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TOPS AROUND TOWN 26 Out & About

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28 TOPS In Lexington Preview Party #1 30 TOPS In Lexington Preview Party #2 32 Pattie A. Clay Auxilliary Charity Ball 34 Miss Kentucky Fathion Show 36 Ashland Lawn Party 38 Children’s Charity Classic 208 Central KY Riding for Hope, Night of the Stars 210 100 Women 212 LexArts’ Fund for the Arts at Apiary #1 214 LexArts’ Fund for the Arts at Apiary #2 216 Junior League Horse Show Pink Night 218 Concours d’Elegance 242 TOP Shots

218 Captions for event photos are typically provided to TOPS by the event organizers. We do our best to check names and spelling…but we are all human and make mistakes. Please contact kristen@topsmarketing.com with any corrections and we will make note of it in the next issue.

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OUT + ABOUT | SOCIE T Y

Kentucky Bank Tennis Pro-Am Winners

Toyota South Supports Special Olympics

Marriott Griffin Gate Ribbon Cutting Golf Course Redesign Heather French Henry at Quality of Life Awards

Freakin’ Unbelievable Burgers and Street Craves Ribbon Cutting

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Courtesy Check Presentation to Makenna Foundation for 15 ‘Geezels’


Fashion

The White Fresh

photos by Kristin Tatem

A

ugust calls for cookouts, long days at the pool, beach getaways, and WHITE. Tons and tons of white. It is hands down the quintessential summer color. What with our skin all kissed by the sun and Labor Day right around the corner, there’s no better time to sport this fresh hue. But let’s elevate our whites with fun elements of interest shall we? A white lace maxi. Oh, does this beauty make a statement. I truly don’t know if this lovely would be such a showstopper if it wasn’t for the soft white lace. It just adds a boho, easy breezy vibe which sums up the final days of summer. An eyelet two piece. I have to say, this look has proven to be one of my faves this summer. Not only is it perfect for a baby shower, girl’s day out, or evening of summer refreshers with your crew, it’s just as fun if you separate the two pieces. Try pairing the top with some distressed skinny white jeans and cognac heels or the skirt with a knotted ribbed tank and a boatload of gold bangles for an effortless vibe day or night. How about a white jumpsuit? Sleek. Sophisticated. Summer perfect if you ask me. This bad boy is such a good foundation for a slew of fun heels, sandals, clutches, jewelry… the possibilities to dress this lovely up are endless. And don’t shy away from the jumpsuit because you fear it may be unflattering—I actually find it to be one of the more flattering pieces in my closet’s arsenal. Remember, white on white need not be plain. Adding unique details; be it lace, eyelet, or even in a jumpsuit shape will take your whites from ordinary to summer extraordinary!

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by Beth Parker Fashion Blogger/Stylist seersuckerandsaddles.blogspot.com


Downtown

The Square

Above & Below: 21c Museum Hotel, Louisville KY

The Square has been at the heart of downtown Lexington since the 1880s. Showcasing a mix of retail, dining and entertainment, The Square’s 140,000 square foot complex encompasses nearly an entire city block adjacent to Rupp Arena and the Convention Center. A 1985 renovation brought all sixteen structures together under one roof with a central courtyard, creating the modern, accessible space that exists today. According to the Downtown Development Authority report, in 2014, the property underwent a $2.3 million dollar renovation. Where possible, the original decorative ironwork, exterior balconies and metal ceilings have been preserved. The result is a seamless blend of historical architecture and modern culture that much of Lexington is known for. As the result of a recent rebrand, “Victorian” has been dropped from the name, and The Square now boats an oversized illuminated sign and a handful of updated tenants. Visitors can enjoy an eclectic mix of shopping, galleries, restaurants, bars, and even a theater and children’s museum. New restaurants include Tony’s, an upscale steak and seafood eatery; Vinaigrette Salad Kitchen, a fast casual salad shop serving fresh gourmet salads, soups, and creative lemonades and teas (think Cucumber Mint, Coconut, or Pumpkin Spice, depending on the season); and Pies & Pints, a casual restaurant specializing in craft beer and gourmet pizza. Adding to the variety are retailers like Urban Outfitters (in the former DeSha’s space), known for their on-trend and often-subversive line of clothing, housewares and gifts; Alumni Hall for all things Big Blue, and Sincerely Yours, a gift boutique specializing in personalized items and women’s accessories. The Square is also home to the Lexington Visitor’s Center, a host of art galleries, and Explorium, a hands-on children’s museum. In a news release, Pies and Pints owner Rob Lindeman expressed his appreciation for The Square’s “central location to the market where we believe there is great synergy with local business, universities and convention center.”

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Downtown

BUDDHA LOUNGE San Francisco native Nick Lagagsorn is in the process of converting a former office building on North Mill Street into Buddha Lounge, a stylish, urban sushi bar and restaurant. With an anticipated opening in late summer or early fall, Buddha Lounge will feature an imaginative, Asian-inspired menu that centers around sushi and tapas, but with a broad assortment of other dishes to suit a variety of palates. Lagagsorn has several years of experience in the San Francisco restaurant scene, and is excited to begin his career as an owner. With two young daughters and an already congested industry in the Bay Area, he realized it made more sense to move his family across the country for a change of pace. Nat Yuttayong, owner of Nat’s Thai Restaurant on South Upper Street and longtime friend of Lagagsorn, suggested he consider moving to Lexington. Lagagsorn visited last spring, and was sold. Buddha Lounge will be a welcome addition to the cluster of restaurants that has appeared on the west side of downtown in recent years. Architect Rebecca Burnworth and her husband, Eric Burnworth of Burnworth Builds, will act as project managers to overhaul the approximately 2,500-square-foot location at 109 North Mill (between Short and Main Streets). They’ll open up the space and add several large windows for an airy atmosphere. While details are still in the works, Lagagsorn expects that Buddha Lounge will be open for lunch and dinner, with happy-hour specials and later weekend hours.

LEXINGTON Quality of Life Trends* • 30,000 in total enrollment at Kentucky’s flagship campus of higher education, the University of Kentucky, with $1.3 billion invested in campus improvements in just 3 years • Lexington was rated 6th among mid-sized cities for population with an advanced degree (U.S. Census Bureau) • $1 billion valuation in projects recently completed, underway and in pre-development within the central business district • 172 restaurants and bars in the walkable central business district contribute to the afterhours entertainment and dining options • $18.6 million annual economic impact created by the arts and culture industry in Lexington • $57 million raised by Bluegrass area start up companies, creating 272 jobs • 7,639 pedestrians through the centrally located downtown outdoor pavilion on average during a Saturday night

DISTILLERY DISTRICT / PEPPER CAMPUS There’s a lot brewing just west of the Lexington Center and Rupp Arena on Manchester Street. The Distillery District offers an exciting, “off the beaten path” experience in an area that has served many purposes over the years. From live music and the arts, to a fully functional distillery and unique industrial architecture, this growing neighborhood offers a fusion of Lexington’s historic past and active present. We’ve highlighted a few Distillery District businesses here, but you can see a full list on lexingtondistillerydistrict.com – or better yet, come out and explore this highly revitalized area for yourself.

*Downtown Development Authority’s March 2015 Market Inventory

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P t H st r, M.D.

The Lexington Clinic Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Center Orthopedic Surgeon

“Greg and Brian, I’m really sorry for getting you guys into this. I wasn’t informed about the photo shoot details. But thanks for hanging with me.”

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J h

C

LM Communications/YOUR 106.3fm On-air radio personality on “The Morning Cruz radio show”

“I believe that we all can do our part to make a difference in others lives! I feel that I have an awesome platform (Broadcast media) to help bring awareness and help the fight against breast cancer! I look forward to partnering with Susan G. Komen for years to come. And besides, I’ve been told I have nice legs, so here’s my chance to show em off in a skirt!”

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H

r W. L sl

Arthur Murray Dance Studio Owner

“I’ve never seen myself walking down a runway in a Pink Skirt... Except for such a great cause!!!!”

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K

P S

State Representative 100th District. Attorney-at-Law

“Move over Caitlyn! I think I need some Spanx!”

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Non-Profits

Clair

C

laire loves music–both singing and dancing to it. She loves the Disney princesses, playing on the playground or in bouncy houses with all her friends, and she rarely meets a chicken nugget that she doesn’t like. Claire’s Dream was to meet the Disney Princesses. In December 2014, Claire’s feeding tube was removed, and she recovered sufficiently to go on her dream trip to Orlando. She went with her family from the last few days of December 2014 through the first few days of January 2015.

If you ask Claire about her favorite part of her trip to Give Kid’s the World (where Dream kids stay while at Disney), she will mention the daily surprises that the “Gift Fairy” would bring while the family went to the amusement parks (like the stuffed animals from parks, especially Mickey Mouse and Shamu). She also enjoyed the spa treatment, getting her nails done and breakfast with Cinderella. “For our family, the trip served as a transition from primary treatment to a maintenance phase of treatment,” Claire’s father said. “It also served as an indication that ‘Claire had made it’ (for now) as there was no more radiation/chemo treatments, her feeding tube had been removed, there were no more frequent trips to the clinic to be concerned with, and she went off nearly all medication shortly before her Dream trip.” Currently, Claire faces frequent, periodic molecular imaging tests to watch for cancer recurrence (15% chance in first two years after treatment). It took a few months to fully regain her appetite and most of her strength; however she started attending school normally in January 2015 with little more than a large scar on her abdomen and still-short hair to remind her of the difficult year in 2014. Claire and her family are happy and very gracious to be a part of the Lexington Dream Factory family.

T

he Dream Factory, Inc. was founded in Hopkinsville, Kentucky in 1980. The Lexington chapter – known as the Lexington Dream Factory – grants Dreams to children ages 3-18 in the Eastern, Central and Southern Kentucky regions who have been diagnosed with critical or chronic illnesses. This year, the Lexington Dream Factory is on pace to grant the most Dreams in the organization’s history. Over the last 27 years, they have completed more than 725 dreams. Dreams are granted through the generosity of corporate sponsors and kindness of individual donors and volunteers in the community. More than 90 cents of every dollar raised goes directly to granting Dreams. 859-254-9474 | lexingtondreamfactory.org

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Proudly Sponsored by:


Non-Profits

Emily F

or nearly fourteen years, the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society has been a part of Emily Rives’ life.

At age 25, Emily was diagnosed with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), a cancer that starts in certain blood-forming cells of bone marrow. “This diagnosis was clearly a shock and life changer for my family and me,” she said. “With the support of family, friends and local doctors at the John D. Cronin Cancer Center, I began my fight with cancer.” After several consultations with doctors across the country, Emily found out that she was eligible for a clinical trial at Oregon Health Science University in Portland. The trial consisted of taking an oral chemotherapy called Gleevec. The “wonder drug” was developed largely in part from a $7.5 million grant given to OHSU by the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society in 2002. It was the first targeted cancer therapy, and the clinical trials were so successful that the FDA approved it in record time. Due in large part to the development of Gleevec and similar drugs, the five year survival rate for people with CML has nearly doubled; compared to older drugs, Gleevec has a relatively benign side effect profile. “My doctors and I agreed that it was the best option for treatment,” Emily said. “The trial lasted for 12 months and I travelled to Portland every 3 months, sometimes staying for weeks at a time.” After the year-long trial, her bone marrow biopsy showed that she had responded to Gleevec. “I was winning the fight against CML!” Emily appreciates the support the local Leukemia & Lymphoma Society office (the Kentucky & Southern Indiana Chapter) provided to her during her fight. She received financial aid that goes towards payment of her insurance premiums and co-pay obligations. “Their support and assistance has removed stress during my times of treatment,” Emily says.

Fourteen years later, Emily still takes Gleevec every day and is in complete molecular remission. “This wonder drug saved my life,” she said. “Thank you, LLS!”

T

he Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) is the largest voluntary health organization dedicated to funding research, finding cures and ensuring access to treatments for blood cancer patients. The mission of LLS is to cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease and myeloma, and improve the quality of life of patients and their families. With over 50 chapters nationwide, LLS is changing the landscape of cancer, having invested over $1 billion in blood cancer research since 1954. Through continued research partnerships with pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, patients support services, and advocates’ working for blood cancer patients everywhere, LLS believes someday without cancer is today.

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858-226-0764 lls.org/kentucky-southern-indiana


Non-Profits

Kate When Kate arrived at the Lexington Humane Society, she was in such bad shape, the staff could barely tell what kind of dog she was. Her face and neck were swollen, her ear flaps were bloody and she had a severe bite wound on her head. Overall swelling combined with 3 fractured legs made it nearly impossible for her to stand. Kate had been ferociously attacked–not by another dog or a wild animal, but by the person who owned her. The LHS staff veterinarian, Dr. Liz Ubelhor, had seen a lot in her 30+ years in veterinary medicine, but this care moved her like few others had. “Even with all of her injuries, Kate looked at me through her swollen little eyelids and licked my face. Licked my tears off as I was crying. Crying about what this poor angel had suffered at the hands of a person who was supposed to love and care for her,” Dr. Ubelhor recalled. “While she was frightened and in pain, she still had enough faith to reach out to comfort me, a person she had just met.” Kate received the immediate medical attention that she needed, the long-term foster care that she required and the showering of love and attention she deserved, all of which was made possible thanks to donations from caring individuals in the Lexington community. Most importantly, Kate was adopted into a safe, loving forever home. Kate is a picture of health and happiness, as well as a living example of what can be accomplished through the LHS, thanks to community support. While the LHS sees many cases of bad things done by bad people, they witness all the good that can be done by good, kind, caring people who want to help celebrate LOVE.

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exington Humane Society’s (LHS) Mission: “To advocate the compassionate treatment of animals; educate the community on responsible, lifelong pet ownership; and promote adoption as the best option when searching for a new pet.” LHS is a 501(c)3 organization solely dependent on private donations and community support. Among other things, LHS is the largest pet adoption agency in Central Kentucky, they care for thousands of homeless animals every year; they are an educational resource promoting a more humane community, and they spay/neuter the pets of qualifying families at a low cost.

859-233-0044 lexingtonhumanesociety.org

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Non-Profits

Dr. Ron Saykaly D

r. Ron Saykaly credits his father with teaching him life’s most significant lesson: the importance of giving back. “My father always told me that I had the ability to make a difference,” he said, “but that it was my responsibility to develop those abilities.” For many years, Dr. Saykaly was a highly respected physician at the University of Kentucky in the field of rheumatology. In addition to treating patients, conducting research and teaching the next generation of physicians, Dr. Saykaly also volunteered in clinics for low-income rheumatoid arthritis patients. “So many people have helped me in my life,” Dr. Saykaly explained. “I knew I could never repay them, so I decided to pay the debt forward.” He consulted with a trusted financial advisor about the best way to do just that. His advisor recommended Blue Grass Community Foundation.

“The Community Foundation is perfect for me,” he said. “An endowment fund at the Foundation allows me to support the projects I care about, in perpetuity–without the expense of setting up a private foundation. The staff is sensitive and caring. At the Community Foundation, I’m not just another fund—I’m an individual.” Dr. Saykaly has established four funds at the Community Foundation including the Saykaly-Garbulinska Composer in Residence Fund in memory of his late wife, concert pianist Teresa Garbulinska. Dr. Saykaly has also made plans to leave a generous bequest to the Civic Leadership Fund, which makes it possible for the Community Foundation to continue its work far into the future. “Physicians must earn their patients’ trust in order to be effective,” said Dr. Saykaly. “The Community Foundation has certainly earned mine. The Foundation’s administration of my legacy is essential to me since I have no offspring to carry out my intentions. I know I can trust the Community Foundation to pay it forward on my behalf–long after I’m gone.”

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lue Grass Community Foundation believes that one person can make a powerful impact. Since 1967, they’ve been helping donors identify their interests, establish charitable funds, meet community needs and made a difference. They work closely with donors to provide personalized services, maximum tax benefits and a wide array of planned giving opportunities. Their goal is to grow the seeds of generosity right here in the Central Kentucky community. They make charitable giving easy, effective and rewarding. Last year, grants for community good exceeded $16 million.

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859-225-3343 | bgcf.org


Non-Profits

Erica A

cancer diagnosis is a life-changing event. For patients and their families, few things are ever the same. Erica Radhakrishnan, a 41-year-old Lexington resident and endurance athlete who survived breast cancer twice, saw life change in more ways than she ever expected. “After my first diagnosis, I wanted to forget it ever happened,” Radhkrishnan said. “I didn’t want to be defined by a cancer diagnosis.” Three years later, following a second diagnosis, her views changed. “My kids were older and watching me go through this, and it really changed my perspective,” she said. “It was no longer about just me.” During her second round of treatment, Radhakrishnan met Dr. Jonathan Feddock, a Markey oncologist and fellow triathlete. “When Dr. Feddock became my physician, I talked to him about how I had competed in triathlons before my first diagnosis,” Radhakrishnan said. “I could peg right away that he was an athlete.” The two bonded over their mutual interest in competing, and Radhakrishnan credits Feddock as a driving force in helping her get back to fighting form. Feddock is not only a dedicated oncologist, he’s also a volunteer fundraiser for the Markey Cancer Center. Last year, he raised more than $150,000 to upgrade Markey’s brachytherapy suite through Ironcology.org, a fundraiser based around competing in triathlons. This year, Ironcology hosted an IronMan-length team relay triathlon called “Survive the Night.” Radhakrishnan’s team for this event included three of her own daughters and was aptly named “Kids Fighting Cancer.” Competing in the event was her way of giving back. “I’m so grateful to be alive, and I would not be alive today without the care that I received at the Markey Cancer Center,” Radhakrishnan said. “I feel a sense of responsibility to give back, and I’m grateful to be able to share hope with others.”

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ince its establishment in 1978, the UK Markey Foundation has been recognized as a forerunner in championing cancer research in Kentucky through direct support of the Markey Cancer Center. After contributing significantly to the Markey Cancer Center gaining National Cancer Institute Designation in July, 2013, their support has expanded to fund innovative research initiatives. They work with researchers across a broad spectrum of cancer fields to find and fund the best research and create better outcomes for patient treatments and care. 859-323-6448 | ukmarkey.org

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Non-Profits

Ed Caudill E

arly on meal distribution day at Papaw’s Kitchen in Carter County, Ed Caudill empties 30 pounds of pinto beans into a large vat. Better known as Papaw to his neighbors, Ed adds piles of fresh vegetables and meals from Smithfield Hams – food he received from God’s Pantry Food Bank. Before long, the pot is bubbling furiously in the commercial kitchen at the once abandoned country restaurant. Volunteers help Ed and his wife, Marilyn, pack fresh, prepared meals into the blue and white bus parked outside. They drive off to deliver 300 meals to Willard, Hitchens and Grayson twice a week. Papaw’s Chuckwagon, one of God’s Pantry Food Bank’s nearly 400 partner agencies, is a moving diner that feeds kids, seniors and families in remote towns and roadsides in Carter County. “If we see that the need is still unmet, our plan is to distribute food each Tuesday and Thursday,” explained Ed. Last year, God’s Pantry Food Bank’s partner agencies helped the organization give 21,600,000 meals to people in 50 counties in Central and Eastern Kentucky. Papaw’s Kitchen was an important part of that incredible mission. The sound of the bus’s shifting gears, hissing air brakes and chugging generator are eagerly awaited along Kentucky Highway 1. An air horn blast invites kids, seniors and families to gather at the roadside and parking lots where the bus makes its stops. Neighbors enjoy their hot meals served from the bus counter. The menu varies based on what food is available through God’s Pantry Food Bank. Chicken salad, vegetable soup and “hambo” sandwiches are also featured menu items. Meals are carried home for shut-ins and children too small or fragile to trek to the bus. Driver Junior Taylor said, “When you see the kids come up for a meal, that is my joy and blessing.”

T

he mission of God’s Pantry Food Bank is to reduce hunger in Kentucky through community cooperation making the best possible use of all available resources. Along with their network of nearly 400 member agencies, the Food Bank serves 50 counties of Central and Eastern Kentucky, distributing $100 worth of food for every $10 donated. Last year, God’s Pantry Food Bank and its member agencies distributed more than 27 million pounds of groceries, including almost 10 million pounds of fresh produce to more than 190,000 individuals. God’s Pantry is a member of Feeding America.

Proudly Sponsored by:

859-255-6592 | godspantryfoodbank.org

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Non-Profits

Jessica “W

ithout The Nest services and my own dedication, I wouldn’t have my children back in my custody,” Jessica Stickrod explained. She considers herself a success story with the help of The Nest. “My children were taken and placed in foster care for a year due to domestic violence. My case plan required me to take domestic violence and parenting classes. I had heard about The Nest through word of mouth and decided to take my classes there.” “In the beginning of it all and even throughout, I was very emotional and angry,” she remembered. The Nest was there to guide her through the rollercoaster of emotions she felt she was on, offering counseling and support. “The Nest made sure I understood the effects of domestic violence on children and advocated for me with such passion.”

Thanks to her own tenacity and the help and support The Nest provided, Jessica’s story has a happy ending. She was reunited with her children. She knew then that she wanted to give back. “I started volunteering at The Nest shortly after my children returned home. After seeing what a hard worker and valuable asset I was, The Nest offered me a part time position,” Jessica explained. She is now the Community Outreach Coordinator at The Nest. She helps clients in their Crisis Care Program and facilitates a parent support group called Moms R Us, held on the second and fourth Tuesday of the month from 11am-12pm. “The group is for mothers who are going through a struggle in life and are in need of support from other mothers with similar situations,” Jessica said. “My Passion within The Nest and myself is to make sure we build more success stories,” Jessica explained. “The Nest is my home away from home!”

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he Nest provides a safe place for education, counseling and support to children and families in crisis. They offer at no charge: childcare, domestic violence counseling and advocacy, parenting classes, and help with basic needs such as diapers, formula, or everyday toiletries for families who are struggling. The focus of The Nest centers on the prevention of child abuse and neglect and stabilization of the family unit. Their four programs work concurrently with one another to empower families to make important changes to improve their current situation. 859-259-1974 | thenestlexington.org

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Non-Profits

Jerry J

erry Hale represents the things that make the Bluegrass so great: UK basketball and horses. As a teenager, Jerry fulfilled a dream to play basketball for the University of Kentucky. Today, he can be found on the historic grounds of Keeneland, where he is the Director of Human Resources. In 1997, Jerry was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Jerry first felt his life was over as he had previously lived it. The American Diabetes Association helped provide vital information in terms of education, nutrition, resources and answering questions about living with type 1, as it is a 24/7 disease. Every decision made–whether it is diet, exercise, work, travel or sleep–revolves around living with diabetes. When it comes to statistics, Jerry is not alone. Nearly 55% of all Kentuckians have type 1, type 2 or pre-diabetes. Healthcare costs in Kentucky stand at over 5.6 billion dollars. Money raised through the Association goes to diabetes research, education, advocacy efforts and numerous programs such as Stop Diabetes at Work, Safe at School, Living with Type 2 and Family Link. As Chairman of the Bluegrass Board of Directors and Step Out Walk Corporate Chair, Jerry works tirelessly to change the future of diabetes. He also has a great family support system, ensuring that he manages his diabetes properly. His wife, three children and son-in-laws also work to make a difference through fundraising efforts and volunteer time for Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes where Jerry’s team, Hale’s Angels, partners with Team Keeneland, as well as the Association’s Kiss a Pig event during American Diabetes Month in November. Eighteen years ago, Jerry needed the American Diabetes Association. Today, he’s giving of his time and talents to help the association accomplish its mission: to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes.

T

he American Diabetes Association is the nation’s leading nonprofit health organization providing diabetes research, information and advocacy for all types of diabetes. Founded in 1940, the Association serves the community through the funding of publishing scientific findings, providing vital information, advocacy, summer camp and many other services for people with diabetes, their families and health care professionals. Through a dedicated volunteer base and the support of community partners, the Association is committed to helping all those affected by diabetes. The Association holds two major fundraising events each year including Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes and Kiss a Pig.

859-268-9129 | diabetes.org

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Non-Profits

Jenny Cox & Sara Donkin J

enny Cox was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease two years ago. However, she started showing signs about a year earlier. “At Thanksgiving she was looking for a casserole dish, and she was looking for it in places where a casserole dish won’t even fit, like under a piece of foil,” said Sara Donkin, Jenny’s daughter. Jenny and Sara first came to the Alzheimer’s Association as participants in an Early Stage Support Group. Sara reported that she didn’t know much about the disease. “[I] didn’t know what to do and was feeling upset, overwhelmed and just needing some guidance,” she explained. So, she signed up her mother and herself for an eight-week Early Stage Support Group for people in the early stages of Alzheimer’s and their care partners. “I made a lifelong friend from being in that group,” said Sara. Even though the friend has lost her loved one to Alzheimer’s, they remain close, talking regularly. After attending the support group, Sara became involved in other family caregiver programming, learning how to provide good care for her mother as well as care for herself. When asked how the Alzheimer’s Association has helped her, she replied, “I know that I am not alone and that there are resources to help. When I don’t have anyone else to call, I know that I can pick up the phone and call and talk to April or Renee. If it weren’t for them, I don’t know what I would have done.” As a result of her initial attendance of the support group, Sara has become involved as a volunteer and team captain for the Walk to End Alzheimer’s®, raising funds for caregiver support and research both in Kentucky and across the nation. Sara’s final words on her relationship with the Alzheimer’s Association and the staff of the Lexington office: “I love them.”

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he Alzheimer’s Association Greater Kentucky and Southern Indiana Chapter covers a 125 county area across Kentucky and southern Indiana. In Lexington, the chapter’s branch office serves central and eastern Kentucky, including Fayette and surrounding counties. Services provided include education programs for persons with dementia, caregivers, professionals and the general community as well as support groups and a 24/7 Helpline. Further, the Chapter actively advocates at state and national levels of government for research and support services on behalf of Kentuckians who suffer from Alzheimer’s disease.

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800.272.3900 | alz.org


Non-Profits

Landon L

andon Hoover is a fighter. Born more than three months premature when his mom went into pre-term labor, Landon’s umbilical cord was wrapped around his head twice and he had a brain bleed. After being delivered via emergency C-section, he then required a ventilator for the first two months of his life as his lungs matured. After three months in the neonatal intensive care unit, with additional time in a transitional facility, he finally joined his parents at home. Eventually at age two, Landon was diagnosed with mild cerebral palsy, a neurological disorder that primarily affects body movement and muscle coordination. Soon after Landon’s diagnosis, the Hoovers relocated to Kentucky and quickly learned of Child Development Center of the Bluegrass (CDCB) and the center’s reputation for helping kids with special needs. They hoped to find a secure environment for their son that allowed him to continue the therapy services he was receiving before the move. With CDCB, they found that and more. CDCB provides dedicated gyms for occupational, physical and speech therapy and on-staff therapists that can work with Landon not only during his therapy sessions, but in his classroom as well. The Hoovers were also attracted to CDCB’s integrated classrooms where children with and without special needs learn and play sideby-side, something his mom feels has been essential to Landon’s progress. “It’s a win-win,” she said. “The kids without special needs also benefit because they learn to see their friend, not a child with disabilities. At CDCB, Landon is not made to feel he’s different from anyone else.” Today, Landon is a happy, active five year-old with a love of construction vehicles, playing outdoors and the Despicable Me movies. “At some point Landon will realize he has a disability,” said his mom, “But the confidence he has gained during his time at CDCB will always be with him.”

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ounded in 1958, Child Development Center of the Bluegrass is committed to ensuring all children reach their full potential by providing high-quality therapy services, preschool and child care programs that benefit children with and without special needs. On an annual basis, CDCB serves more than 400 children from central Kentucky and, since its inception, has reached over 10,000 children and families. The Child Development Center of the Bluegrass at the University of Kentucky is accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children and has received an exemplary 4-Star rating in Kentucky’s STARS for Kids Now voluntary rating system.

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859-218-2322 | cdcbg.org


Non-Profits

Linda I

n March of 2015, Linda Townsend called Kentucky CancerLink after seeing an ad on television for a free colon cancer screening kit. She had not been to the doctor recently and a free do-it-yourself test kit seemed fairly easy to use. After speaking with one of KCL’s patient navigators, the staff was concerned that Linda had not seen a doctor in several years. Although Linda had recently signed up for health insurance, she had been unable to locate a physician who would accept her as a new patient. Kentucky CancerLink was determined to help solve that problem. Kentucky CancerLink had the privilege of working closely with Linda to find a doctor near her home. An appointment was scheduled for her to have a complete physical, including a mammogram, pap smear and blood work. In the meantime, Linda completed the free colon cancer screening kit she previously requested from Kentucky CancerLink. The results came back positive, which signified the need for follow up with a physician. The timing for her to see her new doctor could not have been better! Linda’s new doctor referred her for a colonoscopy, in addition to the many tests and screenings for which she had already been scheduled. Fortunately, Linda’s story is a happy one. After visiting her new doctor, undergoing a physical exam and having important screening tests, Linda has been determined to be in relatively good health! She is so appreciative of the help and assistance she received from the caring people at Kentucky CancerLink and she says there just aren’t enough words for her to say thank you! The staff of Kentucky CancerLink considers it a privilege to serve people like Linda and others throughout the state of Kentucky.

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entucky CancerLink (KCL), formerly known as Kentucky Pink Connection, was founded in April 2008, as a 501(c) (3) non-profit organization. In April 2014, they expanded their services to all cancers. Their mission is to provide support to uninsured and underserved Kentuckians by reducing and/or eliminating barriers to screening, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. They provide patient navigation assistance, including arranging for cancer screenings, such as mammograms and colon cancer screenings, as well as assistance related to transportation and health insurance. Supplies such as mastectomy supplies, lymphedema garments, wigs, and headwear are also available to cancer patients and survivors.

859-309-1700 | kycancerlink.org

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Non-Profits

Braggin Rights W

hen the dirty gray Thoroughbred mare arrived at Our Mims Retirement Haven last November, she was quickly nicknamed “Lady Jane” because her real identity wasn’t known. Donated by an owner unable to care for the mare after rescuing her from a kill buyer’s pen, she needed special attention. Haven founder Jeanne Mirabito knew exactly what to do: evaluate the horse’s health, determine a feeding regimen, and give the mare a bath. The Haven’s vet guessed Lady Jane’s age to be about 25 and in decent condition considering the unknown circumstances of her past experiences. An identification kit was purchased from The Jockey Club, tests were made, and results were sent in. Tests were made and results sent in, and a phone call confirmed Lady Jane to be Braggin Rights and not a 25-year-old mare at all, but a 1996 foal out of Jodi Z by Iroquois Park. No longer unnamed, Brags was now settled in with the Haven’s herd of ten Thoroughbreds, including 1997 Breeders’ Cup™ Sprint winner Elmhurst. Established as a nonprofit in 2006 as a sanctuary for retired Thoroughbred broodmares and based in Paris, Our Mims Retirement Haven is dependent on donations and grants to keep its Ladies and Gent healthy, happy, and thriving. Thoroughbred Charities of America supports the Haven with yearly grants. Says Mirabito: “The TCA has provided funds for major improvements that are critical to the well-being and safety of our elder equines. It’s the little things that are most often taken for granted, barn doors to block the wind and fans to cool heated bodies. We feel the love from TCA every day.” Learn more about Our Mims Retirement Haven by visiting OurMims.org

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ormed in 1990, TCA’s mission is to provide a better life for Thoroughbreds, both during and after their racing careers by supporting retirement, rescue and research and by helping the people who care for them. TCA raises money for distribution to charitable organizations working to uphold this mission in four categories including: Thoroughbred rescue, retirement, retraining and adoption; research; backstretch and education programs; and therapeutic riding programs. Over the past 25 years, TCA has granted more than $21 million to over 200 Thoroughbred-related charities. TCA’s largest annual fundraiser is a Stallion Season Auction held each January. TCA is the charitable arm of the Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association (TOBA). 859-276-4989 | tca.org

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Non-Profits

Michael U

nderneath a cloud of alcoholism and unemployment, Michael Smith found the determination and empowerment he needed to live instead of just existing. As a senior citizen and military veteran, Smith came to the Urban League of Lexington – Fayette County needing steady income. He had worked in various positions before and was poised to do anything to improve his current condition. Through word of mouth, Smith heard about the Urban League’s Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) which placed seniors in nonprofit organizations to gain the experience and training they needed to pursue unsubsidized employment. Within three days of enrolling in the program, Smith was interviewed and hired as a volunteer custodian for the Urban League’s main office. The SCSEP program pays volunteers a training stipend which helps them make ends meet. “I remember getting that first paycheck and I knew that things were looking up,” said Smith. Smith was reliable and capable and his efforts did not go unnoticed. “Mr. Mike did so well as a custodian that we began training him as a receptionist,” said Annissa Franklin, Chief Administrative Officer. As a receptionist, Smith was greeting constituents, answering the phones, writing letters, filing, and learning about office equipment and maintenance. Smith says his battle with alcoholism had shaped his unstable history, but it was the Urban League’s empowerment that helped him to earn and learn while investing in his future. SCSEP also helped Smith to take advantage of his military benefits by accessing the Veterans Retraining Assistance Program. He enrolled at the National College of Business and earned a diploma in Business Administration Management. “The Urban League not only helped me with job training, but helped me in finding a place to live,” said Smith. “I’ve been at their Elm Tree Lane apartments for about five years now. I haven’t lived that long in one place in a while.”

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he Urban League of Lexington – Fayette County was founded in 1968 to assist African Americans and disadvantaged citizens in the achievement of social and economic equality. The League empowers the community and changes lives through providing affordable housing for low-income families. They currently have 43 singlefamily properties and 51 apartments for senior citizens. They provide youth and educational services which includes academic tutoring for elementary students, gang and violence prevention services, college scholarships, financial literacy, and parent leadership training. Their workforce and professional development programs provide opportunities for personal growth. The League is empowering the community and changing lives.

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859-233-1561 | ullexfay.org

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Non-Profits

Matthew M

eet Matthew: a bassoon player in the Central Kentucky Youth Orchestras (CKYO).

Matthew auditioned for CKYO, an organization significantly funded by LexArts, in the seventh grade. He started playing the clarinet the year before and, noting his constant search for a challenge, his music teachers finally handed him a bassoon to try. “That August,” his mother remembers, “his instructor told us that CKYO was one bassoon short and recommended Matthew try out… He jumped at the chance.” Matthew’s audition was right before the first rehearsal of the season. Right after his audition, Daniel Chetel, CKYO Music Director and Conductor, invited him to stay. “That night,” his mother goes on, “we asked how it went and he said ‘I’ve found my home.’” Matthew found more than just an orchestra when he joined CKYO. He found camaraderie and opportunities to match his desire to improve.

“The conductors are really great so you can get better quickly,” he says. “You also get to know a lot of people and become friends… at the same time you know they are going to try hard so you’ll end up with a good performance. It’s a lot of fun.” Most of all, Matthew gained newfound perseverance and confidence that will extend beyond high school. “Matthew would purposely remove himself from the fray…” his mother recalls, “but being in CKYO gave him a boost. It taught him the importance of patience and practice.” Matthew spent one year each in CKYO’s repertory and concert orchestras before successfully auditioning for the symphony this past spring. Now an upcoming sophomore at Lafayette High School, Matthew experiences continued success in music. He earned a chair in the All-State band as a freshman and will play in his school’s wind symphony. “A big part of it is due to CKYO,” his mother says. “CKYO takes kids like Matthew and gives them a space and a path for their passion to develop.” We are so grateful for the opportunity to grow and learn that CKYO provides our kids.” LexArts proudly supports arts organizations like Central Kentucky Youth Orchestras which foster creativity in young people, enable them to develop their passions and enhance their attitudes about themselves and their futures.

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or over 40 years, LexArts has been an incubator of arts innovation, a steward of philanthropic generosity, and an advocate for the economic and cultural well-being of central Kentucky. An investment in LexArts is an investment in Lexington.

859-255-2951 | lexarts.org

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Non-Profits

Shawn “I

wasted years and years of my life in active addiction,” said Shawn, a Hope Center Detention Center Recovery Program and Men’s Recovery Program alumnus. “I never faced responsibility, I never had any ambition or direction.” The only job Shawn could hold down was working for his brothers, who were roofers. “We used to come to the Hope Center to pick up workers. We thought we were so much better than them – never mind that I was living on people’s couches and on the streets, or in jail; I hadn’t quite figured out that I was in the same boat as some of them,” Shawn explained. “I was a three-time convicted felon – no relationship with my children, no relationship with my family – completely alone.” Then, Shawn said a miracle happened: a judge sent him to the Hope Center. “It was my last shot,” said Shawn. “They were talking about acceptance and honesty and all the spiritual principles. It was all completely opposite to the way I lived.” Shawn says the counselor in his program really spoke to him. “He told me about his past, and it really resonated with me. Except unlike me, he was smiling, and full of joy. He asked me, ‘What do you want from life? How about joy?’ I said yes,” Shawn recalled. Upon release from prison, Shawn went straight to the Hope Center Recovery Program. He and a friend have started their own roofing company and named it in honor of the Hope Center. “I’ve been teaching classes at the Hope Center since 2007, and I’m at the jail several times a week. I employ guys who’ve completed the program,” Shawn said. “The last place on the planet I wanted to be was the place I needed to be the most.”

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ince 1993, the Hope Center mission has stayed the same: to care for homeless and at-risk persons by providing life-sustaining and life-rebuilding services that are comprehensive and address underlying causes. The Hope Center is not just a homeless shelter, but a comprehensive group of programs designed to get the homeless off the streets and keep them off. The root causes of homelessness vary widely. Each person who enters the Hope Center’s doors is unique, and in need of a unique set of resources. The goal is to provide each of them with the tools they need to rebuild their lives. 859-252-7881 | hopectr.org

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Non-Profits

Kris “I

t was 10pm and I was frantically finishing the baby registry for our twin girls, Kaylin and Tennyson, before returning to work from winter break,” said Kris Church. She remembers that her husband, their families and community were so excited to meet the girls. “Tragically, the next morning, I began to experience complications.”

Hueit Photography

Kris delivered the twins at 21 ½ weeks. “We felt their hearts beat and hushed their murmured cries as we rocked them into a forever sleep,” Kris explained. The girls were so small and born so early, they weren’t able to be provided with resuscitation. “We left the hospital with empty arms, in complete shock that this could happen.”

“After our loss, I immediately sought out support and was determined to make our girls’ lives matter,” Kris explained. She found the March of Dimes and began learning all she could about premature birth; she discovered that one of the major missions of March of Dimes is to prevent preterm birth. “This information was enough to put my husband and me into action. In honor of Kaylin and Tennyson, we raised more than $8,000 for March of Dimes so more families can leave the hospital with healthy babies.” Kris’s story has become one of celebration. “This April, God blessed us with another little girl, Emerson Blakely. Due to March of Dimes’ research on the causes of premature birth, my doctors were able to provide me with medications in interventions in order to carry Emerson to term,” she said. She and her family were chosen as the Ambassador Family for the 2015 March of Dimes Greater Bluegrass Signature Chef ’s Auction on October 9th. “The March of Dimes has helped us make sense of a great loss and given us hope for the future. I’m thankful for every day that my life’s journey includes this great organization.”

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he mission of the March of Dimes is to improve the health of babies by preventing birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality. Nationally, 1 in 10 babies is born too soon; in Kentucky, it’s 1 in 9 babies. This is truly a community cause and locally, the Bluegrass Division partners with corporate, medical and community leaders to raise funds, where 76 cents of every dollar directly supports mission. At local fundraising events, community Ambassador Families are featured to share their stories providing hope, encouragement, and comfort to those affected by the mission.

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800-255-5857 marchofdimes.org/kentucky


Non-Profits

Mollie & Tom I

t has been said that cancer will touch everyone’s lives. It was not until this past year that Mollie Jameson experienced the full impact of that statement. Her husband, Tom, was diagnosed with cancer. “As Tom received his treatments at the Markey Cancer Center,” Mollie said, “we both experienced a unique non-medical respite that provided a sense of peace and serenity.” In July of last year, she and Tom often found themselves sitting in the Markey Center’s lobby, looking out the windows and listening to piano music while awaiting his treatments. “We watched busy gardeners working outside,” Mollie said. She was curious. “One afternoon, I asked about the project.” Mollie was told that The Lexington Cancer Foundation was funding a Healing Garden in partnership with the Markey Cancer Center and Henkel-Denmark for the patients to enjoy. “This meant a garden that was healthy in the plants and materials, yet created a space that was healing for the spirit and the body,” Mollie explained. By August and September, Tom was receiving full chemotherapy and radiation. Meanwhile, the LCF Healing Garden had been completed. “Many hours were spent meeting friends at the tables and my children would walk our dogs over. Tom and I would just sit and relax, go out to breath the fresh air and pray,” she said. “I was so thankful for the blessings the garden gave me, feeling of being protected and enclosed yet being able to watch the world go by.” In May of this year, Tom had a final surgery with successful results. “He had a follow-up appointment, and as we left, I asked if we could walk past the Garden,” Mollie said. “I wanted to say a prayer for those who were now being protected inside the beauty of the LCF Healing Garden.”

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he Lexington Cancer Foundation is a non-profit organization whose philanthropic mission is to create awareness and raise funds in the fight against cancer. The Foundation is also dedicated to improving the quality of healthcare for cancer patients. Since 2004, millions of dollars have been raised in support of our mission for cancer programs throughout the Commonwealth. 859-388-2620 lexingtonfoundation.org

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Non-Profits

Liz L

iz Noffsinger began working as a Court Appointed Special Advocate or CASA in 2012 and has been matched with nine children over her casework. “I’ve always been dedicated to helping children, especially due to circumstances that are out of their control,” said Noffsinger. Noffsinger is a Psychotherapist and worked in the private sector for many years until starting a family. As Noffsinger’s son grew up she felt the need to commit her time to other children in her community. She went through training with CASA of Lexington and was sworn in as a CASA. She has served as a CASA on three cases, with a total of nine children. Through casework Noffsinger saw firsthand the impact of CASA in helping children receive needed services such as medical and mental health care and education. “It was gratifying to see the direct result of my advocacy,” said Noffsinger. One of the children she worked with experienced severe physical and sexual abuse. “When a six year old says to you, ‘Please don’t make me go back to the house that hurts me,’ you realize how important and life changing the work is,” said Noffsinger. By advocating for trauma care for the child and ultimately permanency in a stable, nurturing home this child now has the opportunity to achieve all of his dreams! He had his first ever birthday party and was so excited his presents would not be pawned and he could keep them.

Committed to CASA’s mission, their unduplicated service and seeing the need Noffsinger joined CASA of Lexington as a Volunteer Manager in 2014. Volunteer Managers are paid staff that supervise up to 30 CASA advocates, in compliance with National CASA standards and Kentucky Revised Statutes, ensuring the appropriate level of supervision and support to the volunteers. However, it does limit the number of children that can be served. In 2014 CASA of Lexington served 284 children, but there were 980 additional children they could not serve due to their staffing. Kentucky is one of eight states with no state funding for CASA, so programs rely on support of individuals and the community to serve the children they provide advocacy to.

859-246-3413 lexingtoncasa.com

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CASA of Lexington is a volunteer driven non-profit which recruits, trains and supervises volunteer child advocates (CASAs). These volunteers advocate for the best interests of children in the family court system that have been removed from their homes due to abuse, neglect or dependency and work to ensure that all victims of child abuse and neglect are given a chance to thrive in a safe, permanent home. CASAs provide an independent voice for children, one child at a time and focus solely on what is best for the children. They also provide vital information to help judges make the most informed decision possible.

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Non-Profits

Isaiah & Jim L

ittle Brother Isaiah and Big Brother Jim were matched in the fall of 2007, when Isaiah was just 9 years old. Jim remembers Isaiah as a young child with a lot of anger. Over the last 9 years, Jim has watched Isaiah grow into a young man who is now the recipient of a full academic scholarship to Kentucky State University, where Isaiah will start college this fall. Jim says it has been a pleasure to be Isaiah’s Big and views them as friends for life. Jim gives a lot of credit for Isaiah’s transformation to the boy’s Father, Michael, for providing a stable home environment when Isaiah moved in with him at the age of 12. Isaiah had experienced significant trauma as a young child, which led to his anger. “I guess he needed me as much as I needed him,” is how Michael describes the timing and circumstances of Isaiah coming to live with him. Michael recognizes and appreciates the consistent and positive presence that Jim has been in Isaiah’s life. Michael recognized that Jim filled an important role as another positive male, especially when Michael was working long hours as a startup small business owner. Michael recalls countless times when he called Jim and they would talk at length. “I knew I could always call Jim to talk about Isaiah”. Regarding Isaiah and his accomplishments, Michael says “I’m so proud of him” and “he’s become an incredible young man.” Isaiah is now old enough to also appreciate and express what Jim means to him. Isaiah points out that Jim “came to my baptism at church and nearly every one of my band concerts.” While Isaiah is thankful to BBBS, he says he doesn’t view Jim as a volunteer from a program, but “more like a friend or uncle.”

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or more than 100 years, Big Brothers Big Sisters has operated under the belief that inherent in every child is the ability to succeed and thrive in life. As the nation’s largest donor and volunteer supported mentoring network, Big Brothers Big Sisters makes meaningful, monitored matches between adult volunteers (“Bigs”) and children (“Littles”), ages 6 through 18, in communities across the country. In 2015, Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Bluegrass was one of ten agencies named a Gold Standard Agency by BBBS of America for their commitment to the children they serve in Central Kentucky.

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859-231-88181 bbbs-bluegrass.org


Non-Profits

PCAK 5K Prevent Child Abuse Kentucky (PCAK) works with churches, athletic organizations and other community serving groups surrounding best practices for keeping kids safe while in their care. The Commit to Prevent Child Sexual Abuse project is impacting communities like the congregation of First Christian Church in Georgetown. Experts estimate one in 10 children are sexually abused before their 18th birthday. Ninety percent (90%) of children who are victims of sexual abuse know their abuser, thus eliminating the “stranger danger philosophy.” Often, offenders seek out situations where they have access to families and children. Open discussions about the realities of child sexual abuse and the importance of prevention led to the development and implementation of child protection policies for all church staff and volunteers involved with children’s activities. Best practices include background checks for volunteers, eliminating one-adult, one-child situations, providing child abuse and neglect prevention training and more. One of the events offered by PCAK is their annual 5K Run/Walk, held each April. “When we first heard about the 5k to raise awareness, I was amazed at how many called our office and said ‘yes, I would love to commit to this cause’,” said Rev. Shayanna Hutchinson, the church’s Senior Minister. “Disciples of Christ strive to be a movement for wholeness in a fragmented world. Prevent Child Abuse KY gave us the opportunity to actually move–physically, communally, and for my family personally–towards a more just and whole future for the children in our Kentucky family.” In addition to members of their congregation participating, church member Gary Kinkaid served on the planning committee of the 5K, deepening the church’s commitment to the cause of prevention. PCAK is grateful for the partnership with First Christian Church of Georgetown and their members. Their dedication to child abuse and neglect prevention is an example of the community support needed to protect children.

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revent Child Abuse Kentucky (PCAK) is Kentucky’s premier statewide, nonprofit child abuse prevention organization, and their sole mission is preventing the abuse and neglect of Kentucky’s children. They strive to accomplish this mission through evidence-based prevention programs, public education, community awareness and advocacy. Their toll-free parent helpline (1-800-CHILDREN), parent education and support groups, training, public education campaigns, fatherhood education programs, and statewide material distribution are the mainstays of the organization. By engaging communities and organizations in the prevention of child abuse and neglect, PCAK can make a difference!

859-225-8879 | pcaky.org

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Non-Profits

Perry Cate P

erry Catherine Foster was two days old when Vish Talwalkar, M.D., pediatric orthopaedic surgeon at Shriners Hospitals for Children—Lexington, met her for the first time. Born with a host of physical deformities, including severe scoliosis, an unformed left hip, left leg-length discrepancy, missing and fused vertebra, no rib cage on her left side, and her kidneys and bladder grown together, Perry Cate had already defied the odds by surviving birth itself. Dr. Talwalkar had the unenviable task of telling her parents, Scott and Carlola, that their daughter would probably never sit, walk or stand. After two weeks, doctors sent her home from the hospital with a three-week life expectancy. Perry Cate went home and did what she does best—she lived. “When she hit six months, we were like, ‘Now what?’” said Carlola. “We came home from the hospital and prepared ourselves for the idea that she would die. Soon we realized we needed to prepare for the idea that she would live, even with the issues she was facing.” When Perry Cate was three, Dr. Talwalkar wanted to implant a titanium rib to help straighten, strengthen, and lengthen her spine. At the time, the FDA had not approved the implant for that purpose, but Dr. Talwalkar never let it go. Five years later, when the implant was approved for Perry’s case, he learned how to perform the implant for her. “Dr. Talwalkar is her champion,” said Carlola. “We’ve been blessed by Shriners. They gave our child her life.” Today, Perry Cate is an active 14-year-old sophomore at East Jessamine High. She loves to draw, act, sing, and write fan fiction. Science is her favorite subject, and she hopes to be a forensic investigator someday. “Shriners Hospital didn’t just give me a new beginning,” added Perry Cate. “It gave me a chance to be.”

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hriners Hospitals for Children is a health care system with 22 locations in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. Their staff is dedicated to improving the lives of children by providing pediatric specialty care, conducting innovative research, and offering outstanding teaching programs for medical professionals. Children up to age 18 with orthopaedic conditions, burns, spinal cord injuries, and clef lip and palate are eligible for care, regardless of the families’ ability to pay. All services are provided in a compassionate, family-centered environment.

859-266-2101 shrinershospitalsforchildren.org/locations/lexington

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Non-Profits

Trust for Life T

he Buffingtons moved to Lexington in 2012, leaving their entire lives in Pennsylvania behind. Just two months after their move, Ryan’s health problems began. Three 911 calls were made over the course of three months due to low blood sugar episodes. Ryan’s kidney disease was diagnosed in March of 2014, and that’s when their journey to finding an organ match began. Early on October 10, 2014 they received a call the hospital might have a match for Ryan. At 12:40pm, their phone rang again. They were instructed, “Dr. Diwan wants you to leave right now.” Bridgit hung up, called Ryan, and within a few minutes they were on their way. For the next 11 hours, they waited, unsure if the transplant was going to happen. At 4:30am, the nurse looked at Bridgit and said, “They’re ready. Time to give him a hug and kiss goodbye.” Bridgit couldn’t help but gasp at the weight of that statement. Choking back tears, she wrapped her arms around Ryan and tried to focus on that moment for as long as she could. “It’s okay. Be strong,” he said. After an intense 8 hour wait, Bridgit was allowed into Ryan’s room. She approached his bed with caution, scared of what he might look like, but was relieved. Despite all of the wires, machines and tubes, he looked much better than she thought he would. Today, Ryan is almost fully recovered from his transplant. “This has been a new beginning for our entire family, she said. The Buffingtons are forever grateful for Ryan’s donor, who was just 19 years old. Bridgit says, “I wish so badly that I could hug this angel’s family and tell them what a miraculous gift has resulted from their tragic loss. This individual donor has done for Ryan what doctors could not. He has cured Ryan’s diabetes.”

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he KY Circuit Court Clerks’ Trust For Life is a 501c3 non-profit organization dedicated to educating Kentuckians about the lifesaving mission of organ donation. How do they do it? With the dollars raised at the Circuit Court Clerk’s office and grants from their partners Kosair Charities and KODA, they have programs that answer questions, dispel myths, and empower Kentuckians to “be hope” by registering as a donor. Fayette County Circuit Court Clerk, Vincent Riggs supports this life saving mission by encouraging his driver’s license staff to ask the two questions that help save lives! Join the Kentucky organ donor registry today! 502-694-3015 | donatelifeky.org

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Non-Profits

Eldaafer M

any of the equine retirees at Old Friends, the Thoroughbred Retirement Facility in Georgetown, KY, come with Jockey Club papers, past performance records, some even arrive with winner-circle photos or thank you notes from owners. But Eldaafer, the now 10 year old gelding who won the Breeders’ Cup Marathon in 2010, came with…goats, the indefatigable Yahoo and Google. Since they arrived, “they’ve been like the Secret Service and he’s the President,” said Old Friends founder and President Michael Blowen. Back in 2010 at the height of Eldaafer’s racing career, his connections were unaware of the bond that had formed Friends founder Michael Blowen with Breeders Cup winner Eldaafer and his trusted companions Google (left) and Yahoo. PHOTO BY RICK CAPONE between the unlikely threesome. When Eldaafer traveled north to Kentucky to run in the Turfway Park Fall Championship Stakes, he was practically psychotic–pacing, sweating, stall walking. The folks on the backstretch at Turfway were worried, and called his connections in Florida. “He’s acting crazy,” they said. Turns out, the goats were doing the same thing. They put Yahoo and Google on the next plane. Once reunited, the friends settled down, and the next day Eldaafer went out and won the race. “Walt Disney couldn’t make this up,” said Blowen. After suffering an injury in 2013, Eldaafer was retired by his trainer, Diane Alvarado. At Old Friends, the horse and his BFFs are still inseparable; the goats never leave Eldaafer’s side, though a curious Yahoo once figured out how to slip under the paddock fence. Their antics are a delight to the throngs of tourists that visit the farm every day to see not only Eldaafer and his buds, but also Breeders’ Cup Champion Gulch, Belmont Stakes winner Sarava, six-and-a-half-million-dollar man Game on Dude, and Kentucky Derby winner Silver Charm, among many other retired stars of the turf. “I like to tell people about Eldaafer’s amazing accomplishments,” says tour guide Lisa Wood, “but in the end, all people want to hear about are the goats.”

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ld Friends, the Thoroughbred Retirement Facility in Georgetown, KY was founded in 2003 by former Boston Globe film critic Michael Blowen with the mission to provide a dignified retirement to horses whose racing or breeding careers had ended. What began with one horse on a leased paddock has flourished into a 136acre farm with over 100 horses and a satellite facility in New York. Old Friends now cares for more than 150 Thoroughbreds. The farm is open daily to tourists by appointment.

502-863-1775 | oldfriendsequine.org

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Gardening

CSA Keeps It Local Community Supported Agriculture, better known as CSA, has been around for decades, but at the rate it is spreading these days you would think it’s something novel and new. CSA allows consumers to buy local, seasonal, farm fresh produce directly from the grower. Farmers offer shares of their crop for a purchase price, which is paid in advance. In return, the members (or subscribers as they are typically called) get a box, bag, or basket of produce each week during the growing season. Farmers benefit from the direct sale and investment early in the season and buyers get the healthy bounty and peace of mind knowing exactly where their food is coming from. Laura Hayden has a share from The Shambles, an urban farm off Versailles Road in Lexington. “My schedule can make it difficult for me to shop regularly at the Farmers Market and it is so convenient to have a bundle delivered weekly to my place of employment,” Hayden said. The cornucopia of goodness has the added bonus of challenging shareholders to try something new since you never know for sure what may end up in your weekly basket. “I love trying new things and this encourages me to think outside of my typical grocery list. It also fits my personality of wanting to explore different recipes firsthand!” Hayden said. CSA’s are not limited to vegetables. You can purchase shares of eggs, chicken, beef, flowers, fruits, herbs, and even locally produced cheese. Kentucky farmers have diversified which makes for plentiful options. Annual cost depends on length of harvest season. Each farmer budgets and takes into consideration their capital expenses like land, equipment, and irrigation. There are operating expenses, which include the cost of seeds, soil, and water. “More than 90% of our seed & seed stock is not only heirloom but organic. We use only natural amendments like aged manure to build the health of the soil,” says Laura Clark of the Shambles. She handles the farming. Her sister June Laves takes care of marketing. All of that takes a lot of time, which has a value too. Once the budget is determined the share prices are set. There are shares to fit most budgets and needs. Some are as low as $5 a week up to $30. Your needs dictate the amount you receive. Mini or half shares feed a single person or a couple that does not do a lot of cooking. A regular/ full share meets the weekly veggie needs of a couple or small family. There are also robust shares for large families or singles/couples who are vegetarians. Laves of The Shambles sums it up simply, “Share the costs to share the harvest.” Shares are limited so it’s a good idea to plan ahead and sign up well before the growing season begins. Even though I grow my own vegetables and herbs in the spring and summer, my garden is small which limits how much I can grow. And let’s be realistic, how many of us are raising our own cattle and chickens? But I sure like the idea of locally raised meats and eggs. So a CSA is great for the small home gardener who would like to supplement what they have as well as those who don’t have the time or desire to grow their own food. For Laura Hayden, it’s fun and rewarding knowing a local farmer is benefiting from her participation. “I love the thought that my veggies are being grown locally, organically and I am obtaining them at their freshest and the peak time!”, she said.

Photos by Chet White

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There are more than fifty CSA’s across Kentucky. Nearly a dozen of them are right here in Lexington, Scott, and Clark counties. To see the full list and learn more, visit kyagr.com and search for CSA.

by Michelle Rauch Gardening Enthusiast


TOPS IN EQUINE

When she speaks to students, Cobb emphasizes accounting as a stepping stone to management positions. After Deloitte, she worked in finance for a company called Treasure Isles that operated some Long John Silver’s and Fazoli’s restaurants. She even explored the idea of becoming a Long John Silver’s franchisee herself shortly before 9/11. Instead, she was called to meet with representatives at Dean Dorton Ford, the accounting firm conducting an audit at the Red Mile.

The live racing season at the Red Mile runs 10 weeks from summer to early fall. This year’s dates for the Standardbred meet are July 26 to Oct. 10. The addition of joint simulcasting and historical wagering will take the Red Mile from a year-round employment base of about 50 people to close to 300 employees. “I think right now is the year we’ve worked for, for 13 years,” Cobb said. ”It is so exciting to see.” A native of Owenton, Kentucky, one of her earliest memories is when she played with her cousins on her grandfather’s farm, the three of them trotting around on a pony named Star. “I’m an animal lover of all types,” Cobb said. She attended county horse shows with her grandparents, “being awed by the beautiful horses and riders, the organ music, the great atmosphere,” she said. “My grandfather, who recently passed away at 93, actually showed Saddlebred horses at the fairs when he was young and must have been pretty good. When he passed, we found hosts of blue ribbons stored away.” When it was time for Cobb to attend college, she went to UK and majored in accounting. “I saw myself as an attorney,” she said. “It was all about getting a good business degree that I thought would parlay into a corporate law field, which I intended to pursue.” She took a CPA position with Deloitte & Touche for two years, a national company with a Lexington office at the time. She assumed she would go on to law school, but you know what they say about the best-laid plans often going awry. “I’m not a bit sorry,” Cobb said of her career path. “It’s interesting how much crossover there is in business between financial and legal types of activities.” As the Red Mile’s CFO, she gets to blend the left-brain elements of detail and precision with right-brain creativity. “That really helps you to be a better business person,” she said. “The accounting has helped my creative side and the creative side has helped my business side. There has never been a day I don’t enjoy my work. It’s always captivating.”

“I sat down with them and with Joe Costa,” Cobb said of the Red Mile’s president and CEO. “I really got entranced with the idea of trying to revive the Red Mile and bring it back to its glory. It was a challenging business model in a tough industry.” She saw the commitment and passion of the ownership group, and in early 2002 accepted the position of CFO. “What I remember first was learning what seemed like a foreign language,” she said. The lingo of the racing business—pari-mutuel, handles, payoffs— was new to her, but she caught on quickly and hasn’t looked back. In her spare time, Cobb is an avid reader and amateur photographer. She also enjoys yoga. She and her husband, Tim, who is also from Owen County, have been married since 1987 and have two daughters. The Cobbs have two dogs, a mini Pom and Lhasa-poo. They just lost their beloved Madison, a golden retriever. A nature lover, Shannon Cobb is often teased about her insistence on saving a 300-year-old bur oak tree in front of the Red Mile property. It sits right smack in the middle of the Red Mile’s planned “town green roadway” and would have been much easier from a development point to take down. “I argued passionately for its life and threatened to strap myself to it,” Cobb said. “Now it will be the center point of the town green and the road goes around it on each side. It’s now jokingly referred to as Shannon’s Tree.”

(photos of Shannon Cobb by Keni Parks)

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TOPS IN EQUINE

The AKC National Owner-Handled Series will be held during this time frame as well. More than 80% of show dogs are handled by their owners, and this AKC Series honors these handler-owners by providing the opportunity to compete against other handlerowners in the conformation ring. The Canine Good Citizen Testing promotes responsible dog ownership by administering a short behavioral evaluation to determine if a dog is well mannered. The goal is good citizenship for all dogs. As a special bonus, Meet the Breeds will be featured in the show rings during lunch intermissions in the judging schedule. This is a great opportunity to meet and talk with some of the owners of the different dog breeds to learn about the breed’s unique characteristics and features. With all the hustle and bustle of the competitions, don’t forget to set aside some time to check out the vast array of doggie goodies and supplies that aren’t found just everywhere. Whether you are interested in the fun canine accessories, nutritional food/supplements, digital paintings of dog breeds, or animal communication, this is the place to find what you’re looking for… or maybe find something you didn’t know you needed.

Dressage (which means “training” in French) opens up the Trials, and this phase of the competition is designed to demonstrate the horse’s ability to perform complex movements in an enclosed area with flexibility and balance in obedience to the body signals of the rider. Each movement is scored for the degree of precision and smoothness, as is the level of effective communication between horse and rider. The controlled strength and suppleness of the horse in the Dressage will be essential to the remainder of the eventing phases. The second day is the Cross Country phase of the competition, which is designed to test the speed, endurance and agility of the horse and rider duo. A Cross Country course is ridden at a gallop over diverse terrain and obstacles with speed requirements dependent on the level of competition. The course may range from 2.75 to 4 miles with 24-36 fixed obstacles to be cleared. Penalties are given for jumping errors such as refusals, run outs and falls as well as exceeding time limits.

The Kentucky Classique Horse Trials

The final phase of the Trials held on the third day is Show Jumping, and this portion of the Trials is to evaluate the horse and rider’s degree of recovery and stamina from the rigorous Cross Country challenges completed just the day before. The Show Jumping course is composed of multicolored, lightweight rails arranged in a variety of configurations of fences of varying heights and widths. The rider must navigate his horse over the fences while constantly assessing the correct distances and turns which necessitates a continual changing of strides, either shortening or lengthening. The horse and rider must be in sync both mentally and physically to successfully complete the course. Any knocked down rail is penalized.

The Kentucky Classique Horse Trials, proudly authorized by the United States Eventing Association (USEA), will be held beginning at 8 AM Friday, August 28th, and culminating at the Hunter Jumper Complex at 5 pm on Sunday, August 30th.

Starting times for the Trials will be posted at www.kyevents.net by August 22nd. This competition is certain to be thrilling as horses and riders take on the demanding challenges of the Kentucky Classique Horse Trials.

2015 USHJA International Hunter Derby Championship Want to see style, grace and fancy hunter horses? Then head to the Hunter Derby Championship August 15. Opening ceremonies begin at 6 pm and there is no admission fee to attend. Bred to jump stylishly and guided by expert riders around obstacles that would resemble jumps you would find riding the countryside, the Hunter Derby makes for a great evening of equestrian flair!

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This 3-day eventing competition is composed of Dressage, Cross Country, and Show Jumping (aptly titled “the equestrian triathlon“ on occasion) and demonstrates the horse and rider’s level of accomplishment on the flat and over fences.

AUGUST 2015 | TOPSINLEX.COM


Tour of Homes

Off

the dining room is a first floor office, painted in warm neutral tones, and featuring an antique reproduction chandelier from Brecher Lighting (which matches the wall-mounted candleholder sconces) and another area rug from Carpet One—this time in rich brown and cream shades. A triple-paned window lets in plenty of light.

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Tour of Homes

The outdoor space is a bright, open living area fashioned with natural materials.

“It brings the comfort of the indoors outside,” said Ed.

Relaxed outdoor sofas and club chairs create a comfortable retreat, while brick and stone exterior walls, a natural wood plank ceiling, an outdoor fireplace and an unencumbered view add a touch of luxury.

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The

master bedroom contains a mini bar and coffee station to make morning more enjoyable. It features custom bedding and window treatments by Petra Designs, a closet system by Corman & Associates, and another gorgeous chandelier from Brecher Lighting.

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Tour of Homes

A

spacious master bath features fixtures by Winnelson Showplace, granite countertops by Top Service, dual sinks with a built-in vanity area, and a gorgeous tile mosaic in the shower. “We spent quite a bit of time on the shower mosaic,” said David. “We wanted the tile pattern to look like a tapestry.” And undeniably, it lends a gorgeous quality to the glass-door shower and pulls the bathroom design together beautifully.

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the inception of the home plan through the design process, Ed was able to help the Barbour’s keep their goal in mind – to create a living space with plenty of room to breathe, but at the same time, cozy and inviting. David commented, “We have these high, open areas with 10-foot ceilings, even in the basement. The hallways are 3 feet wide and the doors are 8 feet tall. It’s massive, but we also wanted to make it friendly.” •


WOW Wedding

Following the ceremony, guests received party hats, party beads, and noisemakers to create a celebration parade as they walked from the Hunt Morgan House to the reception at Belle’s Cocktail House. There, the guests were served a variety of local fare, chosen by the bride and groom so out-of-town guests could experience the true flavor of Lexington. The food was an eclectic selection of bite-sized hors d’oeuvres such as deviled eggs topped with Mingua Brothers beef jerky and Kentucky grass-fed shaved beef tenderloin crostinis with caramelized tobacco onions and cave-aged bleu cheese. Instead of a traditional wedding cake, the couple served donuts from North Lime Coffee and Donuts. Beverages included Ale 8 One, creative cocktails and a variety of local brews, including a selection of beer from West Sixth and Country Boy Brewery. Looking back, the couple loved everything about their special day. When asked for a tip to share with future brides and grooms, they suggested planning a day ideal for you as a couple, rather than focusing on wedding clichés. “Create your vision of what a wedding should be.” •

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Weddings

Bridal Separates

Top It Off

W

hen choosing to go with bridal separates, the cover up or top that works with, or as, your bodice is top priority. These pieces are what take a simple dress, usually a universally flattering strapless, and give it your personality and style. The choice elevates the dress from plain to fantastic and the options are endless. This piece is what will speak for years in your wedding photos about your wedding style, and should be chosen with care. The Sheer Top A stylish cover up of the sheerest lace or illusion is the most magical of all bridal separate top options, covering the shoulders, arms and back area adding ethereal grace. Sometimes fastening in the back, it completely transforms the look of your dress and makes your wedding day statement. This look works with one of the top bridal trends of 2015, which are sheer sleeves with hints of lace. This look can segue from a structured piece to just a sheer chiffon wrap for a simple look with effortless beauty. The Capelet The biggest trend in bridal separate tops is the capelet, a knod to the past with a more sophisticated style for today’s bride. Especially if you want to add a ‘vintage vibe’ or a little boho chic, the scalloped edged or ribbon embellished capelet is a great choice. It can then be whisked away for fun and mobility at your reception. The Jacket A sophisticated covering for your gown is the jacket, adding more structure and style. It is especially smart in cooler months or if a house of worship requires more coverage. Looks range from a delicate lace jacket for a softer silhouette, or for more impact choose a sequined, beaded or even feathered Bolero jacket, great for a bold bride.

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The Shrug The shrug is back in bridal, popularized in the 50s and now delivering an impact statement today. A shrug goes on the arms and connects across the back, leaving the front of your bodice bare – named because you kind of shrug it on. This look can range from ultra sheer to give your skin a smooth, translucent look and your strapless gown an elegant finish, or be thick enough to ad warmth for cooler weather weddings. The final effect is fab. The Corset The corset can be the most elegant bodice separate choice, especially if you are looking for beading and embellishment for a big statement. A plain corset is also a great choice to give you a strapless look worn with a skirt separate. You can then complement these pieces with another sheer separate over the corset. Be very careful here that your corset looks like a bodice and not like you forgot to finish dressing. Some brides push this too hard to be sexy, and look like they hit the honeymoon too early. Save and Compare If you are on a tight budget, you can cleverly utilize a bridal top or bodice separate to completely elevate the look of a simple, inexpensive strapless or other style base gown. Your design will look complete, and save you a bundle. Plus you will be one of a kind, putting you, and your budget, ‘on top’.

by Marsha Koller Wedding Consultant


TOP SHOTS | SOCIE T Y

Woodford Humane Society’s Freedom Fest

Miss Kentucky Clark Davis 2015

Keeneland Concours d’Elegance Event Lexington Fairness Awards

Kelsea Ballerini performs at 98.1 WBUL’s Red, White and Boom

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TOPS Staff Celebrates 10th Anniversary


TOPS In Lexington Magazine, August 2015  

Our best, and largest, magazine to date. Read profiles of local business owners; heartening stories of people and animals helped by our amaz...

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