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JUNE

sensational summer

features

Tour of Homes: Canoe Ridge 50

Derby Recap

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Summer Accessories 140

photos

210 Event photo captions are typically provided to TOPS by the event organizers. We do our best to check names and spelling…but we are all human and make mistakes. Please contact kristen@topsmarketing.com with any corrections and we will make note of it in the next issue.

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Out & About

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TOPS Preview Party

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An Evening Among Friends Featuring Jay Leno

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Tell on Your Teacher Grand Prize Awards Night

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UK Women in Philanthropy Luncheon

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Education Builds Hope Luncheon

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Purses Pouts & Pearls

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Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event

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Encore!

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16th Annual Farmland Conservation Celebration

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Emerge 2016

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Go Red for Women Launch

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Women of Courage

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Camp Horsin’ Around Amazing Eight Luncheon

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TOP Shots

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fundamentals at home Gardening: Sowing The Seeds Of Knowledge

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Tour of Homes: Canoe Ridge

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FACES + PLACES 101

Derby Recap

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TOPS Cares: Kentucky CancerLink

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Meet the Media: Chris Goodman

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New & Noteworthy: Fable + Flame

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cuisine 118

Dining: Pasta Perfection

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Beer of the Month: Goose Island Four Star Pils

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Wine of the Month: Sea Monster Eclectic White Wine

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A Taste of Thyme: Summer Chillin’ & Grillin’

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TOP 5 Dining: Hidden Gems

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Patios: Dining al Fresco

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LIFE + STYLE

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Summer Accessories

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Wow Wedding: Emily & David

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Wedding Trends: Ombre Rose Aisle

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fundamentals family Kids Room Tour: Twin-spiration

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Super Mom: Heather Wehrheim

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A Princess & Her Knight

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In The Buf: Best Friends

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equine 172

Horse Park Happenings

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Filly of the Month: Katie Ross

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Colt of the Month: Lee Carter

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COMMUNITY #BBN: UK Football At A Critical Junction

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Calendar: Lex in the City

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contributors Photographers Paul Atkinson Jim Burgett Mike Cyrus Tracie Dillon Michael Huang

Ron Morrow Ken Parks Keni Parks Woody Phillips

Intern Madison Rexroat

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Writers Michelle Aiello Sarah Boerkircher Jesse L. Brooks Allison Davis Cynthia Ellingsen Amanda Harper Drew Johnson

Marsha Koller Meredith Lane Buffy Lawson Barbara Meyer Michelle Rauch Jen Roytz

Cover photo by Keni Parks Have a great idea for a story? Tell us all about it at info@topsinlex.com


OUT + ABOUT | SOCIE T Y

Jennifer Jabroski and Sarah Noble take a break with Daniel Boone (George Dickson)!

Reflections MedSpa Grand Opening with Amber Gudgell, Janice Mueller, Jennifer Neustat and Amy Maddox

Unified Trust Hats Off To You with Greg Kasten, Jan Kasten and Cheryl Broster

Cinco De Mayo Celebration

Lunafest Film Festival

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Oliver Lewis Bridge Lighting


at home

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Gardening: Sowing the Seeds of Knowledge 48 Tour of Homes: Canoe Ridge 50


Canoe Rid ge by Michelle Aiello photography by Jeff Walker

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ucked away in a private lake community just outside Sadieville Kentucky, the home of Dr. Jim Greer and his wife Terrie is filled with customized touches and rustic charm. Deer Lake is a 600-acre nature preserve with two stocked fishing lakes and numerous hiking trails. The Scott County community is comprised of twenty-two privately owned properties. Canoe Ridge, as the Greer Home is affectionately called, sits on approximately six acres. Nearby Sadieville is located near Georgetown, a 35-minute drive to Lexington with easy access to I-75 and the airport.

New York, the area where the couple honeymooned, heavily inspired the architectural style. They still feel a strong connection to the area, and occasionally vacation there.

This 12-year old 5,400 square foot Adirondack style home contains three spacious levels, five bedrooms, and four and one half baths. It features extensive custom leaded glass throughout, a grand lodge-style salon with thirty-foot ceilings, three master suites, and a soundproofed home theater with an attached bar.

The front porch floor is made from Cumaru, a naturally durable Brazilian timber with a density similar to Ipe, but with a more exotic marbled grain. To ensure the front porch maintains its integrity in the elements, the stone is faux, and the door is made from fiberglass, which has been stained to look like wood. The concept of the entry was to enable looking through the center of the home, making the lake almost part of the home.

The Greer property is listed for sale with Carolyn Wheeler with Bluegrass Sotheby’s International Realty. Interested parties may contact Ms. Wheeler at (859) 221-0166 or by visiting bgsir.com and searching for 129 S. Deerlake Path. Dr. Greer, a partner in White, Greer and Maggard Orthodontics, developed the home’s concept and design himself. He hired a variety of private contractors and draftsmen to custom build the home, while Terrie Greer contributed her vision for the interior design and décor. John Shirley of Shirley Construction LLC in Georgetown is responsible for much of the building. Lodges typically found in the Adirondack Mountains of upstate

The home’s stunning entryway serves as an introduction to the combination of the geometric lines and natural elements found throughout the property. It features a cedar wood double arch and several panes of leaded glass designed by Greer and inspired by the work of Frank Lloyd Wright. Greer hired a local blacksmith to design the iron rod and decorative support for the arch.

When asked for the origin of the name Canoe Ridge, Greer explained, “My wife and I love to canoe and kayak, and we discovered a place called Canoe Bay up in Wisconsin. She said we really couldn’t call it a bay here in Kentucky, but there’s a mountain in Washington state that Lewis and Clark named Canoe Ridge because of its shape. Plus, it turns out that there are actually two wineries on that mountain by that name, so part of the reason we chose that name is because we could purchase Canoe Ridge wine and drink it at Canoe Ridge.”

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he idea behind the design of the great room is very similar to lodges in the Adirondack area, which are built with large central areas and massive wood-burning fireplaces. The high efficiency wood stove, made by Vermont Castings, offers 85,000 BTUs, which can effectively heat the entire central area, while the upstairs rooms remain a bit cooler. A large paddle fan circulates the air, which fuels the fire, enhancing the efficiency of the stove. The wrought iron globe chandelier with faux candles is from Restoration Hardware. Over the mantle hangs an oversized taxidermy mount of an Alaskan Moose.

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isplayed opposite of the stone fireplace is a 1962 cedar and cherry wood Adirondack guide boat that the couple received as a wedding gift. Greer mentioned that all of the decorative items in the home are available for purchase as a package deal, separate from the price of the home. In the event the buyer doesn’t wish to include the items, they will be sold at auction.

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n eat-in area is located to one side of the kitchen, complete with a black leather restaurant style booth and a wall mounted television. Mounted above the table is a mantle made from burled maple. Greer explained that when he was growing up, he went to a hunting lodge on the coast of North Carolina. “It was the coolest place in the world. I remember they had a mantle that was made from an old piece of a ship. I thought I’d like to have a mantle like that, but it turns out that salvaged pieces of ships are very hard to find.” Eventually he found a company in California that deals in old-growth redwood from fallen trees, and had the mantle crafted from the finely marbled wood. Greer finished the gorgeous tabletop from an old-growth California redwood as well. Mounted over the table is a fascinating collection of antique kitchen utensils.

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he traditionally furnished dining room features a 16-foot bay window looking out onto the peaceful countryside. The floors are wide plank hickory—“very durable,” according to Greer, and the cedar pillars were sourced from a local logging company. A tasteful Oriental rug and another rustic chandelier from Highlands, North Carolina complete the dining room’s serene look.

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he other suites offer similar amenities, along with the same rich cedar woodwork and ceilings, en-suite baths with granite countertops, closets, and plenty of carefully chosen antiques and rustic touches.

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KENTUCKY

DERBY 142

Derby Day @ Churchill

Kentucky born Nyquist with Jockey Mario Gutierrez aboard takes the 142nd Kentucky Derby by one length over Exaggerator!

Photos by our TOP photographers Keni Parks, Michael Huang, Ken Parks, Mike Cyrus, Ron Morrow, Jim Burgess, Tracie Dillon and Paul Atkinson 80

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Derby Day @ Keeneland

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KENTUCKY

DERBY 142

Photos by our TOP photographers Keni Parks, Michael Huang, Ken Parks, Mike Cyrus, Ron Morrow, Jim Burgess, Tracie Dillon and Paul Atkinson JUNE 2016 | TOPS MAGAZINE

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Derby Bash @ 21c

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DERBY 142

Photos by our TOP photographers Keni Parks, Michael Huang, Ken Parks, Mike Cyrus, Ron Morrow, Jim Burgess, Tracie Dillon and Paul Atkinson JUNE 2016 | TOPS MAGAZINE

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Favorite HATS

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KENTUCKY

DERBY 142

Photos by our TOP photographers Keni Parks, Michael Huang, Ken Parks, Mike Cyrus, Ron Morrow, Jim Burgess, Tracie Dillon and Paul Atkinson JUNE 2016 | TOPS MAGAZINE

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Throughout the month of June, “Take the #until Challenge” by sharing on social media how you plan to make a difference by using the hastag #until. The challenge is a fundraising effort in which no amount is too small because UNTIL there is a cure for cancer, Kentuckians need help TODAY. If an individual or business accepts the #until challenge, they can receive lavender #until bracelets to show and wear their support. Please call the Kentucky CancerLink’s office at 859-309-1700 or email Melissa Karrer at melissak@kycancerlink.org for more information.

Patient services room: Kentucky CancerLink has an on-site patient services room that includes mastectomy bras, breast prosthesis, wigs, hats and scarves, and lymphedema garments for no cost to the client. If a client is unable to come to Kentucky CancerLink’s office due to proximity or health, supplies will be mailed to them.

“The clients that we mainly assist meet the requirements of 250 percent at or below poverty levels,” Karrer stated. “However, we encourage anyone to call us and let us know what their needs are and we will determine the best way to help. If we do not have funding to help directly, a patient navigator will work with community partners to find resources in the county in which the client resides.” The organization is dedicated to serving Kentuckians and one hundred percent of each donation made to Kentucky CancerLink stays in Kentucky. “We understand that cancer is like a stone thrown in the water,” said Karrer. “The ripples affect everyone in the situation in addition to the patient. Kentucky CancerLink is passionate about helping those in need who are on a cancer journey.” Serving all cancers Prior to 2013, Kentucky CancerLink focused solely on breast cancers. As Kentucky CancerLink’s Founder/Executive Director Vicki BlevinsBooth explained, it was a natural progression of Kentucky CancerLink’s mission to serve all types of cancer. “It was really heart tugging for our patient navigators to answer calls asking for assistance for cancers other than breast and cervical because we didn’t have staff funding to offer support for other cancers,” said BlevinsBooth. “In 2014, the Board of Directors voted and it was decided that the mission would expand to help other cancer diagnoses. We went for a name change and took a leap of faith.” Without any additional funding, Kentucky CancerLink took on all cancers. They have now served 68 different types of cancer.

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screening, but that funding was grant-based as well. The organization raised funds on its own through events, and outreach became a much larger focus, particularly raising funds to help meet the growing demand for resources to aid with other types of cancers. Last year, the 2nd Annual Brave Faces of Cancer was a new fundraiser for Kentucky CancerLink because the organization recognized that the brave faces of cancer include survivors, family members, coworkers, friends and those lost too soon. This year’s race was held on Saturday, May 28 at Coldstream Park with a 1-mile walk and a timed 5K race. At the Brave Faces of Cancer 5K, Kentucky CancerLink kicked off the #until campaign. This is a new fundraiser and awareness effort for Kentucky CancerLink. Blevins-Booth came up with the concept and the organization worked together on the tagline: “UNTIL there is a cure for cancer, Kentuckians need help TODAY.” Over the past eight years, Kentucky CancerLink has touched every county in the state and continues to serve all of Kentucky. “In every hospital and institution, patient navigators know about us and rely on us to help their patients. It has taken eight years to forge these partnerships and that is something we take great pride in,” said BlevinsBooth. “We continue to struggle for funding, but our mission is to increase awareness because we know that research will find the cure. In the meantime, until there is a cure, we will continue to help and serve Kentuckians today.” Take the #until challenge

“We understand the effects of cancer and we are not exclusive to one type. Patients, families and friends struggle with all of the same barriers, so we help anyone with a cancer diagnosis,” Blevins-Booth said.

June is “Cancer Survivor Month” and while survivorship is often thought of as beginning after one has completed treatment successfully, survivorship begins as soon as one is diagnosed with cancer and starts the battle.

Kentucky CancerLink had already begun to partner in 2013 with the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department for colon cancer

“Many, including myself, are unaware of the struggles that take place for a large number of Kentuckians on a cancer journey,” said Karrer.

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Chris with mom, Janet

Meet the Media

Chris Goodman by Michelle Rauch photos courtesy of Chris Goodman

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was born in Paducah and grew up in Louisville. “Kentucky is home to me,” said Chris Goodman. Goodman is the morning anchor at LEX18. He moved here eight years ago, leaving a job in Milwaukee. Normally, people in the business keep moving to bigger cities, but coming back home was personal. “I always worried in the back of my mind. I didn’t know how much longer I would have my mom,” Goodman said. Goodman was always close with his parents. “I am an only child. I was not spoiled that bad, but maybe just a little bit!” His mother, Janice, was diagnosed with lung cancer in 1994. “She survived that. She survived another illness in 2001. She survived breast cancer,” he said. By the time his mom was diagnosed with lymphoma in 2012, Goodman was back in Kentucky. His mother passed away in 2013. “Survivor. She fought and fought. This lymphoma was just too much for her,” Goodman said. “It was a very sad 18 months for me. I lost my dad 18 months before that.” It was difficult to lose both parents in such a short time, but it was in the days, weeks, and years preceding their passing, Goodman learned a valuable life lesson. “Where there is a will, there is a way. She was bound and determined to survive and out of all those sicknesses, she kept coming back. Lymphoma just made her so weak. Finally towards the very end, in her final days, she had pretty much

given up. You can only fight so much. She taught me you can always survive no matter what kind of cards you are dealt, you can survive,” Goodman says. While the loss was painful, Goodman counts his blessings that he was able to continue his career in Lexington. “I was very thankful to be able to be close to my family; to be here a couple good years before all that happened.” He still has family in Lexington and Louisville including his stepfather. Other relatives are spread across the state and in nearby Memphis. “My grandparents still live in Paducah and I go back to visit quite often,” he said. A Nose for News Goodman’s parents always knew he would end up working in television. He had a nose for news from a very young age. “I’ve known since I was six years old I wanted to be in TV news. I grew up watching Peter Jennings and I would tell my mom or dad ‘I want to do that one day.’” When he was in high school, he was always armed with a camcorder. Goodman’s friends were his guinea pigs, always getting interviewed. When he would visit relatives out of state he would show up at the local TV stations to get interviews from the “pros”. No one was immune from Goodman, his inquisitive nature and the camera. “It got to the point they would roll their eyes, oh no, we’re going to get interviewed,” he said.

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Chris with mom, Janet

Chris with stepfather Robert Woosley and Savannah

“I guess I was always a news junkie even when I was a kid. It fascinated me to see not only the news but how these news people did it. I didn’t just watch. I studied it.

“We hit the ground running when we get up,” Goodman said. By 4:30am he is awake and on the air. “You really have to want to work these hours,” he said.

I followed current events. I was just an inquisitive child. That has stuck with me today. I am very curious about the world around us,” Goodman said.

Working the daybreak shift is not something he ever imagined doing. When he was in Milwaukee, Goodman worked the night shift. They approached him once about moving to mornings. “I said no. I was happy doing nights. Now I get up at the time I went to bed in Milwaukee.”

Goodman pursued speech communication and journalism at Otterbein University, which is a small liberal arts college in Ohio. He jokes that his career path had the extra benefit of not requiring math classes. “That’s a real good thing because I am no mathematician or scientist. I was meant to talk for a living,” he said. His first career stop out of college was in Meridian, Mississippi, population 41,000. A small market, to get his feet wet and hone his craft. “That’s what I tell people who want to go into this business. You are going to be really poor for awhile and you are going to do grunt work. It’s not glamorous when you first start out in television news. You work as hard as you can and you make very little money,” he said. After Mississippi it was on to Springfield, MO, where he spent a year and a half. Then he made the leap to Milwaukee, Wisconsin. “If I had to do it over again I would probably go south. I like the warmer weather,” he said. But his five years in Milwaukee were not as bad as he thought they would be. “I thought I was going to hate it, but I loved it. Yes, the winters are horrible, but the people are super nice. It was great up there and it became like my second home,” Goodman recalled. The Move to Lexington His move to LEX18 in 2008 was a blessing, both personally and professionally. “I am very happy to be here,” he said. His schedule working the morning shift keeps him on his toes. Bedtime is 7pm and the alarm rattles him awake at 2:30 in the morning.

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People kept telling Goodman he has the personality for a morning show, so he gave it a try. “Now that I am doing it – don’t get me wrong – its tough getting up at those hours – but it’s great when the afternoon comes and you are off for the day,” he said. It has taken some adjustments and scheduling life accordingly, but it’s working. Most people who work in the public eye have anecdotal stories. Goodman remembers his most embarrassing live TV moment that few will let him forget. It was the 12:30pm cooking segment with Tootsie Nelson. On that day she brought Pear Anise pie. Anise is a spice similar to licorice. “I hadn’t read the script ahead of time and I read the teleprompter and said ‘Today we are going to learn how to make Pear Anus Pie’,” Goodman said grinning. He said a lot of people got a kick out of that slip of the tongue. One thing he gets all the time when he meets viewers is surprise at his size. He is perceived by many to be much taller than the 5’9” he stands. There’s also his weight. “You’re a lot beefier. I guess I look smaller framed and taller on TV.” When Goodman is not at work, he enjoys running and working out. “I try to go to the gym several days a week or at least do something active,” he said. His schedule does not allow much time for anything else, which leaves Goodman with a good sense of humor. “I am really kind of a boring person,” he said. Goodman has a Toy Poodle named Savannah who is a constant companion. She was his mother’s dog, bringing her comfort during her


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hile the location is slightly hidden away, it is absolutely worth it to experience the exciting flavors and textures of each carefully crafted dish. If classic spaghetti and marinara is your thing, you’ll find it here. But you’ll also find bruschetta with local heirloom tomatoes, olive oil and a drizzle of 18 year old balsamic vinaigrette, stuffed gnocchi, fried lasagna, savory smoked gouda & prosciutto mac & cheese, and spinach fettuccine with pancetta, fresh veggies, and sage butter.

tion. Today, Lexington Pasta is sold at the Lexington Farmer’s Market, Kroger, Whole Foods Market, Good Foods Co-Op, Liquor Barn, and Pasta Garage Italian Café. Customers can purchase frozen pasta to boil at their convenience, or place a custom order online and have fresh pasta delivered the next day. The Lexington Pasta tent can be found at special events around town, such as the Night Market, Thursday Night Live, and Taste of the Bluegrass.

According to Romero, a time-honored process and top quality ingredients are they keys to their fabulous product. “Lexington Pasta supplies fresh pasta to many fine restaurants in Lexington and surrounding cities,” he explained. “We import a special flour from Italy and take great care with the other ingredients; to strike just the right balance.”

Romero said that the idea to open a restaurant came from conversations with customers at the Farmer’s Market. He was often asked if he knew of any high-quality Italian restaurants in Lexington that were also quick and casual. Seeing that no restaurant fit the bill, he decided to open his own. Through a Kickstarter campaign, Pasta Garage raised $26,000 in just one month. “The community helped us so much,” Romero said. “Without them, we wouldn’t be here.”

Originally from Venezuela, Romero came to the United States in 1998 to attend West Center University in Cleveland, Ohio. There, he met another young man from Venezuela, and the two became roommates. They rented a house in Cleveland’s Little Italy, and began working at a local Italian restaurant, where they learned the art of making fresh pasta. Romero immediately noticed the restaurant’s huge demand. “The place was always packed with lines out the door at dinner time, even in the winter. I realized that their secret was the fresh pasta. It was homemade, infused with natural flavors, and never used after seven days. It was the only place in the area that was making pasta from scratch,” he remembers. After graduation, Romero worked in the finance industry for several years, but cooking remained one of his biggest passions. Then the economic recession of 2008 led him to reevaluate his career and priorities. He decided to reconnect with his old college roommate. “I called him up and said, ‘Let’s get together and make pasta like the old days’”. His former roommate was living in Lexington, and introduced Romero to the Lexington Farmer’s Market and other local attractions. Later that night, over plates of their handmade pasta and a bottle of wine, the idea for Lexington Pasta was born. The cmpany was founded in 2009 in a one-car garage on North Limestone Avenue. Unlike many new businesses, success seemed to come overnight. The pair made their first batch of pasta for the Lexington Farmer’s Market. Romero recalls, “At that time, we only had a Kitchen Aid stand mixer, a rolling pin, and a pasta cutter. We worked all night making forty pounds of fresh pasta. They next day, we sold out in two hours.” Soon thereafter, they purchased a commercial pasta machine and began expanding their business to restaurant and grocery distribution. Their very first client was Bellini’s, and from there, they continued to acquire accounts and build their reputa-

Lexington native Jake Gaunce first met Romero in 2010 through their mutual friend Jeremy Ashby (of AZUR), and repeatedly ran into Romero while he was delivering his fresh pasta around town. The two developed a rapport, and as it happened, in 2012 Romero found himself in need of an executive chef and business partner for his new restaurant. He called on Gaunce, and the two set to work developing the concept. “It really worked out perfectly, because Lesme is all about the pasta, and I’m a saucier at heart.” Gaunce has always worked in the food industry in one way or another. Like many chefs, he started his career in the fast food industry, and later managed a full-service casual restaurant chain. Eventually he moved on to local, fine dining establishments like Rossi’s, Murray’s, and Nick Ryan’s. “I quickly fell in love with sautéing and more upscale cuisine,” he said. Romero and Gaunce developed the menu for Pasta Garage, as well as the unique self-service concept. Customers are welcome to order dishes directly off the menu, or instead they can create customized pasta bowls by selecting type of pasta, toppings of meat or veggies and house-made sauce. The dishes are prepared to order in an exhibition-style kitchen. While the menu changes frequently as seasonal ingredients become available, customer favorites like linguini, fettuccini, and surprisingly, their number one seller – a gluten free fusilli made from rice, potato, and tapioca flours that Romero spent a year developing – will always be offered. While it was not invented in this country, pasta is one of America’s top comfort foods, and Romero, Gaunce, and their team have elevated this humble pantry staple to something truly remarkable. If you’re a fan of savory Italian comfort food, warm service, and fresh, convenient meals, Pasta Garage Italian Café does not disappoint.

Q&A Lesme Romero & Jake Gaunce

Lesme Romero

How long does it take to make pasta? It takes about an hour to make about 1 pound or four servings of pasta. This is for a home cook with a standard machine. Since we use a commercial machine, we are able to make about 2,000 pounds a week to satisfy all of our orders. Any tips for at-home pasta makers? All you need to make pasta at home is a Kitchen Aid stand mixer with a pasta attachment. You mix the dough, pass it through the

rollers, and once you have the right thickness, you pass it though the pasta cutter. It’s important to use 100% semolina flour, which you can buy at specialty markets or at Lexington Pasta. Do you need different attachments for different shapes of pasta? Yes, but they’re mostly easy to find online or at cooking stores. What is your favorite pasta shape and sauce? It changes every week. I eat a lot of pasta! But my favorite shape right now is our custom-made Kentucky shaped pasta. I like to pair it with marinara and a little parmesan cheese.

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Palmers Fresh Grill

161 Lexington Green Circle | Lexington | 859.273.0103 | PalmersFreshGrill.com Escape to Palmers Fresh Grill patio!

Located at The Mall at Lexington Green, the Palmers patio is situated lakeside, making it a getaway for the senses. Open daily for lunch at 11am, Palmers also features Social Hours every day 4:00-6:30pm. Their live music and beautiful scenery make the patio a can’t-miss dining experience! Palmers serves only USDA Choice or higher steaks and chops. They handcut their fresh steak and fish, and their scrumptious desserts are cooked in their kitchen daily. With small plates, handcrafted cocktails, wines, wells, craft and domestic bottles all under $6, Palmers is a perfect spot to mingle!

J. Render’s Southern Table & Bar

3191 Beaumont Centre Circle | Lexington | www.JRendersBBQ.com

Kick back in comfy Adirondack

chairs while sipping on a great cocktail on the J. Render’s patio! Cantilever umbrellas provide plenty of shade on sunny days, making it a perfect spot to enjoy a quick lunch or to relax after a long day at work. Their Happy Hour is 3-6pm daily and they offer $1 off all drinks and $6 select appetizers. On Wednesdays, enjoy half priced bottles of wine! Their unique comfort food will wow, like the “Oh No You Didn’t” Grilled Cheese, which features pulled pork and smoked mac n’ cheese on Texas toast, all grilled to perfection!

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The Cellar Bar & Grille

3256 Lansdowne Dr. | Lexington | 859.317.8301 | www.CellarGrille.com This upscale sports bar features lots

of reimagined pub dishes that will please any palate, including their Shrimp and Crab Dip and Bourbon Glazed Salmon. With marble countertops, the interior has a great business casual vibe with plenty of TVs for catching the game. They also have a private dining room for large parties. But it’s their 125-seat patio area that overlooks The Signature Club’s pool and lush surroundings that has people piling in during the summer months. Open to the public, this bar makes everyone feel like family. They have daily lunch and dinner specials and Happy Hours is Monday-Friday 4-7pm.

Shamrock Bar & Grille

154 Patchen Dr. #87 | Lexington | 859.269.7621 | www.ShamrocksKY.com

Since 1993, Shamrock Bar & Grille

has been a staple of Lexington’s bar scene. This mom and pop establishment has a great pub vibe inside and a casual, fun outdoor patio. Owners C.O. and Heather Trump–who also own The Cellar Bar & Grille–ensure that Shamrock always offers great food, cold beer and live music, all with a friendly atmosphere that’s perfect for watching sports or relaxing after work. They have daily specials and a menu of comforting pub fare, like Irish Nachos and Loaded Ribeye Sandwich, and a great beer list. Visit their second location in the Hartland Shopping Center, as well!

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Harry’s An American Bar & Grill

Palomar & Hamburg | Lexington | 859.335.6500 | www.BluegrassHospitality.com/Harrys

A tribute to Kentucky’s rich racing history, Harry’s is a crowd favorite. Home of the mini burger and Aqua sushi, known for their signature cocktails and hand-selected wines; Harry’s has something for everyone. Whether visiting for a leisurely lunch or dinner, winding down after work, or catching your favorite team on one of the flat screen TVs, Harry’s is perfect for any occasion. Open year round, enjoy an open-air atmosphere during warm weather months and encased glass and fire pit during cooler months. Visit both Harry’s locations, in Palomar Shopping Center and Hamburg.

Locals’ Craft Food & Drink

701 National Ave. | Lexington | 859.523.3249 | www.LocalsLex.com Everyone’s new favorite local hang-

out is Locals’! Nearly 1,500 square feet of patio is split into three unique sections. The rooftop seating is covered by large sails and offers a spectacular view while the downstairs patios have umbrellas for shade on sunny days. Locals’ is known around town for their white chicken chili and bourbon-brined wings. Their well-stocked bar can’t be missed, particularly their unique cocktails and wide selection of craft beers. Owners Seth Boyd and Billy Oakley invite everyone to stop by and enjoy their happy hour, featuring $1 off wine and select liquors from 4-6pm every day.

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BD’s Mongolian Grill

2309 Sir Barton Way | Lexington | 859.264.0686 | www.GoMongo.com Looking to “Stir it Up” this summer?

BD’s offers both an outdoor and indoor patio, perfect for summertime casual dining! Their adjustable garage doors and climate control make the indoor patio fabulous anytime. With 16 TVs, BD’s is a great destination for catching the big game, listening to their live music or enjoying their All Day Happy Hour and daily drink specials. Hungry? Their Create Your Own StirFry provides a bevy of options, from fresh vegetables to savory proteins. Cool off this summer with their frozen Mango Madness cocktail. From office lunches to backyard barbecues, BD’s catering will have you covered!

Life Brewpub

2628 Richmond Rd. | Lexington | LifeBrewPubLex.com Now Open: Life Brewpub offers

a fabulous beer garden experience that’s fantastic for weekend brunch or catching up with friends over dinner. Enjoy music, games and a relaxing atmosphere alongside Life Brewpub’s unique menu: don’t miss their daily food and drink specials! Their inhouse brewery means they can offer a beer list unlike any other in town. They also have house-made sodas and syrups and specialty made bitters, as well as organic house roasted coffee. Their menu features breakfast, lunch and dinner with vegetarian, vegan, gluten-free and kid-friendly options. Their space can be reserved for private parties, as well!

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Flowers (House) Patriotic ball cap (Bluetique) Ceramic lantern in red (Worlds Apart) Kentucky gingham bow tie in red, white and blue by Olly Oxen (Kentucky Branded) Ceramic canister in white and khaki with crab embellishment (My Favorite Things) Kentucky gingham belt in red, white and blue by Olly Oxen (Kentucky Branded) Red Koozie (Bluetique) Bikini in navy and red by Mainstreet Collection (Bluetique)

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Patriotic knee socks (Francesca’s at Lexington Green) Makers Mark flask by Smathers and Branson (Kentucky Branded) Sunglasses in white and gold (Francesca’s at Lexington Green) American headband (Francesca’s at Lexington Green) Z Strand necklace in pink agate with rhinestone flower by W&M (Bella Rose) Patriotic scarf /sarong (Bluetique) Rose pumps in red by Loft (Sassy Fox) JUNE 2016 | TOPS MAGAZINE

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Blue and white umbrella (Bluetique) State ball cap in blue by Port and Company (Kentucky Branded) Sandals with rhinestone in blue by Amanda (Jerome) Kentucky charm bracelet by Seasons Jewelry (Kentucky Branded) UK enameled cuff (My Favorite Things) Floatie water defender bag in orange by Dry Spell (Worlds Apart) Boy shark trunks by WB (Two Chicks) Blue cup (Bluetique) Keeneland wallet in blue by Longchamp (Keeneland Gift Shop)

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Bow Flip flops in blue by H2K (Two Chicks) Shark beach towel by WB (Two Chicks) Mineral moisture defense SPF 50 (Dillard’s) Swim trunks by Tommy Bahama (Dillard’s) Wine tote by Vineyard Vines (Keeneland Gift Shop) Kentucky serving dish (My Favorite Things) Y’all bottle koozie in blue (Kentucky Branded) UK Notecard set (My Favorite Things) Preppy striped fedora (Two Chicks)

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Bowtie baseball cap by Vineyard Vines (Howard & Miller) Wooden picture frame (House) Sunglasses by Maui Jim (Keeneland Gift Shop) Cigar case (Keeneland Gift Shop) Moonshine cologne (Keeneland Gift Shop) Needlepoint bowtie belt by Asher Riley (Howard & Miller) Leather travel accessory case (Keeneland Gift Shop) 39mm Rolex Explorer with a black dial (Shelia Bayes Fine Jewelers) Keeneland flask (Keeneland Gift Shop) Razor by Geo F. Trumpers (Howard & Miller)

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Shaving cream bowl by Geo F. Trumpers (Howard & Miller Shaving brush by Geo F. Trumpers (Howard & Miller) Tan suede shoe by Peter Millar (Keeneland Gift Shop) See Turtles swim trunk by Peter Millar (Howard & M ller) Leather portfolio in brown (Keeneland Gift Shop) Penny deck shoe by Peter Millar (Howard & Miller) Golf boxer shorts by Vineyard Vines (Howard & Miller) Clock (House) Grilling utensils (House) Cocktail Collection T-Shit by Southern Marsh (Howard & Miller) Brown leather flip flop (John’s New Classic)


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Paisley kimono by Lagaci (Sash & Bow) Decorative set of three boxes with gold tray (Norwalk by K&T Interiors) Fedora (Francesca’s at Lexington Green) Flip flops in nude by T Kees (Bluetique) Gladiator sandal in black by Dolce Vita (Evereve at Lexington Green) Leather Lexi sandal in sandstorm by Toms (Olive You) Pure Color lip and cheek in Summer Glow by Estee Lauder (Dillard’s) Aviator sunglasses (Monkee’s) Fringe leather cross body bag in khaki (Two Chicks)

10 Cuff bracelet in sterling silver, black rhodium, and blue enamel, featuring black freshwater pearls and white sapphires by MCL Design (Shelia Bayes Fine Jewelers) 11 Turquoise cuff (sassy fox) 12 Cuff bracelet in sterling silver, black rhodium, blue enamel and white sapphires by MCL Design (Shelia Bayes Fine Jewelers)

13 Headband with flowers (Bluetique) 14 Headband with beads (Francesca’s at Lexington Green) 15 Necklace by Kendra Scott (Você) 16 Belt (Você) 17 Follow Your Heart wall art ( House) 18 Denim shorts by Mabi (Sash & Bow)

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Candy Kiss perfume by Prada (Dillard’s) Red belt (Jerome) Sun hat in black (Two Chicks) Pearl bracelet (Rose & Lime) Pure Color lip and cheek in Fuscia Lights by Estee Lauder (Dillard’s) Noir crystal long necklace by WEILL (Carl Meyers) One piece bathing suit in black by Kenneth Cole Reaction (Dillard’s)

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Chevron dangle earrings in red (Sassy Fox) Tortoise shell sunglasses in black by Prada (Dillard’s) Juicy shaker Bohemian Raspberry by Lancôme (Dillard’s) Rose handbag in red (Cotton Patch) Straw hat in white with black trim by C.C. Exclusives (Cotton Patch) Water bottle in zebra print by Swell (Monkee’s) Lauren sandal in black by Jack Rogers (Monkee’s)

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SUPER MOM

Heather Wehrheim Maddie + Lilly + Greyson

As a single parent, working two jobs, including being the advocacy director for the American Lung Association and raising three kids, Heather Wehrheim often feels like she and her kids are running from one thing to the next. While Heather doesn’t claim running as her mom super power, she has found that working out and lifting weights keeps her sane. “I’d like to say I have fine tuned all of it from work to heath to family obligations, but as a mom I usually put others before myself,” she says. “I have learned that I have to build in time to workout everyday even if it means getting up at 4:30 a.m. That is how I keep my sanity, which makes me a better mom.” Heather is up early to workout and make it home from the gym by 6:30 a.m. to make lunches and get her three kids, Maddie, Lilly and Greyson, to school on time. She is then off to the office or to the capitol to lobby. If Heather isn’t working overnight in Nashville,

you can find her picking up one of the kids from swim team, cooking dinner or helping with homework. While the kids get ready for bed, Heather gets everything ready to do it all again the next day. “I used to work with single moms, but never thought that I would be one myself,” says Heather. “I never feel like I have enough hours in the day to do all that I need to do for my children. However, when I lay my head on my pillow at night, I know that every decision I make is with their best interests and futures in mind.” When the Wehrheim family isn’t at work, at school or on their way to one of their many activities like swim team, chorus, basketball, baseball or dance, they enjoy spending time together. They love to hike, swim, shop and have movie nights as a family. It is important to Heather that she raises her kids to be independent and strong. More importantly, she wants them to grow up to be loving individuals.

Written by Sarah Boerkircher | Images courtesy of Heather Wehrheim and Keni Parks

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Buf Best Friends :

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t is forgiven when we temporarily dump our bffs, having recently found ourselves with Mr. or Ms. Right in the early days of the relationship. It is the responsibility of the friends to be forgiving when our heads are floating gleefully in the clouds. It is also reasonable of an old friend to allow us to tell sickening stories of our newfound bliss over and over again‌ in the early days. But always remember that if Mr. or Ms. Right turns out to be Mr. or Ms. Right Now, our precious friends are the ones that will be there to pick us up and help mend our broken hearts. Friends are our chosen families. People that we look to for laughter, honesty, support and so much more. If you were born with a deadbeat sibling, with whom you have nothing in common, there are millions of options out there in the world to help fill that void.

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Filly of the Month:

Katy Ross

Profile by Jen Roytz | Photos by Keni Parks

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orn in Charleston, South Carolina and raised here, there and pretty much everywhere, thanks to her father’s career with the U. S. Navy, Katy Ross and her family were never in one place for very long. With new schools, surroundings and friends every few years, in many ways Katy’s life was anything but consistent. The one area in which she was unwavering, however, was her love of horses. Over the years, that love evolved from riding and being around horses to working on their behalf in the areas of welfare, legislation, youth education and more as the Executive Director of the Kentucky Horse Council. GROWING UP A NAVY BRAT For reasons yet-to-be discovered, some people are born with what’s commonly referred to as “the horse gene,” and Katy definitely had it. “I gravitated to horses from day one,” said Katy. “Nobody else in the family was really into them. I really can’t explain it, but I loved them.” When she was seven or so, her family was relocated to Maine and, after significant prodding, begging and pleading, signed her daughter up for riding lessons at a local barn to see if she liked it. She not only liked it, but loved it. Through moves from Maine to Hawaii, then to California and then onto Tennessee, Katy stayed in the saddle, thanks to her mom, who always sought out a new riding stable for Katy each time they relocated. Katy attended the University of the South, where she rode on the school’s equestrian team, and majored in political science with a minor in French. It wasn’t until a chance conversation with her coach, however, that Katy found clarity as to what she wanted to do with her degree and career. “My coach made the comment one day that she needed to hire an equine attorney. I didn’t even know those existed,” said Katy. Katy made the move to Lexington, Kentucky to attend law school at the University of Kentucky, graduating in 2009.

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Upon graduation she landed a job with Regard Law Group, a Lexingtonbased firm specializing in equine law. After four years with the firm, Katy accepted a position with the Kentucky Department of Financial Institutions as a staff attorney, but soon realized she couldn’t find or create the same passion she had for equine law in the world of banking law. “I was feeling depressed and frustrated with my career and looking for not just any change, but the right change,” said Katy. “A friend of mind mentioned to me that the Kentucky Horse Council position was open and I applied. It seemed like everything I wanted to do rolled into one job.” STANDING UP FOR KENTUCKY’S HORSES AND HORSEMEN An affiliate of the American Horse Council based in Washington, DC, the Kentucky Horse Council serves as a leader in the equine community in the areas of equine welfare, education, legislation and community outreach. At the helm of the non-profit organization since April of 2015, Katy is in a position to truly make a difference in the lives of horses and humans alike. “We do a lot of health and welfare work, dealing with sheriff’s deputies and animal control. We offer training seminars for government officials and first responders to teach them how to deal with emergency situations and cases of neglect. We hold gelding and wellness clinics in Eastern Kentucky in conjunction with the ASPCA and Humane Society, we have a seat on several state boards and committees, and I fill those most of the time,” said Katy. “We also take the education portion of our mission statement pretty seriously, especially when it comes to youth education, and are involved with agriculture education programs throughout the state.” One of the more well-known initiatives facilitated by the Kentucky Horse Council is the Save Our Horses welfare fund. Donations to the fund are used for Kentucky Horse Council-driven financial assistance plans, such Equine Safety Net, which assists horse owners who have temporary financial setbacks, such as job loss or medical incident, and are having trouble affording to feed their horses. The program will provide feed for 30 days in order to give the individual time to financially recover or make long-term arrangements for their horses. Every day most Lexingtonians see the Kentucky Horse Council’s largest revenue generator without ever realizing its significance. Proceeds from the popular Kentucky foal license plate, which feature

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an image of a baby horse resting in the grass, go directly to the Kentucky Horse Council to fund their initiatives. “All of the license plate funds go to programming that supports our mission statement,” said Katy, “whether it be hosting one of the trainings, like Large Animal Emergency Rescue, directly into the Save Our Horses funds or purchasing supplies for the mobile ag education trailers.” COMMUNITY ORIENTED After spending her childhood moving from one place to another, Katy is spending her adulthood putting down roots in her adopted home of Lexington. A board member of the Kentucky Hunter Jumper Association, committee member for Derby Eve Lexington and a member of the Junior League of Lexington, Katy stays busy. Her biggest responsibility outside of work this summer is serving as the chairman of this year’s Lexington Junior League Charity Horse Show, the biggest fundraiser of the year for the women’s volunteer and community activism organization. “We’re back at the Red Mile for the eightieth year and we have a lot planned this year. The show will open on the Fourth of July and run through the ninth,” said Katy. “We’ll have live bands on the apron on Monday and Friday nights and lots of activities throughout the week for people to stop by with their families and friends to enjoy an old Lexington tradition. Not to mention, it’s fun to come out and have a beer or a glass of wine and watch horses show with the backdrop of the Lexington skyline.” The show, which raises more than $200,000 each year, is the world’s largest outdoor American Saddlebred show, and the first leg of the “Saddlebred Triple Crown.” “I joined the Junior League in law school and always loved that their biggest fundraiser was a horse show,” said Katy. “The Junior League focuses on raising money for initiatives that benefit women and children and you can see the tangible results of our work in the community.” Life often has a way of coming full circle. The one-time Navy brat who used horses to help her find her way as she bounced from one city and state to the next still uses her love of the horse as a compass to guide her. “My love for horses drives what I do. It’s really influenced every major decision I’ve ever made in my life,” said Katy. “Lexington is my home. I have such a great network of people here and the city of Lexington has so much to offer. We truly are in the Horse Capital of the World.”•


Colt of the Month:

Lee Carter

Profile by Jen Roytz | Photos by Keni Parks

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exington is home to enough hidden jewels to string up a fancy necklace and a pair of earrings to match. One of the brightest gems is surely the Rolex Kentucky ThreeDay Event, an Olympic caliber equestrian event held each spring at the Kentucky Horse Park. It might surprise you to know, however, that the man at the helm of North America’s premier eventing competition is a self-described equestrian novice. “I know nothing about horses…but I’m learning,” said Lee Carter, Executive Director for Equestrian Events Inc. (EEI), the non-profit company which puts on the Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event each year. Lee accepted the position with EEI in 2012 after 13 years working for Host Communications in the Association Management division, where he soon served as the Senior Director of Operations for the National Tour Association, and before that as the Events Manager at the Lexington Center Corporation, which includes Rupp Arena, Heritage Hall and the Lexington Opera House under its banner of venues. “I truly enjoy event management, so when EEI announced that they were looking for an executive director to manage their signature event, I felt like I had about 90% of what they were looking for,” said Lee. “I learned event management from the ground up at Georgetown College when I was the event manager for their newly constructed East Campus facilities and the Bengals were starting to do their training there. Then I gained perspective working for the Lexington Center, understanding industry expectations and following established procedures. Those experiences prepared me to handle large-scale events in major cities for the National Tour Association.” His role with the National Tour Association required a rigorous travel schedule, making it difficult for him to spend enough time with his wife and two sons at their Georgetown, Kentucky home. “I was ready for the next challenge in my career. Plus, having two boys at home at the ages they were (then 12 and 8-years-old)…I was ready to scale back on traveling,” said Lee.

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TAKING ON RK3DE The Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event is the only 4* (read “four star”) event in North America and one of only six such events in the world. Likened to Grade 1 caliber in Thoroughbred racing, a 4* equestrian event is Olympiclevel competition. “Eventing is like the triathlon of equestrian sports, with riders competing in dressage, crosscountry and jumping,” explained Lee. “For the competitors, competing at the Rolex Kentucky Three-Day event is like playing in the World Series or the Final Four. It’s the pinnacle competition for eventing riders in North America.” While he has never navigated a cross-country course on horseback or performed a dressage test, Lee is quick to praise the riders who compete at the Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event for their commitment, well-honed skills and no-holds-barred bravery. “I have a real appreciation for what these people do. To compete at this level, there’s a certain dedication there. If you are going to compete at Rolex Kentucky, this is more than a hobby. They are majorly committed to what they do personally, financially and emotionally,” said Lee. “I’m truly amazed by what they do. There are jumps I wouldn’t want to crawl off of with a ladder much less launch over on the back of a horse.” But Rolex Kentucky isn’t just for those involved in equestrian sports. The event, which has been steadily gaining popularity in recent years, has made a variety of new additions to its schedule that appeal to a wider range of people. “Lexington has a huge tailgating culture, so we introduced tailgating on cross country day (Saturday) in 2011 and it’s grown tremendously since then. You can park near the jumps and galloping lanes, bring your own food and drinks, grill out and enjoy the atmosphere in an entirely new way. It’s really turned into a key piece of the event,” said Lee. “This year we also hosted a 5K on Friday night and had 700-800 runners and the last several years we’ve partnered with Maker’s Mark to produce commemorative bottles that we auction off and donate the proceeds to local charities. We try to introduce our event to a broader audience and these add-ons have helped us engage the local community.” With an estimated eighty percent of the event’s attendees coming from out of state, the Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event is a major

tourism draw for Lexington and the surrounding areas. An event of that size and scope can’t be put on without significant volunteer and community support. It’s hard to believe that the person chosen to take on the management responsibilities of an international Olympic-level equestrian competition came from outside the sport. However, Lee is quick to note that it takes many people to produce this event. “We have 26 board members and more than 2,000 volunteers and this event would not happen without their support,” said Lee. “We also have eight full-time staff members, including myself, who work year-round to put this event on.” Lee and his staff work hard to make sure the Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event not only draws new crowds each year, but holds their interest and converts them into repeat customers. “We are continually striving to offer an unparalleled experience for our competitors, spectators and volunteers,” said Lee. “People have a choice as to where to spend their discretionary dollars. I want to make sure they feel they’re getting a good value for money and provide an event they’ll want to come back to year after year.” BEING A COMMUNITY-ORIENTED FAMILY MAN Lee and his wife, Laura, who works as a physical therapist at Cardinal Hill Rehabilitation Center, have lived in Georgetown, Kentucky for more than twenty years and enjoy being part of the community. Lee is the chairman of the Georgetown/Scott Country Tourism Commission and serves on the board of directors for both the Bluegrass Sports Commission in Lexington and the Georgetown/Scott County Chamber of Commerce. The pair are parents to two boys, both of whom have no shortage of extracurricular commitments filling up their (and their parents’) schedules. “Eli (16) and Graham (12) both play soccer on local travel teams, so Laura and I are at soccer fields four to five days a week,” said Lee. “I got to see a lot of things and gain valuable experience with my job with the National Tour Association, but I traveled extensively and was away from my family often. I was ready to scale that back, and the opportunity with EEI and Rolex has been better than I could have imagined for both my career and my family.”•

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TOP SHOTS | SOCIE T Y

Derby Party Squad

Ralph Coldiron and Bill Clinton

Lexington Womens Club April In Paris

An Old Kentucky Garden Party

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Thank you Big Bertha!


TOPS in Lexington Magazine, June 2016  

Our Sensational Summer issue includes sizzling summer accessories, Derby recap and dining al fresco. Enjoy!

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