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TOPS AROUND TOWN 29 Out & About 30 TOPS December Preview Party I 32 TOPS December Preview Party II 34 Taste of Bluegrass Hospitality 36 Bell Bottom Boogie Bash 38 Saint Joseph Stars Gala I 40 UK College of Dentistry Annual Wine Tasting

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42 National Philanthropy Day Luncheon 44 Holiday Fashion Day 168 Kidney Health Alliance of Kentucky Preview Party 170 7th Annual Jingle Bell Bash Hosted by Young Friends of the Bluegrass Conservancy I 172 7th Annual Jingle Bell Bash Hosted by Young Friends of the Bluegrass Conservancy II 174 Good Giving Gala, Bluegrass Community Foundation I 176 Good Giving Gala, Bluegrass Community Foundation II 178 Lexington Philharmonic Progressive Dinner 180 Bourbon Barrel Project on Town Branch 182 Turner Christmas Party 184 GLAA Apartment Association 194 TOP Shots

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IN EVERY ISSUE 23 Up & Coming 52 Etiquette & Entertaining: Selfie 55 Parties: Party Planning for the New Year 57 Posh Paws: Memories of Tillie 58 Family: I’m on a Low Stress Diet 138 Sports: A First Year Review of the Stoops Regime 139 New Businesses 164 Lifestyle: Game On 167 Gardening: Grow Your Own Super Foods 186 Fashion: The Wintery Mix 192 Weddings: Bouquets of Bling

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138 The views and comments expressed by the authors are not always that of our editors or publishers. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this publication, TOP Marketing Group accepts no responsibility or liability for any errors, omissions or resultant consequences, including any loss or damage arising from the reliance on information in this publication. All images contained in TOPS in Lexington Magazine are subject to copyright of the artist or photographer as named, but not limited thereto. Reproduction of any part of this magazine without prior written permission is prohibited.

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Dining

P

eople in Lexington love a good meal. As our restaurant scene continues to expand, that seems pretty obvious. But thanks to a great resurgence and evolution of the beloved food truck, we are finding out that a restaurant doesn’t have to have walls, tables and chairs to offer up a plate of food packed with flavor. While a handful of food trucks have gained popularity since popping up on Lexington’s streets a few years ago, some have expanded their scope to have their cuisine not just offered on four wheels, but also behind four walls. Such is the case for the Athenian Grill, a place where outstanding Greek cuisine is the norm and its new brick-and-mortar location only seems to confirm its popularity with Lexington foodies. Before the Athenian Grill opened in its new permanent location in the heart of Chevy Chase, the idea merely existed as a possible dream of owner and native Greek Ilias Pappas. He immigrated to the states for his education, attending Lexington Community College and UK before heading further south to Florida International University. While he worked in the technology field at one point, he eventually found his way back to food and worked in numerous restaurants in Miami, including Carpaccio and the Ritz-Carlton Hotel. Of course, this shouldn’t be a surprise given his native culture. “It’s like that ‘My Big Fat Greek Wedding’ movie. We talk about food all the time,” Pappas said. The people in his family who shared Pappas’ passion were his aunt and uncle, George and Louiza Ouraniou. He helped them with their catering business while he was in college, and when his uncle passed away, he moved back to Lexington permanently to be with his family and to eventually help fulfill a shared dream. First came the food truck and catering business, which catered to parties as large as 300 while becoming an appetizing sight at Thursday Night Live as well as local breweries Country Boy Brewing and West Sixth Brewery. Now, Athenian Grill, which opened this past summer at the former location of Belle’s Bakery, offers an expanded Greek menu with a bit more ambience. The quaint, two-story space has a trio of white tables and blue chairs on the floor with exposed ceilings and naked light bulbs connected to snaky silver pipes above your head. The upstairs is where a single, reservation-only table sits where Pappas personally serves you a multi-course Greek meal family style. That being said, the downstairs is where all the action is, as people pile in during lunch and dinner rushes with a line out the door. It’s for good reason if you’ve tried the food. They have many traditional Greek dips served with pita bread like creamy tzatziki, scordalia (potato with olive oil and garlic) and classic hummus. They also have a roasted red pepper hummus that’s fantastic, with a flavorful kick of pepper and garlic right up front and a texture you’ll have a hard time beating. Many people come in for a classic gyro, which can be served with lamb, chicken, souvlaki (grilled pork tenderloin skewer), sausage or vegetarian. While I won’t argue with that choice, you would be doing your self a disservice if you didn’t try one of their traditional Greek specialties. The spanikopita, Greek spinach pie with phyllo dough and feta, was picked dry before my visit ended, and I saw plenty of patrons go for the Cypriot meatballs, with ground beef, veal, onion and paprika. Some of the restaurant’s heartier dishes will certainly be ideal as the temperature drops, whether it’s the pastitsio (Greek lasagna) with baked pasta and ground beef or the Greek beef stew, with grass-fed beef that falls apart on the fork served in tomatoes sauce served with roasted potatoes. My personal favorite was the mousaka, with sautéed eggplant layered with beef and lamb in a béchamel sauce that was brimming with fresh herbs. Big things come in small packages when it comes to Athenian Grill’s fresh-baked desserts, which include classics like flaky and rich baklava, the super moist melomakarona with honey and a welcome bit of spice and the kourabiedes (Greek wedding cookie) with nuts and coated in a downpour of powdered sugar. Pappas’ dream has certainly become even better than he expected with his new restaurant while the food truck and catering side of his business continues to grow. In addition to emphasizing bringing an authentic taste of his Greek heritage in dishes with fresh, local ingredients, he thinks there’s more that accounts for the Athenian Grill’s popularity. “The key to our success is that we try our best every day,” Pappas said. “We want to make sure everybody walks out of here happy.” Owner Ilias Pappas

859 303 5048

3 3 S Ashland Ave

atheniangrilllex com

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Etiquette & Entertaining

selfie by Sue Ann Truitt Etiquette & Entertaining Consultant

The word ‘selfie’ is the number one new word of 2013 selected to be added to the Oxford Dictionary. The meaning of the slang term is a photo taken of one’s self for the purpose of uploading to a social networking site. Could the mention of selfie refer to the obsession with self or selfish? Certainly it conjures thoughts of self. In this New Year of 2014, there are many resolutions you make; to lose those extra holiday pounds, to improve your fitness level, to try a new hair style or to de-clutter your house. This time of the year the focus is on YOU. In the self improvement analysis, consider the restructure of the total self – the way you look and the way you act. In actions, nothing speaks more loudly than good manners. Have good manners been allowed to let slide? It is time to spruce up the total YOU.

son would rather be someplace else or that he is looking for someone more exciting. • Talking constantly while not giving others an opportunity to respond. • Not sitting at the table until everyone is finished with the meal. • Beginning to eat before everyone at the table is served. This is very common, even by people who should know better. It appears that knowing good manners and practicing them are not the same. Proper etiquette is a very important area of the total person which needs attention. Look around and observe how many need to improve. Resolve to incorporate better manners into the New YOU in the New Year!

A poll had been taken of over 50 Lexingtonians of all ages. The following are their responses to: What well known good manners need a subtle reminder? • Putting elbows on the table, bar etc. Many think comfort is of the utmost importance and if being comfortable means leaning on the table, then it is alright. Not so! • Talking on a cell phone or texting while driving. The cemeteries are full or drivers who thought it was once alright. Not so! • Talking on a cell phone or texting in a restaurant at the table. It is rude – there is no other way to explain it. If there is an emergency, then excuse yourself and go outside or to the foyer. • Not replying to an invitation in a timely fashion. This response was given by at least 20% of those polled. So, it is a problem in Lexington and perhaps in many other places. There are very few reasons not to respond. If the reply is going to be late, call to say that the reply will be forthcoming and why. A RSVP means to reply whether you will be attending or regretting. A regret shows the invitation was received and is acknowledged. • A rriving at a party when there has been no reply to the invitation. Today’s parties often involve a caterer who has been given a guest number 4 to 5 days or more ahead. Also, a party could have place cards, seating charts, table gifts, etc. How embarrassing! If the person thinks one more doesn’t matter – Not so! • Not looking at the person when talking to them. It gives the person who is trying to listen the feeling that the per-

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Photo by Wes Wilcox


Parties

Party Planning for the New Year by Deanna Talwalkar Party Planner Extraordinaire

Now that the holidays are over and all of your Christmas decorations have been packed away, it’s time to start organizing. One area that you might not initially consider when organizing for the new year is your entertaining plans. Just like January is the ideal time to organize your house, it’s also a great time to evaluate how you’ll tackle entertaining for the next year. With just a few steps, you can get organized for a year’s worth of stress-free entertaining. Get out your calendar Look through your calendar for upcoming birthdays and other special events. Knowing in advance when you’ll be hosting big events will help you be prepared. If a wedding or other large scale party is scheduled for this year, you can also start making your budget for the event. Looking at your calendar can also help you formulate a plan for events that fall only a few weeks apart. For example, if your child’s birthday is just one week before Easter this year, having an advance warning will keep the events from overwhelming you. Also, if you’ve always wanted to host a certain type of party, such as a Derby Party, but have never had the chance to do so, this is a good time to mark off the date on your calendar. Scheduling the party ahead of time will give you ample time to plan.

for parties. For example, pink and red items are always on clearance after Valentine’s Day. It’s a perfect time to shop for upcoming birthday parties or play dates for little girls. Looking for party supplies in advance will also allow you to compare prices, avoid last minute purchases, and score better deals on the items you need. Assess your party supplies If you hosted any parties at your house over the holidays, you probably have a few items you need to replace. Whether you have a broken wine glass, a hand towel that is starting to fade, or not quite enough serving bowls, make a list of the objects that need to be replaced. To organize your supplies, first, examine your napkins and table cloths. Throw out any stained or ripped linens. If there are table cloths you no longer use, it is a good time to donate them. Second, inspect your collection of serving dishes and drinkware. Make a note of any items that need to be replaced. Since stores often offer discounts on home goods at the beginning of the year, now is a great time to look for new items. Organizing your entertaining supplies and planning the next year’s parties now will make party planning much easier and smoother in the long run.

Start searching for inspiration Knowing which parties you have planned for the upcoming year will also allow you to start brainstorming for party ideas. Magazines, blogs, and books all provide great inspiration for party decorations and recipes. If you have already decided on a few decorations or centerpiece ideas for a party, you can begin to shop around for the items you will need. Shop in advance Once you have a list of your upcoming events, you can be on the look out for good deals. After holiday sales are a great time to purchase items

Photos & Styling by Mirabelle Creations

To download the party planning checklist shown here, visit topsinlex.com/Read/4802/Party+Planning+for+the+New+Year

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Family

I’M ON A LOW STRESS DIET by Hallie Bandy

over

Motherboard

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I’ve never been much for New Year’s resolutions. Honestly, if something is worth doing, why wait until January?

Do I emulate her? Absolutely. Can I keep up? Doubtful. And so I ignore cobwebs until I have time to dust. Or funds to hire a cleaning service.

Still, it’s hard to avoid the “what’s your new year’s resolution” conversation this time of year. And, taking time to evaluate my life’s trajectory is healthy. So, I’ll play.

I leave a little early in the morning to avoid the morning carpool congestion at my kids’ schools. They don’t enjoy getting out of bed five minutes early; it’s their gift to me.

Judging from television commercials and web ads, losing weight and/or getting in shape is at the top of many people’s lists. Who couldn’t benefit from a few new eating and exercise habits? But, like so many others, my tendency to overeat and skip the daily exercise regimen is usually due to incessant issues of stress and lack of time. I’ve often looked to women I emulated for inspiration. What if I could somehow morph into a combination of Laura Ingalls Wilder and Martha Stewart: hardworking, industrious, creative? What if I could actually make and do all the pins on my Pinterest account? Don’t we all just want to be so much more productive? My Grandmother was a working mother who cared for her parents as a young mother. She was up before dawn most days to milk the family goat. The milk was in the separator by the time her daughters woke for breakfast. When I was young, she was running her own business. No longer caring for her parents, she would often care for me when I was sick, so my own working mother did not have to take time off. It’s easy to look at the results of these women’s lives and think I am missing something. Fact is, I am. I am missing the reality, they are human, just as I am. I see the highlights of others’ lives on the glossy pages of a magazine, through a rose-colored lens of warm memories, or on a Facebook timeline. But I miss the moments of stress and fatigue—the feelings of failure that everyone experiences, but so many of us hide. So, a few years ago, I decided to make reducing stress and making more time for myself my goal for the year. I decided to allow myself to be human. I’ve quit beating myself up for not keeping up with Martha Stewart— or my Grandmother.

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Sometimes I allow myself to hibernate, rather than face the cold for a morning run. And sometimes I walk instead of run. Sometimes I stop for the day before I’ve gotten through the to-do list. Sometimes it’s pajama day. And I add a little Kahlua to my coffee. I’ll admit, I haven’t lost as much weight as I’d like to, and there are more than a few items on my bucket list that I need to get to. But now that the pressure is off, I enjoy the process more. It’s the best diet I’ve ever been on.


Inspiration

a schedule of a few hours a day, increasing the hours as the weeks progressed,” she said. A native of Rhode Island, Abbott is the human resources manager for a large defense contractor in Newport. “I'm back to work, part time,” she said, “and slowly getting my life back to the way it used to be, thanks to all of the advancement in prosthetics.” In addition to physical therapy, she is going to the gym regularly for group fitness classes with weights, and is looking forward to getting back into kickboxing or Zumba. As of last November, Abbott has four different prosthetic legs. The first, a flat-foot leg, is the one she wears most often. It has an adjustable ankle so she can wear ballerina flats or sneakers. She has a waterproof leg for the shower and the pool. A high-heel leg accommodates her four-inch heels, with a cosmetic "skin" that looks just like her real leg. And she has a running blade. “This is my coolest looking leg and is so fun to bounce around on,” she said. “It's tough getting used to running on it, and it's somewhat painful as I'm learning, but I am determined to get the hang of it and get back out there running by the mansions in Newport.” Abbott will see thousands of runners in Lexington at the end of March, as she is the invited guest of honor at the 2014 Run the Bluegrass Half-Marathon at Keeneland. “I'm really looking forward to my first visit to Kentucky in March,” she said, “and to meeting some of the folks who have been so kind in supporting me.” Organizers are treating her to a total VIP weekend, and the halfmarathon is donating $1,000 from the race proceeds to Abbott’s medical expense fund. “Every runner has the option to donate a few dollars,” said race director Eric Patrick Marr. “We’re on pace to donate $10,000.” Abbott is thrilled to be the half-marathon’s guest of honor. “I am flattered to be chosen to represent those who were injured in the Boston Marathon bombing last spring,” she said, “and I am so appreciative of the fundraising that has resulted.”

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Not only is the Boston Marathon the oldest 26.2-mile run in the world—it began in 1897—but it’s the standard for marathoners. “You have to qualify,” Lexington’s Marr said. “You have to be really fast.” Two of his good running friends, Gary Cremeans and Thomas Finsand, came up with the idea to invite someone affected by the bombing at Boston to the half-marathon in Lexington. “We wanted to personally do something for Boston,” Marr said. “There’s no better way than personally doing something for one individual.” The Lexington runners reached out to Abbott through One Fund Boston, a nonprofit organization providing financial assistance for those affected by the tragedy. Abbott’s name will be on the back of the Run the Bluegrass runners’ Nike shirts and she will autograph Blanton’s bourbon bottles. Since 2012, Run the Bluegrass has partnered with a different bourbon each year, like Maker’s Mark and Knob Creek, to create a special label. This year Buffalo Trace will have a special bottle of Blanton’s bourbon. It’s one of the touches that sets apart Run the Bluegrass, which is billed as “America’s prettiest halfmarathon.” While most races are run in a downtown urban environment, the 13.1-mile Run the Bluegrass course is unique. Runners have a view of dozens of gorgeous horse farms, including Donamire, Stonestreet and Calumet. The course is closed to traffic, so spectators are encouraged to wait at Keeneland, with the race expo and food trucks. Another standout feature of Run the Bluegrass is the medals for the finishers. They’re designed with a different Thoroughbred each year, from Secretariat in 2012 to Genuine Risk last year. The 2014 finisher medal will feature Zenyatta on the front, and the ribbon will be in pink and teal, the colors of her racing silks. Run the Bluegrass is the brainchild of Marr, founder of LeXenomics, a nonprofit dedicated to building a vibrant economy in Central Kentucky and branding Lexington in a positive light


Inspiration

throughout the country. The half-marathon is the biggest project of LeXenomics. First held at the Kentucky Horse Park in 2011, with 934 registered runners, since 2012 Run the Bluegrass has started and finished on the grounds of Keeneland. In 2013 there were 3,900 registered runners; the goal for 2014 is to have 5,000 people participating. For any runner setting a personal record, an engraved bourbon barrel stave awaits at the finish line. “Last year 40 percent of the runners came from outside Kentucky,

so it is a tourism event,” Marr said. Representing 43 states and 6 countries, the half-marathon runners in 2013 had an economic impact of about $400,000 for Lexington. As race director, Marr is a tad too busy to participate on race day, but he has run the 13.1-mile course around 30 times. “It’s so peaceful and beautiful,” he said of the Bluegrass countryside. “Even though it is challenging, it inspires you.”

To learn more about Heather Abbott and contribute to her medical expenses, visit www.GoFundMe.com/HeatherAbbott. To register for America’s prettiest halfmarathon on March 29, check out www.runthebluegrass.org. Registration is $85 through Jan. 15; then $90 through Feb. 15 and $95 through March 26.

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Fit, Fabulous & Over 40

42 ALI ROBINSON

INFORMATION SERVICES DIRECTOR; VETERAN

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s a United States Air Force Special Operations veteran and former personal trainer, you’d expect Ali to be the pinnacle of physical fitness. But after turning 39, Ali realized her body was changing. She’d hit a plateau and her slowing metabolism meant she was seeing no results after her workouts. She knew it was time to re-examine her overall lifestyle to discover a new path. Ali focuses on nurturing her mind, body and spirit. This single mother of two has plenty on her plate as an Information Services Program Director for a Software & Services Company, Public Relations Officer of the Tuskegee Airmen-Brigadier General Noel Parrish Chapter, volunteer at Lighthouse Ministries and a member of both the Professional Women’s Forum and the Air Force Association. “I create a realistic workout schedule and goals that support a balance between all commitments,” she explains. “My workout schedule is static. This routine helps me stick to my commitment.” She incorporates her family into her workout schedule; they stay active together at the Beaumont YMCA. For Ali, setting attainable goals and sticking to the commitment is the key to fitness success. She also believes it’s important to focus on the positive. “At the end of your workout, give yourself a huge hug and love,” Ali suggests. Ali’s personal mantra is: “Give your all, work hard to be your best and accept the rest. No one body is perfect or identical.”

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Fit, Fabulous & Over 40

DAREN TURNER CEO, AMTECK OF KENTUCKY DEVELOPER/OWNER, STERLING MEADOWS

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Daaren admits that he hasn’t always been fit. As boxer from ages 15-21, Daren broke both of

his wrists, his right foot and his right hand. Racing motocross for 9 years also took its toll on his body. He suffered a torn ACL, MCL and medial meniscus, as well as several concussions. In 2007, a plane crash broke two of his vertebrae and the whiplash resulted in arthritis in his back. “Needless to say, I rarely had the energy or desire to work out.”

After his company opened a gym and workout facility, he and his wife began running and working out with several coworkers. Together, they trained for a competition called “No Guts No Glory”. He joined Crossfit Maximus in June and began working out 4-5 days a week, often with his wife. “I’ve noticed a significant increase in my energy level, my attitude and my overall well-being.” Daren challenges himself to be fit for his family. “I also enjoy the added energy it brings that makes a difference each day with my wife and kids. I’m motivated to stay fit and healthy for their sake,” Daren explains. “We enjoy hunting, hiking, camping, water sports and skiing, all of which take a high level of fitness to accomplish, so I enjoy being fit in order to do these activities with my family!”

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Fit, Fabulous & Over 40

46 JOHN MULLINS CO-F0UNDER,/PRESIDENT MESA

“E xercise has always been important to me,” says John, Co-Founder and President of MESA Medical Group. “In my younger years, it had more to do with competing than wellness. I am a competitive person by nature and exercised in order to maximize my abilities in competitive sports.” In his youth, John participated in football, basketball, baseball and track. As he got older, though, John says that exercise became more of a way of life, a way to reduce stress and a means of continuing to participate in sports. Now, he enjoys skiing, golfing, running races and playing basketball. “I think one has to have feisty persistence in order to stay fit over the long term,” he explains.

He admits his life is busy, with his career, children and relationships. He remains focused on fitness nonetheless, refusing to let it fall by the wayside. “I make my health one of my top priorities and manage to find time in most days to focus on it,” he says. “I have noticed that most people that do not maintain their level of fitness consistently do so because they are too quick to make excuses for not making their exercise routine a priority in their life.” John wants to stay fit to stay healthy, avoiding disease and chronic health problems at all costs. He says, “I want to stay active the remainder of my life and do all in my power to delay the aging process.”

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Fit, Fabulous & Over 40

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LISA HINKLE

MEMBER, MCBRAYER MCGINNIS LESLIE AND KIRKLAND CHAIR, HEALTH LAW DEPARTMENT

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eing involved deeply with community health is one of Lisa’s most important commitments. She works with the Bourbon County YMCA and is chair of the Pioneering Healthy Communities Program, which addresses childhood obesity. She works with the Bourbon County Department of Health and has a strong passion for Hospice of the Bluegrass. Her work with these organizations has highlighted for her the importance of fitness. “I think exercise and fitness is crucial for health,” Lisa says. “My work with childhood obesity and my legal work in the health care area have educated me about how important being active and fit are.” Since she was a child, Lisa has been fencing, playing tennis, swimming, playing soccer and taking ballet/dance lessons. “Over the years, I have found exercise to be a great stress reliever as well as a great way to make friends,” Lisa explains. “Some of my best friends are step class buddies!” Lisa participates in rowing and cardio-barre classes at Sweat, spinning classes at Cycle You, doing Pilates with Shannon Slayton and working out with her trainer, Bambi Todd of Body Structure. “It takes a village to keep me active, interested and committed,” Lisa says. “We are blessed with so many wonderful exercise opportunities in Lexington.” Family is one of Lisa’s most important motivators. Lisa says, “I know the importance of being fit and I want my children to be fit and healthy so that they may live long healthy lives. I am motivated to set a good example for them.”

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Fit, Fabulous & Over 40

DAVID P. CLARK OWNER, CLARK LEGACY CENTERS

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Wemergency hen David suffered a heart attack in 2003, he underwent quadruple bypass heart surgery. One of the by-

passes collapsed six weeks later, resulting in a second heart attack. From then until January 2011, he had 12 stents to open other blockages. So in March of 2011, when his daughter asked if he’d like to run a 5K, David was hesitant. “My answer was no because running wasn’t something I liked to do and I didn’t feel physically capable of doing,” David explains. “She encouraged me to use an app on my phone called Couch to 5K. I started the next day and was amazed when I finished easily.” He ran his first 5K that August. David enjoys jogging, biking, doing Crossfit and participating in bootcamps. He says that variety is the key to his fitness success. “I get bored easily just doing the same type of exercise; with Crossfit it is something different every day,” David says. This husband, father of four and grandfather, tries to schedule his workouts as a regular part of his day. Since his work is unpredictable at times, he says he runs whenever a typical workout isn’t possible. David, who is involved with Central Kentucky Riding for Hope, tends four horses, a donkey, two dogs and 20 cattle. He attributes being able to keep up with it all to his fitness. “I believe that exercise has been a huge factor in overcoming my heart disease.”

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Fit, Fabulous & Over 40

DAVID A. ARNOLD ARTISTIC ENGINEER, MICHLER’S, ARTIQUE, BLUETIQUE, WORLDS APART AND CJ STAR BUSES

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Aknew fter damaging his hand on a table saw six years ago, David it was time for closer focus on his health. T’ai-chi Ch’üan

was the ladder he needed to climb to get out of that wellness rut. Over the last 25 years, David has redefined a T’ai-chi set he’s dubbed “The Neoclassical Long Form” and a set of longevity exercises he refers to as “Drinking From the Fountain of Youth”. Generally, David favors doing T’ai-chi somewhere surrounded by nature. “Anywhere, where I can settle in and enjoy a graceful set of T’ai-chi or a few minutes of Yi Ch’üan (Standing Meditation), while tuning in to all that is going on around me, is usually quite enjoyable,” David says, “but we do have somewhat nebulous boundaries, so stay tuned for David and Sonya’s T’ai-chi flash mobs at the Lexington Civic Center and other locations near you!” For two and a half years, David has been doing what he calls the “20 things diet”. He maintains a high fat intake (focusing on coconut oil and red palm oil) and high protein count, along with a low intake of carbohydrates. With five children and six grandchildren, David says he’s staying fit for his family and the future. “The unknown beautiful future awaits us and I want to see it! I want to play with my grandchildren’s children and be part of whatever world we are forging from the present,” he explains. “How enjoyable it is to be almost six decades old and still feeling as spry, strong and spunky as I did in my early thirties.”

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Fit, Fabulous & Over 40

59 TERRY BAKER HORSE FARMER

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fter a horse riding accident in 1990, Terry had Harrington rods surgically implanted to support her spine. She is also recovering from a double mastectomy and knee surgery. In spite of all of this, she says she’s still committed to her health. She past participated in the Turkey Trot, Reindeer Ramble, a marathon in Virginia and jumping her horse, Johnny Dollar (their record is 6’9”!) Terry loves being fit because it makes her feel good and keeps her mind sharp. For her, fitness has always been a way of life. “I have always been fit and I eat healthy,” Terry explains. She attends classes at the YMCA, swims, walks, does Pilates and works out with Pam, her instructor at the YMCA. She also attributes much of her fitness to farm work! In order to manage her schedule, Terry says she just keeps at it. “Keep moving from one activity to another,” this mother of one teenage daughter advises. By incorporating fitness into her daily schedule, there’s no chance she’ll push it aside. Terry, who owns Fairlawn Farm with her family, loves to snack on fruit, and occasionally splurges on frozen yogurt. Sharing her experience is how Terry likes to encourage others to get fit and maintain a healthy lifestyle. She volunteers with the Arthritis Foundation and in her spare time, enjoys horseback riding, and training horses. For anyone who wants to get fit, Terry’s advice is simple: “Join the Y!”

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Fit, Fabulous & Over 40

60 CINDER CONNERY RETIRED DENTAL HYGIENIST

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t age 45, Cinder broke her back while sledding and had to have Harrington Rods surgically implanted to protect her spine. She had another health setback at age 54 when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. Cinder underwent a double mastectomy. “After my cancer diagnosis, reconstructive surgery, and chemo, the staff at the [Beaumont YMCA] encouraged me and helped me with an individualized program that addressed my special needs,” she explains. “Through the process, I was able to recover quickly and discovered Pilates which has helped me rebuild and maintain my core.” She says she stays fit by participating in cardio classes, spinning, using free weights and laughing. “The majority of my time is spent at the Beaumont YMCA, for both physical and social activities, with almost daily stops at the Beaumont Library,” Cinder says. “In my spare time I enjoy traveling and exploring all that Lexington has to offer with family, friends, and neighbors.” This mother and wife of 30 years has worked with the Lexington Humane Society and participated in the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure, in spite of having a broken foot. Recently, she returned from a mission trip to Kenya with Assisting Better Living Everywhere. “As a cancer survivor, I think it is important to balance taking care of myself and finding joy in every day,” Cinder explains. “I exercise in the mornings then have the rest of the day to play.”

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Fit, Fabulous & Over 40

EDDIE BENTON

SENIOR PASTOR, ROSEMONT BAPTIST CHURCH

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Estarted ddie says he’s been fit since his college days. He running to get in shape and never stopped. He’s participated in 3 full Ironman triathlons, 8½ Ironman triathlons, 82 marathons and 50+ half marathons. In his career, he’s run over 94,000 miles, including 16 Boston Marathons. Not too shabby for a man who is managing hereditary high cholesterol with medication. Eddie says his goal is to finish 100 marathons and to log 100,000 miles of running.

This husband, father of two and grandfather is a pastor, Distance Coach for Henry Clay High School track team and FCA Chaplain for the Lafayette Football Team. He manages to do it all because it’s what he loves. “We find time for things we are passionate about,” Eddie explains. “Being fit helps me be a more effective Pastor and Christian. Also, I love to compete and stay fit.” Eddie’s diet consists of mainly chicken and fish, though he does eat some red meat. He enjoys salads, oatmeal and almonds, raw broccoli and Kashi cereal while avoiding fried foods. His favorite “splurge” food? Chocolate chip cookies. Eddie runs, bikes, swims, lifts weights and does core work. He runs early in the morning to pray and think about the day ahead, then works out with his wife in the evening. For others wanting to get fit, Eddie’s advice is to start slow, but get active. “Make it a part of your lifestyle,” he advises. “Anyone can do it.”

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Fit, Fabulous & Over 40

JOHN G. TAYLOR III SALESMAN, JOHN’S RUN/WALK SHOP RETIRED USAF HELICOPTER PILOT RETIRED HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER

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Wgethenfit. “IJohn’wanted s daughter was born in 1971, he decided he needed to to be able to climb Mt Everest with her, if it was one of her dreams,” John explains. “We did Ironman Louisville together, instead!”

In April 2000, he was struck from the rear by a pickup truck going over 50mph. The wreck broke his back, pelvis, left tibia and left fibula in multiple places. “I had 13 months of physical therapy before I could ride my bike again!” John has survived malignant melanoma and prostate cancer, but has nonetheless been a regionally competitive runner for over 40 years. He’s done 25 marathons/ultramarathons, he’s a member of the USA Triathlon Century Club for completing over 125 triathlons and completed two Ironman competitions, as well as the Ironman 70.3 World Championships in 2011. He loves staying fit and competitive. “I enjoy excelling as an age-group triathlete and/or runner,” John says. John works out at least 8 hours a week year-round. “I try to swim three times a week, run three times a week, ride a bicycle four times a week and lift weights or do Pilates three times a week,” John says. He also enjoys trail running, hiking and mountain biking in Colorado in the summer. He has ridden the Monarch Crest Trail and climbed 25 Colorado 14ers (mountains over 14,000 feet). “Today is the first day of the rest of your life!” John suggests, “Find someone who knows you well enough to provide advice that you will follow; set an achievable goal; and ‘just do it!’”

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Fit, Fabulous & Over 40

73 DAN SALYER RETIRED PHARMACIST

Iis tjusthelpsas committed to be Fit & Fabulous when your spouse to your goal as you are! Dan’s wife, Cinder, is also featured in this issue. The couple exercises together at the Beaumont YMCA. In his spare time, Dan says he enjoys “exercising, reading, traveling and volunteering for whatever my wife signs us up to do.” When Dan was just 17, his father passed away from a heart attack. He says he began exercising then and hasn’t stopped. By strengthening his back muscles, Dan has kept his scoliosis in check without treatment. Dan keeps his diet in a set ratio to ensure a steady balance. He tries to consume 60% proteins, 20% carbs and 20% healthy fats. His favorite snacks include almonds and protein drinks, but he enjoys an ice cream sundae once a week. He uses free weights, does spinning three times a week and does Pilates Reformer, which he’s very proud to say he started at age 70. He advises, “It is never too late!” Dan says he stays fit to keep up with his family. “All of my children are regular exercisers, and I hope it was because they saw a good example,” Dan says. He and his son attended former Mr. Olympia Lee Haney’s Animal Kingdom Bootcamp together. “Learn the correct way to perform whatever form of exercise you choose; take the time to do it correctly and remember that gains come slowly,” Dan suggests. “Sometimes ‘easier’ is much harder.”

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Fit, Fabulous & Over 40

76 SUSAN BRADLEY-COX

UK WILDCAT MASTERS HEAD SWIM COACH, USAT TRIATHLON HALL OF FAME, USAT TRIATHLON COACH, TNT TRIATHLON COCH

Singusan will be honored with induction into the Kentucky Athletic Hall of Fame, Class of 2013, durceremonies next June, 2014. In 2011, she was inducted into the USA Triathlon Hall of Fame’s class of 2010! Since 1989, Susan has participated in 22 International Triathlon Union World Championship events, earning 18 medals at 11 Age Group World Titles. In total, she has competed in more than 200 triathlons. Certainly, that’s no small feat! Arguably the most decorated female age-grouper in US triathlon history, Cox serves as the UK Wildcat Masters Swim Team Head Coach and is a USA Triathlon Certified Coach and Instructor of water exercise at Transylvania University. For her, being fit is something she’s never had trouble finding time for. “It is a way of life for me. Everyone can make time for anything they want to do,” Susan explains. “You just have to discipline yourself to continue.” Susan coaches triathletes for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s Team in Training events. She is also on the steering committee for Bluegrass Triathlon Club, swim coordinator for the Susan Bradley-Cox Tri for Sight triathlon and she volunteers for many local races and triathlon events. She enjoys swimming, biking, running, Pilates, TRX, yoga, cross country skiing, h2O jogging, hiking, ice skating and snow shoeing. This mother and grandmother says, “Whatever the season, I will find a reason to embrace it actively!” Susan enjoys many different activities, so she tries to do it all. “I just want to ‘keep on keeping on’ so I can continue exercising and working out with my friends,” Susan says. “Put one foot in front of the other… go and keep going!”

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Fit, Fabulous & Over 40

AUDREY B. ROBINSON ARTIST

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Talways his fifth degree black belt has had a relatively active life-

style. After undergoing various major cancer operations over the past 8 years, Audrey has found fitness, family and friends to be her key to staying motivated. “Fortunately rebounding [from cancer] has been good,” she says. “Having my martial arts practice and friends to return to has been invaluable.”

For the past 22 years, Audrey has been practicing Shaolin Martial Arts, including Tai Chi and Chi Kung with Master Hiang Thé. “It’s a very well rounded activity, touching many aspects of physical fitness and overall health, including mental,” she explains. She has taught Tai Chi and Tai Chi Sword in the past. Audrey is a member of the Markey Cancer Center Patient Advisory Group. She enjoys reading, writing, creating art, gardening, and Zen practice. This wife, mother of three and grandmother enjoys staying fit to “feel happier, healthier, agile and able.” She has studied piano and had Foibles, a comic and art book, published last year. Audrey balances all these commitments by playing it by ear. “A regular schedule isn’t my preference.” “My lifestyle has always been a relatively active one, fitness being just an extension of whatever was/is the current activity, from homesteading, swimming, sculpture to karate,” Audrey explains. For others seeking a fit and fabulous lifestyle, she advises, “Keep moving and enjoy yourself.”

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Fit, Fabulous & Over 40

JESSE SISKEN

PROFESSOR EMERITUS, UK COLLEGE OF MEDICINE

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t 83, Jesse says that one of his biggest accomplishments is maintaining his level of fitness for so long. He skis 2-3 weeks a year in the western mountains and travels. “What I enjoy doing gives me incentive to stay in decent shape,” Jesse explains. “Skiing at high altitudes—over 10,000 feet, sometimes—can be pretty demanding, even dangerous; especially for someone my age unless one is in reasonably good condition.” Jesse’s favorite ways to stay fit have varied over the years. He’s enjoyed working out at Flex Fitness, running, walking, bicycling and working with his personal trainer, Susan Wagers. He enjoys a low-fat, low-cholesterol diet. On his globe-hopping excursions, he skis and hikes; which for him, is the ultimate motivator. “The most important thing is to have a serious, demanding incentive for doing what needs to be done, whether it be a health or personal problem or a recreational activity,” Jesse says. Jesse flew small airplanes and gliders for more than 35 years. His current hobbies include writing, photography, travel and learning about ancient Greek history. His historical novel, set in 17th century BCE Greece, is now under review. He is also working with Ann St. Clair on a photo book of the Greek island of Skopelos, where part of the movie Momma Mia was made. For others wanting to get fit, Jesse has some advice. “First, have a heart-to-heart talk with yourself to decide if you really and truly want to do it,” Jesse suggests. “Then see a personal trainer who can help you begin to achieve your personal goals.”

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Renew You

Oculoplastic & Orbital Consultants 859.219.0299 | 771 Corporate Dr, Ste 460 dav dcowenmd.com Real women, real results. That’s the focus of Dr. David Cowen and the staff at Oculoplastic & Orbital Consultants. Dr. David Cowen is a highly-trained and specialized ophthalmologist and fellow of the prestigious American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery. “Victoria Secret’s fashion show, Real Housewives and the Hardee’s commercials... who can relate to these women? We wanted to showcase women that other women could relate to,” explains Robin Hammond. Meet Joan. Joan Stone is a 52 year-old wife, mother of four and grandmother of four. She was raised in a military family, living in Hawaii, Germany, Tennessee and Texas before settling down in Kentucky. She is second to youngest of six sisters, but has always been told she looks like the oldest. Joan’s journey with Oculoplastic & Orbital Consultants has included pharmaceutical grade skincare products, Botox, customized facial treatments and a CO2 full-face laser resurfacing. Joan said that this experience has changed her from the inside out. Follow Joan’s story and other Real Women on the Oculoplastic & Orbital Consultants website!

Elle Fitness 859.309.0836 839 Natona Ave, #120 e eftnessex.com Leigh-Ann Mims started Elle Fitness over 2 years ago, the home of BarreAmped in Lexington, Kentucky. Conveniently located in the heart of Lexington, Elle Fitness is the perfect place to get fit in 2014. BarreAmped is the ultimate fitnessoriented regimen based on modern and classical dance, Pilates, yoga and deep stretching, utilizing a barre. This intensive body shaping experience was designed to produce reliable results, no matter the client. Mims studied and worked under BarreAmped creator and international fitness celebrity Suzanne Bowen and was featured on her Slim and Toned Prenatal DVD. Each of the BarreAmped instructors at Elle Fitness are highly trained and form focused, giving clients the most effective 55 min at the barre.

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Renew You

Arthur Murray 859 278 77 80 Alexandria Dr Suite 32 lexingtonarthurmurray com This year, it’s time to try something different to stay in shape! Ballroom Dancing is fast becoming one of the most popular sports to lost weight, stay fit, and have fun! Dancing with or without a partner during a private lesson will burn an average of anywhere from 450 – 600 calories at a time. Most students find that dancing is the equivalent of walking a mile and a half! With so many different dances like Tango, Waltz, Rumba, Samba, and Quick Step, there is something for everyone. Take the first step – if you can walk, you can dance! Don’t miss the chance to enjoy learning to dance! Try a free private lesson and see how easy and fun it can be with Lexington’s favorite dance studio!

Patton Clinic 859.317.9045 2704 O d Rosebud Rd, Ste 230 pattonc n c.net Patton Clinic is proud to offer increased hours for appointments and a larger clinical staff! They have also improved their weight management program. Patton Clinic has expanded their areas of expertise. Their staff includes Barbara Slater APRN, Jacqueline Barclay APRN, Anthony McEldowney MD (Suboxone), Gary Patton MD (grief counseling) and Stevanie Smith M.Ed., NTCMCC, LCPA (VIP, DUI). Patton Clinic offers a variety of services to facilitate the journey toward wellness and balance, including treatment and counseling for weight loss, addiction, PTSD, ADD/ADHD, Bi-polar Disorder, mental health and evaluations. They strive to provide “the Science of Medicine with the Art of Living Well”. The staff at Patton Clinic recognizes the uniqueness of each individual’s road to recovery, whether healing from the stresses of

everyday life, psychiatric disorders, medical conditions, grief, addictions or the clustering of multiple conditions. For anyone curious about the services that Patton Clinic provides, including their weight loss solutions, the staff is always happy to take your call. Their highly trained physicians can create a custom care plan for any need.

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Dr. Fred Schroeder

859.276.5496 | 2401 Regency Rd schroederdent stry.wordpress.com With over 20 years of experience using sedation dentistry, Dr. Fred Schroeder has perfected the art of anxiety free dentistry. Dr. Schroeder is one of the first dentists in the Central Kentucky area to become Board Certified for the administration of moderate sedation. Halcion sedation is a simple, needle free form of sedation that provides a straightforward solution for many patients that experience anxiety associated with dental visits. Containing an amnesia component, Halcion is taken in pill form prior to dental appointments. Dr. Schroeder and his staff use extreme care, skill and judgment when monitoring each sedation patient to provide the most positive dental experience possible. Healthy and happy smiles are made easy at Dr. Schroeder’s office with the use of sedation dentistry.

Zounds Hearing of Lexington 859.278.1109 | 268 Southand Dr, Ste 100 | zoundshearng.com A father’s love revolutionized the hearing aid industry. Sam Thomasson, CEO and founder of Zounds Hearing, made a promise to his hearing impaired daughter, Kate, vowing to create a hearing aid that would solve many of the issues that traditional hearing aids created. What resulted from that promise were the world’s most technologically advanced hearing aids with 58 patents in acoustical engineering! Zounds eliminates up to 90% of unwanted noise and Zounds Dynamic Feedback Cancellation ends the squealing many traditional hearing aids produce. Zounds has developed a fully rechargeable hearing aid, which means no more changing batteries. Plus, Zounds replaces the rechargeable battery free for the life of the hearing aid. Zounds state-of-the-art hearing aids are missing one thing; the middleman markup that competitors tack on to their prices. Zounds offers outstanding pricing that represents substantial cost savings for a product that is superior in technology. They also offer free hearing exams!

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Renew You

Hamburg Vision Center 859.327.3701 | 2716 Od Rosebud Rd, Ste 130 hamburgvsoncenter.com Hamburg Vision Center is a primary eye care clinic and optical boutique located in the heart of Hamburg, across from My Favorite Things on Old Rosebud Rd. Hamburg Vision Center concentrates on pediatric and adult comprehensive eye exams, contact lens fittings, diabetic exams, glaucoma management and acute eye conditions. Dr. Karen Santos will ensure your comfort during the examinations. The optical boutique has an expansive selection of frames and sunglasses, which will suit even the most discerning patient. In order to keep up with the latest trends and fashions, the frame inventory is in a constant state of transition. Dr. Santos and office manager, Jessica Duerson, aspire to exceed the expectations and needs of you and your family. Most insurances are accepted.

Team Agape 859.368.3510 | 1106 Oat ands Park Anyone struggling to find the right care option for a loved one can be difficult. Team Agape is a family alternative to assisted living facilities and non-skilled nursing homes. They provide highly qualified and caring staff to provide 24-hour care in the comfort of your loved one’s home. They offer compassionate care for mentally-challenged individuals and those diagnosed as HIVpositive. They also provide services for individuals recuperating from illness or surgery. They offer “personal care with Christian flair”.

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Their services include hygiene assistance, meal preparation, diet monitoring, administering/monitoring medication, accompaniment to doctors’ appointments, errands, light housekeeping, companionship, respite care and in-hospital care, among others. Team Agape’s mission is clear: to preserve dignity, protect independence and provide peace of mind to clients and their families by providing exceptional care that ensures quality of life in the comfort and security of clients’ homes. They offer affordable hourly rates and do both short and long term assignments.


Renew You

Roberts Health Foods & Services 859.253.0012 1020 Industry Rd, Ste 10 robertshea thfoods.com

Colon cleansing might not sound very appealing to some, but colon hydrotherapy can offer a slew of benefits to your health and well-being! Colon cleansing helps rid the colon of dirt and wastes that have been stored there. Naturally, the colon is responsible for passing waste through the body. However, constipation and other digestive disorders, as well as surgery or accident recovery can cause waste to linger and stagnate in the intestinal tract. Statistics show that one colon cleansing session can actually rid the body of ten pounds of waste. Getting rid of that burden can mean a lot, especially for someone with health issues or weight concerns. Curious? Contact Roberts Health Foods to learn more.

LiLa Body Contouring 888.600.4521 x195 | khaddad@ aenterpr se.com my abody.com

Coming to a physicians office near you in January 2014! LiLa Body Contouring is a clinically proven, FDA cleared cold red laser treatment, ideal for “problem areas”, such as the stomach, thighs or arms. LiLa offers immediate results with every visit! How does LiLa’s Strawberry Laser work? This low-level laser stimulates the adipocyte cells, resulting in the breakdown of stored triglycerides into free fatty acids and glycerol. This releases them via the channels in the cell membranes. The process doesn’t harm surrounding structures, vessels or nerves. The Strawberry Laser does not destroy cells. The process shrinks cells, causing inch loss in a more natural, non-invasive approach. The procedure itself is quick! The painless laser paddles are placed on each treatment area for about ten minutes, then moved to adjoining areas and repeated. After the treatment, you’ll be asked to spend just 10 minutes on their Whole Body Vibration machine. Almost everyone shows measurable loss with each treatment! With no pain, no surgery, no bruising and no recovery time, LiLa’s Strawberry Laser may just be a revolution in body contouring. Contact LiLa today to learn more about this unique and effective option. For information on getting the Lila Lipo Laser in your practice, Please contact Krista Haddad.

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YMCA ymcacky.org The YMCA has served Central Kentucky for more than 160 years. With three locations in Lexington, the YMCA offers some of the city’s most convenient and accessible fitness facilities. They’re also quickly becoming some of the region’s best-equipped!

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sports, including basketball, soccer and football and is the national leader in teaching children how to be safe in and around the water.

The Beaumont YMCA features a newly-renovated cardio area and Kids’ Corner. The High Street Y’s fitness area and locker rooms have recently been renovated and all three Lexington facilities have new, state-of-the-art equipment.

Adults can get in on the fun, too! The Y offers adult sports leagues, including basketball, volleyball and dodgeball. These leagues are a wonderful way to meet new people and make lasting friendships while enjoying staying active. And if you’re looking to get fit and stay fit in 2014, try our personal training services for small groups or individuals.

This family-oriented fitness facilities offers free child watching services for busy parents while they work out. They also offer an array of youth

Looking for an incentive to visit the YMCA? There’s no joining fee through January 15, 2014–a $50 savings!


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Fillies in the Workplace: Cyndi Goyer-Greathouse Marketing Director, .HORSE by Kathie Stanps Cyndi Greathouse owns a marketing agency and is the Global Director of Marketing for the new .HORSE domain. Confucius said if you choose a job you love, you never have to work a day in your life. Cyndi Greathouse is one of those lucky people. She is combining her lifelong love of horses with a new project involving a huge change in the Internet as we have come to know it. There will soon be websites ending in .HORSE, in addition to the common .COM and .ORG web addresses. Greathouse is owner of Greathouse & Hardwick Advertising, an advertising, marketing and public relations firm she founded in 1987. In the early years, her clients were car dealerships, retail chains, and other mainstream clients. Lately her work has developed into niche marketing for equine clients, such as Ballantrae Farm, McPeek Racing and National Dressage Pony Cup. Her latest venture is the .HORSE new top level domain. She is Director of Marketing for .HORSE throughout the world. “The Internet is never going to be the same,” Greathouse said. “The first major transformation of the internet is starting, including how search engines will query for sites. These changes will happen over the next several years to reflect hundreds of new top level domains.” Speculation points to searches looking first for relevant websites first based on the top level domain, letters to the right of the dot, then queries for words left of the dot and then website content. In 2012 ICANN, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, opened the gates for new domains. ICANN received 1,930 applications for these new generic

Cyndi Goyer-Greathouse

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top-level domains, or g TLDs. The HORSE domain is owned by Top Level Domain Holdings Ltd. (TLDH), a publicly traded company on the London AIM. TLDH signed the registry agreement for .HORSE, among other new generic top-level domains, on Nov. 18, 2013. Minds+Machines, a subsidiary of TLDH, is the management firm for .HORSE. Greathouse is Director of Marketing. Another Lexingtonian, Matt Wills, is a partner of .HORSE and will be involved in promotions and marketing. In addition to .HORSE, expect to see around 1,000 new g TLDs being turned on this year, like .CLOTHING, .COOKING and .PHOTOGRAPHY. Greathouse is projecting that the .HORSE domain will go live in the fall of 2014 after the required diagnostic site and security tests are complete, but reservations have begun and are on a first-come, first-served basis for .HORSE website addresses. Greathouse encourages everyone in the industry to register for their HORSE domain names: farms, industry suppliers, organizations, and even their own horses. They may want to register a name to ensure consistency between a current .com or .org before someone else reserves it – or get that domain name you’ve always wanted. Anyone with a trademark through the United States Patent and Trademark Office will have the additional opportunity to register their domain name during the “sunrise period”. “There are many predictions about these g TLDs. One is that social media will be morphed into topic specific web spaces because roughly a third of the 1,930 new top level domain applications are brands such as .CHEVY, .PFIZER, .LOREAL, and .YOUTUBE, or city-based like .LONDON, .NYC, .BOSTON, and PARIS,” she said. Reservations for a .HORSE domain, including trademarked names, will cost $35 and includes basic web hosting complete with templates. The annual fee for premium domain names will be more. “For companies that want bundles of names that may include specific products or for stand alone premium names, they

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need to contact me and I’ll work directly with them” Greathouse said. Top Level Domain Holdings has created a list of premium names, which includes all breeds and disciplines, as well as tack parts and other equine keywords. Greathouse has been involved with eventing, dressage, fox hunting, mounted games, and show jumping herself, and still rides her horse four or five times a week. Her two sons ride competitively. “My kids go all over the eastern half of the United States for shows,” she said. Born in St. Louis, Greathouse moved to Massachusetts when she was a few weeks old and to Cincinnati when she was five years old. In 1984 she transferred from Denison University, near Columbus, to the University of Kentucky, where she was an English major. “I’ve always loved horses, but never could have one,” she said of her childhood. When she moved to Kentucky, she started taking riding lessons and then her kids got involved in Keeneland Pony Club. Her son Nicholas is a junior at Transylvania University and son Michael is a freshman at Centre College. “They have been very involved with the United States Eventing Association, MidSouth Eventing and Dressage Association, and Keeneland Pony Club,” Greathouse said. She was a KPC officer for eight years. She has provided marketing for equine-related companies and organizations, including Thoroughbred Charities of America. “I did their graphic design and web development for nine years when it was a standalone, before it was part of TOBA,” she said. Now it is the charitable arm of the Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association (TOBA). From 2008 to 2010 she was the Development Director for the Kentucky Equine Humane Center. Greathouse supplies marketing and public relations work for the National Dressage Pony Cup, as well as hospitality for several of the big horse shows at the Kentucky Horse Park. In 2009 she founded Horse Aid Live, a nonprofit organization that promotes


On a volunteer basis, she offers marketing and social media help for Area 8 of United States Eventing Association. She has served as the hospitality chair for Hagyards MidSouth Team Challenge Horse Trials, MidSouth Eventing and Dressage Association’s Dressage at the Park I and II, and for Jump Start Horse Trials, a horse trial benefiting Keeneland Pony Club. Greathouse has also been the show jumping announcer for the MidSouth Pony Club Horse Trials. Part of her duties as director of marketing for .HORSE will involve traveling and signing people up at shows and conventions, “Having lived on a Thoroughbred breeding farm for years, and now having my own small farm, I know the life; most of my closest friends have developed through the show world, the Thoroughbred industry and from equine associations,” she said, calling her new gig “a good fit.”

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humane treatment for all equines, and supports horse retraining and rehab centers. She organizes and manages the annual Combined Test and Dressage Show, which takes place at Masterson Station Park the first weekend of August to benefit Horse Aid Live. The event had 30 percent growth in 2013.

History of TLDs The original top-level domains, or TLDs, were registered on Jan. 1, 1985, believe it or not, by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. DARPA’s first domain extensions included .COM for commercial use, .NET for network providers and .ORG for organizations. They also set up .EDU for educational institutions, .GOV for government entities and .MIL for the U.S. military. In 1998, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) got started. Headquartered in Los Angeles, the nonprofit organization is the overseer of the Internet’s naming and numbering systems. In the early 2000s, .BIZ and INFO came along, and by 2011 there were 22 top-level domains, plus two-letter domains for some 250 countries. To reserve a website address ending in .HORSE, contact Cyndi Greathouse at cyndi3334@gmail.com or directly through www.yourhorsedomain.com or Facebook.com/DotHorse.

The horse industry is huge. “I not only love racing, but all of it—the fox hunters, polo players, barrel races, reining, pleasure riding—it’s fabulous,” Greathouse said. In fact, the equine industry’s economic impact in Kentucky alone is almost $3 billion, according to the 2012 Kentucky Equine Survey (released in September 2013), conducted by the University of Kentucky, the Kentucky Horse Council and the National Agricultural Statistics Service “Over the years through my involvement in the horse industry, I have developed clients that way,” Greathouse said. She is expecting .HORSE to take up most of her time now, which she calls the perfect marriage of her hobby and professional life, her passion for animals and the horse industry. “I’m ecstatic about this,” she said. “It’s the American dream.” Cyndi riding her Thoroughbred Horse “StillCrazyAfterAll” (Lasting Approval - Crazy Cyd, by Wavering Monarch)

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Images Courtesy of the USPC Mann, Marketing and Communications Coordinator. And indeed, Pony Club graduates have included Olympic equestrians to local instructors to the backyard owner – all equipped with the confidence and knowledge instilled during their days of Pony Club. At the national headquarters at the Horse Park, the staff assists hundreds of clubs around the country with just about anything – from compliance to marketing and everything in between. “Our goal is to support our local clubs to deliver educational opportunities to our members and to develop character,

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leadership, confidence and a sense of community in members through a program that teaches the care of horses and ponies, riding and mounted sports,” told Mann. Visitors to the Park are welcome to stop by. Housed inside the office is a museum and library containing historical items that have been collected over the past 60 years – offering a fun glimpse of the USPC through the decades. And when summer rolls around again, the highly-anticipated USPC Festival will occur in July at the Horse Park. A special triennial event – the entire Festival will be open to the public with the purchase of a day fee.


Hope in Horses

CKRH began as a grassroots effort in 1981- right at the Horse Park and has grown into one of the most premier therapeutic riding centers in the country. There are 30 horses that are residents of CKRH with over 150 volunteers that help throughout the year. The Fayette County Public School program, The Stables, has 30 students enrolled in the unique full content academic program for students that thrive in a non-traditional setting. It also provides the opportunity to learn vocational skills within the equine industry as well as lifelong skills of responsibility, communication and problem-solving. The traditional therapeutic riding program is designed for those differently-abled with weekly sessions offered for children and adults. CKRH also is partners with Cardinal Hill Rehabilitation Hospital in their Hippotherapy program that is designed to use equine movement in mounted sessions for physical, occupational and speech therapies. With many special memories made at CKRH every day, it remains a place like no other. “A rider’s smile

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Another organization that can be found along a meandering drive of the Horse Park is the Central Kentucky Riding for Hope (CKRH). It may be chilly but CKRH is still full of activity in the barn! Therapeutic riding, therapeutic driving, therapeutic horsemanship, Hippotherapy, equine facilitated learning, equine facilitated mental health, specialized services for military service, vocational rehabilitation and a Fayette County Public Schools program are all going on.

in Special Olympics indicates their pride in remembering the course; a Stables student walks a little taller because they are able to go by themselves to turn a horse out; a young rider speaks their first words and it’s the horse’s name. Every achievement-great and small-is special,” said Ann Katherine Riddle, a staff member of CKRH. The tailored programs at CKRH continue to grow – offering the community the chance to connect and heal with the help of horses. The therapeutic driving program currently provides several adults with brain injuries the opportunity to experience the benefits of equine movement and relationship building with both horse and human. And CKRH is also partners with the Bluegrass Rape Crisis Center for adult survivors of trauma to build relationships and work through conflict in a safe environment with the horses. “CKRH has enjoyed the great privilege to grow with the magnificent Kentucky Horse Park. As the horse park has experienced tremendous growth over the past 10 years, so has CKRH. We are grateful for the many services the Kentucky Horse Park as provided to us over the many years. The tranquil land at the back of the horse park is a perfect therapeutic setting,” Dr. Tom Riddle enthused. Such a salutary program nestled in the pastoral Park is a rewarding experience for all involved, riders and helpers alike. With only 20% of CKRH’s revenue derived from program fees, the rest is dependent upon grants, fundraising events and donations from the community. And CKRH certainly loves its volunteers. Interested in learning more? Visit www.ckrh.org.

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MARK YOUR CALENDARS NOW... EVENTS AT THE KENTUCKY HORSE PARK JANUARY - FEBRUARY Jan 05-06

Snowball Series Mounted Games – Covered Arena

Jan 12 • 8a-5p

US Mounted Games Association – Covered Arena

Jan 11 • 11a-4p

Diamond Rings & Pretty Things – Alltech Arena

Jan 11 • 6p-10p

Professional Rough Stock Rodeo Series – Alltech Arena

Jan 25 8a-5p

US Mounted Games Association – Alltech Arena

Jan 31-Feb 01

Kentucky After Christmas Sale – Alltech Arena

Feb 01 • 8a-5p

US Mounted Games Association – Covered Arena

Feb 08-09

Snowball Series Mounted Games – Covered Arena

Feb 15-16

Kentucky Round-Up – Alltech Arena

Feb 22 • 8a-5p

Snowbird Dressage – Covered Arena

For more information visit kyhorsepark.com and khpfoundation.org See TopsinLex.com for photo coverage of these and other events.

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Transition Reins

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Q&A with Equine Therapist Janet Cameron Janet Cameron is a specialist in equine therapy and owner of Transition Reins Healing with Horses to Expand Horizons. Janet’s facility is located in Versailles, KY and open to clients who wish to enroll in her classes. www.Transitionreins.com • Interview by: Joe Moran

What is Transition Reins and who would be a good

candidate to attend your program?

Transition Reins is the overall name of our approach to offering life skills development. All programs under the aegis of Transition Reins focus on teaching the late Dr. William Glasser’s Choice Theory skills through practicing Natural Horsemanship with horses. The primary, in depth program is Healing Through Healing, a 12 – 14 session program. We also offer 2- and 3-day workshops, which focus on specific choice theory skills. For example, we offer the following workshops: • BUILDING TEAMWORK IN A CULTURALLY DIVERSE ENVIRONMENT – focuses on identifying the strengths of each team member, regardless of cultural and language differences and working collaboratively toward a common goal. • GIDDY-UP LET’S GO – focuses on establishing realistic plans and following through , step by step, with those plans • BUILDING TRUE BLUE-RIBBON RELATIONSHIPS – focuses on using relationship building skills and avoiding relationship destroying skills • KEEP YOUR QUALITY WORLD PASTURE HEALTHY & WELL-FENCED – focuses on clearly identifying what we want and how to get it.

At its basic level, Choice Theory holds that we can’t control anyone else’s behavior. We can control only our own behavior. It teaches that all behavior is purposed to meet one or more of our 5 basic needs—survival, love/belonging, fun, freedom and power/achievement. We don’t picture in our minds the abstract concepts of those 5 basic needs. Rather, we picture specific things that meet those needs. Those “specific things” make up what the late Dr. Glasser referred to as our “Quality World.” For example, if we have 2 people with a high need for power/ achievement, one might try to meet his/her need for power by dominating other people in the workplace. A picture of domination would be in this person’s Quality World. The other might meet the need for power/achievement by focusing on facilitating her/his co-workers to fully participate in the overall production goal of increasing output for the company. This person is picturing improved production output and a creative, happy workplace in her/his Quality World. The first person might meet the goal of domination, but at the price of production. If workers don’t feel that their input is valued and that they are just bodies following orders, they will lose interest in their jobs and might become resentful; consequently, production will suffer. This is what’s called “boss management.” The boss manager then might feel he/she needs to apply stronger domination, which in turn has the opposite of the desired effect. Workers

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become more resentful and less productive. The other person, who encourages ideas and creative input from the employees, won’t have the burden of micromanagement and will have the advantage of cooperation and enhanced employee participation in the company process. The result is higher production and a happier, healthier workplace. This is called “lead management.” Anyway, who is happier, the boss manager or the lead manager? Of course, it’s the lead manager who values cooperation in the workplace and increased production. The boss manager has created an atmosphere of devalued, resentful employees and production has suffered. As a result, the boss manager’s stress level goes up and happiness level goes down. How does our program fit into the above scenario? It’s interesting that most people come thinking that they need to control and micromanage a 1200 lb. horse and that they can accomplish this with a flimsy piece of lead rope. One thing we practice and learn at Transition Reins is that we CAN’T control a horse’s behavior at all. Rather, we build trusting relationships with the horses. We learn that horses communicate through body language and that they always are listening to our body language and if we want a successful outcome we will listen to theirs. This good, clear communication is a skill that is helpful in inter-human relationships. In the programs, we practice putting clear pictures in our Quality Worlds of the result we want with the horse. By backing up that Quality World image with clear communication we will have a positive influence on the horse’s behavior. Through this mutual cooperation, the task with the horse will be achieved. Therefore, the person who comes to the program thinking they must dominate and force a horse to do what they want, will quickly have a 1200 lb. visual demonstration of the futility of this approach. That’s when they cognitively understand the advantages of building a healthy, respectful relationship as a prerequisite to attempting cooperative tasks. That cognitive understanding is the insight, the epiphany. Practicing it on a regular basis with the horses provides a fun, experiential way to do the difficult work of nurturing the mature into the fruits of behavioral change. Participants learn such skills by working with the horses and once learned through interaction with horses, they can apply these skills in their personal lives. Let’s see, you also asked who would be a good candidate for Transition Reins. The answer is that anyone who might feel that what they are doing is not getting them the result they want. These are the people who might benefit the most from learning Choice Theory through natural horsemanship. The late Dr. Glasser wrote in his book, Choice Theory, that, “The major human problems we struggle with—violence, crime, child abuse, spousal abuse, alcohol and drug addiction, the proliferation of premature and unloving sex and emotional distress—are caused by unsatisfying relationships.” Choice Theory provides an explanation for the reasons people have

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difficulty in relationships and also provides concrete directions for the types of behaviors we can choose to have happier, more need-satisfying relationships. Transition Reins provides a fun approach, in a nurturing and supportive atmosphere, to learning and internalizing those choice theory skills that lead to a happier, more rewarding life.

Were you influenced by Pat Parelli, John Lyons and the William Glasser Institute? People like Pat Parelli and John Lyons certainly provided me with great insight into the concepts of Natural Horsemanship. Working with them, watching their videos and reading their books brought the realization that external control isn’t a successful approach to horsemanship. Insight provides the motivation for change, but insight alone doesn’t LEAD to behavioral change. It was the every-day, real life practice that brought me to choose the more effective behaviors of controlling my own behavior in such a way as to build effective, need-satisfying relationships with horses. That’s what it takes to change our behavior habits—everyday practice. It’s just like if you want to acquire any new skill, you have to get out there and practice that skill every day until it becomes part of who you are. So, it was a local, Natural Horsemanship professional, Sally Hebrock, who influenced me the most. She was a dedicated mentor. I owe her a lot. Because Natural Horsemanship seems to benefit horsemen as well as horses, I thought there must be a psychology for people similar to Natural Horsemanship for horses. That’s when I discovered Choice Theory and Reality Therapy. The underlying concepts of Choice Theory and Natural Horsemanship are very similar, only the vocabularies of the two are different. So, I spent two years studying Choice Theory/Reality Therapy as well as Dr. Glasser’s Lead Management and Glasser Quality Schools. I did trainings along with each level’s practicum in order to get certified by the William Glasser Institute. The more I studied Choice Theory, the more I realized the compatibility between it and Natural Horsemanship. So, that’s what brought me to design the Healing Through Healing program—Choice Theory through Natural Horsemanship.

Is your program unique or are there other schools throughout the country teaching the same principles? I believe that Transition Reins is the only program that offers Choice Theory through Natural Horsemanship. I have been contacted by a mental health professional in Arkansas who is on the board of directors of a residential facility for “at risk” youth. He wants me to go there to help them set up a Healing Through Healing program. So, we look forward to reaching out to other programs and helping them expand their own program offerings.

How many sessions are in the program and tell me how a student progresses from beginning to end?


Why does a student never mount a horse during your clinic? That’s a well-timed question. We were just talking about designing an advanced Healing Through Healing course that would include mounted work. Once participants have the confidence of effective communication without coercion, they certainly could expand and fine-tune their skills to include mounted communication. It wouldn’t be typical riding lessons because participants wouldn’t use external control devices such as bits and riding crops. I can still hear Sally Hebrock’s voice shouting from across the arena, “You don’t need any metal in that horse’s mouth to communicate with him.” She was right. I was just uneasy about giving up external control. As the Transition Reins programs stand now, all the participants have been happy to use what they learn with horses to improve their social and professional lives outside the programs. No one has requested to ride. If a participant SHOULD put riding into his/her Quality World, they will leave the program with basics sufficient to pursue their riding goals.

What is the War Horse Therapeutic program that is getting a lot of publicity lately? Is this a program that you foresee getting involved with?

The War Horse program addresses the needs of our revered and courageous veterans. It has been very successful as part of therapy to help vets assimilate their experiences and reintegrate into their communities. I would honor the opportunity to work collaboratively with counselors at the Veteran’s Administration. In the hope that I will have that opportunity, last month I completed a training in PTSD competency.

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In Healing Through Healing, participants progress at their own pace. Generally it consists of 12 – 14 weekly sessions. The 2 – 3-day workshops focus on a few skills. None of the programs is pedagogical in nature, nor are they therapy, although many participants find the programs to be therapeutic. Pedagogy implies external control. Therapy implies that someone needs to be fixed. The TR participants come to have fun and learn new skills. They come with their own issues and leave with their own solutions. Five people can do the same program and each will come away with his/her own epiphany and have the skills to make a plan for creating their own unique, new and happier future.

Tell us about your event that is coming up and some details about it. We’re really excited about the upcoming workshop, WOMEN IN TRANSITION. Think of all the changes we go through in life—change of heart, change of status, change of job, change of address, change of life, change of direction, etc. In addition to experiencing our OWN changes, as traditional caregivers, we also experience change as those we nurture go through their own life changes. “Change” is something that we usually think of as happening TO us, as externally controlled. Because the human tendency is to resist external control, “change” is often accompanied by confusion, vulnerability and stress. “Transition”, on the other hand, implies transformational growth from within and internal control. It incorporates a moment of pause that precedes transformation. That moment of pause is a time to gather the power and wisdom of the past so we can create own unique, personal and smooth transition. That’s what we want to focus on in the workshop—our own internal strengths and power. We can’t control what happens “to” us, but we CAN focus on the opportunities for personal growth that each change brings with it—our personal transitions. I will be collaborating with Theresa BarryGreb. She is well respected in the Lexington area for her work in Emotional Brain Training, which (in a nutshell) is a practical approach to re-wiring our minds for joy. Joe Moran is a firearms specialist at Cowan’s Auctions in Cincinnati, Ohio. He can be reached at Bastillefarm@aol.com

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Brian Fox

Artistic, altruistic, enthusiastic and a man who has his priorities

in life on track, Brian Fox has earned his niche into the world of horse racing art for decades. He hails from Somerset Mass, an hour south of Boston, where he grew up there and was encouraged to draw at an early age to pursue it by his parents who were young at the time. “It was always something I was always doing, but I was doing plenty of other things as well – normal kid playing football out in the yard, basketball, baseball and everything else. As I got older I wasn’t great at academics and my parents said ‘Make sure you go to school for Art.’ I was the first kid to even go to college from my family so it was all new to them too.” Brian graduated from the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth with a Major in Fine Arts. He was an illustrator for a magazine for six years, worked for a newspaper for a year and went on to land a position with a million-dollar T-shirt company designing pretty much anything he wanted to do. While it was a job he very much enjoyed for seven years he came to an impasse with the owner and it was a time for some serious soul searching and a major family decision. In a sports vernacular Brian could relate to it was like one of the many classic humorous head-scratching Yogi Berra quotes, “When you come to a fork in the road – take it.”

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And His Hunt for Capturing the Racing Game “My wife Cyndi and I are Christians and both felt God was leading me to quit my full-time job. This is when most people said I was an idiot and I was crazy. Hey, you’ve got one kid and one on the way, a mortgage,’ and none of what I am doing now was going on at the time. It was a literal leap of faith. So much so,” admits Brian, “We didn’t even tell my in-laws for months because they would have worried so much. They are old world, old school Portuguese people who had retired from a mill and they wouldn’t have quite understood.” Sailing in uncharted waters at this point in his life nine years ago, Brian’s wife was an accountant so they had insurance and were able to “survive” in his words. Anyone who has a friend or family member from the Boston area will understand what ravenous and dedicated sports fans they are. That fact - and Brian’s natural love of sports led to him hitting a home run for exposure of his natural talents for painting athletic endeavors. “What really kind of cracked it open for me in the public’s eye was when the Red Sox won the 2004 World Series because they hadn’t won in 86 years. It was an unbelievable year and I had just quit my job and Curt Schilling the pitcher had just got on the team and was doing public service announcements for his charity the ALS Foun-

“Irish” Micky Ward and Brian Fox

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dation known as Lou Gerhig’s Disease. I called up his charity and said ‘Look, I don’t have any money but I could probably paint a picture for you guys and maybe you could auction it off and raise some money.” His offer was greeted less than enthusiastically until the Red Sox actually got into the World Series. Brian got a call and they said, “Hey you’ve got to get to work on that painting!” Working as fast as he could, Brian didn’t even get to watch the World Series as he listened by radio while finishing the painting. After they won the Series everyone was looking for a story and Brian’s efforts got swept up as part of it. His painting was sold for thousands of dollars and he gave it all to the charity. “Everybody told me you are crazy, what are you doing? I told them I was good to my word, but that kind of opened the door even though it was a slow moving thing. That’s what started me to survive and break through the sports art market.” It was a kick start for his current demand, but not an overnight success. For almost year he would do any project just to bring money into the house, “If somebody wanted a drawing of their dog I would be drawing that just to give the money to my wife to say, hey at least I’m making something.” His connection with Major League Baseball paid off when he was signed by a licensing company to become the official artist for the 2007 All-Star game. He painted live during the Home Run Derby and during the game and all the players signed it and it was auctioned off for charity bringing over $60,000 dollars. That catapulted his visibility with professional players and the MLB, who invited him back for several more years. That exposure began commissions from individual professional athletes and he was then thrown a major curve ball when he was contacted by Walt Disney studios. For three years he ended up creating individual pieces of artwork for their parks - creating paintings of Johnny Depp and scenes from Pirates of the Caribbean, Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck. They told him what they wanted, he painted it from his home and they put them in their own galleries. It helped pay the bills and his name recognition began to branch out. Perhaps most importantly it fit his personal philosophy perfectly.

Seattle Slew

In the midst of all of this going on, Brian Fox stepped into a new world of artistic exposure when he accompanied a friend to one of racings greatest venues – Saratoga Springs. “There is just something about that town is beautiful and only a four hour drive for me through the mountains, it is great.” Brian’s voice lifted with genuine enthusiasm when describing his first visit under the ancient elms. “Then he brought me to the track and I saw these incredible animals and I was inspired to start painting them at the same time. This was around 2005 and I stated doing some paintings and drawings because I just loved them. It’s hard not to be inspired just being around the animals. There is a spirit and magnificence about them so I slowly put that on canvas.” His treks to Saratoga became an annual event and with his work displayed he got to meet owners who began to put request in to have their horses captured by his brush. Brian got to know the owners of Siro’s restaurant, one of the most popular places in all of Saratoga Springs for horses and horseplayers alike. Handicapping seminars are held prior to the races and many a glass of spirits lifted in celebration after a successful day at

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Alan Garcia


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the Spa. Brian was invited to paint live at Siro’s during busy Travers weekend and while handing out a steady stream of business cards he met several gallery owners which led to a shows at the Sorelle Gallery at Saratoga, Newbury Fine Arts in Boston and the South Hill Gallery in Lexington. Fox’s equine connections expanded to Kentucky. “I met up with some great folks like Mike and Letha Drury who have a gallery at the private air terminal and I started working with them. Through there I met Christopher Jackson of Stonestreet Farms and then I ended up meeting different folks through the galleries.” Nicole Pieratt owner of Sallee Horse Vans also collects his works including paintings of Secretariat and Curlin. Disney has called Brian back and he has been discovered by several “A-list” celebrities he was not at liberty to talk about. “It is very surreal right now,” he admits, with work backed up almost a year. “The horse racing art is a big part of what I do and a big part of what I want to stay doing. I love to paint these animals and I have a waiting list for horse paintings and galleries waiting for work – it is a good problem to have as an artist and I am extremely blessed and fortunate.” Some of his A-list patrons in racing we do know about include owner Bill Casner, jockey Alan Garcia and top trainer Linda Rice He is also blessed with a marvelous outlook on his life and his priorities. “On top of it all – I don’t work when my kids Jacob (10) and Nathan (8) are home and I don’t work weekends. It is a conscious thing. I don’t believe God gave me this incredible opportunity as an artist to take away from a bigger blessing, which is my family.” That statement pretty much sums up the heart and soul of Brian Fox who has turned his talent and love of sports into a joy of life. Happy to know that one of those sports that he has embraced is the Sport of Kings. To learn more about Brian Fox and view his work go to www.brianfoxstudios.com

Rachel Alexandra

John C. Engelhardt has been an equine photographer and turf writer for 30 years and served as the President of the Turf Publicists of America. He hosts a weekly radio show on winningponies.com. For reprints of his images or future assignments you may contact him at longshot51@earthlink.net

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Winter Wonderland

Winter Friends

Shedrow Silhouette

White Prince Floats

Barn Cat Trot

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Masked Men Racing


Behind the Lens

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Behind the Lens

grand scale of the moment, how important the game was to me and countless other UK fans just give me chills when I look at it. I have a print framed and autographed by all the UK players in the picture as well as Coach Cal while another copy is actually hanging up in the new locker room at Rupp Arena.” Though his photographs distinctly portray the passion he has for UK sports, the versatility in Dr. Huang’s portfolio reveal that for this man behind the lens, now is merely the beginning. A full-time Internal Medicine physician by trade, Dr. Huang was born and raised here in Lexington. He says, “I graduated from Henry Clay High School and was a Singletary Scholar at UK.” Before accepting his job on the faculty of UK, Dr. Huang completed his internal medicine residency at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, TN. “My photography also mirrors my career choice of primary care internal medicine because I dabble in all kinds of photography,” he explains. “I often tell my patients that I know a little about everything but not a lot about anything. ” Dr. Huang also has underwater camera equipment and has recently started learning how to scuba dive to pursue underwater photography. Further, he enjoys experimenting with shooting long exposures of cityscapes and lights producing a beautiful blend of whimsy and reality. He shares, “It is fun to try new things and see what I can come up with.” This will be his fourth year

shooting UK sports and other events for TOPS and Dr. Huang muses, “When students and regulars at the UK games see me, they just yell out ‘Tops in Lex!’ and they know I will turn around and take their photo!” What is he particularly excited about this year? “Documenting the dawn of the Mark Stoops Era on the football field and our basketball team’s quest for their ninth National Championship,” he answers. “There is really no better feeling than the anticipation before a big game on the floor at Rupp Arena.” Help to make Dr. Huang’s fourth year with Tops in Lex the best yet by smiling pretty when you see him out on the field or at Rupp.

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Tour of Homes

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Tour of Homes

A

t the top of the staircase, there is an incredible view of the great room. Reaching a height of 40 feet, the ornate river rock fireplace steals the show providing a totally unique feel when family and friends gather and celebrate. The room also features a fifteen-person plush leather couch with five built in recliners and cup-holders making it so company never want to leave. Paul Chartier adds, “The magnificent two story windows in this room are like windows to the world and it’s just overwhelming how great this space truly is.” The mahogany mantle holds family heirlooms while sculptures collected over time are displayed nearby.

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Just off the great room is the kitchen. Set against the backside of the river rock staircase, the open concept kitchen is every chef ’s dream with custom cherry cabinetry. A river rock backsplash behind the Viking six-burner gas range stovetop complements the granite countertops and stainless steel dual oven. The Sub Zero refrigerator and dishwasher are concealed by cherry wood paneling which blend naturally into the space. Intricate carvings throughout the cabinetry highlight the craftsmanship of the woodwork in the kitchen.

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Tour of Homes

A chandelier hangs above the cherry wood table in the dining room which seats up to 16 people at family gatherings and parties. Two distinguished columns frame the dining room located just off the entrance adjacent to the great room and kitchen space for added convenience.

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Tour of Homes

Taking center stage in the master bedroom is a four-poster cherry wood bed with a painting of two playful “Cheetah Eyes� resting above the curved headboard. Opposite the bed frame is an electronic river rock fireplace incorporating natural touches with added convenience into the space.

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Lifestyle

GAME ON by Cynthia Ellingsen Lifestyle Novelist

For me, it’s all about staying warm. Reading books, watching movies and of course, breaking out the board games. I think I can trace my passion for winter board games to a particular ice storm that caused businesses, schools and our power to shut down for two weeks straight. My parents were suspicious of generators – the neighbors had one that smelled like gas and thumped away like the drum section of a marching band – so my family spent two weeks roughing that ice storm like something out of Little House on the Prairie. We cooked meals and roasted marshmallows on the wood stove and played board games by candlelight while my dad strummed songs on the guitar. I was in second grade at the time, so it all felt like a big slumber party. It’s a very idyllic, cozy memory. [My mother would tell a different story. Something about being trapped in the house with two kids who complained about being bored every two seconds and something about how the Irish Setter slept too close to the stove and almost caught its tail on fire.] Regardless, the experience with the ice storm sealed the deal on my passion for winter board games. Slushy gray streets or cars covered in salt are bearable when you know game night is on the horizon. Whenever I start praying for summer, I just remind myself to hang tight. That winter is meant for fire, cozy drinks and hilarious interactions as grown people commit to battling for the win. I think the need to win at a winter board game is something beyond us. Something primal, that has to do with wintertime survival. We are programmed to hunt and gather when its cold, which means Monopoly® is not just a fun game where you hope to snap up Boardwalk and Park Place and avoid those pesky utilities. No, no. It can become a real life version of Lord of the Flies. (I have actually seen a grown man’s head spin in a 360 degree circle when he could not wheedle and cajole his way into the last property needed to dominate the red and yellow side of the board). The evolution of board games is also something to note. If you think the only thing humans have accomplished in the past twenty years is inventing the internet and Angry Birds®, know this: We have done more. Board games have experienced vast improvement. Clue® now offers molded figurines instead of plastic pawns to accuse of murder. The Game of Life® is now civically minded, with incentives for recycling and living up to other social responsibilities. Monopoly® has even upgraded to include an electronic debit card, which shaves hours off the game and casts suspicion on all players, rather than one, unfortunate banker. Speaking of electronics—movies, iPhones, electricity—these are all good things. Great things. But when January rolls around, I’m

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ready to roll the dice with a good game of world domination, a.k.a. Risk® because that’s what winter is all about.


Gardening

GROW YOUR OWN SUPER FOODS by Michelle Rauch Gardening Enthusiast

You are what you eat. Consuming super foods can make a super body. But if you’ve ever piled your grocery cart with fresh fruits and vegetables, you know there is nothing super about the price you will pay in the checkout line. Buying healthy foods comes with a hefty price tag. There’s a cheaper way to do the body and the bank account some good. Grow your own super foods. Even though it takes more time than a trip to the store, growing your own food is cost effective. Whether you start from seed or small plants, it’s cheaper. The one time investment will yield an entire season full of fresh food. You also have the added plus of freshness because these fruits and vegetables aren’t being shipped from parts unknown sitting in a truck for days at a time. Here is a list of some foods that are not only good for you, but easy to grow even for the novice gardener. Tomatoes: Very easy to grow.

in six feet of me; garlic is pungent after all. It’s medicinal uses have been touted for centuries. Green onions and scallions are in this category, too. They are equally easy to grow and can boast anti inflammatory benefits and immune boosting. Carrots: They grow easily from seed as long as they are planted in well-tilled soil. They need the ability to push through as they mature. The Benefits: Well known for aiding in better vision, carrots have a wealth of other healthy pluses which include aiding the digestive system, skin and regulating blood sugar. Try juicing it for a tasty beverage that packs a lot of power. Asparagus: A perennial plant that will take a couple of seasons to establish itself, but once it does you’ll have years of fresh asparagus. The Benefits: Great source of protein, folic acid and fiber. High levels of potassium also help control blood pressure.

The Benefits: Tomatoes contain lycopene, which gives them the red pigment. Studies have found lycopene to have antioxidant properties, which can lower the risks of many cancers. Tomatoes are also a wonderful source of vitamins A and C. Lettuce: Sprinkle some seeds and watch it grow. Lettuce doesn’t have deep roots so you can grow it in containers on a patio. I was amazed just how easy it was when I grew it the first time. It’s a treat to grab a bunch of fresh lettuce and make a salad. There is the added bonus of growing it in spring and fall. The Benefits: Good source of dietary fiber which aids in digestion. Spinach: A cool weather crop. You may plant in the spring but will find you will get your best crop in the Fall. The Benefits: Rich in nutrients and low in calories, spinach is a powerhouse thanks in part to its phytonutrients. These provide anti-inflammatory and cancer fighting benefits. Garlic: I cannot speak from experience about growing garlic, but I know people who have and tell me it’s easy. It is on my must plant list as I am a firm believer in its benefits. To grow, simply plant the bulbs in the Fall and harvest in the summer. It’s a self sufficient herb when it comes to growing. The Benefits: I can speak from experience about garlic’s ability to act as a natural antibiotic. At the onset of a cold I start throwing fresh garlic in everything I eat. Granted, I may ward off colds and flu because no one with germs wants to be with-

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Fashion

the wintery mix by Beth Parker Fashion Blogger/Stylist

It’s here. We’re definitely in the thick of it. Frigid temps, frosty mornings, scraping the windshields—you get the idea—Winter is definitely upon us. To break up the drab and dreariness of these cold months, I’ve enlisted the help of some of my favorite winter accessories. Hats have quickly become one of my fave yearlong accessories especially in the winter. From a functional standpoint, it definitely provides a little extra warmth. More importantly in my book, they add a fashionable element to your bundled rig. Be it a boho topper, wool ball cap, or fuzzy ski hat, long gone are the days where hats function solely as a concealer from a bad hair day. Although let’s be honest ladies, that is enough to have me sold on toppers. Another winter must—gloves. Not only do they cover the fact that my hands look like they could crack in two at a moment’s notice; they truly do keep the digits warm. A little tip that I’ve shared on the blog, Target has a great selection of knit gloves. With today’s technology and touch screens, it’s important we’ve got our

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fingertips exposed and ready to swipe. Solution, snip the tip of your $3 Target gloves and voila—fashionable and functional. For a little higher end option, Kate Spade has a super cute selection of gloves and mittens. With sayings such as “Geek Chic,” you can’t go wrong. How about scarves? Whether solid, striped, plaid, or polka dotted, I just love them. Obviously they serve as a great layering piece and provide a solid amount of warmth. Like their fellow accessory, hats, they also accessorize outfits beautifully and can add a little colored pop to your rig. I often get asked how I tie my scarves. To be honest, it’s typically just a haphazard situation where I just bundle it and fiddle until I get it right. If you’d like a little more detailed description, Pinterest has wonderful tutorials on various ways to tie scarves. Another easy scarf option is a snood or infinity scarf—they take the guess work out of the whole tying situation. So the moral of this chilly story, hats, gloves, and scarves are all easily accessible and affordable options that add elements of fun to our colder looks…no doubt the perfect winter additions! seersuckerandsaddles.blogspot.com


WOW Wedding

Jessalyn chose to wear crocheted TOMS shoes instead of heels, to complement both her simple gown and the rustic venue. Jessalyn had her late maternal grandmother’s blue ring tied to her bouquet as a sentimental “something blue.” The couple chose not to see each other before the ceremony, but the bride did a first look with her father before walking down the aisle. When he turned around and saw her as a bride for the first time, he instantly became teary-eyed. The bride walked down the aisle to “Lover’s Waltz.” The couple wrote their own vows and joined strands of rope into a fisherman’s knot for their unity ceremony (though they were so nervous, they did it incorrectly the first time!) The aisle was decorated with mason jars and the altar featured fabric and buntings hanging from two trees. The couple, along with their family and friends, made much of the décor. The reception theme was simple country chic. Jessalyn & Travis opted to let the stunning Kentucky venue shine, choosing simple décor that complemented the space. The bride chose burlap table runners and a sign that read, “eat, drink and be married,” as well as burlap and lace-wrapped mason jars to hold the centerpiece flowers. Inside the barn, seating was created using old quilts atop hay bales. Old-fashioned lights were strung to illuminate the space and offer a rustic touch. Guests placed thumbprints on a drawing of a tree as a guest book. The reception meal featured herbroasted chicken or bacon-wrapped pork chops paired with mashed potatoes, green beans, bread and a garden salad. The beautiful cake featured burlap buntings reading, “love is sweet,” similar to the altar and the sweetheart table sign. The DJ and emcee of the evening was a family friend who created a play list that merged the bride’s classic rock music with the groom’s love of country. Guests dined, danced and basked in the splendor of a Kentucky summer evening.

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WOW Wedding

DETAILS Venue: Three Fields Farm | Photography: Krystal Mitchell, Ginger Snaps Catering: Type A Catering | Bridal Gown: Couture Closet | Flowers: House by JSD Design Groom/Groomsmen: JC Penney | Cakes: Judy Ramsey | Ceremony Music: SMT Music | DJ: Kenny Burke

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Weddings

BOUQUETS OF BLING by Marsha Koller Wedding Consultant

The Brooch Bouquet is a Long Lasting Alternative to Fresh Flower Bouquets Wedding flowers are one of the big expense line items in your wedding budget, but now you can get crafty and creative on your bridesmaids and even your own bouquet, creating one of a kind, lasting remembrances of your big day—without breaking the bank. If you aren’t crafty and do have money to burn, a big brooch bouquet can cost upwards of $600, but look on Etsy for crafters that have one to sell. ‘Brooch’ the Subject: If you or family members have a great collection of vintage brooches, creatively put them together as a wedding bouquet. A great idea is to have each of the members of your wedding party and friends gift you with a brooch, either from their family collections or as found objects, and build a memorable beautiful bouquet with them. A good look is for the bride to have an all rhinestone and pearl bouquet to tie in with a white wedding, and let the bridesmaids carry bouquets with colorful brooches to match your theme. These can be kept to decorate your new home as ‘floral’ arrangements or the bridesmaids bouquets can double as their bridesmaid gift along with a vase to display it in. A Shower of Brooches: Having a Brooch ‘Shower’ is to have each member of your wedding party, family or friends gift you with a pin either from their family collections or found objects, and build a memorable bouquet. Found Objects for Your Bouquet: If you don’t mind that brooches aren’t vintage, there are tons of very affordable brooches at sites like fabulousbrooch.com, or you can find vintage pieces on eBay. Remember, as you are dreaming of a wedding in the future, to scour thrift shops and garage sales for great old hat pins, clip earrings, and big brooches. They all can work together for a big look. Add Pearls, Girls: Scatter Pearls and single vintage pearl earrings between your brooches to round out the glowing look. Be careful not to go overboard on your supplies, you can spend even more than fresh flowers. Brooch Bouquet Basics: In my opinion there are some very good tutorials on YouTube that teach you to work with a lightweight silk flower like a white hydrangea as a base (not heavy wood or foam). You can learn to double wire – a no glue technique that makes the brooch ‘flower’ stiff but malleable, and keeps heavy brooches from drooping. Practice Makes Perfect: If this look doesn’t fit with your wedding theme, you can use a brooch bouquet as your practice bouquet during your rehearsal, and then put it atop a glass vase for an amazing centerpiece or home accent, or place it on your gift table at your wedding. If you don’t pay full retail, you can find and repurposebrooches and pearl strands and pull off bouquet (and budget) magic!

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TOPS January 2014  

Boston to the Bluegrass, Meet Heather Abbott who was injured in the Boston Marathon bombing in 2013.

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