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WORLD’S

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ESG GREEN PAGES

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WORLD’S

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ESG GREEN PAGES ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIAL GOVERNANCE

WORLD’S

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OFFICIALLY ENDORSED

COP17

PUBLICATION

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RLYN E T AR ATIO

OFFICIAL

CATALOGUE FOR COP17 EXHIBITION

S U S TA I N A B L E B U S I N E S S T H AT C A R E S F O R T H E E N V I R O N M E N T ISSUE NO.1

RSA: R145.00 (INCL. VAT) UK: £10.00 USA: $20.00

W W W. E S G . C O . Z A

PARTNERS

A TOPCO MEDIA PUBLICATION

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CONTENTS FOREMATTER

SECTOR OVERVIEWS

Credits and Contributors ............................................ 7 Foreword by Jonathan Hanks .................................... 8 Chairman’s Letter ....................................................... 9 Editor’s Letter ............................................................ 11 Foreword by the Department of Environmental Affairs ............................................ 12 Foreword by the Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO) ... 14 Key Sector Index ..................................................... 114 Advertisers Listing .................................................. 196

Tourism ................................................................... 116 Growing responsible tourism

KEY FEATURES The Principles for Responsible Investment Report 2011 ...................................... 30 UNEP Finance Initiative United Nations Global Impact

Energy..................................................................... 120 Building renewable energy industry Financial................................................................. 129 ESG Developments in the South African Financial Market Waste Reduction and recycling ........................ 131 Keeping a lid on waste Energy Efficiency ................................................. 133 Towards an energy efficiency South Africa Agriculture ............................................................. 135 Growing green

Road Map to a Single European Transport Area: 50 Facts and Figures ............................................ 58 European Commission’s Department for Mobility & Transport

Consultants ........................................................... 136 Expertise for sustainable greening

India: Pattern of an Urbanising Nation ............. 72 International Human Dimensions Programme on Global Environment Change Urbanization and Global Environmental Change

Transportation ...................................................... 139 Essential transport infrastructure

The Impact of urbanisation on Cultivated Land in China ......................................................... 78 International Human Dimensions Programme on Global Environment Change Urbanization and Global Environmental Change Urban Growth and Food Security in the Himalayas ......................................................... 84 International Human Dimensions Programme on Global Environment Change Urbanization and Global Environmental Change

Manufacturing ...................................................... 137 Manufacturing future sustainability

Water ....................................................................... 140 Water at the centre of economic development Material .................................................................. 142 Green building material Property.................................................................. 146 Building for a sustainable future Public Sector ........................................................ 149 Public Sector going green

Chairman & Group Publisher Richard Fletcher CEO Ralf Fletcher Project Manager Chris Hoffmann Group Production Manager Van Fletcher Group Editor Tania De Kock Managing Editor Thulile Nxumalo Head Designer Jayne Macé Designers Kyle Collison, Mpumelelo Bhengu Studio Manager Candice Hooper Traffic Coordinator Raeesah McLeod Website Manager Gaywin Walters Operations and Sales Manager Jonette De Sousa Business Development Coordinators Roman Ross Samantha Petersen, Stephen Paxton, Jehad Kasu, Charmaine Dochecty, Carl Chothia, Lee-Ann Arendse, Recardo de Letago Guy Chicken, Peter Augustine, Ross Maltman, Lyndon Naidoo Office Manager Haley Fletcher Administrator Nafisa Mallum, Mishqah Slamdien Distribution Ingrid Johnstone, Ursula Davids Human Resources Manager Janine Salick Financial Administrators Bernadette Theron, Deidre Daniels, Sharon Tockley, Themba Gaga Printers Paarl Print Contact Details Topco Media (Pty) Ltd, The Pinnacle, 5th Floor, Cnr. Strand & Burg Streets, Cape Town 8001, PO Box 16467, Vlaeberg 8018 Tel +27 (0)86 000 9590 Fax +27 (0)21 423 7576 Email info@topco.co.za Website www.topco.co.za Disclaimer All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written consent of Topco Media (Pty) Ltd Reg. No. 2007/002190/07. While every care has been taken when compiling this publication, the publishers, editor and contributors accept no responsibility for any consequences arising from any errors or omissions. ISBN: 978-0-620-51884-0

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AT AMWAY, WE TAKE OUR COMMITMENT TO SUSTAINABLE FARMING SERIOUSLY.

Each Nutrilite farm adheres to strict guidelines that emphasises responsible management of natural resources and respect for nature’s processes - including pest control, natural fertilisers, soil health, erosion control, and the maintenance of natural plant and animal habitats that sustain the diversity of both native plant and animal species. For more information call 0800 203 772 or visit us on www.amway.co.za Join us on Facebook and follow Amway’s breaking news on Twitter @AmwaySA

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CONTRIBUTORS An experienced editor and writer with a business and development background, Kristina Davidson believes that, while creativity has a place in the business world, creative writing is best reserved for novels. Her forte is combining practical, logical thinking with visual creativity and plain language, and she speaks French. Sukaina Walji is a communications specialist with expertise in digital media and technology-enhanced learning, and is studying towards a Masters in Online Education. She is an advocate of the power of technology to promote social change and believes that African businesses have a great opportunity to leverage ICTs for exponential growth. Copyright permission for The Impacts of Urbanization on Cultivated Land Change in China, Local and Global Changes in an Urbanizing World: The Connections of Urban Agriculture within Cities, India: Patterns of an Urbanizing Nation and Urban Growth and Food Security in the Himalayas granted courtesy of the International Human Dimensions Programme on Global Environmental Change (IHDP) and its the Urbanization and Global Environmental Change (UGEC) core project. Extracted from the UGEC Viewpoints publication (No. 5, April 2011). For a detailed overview of the Urbanization and Global Environmental Change (UGEC) core project’s UGEC Viewpoints publication and other cutting-edge information, please visit http://www.ugec.org.

Copyright permission for Roadmap to a Single European Transport Area: 50 Facts and Figures granted courtesy of the European Commission’s Department for Mobility and Transport. For a detailed overview of the European Commission’s Department for Mobility and Transport’s White Paper 2011 – Roadmap to a Single European Transport Area and other cutting-edge information, please visit http://ec.europa.eu/transport/ strategies/index_en.htm

Copyright permission for Report on Progress of the Principles of Responsible Investment 2011 – An analysis of signatory progress and guidance on implementation granted courtesy of the Principles of Responsible Investing, the UNEP Finance Initiative and the UN Global Compact. The PRI is an investor initiative in partnership with UNEP Finance Initiative and the UN Global Compact. For a detailed overview of the PRI’s Report on Progress of the Principles of Responsible Investment 2011, please visit http://www.unpri.org/publications

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ESG FOREWORD

Jonathan Hanks Managing Director of INCITE Sustainability

“One of the more significant ESG developments (internationally and locally) is the shift to Integrated Reporting, an area in which South Africa has been playing a pioneering role.”

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South Africa faces some significant environmental, social and governance (ESG) challenges. But as a young, diverse nation with a sophisticated business infrastructure in an emerging marketplace, ESG pressures are increasingly acting as a catalyst for positive change. While the rate of progress may be variable, the pockets of evident leadership on ESG issues – among South African businesses, government departments and individuals – is encouraging. Optimism is important, so as we head into COP17 in Durban – with many us perhaps slightly pessimistic about the outcome – there are lots of reasons to be proudly South African. One of the more significant ESG developments (internationally and locally) is the shift to Integrated Reporting, an area in which South Africa has been playing a pioneering role. Not only are we are the first country to actively promote integrated reporting as a JSE listing requirement, but the South African discussion paper on IR, published in January 2011, has an undoubted influence on the discussion paper recently released by the International Integrated Reporting Committee (IIRC). The chair of the IIRC is a South African, and recent international surveys of corporate reporting practice have placed many local reports as amongst the best globally. Local corporates have further demonstrated global leadership in terms of their disclosure practices, with this year’s Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) seeing the JSE 100 companies providing the second highest response rate internationally, and being amongst the leaders in terms of their voluntary emissions reduction commitments. Similarly, an index tracking the environmental reporting of the 300 biggest companies among BRICS countries ranks

South Africa in the lead on emissions reporting and verification. The South African government, host of COP17 and previous host of the World Summit on Sustainable Development, has also shown leadership in these areas. We are recognised internationally for having some of the most progressive water legislation in the world, and our recent conditional climate change emission reduction commitments are seen as more progressive than many other countries with similar socio-economic characteristics. We are also moving ahead with the introduction of a possible carbon tax, a sign that even without international agreement (a common reason for inaction) the country is committed to domestic mitigation efforts. Our home-grown King III governance standard, part of the first governance codes globally to effectively integrate sustainability issues, has been described as “the most effective summary of the best international practices in corporate governance”. Although still a trend-setting minority, a number of South African companies are seeing ESG issues as an opportunity to create value, focus their innovation efforts and address societal challenges. From new banking products that serve the previously unbanked, to healthcare models that integrate primary with tertiary care, and public with private services, and from low-cost communications platforms that enable mobile health services and mobile banking to micro insurance products that take into account the increase in weatherrelated claims, these companies are ushering in the world of tomorrow. They are the companies that feature in the ESG Green Pages publication. Jonathan Hanks Managing Director, Incite Sustainability

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CHAIRMAN’S LETTER ESG

Chairman’s Letter

Johnny Cash, the American Country music singer, has a song called 40 Shades of Green that I think sums up the ESG Green Pages publication. My rationale behind this is that going green is multifacetted. In this publication we have looked at many of the ways in which the private and public sectors can be both sustainable and environmentally friendly, we have listed companies that have produced both innovative goods and services, which will help us all in the drive to become green. In my mind this is imperative and long overdue. I would like to give a big thank you to Roger Surridge of The Rebus Advertising Agency in Paris – Roger was responsible for first planting the seed about a publication about Environmental and Social Governance (ESG) in Africa. I would like to extend a further thank you to Jonathan Hanks of Incite Sustainability and Professor Ralph Hamann of the UCT Graduate School of Business for their valued support and advice during this project. The ESG Green Pages publication would not have reached fruition without the Topco team, including Tania, Chris, Carl, Lee-Ann and Ross, who, from a standing start have produced one of the most important publications in South Africa for 2011. As it says in the song ‘I close my eyes and picture the 40 Shades of Green’ in this incredible continent of Africa. Best regards

Richard Fletcher Chairman Topco Media

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EDITOR’S NOTE ESG

EDITOR’S Note

Despite consensus among the world’s scientists and overwhelming evidence to support their claims, a great deal of people and corporations still remain skeptical about climate change and our contribution to the worsening situation. Climate change in itself is not a foreign concept on earth, but it’s the rate at which it is currently happening that is of great worry. If climate change happens over hundreds or thousands of years, it gives living organisms (humans included) time to adapt, but if it takes place over a couple of decades, the challenges are much greater. South Africa might be hosting the UNFCCC Conference of Parties 17 (COP17), but we still need greater awareness of the real, ‘tactile’ climate change issues. Humans, at the top of the food chain, cannot positively respond to something they do not understand. The fact remains that although Africa’s carbon emissions remains at the lower end of the scale, the continent will be on the receiving end of the rest of the world’s unwillingness to act – and act decisively. This sentiment is supported by Ban Ki-moon, the current Secretary-General of the United Nations in his 2009 Korea Herald interview: “Climate change affects us all, but it does not affect us all equally. The poorest and most vulnerable – those who have done the least to contribute to global warming — are bearing the brunt of the impact today”. What effect has climate change had on our surroundings? In Africa alone, the changes to the Benguela current has negatively affected the marine fishing industry, long-lasting droughts have left their mark on not only the Horn of Africa, but several SADC countries – and there is a real risk that malaria, one of the biggest killers in Africa, will affect once malaria-free zones in the south of the continent. It really is time that the citizens of this planet take responsibility for the future we are creating. We cannot keep on looking the other way and pretend that we don’t realise that for every one of our actions, there is a reaction. Let us consider our actions and change the reactions. Let’s not be the culprits as referred to by Thomas Edison in 1931 when he remarked to his friends Henry Ford and Harvey Firestone: “We are like tenant farmers chopping down the fence around our house for fuel when we should be using Nature’s inexhaustible sources of energy — sun, wind and tide... I’d put my money on the sun and solar energy. What a source of power! I hope we don’t have to wait until oil and coal run out before we tackle that”.

I believe that each individual, whatever our nationality, is born with the responsibility to be part of the solution. Start today – because tomorrow might be too late. Best regards

Tania de Kock Group Editor

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Edna Molewa

Minister of Environmental Affairs The phenomenon known as “climate change”, refers to an ongoing trend of changes in the earth’s general weather conditions as a result of an average rise in the temperature of the earth’s surface often referred to as global warming. This rise in the average global temperature is due, primarily, to the increased concentration of gases know as greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere that are emitted by human activities. These gases intensify a natural phenomenon called the “greenhouse effect” by forming an insulating layer in the atmosphere that reduces the amount of the sun’s heat that radiates back into space and therefore has the effect of making the earth warmer.

www.environment .gov.za

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FOREWORD ESG

The fundamentals of the National Climate Change Response White Paper.

While weather changes on a daily basis, climate represents the statistical distributed of weather patterns over time, and on a global scale has changed only very slowly in the past – usually over periods of tens of thousands of years or even millions of the year which allows time for the earth’s bio-physical systems to adapt naturally to the changing climatic conditions. Currently, the global climate is changing much more rapidly as a result of global warming, leading to, among others, the melting of polar and glacier ice, sea level rise, ocean acidification, intensity of extreme weather events, such as tornadoes, hurricanes and cyclones. The rapid rate of this climate change does not allow the earth’s biophysical systems to adapt to these changes naturally. The evidence of rapid climate change, including more frequent and intense weather systems and greater climate variability, has already has been observed and includes: • Increases in the average global temperature; with the past decade being the hottest on record; • Rises in the average global sea level; • Changes in average rainfall pattern, with some regions experience higher rainfall (e.g. Northern Europe) and the areas experience drying (e.g. the Sahel and southern Africa) • Increased frequency of heavy rainfall and extreme weather events over most land areas; and • More intense and longer droughts, particularly in the topics and subtropics. The rate of change to the earth’s climate exceeds the ability of all types of ecosystems (marine, coastal, freshwater, and terrestrial) to adapt as well as compromising their ability to function affectively. Ecosystems provide important services to society, such as the formation of soil; the provision of food, fresh water, wood, fibre and fuel; the regulation of climate, floods and the spread of disease; protection from storm surges and floods; and a range of cultural, spiritual, educational, and recreational services. The protection of biodiversity, habitats and ecosystems is essential to the maintenance of these services, which is a key pillar for sustainable development. South Africa’s response to climate change has two objectives: • Effectively manage inevitable climate change impacts through interventions that build and sustain South Africa’s social,

economic and environment resilience and emergency response capacity. • Make a fair contribution to the global effort to stabilise greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that avoids dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system within a timeframe that enables economic, social and environmental development to proceed in a sustainable manner. The overall strategic approach for South Africa’s climate change response is needs driven and customised; development; transformational; empowering participatory; dynamic and evidence-based; balanced and cost effective; integrated and aligned. Principles and approach is structured around the following strategic priorities: risk reduction and management; mitigation action with significant outcomes; sectoral responses; policy and regulatory alignment; informed decision making and planning; integrated planning; technology research; development and innovation; facilitated behaviour change; behaviour change through choice; and resource mobilisation. Africa will build the climate resilience of the country, its economy and its people and manage the transition to a climate-resilient, equitable and internationally competitive lowercarbon economy and society in a manner that simultaneously addressed South Africa’s over-riding national priorities for sustainable development, job creation, improved public and environmental health, poverty eradication, and social equality. In this regard, South Africa will: • Effectively manage inevitable climate change impacts through interventions that build and sustain South Africa’s social, economic and environmental resilience and emergency response capacity. • Make a fair contribution to the global effort to stabilise GHG concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that avoids dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system within the climate system within a timeframe that enables economic, social and environmental development to proceed in a sustainable manner. South African climate change response requires economic, social and environmental interventions that integrate mitigation and adaptation elements within a developmental framework. Furthermore, an effective South

African climate change response also requires the management measures of other countries that have negative consequences for the country. Principles and approach is structured around the following strategic priorities: risk reduction and management; mitigation action with significant outcomes; sectoral responses; policy and regulatory alignment; informed decision making and planning; integrated planning; technology research; development and innovation; facilitated behaviour change; behaviour change through choice; and resource mobilisation. Amongst a range of environmental constraints that are of necessity playing an increasing role in social development planning, climate change represents the most urgent and far-reaching challenge of our time. While every country will have to develop its own adaptive responses to the effects of climate change, mitigating climate change to ensure the disruption caused to human and natural systems is within manageable parameters can only arise out of a global response. Responding to climate change is cross-generational challenges. The effects of action or action or inaction will not be felt immediately, but will have significant consequences for future generation. It is within context, and informed by an appropriate sense of urgency, that the South African government has developed National Climate change Response Policy. The current plan represents the first iteration of South Africa’s ongoing efforts to adapt to climate change and contribute to the global mitigation effort. In terms of contribution to the global mitigation effort, the decision to institute sectoral desired emission reduction outcomes and carbon budgets is momentous – it represents a concrete and practical commitment by South Africa. Realising the commitment will require sustained effort and cooperation from all spheres of government, the private sector and civil society formations, and ultimately will depend on decisions by individual citizens to embrace climate-friendly lifestyles and habits. Everyone is a stakeholder in the plan, and the level of engagement from the public in the process of drafting the National Climate Change Response suggests that there is no shortage of the requisite will to make the far-reaching changes that are required.

E S G G R E E N PA G E S

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FOREWORD ESG

Maite Nkoana-Mashabane DIRCO Minister

Minister of International Relations and Cooperation, Maite Nkoana-Mashabane, as the incoming President of COP17/CMP7 The successful deliverance of COP17/ CMP7 in Durban from 28 November to 09 December 2011, is one of the key issues that is at the centre of the South African Government’s key deliverables for the period 2011/2012. This is, in part, influenced by our hosting of COP17/CMP7 in the magnificent City of Durban, but also by the centrality that climate change has acquired as an urgent and immediate threat to our way of life as we know it. We have all witnessed the acute changes in weather patterns all over the globe. Internationally, we have witnessed devastating floods in Pakistan, and the devastating power of the Tsunami in Japan. Here in Africa we have all seen the helplessness of humanity when confronted by nature’s destructive power as evidenced in Somalia, where our Government in partnership with the Gift of the Givers continues to play an instrumental role in alleviating the challenges facing that country. We have also seen the changing weather patterns affecting Nigeria and Benin, where floods have wrecked havoc within those countries. Here at home, we have experienced some of the coldest winters on record throughout the country, including changing rainfall patterns in the Eastern Cape. These climatic challenges certainly have an impact on both our way of life as well as on our ability to feed our societies. As the Incoming COP President, my role is to lead the world in forging a common consensus in terms of reversing these adverse effects of climate change. By hosting COP17/CMP7, South Africa hopes to uphold rules-based multilateralism as one of our fundamental interests, which we aspire to globally. Accordingly, South Africa will endeavor to uphold the consensus nature of decision-making that has characterized the UNFCCC and its

Conference/s of the Parties, since 1995. In this regard, South Africa, in cooperation with the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), will seek to facilitate an outcome, which is fair, transparent, and inclusive and upholds the Convention principle of common but differentiated responsibilities and capabilities. The negotiations in Durban will be a Partydriven process with South Africa playing an enabling role for Parties to find agreement on the salient issues of climate change. South Africa will not seek to impose a solution of its own, as its own processes and Rules of Procedure, which we think is important to observe since this strengthens multilateralism and the legitimacy of the whole process, govern the UNFCCC. In this juncture, it is important to note that one of our critical immediate responsibilities is to ensure that the trust which was restored in Cancun does not

“Let us take up the challenges of ensuring that, through South Africa’s hosting of COP17/CMP7, we will be truthful to our commitment to Working Together: Saving Tomorrow Today.” suffer a second disconnect amongst Parties as evidenced in the Copenhagen negotiations. As the Parties prepare to meet in Durban, there is an urgent need for all Parties to approach the Durban negotiations with an element of maturity, as the outcomes of the Cancun negotiations, although laudable, unfortunately did not address all the issues. The success of Durban will be measured in terms of the following: • One: There is consensus on the

position that the Cancun Agreements must be operationalised, including the establishment of the key mechanisms and institutional arrangements agreed to in Cancun. Here the Green Climate Fund represents a centerpiece of a broader set of outcomes for Durban. Developing countries demand a prompt start for the Fund through its early and initial capitalization. • Two: For Durban to be successful, we have to do more than making the Cancun Agreements operational. We have no option but to deal with the outstanding political issues remaining from the Bali Roadmap. This means finding a resolution to the issue of the 2nd commitment period under the Kyoto Protocol and agreeing on the legal nature of a future climate change system • Third: Adaptation is an essential element of the outcome in Durban as it is a key priority for many developing countries, particularly small island developing states, least developed countries and Africa. The current fragmented approach to adaptation must be addressed in a more coherent manner and give equal priority to adaptation and mitigation. Let us take up the challenges of ensuring that, through South Africa’s hosting of COP17/CMP7, we will be truthful to our commitment to “Working Together: Saving Tomorrow Today.”

Maite Nkoana-Mashabane Incoming President COP17/CMP7

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GADGETS

Energy-wise electronics Live a green lifestyle.

FLICKER

FREE 3D PICTURE

LG LW6500 CINEMA 3D TV The LG LW6500 CINEMA 3D TV combines the first ‘flicker free’ 3D picture in the industry with more comfortable glasses, a brighter picture, more flexible viewing positions and a wider viewing angle. Together, these features make it more comfortable for viewers to enjoy 3D content in the company of family and friends. With LED plus, individual LED blocks work more precisely and efficiently in 3D mode to drastically reduce crosstalk and create brighter and clearer 3D images. And because it only uses as much light as is necessary in each block, Micro Pixel Control also significantly reduces electricity consumption. Because LG CINEMA 3D glasses don’t need to be shuttered, the 3D images are also entirely free of flicker. This advance has earned the LG 3D TV ‘Flicker Free’ certification from Intertek and TÜV, two world-renowned certification agencies based in Europe, making it the world’s first 3D TV to receive the designation. With such a smooth picture, the LW6500 practically eliminates the feelings of dizziness or eye fatigue that could occur with previous 3D TVs, meaning viewers can enjoy 3D content for longer and in greater comfort. Source: www.lg.com/za, www.meropa.co.za

JETMAXX The JetMaxx Green is a full size bagged canister vacuum cleaner with high-speed dust removal. This model delivers a 33 percent energy saving compared to a 2000W vacuum cleaner and has the dust pick-up of an average 2000W vacuum cleaner. The JetMaxx Green is made from 55 percent recycled plastic and its packaging from 100 percent recycled paper. 92 percent of this vacuum cleaner can be recycled. The JetMaxx Green uses a disposable Green s-bag® (dust bag) which is made from only natural renewable materials with no performance compromise. Source: www.aeg-electrolux.co.za. Contact: +27 (0)21 681 7500 • 92% of vacuum cleaner can be recycled

33%

ENERGY

40%

SAVING

ENERGY

SAVING

LG Charcoal Heater Lightwave Oven LG’s new Charcoal Heater Lightwave Oven saves on energy and cooks healthier meals than ever before. The Charcoal Heater allows for more precise and healthy cooking with an energy saving of up to 40 percent. With the LG Charcoal Heater oven there is no more waiting for the oven to pre-heat before you can start cooking. The Active Convection technology, coupled with the Grill Temperature Control and Quarts heaters enables faster start-up times – up to 4 times faster than conventional ovens – saving time and energy. With an energy saving of up to 40 percent over conventional ovens, the LG Charcoal Heater Lightwave oven is more economical and environmentally-friendly. Source: www.lg.com/za, www.meropa.co.za

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ESG REVIEW PAGES

MANUFACTURED

IN SA

Ecoheat infrared heaters – EcoHeat Ecoheat heaters use infrared technology to provide comfortable, gentle heat using significantly less energy than convection, gas or oil heaters. Rather than wasting energy by heating the ambient temperature through convection, the heaters emit radiant heat in an infrared band that is safe and ideal for absorption by the human body, saving you up to 50 percent of your electricity usage and heating cost. The results combine energy efficient, dependable technology with competitive pricing, providing a financially and environmentally friendly heating option for indoor applications. Ecoheat heaters energy efficiency goes a step beyond traditional infrared heaters by using elements known as “black body emitters”. These elements radiate mostly infrared and very little visible light. This means that more of the electricity used by the heater is converted into comfortable, gentle infrared heat. Ecoheat infrared heaters are proudly manufactured in George, South Africa and are well suited for a diverse range of applications; including home use, offices, schools, large commercial installations, and use in hospital and other healthcare facilities. Source: www.ecoheat.co.za. Email: info@ecoheat.co.za. Contact: 0861 999 887

The Detector-54 Enjoy the feeling of knowing your home is wellilluminated while not paying rising electricity rates. The Detector-54 has 54 super bright LED lights and a panel/ battery pack which ensures you will never run out of light, no matter what the weather. Contact: +27 (0)21 791 0821 • LED Lights

LG Linear Compressor Refrigerators The refrigerant gases used in the LG Linear Compressor fridges are known as R600A gases, which are more eco-friendly than the traditional R134A refrigerants used in conventional fridges. Compared with an average refrigerator, which emits around 336Kg of CO2 per year, LG’s Linear Compressor provides energy savings of up to 20 percent annually. The reduction in CO2 emissions and increased energy savings amounts to the equivalent of planting 24 pine trees. LG Linear Compressor technology contributes to a more eco-friendly and sustainable environment. Source: www.lg.com/za

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INTELLIGENT TECHNOLOGY

ENERGY

SAVING ANNUALLY

LG BIG-IN 11kg Direct Drive LG’s Big-In washing machine is the next best thing in addressing your washing woes. The latest LG Big-In 11kg front-loader washing machine features the biggest drum size on the market, allowing you to do more washing, less often. Apart from the huge time savings due to the bigger and better capacity, the LG Big-In is also equipped with the latest technology that helps consumers save money and be more eco-friendly. The LG Big-In washing addresses everyday consumer needs with intelligent technology that makes life easier while offering the ultimate power-saving, eco-friendly and cost effective household investment on the South African market. Source: www.lg.com/za www.meropa.co.za

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FASHION

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ECO-FRIENDLY CHIC

Go Green with Ec0-Friendly fashion Get trendy and environmentally – friendly with recycled fashion. 1. 5

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Stylish and trendy shoes made of shweshwe material (known as BaSotho material). Anything – from a scarf to a bag – can be made using this material. Also suitable for infantwear Shoes produced under strict ecological standards and made from genuine vegetable-tanned leather (toxin-free and fit for allergy sufferers). T-shirts, printed with water-based ink, with messages promoting eco-living. Baby-doll dress made of hemp plant material – which has more sustainable natural fibre than cotton. Bangle made from recycled pleather material and a circuit board.

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ESG REVIEW PAGES

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Recycled dresses. Recycled denim short. Recycled tape measure creatively folded to create a unique flower. Material used to manufacture this pouch was taken from old torn couch, can be used for as a camera, cellphone, and iPod pouch. Trendy purses made of recycled woven plastic material. Shopping bags made of recycled manure sack. PVC banners recycled into bags.

STOCKISTS

• Eyakho Green: +27 (0)31 562 3366

• Lucky Friday: +27 (0)21 422 3801

• House of Hemp: +27 (0)16 362 1022

• Sitting Pretty: +27 (0)21 422 3996

• Home Brew: +27 (0)82 818 3665

• Think Shoes: +27 (0)21 418 4503

• Change Room: +27 (0)78 392 1532

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ESG SA 1st Edition  

ESG South Africa is the communication space of choice for role players that operate in the fields of environmental sustainability or social...

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