BRIEFS

“TOYOTA 100 CARS FOR GOOD” Program Public Voting to Determine 75 Remaining Nonprofit Organizations to Receive Toyota Vehicle • First 25 nonprofit organizations have been selected by the public to receive a new Toyota vehicle. • Five non-profit organizations will continue to be profiled on Toyota’s Facebook page www.facebook.com/ toyota each day through August 16— One vehicle will be awarded each day! Toyota today announced the first 25 winners of the Toyota 100 Cars for Good program, which awards 100 vehicles over the course of 100 days to 100 deserving non-profits. Winners of

the Toyota 100 Cars for Good program are determined based on voting from the public. Each day, five organizations are profiled on Toyota’s Facebook page where the public is invited to show their support by voting to determine the winning nonprofit organization. Each daily winner will be awarded a new Toyota vehicle to help the organizations continue to do “good” in their local communities. The remaining finalists will each receive a $1000 grant from Toyota.

The first 25 winners spanned several categories including animal welfare & wildlife, arts & culture, education, health & safety, and human services.

The first 25 winners spanned several categories including animal welfare & wildlife, arts & culture, education, health & safety, and human services. From promoting the mental, physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being of adolescents to alleviating the suffering of abandoned, abused and injured animals, a variety of worthy causes were shared on the finalists’ profiles and ultimately selected by the public to receive a new vehicle to further support their missions. Public voting for the 100 Cars for Good program opened May 9 and will continue through August 16. Voters may place one vote per day, each day, over the course of the program. Each day, the previous day’s winner will be announced and five new nonprofit organizations will be featured for voting. Winning organizations can choose from the following vehicles: Prius, Tacoma, Tundra, Highlander Hybrid, Sienna or Sienna Mobility. With each vehicle, Toyota Financial Services will provide a six-year, 100,000 mile Toyota Vehicle Service Agreement to provide extended protection beyond the vehicle warranty. The 500 finalists, from which the 100 winners are ultimately selected, were chosen by an independent panel of judges who are experts in the fields of philanthropy and corporate social responsibility. “We are delighted to announce the first 25 winners of the Toyota 100 Cars for Good Program,” said Jim Lentz, president of Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc. “The program was created to provide vehicles to deserving non-profit organizations that are doing good things in their communities. Each of the selected winners is a testament to the outstanding missions of their respective organizations. We congratulate our first 25 winners and wish the remaining finalists in the running the best of luck.”

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World Renowned LASIK Surgeon Retires After 30 Years in the South Bay NVISION Eye Surgeons’ Dr. Franklin Lusby, Dr. Amarpreet Brar and Dr. Michael Brenner Continue To Build a Legacy for Eye Health in Torrance People have come from across the United States and around the world to have LASIK surgery with Dr. Wendell Wong, Medical Director and Chief of Laser Surgery at NVISION Laser Eye Centers, Torrance. South Bay residents are just a short drive away from this world renowned physician — that was until this year. Dr. Wong retired earlier this year after having performed more than 70,000 procedures on patients that include doctors (700 approximately), lawyers, professional athletes, members of Royalty, prominent political figures and entertainers. However, Dr. Wong says, “I consider all of my patients to be stars.”

has performed more than 25,000 LASIK and other refractive eye procedures and was among the first in California to implant multifocal intraocular lenses back in 1997. Free Consultations Available People interested in a free consultation for LASIK or other refractive surgery can contact NVISION Laser Eye Centers, Torrance at 310-784-2020, or visit our web site at www.nvisioncenters.com/torrance The center is located at 23550 Hawthorne Boulevard, Suite 220, Torrance, CA.

Dr. Wendell Wong retired earlier this year after having performed more than 70,000 procedures on patients.

A Thirty Year Legacy in the South Bay Continues Dr. Wong has left his practice in the capable hands of Dr. Franklin Lusby, as the Medical Director and Chief of Surgery at NVISION Torrance; and eye surgeons Dr. Amarpreet S. Brar and Dr. Michael Brenner. Dr. Lusby began specializing in ophthalmology in 1980. Since 1989, the focus of his practice has been refractive surgery. As of 2010, Dr. Lusby has performed over 45,000 refractive or LASIK surgeries. A local Southern California native, Dr. Brar has been board certified for more than 10 years. He specializes in LASIK, PRK, LASEK, cataracts, intraocular lenses, Custom LASIK and Wavefront Technology. He is also an expert in implanting multi-focal, accommodating, TORIC and monofocal intraocular lenses. In his nearly 20 years as a boardcertified ophthalmologist, Dr. Brenner TO R R A N C E M A G A Z I N E

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The For Our Children Committee surrounds the 2011 Honda CR-Z-EX generously donated by American Honda Motor Co., Inc. Kneeling in front of the car (from left) is Steve Morikawa, American Honda Motor Co., Inc.; Mandy Gregory and Kelly Trudgen. Standing (from left) is Barbara Roberts, Providence TrinityCare Hospice Foundation; Claudia Levin, Karin Baker, Erin Pieronek, Laura Grabher, Sandpipers President; Robin Bosmajian, Laura Miller, Natalie Muckley, Jim Sala, Sharon Martinez, Jan Curtis, Lynn Watson, Melissa Wickman and Claudia Levin

For Our Children Raises Over $140,000 for TrinityKids Care and Sandpipers’ Philanthropic Programs On a recent sunny Sunday in May, over 850 guests joined together with Sandpipers and TrinityKids Care for The 26th Annual For Our Children Food and Wine Festival, presented by Honda. This event, held on the Honda campus, featured an afternoon of gourmet foods and fine wines from nearly 100 restaurants, wineries and beverage purveyors. As always, guests had the opportunity to bid on fabulous silent and live auction items, and purchased chances to win the 2011 Honda CR-Z EX sport hybrid coupe donated by American Honda Motor Co., Inc. the event’s presenting sponsor. For Our Children raised over $140,000 to benefit children and

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their families through TrinityKids Care, a program of Providence TrinityCare Hospice Foundation and Sandpipers’ philanthropic programs. Event co-chairs Sharon Martinez, Sandy Fisler and Claudia Levin were very pleased with the support of the community and sponsors. Ms. Levin stated, “We are so happy to present the proceeds from this event to Sandpipers and TrinityKids Care, and we are thankful to the community for their continued support.” Added Ms. Martinez, “We are grateful to Honda for their generous partnership and for allowing us to continue this wonderful tradition on their campus.” Additional major sponsors included Classic Tents, travelstore, Young’s

Market/The Estate’s Group, and Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Center - Torrance. TrinityKids Care is the only dedicated pediatric hospice program for infants and children in Southern California, providing end of life care to children with life-threatening illnesses. Sandpipers’ philanthropic programs provide critical scholarship funding for qualifying students for four continuous years of under-graduate study, as well as community outreach programs that supply ongoing emergency financial and in-kind assistance to children, adults and families at risk within the South Bay community.


NEWS

BRIEFS

Japanese Atomic Bomb Survivors Examined As Part of A Long-term Study of Radiation Exposure More than 100 Japanese survivors of atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War II underwent comprehensive medical examinations over the weekend as part of an international medical research effort sponsored by Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Center Torrance to determine the long-term effects of radiation exposure. More than 65 years after the atomic bombs scorched the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the scars of health problems and traumatic memories of the event still linger for the many Southern California residents who survived the devastation. “I have physical and emotional scars from the bomb that will never heal,” said Kaz Suyeishi, president of the American Society of Hiroshima-Nagasaki A-Bomb Survivors. “It is important to me that others remember the devastation that myself and other survivors endured. I don’t want anyone to ever have to go through what I went through.”

“We have learned a great deal about the long-term effects of radiation exposure as a result of this research program,” said Dr. Fred Sakurai, medical director of Providence Little Company of Mary Ningen Dock Center and president of JCHA. “Besides the medical knowledge we have discovered, the examinations

provide a social platform for survivors to share their personal stories and help each other heal.” Dr. Sakurai said that given Japan’s current radiation issues as a result of the earthquake and tsunami, the medical insight from the long-term study of radiation exposure will help today’s medical professionals in Japan.

More than 65 years after the atomic bombs scorched the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the scars of health problems and traumatic memories of the event still linger for the many Southern California residents who survived the devastation.

The victims, termed “hibakusha” in Japan, underwent medical examinations and counseling by a team of physicians from Japan and the United States that are experts in radiation-related disease and illness. The examinations were conducted at Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Institute, 21311 Madrona Ave., Suite 100-A, Torrance. The mission to monitor and examine the health of the survivors began in 1977 and has occurred every other year. The efforts are supported by the Japanese government’s Ministry of Health and Welfare, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima Prefectural and local medical associations such as the Japanese Community Health Association (JCHA.)

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LO O K I N G B AC K , W H I LE M OV I N G F O RW A R D

Toyota — Investing in Communities Where They Do Business In 1957, Toyota opened its first dealership in Hollywood, CA. Since then, Toyota has been committed to investing in the communities where they do business. On January 31st, 1967, Toyota officially moved its head-quarters to Torrance, CA. Today, not only is Toyota a leader in the automotive industry as we know it, but also a leader in the development of new technologies and business practices that benefit society and the environment. For more than half a century, Toyota has grown with America — making history along the way. The Toyota USA Automobile Museum opened in January 2000 to honor that journey, and to preserve a collection of vintage vehicles tracing Toyota’s amazing impact on America. In June 2010, the Museum relocated and expanded its footprint. The Museum features significant model offerings and milestone vehicles representing Toyota’s history in the United States. These vehicles tell the story of Toyota’s timeless commitment to quality, innovation and durability.

Hollywood: The 1967 2000GT, one of the stars of the James Bond movie “You Only Live Twice.” Racing: Ivan “Ironman” Stewart’s famous off-road stadium truck; GTP race cars; a Long Beach Grand Prix historical photo wall; and the Chip Ganassi Target Champ Car New Brand: the recently introduced Scion xA and xB and tC vehicles Environmental: the world’s first gas/electric hybrid car, the Prius, along with a cutaway drawing Design: CALTY studio concept drawings, clay and 3-D fiberglass models One of a Kind: several serial No. 1 vehicles from U.S. and Canadian manufacturing plants, along with some pre-production prototype vehicles This Museum is just one way Toyota contributes to the community by serving as a gratuitous venue for Toyota associate and dealer groups, trade associations, car clubs, Chamber members, civic and community organizations.

The Museum is open Monday through Thursday for tours, meetings and events by appointment only. The Museum is closed all holidays. The Meeting Hall is 6000 square feet, Motorsports and has the capacity to serve: Visitors have a unique opportunity to tour the 33,000 square • 250 people at 60” round tables (8-10 chairs) foot Museum and view the 100+ cars on display (valued at over • 60 - 80 people classroom-style set-up $12 million) — including Toyota, Lexus and Scion cars and • 300 people auditorium set-up trucks dating back to 1958, along with more than a dozen hisThe Catering Kitchen is 418 square feet. Also available, toric racing vehicles. A history of Toyota’s operations in the U.S. is a 341 square foot Conference Room (12-15 attendees). and around the world is also a part of the Museum exhibit. The Museum is handicapped accessible with a wheelchair VEHICLES ON DISPLAY AT THE MUSEUM INCLUDE: ramp, four handicapped parking spaces, and wheelchair • 1958 Toyota Crown, the first Toyota sold in America accessible restrooms. • 1965 Toyota Corona, Toyota’s first high volume car in the U.S. • three very rare Toyota 2000 GTs — only 337 were produced, For those driving an electric vehicle, there is an Electric 54 were shipped to North America, and three reside in the Vehicle Recharging Station located in front of the Museum Museum building. • The championship winning race cars including off-road Reservations for a tour or meeting can be arranged with stadium trucks, IMSA Celica and GTP race cars and an Museum Curator, Susan Sanborn, at 310.468.4728 or Indianapolis 500 winner 310.GOTUSAM or susan_sanborn@toyota.com. The Toyota • 1986 Corolla, the first Toyota built in the U.S. and several Automobile Museum is located at 19600 Van Ness Ave., other serial No. 1 vehicles marking the launch of production Torrance, CA 90501. at various U.S. and Canadian plants Toyota plans to keep America moving in the 21st century, • Original Lexus and Scion models first launched in the U.S. while the Museum captures its history as the vehicle SPECIAL EXHIBITS AT THE MUSEUM INCLUDE: collection continues to grow — looking back, while moving Futuristic: the Lexus “Minority Report” Tom Cruise movie prototype forward.

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NEWS

BRIEFS

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31st Annual Golf Classic Presented by Honda Breaks Records with $350,000 for the Community The Providence Little Company of Mary Foundation 31st annual Golf Classic presented by Honda generated a record $350,000 benefiting Providence LCM charitable care and community outreach programs. More than 200 philanthropic guests enjoyed a day on the links, a luncheon BBQ, hosted cocktail reception, dinner, silent and live auctions and trophy presentations at the Rolling Hills Country Club on May 23, 2011. Foundation trustee Ed Fountain served as event chair. Along with presenting sponsor American Honda Motor Co. Inc., platinum sponsors included The Jankovich Company, Lend Lease DASCO, Nan M. and Reed L. Harman Foundation and Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc. Gold sponsors were Emergency Specialist Physicians Associates, Inc.; The Jacqueline Glass Family; Providence LCM Torrance Medical Staff; Ralph and Loraine Scriba and U.S. Bank Healthcare Division. Opportunity tickets are still available to win an Acura MDX generously donated by American Honda Motor Co., Inc. Drawing to take place on October 7, 2011 at the Providence LCM Foundation 10th Women’s Wellness Conference – The Power of Pink presented by Honda. Tickets are $25 each or 5 for $100 and can be purchased at www.plcmfoundation.org.

Steve Morikawa, Assistant Vice President, Corporate Community Relations for American Honda Motor Co., Inc., and Foundation trustee; Foundation Chair Dick Brombach, Betty Jean (BJ) Brombach, Trustee Tony Arminio, Trustee and event chair Ed Fountain and Foundation President Joe Zanetta

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BENEFITS

Increasing Your Bottom Line with Cost Saving Benefits as a Member of the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce C H A M B E R O F F I C E D E P OT P RO G R A M Office Depot has partnered with the Torrance Chamber to offer your business an opportunity to save approximately 15% to 25% annually on your office supplies. This program is absolutely FREE to join! Once you have joined, a new account package will be sent to you, which will give you access to: Shop online or in the store, Save up to 60% off a list of 175 items most commonly purchased by businesses and customize up to 10 items you use the most that may not be on that list, Fast & FREE delivery on qualifying online orders of $50 or more by 5:00 p.m., Copy & Print Depot Services and promotional items, Green Products, Technology Solutions from TechDepot, Office furniture ranging from basic to designer brand, Cleaning & break room supplies! For more information, please contact Pamela.Rice@OfficeDepot.com or Tom.McKiney@OfficeDepot.com

E M P LOY E E S AV I N G S T I C K E TS P RO G R A M Employee Savings Ticket office offers discounted tickets and services. Employee Savings Ticket office offers discounts to amusement parks, movie theatres, trips (near and far), medical procedures, automobile servicing, merchandise, water parks, special events and so much more. Magazines listing these discounts are available from Employee Savings Ticket office or from the Chamber lobby. To use this service, you must bring proof of valid employment with your business. Employee Savings Ticket Office is located at 22410 Hawthorne Blvd., Unit 1, Torrance, CA 90505 or you can reach them by phone at 310-316-3384.

M E M B E R TO M E M B E R P RO G R A M The Member to Member program is a discount program for members by members. There is no cost to members for placing a discount for goods and services and you do not need to be a participant to take advantage of the savings. This program gives your business a vehicle to expose a select discount to thousands of employees of our members’ businesses. Your listing will be published on our website at www.torrancechamber.com and in print, and is subject to change without prior notification. Notice to Participate: This program is only available to members in good standing. To avoid confusion, please notify all employees of Chamber discount.

DA I LY B R E E Z E A DV E RT I S I N G C E RT I F I C ATE The Daily Breeze has partnered with the Chamber to maximize your membership investment. This special membership benefit is designed to build your business. The Daily Breeze will match your Chamber membership fee with free advertising when it is matched by the same amount of paid advertising. This program has been a very popular benefit of Chamber membership for several years. While some restrictions apply, the program fits most business owners and in many cases is the catalyst to a long standing business relationship. The Daily Breeze provides unmatched readership in the South Bay and is a proven vehicle for advertisers, large and small.

To learn more about these benefits, please contact Kelly Hernandez, Membership Manager at (310) 792-3808

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Torrance Magazine July 2011