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38 Out & About 40 TOPS In Lexington Preview Party #1 42 TOPS In Lexington Preview Party #2 44 Bluegrass Sports Awards 46 Shinnenkai #1 48 Shinnenkai #2 50 BB&T Bundle Up with Bourbon & Blues 52 2016 KEMI Awards #1 54 2016 KEMI Awards #2 56 2016 KEMI Awards #3 176 Third Annual Eat, Drink, Dance and Be Charitable 178 Cardinal HIll Wild Game Dinner & Sport Auction 180 Sts. Peter & Paul School Mardi Gras 2016 #1 182 Sts. Peter & Paul School Mardi Gras 2016 #2 184 Central Ky Heart Ball #1 186 Central Ky Heart Ball #2 188 Central Ky Heart Ball #3 190 LHS Tails & Ales 192 A Knight on the Red Carpet #1 194 A Knight on the Red Carpet #2 226 TOP Shots

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Captions for event photos are typically provided to TOPS by the event organizers. We do our best to check names and spelling…but we are all human and make mistakes. Please contact kristen@topsmarketing.com with any corrections and we will make note of it in the next issue.

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IN EVERY ISSUE 61 Love It in Lexington: Florals 135 Pets: Springing Forward 136 Parties: 10 Tips for an Egg-cellent Easter Egg Hunt

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58 Outfit of the Month

139 Relationships: The BIG Stuff 141 Etiquette & Entertaining: House Guests 154 Bleed Blue: All-time Greats in Men’s UK Basketball History 161 Bleed Blue: It’s Time for the Stretch Run 162 Bleed Blue: TOP 20 Most Memorable Moments 166 Family: Family Camping 172 Business News 203 Weddings: Take Your Seats 204 Southern Lady Cooks 207 TOP 5 Dining 215 A Taste of Thyme: March Madness 216 New & Noteworthy: Meant To Be Boutique 218 Lex in the City

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The views and comments expressed by the authors are not always that of our editors or publishers. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this publication, TOP Marketing Group accepts no responsibility or liability for any errors, omissions or resultant consequences, including any loss or damage arising from the reliance on information in this publication. All images contained in TOPS in Lexington Magazine are subject to copyright of the artist or photographer as named, but not limited thereto. Reproduction of any part of this magazine without prior written permission is prohibited.

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Tour of Homes

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n an adjoining room they refer to as the library, the Mitchells display their impressive collection of Kentucky Basketball mementos. It’s hard to believe the built-in shelving wasn’t made specifically for the collection. When not consumed with Matthew’s demanding job as Head Coach, the Mitchells enjoy traveling (they often go on trips with Matthew’s daughter Lacy Arant, who lives in Starkville, MS). They also take an active role in the community, regularly participating in fundraisers and other initiatives. Matthew said, “The opportunity to serve in the community has been immense. We’ve been involved in so many things, and Lexington has been so supportive of us personally, as well as the basketball program.” The couple has been working with children’s charities for the past ten years. Jenna is very active in the Children’s Advocacy Center, and Matthew is on the board of the Children’s Charities of the Bluegrass. About two years ago, they launched their own charitable organization — The Mitchell Family Foundation. “We are trying to enhance the community by giving people opportunities to strengthen their character,” explained Matthew. “This is our hometown. Lexington has given so much to us, and we want to do something that impacts the community. High character living can really make a difference in an individual’s life, and if enough people do that, we’ll have an even greater community.”

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he formal dining room features an antique brass and crystal chandelier, as well as a dining table and metallictoned chairs by Christopher Guy. The metallic heart print is from Natural Curiosities.

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he serene master bedroom features a high, recessed ceiling, and is decorated in neutral tones of white, back and gray. French doors give way to an outdoor living space. His and hers closets are located a short distance away.

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he girls’ upstairs rooms feature the same neutral color palette, but with fun pops of pastel pink and aqua, and playful elements like a chevron motif on the window shades, a display of 3-D butterflies, whimsical stencil work, and more original art. Also located on the second floor are two guest bedrooms decorated in beautiful taupe and sage tones.

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atthew’s office is a handsome and masculine space, featuring caramel colored French tacked sofas and a rustic cowhide rug. On the right there is an artistic map of Kentucky and on the left a horse print, both from Natural Curiosities.

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he basement living space is painted Wildcat blue and contains comfortable sofas as well as a large flat screen television for relaxing and watching games. The theater offers plenty of seating with a unique crescent leather couch and oversized bean bags.

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Tour of Homes

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fter spending just a short time with the Mitchells, it’s clear that their sassy, affectionate banter is a sign of their close connection. The pair met in Gainesville, Florida. At the time, Matthew was working as Florida women’s assistant coach. Jenna was studying Public Relations at the University of Florida and working nights at a local restaurant. One night, Matthew came in with Florida men’s coach Billy Donovan and a few other coaches. Since the restaurant was nearly closed, Jenna and her manager worked hard to wait on the coaches, who were a “really rowdy bunch”. According to Jenna, she and Matthew didn’t exchange words that night, but there was “definitely eye contact”. Afterwards, Matthew visited the restaurant more frequently, and he and Jenna soon developed a relationship. They dated for a few months, and then Matthew was hired at the University Kentucky as Assistant Women’s Basketball Coach under Mickie DeMoss. “After graduating, I struggled with the indecision of moving to Lexington to be with Matthew or following my own path,” Jenna remembers. “I wanted to chase my dreams, so I got a job with a biometrics start-up company in San Francisco. I was splitting my time between Kentucky, San Francisco and New York City. It had always been a dream of mine to live in New York.” But after a two-year long-distance relationship, the couple decided enough was enough. Jenna was hesitant, because big city living was her dream and Lexington seemed so small. But Matthew proposed during Christmas dinner at his family home in Mississippi, and the couple moved to Morehead, where they lived for two years before coming to Lexington. Despite relocating to an even smaller town than Lexington, Jenna soon grew to love the experience. “Morehead turned out to be a great place with great people. And it lead us back to Lexington, for which I am forever grateful. We have been here for 9 seasons, (we think in terms of seasons—not years!) and I’m thankful for each day we live here. There is nowhere else we would rather be.” Matthew’s career may have brought him to the University of Kentucky, but he and Jenna agree that the support they’ve received has really made Lexington feel like home. “This city is more home to me than any place I’ve lived, and I hope we’re here for another 20 years,” said Jenna. “The fan support is unbelievable. There’s still the pressure to perform, but it’s the perfect city as far as the support.” Matthew added, “When it comes to coaching college basketball, we couldn’t be in a better city in America. But even if I wasn’t coaching basketball, we love Lexington. This is home.” •

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party barn would not be complete without games to keep everyone entertained. In addition to two sitting areas, perfect for a game of poker or Monopoly, the Turners have a pool and gaming table and a shuffleboard sand table.

Vendors: Jessica Cull, Design Link Aaron Ferguson, Builder Richmond Mechanical Wes Hamilton, Digicam Technology Old World Corman’s Clay Ingels

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he loft includes a kitchenette, dining and living space,two bedrooms and a full bathroom with laundry.

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he tree trunk under the stairwell was the “Kiss Me� tree from a college, where students experienced their first kiss.

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Home & Garden

Ball homes

The Glenstone Visit the Glenstone model and four other Ball Homes models at our Gallery of Homes, located on Julia Circle in Georgetown’s Paynes Landing.

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Models are open daily from 1 to 5. Choose your perfect floor plan and homesite from our wide selection of homes and locations around Central Kentucky.


Posh Paws

Springing Forward Spring? It’s practically here! With Daylight Savings Time beginning mid-month and the spring equinox just a week later, ‘tis the season to start dusting off your warm weather clothes… and your warm weather habits. When your clock jumps forward, your dog walking (and feeding) routine will almost certainly be thrown for a loop. If you can, spend a week meeting your old schedule and the clock halfway: shift activities a half hour to help your pet get with the program. If that’s not in the cards, just remember to be patient with your pet. Slightly longer walks might be necessary. Your pet might be waking you up for his breakfast before you’re ready to rise. Just take it all in stride, as things will even out before too long. Of course, DST doesn’t just bring inconveniences. It also comes hand-in-hand with sunshine! Now is the perfect time to start planning some excursions to make the most of springtime in Kentucky. Take a hike, go for a long drive or schedule a play date with another pet parent. If winter rears its ugly head, take solace in the new birds that are visiting your home: spend some time with your pet, just watching them flit by. If you (and your pet) have been meaning to get more active, it may be a great time to set some walking goals with your dog. Try adding a couple blocks onto your normal walk, and throw in an extra walk or two a week. If you both need to take a break during your walk, enjoy it! Bask in the sunshine while you stretch or sit. While you’re springing forward with good habits, take a look at other ways you can be proactive in ensuring your pet is happy and healthy. Make sure she’s up-to-date on her vaccinations. Go in for a checkup with your veterinarian if it’s been a while. Do a little springcleaning around your pet’s favorite hangouts in your home. Check and make sure his microchip and collar tag information is current. There are lots of little things that can help you keep on top of your pet’s happiness and health.

by Amanda Harper, Pet Aficionado

Spring forward this year with a plan to help you and your pet feel your best! Starting the season off on the right foot will set you up for an active, exciting summer. If you’re ever stumped how to get active with your pet, ask your veterinarian for some ideas. They’ll be able to offer specific tips based on your pet’s breed and physical needs. And don’t forget to check in with your own doctor!

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Etiquette & Entertaining

House Guests – A Two-sided Coin I

n Central Kentucky many are taught, at a very young age, to love having “company”. Sleepovers grow into weekend houseguests. Keeneland and Derby serve as magnets for visitors. If you are living away, you want to come for all the festivities. If you live here, friends hope to come visit. The coin flips both ways – you either are a house guest or you have a house guest. Regardless, preparation is the key to a successful visit. Entertaining a Houseguest Planning a comfortable guest room is of the utmost importance. It is beneficial to imagine that you are the guest; what would you wish for? In a clean and organized room, the bed is very important. Illustration by Elizabeth Edwards Build your bed with layers, adding as many as you find inviting. Beginning from the floor, the bedskirt presents a very put-together look for the bed. Add a comfortable box spring and mattress set. Top with a featherbed and protector. The sheet set should be immaculate and well pressed. A winter or summer blanket should be selected according to the weather rather than the current season. Folding a comforter at the end of the bed offers options for the guest. As for the pillows, several firmness choices should be available with protectors and crisply ironed cases. In addition to the welcoming bed, other niceties will make for a comfortable guest room. A chair and lamp for reading is important. An uncluttered closet with matching hangers. A collection of current magazines and several publications about the area and events is always enjoyed. A luggage rack to hold the suitcases makes the room neater. Bowls of fresh fruit and flowers give by Sue Ann Truitt the guest a feeling that the hostess is Etiquette & Entertaining happy they are visiting. Consultant

Preparing for houseguests goes beyond the guest room. Planning events to be enjoyed by everyone will make a pleasant visit. However, in scheduling the activities for your visitor, allow periods of free time for resting, reading or other leisure activities. Communicating with your soon-to-be guest regarding these activities and type of attire needed will be most helpful. Meals at home, specialty locations and events can be one of the most exciting parts of the preparation. The hostess and guest should have prior communication to answer any questions about the dietary needs of the guest. Arriving as a Houseguest There are few personal honors greater than to be invited to visit in someone’s home. You become a part of an established private life of friends. You should try in every way possible to fit into the plans and lifestyle of the hostess. Arrive with a gift in hand or have something delivered prior to your coming. This hostess gift might be flowers, wine, an addition to a special collection or a gift card for a restaurant the hostess enjoys. Carrying the luggage into the neat, cleaned house, made ready for your arrival, can be overwhelming. It is only polite to travel light and have your belongings well organized when you arrive. Take them directly to the guest room, being careful not to leave a trail of “stuff”. Keep your possessions contained in the guest room while you are visiting. Being a house guest means you fit into the plans and schedule of your hostess. As the visit progresses, try to be helpful when you become aware of a need. Make time to retreat to your room to read or at least, to be out of the way for a while. Too much togetherness is rarely a good thing. Be agreeable and appreciative for whatever is planned. Whether you are opening the door as a hostess or walking in the door as a house guest, it is an honor to share a friendship. Enjoy your time together.

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TOPS in Equine

Horse Park Happenings Spring is finally returning to the Bluegrass! While Kentucky’s unpredictable weather may range from snow to downpours to beautiful sunshine in March, the Kentucky Horse Park will have plenty to enjoy, indoors and out. With spectacular equestrian events and fascinating exhibits, make sure to mark a trip or two to the Kentucky Horse Park on your calendar this month!

Bits & Pieces of Saddlebred History Bits & Pieces of Saddlebred History: Recent Donations & Special Selections will feature new acquisitions to the American Saddlebred Museum permanent collection along with loans of unusual items from several collectors of Saddlebred memorabilia. This show runs from Wednesday, March 9th through Monday, March 21st, so don’t miss it! Visit absmuseum.org to learn more. This is an interesting prelude to the exhibit that will open April 1st!

Road to the Horse The World Championship of Colt-Starting is a three-day event that matches the country’s best horse trainers and clinicians against one another. Competitors choose a horse out of a group of 10 horses, then begin building a relationship between horse and human. The goal of Road to the Horse is to teach horsemen and women that natural horsemanship is a kinder, gentler way of working with horses. Be there on Friday, March 18th ‘til Sunday, March 20th at the Alltech Arena to experience the excitement! Visit roadtothehorse.com for more information.

Hippity Hoppity Hunt Want to put a twist on your Easter celebrations this year? Try camping at the KHP Campground and participate in the annual Hippity Hoppity Hunt on Saturday, March 19th 11am-3pm! Little campers and their parents will enjoy the egg hunt, crafts and a visit from the Easter Bunny. Reservations for the campground can be made by calling 888.4KY-PARK.

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Paul Frazer Memorial Combined Test and Dressage Competition Dedicated to a former CKRH Board Member, who for years worked to remove physical barriers to handicapped young people in the Fayette County Public Schools, this show highlights both the art of dressage and combined tests. Paul designed the first handicapped bus in the Fayette County Public Schools, and his design later served as a model for all handicapped buses in Kentucky. As Director of Maintenance for Fayette County schools, Paul oversaw the construction of handicapped ramps, installation of elevators and other structural remodeling to ensure access for every student. Paul volunteered with CKRH. This show, name in his honor, will take place on Saturday, March 26th, 8am-5pm at the Dressage Complex.

Trainers’ Treasures: Gifts from Saddlebred Professionals This beautiful exhibit will fascinate equestrian fans. The show consists of items that have been donated to the American Saddlebred


TOPS in Equine

Colt of the Month:

Drew Fleming

You can often predict what type of runner a racehorse will be based on its pedigree. If its sire (father) is a sprinter and its dam (mother) is a sprinter, chances are the resulting foal will grow up to be – you guessed it – a sprinter. But once in a while an individual bucks that trend. We saw it happen in this year’s Breeders’ Cup at Keeneland, when fan-favorite Runhappy blew the doors off of his competition to win the Breeders’ Cup Sprint and ultimately became the year’s Eclipse Champion Sprinter. With his sire (Super Saver) best known for winning the Kentucky Derby at a mile and a quarter and his mother’s family known for producing top-class route horses, it was a pleasant surprise, but a surprise nonetheless, that their son was one of the best sprinters the world had seen in years. Thoroughbred breeding isn’t the only arena this scenario plays out. Born and raised in the Bluegrass, Drew Fleming was bred to go into the legal profession. His father is a lawyer. Both of his uncles and one of his grandfathers also practiced law. So, when Drew was recently named the Breeders’ Cup Senior Vice President of Development and Administration, it definitely bucked his breeding, but in the best way possible. “I grew up in the legal business,” said Drew, “but I always loved the horse business. While I did not grow up in a family that was directly involved in the Thoroughbred industry, one of my best friends, Gatewood Bell, did and he introduced me to horseracing at an early age.” As a teenager, Drew often attended the races with Gatewood, who owns Cromwell Bloodstock and whose family owned Jonabell Farm. He instantly fell in love with the sport, from the horses and handicapping to the people Profile by Jen Roytz | Photos by Keni Parks

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TOPS in Equine

and their stories. From top to bottom, it all appealed to him in a way that was both nostalgic and exhilarating.

Tabbed for a New Challenge After several years of working with Drew, Breeders’ Cup President and CEO Craig Fravel approached him about a position Breeders’ Cup was looking to create that would focus on long term planning and the coordination of business opportunities, including community relations in Kentucky and future Breeders’ Cup sites, legislative support and legal compliance.

“While in high school I worked under Brian O’Rourke at Wimbledon Farm and he continues to be a wonderful friend and mentor,” said Drew. “I got to learn the racing side through Gatewood, the farm management side through Brian and the legal side through Stoll Keenon Ogden.”

It was an opportunity Drew could not pass up.

A Ride of a Lifetime

The connections and experiences Drew has developed in the horse industry will serve him well in his new role, as will his congenial candor and collaborative nature. At only 33 years of age, Drew looks forward to his new role as opportunity to engage and work with the next generation, both within and outside of the horse industry, including close friend and Breeders’ Cup board member Bret Jones.

It was while he was first practicing law that Drew finally had the financial ability to get into the racing game as an owner. Of course, he looked to one of his best friends for advice. “I bought a fractional interest in a horse with Gatewood and one of his clients, Wes Welker,” said Drew. “Her name was Nina Fever.” Nina Fever impressively won her first lifetime start at Keeneland as Drew cheered her on with family and friends, the group gathering in the winner’s circle to celebrate both her and his first victory. The winner’s circle photo still sits on his desk as a reminder of one of his fondest memories. Drew went on to purchase small pieces of a few other horses with Gatewood, Wes and others, and their luck continued. “We took the success of Nina Fever and parlayed it into a horse named Gypsy Robin. She went onto win the Beaumont and Raven Run, both Grade 2 stakes races, at Keeneland, and placed in the Grade 1 Test Stakes. We had a lot of fun with her, especially winning at my home track. Her photo sits on my desk as well,” said Drew. Drew was enjoying success off of the track as well. Drew’s career at Stoll Keenon Ogden was becoming more and more focused on the Thoroughbred industry, specializing in equine transactions, mergers and acquisitions, and venture capital. At Stoll Keenon Ogden, Drew’s client list included sales companies, breeding farms, and domestic and international Thoroughbred owners. It also included the Breeders’ Cup.

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“Bret is definitely a leader among my generation of horsemen,” said Drew. “I am excited to collaborate with Bret and many others to strengthen and grow our industry. “The Breeders’ Cup board consists of the best and brightest in our industry. I’m looking forward to working with and learning from all of them, as well as Craig, Bob [Elliston, Breeders’ Cup COO] and the rest of the Breeders’ Cup team.” The feeling is most definitely mutual. “We welcome Drew to the Breeders’ Cup and look forward to him providing us with a vital and creative direction in new business development and take advantage of his knowledge, expertise and connections within our industry,” said Craig in a statement released by the Breeders’ Cup regarding Drew’s hire. While his new role with the Breeders’ Cup is a definite departure from “the family business,” it is one that Drew is eager to embrace. “It wasn’t a difficult decision, because when an opportunity like this presents itself, you have to take it, but it’s definitely an unexpected, but albeit exciting change in my career path,” said Drew. “I really love horseracing – the whole experience. I have a great day at the track even if I don’t wager a dollar. Being a lawyer allowed me to learn the business side of the sport. This new role is a dream come true.”•


TOPS in Equine

Filly of the Month:

Anne Hardy

“Why do you go away? So that you can come back again. So that you can see the place you came from with new eyes and extra colors. And the people there see you differently, too. Coming back to where you started is not the same as never leaving.” – Terry Pratchett, A Hat Full of Sky Anne Sabatino Hardy knew Central Kentucky would forever hold a special place in her heart from a young age. The Indianapolis, Indiana native often traveled to Lexington with her family for weekend getaways and loved soaking in the city’s culture and history. It wasn’t until she went around the world and came back again that she realized it was where she truly wanted to build a life, a career and a legacy. “My dad was a pilot and we used to fly down to Lexington into Blue Grass Airport. I remember loving the scenery of the approach. It’s beautiful, but so unique,” said Anne. “I was so removed from the horse industry – I didn’t grown up riding or being around horses and the closest I got to them was rooting for the Colts in Indy – but I was drawn to the area. It was so appealing and inviting.” It was while attending Asbury College (now Asbury University) that Anne truly decided that Lexington was where she wanted to set her roots. Upon graduation, she landed a job at Lexington public relations firm Preston Osborne and later with Associations International. It was those roles that laid the foundation for her career today as the Executive Director for Horse Country, a non-profit organization focused on making the area’s Thoroughbred farms and related business accessible to the general public through tours. “I worked as Phil Osborne’s assistant out of college. He’s a wonderful man who taught me so much about communications and working hard to accomplish your goals,” said Anne. “Then, at Associations International, I got to really see the guts of what it’s like to work within an organization like Horse Country. It gave me a much stronger background and understanding of membership growth and engagement, dynamics and working with boards of a non-profit.” Seeing Lexington with New Eyes It was a few years later that Anne’s life took an exciting and exotic departure that landed her in the Middle East. “My now-husband, Jacob, was enrolled in grad school studying international business and the program required a cultural and language immersion experience,” said Anne. “He had already chosen the Middle East before we had gotten together and said ‘You should come with me!’ I had worked all through college and never studied abroad and had never taken time after college for travel and adventuring, so I put my house on the market, gave my dog to my mom and followed the person I was in love with, getting on a plane to Morocco three days after our wedding.” Profile by Jen Roytz | Photos by Keni Parks

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TOPS in Equine

Anne and Jacob spent two months in Morocco, then spent the remainder of the year in Oman on the Arabian Peninsula. True to form, Anne made the most of the opportunity, taking classes, teaching English and, along with her new husband, traveling throughout the Middle East and Europe. “We got to experience Dubai as the city was being built and coming alive. We got to learn about and enjoy Middle Eastern culture. It was unbelievable,” said Anne. One of the places Anne and Jacob visited was Zabeel Stables in Dubai, which is owned by Sheikh Mohammed, who also owns Darley Stud in Lexington. It was there, in a place so foreign from all she was accustomed to, that she found a sense of comfort and familiarity with her surroundings. “I remember how at home I felt there. Even though I wasn’t an equestrian or involved with the industry, I felt like I’d found a little bit of home in a very foreign place,” said Anne. The experience at Zabeel Stables gave Anne a very unique perspective. Much like how she felt on her family trips to Lexington growing up, Anne once again felt the emotional connection and reaction people have to the farms, horses and equine culture. It is the view from that lens that made Anne the perfect person to head up Lexington’s Horse Country initiative. Presenting Lexington’s Horse Country to the World Several years ago a group of leaders from within the Thoroughbred industry came together with a vision of making the Bluegrass’s iconic Thoroughbred culture – from the farms and landscape to the horses and people –accessible to the public. In the same way that Napa Valley, California had capitalized on its vineyards and wineries, Lexington, Kentucky could make its most notable asset – Thoroughbreds – a fun and educational tourism draw. The idea grew into a partnership between the Thoroughbred industry and Lexington’s Convention and Visitors’ Bureau and evolved into Horse Country, which offers public tours of the area’s most popular and traditionally private farms. In late 2014, Anne was tabbed to head up the organization.

“It’s definitely a start-up, but it was very well planned and it was an idea that was very passionately developed, processing and percolating for a number of years with the leadership of the industry,” said Anne. The not-for-profit venture includes guided tours of horse farms, equine medical clinics and other equine attractions. Seasoned tour guides share stories and information about the land, horses and people that make the Bluegrass Region so unique. “The long-term goal for Horse Country is to help to make Lexington a bucket-list experience,” said Anne. “It is definitely a community effort and we are thrilled to play a role in making that a reality.” The group had a soft launch in October of 2015, offering its first tours during Breeders’ Cup week. Horse Country welcomed 1,100 people from 40 states and four countries to experience the Bluegrass like never before. They are currently offering tickets for spring tours. “Breeders’ Cup was wonderful. We were featured in Southern Living, the Wallstreet Journal, the New York Times and more. I’ve been doing PR for a long time and I’ve never seen anything like this,” said Anne. Horse Country can accommodate tours for individuals and families to larger group tours. They work in partnership with local tour companies to offer unparalleled experiences throughout the area and can assist in planning customized tours based on specific preferences. “Hopefully people will make repeat trips here to see the different locations and seasons. It’s fascinating to an outsider to experience the whole life cycle, from newborn foals frolicking in fields to yearling prep and sales. You can come any time of year and see fascinating and unique things at each location. I want people to experience all of that,” said Anne. More than anything, Anne, along with the rest of the team behind Horse Country, wants people to fall in love with Kentucky and all it has to offer. “We want people to get here and fall in love with the land, the horses, the people – everything that makes this region so unique from anywhere else on Earth,” said Anne. “I learned to be a Colt’s fan because my dad taught me to watch football. It’s the same with the Bluegrass. I want people to fall in love with it and engage on a deeper level.”•

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We Bleed Blue

All-time Greats

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UK Men’s Basketball History

ifting through names of great players in UK men’s basketball history can take some time. There are a lot of them to consider, dating back more than 100 years.

The greatest of them all, as far as scoring is concerned, is Dan Issel, whose record 2,138 career points likely will never be broken in this age of hasty exits to professional riches. Issel was a center, although in today’s jargon he’d be known as a low post player or, simply, a “big.” UK has had a lot of great ones and while sweet-shooting forwards surrounded most, they all had one thing in common: a talented point guard who could get him the basketball. Even though this current UK team doesn’t feature a “big” who will show up on any all-star teams this season, it does have a guy who has managed to thrust himself into any Player of the Year debate, despite the fact that he’s usually the smallest player on the court. The emergence of Tyler Ulis has prompted discussion of where he ranks among the nation’s best, as well as all-time Wildcat floor generals. “He’s so good that the only weakness we can find is his height,” says former Wildcat sharpshooter Cameron Mills, now a Lexington radio personality. “That’s all anyone will talk about. ‘Well, if he was three inches taller, how good would he be?’ He’s so good we can’t find a weakness in his game.” ESPN analyst Jay Bilas dismisses any question relating the 5-foot-9 Ulis’ efficacy to his size with a phrase some UK fans now are wearing on T-shirts: “If you’re good enough,” Bilas says, “you’re big enough. And he’s good enough.” How good? “Dominant” was just one of the words used by an op-

Dan Issel

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Ralph Beard

posing coach. “I felt that Ulis was probably the most dominant player on the floor for either team,” said Vanderbilt coach Kevin Stallings, shortly after the UK guard scored 21 points and handed out five assists in a 76-57 UK victory. Stallings listed Ulis’ qualities as though they were the Litany of the Saints: “He has a great understanding of the game. He plays at a great pace. He doesn’t get sped up. He can make shots. He’s a great layup maker. He’s got good vision. He’s really got everything. He actually utilizes his size to his advantage. He creates advantages with his stature. That’s a unique skill.” Mills crunched some numbers for his web site, CameronMillsRadio.com, and was shocked at what he found. A vital measuring stick for point guards is assist-to-turnover ratio. According to Mills’ research, until now, former teammate Anthony Epps was the best (since such figures were recorded) at 2.8/1. Ulis for his career: a sparkling 3.45/1 and for this season alone, 3.5/1. During one fourgame stretch in February it was a staggering 9/1. “I was always aware of that being a big deal to coach (Rick) Pitino and to Anthony personally,” says Mills. “That was a stat he took a lot of pride in.” Ulis can take pride in numbers like those, which put him in heady company. A look back reveals a wealth of UK point guards who specialized in making life simpler for their taller teammates. Some believe Ralph Beard is still the greatest in UK history, among the best of all time. Of course, it’s impossible to compare today’s players with the guys who laced ‘em up more than six decades ago. But

Kyle Macy

Dicky Beal


We Bleed Blue it’s also just as impossible to ignore the fact that Beard was a three-time AllAmerican who helped pilot the Wildcats to back-to-back NCAA championships (1948-49). Not until the “modern” era does another Wildcat point guard pop up on the All-America rolls, Kyle Macy, a consensus A-A in 1980. After him, it seemed as though there was a never-ending stream of talented floor generals. Macy passed the baton to all-time assists leader Dirk Minniefield, who was recruited to feed the ball to Sam Bowie and Melvin Turpin, although coach Joe B. Hall often had to slide him into the shooting guard slot. That move helped pave the way for Dicky Beal who, like Ulis, was undersized but phenomenally quick and as such, a tremendous defender, although Ulis is a far superior shooter. Point guards with sweet shots came later. Travis Ford, Roger Harden and Brandon Knight all could light it up from outside whenever the offense failed to yield an opportunity to feed the low post. Ford racked up big assist numbers passing to All-American Jamal Mashburn. Harden’s chief target was another All-American forward, Kenny Walker. And in his lone season as a Wildcat, two of Knight’s favorite targets were Terrence Jones and Josh Harrellson. The most dynamic talent ever to wear the blue-and-white in recent years was John Wall, himself a 1st-team All-American who, when he wasn’t looking for Cousins, was slashing to the basket or beating everyone down the floor in a one-on-none fast break. There are so many others: Larry Johnson, Ed Davender, Rajon Rondo, Marquis Teague, Ramel Bradley, Cliff Hawkins. Wayne Turner won title rings both with Pitino and Tubby Smith. Sean Woods, one of the “Unforgettables,” was two seconds away from being known as the author of the greatest shot in UK basketball history. Christian Laettner oneupped him moments later. But this is Ulis’ time and he’s painting his own picture in the UK history books, wielding a broad brush, using bold strokes. His game is big enough. That’s why he’s good enough.

John Wall PHOTO COURTESY: UK ATHLETICS

by Dick Gabriel BigBlueInsider.com

Tyler Ulis PHOTO CO TESY MICHAEL HUANG

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We Bleed Blue

TOP 20 Most Memorable Moments I remember the first time my dad let me stay up and watch the NCAA championship game. It was 1978. Kentucky beat Duke. It’s the night I became a UK basketball fan.

T

his year marks my 20-year anniversary of covering the Kentucky Wildcats as a member of the media. So in honor of this anniversary, I thought I would rank my “Top 20 Most Memorable Moments” from the NCAA tournament. 20) Dwight Perry starts – It happened in the 1st round in 2007 against Villanova. UK assistant David Hobbs accidentally inserted Dwight Perry in the Cats starting line up instead of his cousin, Bobby Perry. Dwight didn’t even have his name on the back of his jersey. Dwight started, immediately committed a foul and was taken out of the game. 19) Memorial Magic – There was something very special about the Cats playing UNLV in the NIT tournament in 2009 in Memorial Coliseum. The game gave us a glimpse of what it was like back in the Adolph Rupp days. Plus, Perry Stevenson provided one of the best dunks in the modern era. 18) Bradley vs Bogut – Ramel Bradley was a 6’1” freshman. Andrew Bogut was a 7’0” player of the year candidate. During the Cats Sweet 16 match up with Utah in 2005, Bradley wasn’t about to let Bogut push him around and famously “manned up” to the 7 footer. 17) “Snownado” – As the media set up outside the Carrier Dome in Syracuse in 2002, photographer Kenny Harvener spent over an hour in freezing temperatures setting up a tent for all of WKYT’s news coverage. Just minutes before the newscast began, a rare “snownado” blew through and wrapped Kenny’s tent up like a pretzel. 16) Bledsoe who? – After spending the entire season in the shadows of John Wall, DeMarcus Cousins and Patrick Patterson, freshman Eric Bledsoe cemented himself as a bona fide “one and done” when he set a UK NCAA tournament record by hitting eight 3-pointers in the Cats opening round game of the 2010 NCAA tournament. 15) “Twin to Twin” – A heartbreaking loss, but one of the most memorable moments in recent UK and NCAA tournament history. UK was the overall #1 seed playing UAB, a #9 seed, in the 2nd round in 2004. UAB’s Ronell Taylor stole the ball, blindly threw it over his head nearly the length of the court, hitting his identical twin brother, Donell Taylor, in stride for an easy dunk. UK could never recover. 14) WCS dunks – UK’s quest for an undefeated season and

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the school’s 9th NCAA title in 2015 provided a ton of fun and highlights. None bigger than when Willie Cauley Stein threw down some massive dunks. The one everyone will remember is when he posterized Cincinnati’s Quadri Moore in the 2nd round in Louisville. 13) Tayshaun beats St. Bonny – The Cats were nearly knocked out of the first round of the tournament by Saint Bonaventure in 2000. UK was down 3 with 7 seconds to go when Prince hit a 3-pointer to send the game into overtime, which the Cats won in double overtime. 12) Padgett beats Kansas – Scott Padgett was the hero against Kansas in the 2nd round in 1999. Down 3 points with 17 seconds left, Padgett hit a step back 3 to tie it and send the game in overtime. The Cats then won it in OT 11) Sullinger eats Spalding – During the 1st half of UK’s upset win over #1 seed Ohio State, and with the ball going out of bounds after a missed shot, Josh Harrellson not only beat Jared Sullinger to the ball, but also threw it off his chest as he was going out of bounds to give the ball back to the Cats. 10) Young beats Wichita State – Not only did James Young hit the big shot to help give UK the upset win over undefeated and #1 seed Wichita State in 2014 during the 2nd round, but Young admitted later that he wasn’t listening during the time out, so when he walked back out on the court, he didn’t know what to do. When he got the ball, he said, “I just decided to shoot it.” 9) “Anklegate” – No team was hotter than UK going into the 2003 tournament. During UK’s win over Wisconsin in the Sweet 16, Keith Bogans sprained his ankle. For the next 48 hours, the entire commonwealth was consumed with, “Will Bogans be able to play against Marquette and their star Dwayne Wade?” UK used covert operations to hide Bogans injury from the fans and the media. Alas, Bogans did play, but UK could still not win the game. 8) Prince is King – In UK’s 2002 NCAA tournament game in the 2nd round against Tulsa, Tayshaun Prince lit Tulsa up for 41 points. The great story line was that Prince’s 41 resembled Jack Givens scoring 41 in the 1978 NCAA championship game. Both players are left handed. Both players wore #21, and both games happened in St. Louis.


Business News

Home Builders Care

Home Builders Care is pleased to announce that a unique project to support a Kentucky veteran and his family has been completed. The result is a beautiful home located at 1917 Millbank Road in Lexington that is filled with love and support for a family who truly deserves this special support. Home Builders Care is a non-profit organization founded by the Home Builders Association of Lexington. Home Builders Care is committed to building a better future through active participation in community service projects that support Kentucky families. In July of 2015, the group broke ground on a special charitable project: a home for a Kentucky military veteran or active serviceperson. “These people have sacrificed so much for our freedom and we want to give back,” Don Sullivan, Secretary/Treasurer of Home Builders Care, explained of the group’s motivation. Members of the association, builders and community volunteers have worked together to create the house, culminating in a charming, affordable home in the Brookfield Chase neighborhood. From a number of nominations, the group chose Cade Shackelford, a US Army National Guard veteran, as the home’s occupant. “This brings our Home Builders Care project full circle,” Todd Johnson, HBAL Executive Director, said. “We are excited to dedicate this fantastic home to the Shackelford family.”

SSG. Shackelford is an active member of the US Army National Guard who served our country in several overseas tours in the Middle East. He is currently serving as a Military Police Officer at the Bluegrass Army Depot in Richmond, Kentucky. He is dedicated to the US Military and plans on remaining in service until his retirement. In January 2016, Home Builders Care along with city council members took part in a dedication ceremony to present the new home to Shackelford and his family. “We are fortunate to partner with a local bank to obtain the lot for the home and our Builder members leading this effort have been nothing short of amazing in bringing this project together! Mike Hall with Andover Construction has been the lead builder on the project and he and our other members have been able to get discounts and donations to make this home affordable for Cade and his family,” Mr. Johnson explained. “The outpour of response has been great from HBA members for this project. Home Builders Care will continue to support our local veterans, as well as helping those who are in need through a variety of different charitable projects, in the coming year.” For more information about Home Builders Care and how to get involved with future projects, email info@hbalexington.com. For specific questions regarding donations, contact Don Sullivan (donsullivan2@gmail.com).

859.273.5117 ext. 25 | nfo@hba ex ngton.com | www.hba ex ngton.com

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Business News

Christ the King School

One of Lexington’s oldest private schools is pleased to announce a brand new 2-year-old program! Christ the King School’s new program will provide an environment of learning and nurturing for 2-year-olds. Open daily from 7:30am6pm with flexible drop-off and pickup, CKS offers wonderful options for local families. They offer 5-day, 3-day and 2-day options in an age-appropriate facility. The overall benefits of Pre-K have been well documented, but the Christ the King PreK teachers all agree that having the program allows for a smooth transition and better preparation for Kindergarten. It also offers a sense of community where students can interact and learn in an environment with a strong faith-based foundation. The school follows Early Childhood state standards. This means that the staff will help foster language and physical development, as well as social, emotional and cognitive learning with an emphasis on spirituality. Children learn to build positive relationships through sensory development, socialization, and cooperative play. CKS has also embraced the Minds in Motion program for preschool through first grade. Through regular exercise, the child’s ves-

tibular system is strengthened while visual and auditory processing is stimulated. Children develop gross and fine motor skills to better prepare for cognitive learning. Christ the King School first opened its doors in 1951. Over sixty years, the enthusiasm and initiative of their school administration, parish priests, faculty and staff have contributed to a community that prioritizes education alongside faith principles. The school’s mission is to develop character, knowledge and spirit in its students and community by living the Catholic faith through sharing the sacraments, promoting academic excellence and engaging in service. In 2005, Christ the King was named a “Blue Ribbon School” by the U.S. Department of Education. CKS underwent the AdvancEd accreditation process, demonstrating continuous improvement and quality assurance through internal and external review. For more information about specific services the CKS 2-year-old program offers and admission information, contact Kim Thompson (kthompson@ckslex.org). Children must be two years old by August 1st of the year entering the program to qualify. Also ask about their new summer program for two, three and four-year-olds, starting June 2017.

859.266.5641 | 412 Cochran Rd. | www.ctkschoo .net

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WOW Wedding

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Weddings

Take Your Seats

With Artfully Arranged Outdoor Ceremony Seating Outdoor ceremonies top many brides’ wish lists these days – along with

crossed fingers and a prayer that the weather cooperates. So many modern churches no longer have a beautiful, traditional sanctuary or even a chapel to host a nice ceremony in. At the same time nothing is more simple than an outdoor ceremony. But you can make your outdoor vows beautiful by thinking outside of the box and doing more than just rows of chairs in a field. Beautifully chosen chairs help, but the arrangement can steal the show with any type of seat. Seating arrangements take on a whole new meaning when you consider these ideas. Seating With a Twist If you have a smaller number of guests, or if you are doing a destination wedding in a land far, far away, arranging your outdoor ceremony seating in a spiral is magical. What I like best about this is that the bride and her father walk past every guest to get to the altar, giving everyone a prized “aisle seat”. Repeat the motif with flower petals along the line of seating to reinforce the spiral design. The look is so sweet and special. Circular Seating Another creative seating arrangement that I love is a double semi-circular design allowing guests to intimately surround the bride and groom. This seating arrangement brings your guests closer to the altar, and almost seems to make them part of the wedding vows themselves. It also allows for a larger number of guests. In this case, you may choose a bride’s side and a groom’s side, with the bride’s side now on the right. This way, the bride’s friends and family can see the face of their girl during the ceremony, and vice versa for the groom. Love it! Angled Seating In the Round With a large guest list, angling seats at each corner makes your layout interesting. This creative layout allows for four points of entry, where your bridesmaids, groomsmen, mothers of the bride and minister can mix it up for interest. You can choose to use a runner or just embrace grass scattered with petals. If you choose a runner with this layout, it looks nice to use it in all the aisle ways. When you take this “angle”, there is not a bad seat in—or outside—of the house. Ceremony Seating Takes the Décor Lead Your ceremony seating will be some of the first wedding décor that your guests see, so let it make a statement. There are many creative ways to play with seating, and we will take a look at some great ideas in future issues.

by Marsha Koller Wedding Consultant

MARCH 2016 | TOPS MAGAZINE

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Dining

R

iding on the coattails of the renowned Heirloom Restaurant in Midway, Distilled at Gratz Park is a stylish and sophisticated destination for classic, refined Southern food. The name Distilled is more than just a nod to the restaurant’s extensive bourbon and cocktail selection. It also suggests the theme of the menu: classic dishes taken down to their essence so that the flavors really shine. Chef/Owner Mark Wombles and his team work with fresh, local ingredients while taking a creative and often surprising approach to Southern cuisine. Those who have visited the Gratz Park Inn on West Second Street will hardly recognize the space that formerly housed Jonathan’s at Gratz Park. The restaurant in Lexington’s most historic boutique hotel has been given a complete makeover, and the dining room has been opened up to reveal a modern, airy, and sociable space. Metallic accents and cool gray, white, periwinkle and lavender tones create a contemporary and relaxing environment. Chef Mark Wombles says that the menu at Distilled features a decidedly Southern flair – think fried chicken and waffles, crab cakes, and country ham. But at the same time, guests should expect the unexpected. “We’re trying to present Southern food with an element of surprise,” he said. “Plus, our menu changes frequently so we can offer the freshest seasonal fruits, vegetables, meats and fish.” It may be surprising to learn that Distilled offers a breakfast menu. Because the restaurant regularly serves hotel guests, the kitchen opens at 7 am, serving up classics like Wiesenberger Grits and Sausage, Buttermilk Lemon Poppy Seed Pancakes, Chicken Biscuits and Gravy, and the Frittata of the Day. Lunch selections include Vanilla Bourbon Roasted Parsnip Soup, Cheesesteak Sandwich with Beef Tenderloin, Sautéed Mushrooms, and Crispy Bacon on a baguette, and a Crab Cake Sandwich with Spicy Fresno Slaw, served on a Challah Bun. And for dinner, expect showstoppers like Grippo Crusted Rabbit, Bacon Wrapped Pork Tenderloin, Sweet Glazed Short Ribs and Sweet Potato & Mascarpone Agnolotti. When asked about customer favorites, Wombles mentioned the Maine Lobster Salad, which is served with Chive Cream, Toasted Sourdough, and Fried Egg. “It’s one of the most popular items on our menu, and looks beautiful on the plate,” he said. Distilled makes it a priority to support local farms such as Marksbury Farm, to bring fresh and seasonal foods to their guests. In addition, there is a beehive located on the roof of Gratz Park Inn that supplies honey for cooking and cocktails. Bourbon is prominently featured at the Distilled bar – for example, The Revolver (Bourbon, Coffee Liquor, Orange Bitters) or the Bourbon Buck (Bourbon, Lemon Juice, Simple Syrup, Fresh Strawberries, Ginger Beer), but guests will also find an extensive wine list and an array of specialty cocktails and local craft beer. With Heirloom and now Distilled, it would seem that Wombles has always had a fondness for Southern food, but in fact, that connection has been more recent. “My former background had more to do with California cuisine,” he explained. “I went to school in San Francisco and worked there for several years. When we opened Distilled, I wanted to explore Southern cuisine and try to put a modern spin on it. I love the whole Southern hospitality thing…cookouts with lots of fixings. People just seem to be nicer in the South and that translates into entertaining with food.” When asked how he defines hospitality, Wombles said, “It means a lot of things, but mostly it is to welcome and enchant someone. People love new experiences and love to be taken care of. That’s what we do in the restaurant business. We try to transport people into another world where they can slip away for an hour or so, and forget their stresses.”

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Dining

Q&A

CHEF MARK WOMBLES

Your job title: Chef/Owner, Distilled, Heirloom, Mezzo Italian Café Your age: 39 Tell us about the overall concept for Distilled. How does it differ from Heirloom? The concept doesn’t differ too much from Heirloom. We wanted to have a minimal approach to the decor so that most of the focus would be on the food. What was the last thing you cooked for yourself? A taco. What is your favorite food or food memory from your childhood? My mom is an incredible cook. We had a huge garden and she would always cook something from the garden: fried green tomatoes, BLTs with tomatoes still warm from the garden. My mother would also make the best chili I’ve ever had, even to this day! Her butterscotch pie was unbelievable! How would you describe working in your kitchen? The best way to describe it is even-keel. I like to keep things calm and composed in the kitchen. We do like to pull the occasional prank on one another. What chefs do you admire (Lexington or others)? I honestly admire any chef that does well in this business on any level. I appreciate when chefs take a simple approach to food. Something in your fridge or freezer that would surprise people? Ketchup from 2013. We never eat at home! A meal or a dish that, as a young chef, was an inspiration or a revelation? I was inspired by everything as a young chef. I would often become fixated on a particular dish. It would become like an obsession and then I would move on to something else. I guess I had a “flavor of the month” type of mentality. Last restaurant where you dined? Miyako. If someone wanted to start a restaurant, what 3 things

would you tell them? Have a lot of passion, work hard, and don’t give up! What is one dish on your menu that will follow you wherever you go? Chicken livers from Heirloom! People LOVE them! Favorite meat & way to prepare it? I’m more of a fish type of guy, but occasionally I get a hankering for a steak. If that’s the case, I sear it at a high temperature, with lots of butter, pepper, and fresh thyme. What are your guilty pleasures? I gave them up after having kids. Quote you live by? I have two. “The whole is greater than the sum of its parts.”- Aristotle. “Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.” - Ferris Bueller. You have a beehive on top of the restaurant and make your own honey. Do you use that same DIY approach in other ways? Not at the moment. However, we do plan to make our own burrata (a fresh Italian cheese made from mozzarella and cream) at our new restaurant, Mezzo Italian Café in Midway. What food trends are you excited about? What trends do you wish would go away? I’m not much to follow trends. I just do what I like.

Cocktail Recipe: Thistles of New York

Ingredients: 2 ounces Cardamaro 1 ounce Bourbon whiskey ¾ ounces freshly squeezed lemon juice ¾ ounces simple syrup 2 ounces red wine Preparation: Combine 2 ounces Cardamaro with the Bourbon whiskey. Add the ¾ ounce fresh lemon juice, and ¾ ounces simple syrup in a cocktail shaker. Fill with ice, cover, and shake until outside of shaker is frosty, about 30 seconds. Strain into a rocks glass filled with fresh ice. Gently pour ½ ounce fruity red wine (such as Shiraz or Malbec) over the back of a spoon held just above the drink’s surface so wine floats on top.

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TOP SHOTS | SOCIE T Y

Lexington Art League’s Artist: Body

Committee of the 101 Members

Celebrating Chinese New Year

Her Knight Princesses

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Jim & Pat Host, Joe B. Hall, Reggie Warford, Grant & Marissa Warford, Jack Givens, Steve Hall


TOPS in Lexington Magazine, March 2016  

Check out our Home & Garden issue! Included is a home tour of Coach Matthew Mitchell and his family, two unique barn renovations and much, m...

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