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CONTENTS

OCTOBER

Volume 13 Number 10

the inspiration issue

COMMUNITY 32 48 52

57 59 116 119 125 126

Cancer Survivors CBD and Your Health Who’s Who:

Timothy Johnson 6 Ways to Give Non Profit Spotlight Breaking the Bronze Ceiling

Laura Clay New & Noteworthy Branch Out

Lexington Farmers Market Digital Savvy:

Google Ad Grants

LIFESTYLE 131

Top Dressed Oufit of the Month:

Pink Power

TO TOPS October 2019 • Priceless

Gor-Jess:

//

WHAT TO DO

Get The Look: Mistress of Evil

OCTOBER 2019 • vol. 13 no. 10

12

140 WHAT’S NEW

144

52 //

139 140

Fall Wardrobe Staples

WHO’S WHO

136

Fashion:

TOPS

132 135

32

Savin’ Face Wow Wedding:

What’s Your Shade of Pink?

MEET LOCAL CANCER SURVIVORS

plus D I S C O V E R L E X I N G T O N ’ S N O N P R O F I T S

on the COVER

Maryn + Noah Weddings Unveiled:

T H E I N S P I R AT I O N I S S U E

144 TOPS in Lexington | October 2019

Kentucky Offensive Line Coach John Schlarman, Dr. Emily M Marcinkowski and Josh Paschal... local cancer survivors Photo by Erica Lee Photography


CONTENTS 148 AT HOME 148

Tour of Homes:

170

Color Catalog:

173

Super Mom:

176

Fall Family-Friendly Fun

Revitalized Revival Metropolitan Melanie Tyner-Wilson

EATS & ENTERTAINMENT 180 184 185 188 190 193 194

Dining:

Agave & Rye Top 5 Dining:

Catering Services Dining Guide

180

Recipe:

Spicy Baked Sriracha Chicken BBN:

Handy Landon Young Equine Update Art in the Bluegrass:

Andre Pater: A Sporting Artist for the Ages

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TOPS in Lexington | October 2019


CONTENTS PHOTOS 28 198 200 202 204 206 208 210 212 214 216 218 224 225

Out & About TOPS

September Preview Party Forcht Bank

Salute to Small Business Awards Festival of the Horse TOBA

National Awards Dinner Andre Pater: An American Journey

208 198

Easter Seals

Kentucky BASH Spendthrift Farm

13th Annual Breeders’ Party AVOL

Dining Out for Life Wells Fargo Breaking the Bronze Ceiling

Artist Sneak Peek

NEXT MONTH

Dress for Success

NOVEMBER

Recycle the Runway

the go red for women issue

Taste at the House:

Bourbon at Bodley-Bullock Top Shots TOPS Social Event photo captions are typically provided to TOPS by the event organizers. We do our best to check names and spelling…but we are all human and make mistakes. Please contact kristen@topsmarketing.com with any corrections and we will make note of it in the next issue.

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TOPS in Lexington | October 2019


TOPS TOPS

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CONTRIBUTORS Photographers: Ron Morrow, Keni Parks, Danny Pendleton, Paul

Atkinson, Woody Phillips, Ruth Wienstock, Conrhod Zonio and Matt & Kelsey Malicote

MEGAN MARTIN

CLAIRE TAUER

Writers: Jesse L. Brooks, Amanda Harper, Kate Horning, Donna Ison, Barbara Meyer, Rob Bolson, Haley Norris, Lauren Rogers, Jen Roytz, Kathie Stamps, Savannah Blank and Larry Vaught Intern: Allison Sullivan

Account Executive mmartin@topsmarketing.com

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The views and comments expressed by the authors are not always that of our editors or publishers. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this publication, TOP Marketing Group accepts no responsibility or liability for any errors, omissions or resultant consequences, including any loss or damage arising from the reliance on information in this publication. All images contained in TOPS in Lexington Magazine are subject to copyright of the artist or photographer as named, but not limited thereto. Reproduction of any part of this magazine without prior written permission is prohibited.

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TOPS in Lexington | October 2019

®


PHOTOS Out & About

OA John Morris, Art Still, Lindley Barker at the Cardinal Hill Kentucky BASH

Spotz Lexington Grand Opening Preview Night

Keith Yarber and Carson Kressley at AVOL’s Dining Out for Life

Peri Avenue Salon Opening

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TOPS in Lexington | October 2019


October 2019 | TOPSinLex.com

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COMMUNITY

32 48 52 57 59

Cancer Survivors CBD and Your Health Who’s Who:

116 119 125

Timothy Johnson 6 Ways to Give Nonprofit Spotlight

126

Breaking the Bronze Ceiling:

Laura Clay New & Noteworthy Branch Out:

Lexington Farmers Market Digital Savvy:

Google Ad Grants


Survivors

COMMUNITY


COMMUNITY

I’m grateful for this second chance to take in all this life I have left.

Two years ago, Casilee was seven months overdue for her annual mammogram. When she finally made the appointment, they discovered the abnormalities that would turn out to be Stage 1B Triple Negative Breast Cancer, one of the more aggressive forms. Casilee elected to have a bi-lateral double mastectomy. She underwent four doses of dense AC chemotherapy. As a mortgage lender with Northpointe Bank and mother to three teenagers, she knew found support from her husband, friends, coworkers and family. “I realized I was not in this by myself and had so much left to live–and fight like hell–for,” she said. What advice would you give to anyone who has recently been diagnosed with cancer? We have amazing medical care right here in Lexington with so many local support groups and services. Take advantage of all the resources out there. The resources at UK’s Markey Center are incredible. I also took advantage of the American Cancer’s Society’s resources including the “Look Good Feel Better Program”. What was the most challenging part of your cancer battle? Without a doubt, the hair loss. I never felt sick or felt like I had cancer until I saw the effects it had on my hair and watching it fall out so suddenly. I gave myself a few days of pity party then bought some amazing wigs and never looked back. 34


COMMUNITY

Eva

Cancer let me know how bless I am and not to take life for granted.

White

Eva, a Deputy Clerk at the District Criminal Court House, was 42 when she was first diagnosed with breast cancer. At the time, her daughter was a teenager. Eva said she just focused on her daughter and living to be there for her. She underwent a mastectomy, chemotherapy and radiation. In 2012, she was diagnosed again through an ultrasound. She had another mastectomy, which has led to Eva being pronounced cancer-free! Now, Eva’s daughter is 34 and living in Marietta, GA and has a teenage son of her own. “They are my everything,” Eva said. “I try to see them and spend as much time as I can with them.” She says she loves getting together with family and friends whenever she can. What advice would you give to someone facing a cancer diagnosis? Trust in God and pray. Think about what inspires you to stay strong and fight. What was something that you learned through your cancer journey? All things are possible through Christ, who strengthens you! How has cancer changed your life? It let me know how blessed I am, and not to take life for granted.

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Judy

I am still living, breathing and grateful for every day I have.

Last year, Judy was experiencing lower abdominal pressure and pain in her left side. She was bloated in spite of regular exercise. A CT scan uncovered “metastic omentum caking” or thickening of the fatty tissue that stretches over the abdomen. A biopspy revealed that Judy had primary perionetal cancer, a rare cousin of ovarian cancer. Because her mother died of ovarian cancer at only 38-years-old, Judy had undergone an elective hysterectomy in 2014. As Judy learned, it is possible to develop this cancer even if your ovaries have been removed. This type of cancer has a high chance of recurrence with only a 30% chance of living five years. Unlike other forms of cancer, there is no maintenance plan that would help. “I’m hopeful that more research will be done for peritoneal cancer that would offer either clinical trials or new treatments,” Judy said. What advice would you give to others who have been diagnosed with cancer? I would say that you know your body better than anyone. When you notice that something doesn’t feel right, don’t ignore it. Seek medical care right away to get to the bottom of your concerns. What local resources did you rely on for support? I had an amazing GYN Oncologist, Dr. Charles Dietrich, at Markey Cancer Center. He made me feel from the moment I met him that I was in good hands. I utilized the Cancer Counseling Services provided through Markey to help me process my thoughts and feelings about having cancer.

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TOPS in Lexington | October 2019


COMMUNITY

Bob

Quick

My appreciation for my wife, kids, family, colleagues, Lexington and life is greater!

On his 16th work anniversary at Commerce Lexington, Inc., Bob’s life changed forever. He had been seeing his internist for several months for minor abdominal pain, but something changed on the days leading up to February 5, 2017. “I felt like I had a Star Wars battle going off inside by lower abdomen and chest,” he explained. Bob called Dr. Michael Karpf, a UK Hopsital executive, and described the pain he was experiencing. Dr. Karpf instructed him to go to the ER, where he had three doctors ready to assist Bob with testing. Bob had an aggressive form of lymphoma, Stage 3 Non-Hodgkin Large Diffuse B Cell Lymphoma. He didn’t have a lot of time to process his disease or treatment options. Bob and his wife did their homework on the oncologist that Dr. Karpf recommended, Dr. Gerhard Hildebrandt. Bob endured six 3-week cycles of dose adjusted EPOCH, some of the strongest chemotherapy drugs available. He also had chemo injected directly into his brain via eight spinal taps to protect his central nervous system and keep it cancer-free. By June, he was declared officially in remission and he began a stem cell transplant. He later turned to the YMCA’s Livestrong program to help rebuild his stamina. What advice would you give to someone facing cancer? Develop the best support system for care that you can–at home and medically. Get to know your medical team from the oncologist or pharmacist to the nurses, techs and general staff. Ask lots of questions–it’s better to know what you are up against. There is actual relief in knowing the truth. 37


Josh #4 Kentucky redshirt sophomore linebacker Josh was only 19 years old when he noticed a small dot on his right foot. “I didn’t care too much about it because I thought it was a blood blister,” he explained. The black spot under Josh’s big toe grew to the size of a dime and began to sting. It became surrounded by smaller “satellite” dots. He went to his athletic trainer, who had him consult a podiatrist and eventually a dermatologist. A biopsy revealed the real diagnosis: melanoma. Josh underwent three surgeries to remove the cancer. A biopsy of the lymph nodes in his groin revealed a trace amount of cancer cells, so he just wrapped up a year of immunotherapy. What advice would you give to others? Whatever you see on your skin that looks irregular, you should get that checked. And wear sunscreen no matter what color you are! What did you learn from your cancer journey? I’ve learned patience. You have to wait to heal. My faith as a Christian is what’s keeping everything together, it’s keeping me positive and it has given me the strength to know everything is going to work out for His will. Having cancer made me stronger in my faith and made the bond with my family and friends even stronger as well.

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I live every day to the fullest and I am striving to be a good example for those around me.

TOPS in Lexington | October 2019


Dawn

There are so many people that want to help you through your journey.

Dawn started a small business in July 2017 called Staging the Bluegrass with her business partner, Amy Bronski. Just three months later, she found a lump during a breast self-exam. She went to have a mammogram and was officially diagnosed with breast cancer. The wife and mother of two teenagers underwent a double mastectomy and subsequent reconstruction. Her treatment plan entailed eight rounds of chemotherapy and 33 days of radiation. Dawn, 49, loves to go to the lake with her family and two dogs. She attends horse shows for her daughter and loves to meet the barn families. What advice would you give to others who have recently been diagnosed with cancer? Never give up! For me, the most challenging part was not letting it bring me down. You think the process is never going to end. There is a light at the end of the tunnel. Try and find another survivor that you can connect with and share experiences with. Your family and friends are your support system! They give you your strength. How has cancer changed your perspective? I’m more thankful for every day. Life is too short: don’t be afraid to try new things and experiences!

October 2019 | TOPSinLex.com

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Justin went to the ER in November 2016 with abdominal pain. The 27-year-old was sent home with pain pills. Luckily, his general practitioner asked to see him once the CT scan results hit their system. They found a lump in Justin’s neck, which they biopsied. This revealed Nodular Sclerosing Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, a lymphoma that occurs most commonly between the ages of 15 and 35. As the General Manager a local Panera Bread, Justin decided to work through his recovery. He was fortunate to have the support of those around him, including his wife and three fur babies. What advice would you give to others who have been diagnosed with cancer? Every person has to go through their journey in their own way. I truly believe that your mental state is half of the battle. I cannot imagine not having the positivity I had during my treatment; it would have been a much different fight. What did you learn from your cancer journey? We cannot always see what people are going through. We cannot assume that someone having a bad day is always their fault. They may be going through something under the surface that we cannot even imagine. I am heavily involved in supporting other cancer patients through a peer to peer program at Baptist Health. Talking to these people through their struggles and sharing experiences has humbled me.

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It was hard to take a step back and let others do the heavy lifting for once.

TOPS in Lexington | October 2019


Joey

This has helped me reset priorities, for sure.

Joey had put his first routine colonoscopy off for–he admits–too long. At 54, he was diagnosed with Stage 4 colorectal cancer. He underwent two surgeries, one to remove the tumor and one to remove the metastases on his liver. Eight rounds of chemotherapy were also part of his treatment plan. Joey and his wife, Sara, just celebrated their 33rd anniversary. He says she is the one who held everything and everyone together through this experience. They have two children who live in Washington, DC. Through his work as the Executive Director of the American Heart Association chapter in Lexington, Joey has met many survivors. He was inspired by their bravery, especially that of Finn Collier, a boy who was incredibly brave in the face of sometimes uncertain odds. A special cousin, Trisha Verdin, inspired Joey to get tested after her own diagnosis last year. She passed earlier this summer. She was just 43. What advice would you give to others facing cancer? Stay positive! This is a new age in health care and there have been so many advances that have improved survival rates. What did you learn from your cancer journey? Just how precious life is and how many great people there are in this world! What resources did you turn to? I had and all-star medical team! My gastroenterologist, my surgeon, my oncologist and a neurologist we consulted with were tremendous. A special shout out to the infusion nurses who deal with cancer patients daily with smiles on their faces, with empathy and with great knowledge! My physical therapists are excellent.

October 2019 | TOPSinLex.com

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COMMUNITY

e

Penny is the Direct of Patient Safety and Risk Management at Baptist Health Lexington. In 2002, she was first diagnosed with breast cancer at age 41. At the time, her son was just 15-yearsold. She found herself thinking that she had to be there to raise him. She underwent a lumpectomy and six weeks of radiation treatment. She took an estrogen modulator for five years. But in 2015, she faced a recurrence. At that time, she had a double mastectomy and chemotherapy. What advice would you give to others facing cancer? Do not let cancer consume your life. I know it sounds cliché, but stay positive and keep a smile on your face. You cannot dwell on cancer or it will take over your life and those around you. Utilized the three F’s: family, friends and FUN! I was blessed with a family that consisted of my relatives, a special person in my life and my Baptist Health friends. The fun for me was watching UK basketball when I was in the hospital or at home healing from surgery or treatment. How did you find the strength to fight your battle? I have never been the kind of person when confronted with a difficult situation to say, “I can’t do this.” I have always faced these situations head on with “how CAN I do this?” I educated myself on what I needed to do and started the process, looking at each step individually.

When you hear your name in the same sentence with the word ‘cancer,’ it truly puts everything in proper perspective.

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COMMUNITY

Rober

I found strength in my faith and the people around me. Their prayers and acts of love made a huge difference.

Retired from teaching for 33 years, Sally is on boards of CancerLink.org and Alltech. After an evening of playing tennis about a year ago, Sally noticed a bruise. She felt it and discovered a small lump the size of a jelly bean on her breast. Her husband, a physician, made her an appointment at St. Joseph East.

Sally’s radiologist, Dr. Kenney, gave Sally her the diagnosis of HER2 positive breast cancer. After 6 rounds of chemotherapy with Dr. Croley, Sally underwent a lumpectomy followed by radiation and immunotherapy treatments. She has just a few rounds left, then will take a daily pill that inhibits estrogen growth for 5 years. What advice would you give to others facing cancer? I would tell them to trust their intuition. If something does not feel right, then talk to your doctor about it. They are so receptive to hearing from you. What are positive ways you’re processing your cancer journey? I am seeing a life coach, who I had initially hoped would help me through my fears of this illness. She has helped me through this, but she has also done a lot more for me. I am learning to live with a sense of peace, acceptance and love. I am also learning about restorative yoga which has been rejuvenating for the sore body, but for the heart as well. It is as good as getting a massage!

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John

You have to take things as they come and trust in the Lord.

Just before the start of the football season in the fall of 2018, this Kentucky Offensive Line Coach found himself feeling like something wasn’t quite right. He would get uncomfortable after eating, and he initially thought it was acid reflux. He went to the UK Medical Center for tests. An endoscopy and colonoscopy were inconclusive, but an ultrasound turned up a lot of red flags. He was diagnosed with cholangiocarcinoma, or cancer of the bile ducts. The husband and father of four is taking a trial drug through MD Anderson in Huston. What advice would you give to others facing cancer? Take it one day at a time. There will be highs and lows and at first a lot of lows. Put it in people’s hand that know what they are talking about. Trust the doctors and listen to them. Grit your teeth and battle through. How were you able to find the strength to fight? I think in most people the strength is there. This is what I have to deal with and I’m going to do whatever it takes. What’s the other option? You really don’t have a choice. I attribute my strength to my parents. They taught us to be fighters and to fight through it. It’s what you’re made of, too. Cancer has made my faith stronger. It’s helped me continue to appreciate my family. I also appreciate Coach Stoops and the entire staff. They have been unbelievable. It makes me want to fight harder for them.

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TOPS in Lexington | October 2019


Ashley

A positive attitude and laughter go a long way.

Last August, Ashley discovered a lump on her breast while changing clothes. She visited her gynecologist, who sent her for a mammogram and ultrasound. This led to a diagnosis of Stage 2B invasive ductal carcinoma. She underwent eight total doses of chemotherapy. She used the new cold cap technology to help preserve her hair. This was followed by a lumpectomy and 20 rounds of radiation. She now takes hormone therapy drugs. Ashley is an Expanded Duties Dental Assistant at Beaumont Family Dentistry. She is engaged and has four fur babies. What advice would you give to someone who was recently diagnosed with cancer? It is so very scary and it’s okay to cry. I was so scared and in the end, I am so proud of myself for getting through it! What did you learn from your cancer journey? There’s so much more to life than what many think and I now try not to let things bother me like they did. Some things are so trivial now. How were you able to find the strength to fight? I have a wonderful group of friends, as well as my mom, my fiancé and my work family. They really helped me a lot. Going out and doing something–even as simple as getting gas for my car or going for a walk–really helped. I also turned to My Pink Navigator as a resource.

October 2019 | TOPSinLex.com

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COMMUNITY

Dr. Emily

Know your breasts. You know them better than anyone else ever will!

As a board-certified Surgical Oncologist who treats specializes in breast, skin and soft tissue cancers, Dr. Marcinkowski knows how important it is to stay aware of your body. Two years ago, while detaching her breast pump, she felt a lump in her left breast. She was diagnosed with Stage IIB invasive ductal carcinoma. Emily felt very fortunate to have her staff at UK Markey Cancer Center. Friends and colleagues handled her care throughout the entire process, from diagnosis to reconstruction. She underwent 18 weeks of chemotherapy and one year of Herceptin treatment following bilateral mastectomies. What advice would you give to anyone who has recently been diagnosed with cancer? Use your resources and your friends; they want to help you. Our cancer center wants to help you. Ask questions! No question is off-limits. Do things that make you feel in control. What did you learn from your cancer journey? What the human body is capable of. I’ve never been so sick, and yet I put one foot in front of the other. I also learned how trite we can be as health care providers. I used to say things like, “Hair will grow back!” Well, for some patients, it doesn’t, and losing your hair–and that sense of control–is a big deal. How has cancer changed your life? I prefer to think I changed cancer’s life!

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Survivors

COMMUNITY

Tips from Dr. Emily Marcinkowski, Surgical Oncologist at UK Healthcare Cancer doesn’t discriminate, but even oncologist Emily Marcinkowski was shocked when she diagnosed herself with breast cancer. Here are some helpful tips from her unique perspective of being both the patient and the doctor.

KNOW YOUR BREASTS. You know your breasts better then I ever will. Monthly breast exams help you get to know your breasts. If you find or feel something different, tell your provider.

ASK QUESTIONS. Don’t be afraid to ask your doctor. It’s their job to help you understand the disease that you have. USE YOUR RESOURCES. In Lexington, we are fortunate to have so many resources for cancer patients: From wigs to rides to chemotherapy to a friend to sit with you. Use your resources!

LEAN ON YOUR FRIENDS AND FAMILY. I have no doubt that you have been there for your friends and family. Now it is their turn. Allow them the gift of taking care of you. SHOW UP TO FIGHT. A cancer diagnosis gives you a sense of loss of control.

You cannot control what your doctor will recommend and you might not want to fight, but it’s your only choice. Bravery without choice. The only control you have is showing up to fight. So show up.

GET YOUR MAMMOGRAMS. Your best defense is a strong offense!

photos courtesy of UK Healthcare

October 2019 | TOPSinLex.com

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Hemp and Cancer

COMMUNITY

We started advocating for the legalization of hemp in Kentucky. Everybody thought we were crazy. Bill was told that nobody would want CBD, that this wasn’t the direction hemp was going to go. - Adriane Polyniak, Executive Director of Kentucky Cannabis Company Medical advancements have come a long way over the past few decades in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, the proliferation of abnormal cells that create a malignant neoplasm, otherwise known as a malignant tumor. But with medicine and treatments come side effects, so patients and health care professionals are always on the lookout for methods of easing symptoms such as nausea, loss of appetite, hair loss and lethargy. CBD has recently become a symptom-reliever of choice for many patients. Before it came on the market, there were patients who would seek marijuana to alleviate the side effects of chemotherapy, even though it was illegal and caused a buzz. Today it is possible for legal, non-high, management of some symptoms. With a caveat or two. CBD is an abbreviation for the first, middle and last letters of the word cannabinoid, a natural chemical compound found in cannabis plants. One variety of cannabis is hemp and another is marijuana. Both contain CBD—in fact, over 100 types chemical compounds. You can see how this subject becomes complex very quickly, right? Basically, the difference between legal vs. illegal, between non-intoxicating vs. getting high is the compound tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC. “Hemp, by legal definition, is less than 0.3% THC, so just a trace of it,” said attorney Jonathan Miller. “Marijuana, if you go out and buy a joint, is going to be 15% to 20%.” Miller is a member-in-charge with Frost Brown Todd and he is general counsel for the U.S. Hemp Roundtable. He actually founded the organization in honor of Gatewood Galbraith, who died in 2012. James Comer was the Kentucky Commissioner of Agriculture at the time and asked Miller to help out with the hemp cause and form a trade organization to fight for the interest of hemp farmers and businesses. Miller did so, originally calling it the Kentucky Hemp Industry Council. For the past three years it has been known as the U.S. Hemp Roundtable. “It started off with four people in my basement and a $20,000 budget and now we’ve got more than 80 companies and more than a $1.5 million budget,” Miller said. “We led the fight for passage of the 2018 Farm Bill, which completely legalized hemp. We’re working with the FDA to get their stamp of approval.” Ohio is one of the states allowing marijuana to be sold for medical purposes; a half-dozen states allow it to be sold to adults for recreational use, including Colorado, Oregon and California.

“Hemp is hemp; it is now legal 100% on a federal basis; you don’t need to have a medical card to get it,” Miller said, adding, “Hemp CBD cannot be sold with any medical claims.” Any product that claims to treat a disease or its symptoms has to go through a lengthy process with the FDA, the Food and Drug Administration. In the summer of 2018, the FDA did approve Epidiolex, a hemp product, as a treatment for seizures associated with two rare forms of epilepsy. Adriane Polyniak is the executive director of Kentucky Cannabis Company. KCC was formed in 2013. “We are farmers first,” she said. She and her husband, Bill, grow and harvest hemp on their farms in Fayette and Mercer counties, extracting and processing the resin of the plant to create full-spectrum CBD extracts with a high CBD content of cannabinoids. When the Federal Farm Bill of 2014 was passed, Kentucky Cannabis Company was one of six pilot programs granted legal authority to cultivate hemp in Kentucky. The Polyniaks were focused on cannabinoid research instead of the commercial manufacturing side of hemp for its fiber and seed. In 2015 they started a retail component for consumers, Bluegrass Hemp Oil. The store is located off East Reynolds Road and they have another retail location in Spokane, Washington. The Polyniaks initially started researching hemp and cannabinoids to help their son who in 2009, at the age of three, was diagnosed with epilepsy and had hundreds of seizures a week. Doctors were prescribing pharmaceuticals for little Colten, but the side effects were awful and he almost wound up in organ failure. “Going through all this, we started looking for more natural options, something that would bring him seizure relief but not change our child,” Adriane Polyniak said. “My husband came across research on marijuana that doesn’t get you high.” It turned out to be high-CBD varieties of hemp, instead of marijuana containing “high” THC. “We started advocating for the legalization of hemp in Kentucky,” she said. “Everybody thought we were crazy. Bill was told that nobody would want CBD, that this wasn’t the direction hemp was going to go.” In less than a handful of years, hemp has exploded throughout the country. Some people believe it will be a $20 billion industry by 2022. It is already emerging as a $1 billion industry.

October 2019 | TOPSinLex.com

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COMMUNITY

Hemp and Cancer

“People in Lexington might not know that we are ground zero for hemp,” Miller said. “We were the leading exporters of hemp 200 years ago when Henry Clay was around and we are now we poised to do the same here in Central Kentucky.” He is hopeful that research will soon show that hemp CBD products cure a lot of diseases and that there will be FDA approval for it. Until then, Miller cautions consumers to do their due diligence and use good judgment in purchasing hemp products for general health and wellness. “If someone is making medical claims, like this product is going to cure cancer? Don’t buy those products,” he said. “Those are not legal claims.” “CBD doesn’t work like a pharmaceutical does,” Polyniak said. “It’s not going to immediately mask whatever’s going on. It’s going to work within your body and help your body fix itself.” While there aren’t any known side effects caused by the CBD itself, it can interact with pharmaceuticals in the same way that grapefruit can, due to the same enzyme. “Colten is seizure free and pharmaceutical free,” Polyniak said. “He takes our CBD extract, and he is back to being the kid he was meant to be.” •

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Attorney Jonathan Miller is hopeful that research will soon show that hemp CBD products cure a lot of diseases and that there will be FDA approval for it. Until then? He cautions consumers to do their due diligence and use good judgement.

LEARN MORE: cancer.gov cancer.org kyhia.org projectcbd.org ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

TOPS in Lexington | October 2019


October 2019 | TOPSinLex.com

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Who’s who:

TIMOTHY JOHNSON

PRESIDENT AND CEO OF UNITED WAY OF THE BLUEGRASS

by Kathie Stamps | photos by Keni Parks The day after Labor Day, Timothy Johnson began a new job—a labor of love, for love, with love—when he took the reins as the president and CEO of United Way of the Bluegrass. “I am excited about the incredible giving and philanthropic nature of the community,” he said. “There’s a long tradition of pitching in and giving and helping, which really speaks to something inside.” A new resident of Lexington, and a new UK fan, Johnson is originally from Brooklyn (Bedford-Stuyvesant, to be precise), where he grew up wanting to be an obstetrician. He was pre-med in college and earned a bachelor’s degree in biology from North Carolina Central University. Then it was back to New York to study for his MCAT, the Medical College Admission Test, until he got “an accidental job working in city government,” he said. “I discovered the world of workforce development.” He soon found out he was helping a lot of people through nonprofit organizations, “similar to what I wanted to do in medicine, just in a different way,” he said. Since 2005, Johnson has served in a variety of United Way leadership roles: as director of workforce development initiative at United Way New York City, director of community impact for United Way of Greater Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey, and vice president


Who’s Who

COMMUNITY

United Way Campaign Kick Off Event | photos by Ron Morrow

“ I FELL IN LOVE WITH THE

MISSION OF THE ORGANIZATION. I BELIEVE STRONGLY THAT WE CAN

ACCOMPLISH

MORE TOGETHER

THAN INDIVIDUALLY.

of community impact and then the chief strategy and impact officer (CSIO) at United Way of the National Capital Area in Washington, DC. “I fell in love with the mission of the organization,” he said. Johnson considers himself a United Way “lifer.” He is familiar with different audiences and different landscapes, from urban to suburban to rural. He also has a master’s degree in nonprofit management, with a specialty in health care management, from New School University in New York City. “I would say all United Ways attract similar types of people–do-gooders– which is what draws me to the organization state after state,” he said. You probably won’t find him sitting behind a desk much. Johnson already has 200 meetings scheduled throughout Central Kentucky during his first three months to talk with board members, volunteers, business leaders and other members of the community. “Because of our reputation and track record, we collaborate with all kinds of stakeholders,” he said, “to solve issues together that we can’t solve individually.” UWBG works closely with school districts. “Education is the new currency of the 21st century,” Johnson said. The United Way global network is involved with the census every 10 years, getting the word out so people know how important it is. “The information is utilized for the next decade in terms of resources that are invested in communities,” Johnson said. One of his goals is to involve UWBG in the 2020 census. Established in 1921, United Way of the Bluegrass serves nine counties in Central Kentucky and funds 81 nonprofit agency partners and 140 programs. UWBG’s mission is to fight for the basic needs, education and financial stability of every person in Central Kentucky. Over 50,000 working families in this area struggle to make ends meet. “My overarching goal is to help make United Way of the Bluegrass become the philanthropic partner of choice in this region,” Johnson said. “I believe strongly that we can accomplish more together than individually.”

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Who’s Who

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THIS IS THE TYPE OF COMMUNITY MY WIFE AND I HAVE LOOKED FOR.

Johnson and his wife, Opa, just celebrated their fifth wedding anniversary. Born in Miami, Opa grew up in Albany, Georgia. She works remotely, also in the nonprofit sector, serving as chief of staff of GirlTrek, a Washington, DC-based organization that embraces technology and health through neighborhood walks. Now that they’ve moved to Lexington, the Johnsons are settling in just fine, driving around to see horse farms and the local scenery and landmarks, and getting to know the area. They especially enjoy being outside and participating in activities like walking, hiking, biking and riding horses. “This is the type of community my wife and I have looked for,” Johnson said. “It speaks to the Southerner she is and the inner Southerner that I had inside of me. Lexington felt like a place we could lay down roots, build community, find a good church and plug in.” •

Curious about UWBG? United Way of the Bluegrass serves nine counties in Central Kentucky: Anderson, Bourbon, Clark, Fayette, Jessamine, Madison, Montgomery , Scott and Woodford. Last year 131,256 Central Kentuckians were served by UWBG programs and partners; 4,704 people received financial literacy education; and 6,978 children were supported through early childhood programs. Find out how you can volunteer or give at UWBG.org.

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6 Ways to GIVE h

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Being generous is not only about giving money; generosity comes in many forms. If you have time and talent to spare, there are so many causes and nonprofits in our community that need your help. We’re excited to introduce this monthly column that features simple ways you and your family can make a difference in Lexington!

Clean out your closet and donate your professional apparel, shoes, handbags and accessories to Dress for Success on October 12th and/or November 9th. Contact lexington@dressforsuccess.org.

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Arbor Youth Services provides shelter for unaccompanied youth who may be homeless, abused, neglected or are at risk of being victimized. AYS serves lunch to these youth every Friday, and is in need of volunteers of all ages to provide and/or prepare meals. Contact Missy Pate: ays@arborky.org.

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Bluegrass Council of the Blind holds monthly lunch and learn sessions for visually impaired members of our community, and they need volunteers to help greet people, assist them with seating, serve food and more. This month’s meeting is on October 24th. Contact Susan Ament: susana@bcbky.org.

Central Kentucky Riding for Hope needs volunteers October 21st – 25th to help prepare donations for its fundraising Tack Sale. CKRH is also looking for volunteers ages 11 and up for its therapeutic riding programs. Contact McKenna Toenies: volunteers@ckrh.org.

The Nest averages 300 families per month in its Crisis Care Program, so it always needs donations of diapers, wipes, formula, shampoo, conditioner, bar soap/body wash, deodorant, razors, toothpaste, toothbrushes and feminine hygiene products. Contact Rachel Madden: rmadden@thenestlexington.org.

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To learn more about these nonprofits and over 400 others, visit GoodGiving.net. Or if you want to learn more about the work of Blue Grass Community Foundation and how they can help you better organize and simplify your personal or business giving call 859.225.3343 or email Lauren Parsons: lauren@bgcf.org.

October 2019 | TOPSinLex.com

Sign up to volunteer for the Girls on the Run celebratory 5K run at Keeneland on November 23. Contact Heidi Guckenberger: heidi@gotrcentralky.org.

Laura Parsons, Director of Strategic Initiatives & Communications

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Adopt an Art www.adoptanart.org

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entucky native Alex Francke is a 22-year-old graduate of the University of Kentucky Gatton College of Business and Economics. During her time at university, Francke was involved in DanceBlue, belonged to Alpha Delta Pia and was an Alumni Ambassador. Francke is now also involved with the Miss America Scholarship Organization; having won Miss Kentucky 2019, and works on behalf of the Kentucky Department of Agriculture as the spokesperson for Kentucky Proud. Francke recognizes the power of a platform, and she does not intend to waste hers. Francke founded Adopt An Art in 2014 to provide Kentucky public schools and community programs with high-quality art classes free of charge. The non proďŹ t celebrates the humanities by engaging children across central Kentucky in its various disciplines. Adopt An Art centers around the idea that art empowers children and combats the fact that many children have no access to the arts. The non proďŹ t partners with schools whose art programs are either dead or dying and works to revitalize the arts within that community. Volunteers who are passionate about the humanities and dedicated to community building teach a curriculum centered around the arts. Adopt An Art offers curriculum in three disciplines within the humanities: visual art, drama and dance. By working to inspire young people through these disciplines, and offering a creative outlet for them to express themselves, Adopt An Art seeks to serve the new generations and empower them to pursue the arts. The community can help by volunteering their time to help write lesson plans or mentor students; donate supplies to be used in dance, drama, art or music class and; donating money to help buy supplies and fund our experiential learning trips (to see broadway shows, dance programs, galleries, etc) through our website adoptanart.org.

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American Cancer Society www.cancer.org

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n estimated 25,990 Kentucky residents will learn they have cancer this year and getting to their scheduled treatment will be one of their greatest roadblocks. To ensure patients get to the critical care they need without additional stress, the American Cancer Society Road To Recovery® program can help provide free transportation to and from treatment for people who have cancer and who do not have a ride or are unable to drive themselves. “Every driver has what it takes to help save lives,” said Kelsey Lewis, Mission Deliver Program Manager for the American Cancer Society. “We’re urgently asking drivers in the Lexington area to donate their passenger seat and volunteer to take cancer patients to treatment.” Many cancer patients don’t own a vehicle, can’t afford the extra gasoline, or don’t have access to public transportation. Some patients may be elderly and unable to drive, too ill to drive, or have no family members or friends who are able to provide regular assistance with transportation. Even the best treatment can’t work if a patient can’t get there. The Road To Recovery program provides transportation options for patients in these situations. The Bluegrass area Road to Recovery program is currently in need of volunteer drivers in Fayetteand all surrounding counties. Currently the program has thirty volunteers who were able to provide over 1,700 rides in 2018 to patients. To volunteer, you must have a valid driver’s license, a safe and reliable vehicle, and proof of automobile insurance. Drivers must be at least 18 years old and have a good driving history. They arrange their own schedules and can commit as many or as few hours as their schedule allows. The American Cancer Society provides free training to drivers and conducts criminal Presented by background and driving record checks. For information about the Road To Recovery program, call (859) 260-8285 or visit cancer.org/drive.

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Go Red for Women www.goredforwomen.org

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o you ever feel like you are constantly on the go; taking care of kids, parents, friends and spouses? Do you live in your car, grab fast food and never take time to exercise? Do you ever find time just for yourself? If you can relate, you will want to join the American Heart Association on November 8 as Lexington trades in its BIG BLUE for RED at the Go Red for Women Experience at Lexington Center. The Go Red for Women Experience is an event like no other. Over the years it has grown from a luncheon with a few hundred guests to a day of learning, fun, entertainment and impact that only a thousand women together in one room can make. This year’s event will feature many new and exciting things to see and do, including breakout sessions including Women’s Heart Health sponsored by CHI Saint Joseph Health; Yoga and Stress Management sponsored by Passport Health Plan; and Healthy Cooking and Food Photography sponsored by KY Beef. There will also be a Discovery Village where guests can participate in health screenings, get a mini makeover, relax with a soothing chair massage, bid on designer handbags at our purse auction or just enjoy a day out with mothers, sisters and friends. But don’t stop there! Stay for the luncheon (beginning at 11:30 am) and be inspired by our heart and stroke survivors and enjoy a delicious healthy lunch as you listen to Karen M. R. Townsend, Ph.D. share how she learned to make herself a priority. “Dr. Karen,” has a deep connection to the Bluegrass. She graduated from Kentucky State University and has been commissioned to the Honorable Order of The Kentucky Colonels in recognition of leadership and community service. Bring your mothers, sisters, friends and the people you love to this exciting event. And don’t forget to wear red! Go Red for Women is nationally sponsored by CVS Health. Local cause sponsors are CHI Saint Joseph Health, Passport Health Plan, Together to End Stroke® and Encompass Health Cardinal Hill. Tickets and tables are available online at LexingtonGoRed.heart.org.

Top: Karen M. R. Townsend, Ph.D. with her mother Bottom: Carol Russell speaks at the Go Red for Women Luncheon in 2018

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AVOL www.avolky.org

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or over thirty years, AVOL Kentucky has been your community’s boots-on-the-ground champion for ending HIV. AVOL provides housing and supportive services to more than 300 persons living with HIV in central and eastern Kentucky and operates Solomon House, a long-term community residence for people with more advanced medical issues. AVOL provides prevention education and free HIV, Hepatitis C and STI testing for those at-risk and serves as an important link connecting those newly diagnosed to critical medical care. Advancements in HIV prevention now include PrEP (PreExposure Prophylaxis), an effective daily prevention pill available to help keep an HIV-negative person from acquiring the virus. AVOL helps connect people to PrEP. Medical treatment of HIV is now so advanced that it is common to achieve viral suppression at levels where patients feel better and cannot pass the virus to others. HIV is now categorized as a chronic illness and while the advancements to treat the virus have been tremendous, AVOL will not be satisďŹ ed until it is once and for all eradicated. For more information on services and free HIV testing, PrEP or to donate, please visit AVOL Kentucky at avolky.org.

Dining Out for Life 2019

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Blue Grass Community Foundation www.bgcf.org

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t Blue Grass Community Foundation (BGCF), our mission is to create more generous, vibrant and engaged communities in Lexington and throughout the Bluegrass and Appalachia, Kentucky. Launched in 1967 with one charitable giving fund and a single contribution of $1,000, BGCF has grown to over 660 charitable funds, each with its own charitable purpose, and total assets of $137 million. Most importantly, in partnership with our generous donors, we’ve awarded almost $100 million in grants, with 95 percent going to local and Kentucky-based organizations. We invite you to join us! If you’re looking to make your giving more simple, organized and impactful, establishing your own charitable fund may be the right solution. But, helping individuals, families, businesses and nonprofits establish charitable funds is just one way we grow local generosity. If you want to get more engaged with civic and charitable life in Lexington, consider joining BGCF365. By giving just $1 per day, you can become part of a powerful, collective giving engine that funds local charitable and civic projects while meeting likeminded young Lexingtonians at quarterly social and networking events. Learn more at bgcf.org/365. If you’re looking to leverage your giving dollars to your favorite local nonprofits (and discover new ones), the GoodGiving Challenge is for you! Launching on Tuesday, December 3 at 9am, this year’s Challenge features more than 130 local nonprofits. Now in its ninth year and raising more than $10 million, givers of all sizes are encouraged to donate at BGgives.org. With hundreds of thousands of match dollars on the table, you’ll help local organizations win their share and make your giving dollar go farther. At BGCF, we help grow good. Whatever your charitable needs or aspirations, we’re here to help. Drop by our office in the Woodland Triangle, give us a call at 859.225.3343 or email our President/CEO, Lisa Adkins, at ladkins@bgcf.org. Together, there’s no limit to the community good we can create!

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Bluegrass Care Navigators www.bgcarnav.org

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luegrass Care Navigators is a national leader in delivering high quality care to the seriously ill and a pioneer in developing new programs that are responsive to the evolving needs of seriously ill patients and their families. In addition to providing hospice services in 32 counties across central, southeastern and northern Kentucky, Bluegrass Care Navigators operates Bluegrass Extra Care, Bluegrass Transitional Care, Bluegrass Palliative Care and Bluegrass Grief Care. All of these programs offer invaluable services that enhance the quality of life of patients and families.

Meet Sarah Sarah Guthrie never imagined she would become familiar with Bluegrass Care Navigators at such a young age. At just 28 years old, Sarah found herself speaking to a hospice nurse about care for her father, who had been admitted to UK Hospital with a serious illness resulting in a terminal diagnosis. “I was totally unprepared for how to handle it,” she said. “I have loving and supportive friends and family, but as an only child, I’ve never felt more alone and helpless.”

Sarah Guthrie speaks at the opening of the Bluegrass Care Navigator’s inpatient Hospice Care Center at UK

Bluegrass Care Navigators helped Sarah through a tremendously difficult time, developing a plan to keep her father comfortable during his final days. Sarah’s relationship with the organization continued as she utilized bereavement services. During this time, Sarah began to think about ways she could give back. She became a volunteer, first helping with the annual Bundle Up with Bourbon & Blues event and recently worked with children at Camp Hope, a grief camp for children who experienced a loss like she did. “I started volunteering for Bluegrass Care Navigators because I wanted to try and give back what they gave to me—a sense of hope,” Guthrie said. “It never crossed my mind how much children needed this feeling until I volunteered at Camp Hope. There aren’t words to describe watching a child’s eyes fill with hope again. It was my most favorite volunteer experience.” Presented by

Sarah Guthrie and her father

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Caddie127 www.caddie127.org

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he Barbasol Championship, Kentucky’s only PGA TOUR event, is recognized as one of the top annual sporting events in the Commonwealth and features some of the greatest golfers in the world. The heartbeat of the Barbasol Championship is the tournament’s charitable arm, Caddie127. All God’s Children, Kentucky Children’s Hospital (UK Healthcare), the Kentucky Region of the Make-A-Wish Foundation, Refuge for Women, and the Woodhill Community Center are official Caddie127 partners and recipients. Whether you are a corporate partner or ticket holder, your investment reached far beyond an amazing experience at Champions at Keene Trace – you made a difference in the lives of hundreds of local women and children. Many people don’t realize local charity is the driving force behind PGA TOUR events. Last year, the PGA gave $190 million dollars back to charity, more than all other major professional sports combined. Caddie127 charities benefit greatly from the Barbasol Championship, which is why we are excited to grow this event from year to year. Mark your calendars and come out July 16-19, 2020 to watch world-class golf while supporting a great cause!

Top: Caddie127 Ambassador with Golfer Troy Merritt Bottom: Make-A-Wish recipient, Rylan Crouch, his little sister and UK Wildcat

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Children’s Charity Fund of the Bluegrass www.childrenscharityofthebluegrass.org The Children’s Charity Fund of the Bluegrass was founded in 1981 to help provide needed funds for the Child Development Center of the Bluegrass, an agency that provides a full range of services for children from birth to five years of age who have disabilities. The Mission of the Children’s Charity Fund of the Bluegrass, Inc. is to establish and maintain an ongoing concerted fund-raising effort to benefit local charitable organizations which have as their primary goal the betterment of children of the Commonwealth. The Children’s Charity Fund’s first fundraising activity was a celebrity golf tournament for the CDCB at a time when celebrity golf tournaments were rare. The Children’s Charity Celebrity Golf Classic was an immediate success and over the past 30 years has become one of America’s most enduring and profitable celebrity golf tournaments. Since its launch, the Children’s Charity Celebrity Golf Classic has raised more than $6 million dollars for the children of central Kentucky. Presented by

Top: Golfing fun Center: Celebrities Art Still, Drew Franklin and Valerie Still attend the Children’s Charity Cabaret Show & Dinner in June 2019 Bottom: Johnny Bench, Doug Flynn and Matthew Mitchell host the Cabaret Show

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Green Check www.greenchecklex.org

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exington does its part when it comes to creating and encouraging businesses to go green. Green Check is the city’s own (free!) certification program, providing businesses and organizations of Lexington with resources they need to become more sustainable. Environmental education non-profit organization Bluegrass Greensource is contracted by the City of Lexington to implement the program which began in 2016 and certifies approximately 8 to 10 businesses each year. Aiming to prove that everyone including businesses can increase their sustainability, Green Check recruits businesses representing a wide range of sizes and industries. Their success goes to show that it can be done by everyone - no excuses! Once businesses have applied and been accepted online, a Bluegrass Greensource Outreach Specialist sets up an initial consultation. During this consultation, a comprehensive five-page GreenCheck scorecard is reviewed to address several areas of sustainability including waste reduction, energy efficiency, urban forestry, transportation, and more. Businesses then have a few months to work on their goals, and are encouraged to use the free resources available to them through the City of Lexington and Bluegrass Greensource. When a score of at least 30% is achieved and all required items are complete, businesses become certified. The four membership levels (member, bronze, silver, and gold) reflect the goals and achievements accomplished by the organization, as well as their commitment to sustainability. Green Check also provides members with post-certification and highlight some of their initiatives on the blog and/or through social media. There are several events scheduled for members including networking hours and tours of environmental locations. A page for resources can be found on Green Check’s website containing information on how to be more sustainable in areas such as (but certainly not limited to) recycling, water quality, energy efficiency, and buying local. This year, we celebrate our pilot members who joined us in 2016 as they receive recertification. They include: Lexmark (Gold), Bullhorn (Gold), Good Foods Co-op (Silver), RossTarrant Architects (Silver), and Lexington Habitat for Humanity (Silver).

Top: Green Check Awards Middle: GRW Bikes

Newly Certified 2019 members: Most Valuable Pets (Silver), EARTHelm Landscape Design Studio (Silver), Bluegrass Landscapes (Silver), West Sixth Brewing (Bronze), GRW (Bronze), Carson’s Food & Drink (Bronze), Downtown Lexington Partnership (Member), Clark Law Office (Member) and Barnhill Chimney (Member).

Bottom: West Sixth pack tech recycling

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Hope Center www.hopectr.org

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e Help. We Heal. We Give Hope. The Hope Center’s mission is to care for homeless and at-risk persons by providing life-sustaining and life-rebuilding services that are comprehensive and address underlying causes.

Meet Rodney Rodney, a former Hope Center Recovery Program client, found a successful career after completing the program and helped construct the Don Ball Campus Center—the place he now calls home. When the Hope Center announced they would be constructing a new building, Rodney volunteered to set up for the groundbreaking ceremony. As he watched them break ground, he remembers thinking, ‘Man, I would love to be working over there.’ After finishing the program, a friend told him he could get a job with Spectrum Contracting. Rodney explained, “I soon found out I would be working on the Don Ball Campus Center! I worked here for close to nine months and helped with almost every aspect of this building.” Rodney is forever grateful to the Hope Center for helping pave the way for a successful recovery and life ahead. He said, “Thanks to the Hope Center teaching me how to be a productive member of society and thanks to Spectrum for giving me a job, I got my license back. I bought a truck, I have insurance, I’ve paid fines off, I’m paying child support and I’m being a responsible adult. I’m thankful for the Hope Center and I’m thankful for Spectrum—they changed my life. I wouldn’t trade even half of my new life for 1,000 of my old lives.”

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Juvenile Diabetes

Research Foundation www.jdrf.org

Rhonda A. Rathgeber, PhD, DVM

T1D (Type One Diabetes) is an autoimmune disease that occurs when a person’s pancreas stops producing insulin, the hormone that controls blood-sugar levels. Today, more than 1.25 million people in the United States are living with T1D; by 2050, that number will triple. The number of T1D cases in people under 20 has jumped 21% in the last decade. To put it another way, T1D rates have gone from 1 in every 600 school-age children to one in every 300. Founded in 1970 by parents determined to find a cure for their children with T1D, JDRF has expanded to become the largest charitable supporter of T1D research in the world. Our community — of more than 70 U.S. chapters and international affiliates, and 1 million volunteers — is dedicated to creating a world without T1D. Rhonda Rathgeber exemplifies the power of JDRF’s volunteers, PhD, DVM, a partner with Hagyard Equine Medical Institute, JDRF of Kentucky Board Member and mom to two beautiful daughters, the eldest of which has Type One Diabetes. “Four years ago, my family was forever changed by my daughter’s diabetes diagnosis. Like any mother, all I want is to ensure that my family is happy, healthy and safe. With each high and low blood sugar, the reality of these three things seems more distant. However, with the support of JDRF, I have hope that not only will my daughter be able to live a happier, healthier life but eventually, she will be cured of type one diabetes,” says Rhonda. Rhonda’s passion for finding a cure for Type One Diabetes led to the inaugural JDRF Hope Gala in Lexington in 2017. She is the Gala Chair for this year’s 3rd annual event on November 15 at the Woodford Reserve Club at Kroger Field.

Presented by

Rhonda goes on to note that “last year, corporate partners and donors helped to raise over $140,000 to further the quest to treat, prevent and eventually cure T1D. That’s a spectacular result, and as chair of the 2019 Hope Gala,I am privileged to serve as the chair for this year’s Gala and am committed to continuing to increase those numbers. But beyond raising funds, the Hope Gala has accomplished something else over the last three years. It has built a community. A resource. A powerful kinship of corporate partners, donors and volunteers. I’m particularly grateful to the equine and thoroughbred racing community who has embraced this event and been so supportive of me and my work with JDRF.” “Join us on November 15 and become a part of the community of volunteers and donors who are working to turn Type One into Type None!”

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Kentucky Equine Adoption Center www.kyeac.org

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lease help me with my horse. I don’t know where else to go.” Those are words the staff at The Kentucky Equine Adoption Center hear way too often unfortunately. The KyEAC is a safe haven for horses whose owners can no longer care for them, or are victims of abuse, abandonment and neglect. One winter day, the Center received a call from a woman who was desperate to find a home for her horse. Sadly, she was in the midst of a difficult financial situation, and was trying her best to find a safe place for her gelding. Because of his boarding situation, she had taken to sleeping in her car in order to make sure he was safe. Alvin P showed up, all 16.1h of him, a beautiful chestnut gelding with a kind and soft eye. He raced eighteen times as a three, four and five-year-old, before being retired. He is now 19 yrs old. Because of his age and current condition, Alvin P is not very suitable for riding and is one of the Center’s companion horses. His calm and loving demeanor is his greatest asset. Because horses like Alvin P have much to contribute, The Kentucky Equine Adoption Center launched Heads Up, Hearts Open, a program of equine-assisted growth, awareness, and communication clinics using these companion horses, to give them a chance to be of value to those who understand them and need them. Presented by

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Kentucky Horse Park Foundation www.khpfoundation.org

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he Kentucky Horse Park is a unique treasure in the Bluegrass, serving school groups, businesses and visitors from around the world as an educational, equine -themed park. From its state-of-the-art competition facilities to the Smithsonian affiliate International Museum of the Horse, to more than thirty national equine organizations located on the grounds, the Park exists as a special site dedicated and available to everyone who shares a love for the horse and an appreciation for the equestrian lifestyle of Kentucky’s Bluegrass region. Maintaining and improving the attractions, venues and the serene grounds of the Kentucky Horse Park would not be possible without generous gifts from Kentucky Horse Park Foundation donors. “As chair of the Kentucky Horse Park Foundation Board of Directors, I am privileged to experience how special the Kentucky Horse Park is to individuals from all over the world.” -Clay Green Who are the generous individuals who support the Kentucky Horse Park Foundation? •Equestrians who compete at the Kentucky Horse Park and value the extraordinary world-class facilities. •Lovers of nature who want to ensure that green space is preserved, maintained and available for all to enjoy. •Educators and historians who value the incredible resources of the International Museum of the Horse. •Animal enthusiasts who are passionate about horses and want to ensure that the Park’s resident horses have a wonderful home. •Investors in our youth and children who want to guarantee access for any child who wants to experience horses, nature and the magic of the Bluegrass lifestyle. These are just a few examples of the generous individuals who have chosen to be part of a rewarding partnership that combines the strengths of the public and private sectors to benefit the Kentucky Horse Park Foundation, a 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to enhancing, expanding and improving the Kentucky Horse Park. There are so many ways to support the growing family that loves the Kentucky Horse Park. We invite you to donate today and share your experience by visiting khpfoundation.org.

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Lexington Christian Academy www.lexingtonchristian.org

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AITH … SERVICE … EXCELLENCE.

These simple words are powerful on their own. Together, they form the backbone of our school. Since 1989, Lexington Christian Academy has produced scholars that impact the world for Jesus Christ. One of the unique aspects of LCA is the Christian environment … our faith. We believe that all truth is God’s truth, and every class at LCA is taught through the lens of a Christian worldview, incorporating biblical principles. Our goal is to help each student grow in their walk with Christ as they study, understand and obey God’s Word, and develop a Christian worldview. Beginning in preschool, and continuing through graduation, students attend weekly chapels and are taught daily Bible lessons. Our Savior taught us that to be a true disciple of Christ; one must first be a willing servant. Thus, we at Lexington Christian Academy provide opportunities for our students to serve the Lord with their hands, hearts, and all their God-given resources. Service can take many forms … aiding one’s teacher, mentoring another student, assisting with an outreach project, or participating in a mission trip. Our students are challenged to be our Lord’s hands and feet in order to make a positive impact on the world. To prepare our students to serve Christ in this competitive, global world of the 21st century, we are committed to excellence … academic, artistic, and athletic excellence. With a rigorous curriculum, LCA is dedicated to preparing students to achieve a productive and successful future. The lessons learned at LCA equip students with the lifelong skills to think critically and discern truth. In addition, we believe that co-curricular programs such as fine arts and athletics are ideal complements to academics in the overall educational experience. The art room, performance stage, and field of play provide excellent places for the development of self-discipline, work ethic, teamwork, and school pride. We believe our programs challenge students to excel and succeed as they are being prepared for college and career.

Thank you for taking the time to consider Lexington Christian Academy. We invite you to contact our Admissions Office at (859) 422-5733 or admissions@lexingtonchristian.org and schedule a visit to learn more about our school.

Top: Families pray over their students during the Senior Convocation Chapel held at the beginning of the school year. Center: Our preschool – 12th grade students complete numerous service projects throughout the year. Shown here are junior high students who packed boxes for Operation Christmas Child. Bottom: Some of our 2019 graduates pose for a photo in the hallway. LCA continues to have a 100% graduation rate.

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Louisville Ballet www.louisvilleballet.org

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t’s an event of athletic prowess that rivals others by leaps and bounds. In a historic collaboration that unites two rival cities, Lexington Ballet and Louisville Ballet are coming together for the first time in United State of Dance, October 25–27, at the Lexington Opera House. Lexington Ballet and Louisville Ballet are proud to partner with DanceBlue in donating $5 from every ticket sold toward their mission of eradicating pediatric cancer. The two cities have always been friendly competitors, but at the end of the day, only one thing matters: the kids. “The children who spend most of their lives at the DanceBlue clinic matter. The kids who don’t get to go to school matter. The kids who miss birthday parties, vacations, sleepovers, and days at the playground matter. The kids who still laugh with smiles on their faces despite cancer staring right at them matter.” Through this collaboration, both companies will unite to bring our great state together through the healing power of dance. Come and see Lexington take on Louisville. And watch both win.

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Makenna Foundation www.makennafoundation.com

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he Makenna Foundation facilitates hope, joy and courage for children facing life-threatening trauma and illness. These children and their families are served by caring professionals at the Kentucky Children’s Hospital. Established in September 2001 in loving memory of Makenna David who died following her diagnosis of the rare pulmonary veno-occlusive disease in 1998 when she was just 20 months old, the Makenna Foundation raises funds to help make the Kentucky Children’s Hospital a benchmark of children’s hospitals. Since 2001, the Makenna Foundation has raised over $2 million for the Kentucky Children’s Hospital, providing equipment and assistance needed for facility upgrades and expansion. Each year the Makenna Foundation receives generous private and corporate donations through various fundraising functions. In 2019 the foundation hosted three fabulous events - Derby Eve Soiree, Courtesy Fun Day and Talon Winery Concert Series - and they would like to thank the hundreds of attendees who helped raise over $100,000 combined. While these community functions are fun and fabulous for attendees, they are also paramount to improving the quality of life for so many families going through the unthinkable. For that, the Makenna Foundation is so grateful to the growing number of sponsors and hosts who make these events possible, including Dan Glass and Courtesy Acura; University Club of Kentucky; Talon Winery; the Makenna David Pediatric Emergency Department; Dr. Scottie Day; Dr. Craig Carter; Halfhill Auction Group; Hyatt Regency; and many more.

Top: Makenna David Center: The Sensory Room in Kentucky Children’s Hospital Bottom: The new Makenna David Welcome Center

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Since its establishment, poignant events such as these have enabled the Makenna Foundation to raise enough funds to purchase a bronchoscope; sponsor the new Makenna David Welcome Center, sensory room and toddler playroom in Kentucky Children’s Hospital; and open the Makenna David Pediatric Emergency Center.

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Marco Shemwell Foundation www.marcoshemwellfoundation.org

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arco Shemwell was a precocious 4-year-old boy who loved BIG! Though Marco was small, he had a joy for life and a personality that would fill a room. We called him our “sour patch kid.” He could be mischievous, and then immediately melt your heart with his infectious wide smile, an “I love you,” and a hug that would make your day. Marco was a talker — engaged and extroverted. He was thrilled to be four, adored UK sports and Batman was totally his favorite superhero. If you asked him why, he would say, “Because he helps people.” On September 15, 2018, Marco was waiting to cross the street with us after a UK Football game when he was tragically struck by a vehicle driven by a UK student. Marco’s injuries were not survivable. He died two days later. Marco was ours and we loved him, as did anyone who had the pleasure of knowing him. After his death, everyone around seemed to have a story or memory about him that they wanted to share. We immediately understood that even though he was young, Marco had a gift for changing the perspectives of those around him — more than we could have ever imagined. He was charismatic, empathetic and so engaged with the world and other’s experiences. Marco Shemwell Foundation was formed to both honor Marco and pay forward the kindness that we continue to receive after his passing. Our mission is to bring hope, comfort, and healing by creating Marco Moments that leave ripples of positive change. Every week we post a Marco Monday Challenge on social media, where we ask people to do specific acts of kindness. We are currently working on initiatives that we hope will create more positive ripples in the community. In August, the foundation collected items and distributed more than 1000 Birthday Boxes to families in need, in honor of Marco’s Birthday. We plan to make this an annual event, and look forward to more opportunities that allow us to servePresented others. by

Top: Photo by Kasey Moore Photography Bottom: Marco’s handprints are on the Catmobile Photo by Mark Cornelison UK Photo

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Safe Haven Equine Ministries www.safehavenem.com

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afe Haven Equine Ministries’ mission is to provide a safe place for youth to experience healing, hope and horses.

Our Stable Moments program serves young people with a history of trauma, such as abuse or neglect, through mentorship and equine-assisted learning activities. The mentor and horse teams teach independence, self-esteem, healthy relationships, emotional awareness, responsibility and self-regulation. The end to the foster care crisis in Kentucky lies in meeting each individual where they are at, understanding their experience and equipping them with life skills to move forward into healthy adulthood. There is exponential growth when you pair a “fight or flight” animal, such as the horse, with an individual with trauma. Their brains work in markedly similar ways, and thus they can learn from one another in ways they cannot with other people. You can get involved today by becoming a mentor, volunteering on the farm, or donating much-needed materials and items. By joining with Safe Haven, you can help change the life of a young person today!

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Step by Step www.sbslex.org

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tep By Step is a 25-year-old nonprofit serving young single moms ages 12 to 24, and their children. Our mission is to empower and embolden young single mothers to improve their lives, their families and their communities through healing, encouragement, faith and education. We serve these young families in 5 ways: Revive Nights: We provide transportation, a hot meal and children’s programming for our weekly Revive Nights. Moms learn life skills such as financial literacy, harm-reduction, resume writing, interview skills and more. Dare To Dream: Our goal setting program sends our staff into homes, shelters and schools to walk alongside these mothers as they set and achieve their goals. Refine Mentor Program: Refine pairs women from our community with young moms for a minimum of one hour per week for a calendar year as they walk alongside our moms offering support and encouragement. Support Services: We sit with young moms in court as they fight to protect themselves and their children. We visit them in delivery rooms when they might otherwise be giving birth alone. We provide emergency service referrals and emotional support. Echo & Resound Leadership Program: Moms who have graduated our program participate in a rigorous leadership academy where they learn skills transferable to the workplace such as public speaking, leading workshops and creating curriculum. How you can help: We are currently asking for $20 gift cards to Walmart, Kroger or Target, 20-ride bus passes for Lextran and $15 gas cards. Your organization or company can participate in our $500 & Some Change Campaign to sponsor one of our Revive Nights. Contact us at 859-258-7837 or www.sbslex.org for more involvement opportunities.

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Susan G. Komen Kentucky www.komenkentucky.org

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or many people, when they see the color pink, they think of Breast Cancer Awareness Month—with pink ribbons, pink apparel and everything that comes with the month of October. What they may not think about is what all that “pink” makes possible in the community. Susan G. Komen is the world’s largest breast cancer organization, funding more breast cancer research than any other nonprofit, while providing real-time help to those facing the disease. The Komen Kentucky affiliate is a local nonprofit dedicated to combating breast cancer right here in our community. Komen Kentucky funds grants to local hospitals and community organizations, providing screenings, diagnostics, treatment support, education and survivorship programs for underserved and underinsured women and men in Kentucky. The nonprofit also funds global research programs to develop new treatment strategies and screening tools. Even though general awareness of the disease is high, Komen Kentucky continually works to educate the community, as there are still many misconceptions about breast cancer. Many believe that “it only affects older women” or “if it doesn’t run in my family, I am safe.” Breast cancer does not discriminate when it comes to who is affected. Approximately 1 in 8 women and 1 in 1,000 men in the U.S. are diagnosed with breast cancer during their lifetime. It strikes people of all races and ethnicities. Ninety to 95 percent of people diagnosed with breast cancer do not have a family history of the disease. Every donation to Komen Kentucky is used to achieve the organization’s Bold Goal: to reduce the current number of breast cancer deaths in the U.S. by 50 percent by the year 2026. The nonprofit is working to achieve this goal by making research a priority and providing quality care for all. As the Lexington community begins to see a lot of pink this month, please think about “what makes pink possible” and join the movement for the first-ever Polo for the Cure on Saturday, October 5th. The event will be held at the Commonwealth Polo Club in Paris, Kentucky at 6pm. Lexington’s 24th Annual Race for the Cure will be on Saturday, April 25, 2020.

Every step, every dollar and every voice matter. Join us in the fight against breast cancer.

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Thursday’s Child www.thursdayschildky.org

The Pingleton Family

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teve and Shelia Pingleton married in 2003. They each brought children into the marriage and thus began their blended family. The couple are parents to many biological children including Landon Pingleton (32), Leann Taylor (28), Brittany Pingleton (26), Brandy Pingleton Robinson (26) and Crystal Taylor (21). They live on a 40-acre farm in Garrard County, which has been in Steve’s family for generations. They currently raise cattle, hay, produce, pumpkins, flowers and children. Steve is officially retired from EKU where he supervised all of the grounds for the University. Since retirement, he has also held several part-time jobs (in addition to farming), which include driving a bus for the local school district. Shelia has retired previously and then returned to driving a school bus for the local school district. She drives the school bus route where their farm is located and many of the children on her bus are her own children and grandchildren. Several of their adult children live on the family farm, or near the farm, and several of their adult children have also served as foster parents and are following in the family tradition of adopting from the state foster care system. Steve and Shelia felt called to help children and began serving as foster parents with the Department for Community Based Services in 2005. They have served as foster parents for approximately 24 children. At this time, they have adopted eight children and are currently fostering a baby (that they hope to adopt). Their adopted children are Alexis (20), Amanda (20), Shataria (15), Daisy (9), Makaylah (9), Laylah (8), Dillon (7) and Trinity (6). The family is active in their local church and participates in numerous community events such as a wide variety of sports. Many of the children play on softball and baseball leagues and the family often travels to sporting events with their children, including trips to Lexington to see the Lexington Legends. They also participate in numerous local festivals, where they often set up booths to sell the produce from their family farm. The children Presented by run and play on the farm, and also have chores such as helping to sell their produce during community events in Berea, Kentucky. They have an in-ground swimming pool on their farm, which is the site of numerous family and community celebrations. As you can see, Steve and Shelia have a heart for children and find joy in serving others within their family and community.

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UK Markey Cancer Foundation www.ukmarkey.org

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t was six years ago on a trip home to visit her family that Gwen first felt the lump sitting just above her collarbone.

“As soon as I felt it, I knew something wasn’t right. It wasn’t painful and I hadn’t recently been sick,” Gwen recalled. Doctors told her it was likely due to an infection and put her on an antibiotic regimen. The lump, however, did not go away so she sought out a second opinion. “I saw a top head and neck specialist in Boston who reiterated that he believed the lump was due to an infection and that I should follow up with my general practitioner once I returned home,” she said. “In my gut I just felt like the pieces weren’t fitting together, so as soon as I returned to Lexington, I called Markey and requested an appointment with a Head and Neck Surgeon.” Gwen met with Dr. Rony Aouad at the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center, who reviewed her scans and was alarmed by the presence of multiple enlarged lymph nodes and a mass on her thyroid. A biopsy confirmed thyroid cancer. Unfortunately, that was not the only diagnosis he made. “Dr. Aouad met with me after my thyroidectomy and told me that although he successfully removed the mass on my thyroid, he had found a second type of completely unrelated cancer in my lymph nodes called Hodgkin’s Lymphoma,” she said. Thankfully, the team at Markey team acted fast. She endured eight rounds of chemotherapy, followed by 22 radiation sessions, then radioactive iodine ablation to address the Hodgkin’s Lymphoma and then the Thyroid cancer. “The comprehensive care that I received at Markey not only focused on treating my cancer, but helped me face the physical and emotional toll brought on by rounds of chemotherapy and radiation,” she said. Today, Gwen is a registered nurse and will complete her Master of Science in Nursing Family Nurse Practitioner degree from Duke University this summer. “I was lucky to have amazing doctors who guided my treatment decisions, but I was truly inspired by the nurses who were by my side every step of the way. From my first chemo infusion to every single follow up visit after that, they were such an integral part of my care. It was through this experience that I realized nursing was my calling. I hope that I can make that same difference in patient’s lives.”

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Yes, Mamm! 5K www.chisaintjosephhealth.org/waystohelp

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tarted by the Saint Joseph Hospital Foundation in August of 2012, the Yes, Mamm! Program provides free mammography screening, diagnostic services and program support to uninsured and underinsured women and men. Over the past seven years, nearly $630,000 has been raised for this critical program through philanthropy, over 3,000 screening mammograms, 700 diagnostic services, 500 ultrasounds and approximately $5,000 in transportation assistance has been provided to those in need. Along with community partner, Kentucky CancerLink, the Yes, Mamm! Program also provides lifesaving equipment, supplies such as lymphedema sleeves, wigs and chemo caps, patient navigation, transportation assistance, patient counseling and education for the breast care team. Each October the Saint Joseph Hospital Foundation hosts it’s annual Yes, Mamm! 5K to raise funds for this important program. This year’s race will be held on Saturday, October 12, 2019, at RJ Corman Railroad Group in Nicholasville, KY. Over the past five years the Yes, Mamm! 5K has raised over $70,000 for the Yes, Mamm! Program. For more information about the Yes, Mamm! Program or the Saint Joseph Hospital Foundation, please visit www.chisaintjosephhealth.org or call 859.313.1705.

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Surgery on Sunday www.surgeryonsunday.org

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urgery on Sunday’s mission is to change lives one surgery at a time. The program provides free outpatient surgery to uninsured and under-insured individuals who do not qualify for federal or state government assistance and was the ďŹ rst of its kind in the United States. Surgery on Sunday is only able to help those in need through the generosity of our volunteers. Other than a full-time executive director and a part-time volunteer coordinator, everyone at Surgery on Sunday is a volunteer, including surgeons, anesthesiologists, nurses, surgical techs and administrative personnel. Since inception in 2005, more than 400 volunteers have donated more than 100,000 hours of service.

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For one surgery day to occur, 50-60 volunteers are required, depending on patient volume. Besides surgery days, volunteers are needed for office work, special projects and special events.

Your donation could save a life. Surgery on Sunday is thankful to have supporters, not only from across the state of Kentucky, but across the country. Generous monetary donations and in-kind gifts enable us to provide surgeries at an average cost of $1,500 per procedure - procedures valued up to $20,000.

Contact us today to find out more about donations and volunteer opportunities. 533 Waller Avenue, Lexington | (859) 246-0046

www.surgeryonsunday.org

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Bluegrass Council of the Blind www.bcbky.org

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Theresa Thomas, Executive Director of Bluegrass Council of the Blind

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he Bluegrass Council of the Blind (BCB) offers resources and services to Kentuckians affected by a loss of sight. We strive to educate and empower persons with vision impairments of all levels to continue living independently and as engaged members of our community. A critical component of our work is peer support. More than 50% of our staff, board, members and volunteers are people with vision impairments, sharing and learning from each other. We provide information, education, peer support technology and training to ensure that persons with low to no vision have the tools and resources they need to live safe, independent and healthy lives. Our services and supports are free of charge and available to anyone directly or indirectly impacted by the effects of vision challenges. No referral needed. No fees for service. Call us today at 859-259-1834 or learn more at www.bcbky.org.

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Lexington Children’s Theatre www.lctonstage.org

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High School Musical Jr. (2019) Photo by Sally Horowitz

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elcome to Lexington Children’s Theatre (LCT)! LCT is a memory-making, ground-breaking, perspectiveshaking one-stop shop for all things theatre for youth! We’ve got opportunities for your young person to perform, to create, and to explore - but most importantly, we’ve got space for you and your family to make memories together! For 81 years LCT has helped young people and families come together to create something special. Through our Discovery series, kids 9 and up can perform in professional theatre productions. Theatre school classes are another great way for young people ages 4 and up to hone their acting skills and build their confidence and creativity. With an 11-show season and year-round theatre education programming, we invite you to step away from phones, screens, and things that beep to make memories with your family that will last a lifetime! Visit us at 418 W. Short St. or www.lctonstage.org to learn more.

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Lexington Hearing & Speech www.lhscky.org

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exington Hearing & Speech Center is approaching its 60th Anniversary of serving families. While LHSC began as a preschool for children with hearing loss, the Center has grown into an established statewide organization that provides programs for children and their parents, as well as adults, within three areas: The Early Learning Center is a language-enriched early educational center for children with and without special needs, ages six weeks through kindergarten. Speech-Language Pathology Clinic provides evaluations and individual speech therapy for infants and children. “Tele-Talk & Teach” program is a new grantfunded program offering free tele-therapy for children with hearing loss ages 0-3, with an emphasis on listening and spoken language.

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Audiology Clinic, which provides hearing healthcare (hearing evaluations, hearing aids, educational audiology, and more) for all ages, “Twinkle to Wrinkle.” For more information about Lexington Hearing & Speech Center, visit www.lhscky.org or call (859) 268-4545.

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Lexington Public Library www.lexpublib.org

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n July, Heather Dieffenbach (46) became Lexington Public Library’s Executive Director.

Heather’s personal life has taught her that we all learn differently, and she envisions the Library as a place that helps us all. Under her leadership, you can expect to see increased digital programming (think coding classes, video games and 3D printing), a focus on early education to better prepare Lexington’s children for success, arts and cultural opportunities for all ages and refreshed spaces within the library for social interaction, group meetings and community forums. Of course, a library wouldn’t be a library without reading materials. Lexingtonians checked out over 3.2 million items last year, which is roughly ten items per person! Library items include print and digital books and magazines, DVDs and even board games.

Heather Dieffenbach Photo by Mark Mahan

If you haven’t been to the Library recently, check it out at any of LPL’s six locations, Libby app for eBooks and eAudio or www.lexpublib.org.

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New Vista www.newvista.org

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ew Vista, formerly Bluegrass.org, was the ďŹ rst community mental health center established in Kentucky in 1966, with headquarters in Lexington. Today, New Vista employs 200 psychiatrists and licensed therapists who help 25,000 Kentuckians in 20 counties. Our mission is to provide mental health, substance use and intellectual and developmental disability services to all children, adults and families in our service area, especially those with limited resources. Our name, New Vista, evokes a sense of hope, healing and our vision of improving the lives of our clients.

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New Vista continues to be on the front lines of ďŹ ghting the opioid epidemic in Kentucky, with a full continuum of evidence-based services. We provide prevention resources, intensive outpatient programs and quick response teams to help individuals after overdose situations. We offer residential treatment for pregnant women, 28-day programs for men and women, along with medication-assisted treatment and therapy. For support or questions, call our 24-Hour Helpline at 1.800.928.8000 or visit www.newvista.org.

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Breaking the Bronze Ceiling

Inspirational Women:

LAURA CLAY First president of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association story by Rob Bolson Laura Clay grew up in a large family of activists at White Hall in Madison County. Her father Cassius Clay eventually divorced his wife. Mary Jane Warfield Clay moved to Lexington where she became active in the woman suffrage movement, encouraging all four of her daughters to take leadership roles. Their farms in Madison County kept them economically independent. The two older sisters, Mary Barr and Sallie, began working for the national suffrage clubs, and they invited the leaders to come and speak in Kentucky. Lucy Stone came to stay with Mary Jane, Laura and Annie in Lexington before the American Woman Suffrage Association meeting in 1888. At that national convention, they founded the Kentucky Equal Rights Association (KERA) and elected Laura Clay as president. She served in this role until 1912. She worked effectively as an orator and political lobbyist, speaking on behalf of women in the justice system and higher education. Under her leadership, KERA regularly published convention reports, newspaper articles and preachers’ sermons; she personally worked with local leaders to start up their own suffrage clubs. She also organized nine suffrage societies in the South; and, she campaigned in the West where white women won the right to vote sooner than in the East. KERA worked closely with the Kentucky Federation of Women’s Clubs and the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union, winning women the right to vote in local school board elections before they had the right to vote for any other office in Kentucky. Clay believed that the power to change old customs should come from local and state levels, not a federal amendment. Just before the 19th Amendment was ratified, she left the National American Woman Suffrage Association and KERA to focus on her work with Southern suffragists seeking state-wide laws for women’s rights. In 1913 Clay was elected vice-president of the Southern States Woman Suffrage Conference. During the 1920 Democratic National Convention, Clay became the first woman to be awarded votes toward becoming a major political party’s presidential nominee. She also led the lobbying for women to serve in leadership roles in the Episcopal Church. Clay lived the last years of her life out of the spotlight, continuing to run her farm in Madison County from her home at the corner of Second and Mill Streets in Lexington. •

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photo by Bain News Service, Retrieved from the Library of Congress

GET INVOLVED:

Support Breaking the Bronze Ceiling in erecting a statue in downtown Lexington to celebrate the 100th anniversary of women’s right to vote. Visit breakingthebronzeceiling.com to donate and be a part of this important movement!


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At Harrodsburg event, Apple announces huge investment in Corning

Carissa Colors gives breast cancer patients beautiful options Carissa Fondaw is a Paramedical Micropigmentation Specialist. Her mission? To reach out and help others feel comfortable in their own skin. Carissa began her career path by studying microblading, and she soon discovered how powerful the procedure was for patients who had lost their eyebrows due to chemotherapy, and to those who had no hair due to alopecia or scarring. This spurred her passion for both microblading and medical tattooing. Paramedical Micropigmentation implants pigments within the skin via medical tattooing. The pigments are color matched for a natural appearance. For patients who have undergone a mastectomy, the process can be used to create the appearance of 3-D areolas and nipples. It can also blend out scarring, vitiligo or skin discoloration. Carissa has created a client focused atmosphere that is warm, comforting and full of compassion. Carissa Colors offers consultations by appointment.

Apple recently announced that it is investing $250 million in funding toward future research and development of the glass screens used in their mobile phones. Corning’s central Kentucky factory has produced glass for every version of the iPhone since its debut in 2007. The Harrodsburg team played an important role in development of the glass used in the iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 pro. “Just last week, as John mentioned, we announced two new phones, and they have the toughest glass in the world in a smartphone thanks to the work that you guys do here,” said Apple COO Jeff Williams at the announcement event held in the Corning facility. The new investment from Apple will allow Corning to research and develop more products for future generation devices. “I just want to thank Jeff and the Apple team for the trust and confidence they have shown in Corning since day one—every day over the last twelve years,” said John Bayne, senior vice president and general manager of Corning Gorilla Glass.

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Spotz Gelato is making Broadway a little sweeter Who doesn’t love gelato?! Spotz Gelato serves up award winning, handcrafted, small batch gelato and sorbet. They use Kentucky Proud ingredients whenever possible. Their menu is a rotating selection from over 50 flavors! Their sorbet comes in blackberry, blueberry, champagne or strawberry. Gelato flavors include decadent selections like fluffernutter, cream cheese, banana pudding, lemon berry chiffon, salted

caramel and more. They also offer sundaes, “sammies”, cookies, milkshakes and Italian sodas. Ready to grab something sweet? Check them out in Versailles, Georgetown and now on Broadway in Lexington! You can also stop by their food truck at local festivals, events, weddings, corporate events and private parties throughout the state. Ask how you can book a Spotz truck!

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City council approves funds to fix City Hall entrance On September 17th, Councilmembers gave initial approval to rebuilding the entrance to Lexington’s 100-year-old City Hall to address safety concerns.

The report by EOP Architects shows that the vestibule has to be rebuilt because the masonry has debonded or the mortar has failed, allowing water damage inside.

The move was proposed by Mayor Linda Gorton after architects examined the building’s exterior in May and June and told Councilmembers in an earler September meeting that the building is unsafe.

Gorton said the aging City Hall exterior will require additional improvements to address other safety issues in the near future. “Safety comes first. And we must also recognize that failing to act in the short-term just increases costs in the long-term,” she said.

Council okayed borrowing $250,000 to rebuild the Main Street entrance, where the architects say large limestone blocks are in danger of falling. “This is a safety issue. It’s a decision this government has delayed for more than a decade, kicking it down the road. Now, it’s time to act,” Gorton said. “We must take steps to protect the members of the public and the City employees who use this entrance every day.”

Council gave initial approval to a bond package that includes funds to rebuild the vestibule. The annual bond package is used for one-time expenses, such as police cruisers and other vehicles, paving and new voting machines. The bond Gorton included in this year’s budget is the lowest bond package since 2013, even with the addition of the funds for the vestibule. story courtesy of Susan Straub

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Celebrate Halloween in Lexington! Lexington Parks & Recreation presents its annual Halloween Festival and Parade, Sunday, Oct. 27 (parade rain date: Oct. 28.) This annual tradition has become a local must see as Halloween enthusiasts of all ages descend on downtown Lexington to celebrate the season and community. Lexington’s largest, free Halloween party will kick off with Halloween-inspired art and performances at the Wicked Wonders Market and Halloween Variety Show (4 – 8 p.m., Courthouse Plaza). The Halloween Parade will begin to creep down Main Street at 6:30 p.m. New to the parade this year is the Monster Mash-up Flash Mob.

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Groovy Ghouls, Whirling Werewolves, Marching Mummies and Frolicking Fiends will present a new spine-chilling addition to the annual Halloween Parade. Like the Thriller re-enactment, which is also a part of this year’s parade, the Monster Mash-up is open to all skill levels. Both the Monster Mash-up and Thriller re-enactment will follow the parade and occur repeatedly along Main Street, beginning at Quality Street and ending at Mill. Monster Mash-up and Thriller participants may select only one dance and must register between September 16 and October 19. Rehearsals are held at Artworks at the Carver School, 522 Patterson Street. To learn more: lexingtonky.gov/halloween story courtesy of Amber Luallen

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Paint LEX Purple in support of survivors of domestic violence October 19th is Wear Purple Day. Join the Lexington Domestic Violence Prevention Board in raising awareness and showing support for people impacted by domestic violence during October, Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Visit lexingtonky.gov/dvpb to learn more and access their Paint LEX Purple toolkit. Here is a list of ways the DVPB suggests to show support for survivors of domestic violence: PUT UP FLYERS: Print DVPB’s “I Believe You” posters and hang them in highly visible places, such as windows, bathroom stalls and bulletin boards at your place of work. CREATE A DISPLAY: Decorate the entrance, counter or window of your business or organization with purple paper, bunting, balloons, streamers, purple pumpkins, etc.

clothes, purple hair coloring, purple nail polish, etc.). Take a photo and share it on social media using #LexStopDV. CHANGE YOUR PROFILE PIC: Make your Facebook or Twitter profile picture purple by using DVPB’s Twibbon or “Together We Can” profile pic. SHARE ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Post DVPB’s “Together We Can” graphics on your personal, business and/or organizational social media page expressing your commitment to supporting survivors. Use #LexStopDV. TAKE A SELFIE: Take a selfie holding one of DVPB’s selfie signs and let Lexington know why you are supporting survivors. Post to social media using #LexStopDV.

EDUCATE: Display informational material and resources at your business or organization to help educate and expand awareness.

PUT IT ON PACKAGING: Place stickers in visible places and on product packaging (ex. coffee shops could place “Together We Can” stickers on drinks served in October). Download and print stickers from DVPB’s toolkit.

WEAR PURPLE: Coordinate with coworkers, friends, family or volunteers to show visual support by wearing purple (purple

MAKE IT PURPLE: Dye products purple to show your support for survivors (eg. drinks, donuts, cupcakes, etc.)

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AROUND TOWN:

Asbury University earns Top-10 Ranking as they announce new president, Dr. Kevin J. Brown Asbury University’s unique combination of academic excellence and spiritual vitality has made it a premier institution in the state of Kentucky for decades, and once again the private, Christian university has been recognized for its excellence at the regional level with a Top-10 ranking. With scores near the top of the rankings in graduation rates, retention rates, student/faculty ratio and more, it’s no surprise that Asbury was hand-picked as a top university in the annual U.S. News & World Report Best College Rankings. For 201920, Asbury moved up in the rankings, coming in at No. 9 on the list of more than 150 Regional Universities (South) — the only Christian (CCCU) institution to make the top 10 and the highest-ranked school from Kentucky in any category. U.S. News & World Report ranks schools on multiple criteria within each category including outcomes (retaining and graduating students); social mobility (graduating students with

various family incomes); faculty resources (faculty/student ratio, full-time faculty); accreditation, peer evaluation, study abroad programming, student excellence and more. Dr. Kevin J. Brown, who became president at Asbury this year, notes that the ranking speaks to the unique qualities of an Asbury education — an education that gives graduates the tools needed to continue whole-person cultivation after leaving campus. “At Asbury University, we aim to provide a rigorous, relevant 21st-Century education in tandem with a spiritually formative community experience,” Brown said. “Students are prepared to add value to the professional environments they go on to inhabit after college, but we also want them to be the best version of themselves – experiencing fulfillment by living into the fullness of who God created them to be.” story courtesy Asbury University

COMING SOON:

City Center corner restaurant announced, which will feature Chef Jonathan Lundy Lexington’s own celebrity Chef Jonathan Lundy & business partner/Certified Sommelier TJ Cox, co-owners of Corto Lima, have once again partnered with Lee Greer, President of Greer Companies, to develop ItalX, an avant-garde Italian restaurant coming soon to City Center at 160 West Main Street.

“Italian food and wine has always excited me. The Greeks coined Italy “Enotria” or ‘land of the vine’. Wines in Italy are made in the style that is most appropriate for the region, it’s cuisine and people. My goal is to bring that philosophy to ItalX.” – Certified Sommelier TJ Cox

The team draws inspiration from Italy’s emphasis on simple, fresh, quality ingredients and inspired hospitality in a warm and inviting space. A twist on traditional Italian fare, the menu will feature multiple scratch-made pastas, reimagined small plates, vegetarian and gluten-free offerings, and everyone’s favorite desserts. Popular Italian dishes will be reinvented with elegant presentation.

The restaurant will accommodate approximately 80 guests and include 15 bar seats with interiors inspired by the laid-back luxury of Italy and its viticulture, shown through the wine color directing the palette. Patterned and textural design elements combine with contemporary and comfortable furnishings to create a local interpretation of a Mediterranean bistro. Sculptural lighting completes the sensory experience.

Chef Jonathan Lundy brings culinary expertise and creative freedom to ItalX, marrying international cuisine influences and concepts with the local Kentucky dining culture to deliver fresh interpretations of Italian fare. The restaurant wraps around the northwest corner of Main and Upper Streets diagonally overlooking the historic Courthouse and is across from 21C. ItalX’s bar program, developed by Certified Sommelier TJ Cox, will offer extensive Italian wines from all regions of ‘the Boot’ and an inventive cocktail list, backed by house-made ingredients and Italian liqueurs.

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“This Italian concept has been in the making for about five years and I am excited to see it come to life. Thanks to my partnership with TJ, Lee and our team we are finally prepared to move into a beautiful restaurant space in Lexington’s hottest new development,” said Chef Jonathan Lundy. Lee Greer added, “We sought the best culinary legacy in Lexington and grabbed the Corto Lima duo, Chef Jonathan Lundy & TJ Cox. Together, we have the opportunity to create something special and different on the block we are the proudest of. This collaboration brings innovative ideas to the cornerstone of the City Center project.” story courtesy Digital Tulip

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Branch Out

COMMUNITY

photos courtesy Lexington Farmers Market

OUT!

Discover the Bounty at

Lexington Farmers Market

A lot has changed about the Lexington Farmers Market (LFM) since its official inception in 1975. The LFM has grown to represent 70 growers from 29 counties selling produce, and local artisans selling handmade goods. The process to become a vendor ensures that everything you bring home is from a verified vendor whose process is up to the standards set by the LFM cooperative. If you visit on a Saturday morning at the Fifth Third Pavilion, be sure to check out the market info booth. LFM volunteers and staff will be happy to give you info on parking validation or daily programming and can run your credit card for cash back (although most vendors accept card). In October, you’ll find over 40 varieties of apples at the weekend market. You may also find pawpaws, dahlias, mums, heirloom corn and more seasonal crops and crafts.

by Megan Martin

Bring the family to participate in LexWalk, a wellness initiative sponsored by the American Heart Association and the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department. Earn a $4 voucher for every person over 12 in your group that walks the 1-mile route on Sunday at the Southland Drive market, and be entered for more prizes! The market is open year-round. In the colder months, you may find meats, baked goods, jams, storage crops, herbs, and giftworthy artisan creations. The late fall and winter markets are heated, so you won’t be rushed home by the chilly temperatures! Stop by any of the five weekly locations, and you will realize how much of your grocery list can be fulfilled with local, inseason produce. You might even take home a family recipe from a friendly farmer!

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COMMUNITY

Digital Savvy

Savvy : Google DIGITAL

Ad Grants for Non-Profits

by Savannah Blank, digital guru

Have you ever imagined what your non-profit could do with $10,000 in advertising funds? You could recruit more volunteers. Attract more donations. Let the public know about your upcoming events and programs.

These campaigns are completely keywords targeted. The ad is only paid for when someone clicks to go to your website. If they do not click on the ad... you are getting a digital banner at the top of Google for FREE!

This all can be done through Google Ad Grants! This program was created by Google to help bolster local non-profit organizations on its platforms.

What does it take to qualify? “Organizations must be recognized by the IRS as tax-exempt 501(c)(3) organizations formed for charitable, educational, religious, literary, scientific or other tax-exempt purposes.” -Google Support.

Spread the word about your non-profit’s mission and find ways to engage new supporters using Google Adwords. The text ad will appear alongside your organic listing when people are searching for nonprofits in Lexington, or anywhere in the United States.

They also have a few eligibility requirements. Head online to see if your non-profit is eligible to receive up to $10,000 per month in Google Ads: google.com/grants/eligibility

Wondering what your next steps are? Get in touch with TOPS Digital Solutions today! We can provide a free website evaluation and discuss how you can improve your digital platforms. 859.543.8677 • advertising@topsmarketing.com

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LIFESTYLE

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Fashion:

Fall Wardrobe Staples Top Dressed Outfit of the Month:

Pink Power Gor-Jess:

Mistress of Evil

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Savin’ Face Wow Wedding:

Maryn + Noah Weddings Unveiled:

What’s Your Shade of Pink?


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Editor’s Picks LIFESTYLE

WARDROBE STAPLES The hottest trends you won’t want to miss out on this season!

Prairie Godmother Madewell Button Front Tier Dress

Layered Charm Kendra Scott “Samuel”

Animal Print Sweaters! Oh My! Mango Leopard Print Knit Sweater

Glammed-Up Gloves Barbour “Lady Jane”

Silky Hair, Meet Silky Hair Tie Urban Outfitters “Lana”

Stadium OK’d Clear Bag

Camel-Colored Cutie Bootie Kaanas “Cortese”

Cotton Patch of Kentucky

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Life + Style

There’s no doubt about it... BLUE looks great on everyone!

TOP

DRESSED

The TOParrazi have been out and about, capturing the most stylish looks this month! As we say “hello” to fall, here are some of our favorite transitional looks. Check out our picks for TOP Dressed of the month!

Andre Pater knows that finding the perfect accessory is an art!

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When the squad joins up to match... and support a great cause!


Outfit of the Month LIFESTYLE

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Breast Cancer Awareness month is all about spreading consciousness through pink, and we are showing our support with a power suit that means business. Prabal Gurung’s statement ribbon detailed blazer and matching straight leg trousers serve up a classic pairing that packs beautiful symbolism. For a touch of understated glamour, we added Miu Miu’s metallic leather sandals featuring shimmering crystals along the delicate ankle straps,

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Serpui’s rose-gold marble cracked clutch and Sophie Bille Brahe’s dreamy pink baroque pearl earrings. We sealed up our look with a spritz of perfume that literally helps save lives. For every bottle sold of Jo Malone’s beloved Red Roses perfume, a sizable portion of each sale throughout the month of October will be donated to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. While pink can often make us look and feel soft and delicate, there is great power behind the enchanting shade and October is no better time to wear it.

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in the look: 1 | Prabal Gurung ribbon collar blazer 2 | Sophie Bille Brahe Venus 14-karat gold pearl earrings 3 | Prabal Gurung classic straight leg trousers 4 | MIU MIU crystal-embellished metallic leather sandals 5 | Jo Malone London Red Roses Cologne Breast Cancer Awareness Edition (Available at The Summit at Fritz Farm) 6 | Serpui cracked panel clutch purse

October 2019 | TOPSinLex.com

by jesse brooks

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LIFESTYLE Gorjess: Get the Look

by jesse brooks For the month of Halloween we naturally had to spook it up when it comes to beauty. With one of our favorite Disney live-action film’s releasing it’s highly anticipated sequel this month we thought it was the perfect time to channel our inner Maleficent. To turn the already mesmerizing Angelina Jolie into a character that was both beautiful and terrifying her personal makeup artist Toni G kept things fairly simple, focusing on icy pale skin, oil spilled eyes, razor sharp cheekbones, long, sinister nails and of course her signature juicy red lip. While prosthetics and contact lenses certainly elevate the evil, the makeup alone can cast a spell. If you’re looking to go dark for the mysterious holiday these products will have you looking and feeling like the ultimate evil queen. 1

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9. MAC Shape + Shade ‘Fling’ Brow Tint 10. MAC Pro Longwear ‘Kiss Me Quick’ Lip Liner Pencil

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9 1. MAC Full Coverage Foundation 2. MAC Select Cover-Up Concealer 3. MAC Prep + Prime Highlighter 4. MAC Natural Beauty Powder 5. Mac Sculpting Powder 6. MAC Eyeshadow in ‘Carbon’, ‘Goldmine’ and ‘Brown Down’ 7. MAC Brushstroke Eye Liner 8. MAC Disney Maleficent False Lash #36 11. MILANI ‘Red My Lips’ Brilliant Shine Lip Gloss 12. Urban Decay ‘No Tell Motel’ Vice Lipstick


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savin’ face

Savin’ Face LIFESTYLE

Story by Jayme Jackson

M

y obsession with all things southern started when I was young. Southern, synonymous for: our food (universal word for casseroles), charming hospitality, representing the SEC, and most of all - our hair and makeup. Beauty comes in all shapes, sizes and colors. There is no standard for what is beautiful. Some of you gals are lucky enough to be natural beauties. I unfortunately did not inherit that gene but when I put on my makeup, tease my hair (using almost an entire can of Big Sexy hairspray) and put on my oversized jewelry and 3’ heels, I can conquer the world. This entire process has become my suit of armor and I can close any deal or overcome any obstacle as long as I have it on.

My spirit animal is Dolly Parton and I am whole heartedly doing my very best to make her proud, one can of hairspray, shot of Botox and cosmetic procedure at a time. My look is somewhere between a 1986 Miss Texas and a news anchor. It will not be everyone’s style, but we all have one thing that bonds us… we are all getting older. It was easy being pretty when you were 20. It takes more work (and duct tape) after 40. I’ve got a few tricks up my floral-printed sleeve that all of us gals can benefit from, no matter your shape, style or age. My hope is that we become the very best of friends over the upcoming issues and that each month, we discover the latest secrets in anti-aging. I am all about Savin’ Face. Let’s start with a few products that I use every single day. Keep in mind this advice from my role model: it’s expensive to look this cheap. Until next time, girls! SEPHORA Beauty Amplifier

KEVIN AUCOIN Sensual Skin Enhancer

SKINMEDICA HA5 Rejuvenating Hydrator

LORD AND BERRY Back in Black Mascara

SOUTHERN BELLE Volumizing Mousse (available at Dry Bar)

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LIFESTYLE WOW Wedding

story by lauren rogers

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n instant spark can take a while to fully ignite. At least, that was the case for Maryn and Noah Smallwood, though ignite it did. Maryn remembers the first time she saw Noah, who sat in front of her during their shared Sociology class at Morehead State University, like it was yesterday. “Both of us were interested immediately but Noah wouldn’t speak to me, make eye contact, or even pass me the attendance sheet,” she laughs. Though Maryn transferred to Murray State after her first year at Morehead, the couple decided to date long distance and were together for the rest of their college years. Even though they were over 4 hours away and in 2 different time zones, they realized they had something very special and were confident that their long-term plans would include marriage. Luckily, they were right, and the pair were soon engaged. After college, Maryn, who is originally from Oxford, Ohio, and Noah, who grew up in Nicholasville, decided to make Kentucky home and the search for the perfect wedding venue began. With the wedding date set for 10-20-2018, Maryn had a very specific vision in mind to bring their dreams for a beautiful Bluegrass wedding in the fall to life. Their desired aesthetic included pumpkins, (all of which were imported thanks to the bride’s mother Diane,) flower arrangements with loose petals and delicate twinkle lights to cast a warm glow on all in attendance. Adding even more importance to this already significant date, October 20th is Noah’s father’s birthday, David, who tragically passed away in 2013. “We already knew we wanted an October wedding so going with the 20th seemed like a thoughtful way to include Noah’s late father,” Maryn shares.

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WOW Wedding LIFESTYLE To make this dream become a reality, the couple selected historic First Vineyard Winery in Nicholasville for both their ceremony and reception. Established as the nation’s first ever commercial winery in 1799, First Vineyard captured the hearts of the Smallwood’s and delighted all of their guests. “It was the perfect size for those in attendance at our wedding and reception, the views were beautiful, the wine was delicious, and the staff was wonderful!”, Maryn exclaims. The vineyard also offered plenty of living quarters for those in Maryn’s family who were travelling from out of state to join in the festivities. In addition, because First Vineyard gives the option to choose any caterer desired, the bride and groom opted for a delicious pizza reception bringing their culinary wedding wishes to fruition. They share excitedly, “The pizza truck was a huge hit. Rolling Oven was perfect, and we could not have asked for a better food vendor. They were making pizzas all night and a lot of attendees even got to take a pie home!” Other favorite moments of the groom were those spent getting ready before the ceremony, the first and watching his family interact with that of his bride-to-be. Noah says, “hanging out with my closest friends and family before the chaos began helped to keep me calm and our group photos were fun and full of smiles.” The bride divulges that her favorite part was the first look with Noah. “I tried to not ‘wish the day away’ because I wanted to enjoy the time with my friends and family beforehand, but I couldn’t wait to see Noah! My face hurt before the ceremony even started because I couldn’t stop grinning.” She continues, “Also, I was highly anticipating the pizza!” But who can blame her? A surprise choreographed dance following the more traditional father/bride dance added a particular element of fun for all. “It was a total secret and we had a few practice sessions before the wedding festivities started. We decided to incorporate the hand jive (we are both very fond of Grease,) and it was a total hit!” On hand to capture all of the magic from the surprise proposal, engagement memories and the wedding itself was stellar photographer, Ashley Rainwater. “She is a true professional and seems to know just what the customer is looking for,” disclose the Smallwood’s. Further, they share that “she helps to keep the sessions moving and always offers helpful suggestions.” As far as making their own helpful suggestions, the happy couple recommends others to invest in a planner. Maryn explains, “It’s hard finding the time and energy to plan between work and everyday tasks, then sit down to plan a wedding. We encourage friends who are planning their own weddings to enlist somebody who knows how to do this and knows vendors, what they have seen brides and grooms likes and dislikes, just overall somebody with experience.” If a planner is not financially an option, the couple recommend setting aside time to keep everything on track. “Noah and I would visit topics each week to address topics and issues that haven’t yet been addressed or totally nailed down yet. In the end, however, we cherished the day and enjoyed all of our moments, together, as husband and wife.”

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LIFESTYLE Gorjess: Get the Look

PHOTOGRAPHER Rainwater Photography VENUE First Vineyard Winery CATERING Rolling Oven Pizza SWEETS Kayleigh Adams Cakes & Events FLOWERS Stems, LLC

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DECOR Purdon’s Rentals BRIDAL GOWN DESIGNER Stella York BRIDAL GOWN Twirl Boutique BRIDAL PARTY ASOS, Adrianna Papell

and Soieblu

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GROOM/GROOMSMEN The Black Tux HAIR Indigo Salon MAKEUP Jennifer Banks STATIONERY Minted PHOTO BOOTH Flashing Lights


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LIFESTYLE Weddings Unveiled

CLASSIC

blush

A classic bride loves a classic blush pink to plan their day around. Think soft, pale pink bridesmaid dresses and delicate blush florals to top off a clean, white cake. This palette is more simple, but definitely not less beautiful.

MODERN

A more modern twist to the color pink is the beautiful moody shade of dusty rose. This palette continues to stay in trend and allows a bride to have a little whimsical fun with their overall theme. Think sleek mauve bridesmaid dresses and vintage rose gold details.

DRAMATIC

Going for a romantic burgundy is a deeper shade of pink that is perfect for those late summer and fall weddings. Have fun with this color by playing with the attire, even the groom’s suit, and also incorporating deep florals will add that perfect pop of drama.

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Outfit of the Month LIFESTYLE

P h o t o v i a Ju s t i n e M i l t o n P h o t o g r a p hy

photo credits 1 | Valentina Glidden 2 | Valentina Glidden 3 | Elizabeth Nord Photography 4 | Jessica Bellinger Photography 5 | Mirelle Carmichael 6 | Rebecca Taylor Photography 7 | Brandon Kidd Photography 8 | Tamara Gruner Photography 9 | Shannon Moffit Photography

by haley norris Recent Bride & Owner of Haley Michelle Designs

www.haleymichelledesigns.com

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AT HOME

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Tour of Homes:

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Color Catalog:

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Revitalized Revival Metropolitan

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Super Mom:

Melanie Tyner-Wilson Fall Family Friendly Fun


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Tour of Homes

e it story by donna ison photos by shaun ring

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AT HOME

R E V I VA L This grand Colonial Revival recently received a fabulous facelift.

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fter spending two decades in their South Hanover home, Janie Fergus and John Meyers realized they were ready for a revamp. The Lexington natives purchased the home, originally built in 1922, upon getting married and have been there ever since. Moving is not an option. Janie explains, “I couldn’t leave Ashland Park. The location is perfect for us. We love it for the historic homes, going to Ashland, home of Henry Clay, for dog walks, the friends and neighbors, and its proximity to local restaurants, shopping, groceries and, of course, our veterinarian.” Their two dogs Cricket and Ned are a vital part of the family. Janie and John were still content with the fundamental bones and layout. According to Janie, “The home has large open areas which fit our lifestyle.” And, of course, as the president of Blue Grass Trust for Historic Preservation, she wanted to maintain the architectural integrity of the nearly century-old, two-story home. “I love and appreciate the characteristics of historic design.” To update and renovate the residence without compromising its traditional qualities, they employed a team of some of the best in business. The team included Vimont Builders; architecture and design firm, Pohl Rosa Pohl; Ralph Martino of Christopher Michael Fine Furniture; Judy Strassburg of Guthrie Strassburg Interiors; and Debra Hupman of Creative Kitchen & Bath.

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Using nature as her primary inspiration, Janie wanted to highlight organic elements and natural textures. It was important to maintain a color palette of “natural and subdued colors, which are soothing and calm.” Additionally, the couple’s special interests influenced much of the decor and include original art and objects collected while traveling. Some of the decorative items are antiques procured from local dealers and found at the annual Bluegrass Trust for Historic Preservation Antique and Garden Show as well as family heirlooms like a Kentucky-made sugar chest from Janie’s grandmother Fergus. Their extensive collection of art is a combination of contemporary, by artists such as John Tuska and Martin LaBorde and historical pieces, including several English 18th century paintings. New elements from Christopher Michael Fine Furniture were mixed in to invigorate the existing décor.

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The sunroom exemplifies this eclectic approach to decorating and is where Janie, who is enjoying her retirement (after a career in information technology management including CIO at the Saint Joseph Health System) most enjoys spending her leisure time. Three walls of windows allow the outdoors to pour in and nods to nature abound. Janie explains, “Ralph said, ‘This just needs to be an extension of the garden,” and I fully agreed.” A circular wood top table with a gleaming brass base and silver starburst mirror juxtapose aged, wooden screens and a columned, stone console displaying a shell art terrarium by Ron Meece. Rustic influences like birch branches, concrete planters, and a jute table pepper the sunroom. Several pieces of leaded glass, created by internationally known artist Guy Kemper, from very early in his career, catch the sun. The comfortable chaise provides the perfect spot for Janie to read the latest selection for her beloved book club. An antique secretary writing desk offers the ideal view while working.

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John prefers to relax and unwind in the adjoining den as it houses two of his favorite pieces: a coffee table that features an ancient Roman mosaic dating back to near 300AD, which reflects his love of Roman history, as well as a wooden partner’s desk. Several other components add to the classical feel of the family room. Above the green marble fireplace hang a pair of graphite drawings depicting Neptune from a Brazilian artist. Built-in bookshelves, a set of bay windows, one with a tan ostrich leather seat, round out the refined character of the den. However, John, who serves as the Executive Director of Kentucky Bar Association and is an avid UK sports fan, resolved to include a large TV for friends to gather around to watch the games. To keep the sophisticated feel of the room while accommodating a substantial screen proved challenging. Ultimately, the television was hung against a dark, natural husk wallpaper causing it to all but disappear when not in use.

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AT HOME

Ralph Martino designed the sunroom and den, as well as the dining room, living room, foyers and the upstairs master bath.

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Throughout the rest of the first floor are other unique facets and fabulous furnishings. In the dining room, a Florentine Scagliola table by Emilio Martelli of Florence from the first half of the 20th century takes center stage. A wet bar with mirrored shelving to display glassware and polished nickel, mosaic, blue glass-tile sink which is built into the hallway connecting the den to the foyer. The front entryway is accented in a cork-inspired wallpaper with a metallic background that harmonizes with a custom “sea cloud” chandelier. In the powder room, designed by Judy Strassburg, a brushed brass faucet and a matching hammered brass basin echo the design in whimsical wallpaper with a golden salamander print.

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Perhaps the most significant transformation occurred in the L-shaped kitchen. Notably, the move of a wall and addition of windows create an open feel, let in light and affords a view to the home’s meticulously manicured side garden. Debra Hupman modernized and further functionalized the space by installing floor-to-ceiling white cabinets with polished nickel hardware and white quartz countertops done by Mees Tile & Marble, with floor tiling by Hurley Marble & Tile. State-of-the-art, stainless steel appliances from Ferguson Bath, Kitchen & Lighting Gallery and signature light fixtures, like the gingko pendant light above the cooktop by Michael Aram from Christopher Michael Fine Furnishings, complete the contemporary concept. 160

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AT HOME

The refrigerator maintains clean lines as it was recessed into a doorway and given an antique mirror facade to reflect the outdoors. One of the room’s more personal touches is the lighted niche that was added to display Janie’s collection of silver cow creamers. These creamers, primarily from 19th century, include one crafted around 1750 by Dutch Silversmith John Schuppe, who started the movement. Similarly personalized, the walnut top was harvested from Janie’s father’s farm in Scott County.

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From a set of stylish foyers, dual staircases lead to the second floor. One ascends to the owner’s suite with an elegant master bedroom equipped with an ornate bed, marble fireplace, and his and hers writing desks.

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In the master bath, brushed brass hardware and ďŹ xtures from Willis Klein in a key-motif complement a white vanity with a grey and white quartzite top from Counter Culture and extensive marble oor and wall tile installed by Hurley Marble & Tile. As a bonus, the glass-doored, walk-in shower contains a convenient dog washing station. The bedroom suite also houses a laundry and walk-in closet. The second staircase accesses a guest suite replete with a bedroom, seating area and a full bath.

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When it came to the backyard, Janie had a clear vision of what she wanted. “Our yard is small, and Charleston is one of my favorite cities, so the design goal was to invoke the ambiance of a Charleston courtyard.” The atmosphere was achieved, with the help of Mike Clarkson of Lawnworks, Inc by encircling a goldfish pond with bushes, evergreens, ivy and trees, and integrating statuary and a wrought iron bench. “The fishpond brings so much enjoyment by providing the sound of water falling, the sight of graceful swimming fish, along with providing a great water source for birds. There is always something interesting to watch. I love to work on the computer on the patio or sit and enjoy the sounds and sights,” states Janie.

Lawnworks also landscaped the front and side yards with Red Oak Outdoor Lighting installing perfect ambient light. Though the home pays homage to nature, it also employs high tech amenities. Janie points out, “I love technology. We use the Petcube, so we can monitor Ned and Cricket, speak to them and play with them using a laser. When we travel, I love to access it so I can see they are well cared for and that they don’t forget me.” They also just had a RING security doorbell installed to bolster the existing security system. The master bath floor is even wi-fi connected to respond to the weather and heats accordingly.

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The entire remodel took 18 months and was a learning experience. Janie states, “I really enjoyed learning more about the guidelines used by the Board of Architectural Review and seeing all the complexities of construction. And, it was an evolving process, as one upgrade inspired more upgrades.� The result evokes a genteel past while being revitalized and ready for all the future holds.

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HISTORY Story by Amanda Harper Photo by shaun ring

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f you’ve seen the “BGT” plaques on local homes, you may have wondered what that means – and how to make your house a Blue Grass Trust home!

The BGT Plaque Program is one of the most visible arms of the Blue Grass Trust. The purpose of the plaques is to call attention to buildings of architectural or historical significance. Over 900 have been awarded since the program’s inception in the 1970s. The property must be at least 50 years of age. To apply, you can visit the Blue Grass Trust website. The property owner can include information about the building’s unique history, architecture, date of construction and other notable details. They also request photos of all sides of the building. There is a cost associated with the plaque. There are two options of plaque at $150 or $250. This fee covers production of the plaque itself, processing and a one-year membership to the Blue Grass Trust. Once the BGT has received your application, the plaque review committee considers the information submitted. They look to ensure that the submission follows the spirit of the program and that all information appears to be authentic. If for some reason the application is not approved, the homeowner will be contacted to explain why. The Blue Grass Trust is the state’s oldest non-profit historic preservation organization. Members support the mission to preserve and protect the architectural history of the Bluegrass region. It’s important to note that the placement of a BGT plaque does not obligate the homeowner to open their premises to tourists or the public. It also doesn’t create any kind of restriction on further changes made on the property. Questions about the process? Contact the Blue Grass Trust at 859.253.0362, info@bluegrasstrust.org or bluegrasstrust.org. BGT Mission Statement: The Blue Grass Trust for Historic Preservation is a non-profit advocate for historic preservation that strives to protect, revitalize and promote the special historic places in our community to enhance the quality of life for future generations. The Trust is guided by three tenets – education, service and advocacy. Founded in 1955, they are the 14th oldest preservation group in the United States.

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Color Catalog

Surya Furniture Ottoman MY FAVORITE THINGS

Rectangular Mirror with Round Handle

Penida Pillow

POTTERY BARN

MARKET ON NATIONAL

PPG

Color METROPOLITAN Criteria Sideboard by Bernhardt PERIGOLD

Benjamin Moore’s “Metropolitan” (AF-690) is a stylish alternative for anyone seeking the perfect greige. With cooler undertones, Metropolitan brings both balance and glamour. Calm and composed, this lovely hue adds sophistication and simplicity wherever it’s applied. It’s a perfect springboard for any color palette you wish to create. Benjamin Moore created this look by pairing unique versions of neutrals. It makes a very cohesive look that goes wonderfully with a minimalist design style. But don’t think that “minimalist” means you must go modern! Metropolitan is a classic hue that would work perfectly with traditional furniture and antique aesthetics. Here, Metropolitan is used to great effect in a living room. It would also be stunning in a kitchen with a boldly-colored island, or anywhere natural stone countertops have been used, such as a large master bathroom.

PAIR WITH:

Solana Handwoven Rug ARHAUS

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Black Pepper

TOPS in Lexington | October 2019

Smoke

Putnam Ivory

Kendall Charcoal


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BEHAVIORAL TARGETING

SOCIAL MEDIA MGMT


Super Mom

AT HOME

Melanie

Tyner-Wilson story by lauren rogers photos by keni parks

M

elanie Tyner-Wilson gently encourages us to remember that all moms are super, whatever their circumstances may be. She shares, “I am like so many other women that are doing many things (work, family, all the chores with keeping a household going and advocating for others.) I am blessed to have a spouse to help me accomplish this and I work a job that is challenging that I love. I have adult children, (Jay 26 and Jesse 20), that I love and are a part of my life, but I am not a super mom.” It is this humble reminder and approach to motherhood that may, however, solidify why Melanie is a particular brand of magic... and a Super Mom after all. Since 2015, Melanie has served as the Family Support Specialist and Navigator at the University of Kentucky Developmental Behavioral Pediatric clinic. As the biological parent of a special needs child with autism and a foster-turned-adoptive parent of a special needs child, the advocacy of which Melanie speaks has been focused around promoting educational policy and legislation related to enhancing the quality of family life for all Kentucky children. Melanie has served on the Kentucky Autism Council and is a member of the Autism Society of the Bluegrass. Previously, she has served as an advisory board member of Kentucky Autism Training Center, the National Early Childhood Transition Center, and the Kentucky Partnership for Families and Children and together with her husband Steve, a UK Architect, she served as a parent liaison for the Adoption Support of Kentucky for 11 years. She worked as a Kentucky Special Education mediator for 11 years and is a Council on Parent Advocates and Attorney’s (COPAA) Special Education Advocate graduate.

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AT HOME

Super Mom

Inspired by other caregivers, Melanie has learned how to advocate for her children and others, an education that is on-going and continues to drive her every day. Though her sons may be grown and involved in their own activities, (Jay with swimming, bowling and the Self-Empower Network through the Arc of Kentucky and Jesse with video games, cars and his career,) the Tyner-Wilsons enjoy family outings to pool and the movies whenever they have the opportunity to be together. She reflects, “For me, the most rewarding part about being a mom is just to be a part of a child’s life and to care about someone so much. Above all else, I encourage you to celebrate the children in your life and to be proud of what they have accomplished.” Ever driven to inspire change and continue her advocacy work, Melanie says she struggles to find enough time to do all the things she wants to accomplish in her lifetime. “I see so many families that have such great needs and feel that it is so hard to be a mom these days because of all the expectations that are made for individuals.” She continues, “Although I do not do a very good job with balancing everything, I do try to exercise or walk daily and I have a group of amazing moms that I connect with on a weekly basis. These people keep me grounded.” She smiles, “Also, I could not do any of this without the support of my amazing husband, Steve. We have been together a long time and he puts up with a lot from me!” •

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FAMILY-FRIENDLY FUN! by Katie Kerwin & Amanda Harper

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DEVINE’S CORN MAZE & PUMPKIN PATCH

BOTANICA FARM

JACK O’ LANTERN SPECTACULAR

Devine’s has been bringing family fun for 12 years with a massive corn maze that is designed to be impressive when viewed from above. This year, they’re celebrating Kentucky Farm Bureau’s 100th anniversary.

Imagine taking a stroll amidst over 5,000 glowing jack o’ lanterns! This festive autumn attraction is held each year at Iroquois Park in Louisville.

Devine’s offers many kid friendly things to do, including a kiddie corn maze, a petting zoo area, pumpkin picking and a nightly bonfire. They have recently added paintball, ziplining and more. Bring the family and enjoy the fun behind the #3 ranked corn maze in the nation!

Botanica is a family farm located in Lexington that has been around for over 60 years now. Bring the family and enjoy a playhouse set, pumpkin patch and a corn maze with a surprise: answer questions throughout the maze and be entered to with a pair UK exhibition basketball tickets! From the petting barn to the vertical tire wall, there’s a lot to see at Botanica!

623 Talmage-Mayo Rd. • Harrodsburg, KY devinescornmaze.com

6327 Old Richmond Rd. Lexington • botanicaky.com

1080 Amphitheater Rd. • Louisville, KY jack-o-lanternlouisville.com

TOPS in Lexington | October 2019

October 8th – November 3rd, the pumpkins light up daily around dusk (approximately 7:15pm) and they glow until 11pm SundayThursday and midnight on Fridays and Saturdays. You walk along a 1/3-mile walking trail. Each year features newly-themed scents with music. Proceeds benefit the Louisville Parks Foundation.


Family Fun LIFESTYLE

EVANS ORCHARD & CIDER MILL

PUMPKIN PATCH TRAIN RIDE

ECKERT’S VERSAILLES FARM

Aside from their pick-your-own fields, Evans has a lot of fun in store for the whole family. Their play area includes a jumbo jumper, the Apple Cider Slider, a rat racers big wheel track, pedal carts, a hay castle and more. The barn yard and petting zoo is completely adorable.

Each weekend in October, the Bluegrass Scenic Railroad and Museum offers Autumn Leaves train rides to see the beautiful landscapes of central Kentucky.

Children and adults can enjoy bonfires, hayrides, apple picking and many other outdoor activities at Eckert’s farm. From their corn maze to the Country Store, there’s so much to see and do.

While you’re there, pick out a pumpkin and enjoy some homemade fudge with the family at Evans. The Sweet Apple Café & Bakery is a can’t-miss!

The train makes a stop along the way at Life Adventure Center, where guests can disembark and purchase pumpkins (to benefit LAC). Enjoy cider and marshmallows on this festive adventure.

198 Stone Road. • Georgetown, KY evansorchard.com

175 Beasley Rd. • Versailles, KY bluegrassrailroad.com

photo: Eckert’s

Looking for spooky fun? Head out Fridays and Saturdays through October 26 for the Haunted Hayrides. Check out their website for a calendar of other events happening this fall season. They have fun seasonal events planned for November and December, too! 1396 Pinkard Pike • Versailles, KY eckerts.com/versailles

photo: Jack o’ Lantern Spectacular

photo: Evans Orchard

AUTUMN FEST AT BI-WATER FARM

HALLOWEEN LIGHTS DRIVE

THE ARBORETUM

Bi-Water Farm hosts the largest fall farm festival in the area over 185 acres of land in the heart of Kentucky. Enjoy everything from corn mazes, petting zoos, ziplines and paintball – just to name a few. Check out the Pumpkin Warrior Obstacle course of Spooky Farmhouse. Check out their website for the full list of the adventures your family can enjoy while at BiWater! You can join them on Friday nights for a community bonfire, storytelling and s’mores or Darkside Hayrides.

Enjoy twinkling lights and spooky sights over a one-anda-half-mile drive. Hundreds of thousands of lights and Halloween scenes are built by Fort Boonesborough State Park and its campers to create a chilling good time… but since you’re in your vehicle, no need to worry about the chill in the air! Drive on down October 4-26. Lights are on dusk - 10pm.

The Arboretum has all kinds of great familyfriendly events. Visit their online calendar for walks, seasonal activities, plant exchanges, vegetable garden workdays and more. From learning about local plants to soaking in the sunshine at the Children’s Garden, The Arboretum is one of Lexington’s best family destinations.

877 Cincinnati Rd. • Georgetown, KY biwaterfarm.com

4375 Boonesboro Rd. Richmond, KY • parks.ky.gov

500 Alumni Dr. • Lexington, KY arboretum.ca.uky.edu

October 2019 | TOPSinLex.com

Check out their annual Autumn Scarecrow Display as you walk through the Horticultural Gardens. Or celebrate Tree Week with them October 12-19!

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Dining:

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Top 5 Dining:

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Agave & Rye Catering Services Dining Guide Recipe:

Spicy Baked Sriracha Chicken

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BBN:

Handy Landon Young Equine Update Art in the Bluegrass:

Andre Pater: A Sporting Artist for the Ages


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Dining EATS & ENTERTAINMENT

With striking

Agave

art and unconventional tacos, Lexington's newest Tequila and Bourbon bar is on a mission to elevate simple food into something extraordinary.

Rye

Agave & Rye, a Tequila and Bourbon Hall based out of Covington, Kentucky recently opened their Lexington location as the second spot in a major nationwide expansion. As you walk through the doors of the funky restaurant, you quickly understand why their growth has been so rapid. Co-owner Yavonne Sarber, one half of the husband/wife team that created the unique concept, describes the decor of the restaurant as "urbanchic aesthetic, with its grungy side, but polished-up." Everything from original art, painted murals and hip graffiti, including skulls and crossbones and super chic, modern black and white stripes cover the interior walls. "We wanted the restaurant decor to be approachable for everything from a lunch break to a date night and even girls night out," comments Sarber. "Comfortable, energetic, eclectic, edgy, vibrant ‌ it's the perfect backdrop for our EPIC food."

Story By Kate Horning H EALTHY L IVING C HEF katehorning.com Photo by Keni Parks

October 2019 | TOPSinLex.com

Initially opening as a taco joint featuring their unique tacos as well as chips and dips the menu has evolved based on feedback from their guests. Their offerings now include more shareable items such as the Guaca Fries topped with smashed avocado sauce, white cheddar and spicy chipotle crema. The Crispy Brussels Sprouts, another popular dish, is drizzled with dijon aioli, sliced almonds and parmesan. Then there are the not-to-bemissed Chicharrones, crispy pork skins sprinkled with magic dust and drizzled with spicy chipotle crema.

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Dining "A taco is the perfect vessel for pretty much anything." If you're visiting Agave and Rye and looking for something a bit more on the wild side, you may want to give their Crown Jewel a try. This over-the-top taco features butterpoached lobster, sauteed mushrooms, truffle mac and cheese and green onions. Another unique option is the Sensei, a combination of soy-ginger marinated kangaroo tenderloin topped with sticky orange rum glaze, crispy rice noodles, fresh bibb lettuce, spicy chili oil, and thin-sliced green onion. "Kangaroo is as popular in Australia as cows are here," mentions Sarber. If you're looking for something more conventional, the Plain Jane taco, a combination of ground beef, shredded lettuce, aged white cheddar, diced tomato and sour cream, might be up your alley. The fan-favorite taco, the Swipe Right, a taco ďŹ lled with honey-lime chicken, sweet and spicy bacon, aged white cheddar, salsa and sour cream lives up to its clever name. "Everyone says yes to it," laughs Sarber. "We also added the Gator Hater, a homage to our Lexington location, to the menu and people are loving it," shares Sarber. "Plus, tacos are so affordable; it's a great opportunity to try new things. If you don't love it, we can have a different taco served quickly. We strive to have something for everyone." says Sarber. The entree bowls are another recent addition to the menu and are perfect for those who might not be in a taco kind of mood. While the food and decor are most likely the focal points of the restaurant, as the name highlights, they're also quite passionate about their equally epic libations. With an extensive list of both bourbon and tequila as well as a mouthwatering, handcrafted cocktail menu, it may be hard to pass up something to sip on with your meal. Fortunately, they have a fantastic happy hour daily as well as weekly specials. Margarita Monday and Taco Tuesday specials mean anyone can leave with a full belly and enjoy a hand-squeezed cocktail for under $20. "We're also launching our frozen margaritas made with fresh-squeezed lime juice. It took us a while to develop that recipe, but we're excited about it," shares Sarber. "Our mission at Agave and Rye is to provide a dining experience unlike any other. Alongside the food, service and atmosphere we offer exceptional service and outstanding energy," mentions Sarber. And with that kind of mission, it's certainly worth a visit to give their crave-worthy tacos and fresh-squeezed margaritas a try!

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Q+A ith

e

e

CO-OWNER

Favorite veggie? Corn. I love it fresh roasted and taken off the cob with a little butter salt and pepper. What made you fall in love with food? You know that is a great question, back in my early days I thought I would be an interior designer for the rest of my life. I worked for great restaurants in my starving artist days. The last restaurant I worked in was in the brewery district of Columbus and the owner had an insane dedication to food and his standards were unbelievable. I worked for 6 years with him and it inspired me to become a restaurateur today. He sparked that passion and I got the bug and here I am. How do you stay inspired? There is a book called From Good to Great that our leadership team is reading. When you choose what you want to do as an entrepreneur you want to say “I can't believe I am getting paid for this,” That is how I feel. It’s amazing to get better every day and teach those that work with what we do and how to achieve their goals its not hard, it’s awesome. I feel so privileged Favorite cocktail? Mine is the margarita. The OG here or the Madison margarita in Covington. I like Grand Mariner in my margaritas.

AG AV E & RY E

What’s the last thing you ate? Club sandwich from the Beans Roastery in Owensboro on the way here. Do you have a morning ritual? If so, what does it look like? Well, I, unfortunately, have a ton of hair so I spend an hour and a half every morning on that. I answer emails, check bank accounts and such. So it’s a productive time. Favorite dish from your childhood? I have a lot of food allergies which my stepmom never paid attention to - ha. So we’d eat roast spaetzle, a German egg noodle tradition for every Holiday. What do you love most about Lexington? The people. They are so kind here and so approachable and unbelievably friendly. Everyone we encounter is so happy and the community really is great. When you're not working, are you cooking or grabbing carryout? For sure carry-out. We do Door Dash quite a bit and we just found a really good Oriental Wok restaurant we love. Piece of advice for someone who dreams of pursuing a career in food. I say you do need to be really passionate about it. If it’s something you wake up and go through your day and find yourself thinking about, dive in If it's not a passion don’t do it.

Bee Sting Margarita 2 oz Maestro Tequila 3 oz Agave and Rye Fresh Lime Mix 1 oz Ginger Honey Syrup Fresh lime mix: 2 oz Fresh squeezed lime juice 1 oz Simple syrup 1 oz Triple Sec

+ secrets

(can’t tell ya what it is, but not mandatory for recipe)

October 2019 | TOPSinLex.com

Glass - Double rocks. Method - On the rocks. Garnish - Buzz button. Place on top. Must direct guests to eat the buzz button before they drink the cocktail. (The buzz button will temporarily numb the tongue which intensifies the flavors of the cocktail.)

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EATS & ENTERTAINMENT Top 5 Dining

TOP

5CATERING SERVICES story by Amanda Harper

DUPREE CATERING + EVENTS 859.231.0464 • DupreeCatering.com Whether it’s blue jeans or black tie, Dupree can create a tasteful spread for any celebration. They can easily handle all types of get-togethers, like brunch buffets, afternoon teas, plated dinners, cocktail parties and more.

LUNDY’S SPECIAL EVENTS 859.253.9408 • LundysCatering.com Whether for cocktails or delicious bites, Lundy’s is able to make any holiday event merry and bright. From chocolate-dipped bacon to delicious, fresh salads–and everything in between–Lundy’s can make magic for your special day!

SELMA’S CATERING AND EVENTS 859.971.2763 • SelmasCatering.com For 20 years, Selma’s has been a locally-loved caterer because of their delicious food that is always beautifully displayed. They are also proud to use local produce whenever possible. From appetizers to plated dinners, they can make any occasion tasty!

SEASONS CATERING & SPECIAL OCCASIONS 859.266.6661 • SeasonsEvents.com Over the years, Seasons has become a local go-to for exquisite parties throughout the area. A full-service catering company, they specialize in amazing food and creative vision. Ask about their incredible ice sculptures!

Thinking it feels a little too early to be planning your holiday parties? Actually, October is a prime month for reserving your caterers! Reserving your caterer now will not only ensure you get the date you want, it will also help you stay stressfree as you get ready to celebrate with your friends, family, coworkers and loved ones.

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DARAE & FRIENDS CATERING 859.272.8003 • DaRaeAndFriends.com From 10-person business lunches to wedding celebrations for 800+, DaRae has handled it all. Smoked turkey, hams, adorable desserts and hot mulled cider make appearances on their holiday menus.

TOPS in Lexington | October 2019


TOPS Dining Guide EATS & ENTERTAINMENT

TOPS

DININGde gui

Visit topsinlex.com for more local restaurants

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EATS & ENTERTAINMENT TOPS Dining Guide

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TOPS Dining Guide EATS & ENTERTAINMENT

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EATS & ENTERTAINMENT Recipe

Spicy

BAKED

SRIACHA CHICKEN Prep Time: 15 minutes | Cook Time: 18-20 minutes

Ingredients: 1 pound boneless skinless chicken breasts, cut into 1-inch cubes (about 35 pieces) 2 egg whites, whisked ¾ cup panko bread crumbs + 2 tablespoons salt, to taste black pepper, to taste ½ cup sugar-free maple syrup 2 tablespoons sriracha hot sauce 1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce 1 tablespoon cornstarch ¼ cup cold water

Preparation: Preheat the oven to 375°F and grease a cooling rack that fits in the baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray. (This will help the baked nuggets be crispy.) Whisk the egg whites in one small mixing bowl, and the panko, salt, and black pepper in a second mixing bowl. Dunk the chicken pieces in the egg whites and let the excess drip off. Next, dredge the chicken pieces in the panko, coating all sides. Place the chicken on the prepared baking sheet and bake until the chicken is golden and done, 16-18 minutes. While the chicken is baking, prepare the sauce by heating the syrup, sriracha and soy sauce in a small saucepan over medium heat. Stir together the cornstarch and cold water to make a slurry, and set aside. Bring the sauce to a low boil, and then stir the slurry into the sauce. Allow it to come back up to a low boil for 1 minute until thickened. When the chicken is cooked, toss it into the sauce and serve hot. Nutrition Facts: Yield: 6 servings | Serving Size: ½ cup chicken Calories 124 | Fat 2g | Carbohydrates 11g | Cholesterol 43mg Sodium 362mg | Fiber 0g | Sugar 1g | Protein 18g

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Recipe Courtesy of Popculture.com is the nation’s go-to source for all things pop culture and speaks to fans that eat, sleep and play amidst today’s prevailing trends and provides an authentic, one-of-a-kind view of the contemporary landscape.

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EATS & ENTERTAINMENT BBN

Landon Young signs autographs for young fans at UK's Fan Day.

I love playing football but I love helping others even more" – Landon Young

STAYING G

YOUNG

ive Landon Young an opportunity to help others and the Kentucky junior offensive lineman is going to do it.

During his three plus years at Kentucky, he’s visited a local nursing home for pre-Super Bowl parties, helped at Habitat for Humanity, spoken at churches and schools, done yard work for Lexington Christian Church members not physically able to take care of their yards and been on a service trip to Ethiopia that he quickly admits changed his life. That’s why he was one of 22 players named to the Allstate AFCA Good Works Team® for his dedication to giving back and leadership on and off the football field. He is also one of 91 nominees for Wuerffel Trophy given to the FBS player that best combines exemplary community service with athletic and academic achievement. “My father always taught me growing up that character is the most important thing in life above anything else you might accomplish in sports or anything else,” said Young. “To be recognized for something in my sport that is about more than just my sport does reflect more on what I am to other people and how I treat others rather than just what I do on the field."

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Kentucky offensive lineman Landon Young likes being able to visit with residents like those at Cambridge Place and says he gets more out of the visits than the residents.

story by Larry Vaught Photos courtesy of Vicky Graff, Larry Vaught, and UK Athletics

“Instead of just being a guy who blocks on the football field, I have hobbies and things I like to do. I want to give back all I can because so many people have done things for me. If I get a chance to do something for someone, I like to do it.” That chance can often be visiting with residents at Cambridge Place in Lexington, which he has done several times, after being invited by former UK athletics trainer Tim Biggs, who works there. “Mr. Biggs is now like part of my adopted family and I am so grateful he got me involved there. Every time I go in and see an older person all I can think about is my granddad. I lost him a couple of years ago and it makes me feel comfortable to spend time with older people who I know are wiser than me,” Young said. “I don’t like other people to even know when I go there. I just like being able to help pick their (residents') day up but it also picks up my day. It’s as much for me as them. I get a lot out of it.” He experienced that same feeling when he got to go to Nicholas County and spend time at a youth camp for boys, offering his insights on whatever the youth wanted to know.

TOPS in Lexington | October 2019


Landon Young hopes to return to Ethiopia for another mission trip after the uplifting experience he had with UK Athletics and Ordinary Hero in May.

“That was huge for me to be able to help and maybe change what just one kid was thinking or doing,” Young said. “I go to church breakfasts to speak to men’s groups. It’s just about giving my time and my word. I want people to know and hear more about me than they see every day through football. I would actually love to do more but football takes a lot of time.” He never doubted he would find time for a service trip to Ethiopia that he took in the spring with UK Athletics and Ordinary Hero. As soon as former Lexington Lafayette standout got to UK, he made it clear that when his year came to be part of the annual trip, he wanted to go. “It was not only spiritual, it was uplifting,” Young said. “It was so cool to look at everything in a different perspective. We are so focused on material things here. Once you take that away, what is left? It was so helpful to me to see how great their love is. They have different circumstances when it comes to money and living conditions, but those people are always positive and never make excuses about anything. It’s always about love." He added, “I will absolutely make that trip again. I have already talked to my parents and different ones in my family about going. It helps you grow so much mentally and physically. It is a life-changing trip and the kind of thing I love doing." “I love playing football but I love helping others even more and the best thing is that when you do help someone else, it usually ends up benefitting you even more because of how it makes you feel.”

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Equine EATS & ENTERTAINMENT

EQUINE UPDATE e

e

e

story by Jen Roytz

SUNRISE TRACKSIDE October 5, 12, 19 and 26 Keeneland Race Track

2019 SECRETARIAT FESTIVAL October 12-13 | beginning at 10:00am each day Keeneland Held annually, this year’s Secretariat Festival will be held on the grounds of Keeneland and will feature the unveiling of a bronze monument of Secretariat. In addition to being one of the first to see the statue of “Big Red,” attendees can enjoy special farm tours, celebrity appearances, forums, a silent auction filled with racing memorabilia and, of course, horse racing in one of the sport’s most iconic venues. For more information or to purchase tickets, go to www.secretariat. com.

CKRH ANNUAL TACK SALE

There are so many traditions that come with Keeneland’s biannual racing meets. One that’s not to be missed, especially for families, is Sunrise Trackside. Guests can come to the track during morning training hours and enjoy “Breakfast with the Works,” where they will enjoy a delicious Kentucky breakfast while watching Thoroughbreds gallop and breeze on the racetrack. There are plenty of activities for the kids, including face-painting, photo ops with jockey silks and more! Guests can also go to the paddock to watch live demonstrations with horses. If you want to learn more about Keeneland and horse racing, tours of the grounds are also available. For more information, visit keeneland.com.

THE CRAWL: TALES OF THE KENTUCKY HORSE PARK

October 26 | 8:00am-12:00pm Central Kentucky Riding for Hope Whether you’re looking to purchase a few like-new items for your horse or have some equipment to get rid of, the CKRH Tack Sale is the place to go. Equestrians can browse through everything from saddles and bridles to saddle pads, blankets, bits, equestrian clothing (for people!) and more. It’s basically a horse-person’s shopping oasis! All money raised from this annual event goes to support the therapeutic riding programs offered at Central Kentucky Riding for Hope. To donate items to the tack sale, simply drop them off at CKRH, located at the Kentucky Horse Park, between 9AM and 5PM (open 7 days a week). For more information, go to ckrh.org.

October 18-19 | 5:00-8:30 (multiple tour times available) Kentucky Horse Park Presented by the International Museum of the Horse, guests will take a walking tour of the Kentucky Horse Park's historical grounds and learn about some of the spooky stories associated with the historic equine venue’s human and equine mysteries. Guests can also participate in “ghostly activities,” enjoy making s’mores (a fall staple!) and adults can enjoy a libation or two. Reservations are required and can be made by calling 859-259-4213 or by going to kyhorsepark.com.

October 2019 | TOPSinLex.com

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EATS & ENTERTAINMENT Art in the Bluegrass

Art

in the Bluegrass:

ANDRE PATER A SPORTING ARTIST FOR THE AGES

Photo courtesy of andrepater.com

story by Jen Roytz

Ask Andre Pater, one of the most acclaimed sporting artists in the world, from where the inspiration for his now hundreds of coveted works of art originally came, and his answer is as simple as it is pure. “I’ve always loved animals,” he says. While many of Pater’s pieces hang in homes, offices and restaurants throughout the world, this autumn a carefully curated collection of Pater’s paintings and other artwork will be on display at the Headley-Whitney Museum. Titled Andre Pater: An American Journey, the exhibition, which runs from September 13 through November 17, will not only include notable pieces from throughout Pater’s career on loan or from his collection, but will also unveil several new works of art created especially for this exhibition. “I turned 66-years-old this year, and we used this as a theme. Route 66, a true American journey. It shows not only some of my most serious pieces but some drawings and other works,” said Pater of the 90-piece exhibit. “I have drawings almost 30-years-old of my wife weeks before our son was born, so it’s very personal, but it’s my journey here to America as an immigrant, a husband, a father. The show was put together mostly by local collectors. Some were commissions, and some purchased at charity auctions. This collection is who I am as an artist and as a member of society.” Growing up in the metropolitan city of Krakow, Poland, Pater was surrounded by galleries and museums. It was on his trips to the market with his grandparents and parents that he first fell in love with horses. “I would watch them, pulling carts for the farmers filled with produce to be sold. For me to stand and watch and smell them – they were not top-class horses, but they were inspiring, and I began to draw them. Soon I was drawing many other types of horses,” he said. “The first painting I ever sold was of a soldier from the First World War sharing a loaf of bread with his horse.”

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EATS & ENTERTAINMENT

Pater and his wife first came to the U. S. via Dallas, Texas, where he first garnered acclaim for his portraits of Herford cattle, which were plentiful in the area. While sales of his paintings provided a steady source of income, he yearned to be immersed in the landscape and culture of equestrian sport, specifically Thoroughbreds, and soon he and his wife made the move to Lexington, Kentucky so he could pursue his passion fully. “We lived on a farm owned by Hillary Boone. He had fabulous hunting dogs, fox hunters, polo horses, and most of the horses were, of course, Thoroughbreds,” said Pater. “My horse fascinations have led me to do other things – other animals, jockeys, landscapes.”

Image courtesy of andrepater.com Paintings by Andre Pater | Photo by Paul Atkinson unless otherwise specified

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EATS & ENTERTAINMENT Art in the Bluegrass

Some of Pater’s more recent works, which have garnered critical acclaim and high price tags when offered at auction or for sale, feature Native American scenes and subjects. It is the exploration of new subjects, and on new takes on old subjects, that he feels keep his artwork fresh and keep him eager to create more. “I did a period of horses galloping, mostly in Poland, but I evolved into a period of stillwatching. You can use elements of expression, such as the way a horse carries his head, his tail, his musculature, the look in his eye. You don’t have to capture the horse in motion to capture fabulous movement and emotion,” he explained. Andre Pater: An American Journey takes guests through the evolution of Pater’s career, subjects and styles and is a showcase of his life story. It also is a compliment to his recently released A Matter of Light, the Art of Andre Pater, a 240-page coffee table book that features more than 200 of Paters paintings and drawings, as well as essays, musings and observations. “The book was the inspiration for the show and the show the inspiration for the book – they are completely intertwined,” said Pater.

Image courtesy of andrepater.com

When asked if he had a favorite piece he’s created through the years, he said each work is as much an evolution on canvas as it is emotionally for him. He can’t choose a favorite but can reflect upon and appreciate the mindset he had while creating each one.

“When I begin, I have an idea of what I want to do, but the painting always evolves and starts to take its own direction, regardless of what I’m doing. The best way to make peace with it is to follow it,” he said. “By the time I’m done with a piece, I’m tired of it, but once I step away for a while, I can come back to it, and it makes an impression on me, like “wow, I created this.” I can look at it with new eyes and experience what others might appreciate or see in it.”

“A Matter of Light, the Art of Andre Pater” By Andre Pater With Contributors and a Foreword by the Duke of Devonshire

ANDRE PATER An American Journey September 13 - November 17, 2019 Headley-Whitney Museum 4435 Old Frankfort Pike, Lexington, Ky 40510 | (859) 255-6653 | headley-whitney.org

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PHOTOS

TOPS

SEPTEMBER PREVIEW PARTY Cumberland Valley National Bank September 4 topsinlex.com Photos by Woody Phillips

TAMMY BARRELL, ERIC ROBERTSON AND BEVERLY MARCRUM

JANIE OLMSTEAD AND TIM CULVER

KELLY & ERIC KARLS

JAYME JACKSON AND MATT ANDERKIN

CARRIE PATTERSON, JESSICA CULL, SAMANTHA WILLIS, ANN-ALAN CALLAHAN AND JAYME ROOS

198

TOPS in Lexington | October 2019


PHOTOS

BERRY, SUSAN AND LAUREN POPP

ERIC VOLRSETH AND JEANINE PETELL

MEREDITH, NOELLE AND JORDAN ENGLISH

WINSTON GIFFIN AND WADE VAUGHN-GREER

October 2019 | TOPSinLex.com

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PHOTOS

FORCHT BANK

SALUTE TO SMALL BUSINESS AWARDS Keeneland | August 22 commercelexington.com Photos by Ron Morrow

LARRY JACKSON, TIM CAMPBELL AND HOUSTON HALL

BOB QUICK AND MARK TURNER

JAYNE HANCOCK AND ELIZABETH COMBS

200

DAVE COTTINGHAM, DANNY GOODPASTER AND CRYSTAL NEWTON

STEPHANIE ARNOLD AND LAWRENCE WETHERBY

TOPS in Lexington | October 2019


PHOTOS

JEFF KOONCE, LARRY & DEBBIE JONES, ANGELA CARLOS

JIMMY ADKINS AND SHAWN WOOLUM

KYLE WHALEN

JULIA HALL

MONICA KING AND JOANNE UNDERWOOD

October 2019 | TOPSinLex.com

201


PHOTOS

FESTIVAL OF THE HORSE Downtown Georgetown | September 7-9 georgetownky.com Photos by Rob Bolson

COUNTRY BOY BREWING

KACY MCLEAN

GRAND PARADE OF HORSES

202

TOPS in Lexington | October 2019

RHYAN SINCLAIR

OUR LIDDLE BIDDLE FARM


October 2019 | TOPSinLex.com

203


PHOTOS

THOROUGHBRED OWNERS & BREEDERS ASSOCIATION

NATIONAL AWARDS DINNER Fasig-Tipton | September 7 toba.org Photos by Ron Morrow

204

VICTORIA BENNETT, LESLEY GREATHOUSE KIBLER AND VALERIE ROWE

JACK WOLF AND BOYD BROWNING

ELLIOTT & REBECCA WALDEN, ANNE & DAVID HANLEY

NICOLE, TANYA AND JOHN GUNTHER

NICK, VALERIE AND TRISTAN DE MERIC

TOPS in Lexington | October 2019


PHOTOS

ANDRE PATER: AN AMERICAN JOURNEY Headley-Whitney Museum of Art September 14 - November 17, 2019 andrepater.com Photos by Paul Atkinson

JOHN SIKURA AND ANDRE PATER

ESTHER VON UNRUG

KASIA PATER, CHRISTINA BELL AND CATHERINE CLAY NEAL

206

TOPS in Lexington | October 2019

MILLIE STEWART AND DONNA WARD

JANE & STEVE BESHEAR


October 2019 | TOPSinLex.com

207


PHOTOS

EASTER SEALS CARDINAL HILL

46TH ANNUAL KENTUCKY BASH Kroger Field | August 30 cardinalhill.org Photos by Ron Morrow ROBIN BRYANT, JAMIE MORGAN AND GWEN HART

CHRIS BAILEY AND DICK GABRIEL

ALEX FRANCKE

208

MICHELLE WILSON, HEATHER FERGUSON, WALTER & ALMA FERRIER

COACH MARK STOOPS WITH FORMER UK FOOTBALL PLAYERS

TOPS in Lexington | October 2019


PHOTOS

JEFF & HEATHER ANDERSON, JUDY & JOSH CUMMINS

KAREN & MIKE COX

SHARON MICHAEL AND AMBER PHILPOTT

DEBBIE FEHELEY, SANDRA WICKLINE, CHRISTINE PARSONS AND ANTHONY WICKLINE

October 2019 | TOPSinLex.com

209


PHOTOS

SPENDTHRIFT FARM

13TH ANNUAL BREEDERS’ PARTY Spendthrift Farm | September 12 spendthriftfarm.com Photos by Ken Parks

B. WAYNE, PATRICIA AND CHUCK HANES

JACOB & ALLISON TAMME

VIRGINIA & RJ RANGEL

210

ALICIA BURBERRY, JUDY WOLFOLK AND LIZ LAYNE

COLTON PENCE AND MADDIE HAMLIN

TOPS in Lexington | October 2019

AUTRY GRAHAM AND LAUREN CARLISLE


October 2019 | TOPSinLex.com

211


PHOTOS

AVOL

DINING OUT FOR LIFE Local Restaurants | September 12 avolky.org Photos by Woody Phillips

NATALIE CUNNINGHAM, LUCY JONES, CARMEN NORRIS AND MICHELLE AIELLO

JON PARKER AND TIM BURCHAM

A.C. MULLINS AND RICK PRINCE

ANNA CLINE ROSS AND CHRIS HUTCHISON

212

J.T. HULAN

TOPS in Lexington | October 2019

DONNA ISON

BRIAN VOLZ


October 2019 | TOPSinLex.com

213


PHOTOS

DRESS FOR SUCCESS

RECYLE THE RUNWAY Limestone Hall | September 20 lexington.dressforsuccess.org Photos by Ruth Weinstock MCKAYLA CAIRNS, LINDSAY THURSTON, TAYLOR CLARK AND DINAH BEVINGTON

MATT BOWLING AND HAYLEY HARMON

NANCI HOUSE AND ELIZABETH MIRANDA

ELIZABETH CALDWELL AND BLAIR EADS

COLENE ELRIDGE, AMANDA BLACK AND ERIN JONES

214

PAMULA HONCHELL

DIANE VERHALEN AND HANANN MARAWI

JULIE BOOHER AND KELLI PARMLEY

JESSICA STIGALL, ALLISON COMMINGS AND MALLORY WOOD

TOPS in Lexington | October 2019


October 2019 | TOPSinLex.com

215


PHOTOS

WELLS FARGO BREAKING THE BRONZE CEILING

ARTIST SNEAK PEEK Arts Place | September 19 lexarts.org Photos by Woody Phillips MARY HUGHES AND KAREN SUMMERS

VINNIE BAGWELL

JENNIFER MOSSOTTI AND DUDLEY WEBB

PROPOSED PUBLIC MONUMENT COMMEMORATING THE 19TH AMMENDMENT

216

TOPS in Lexington | October 2019

KATHY PLOMIN

DAVID JONES AND SYNDY DEESE


PHOTOS

CLIFF GARTEN

MARSHA WEINSTEIN

JENIFER WOURENMAA AND ROB BOLSON

ISABEL YATES, JANET HOLLOWAY AND JULIE GOODMAN

HEATHER LYONS, TAMMIE WILLIAMS AND LORI MEADOWS

October 2019 | TOPSinLex.com

JANE DEDECKER

217


PHOTOS

TASTE AT THE HOUSE:

BOURBON AT BODLEY-BULLOCK The Bodley-Bullock House | August 23 Benefiting Junior League of Lexington lexjrleague.com Photos by Ruth Weinstock REBECCA & AUSTIN STONE, BRET & ALLISON KRIFT

WALTER SMITH AND MAGGIE MURPHY

CHRISTINE & JUSTIN STANLEY

218

SAM MEDLEY AND JUSTIN THOMPSON

MAGGIE MURPHY, ALLISON KRIFT, ALAINA MATTHEWS, ERIN JONES, MARY LEPPO, DAVIS VELJKOVIC AND NANCI HOUSE.

TOPS in Lexington | October 2019


OCTOBER 4-26

OCTOBER 9

Keeneland Fall Meet

Lyle Lovett and His Acoustic Group

OCTOBER 4 The Night Market

6-10pm 700 Block of Bryan Avenue

Freaky Friday Flicks

of Events

CALENDAR

7:30pm Moondance Amphitheater

Without Borders Closing Reception 5-8pm The Lyric Theatre

Béla Fleck, Edgar Meyer, & Zakir Hussain with Rakesh Chaurasia 7:30pm Singletary Center for the Arts

OCTOBER 5 Paw Patrol Live!

10am & 2pm Rupp Arena

Wizard Pub Crawl Local Bars

Bob Ross Painting Party 1-5pm KET

7:30pm Norton Center for the Arts

OCTOBER 10 Make-A-Wish Day Keeneland

Central Bank Thursday Night Live 5-8pm Fifth Third Bank Pavilion

A Night with Janis Joplin 7:30pm EKU Center for the Arts

OCTOBER 11 BIG BLUE MADNESS 7pm Rupp Arena

Freaky Friday Flicks : Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban 7:30pm Moondance Amphitheater

Peculiar Victorian Mourning Customs 7pm Waveland

Wheels of Time Cruise-In

OCTOBER 6 The Raven 10K & Robin 5K

10am Raven Run Nature Sanctuary

Paw Patrol Live!

12pm & 4pm Rupp Arena

UK Men’s Basketball: Pro Day

6:30-9:30pm Lawrenceburg

The Texas Tenors

7:30pm EKU Center for the Arts

OCTOBER 12 UK Football vs Arkansas Kroger Field

5:30pm Joe Craft Center

Yes Mamm! 5K

7:30am-12pm RJ Corman Railroad Group

220

TOPS in Lexington | October 2019


Puccini’s “Gianni Schicchi” and “Suor Angelica”

7:30pm UK Singletary Center for the Arts

Kentucky Guild of Artists & Craftsmen Fall Fair Indian Fort Theatre, Berea

Styx

7:30pm Norton Center for the Arts

The Bourbon Chase The Bourbon Trail

OCTOBER 20 The Earls of Leicester 7pm The Lyric Theatre

OCTOBER 19 UK Football at Georgia Away

The Bourbon Chase Triangle Park

OCTOBER 22 The Price is Right Live 7:30pm Rupp Arena

OCTOBER 24

Pugkin Bash

Little Goblins Galore

Casting Crowns

1-5pm McConnell Springs

7pm Rupp Arena

OCTOBER 13

Postmodern Jukebox

OCTOBER 25

12pm National Guard Armory

Puccini’s “Gianni Schicchi” and “Suor Angelica”

7:30pm UK Singletary Center for the Arts

Kentucky Guild of Artists & Craftsmen Fall Fair Indian Fort Theatre, Berea

OCTOBER 18 Blue/White Game 7pm Rupp Arena

7:30pm Singletary Center for the Arts

Lexington Hot Cider Hustle 5K 8:30am-12pm Kentucky Horse Park

Carmen

2pm & 7pm Lexington Opera House

The Pumpkin Run 3K

9:30am-11am Wellington Park

Boo Fest Featuring TI 7pm Rupp Arena

Black Cat Chase

6pm-8pm Frankfort YMCA

National Horse Show

8am-6pm Kentucky Horse Park

Adult Trick or Treating 5-7pm Lawrenceburg

Due to the changing nature of events, please contact hosting organizations before attending any event. Visit TOPSinLex.com for more fun!


CALENDAR October - November 2019 OCTOBER 26

NOVEMBER 1

NOVEMBER 8

UK Football vs Missouri

Ghost Hunt

Madagascar

Booktacular: A Great Gatsby Affair

Festival del Dia de los Muertos

5-9pm The Living Arts & Science Center

UK Men’s Basketball vs. Eastern Kentucky University

Bluegrass Youth Ballet: Dia de los Muertos

Warehouse Block Sip n’ Shop

UK Men's Basketball vs. Kentucky State University

NOVEMBER 9

Kroger Field

7pm Limestone Hall

Central Kentucky Riding for Hope Annual Tack Sale 8am-12pm CKRH

OCTOBER 27 UK Men’s Basketball vs. Georgetown College

8pm-12am Waveland

7pm Lexington Opera House

7pm Rupp Arena

5pm Rupp Arena

NOVEMBER 2

Halloween Festival and Parade

Bluegrass Youth Ballet: Dia de los Muertos

2-11pm Downtown

OCTOBER 29 Trunk or Treat with Make-a-Wish 5:30-7pm Make-a-Wish Office

PumpkinMania

5pm-7:30pm Transylvania University

222

2pm Lexington Opera House

The Avett Brothers 7:30pm Rupp Arena

NOVEMBER 7 Madagascar

7pm Lexington Opera House

TOPS in Lexington | October 2019

7pm Lexington Opera House

Rupp Arena

North Ashland Ave.

UK Football vs. University of Tennessee Kroger Field

Madagascar

2pm & 7pm Lexington Opera House

Bluegrass Baby Expo 12pm Lexington Center

NOVEMBER 12 UK Men’s Basketball vs. University of Evansville Rupp Arena


NOVEMBER 14

NOVEMBER 17

Ball Homes Night of Hope

Ariana Grande

7pm Lexington Opera House

Cocktails & Conversation 5pm The Mane on Main

NOVEMBER 15

7:30pm Rupp Arena

NOVEMBER 18 UK Men’s Basketball vs Utah Valley University Rupp Arena

JDRF Hope Gala 6:30pm Kroger Field

Barrels & Broads

6:30pm Signature Club of Lansdowne

Commerce Lexington Spotlight

1pm & 7:30pm Lexington Opera House

Chris Young

7:30pm Rupp Arena

NOVEMBER 24 Beautiful: The Carole King Musical 1pm & 6:30pm Lexington Opera House

Holiday Jam featuring Xscape 7pm Rupp Arena

Beautiful: The Carole King Musical

NOVEMBER 18 David Sedaris

7:30pm Lexington Opera House

UK Men’s Basketball vs Lamar University Rupp Arena

NOVEMBER 22

NOVEMBER 29

UK Men’s Basketball vs. Mount St. Mary’s

UK Men’s Basketball vs. University of Alabama at Birmingham

Rupp Arena

Rupp Arena

8am The Grand Reserve

Beautiful: The Carole King Musical

NOVEMBER 16 UK Football at Vanderbilt University Away

7:30pm Lexington Opera House

NOVEMBER 23 UK Football vs. University of Tennessee at Martin

NOVEMBER 30 UK Football vs. University of Louisville Kroger Field

Kroger Field

Due to the changing nature of events, please contact hosting organizations before attending any event. Visit TOPSinLex.com for more fun!


PHOTOS Top Shots

TS

Aine O'Rourke and Rhonda Rathgeber at the Betsy Gala and Grand Prix

Manny Caulk and Jessica Berry at the United Way of the Bluegrass Campaign Kickoff

Stephen Drayton and Steven Burch at AVOL's Dining Out for Life Preview Party at Carson's Food Drink

Touch a Truck Thursday's Child Tropical Night of the Stars

224

TOPS in Lexington | August 2019


PHOTOS

Waveland Art Fair

2019 Moon Festival

Make-A-Wish at Cycle You Robbie Morgan at Christ the King Octoberfest

April 2019 | TOPSinLex.com

225


Profile for TOPS Magazine

Tops Lexington - October 2019  

Who's Who; What's New; and What To Do in Lexington, Kentucky

Tops Lexington - October 2019  

Who's Who; What's New; and What To Do in Lexington, Kentucky