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CONTENTS Who’s Who: Nan Plummer

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Art in the Bluegrass: Living in Color

50

Meet the Teachers

56

Fayette County Agriculture

66

Downtown in Development

76

New & Noteworthy

79

Non-Profit Spotlight: Local First Lexington

82

Keep it Local

LIFESTYLE

14

121

Fitness Forum: Local Walking Trails

123

Outfit of the Month: Think Pink

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Getting Gor-Jess: Coral Crush

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Wow Wedding: Katey + Noah

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Weddings Unveiled: Kentucky Proud Weddings

August 2018 | TopsInLex.com

the what makes lex great issue

Volume 12 Number 8

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COMMUNITY 32

AUGUST

56 126


CONTENTS 136

AT HOME

164 170

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Tour of Homes: Mid-Century Marvel

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Color Catalog: Caliente

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Super Mom: Heather Shaw

EATS & ENTERTAINMENT 170

Dining: Oscar Diggs

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Make a Meal Meaningful: Dining Out For Life

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Top 5 Dining: Local Chefs

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BBN: Preseason Predictions

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Equine Update


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Out & About

182

Junior League Horse Show

184

Arthur Murray: The Greatest Showcase

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Summer Gala

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The Gift of Color: Henry Lawrence Faulkner Book Signing with Author

190

Lexington Fairness Awards

192

Lexington Pride Festival

194

Body Structure & Gill Heart Institute 20-year Celebration

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LexArts Hop

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Kentucky Bank Tennis Championships Sponsor Party

202

Keeneland Concours d’Elegance

210

Top Shots

CALENDAR 204 August - September 2018

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210 Event photo captions are typically provided to TOPS by the event organizers. We do our best to check names and spelling…but we are all human and make mistakes. Please contact kristen@topsmarketing.com with any corrections and we will make note of it in the next issue.


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Photographers: Paul Atkinson, Rob Bolson, Savannah Brant, Sarah Caton, Ron Morrow, Keni Parks, Danny Pendleton, Woody Phillips, Ruth Weinstock, Conrhod Zonio and TeamCoyle Writers: Michelle Aiello, Sarah Boerkircher, Jesse L. Brooks, Amanda Harper,

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The views and comments expressed by the authors are not always that of our editors or publishers. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this publication, TOP Marketing Group accepts no responsibility or liability for any errors, omissions or resultant consequences, including any loss or damage arising from the reliance on information in this publication. All images contained in TOPS in Lexington Magazine are subject to copyright of the artist or photographer as named, but not limited thereto. Reproduction of any part of this magazine without prior written permission is prohibited.

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Photos

OUT and ABOUT

Lakeside Live at Lexington Green

Susan & Victor English, Carin Lovell and Julie Hahn at the Summer Gala

Tim Knittle at Storm the Castle

Frances Moskowitz Winstock at the Henry Clay Class of 1968 50 year reunion

Luau at Brookdale 28

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Kids course at Breyerfest

Entertainers at the Concours Bash

All kinds of wheels at the Keeneland Concours d’Elegance

Martina Jackson and Diego at the Pride Festival

Thursday Night Live is better with the Wildcat! TOPS Magazine | August 2018

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32

Who’s Who: Nan Plummer

66

Downtown in Development

36

Art in the Bluegrass: Living in Color

76

New & Noteworthy

50

Meet the Teachers

79

Non-Profit Spotlight: Local First Lexington

56

Fayette County Agriculture

82

Keep it Local


Community

Nan Plummer

who’s who

LexArts has been a constant source of supporting and promoting the arts in Lexington for the last 42 years. During that time, it has grown from a traditional nonprofit council to an organization with a greater purpose and reach. Public service projects and grant-making are enriching the central Kentucky arts community in imaginative ways. Nan Plummer has been the President and CEO of LexArts since 2014. story by Michelle Rauch photos by Keni Parks

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Community LexArts Hop, formerly known as Gallery Hop, is celebrating its 26th year. When the event was created in 1994 it was part of the downtown development plan to keep people downtown after the workday. It’s been a tremendous success, growing to 42 venues which graciously open their doors to display art. “Hop demonstrates that artists and patrons benefit in tandem. People especially enjoy art in social settings. And artists need audiences to appreciate and buy their work,” she said. While LexArts Hop is a seasonal event, the LexArts Gallery features the work of Kentucky artists all year. “I especially encourage anyone who wonders if Kentucky art is only quilts and rural landscape painting to visit the LexArts Gallery. Artists in our state are creating things in all media, across the spectrum of human experience,” Plummer said. Past exhibits have included interactive sculpture, conceptual work, prison art, and most recently, Paint the Town, a show featuring downtown Lexington streetscapes. LexArts recognizes the value of exposing young people to the arts. The Youth Arts Council invites students from every Lexington high school to invent and execute their own creative projects. They are guided by the expertise of the LexArts staff and interns from the University of Kentucky. A recent project produced by the teenagers was a festival of original short plays, written, produced, and performed by the young artists. Most summers the Youth Arts Council organizes Lexaroo, an outdoor concert of youth rock bands. Beyond enrichment, students are learning leadership skills. “If you are a squad leader in marching band, you learn to keep three of your peers motivated, focused, in line, and in time. An actor learns how to improvise when someone misses an entrance, leading the way out of a problem. A painter, poet or pianist puts her work out there for everyone to see, leading with the courage to take a risk. Together or solo, kids in the arts learn skills and attitudes that will serve them and others throughout life,” Plummer explained.

“The arts benefit different people in different ways. Individually, we may find comfort, inspiration, escape, momentary amusement or deep joy in our favorite art forms. But whether we like Broadway or Bach, Monet or the movies, once a year or every day, our community as a whole benefits from an active arts scene,” Plummer said.

Community outreach continues with collaborative works like the Book Benches Project. Functional benches were painted by local artists who were inspired by books written by Kentucky authors. The program is supported by LexArts, ArtsConnect and the Carnegie Center. The artful benches are placed across the city and will be auctioned off in November. Money raised will support all three organizations. “Neighborhoods come together around art projects. Our local economy strengthens through employment, tax revenues and tourism that the arts generate,” she said. A unique and noteworthy event that is returning is called Arty Parties. Hosts and hostesses open their homes or other special venues for uniquely themed and intimate events. Past Arty Parties have featured an art swap, an Iranian tea party, a poolside supper, cocktails on the porch and a gospel brunch. One of the upcoming parties planned is called Ink for the Arts which will feature the new Tattoo Flash exhibition. The party book for planning will be released in mid-August. It’s a fun way to support LexArts while enjoying the creativity of friends and neighbors. Plummer and the board are looking forward with a vision to expand their service through more public art projects. Additionally, they are eager to play a leadership role in the future of the arts across Lexington. “To me, the phrase, “quality of life” actually means quality of people. The arts make us more human, more connected, more resilient,” Plummer said. As Plummer sees it, an investment in the arts, is an investment in the community. “The arts express social concerns and values. They teach kids leadership and improve academic performance. The arts in healthcare settings demonstrably improve health outcomes,” she said. To learn more about LexArts visit their website at lexarts.org or stop by the gallery at ArtsPlace downtown on North Mill Street. Admission is free! •

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Community

How Public Art Beautifies Our City Written by: Michelle Aiello

Artist Photos by: Sarah Caton

When we consider memorable places, we think about their icons –The arch of St. Louis, Cloud Gate (also known as “The Bean”) in Chicago, the Eiffel Tower in Paris. All of structures fall under the category of “public art” and were the work of creative individuals who captured the culture, spirit and atmosphere of the places around them. Studies have continually shown that public art is instrumental when it comes to creating an attractive, vibrant community. Through their Soul of the Community initiative, The Knight Foundation surveyed 43,000 people across 43 cities and found that “social offerings, openness and welcome-ness,” and, significantly, the ‘aesthetics of a place – its art, parks and green spaces,’ ranked higher than education, safety and the local economy as a ‘driver of attachment.’” Another survey of Philadelphia residents found that viewing public art was the second most popular activity in the city, ranking higher than biking and hiking. By its very nature, public art is fundamentally different from its private counterpart. Public art is not just for the wealthy or those inclined to visit museums and art galleries. Compared to prestigious gallery shows, public art, much like landscape architecture or park design, is often under appreciated. But there’s a lot to like: It’s free. There are no tickets. There is no dress code. You can view it alone or in groups, any time you want. It’s open to all. Nan Plummer, President and CEO of LexArts, has a similar view. Each year, she and her team raise money for the arts and re-grant to many arts organizations in Central Kentucky. LexArts also serves as our city’s local arts council, providing technical assistance, subsidized office and creative space, and marketing exposure for the arts community –which includes the facilitation of public art projects. “Our aim is ‘arts everywhere’—and while we have lots more places and people to reach, we’re excited to see the expansion in quantity, quality and diversity of the arts in Central Kentucky,” she said. “The big organizations are always trying new things, and there are more small organizations and projects every year. We’re able to do this because of terrific support from the City of Lexington and especially from everyday people who support our Fund for the Arts Campaign.”

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Community

- Nathan Zamarron When asked how public art benefits the community in her view, Plummer said, “It creates an environment of visual interest and fun. It also creates a sense of place and of pride in that place. It draws tourists, and it rallies neighborhoods.” LexArts Community Director Nathan Zamarron added, “Public art reaches everyone, in unexpected ways, in unexpected places, brightening our day and making it more interesting. Lexington has become place known nationally as a destination for horses, bourbon and increasingly for public art.” He also mentioned that in the ten years he has been with LexArts, they have seen many new arts organizations established and flourishing, an increase in requests for and appreciation of public art and innovative collaboration between artists, organizations and the city. From the Horsemania project of 2000 and 2010 to citywide mural projects, there is always something creative in the works. So what can we expect in the future? “LexArts will be part of several major citywide initiatives including Town Branch Commons and Town Branch Park, which will be great opportunities for public art to be integrated in the landscape of downtown Lexington,” said Zamarron. “Plus, the renovation of Southland Drive sidewalks will include a temporary sculpture exhibit and commission of a permanent site-specific work that enhances Southland as Lexington’s Music Row.” Plummer added that there will soon be a permanent installation of the Unlearn Fear + Hate project (conceived by Transylvania professors and artists Kurt Gohde and Kremena Todorova) on Short Street. Those wishing to support public arts can do so in a variety of ways. Making a contribution to the LexArts Fund for the Arts Campaign supports over 50 arts and cultural organizations in Central Kentucky. Institutions can contract with LexArts to coordinate large-scale purchase and commission of original site-specific work. And of course, buying art from local artists and galleries is always a great way to show support.

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book benches hes

Community

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“Bertyl - I just Want to Belong” Book Bench by Frederick Douglass Hich School

Modeled after the very successful and well-received Horsemania Bourbon Barrel Projects, The Book Bench initiative gave 37 local artists a chance to design and paint book-shaped fiberglass benches, each showcasing the work of various Kentucky authors.

book benches

A collaborative effort among LexArts, the Carnegie Center for Literacy and Learning and Arts Connect, the benches were unveiled in a reception in Gratz Park in June and are currently placed throughout Lexington. On November 17th, the benches will be sold at an auction held at The Livery. Proceeds from this will go to further the missions of Arts Connect, LexArts and the Carnegie Center for Literacy and Learning. Unlike past communal projects, the Book Benches bring two segments of the creative world together – literature and visual artists – in unique new ways, building community among all involved. A major goal of the project is to facilitate reading and involvement in the arts and to pay homage to Kentucky’s diverse 200-year literary tradition (the first novel by an African American, Pulitzer Prize winners and works by the first poet laureate of the United States were all Kentuckians). Five benches were decorated by local schools, including Frederick Douglass High School, Henry Clay High School, The Lexington School, Head Start with the Community Action Council and Sayre School. Ninety-two proposals for projects were submitted, and the chosen artists had six weeks to paint their benches, which are designed to be a functional seat. All genres of the literary world are represented –from non-fiction to poetry to graphic novels. In some cases, the author and artist are one and the same. Each bench has a QR code that can be scanned to learn more about the book, the author and the artist. More information on the project can be found at www.bookbencheslex.org.

August 2018 | TopsInLex.com


Community

The Color Queen Self-described “Proud Kentucky girl through and through” Blake Eames has been exhibiting her art in and around Kentucky for over 20 years. Her bold paintings, interior and graphic design, murals and furniture pieces can be found in homes, businesses and collections across the country. And all of her creations come to life in a light-drenched converted gas station on Old Vine Street. When asked how this virbant career came to be, Eames said, “Like many before me, Jonathan Adler (my design hero), lead me into creating art. I’ve always had an instinctual way with color and began getting requests for color consultations in residential homes. From there (my business grew) from word of mouth.” During those early years, she says, “I learned so much about color theory, construction, project management and how the function of one’s environment could create a happier human existence in their day-to-day lives.” When Eames first opened her business in 1997, she worked for other interior designers like Richard Kimbrel. “I learned so much from Richard about the importance of client interactions in design. It was never just about making money or creating a perfect photo spread in a magazine. It was about connecting people to their space and making it functional as well as beautiful. Designers get to know their clients in a deeply emotional way. We have to know their desires and what is and isn’t working to make the project a success.”

“The Peace of Wild Things” Book Bench by Blake Eames

Over the years, Eames has applied that philosophy to her many public commissions –including the Storm Drain Project of 2010. She remembers it as one of her favorite projects to date, and also one of the most physically grueling. The 34 drains she and Claudia Michler painted were part of an Eco-Art Grant by the then Department of Environmental Quality. Eames said that what inspired them was the fact that “People didn’t know storm water runoff flowed directly into the Town Branch and our watershed.” She and Michler didn’t have a plan when they set out for each location, but rather created the concept of each drain based on its environment. For example, “The corner of Limestone and Mechanic was so full of debris, it looked like a hippo eating everything it came in contact with.” So they designed that drain to resemble the giant animal’s mouth. Eight years later, they are still getting calls to teach and share their process. Eames’s book bench was inspired by Wendell Berry’s poem, “The Peace of Wild Things”. Her work is typically very geometric and bold, but for this design, she went out of her comfort zone. “I simply felt so connected to this poem that I had to create that design. A copy hangs at eye level in my office and when I’m feeling stressed or overwhelmed, that last line ‘I rest in the grace of the world and am free’ brings me back to center.”

“Mosquitoland” Book Bench by Blake Eames

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Community

other book bench artists... Damon Farmer Damon Farmer is a grandmaster sand sculptor out of Woodford County. In 2016, Farmer shaped 20 tons of Cincinnati glacial sand, over four days, into a Bluegrass band in Lexingtons Triangle Park. The sand sculpture stood for two weeks and included a Kentucky Wildcat as the band fiddler. This year Farmer brought his painting skills the Lexington. According to Farmer, by happy coincidence, I was reading the Sena Jeter Naslund novel when I became aware of the Book Bench Project. Already inspired by her vivid nautical descriptions, the book was a natural choice.

Maui Crane “Ahab’s Wife” Book Bench by Damon Farmer

Maui Crane is a Lexington florist, designer and painter. Crane was chosen to paint the book bench inspired by Robert Kirkman’s The Walking Dead. Kirkman is a Kentucky native and wrote “In a world ruled by the dead, we are forced to finally start living.” According to Crane, she is a huge Walking Dead fan and it was an honor to come up with a design. Crane was inspired by the black-and-white illustrations of the Artist Tony Moore.

Chris Ware Louisville native, Chris Ware has been an illustrator at the Lexington Herald-Leader for nearly 40 years. Along with his work at the Herald-Leader, Ware has also written children’s books which includes the picture book Max Takes a Nap. It only seemed fitting that Ware would be the one to paint the bench inspired by his own book.

“The Walking Dead” Book Bench by Maui Crane

“Max Takes a Nap” Book Bench by Chris Ware

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“The Escape; or, A Leap for Freedom” Book Bench by Enrique Gonzalez


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Community

murals

At nearly every turn, Lexington’s beautiful and compelling street art speaks to the many creative souls who have graced our city with their talents. From world-famous commissioned artists to anonymous contributions, these murals are one of the most unique aspects of our vibrant downtown. Through the VisitLex Mural Challenge, locals and visitors alike can earn a free poster by snapping photos of any five murals in town, e-mailing them to biglex@visitlex. com with the subject line “Mural Challenge,” and sharing them on social media using the hashtag, #ShareTheLex.

by Lennon Michalski

lexington murals...

BroCo Loco

BroCoLoco was created by two Lexington raised brothers Aaron and Jared Scales.The brothers say they use their art to to transform buildings and neighborhoods. In 2015, the pair created the mural of thousands of miniature baseball bats which commemorated the Lexington Legends 15th anniversary. The pair also created the mural that hangs in the produce section of Kroger on Euclid Avenue.

Christine Kuhn Lexington artist Christine Kuhn helped bring back the history of Lexingtons all-black Dunbar High School which closed after Fayette County Public Schools were desegregated. With help from several student groups the team created 15 seperate murals of alumni or the school. The project can be seen over the old windows of the Dunbar Community Center.

Agustin Zarate Agustin Zarate, a native of Mexico City, had lived in Lexington for 15 years. Zarate was chosen in 2017 to paint the mural on the side of the Village Idiot in Downtown Lexington. The 30 foot mural is of the well remembered racehorse Man o’ War. Zarate was also chosen to paint a book bench of C.E. Morgan’s book, The Sport of Kings. 42

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While there are several organizations that actively bring street art to Lexington, PRHBTN often comes to mind. John and Jessica Winters founded the art organization eight years ago with the goal of “bringing together a regional community of seasoned art lovers and those new to the street art genre by showcasing international, national, regional and local artists, musicians and businesses intrinsic to urban culture.” The Winters’ are responsible for facilitating a host of thought provoking (and sometimes controversial) murals to Lexington, including work by Eduardo Kobra, MTO, Pariz One, MrDHEO, ODEITH, ROA, Phlegm and many more. In addition to the commissioned works, they also hold an annual festival.


Community

by Agustin Zarate As they explained on their Kickstarter page, “PRHBTN has always been two people who came together and wanted to put on a street art festival for the city of Lexington,” Over the years so many people have been indispensable in helping us realize that vision, but PRHBTN as an organization has remained small. We are still just two people and countless volunteers working together to try and do something cool.”

by Christine Kuhn

by BroCo Loco

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Community

Multitalented Maker

Lexington-born Lennon Michalski creates commissioned paintings for individual collectors and organizations, as well as cohesive bodies of work that show at various galleries around the country. He says he always had an interest in art and the investigation and exploration associated with being a creator. “When I was young, my parents took me to art workshops at Artist Attic, and always motivated me to be creative and explore the arts,” he said. “My father is very creative, and I had the pleasure of watching his endeavors in music and video editing throughout my childhood.” One of Michalski’s recent commissions, The NoLi Water Tank project, was a collaborative effort between NoLi CDC, the Bluegrass Community Foundation, Kentucky-American Water Company, and the Lexington Art League, aimed to commemorate the rich history of the North Side of Lexington. The project was funded by a $26,000 grant provided by the Gimball Foundation. Michalski painted the mural, along with help from local artists Terry Stout and Charles Browning, who created the overall design concept. Once Michalski was brought onto the project, he adapted their idea and created a cohesive design that became what is now painted on the water tank on York Street. “It

was a really collaborative project to complete, and I couldn’t be happier with the end result,” he said. He also created a Book Bench based on his own book, “How Penguins Saved TV”. The story provides commentary on our connection to technology, and follows a group of penguins wearing jetpacks on their quest to rediscover the turtle TVs, which were believed to be extinct. “I was really excited when I heard about the book bench project, and I couldn’t wait to reproduce the imagery from the book on a piece of functional public art,” he said. The process of creating the bench was unique because of the irregularly shaped surface, but since he had produced the imagery previously, he just reimagined the layout on the bench’s surface. “I am really pleased with the final result, and get excited every time I pass it on Main Street outside of the Starbucks.” Michalski certainly has a lot on his agenda at the moment. In addition to a handful of commissions for both private clients and companies, he is also working a large-scale piece for the Lewis Honors College based on the medallion design he completed earlier this year. He is looking forward to working with PRHBTN to complete another mural within the next year. He also has a show coming up in September at Gallery 2987 in Detroit, Michigan and February at the Living Arts and Science Center. “I stay busy, and always have a new and exciting projects to look forward to,” he said.

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sculptures

Community Throughout the city, old and new monuments offer comments on the past, present and future of Lexington. Here is just a small sampling of our diverse collection of public sculptures. A comprehensive list of art and locations is available on www.lexarts.org/participate/public-art

Castlewood Downs In July 2017, The Lexington Art League initiated a call to artists for this public art initiative in Castlewood Park. Made possible through a partnership with LFUCG Parks and Recreations, the project created an interactive green space in one of Lexington’s most culturally and economically diverse communities. It was juried by the internationally acclaimed sculptor and Lexington native, John Henry. In addition to Henry’s work, the installation showcased works by Carl Billingsley, Isaac Duncan, Walter Early, Jim Galluci, Adam Garey, John Henry, Ray Katz, Gary Kulak, Bret Price and Bryce Robinson.

Origins “Origins” is a series of six illuminated, abstract sculptures adorning the Oliver Lewis Way Bridge, just south of Main Street and Newtown Pike. The project was a partnership between LexArts, 2nd District Council Member Shevawn Akers and the LFUCG Corridors Commission. According to the artist, Christopher Weed, the sculptures symbolically represent the charring of oak barrels, used in the aging of bourbon.

Flying Horse of Gansu

by Kiptoo Tarus

In 2000, the Kentucky Horse Park hosted a world-renowned art exhibit entitled, “Imperial China (The Art of the Horse in Chinese History)”. As a gift to the host city of Lexington, the Chinese city of Xi’an (and Shaanxi province) presented a replica of an 1,800 year-old Han dynasty sculpture. It can be seen in a plaza across from City Hall at Main Street and North Martin Luther King Blvd. This majestic Flying Horse is the official symbol of tourism for China and has become a celebrated fixture in downtown Lexington. “All That Glitters” by Robert Morgan

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by Garry Bibbs


Community

“Origins”

notable sculptors... Garry Bibbs Garry Bibbs is a renowned sculptor and a UK Fine Arts Professor. His work has been shown at the Smithsonian, the Ruschman and the Art Institute of Chicago. Some of his local works include the airborne sculpture in UK’s Gatton Economics and Business building, the stainless steel sculpture of a family embrace outside UK Kentucky Clinic, and the Art In Motion piece at the transportation stop on Elm Street.

Robert Morgan Robert Morgan began his career collecting everyday objects from the homes of gay men who were victims of AIDS, alcoholism and drug abuse. Morgan turned these objects into art that “glitters”. The Gallery Institute 193 in Lexington holds the All That Glitters collection. In conjunction with Lexington’s EcoGrant program, Morgan recycles memories and stories that haven’t been told.

Gordon Gildersleeve Gordon Gildersleeve is a Lexington based sculptor who uses a large variety of metal. Gildersleeve holds a large body of award winning work. His sculptures and functional art, described by critics as “wildly elegant” and “full of vitality,” are exhibited nationally, installed publicly and displayed in numerous private collections, including a 2003 acquisition by Churchill Downs in Louisville, Kentucky.

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Community

From Stump to Sculpture Perhaps best known for his large-scale wooden hand sculptures, Kenyan artist Kiptoo Tarus came to Lexington to earn his MFA at The University of Kentucky and has quickly been making a name for himself in the regional visual arts world. He explained that his transition to the art world was very much a conscious decision. He quit his job at a bank and converted his apartment to an art studio. Initially, he used wood because “The first easily available materials were roots from trees taken down while paving the way for road construction around my neighborhood. Since then, “I

have found lots of inspiration from wood and other materials.

Several of his sculptures can be seen around the Kenwick neighborhood where he lives. He crafted a set of praying hands in a neighbor’s yard using wood from a fallen tree, saying that “The process of transforming the wood represented, on a deeper level, transformations of time, place and people.” From there, he created several other sculptures around town, including “Will and Big Red (oak) on Richmond Road, “Nomad’s Palace” (steel) on the corner Versailles Road and Red Mile Road, “Angel’s Share” (cherry) in front of The Lyric Theatre, “Maker’s Mark Fusion” (cherry) at Maker’s Mark Distillery and “Yellow Hand” (maple) in front of Locals’ restaurant.

Tarus also created a book bench, which is adorned with the anonymous stick figure character of Audrey Robinson’s “Foibles,” a collection of cartoons about embracing everyday difficulties and mistakes in life, and how one person can change their circumstances. Like Taurus, Robinson was a sculptor before cancer forced her to turn to illustration, eventually creating the book that inspired Tarus before her death in 2016. He met Robinson and her husband Don on their Lexington horse farm on a job taking down one of her old art studios. “After being in awe of her sculptures there, she introduced me to a book she was working on, ‘Foibles’. A world that I truly never heard of suddenly became so profound in defining a human condition,” he said. When Tarus’ signed copy of the book was burned in a house fire, Don gave him two more copies, which is represented on the bench in a wordless comic. In October, Taurus will show his work along with fellow sculptor Travis Ridell at Artsplace.

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Meet the

Teachers

Teachers in our community received no shortage of press this year. In April, Matt Bevin passed Senate Bill 151, causing uproar and fear

for public employees across the state who depend on employee pensions. In June, Franklin Circuit Judge Phillip Shepherd ruled Kentucky’s controversial pension reform law as unconstitutional. According to Attorney General Andy Beshear, the ruling means the 200,000 state employees affected will see their pensions restored, for now. The teachers in our community spoke up for themselves, while continuing to support their students. They never lost site of their role in leading our future. For that, we have a great deal of respect and appreciation for our community’s teachers. Thank you to our local teachers for helping make Lexington great!

Julie Cheuvront Windburn Middle School • 6th - 8th Grade Computer Applications, Business/Marketing What inspired you to become a teacher? I started teaching after doing other things, including dance instruction, coaching diving and fitness training. I realized I had been teaching in some form all along, getting certified in education was a natural progression! What is one thing your students would be surprised to know about you? I was a diver at UK from 1984 - 1988.

Sponsored by:

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SPONSORED CONTENT


Bo Lankster Tates Creek High School • 9th - 12th Grade Geometry and College Prep Math What is the most rewarding part of your job? Watching them mature over a year long period. Also, running into students when they are adults and hearing about their lives. What advice do you have for new teachers? You have to be selfless. You are there for them. And you set the tone and climate for your classroom.

Sponsored by:

Josh Collins Bryan Station Middle School • 8th Grade Multiple Subjects What advice do you have for new teachers? Educate yourself daily in order to adapt with strategic creativity. What is the most rewarding part of your job? I know that what I give a child cannot be taken from that child. What is one thing your students would be surprised to know about you? I have been to 41 states, four countries and I read Ancient Hebrew.

Sponsored by:

SPONSORED CONTENT

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Meet the Teachers

Christian Adair Fayette County Public Schools • K - 12th Grade Office of Equity What is the most rewarding part of your job? Removing barriers and providing opportunities for underperforming students to be successful, and watching their growth. What is the most challenging part of your job? Not having all of the resources available that would make an impactful difference in the lives of all of our students. What advice do you have for new teachers? First action is to build relationships with students and families by having cultural awareness (the understanding of difference between yourself and others). Enjoy that process and embrace it.

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Sami Williams Sandersville Elementary • K - 5th Grade School Counselor As a School Counselor what do you teach students? I work with students on topics varying from character education, social emotional learning, behavior goal setting and managing emotions. What inspired you to become a teacher? I was interested in helping students who faced additional challenges including anxiety, low self esteem, family struggles, etc. I wanted to empower students and help them learn to deal with their struggles effectively. What is one thing your students would be surprised to know about you? I have an obsession with vintage vehicles and would love to have my very own classic truck.

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SPONSORED CONTENT


Meet the Teachers

Vivian Salyer Stonewall Elementary • Kindergarten Assistant / Student Teacher What inspired you to become a teacher? I want to make a difference in the lives of as many students as I can, and help to shape the people they’ll become. What is the most rewarding part of your job? Witnessing the “aha” moments, when students realize that possibilities are infinite. What is one thing your students would be surprised to know about you? Before I decided to become a teacher, I was an equine veterinarian, a title I received in my home country, Brazil.

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Stephanie Fitch Bluegrass Community & Technical College Freshmen & Sophmore Film Production Technique and Theory What inspired you to become a teacher? I worked in the field for almost 20 years and wanted to share my experiences. I loved working with interns and teaching workshops, so it seemed a natural progression. What is the most challenging part of your job? Not having enough one-on-one time with students. What is one thing your students would be surprised to know about you? I love Korean dramas.

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Community

Agricu Fayette County’s

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Community

lture

It’s a word that probably evokes the image of man in bibbed overalls standing a field, stalks of corn reaching up to the sun, countless rows of green as far as the eye can see. Maybe a tractor is driving by. It’s not a particularly thrilling topic for most people to mull over, but we’re here to say...

It’s a BIG part of What Makes Lexington Great! story by Amanda Harper

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Agriculture

and the businesses that support it in Fayette County account for one in twelve jobs and over $2.3 billion in annual output, according to the University of Kentucky’s Community and Economic Development Initiative of Kentucky. Those numbers are massive, especially for something that most people don’t think about past Sunday meal prep. Agriculture isn’t just food that’s grown or raised for the grocery store. Merriam-Webster tells us that it’s: “the science, art or practice of cultivating the soil, producing crops and raising livestock and in varying degrees the preparation and marketing of the resulting products.” Farms have a ripple effect through other industries and areas of our lives, too. The beautiful horse farms and greenspaces encourage tourism and boost everyone’s quality of living. Produce farmers supply ingredients to restaurants, breweries, wineries and farmers’ markets. Livestock farms help support other industries, as well. Every farm has a network of positive influence in our local economy, offering jobs and better lives for men, women and children throughout the Bluegrass and beyond. “The Fayette County farms, which provide for a distinctive and scenic countryside, are also significant contributors to the local economy,” explained Alison Davis, a Community and Economic Development Initiative of Kentucky director and agricultural

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photo by Savannah Brant

economics professor. “This is seen not only in traditional ag output, but also in the tremendous growth in tourism tied to the ‘ag cluster’, such as Keeneland, Horse Country, breweries, wineries and more.” What’s an “ag cluster”? It used to be common practice to measure the economic impact of farms directly on the profits or expenditures of the farms themselves. But that’s not the whole story. Because of their wide influence in our communities, farms have far-reaching economic impact. Take a cattle farm, for instance: it employs farmhands and makes a profit from the cows they sell or milk. But they also help keep butchers, veterinarians, auctioneers, farm supply stores and livestock transporation companies in business. Maybe they supply meat to a restaurant, milk to an ice creamery and excess hay to a landscaping company. Perhaps they rent out a barn for weddings or host farm-to-table dinners in their beautiful fields: in fact, a local tour company regularly includes the farm on their tours. That’s a whole cluster of economic activity. When the farm sells off 300 head of cattle, that’s not the whole story of their economic footprint in their community. As you might imagine from looking around, Lexington’s agricultural story isn’t told in rows of corn. Fayette County’s economy, culture and appeal owes a lot to the local ag cluster.

ere are 114,857 acres of farmland in Fayette County. To put it in perspective, that’s about two and a half times the size of Washington, D.C.

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Community

Horses

Shortly after Lexington was made a city, there were more horses here than people...

It’s impossible to ignore one massive aspect of Kentucky’s agricultural landscape: we’re proudly known as the Horse Capital of the World. Over 25,000 horses reside in Fayette County on 89,000 acres of land. They’re a huge part of Lexington, and one of the most iconic symbols of our region. The estimated economic impact of Kentucky’s horses is $4 billion annually, and much of that centers around Lexington sales, where these incredible animals sometimes fetch in excess of $1 million. Horses are big business for Fayette County! It’s probably no surprise that about 70% of the horses in Fayette County are Thoroughbreds. According to a Kentucky Equine Survey conducted by the National Agricultural Statistics Service, the combined value of these superstar animals totals over $2.5 billion. The second-most common horse breed in Fayette County is the American Saddlebred, which was developed into its modern type right here in Kentucky. Saddlebreds participate in harness racing at Red Mile and are often shown at the Kentucky Horse Park. Like Keeneland, these events bring in participants from all over the world and draw in spectators who will inevitably spend money at local businesses during their visit. How did horses become such a big part of our identity? Settlers from Virginia brought their horses–and their deep love of horse racing– with them. They built tracks and breeding stock before Kentucky

was even a state. The first newspapers reported on the quality of breeding stock. As it turned out, Kentucky’s landscape is ideal for raising horses. Many claim that the limestone shelf beneath our soil nourishes our pastures, producing grass that serves as amazing horse feed, developing strong bones and sturdy constitutions. What we do know is that our moderate climate is perfect for horses, who seem to grow best when exposed to distinct seasons on our gently rolling terrain. The push at the turn of the 20th century to make gambling legal helped solidify Kentucky’s place in horse history. At the time, many states banned gambling of any sort, but not the Bluegrass State. Gamblers with deep pockets and a passion for equine racing settled in central Kentucky, building racetracks and farms with stately mansions. According to a UK study on The Influence of the Agricultural Cluster on the Fayette County Economy, the presence of a racetrack in a county has a strong impact on the hospitality, recreation and retail industries. For us, that’s $88 million in additional annual payroll in these industries and $74 million in recreational sales, all attributed to the presence of racetracks in Fayette County. A study commissioned by Keeneland from the University of Kentucky’s Center for Business and Economic Research, Gatton College of Business and Economics estimates Keeneland’s yearly economic impact at $590 million when combining retail impact, horse sales, race attendance and wagering. Horses grazing and playing at Taylor Made, photo by Savannah Brant

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Community

Livestock

Kentucky is the 8th largest cattle-producing state in the US, with over 2.2 million cows grazing on Bluegrass farmland. The overwhelming majority of Kentucky cattle are raised for beef production. Most farmers rely on middlemen to auction the cows off for processing or to source new steers to keep their herds strong: that’s where stockyards come in. Since 1946, Blue Grass Stockyards has served as a hub for livestock farmers to engage in commerce and socialize, especially during their many livestock auctions. When a fire destroyed the Lexington facility in January 2016, the staff turned their attention to expanding and creating a new facility to serve as more of a one-stop-shop for people who are passionate about Kentucky’s agricultural heritage and future. The facility offers educational opportunities and a museum to help people of all ages to experience and connect with local agriculture and cattle production. The Bluegrass Regional Marketplace also includes shopping and dining, making it a great destination for

anyone. Located across from the Kentucky Horse Park, it’s easy for tourists to stop in and discover a little more about our region. “You really have to see it for yourself,” said Lauralee Estill, Event Coordinator at Bluegrass Regional Marketplace. “This is becoming the center of ag culture in central Kentucky. From the classroom and museum to the sales ring and barn, this is the place connecting people to where their food comes from and the people producing that food.” In 1942, Kentucky had more sheep per square mile than any state east of the Mississippi. Sheep were able to thrive in central Kentucky for many of the same reasons that horses love our state. In spite of our state’s love of mutton barbeque, our sheep were raised primarily for wool. After World War II, cheap synthetic fibers dealt a major blow to the wool industry and sheep numbers have never quite recovered. However, the number of sheep in Kentucky has started to rise with the interest in alternative meats and milks, as well as the (perhaps ironic) interest in genuine wool as an alternative to synthetic fibers.

Fayette County is second in the state for producing livestock, poultry and their associated products. e’re first in the state for other animals and other animal products , a category which includes bees, alpacas, llamas, rabbits and a host of other critters and their products

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A Gr0wing Future When most people think of agriculture, they think of crops. The total value of Fayette County’s crop sales sits around $13.5 million coming from corn, soybeans, hay, tobacco, grains, fruits and vegetables. Like much of Kentucky, tobacco was once a major cash crop for the city of Lexington. During the Civil War, military blockades of southern ports combined with fighting in the biggest tobacco-producing states opened up the opportunity for Kentucky to cement its place as a major growing powerhouse. Burley tobacco, a favorite among cigarette manufacturers, was introduced and our soil suited the plant perfectly. In the early 1900s, deadly feuds erupted in western Kentucky’s tobacco production community. Major warehouses and auction companies headed east to Lexington. The location allowed farmers from both ends of the state to congregate and the biggest tobacco buyers to buy and ship product easily via new post-war railroads. By 1910, Lexington called itself the “largest tobacco market in the world”.

The solution, according to many, dates back to 1775. In that year, the first hemp crop was grown in Danville. Senator Henry Clay was a “hemp pioneer”, growing it on his estate, Ashland. In 1810, he gave a speech on the Senate floor in favor of requiring the US Navy to use domestic hemp exclusively. The speech was widely reprinted and helped encourage hemp’s production. By the mid-19th century, Kentucky was the nation’s leading hemp producer. Throughout history, industrial hemp has had countless applications. One of the fastest growing plants around, it was one of the first plants to be spun into fiber over 10,000 years ago. Hemp can be made into paper, clothing, biodegradable plastics, insulation, biofuel, paint and more. Hemp can also be eaten raw, ground into meal, turned into drinks, pressed for oil or ground into animal feed. This crop was banned across the nation by the Controlled Substances Act due to what most feel is a misunderstanding of hemp’s chemical makeup. Industrial hemp is a member of the Cannabis sativa family, making it a cousin of marijuana. Both plants contain the psychoactive chemical tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is why hemp was targeted during the War on Drugs. However, hemp has significantly lower concentrations of THC and higher concentrations of cannabidiol (CBD), which decreases or eliminates the psychoactive effects. In fact, with careful breeding of the plant, the levels of THC can be lowered further–and levels of CBD can he higher.

At its height, hemp covered 52,000 acres of Kentucky.

The decline of the tobacco industry began in the 1970s, with many warehouses demolished or abandoned by the 1990s. Following the passing of the Fair and Equitable Tobacco Reform Act (more commonly referred to as the “tobacco buyout”) in 2004, most Kentucky farm families moved away from growing tobacco, leaving a vacuum in our agricultural economy.

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Hemp at Waveland photo by Savannah Brant


Community In recent years, CBD has sparked national interest due to its potential medicinal applications. Scientific studies have shown that CBD is an effective treatment for certain types of childhood epilepsy. A CBD-based drug is used in Canada and Sweden to alleviate pain associated with multiple sclerosis. People have used CBD to aid with sleep, appetite, pain and a host of other concerns. There are ongoing efforts to revive this industry in Kentucky. Helping lead the charge are The Kentucky Hempsters, a team of young, female professionals who have teamed up with volunteers, sponsors, partners and farms to advocate for this incredible plant. Co-founder Alyssa Erickson explained, “In college, we recognized Kentucky’s struggling economy and wanted to help give back to our home state. With tobacco to coal production declining, it was important for us to find something that would help supplement these industries, and create new opportunities for Kentuckians. After discovering the impact hemp had on Kentucky’s economy from the late 18th century to World War II, we hoped to help bring back what was once the state’s leading cash crop to Kentucky farmers and manufacturers.” Thanks in part to their advocacy and having the issue championed by representatives like former Kentucky Agriculture Comissioner and congressman James Comer and Senators Rand Paul and Mitch McConnell, hemp legalization has gained a footing in Congress. Kentucky was one of the first states to pass a hemp bill that would set up the framework for legalization. The Agricultural Act of 2014 included language that clarified industrial hemp’s status as a legitimate agricultural product and authorized higher education institutions and state departments of agriculture to conduct research programs. Shortly after, the Kentucky Department of Agriculture launched the Industrial Hemp Research Program to allow farmers

and processors to begin development of a local hemp industry. “Right now, there are a multitude of hemp products being produced as part of the Kentucky Hemp Pilot Program. We strongly encourage everyone to purchase these products to help give back to those proving the crop’s economic potential. There are also a number of hemp events you can attend, and organizations you can join,” Alyssa explained. “We hope that more people will become advocates for hemp, and share their own experiences with others. Many misconceptions still remain about hemp and what it is, so the more people who become educated and help educate others, the sooner these misconceptions will be cleared and the door will be opened for a thriving industry here in Kentucky.” Their website, kyhempsters.com, offers a wealth of information about hemp’s past, present and future in Kentucky. “Recently, we opened a hemp museum in partnership with the Blue Grass Trust for Historic Preservation here in Lexington at Hopemont, the Hunt-Morgan House to preserve and promote pieces of hemp history,” Alyssa said. “You can also explore the Heritage Hemp Trail at hertiagehemptrail.com, which highlights a number of historic sites with a significance to the early hemp industry in Kentucky including Lexington stops like Hopemont, along with Ashland, The Henry Clay Estate and Waveland which feature live hemp crops growing.” She added, “Hemp offers a number of agricultural, industrial, environmental and economic benefits for Kentucky. It gives farmers a new source of income, and can be used for more than 10,000 different products that are sustainably produced and healthier for us. It also has the potential to create thousands of jobs, whether its on the farm or in manufacturing or retail.”

Wine, Beer & Spirits Did you know that American winemaking began in Kentucky? The first commercial winery in the United State was established in 1799 in what is now Jessamine County. Kentucky’s climate and soil is right for growing grapes that produce excellent wine. By the mid-nineteenth century, Kentucky was the third-largest wine producing state in the country. When Prohibition was enacted, Kentucky’s winemaking history was all but finished. It wasn’t until 1976 that the Kentucky legislature made winemaking possible again. Kentucky’s “wineaissance” carries on today, with dozens of locally-produced wines gracing glasses the world over. When a love of craft beer swept the nation, Kentucky was quick to carve a niche in the industry. Local brewers made the best of local ingredients and taste profiles to create beers with a uniquely Kentucky flavor. Distilling is a quintessentially Kentucky pastime, and Fayette County has a rich history in this arena. Craft distillers are making new local spirits, often with local grains.

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Community

Agritourism The decline of tobacco left many of Kentucky’s farms to rethink strategies and attempt to transition into other streams of revenue. The Kentucky Department of Agriculture has made promoting Kentucky agritourism an important part of helping Kentucky’s farms and farmers thrive. New ways to make every acre as profitable as possible–while helping the community at large–is an essential mission to ensuring our farms’ continued success. “Agritourism offers an opportunity to build relationships between the agricultural community and the local tourism industry by incorporating tour groups, educating school children and hosting civic events. This increases rural economic development dollars in areas with agritourism venues,” the Kentucky Department of Agriculture website explained. “The ultimate goal of an agritourism venue is to increase net farm income by filling customer needs for education and recreation on the farm.” How are farms making new revenue? Many rent out facilities for special events, like weddings or charitable fundraisers. Others are branching out into autumn with pumpkin patches, haunted forest attractions, hay mazes and other fun activities. On-farm events, like festivals, live music, tours or seated dinners, can be a great way to educate the public about agriculture while offering everyone the chance to get down on the farm!

Taylor Made, photo by Savannah Brant

Why Does Conservation Matter? The researchers behind the Community and Economic Development Initiative of Kentucky had an important question: if mounting pressure to sell off Fayette County’s farmland continues to win out, what will happen to our local economy?

identify problems in agricultural industries, developing solutions and taking actions to help improve farmers’ net income, providing better economic opportunities and enhancing the quality of life for everyone.

They found if production agriculture declined by just ten percent, there would be an overall additional decrease of more than $26.5 million in output with supporting businesses and services in the ag cluster, a $81 million hit for Kentucky’s economy annually. Of course, the ripple spreads further: this could indirectly affect household spending in unpredictable ways, resulting in even more of a loss.

That’s an important mission. The Influence of the Agricultural Cluster on the Fayette County Economy authors assert that, “Fayette County’s unique agricultural status allows it to import tremendous wealth from outside the region that is then invested and spent within Fayette County in a wide range of industries. Agriculture alone does not create Fayette County’s unique image; it is the combination of the visual amenities of its farms, the glamour of its equine events, and the deep cultural history evident throughout the area.” They added, “Having a strong character makes Fayette County a fertile place for business creation. This is particularly true for local agricultural and food businesses that rely on consumer perception of place as a component of their value.”

“It is important to invest in Fayette Counties agricultural future because agriculture is a huge economic driver here in Fayette County,” explained Carrie McIntosh, executive director of the Fayette County Farm Bureau. “We are a destination stop for a lot of tourists because of our signature horse industry. Nowhere else in the country will you find the landscape that we have here in Fayette County and it is important that we protect this beautiful landscape and not become just another large city. Our soils are very unique here in Fayette County and central Kentucky, making for raising great horses, grazing cattle and other livestock as well as distilling great bourbon.” Farm Bureau is an organization dedicated to serving as an advocate and voice for agriculture. Farm families and allies work together to

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What is the indirect value of having sweeping, unobstructed views of verdant horse farms and hay swaying in the breeze? The study cites major local commercial businesses who explained that their applicants for high-level jobs chose to settle in Lexington over other offers elsewhere because of the quality of life that Lexington can offer. Business influencers move here because of the beautiful scenery. Farmers’ markets, orchards, wineries and locally-sourced ingredients or products help directly enrich all of our lives. •


Community

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Community

DOWNTOWN in

Development The last decade of Lexington has been one of fast-moving progress. Mayor Gray’s term as Mayor will end in January. His eight years in office have been marked by accomplishment and collaboration with our city government, taking on projects that will likely change the face of Lexington for the better. At the groundbreaking ceremony for the much-awaited Lexington Center and Rupp Arena expansion and renovation, Mayor Gray drove home the importance of this progress. “This is all about quality of life, and quality of place. It’s about a powerful destination that will stimulate and activate our city in remarkable ways. It will add to our economy and our culture in ways we actually can not even imagine today, creating opportunities and jobs now and into the future. Build it, and they will come. Yes, by the thousands, and over time, by the millions.” Ideas that have been discussed for years are solidifying in the heart of downtown Lexington, bringing commerce, beauty, entertainment and function to the city. Many may not know that one of Mayor Gray’s most important initiatives was to extend a hand to Lexingtonians, inviting them to be a part of imagining our city’s future. The city’s Comprehensive Plan outlines the objective to “engage and educate the residents of Lexington-Fayette County in the planning process.” The city achieves this through social media, surveys, community planning teams, public hearings and the On the Table initiative. Mayor Gray believes that individual members of our community are the most important asset we have for change. He said, “Miracles can happen. Dreams can come true because of citizens like each and every one of you.” renderings and stories provided by the individual development firms

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Community

A Downtown Lexington Partnership survey revealed that 37% of people who visited downtown Lexington in the last six months attended a sporting event. e improvements made to upp rena and the e pansion and replacement of the Lexington Convention Center are an investment in our future.� - Craig Turner,

Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Lexington Center

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Community

Lexington Center The Board of Directors of the Lexington Center Corporation voted unanimously to award Messer Construction Company the contract to build the new and expanded Lexington Convention Center. The $241 million winning contract bid will keep intact the original 2014 design and vision of the project.

ere is nothing more powerful than an idea whose time has come. e are delivering on a powerful idea and soon it will be revealed in bricks and mortar for a world class reinvented arena and a new convention center.

The contract includes: all-new construction costs, demolition of the Jefferson Street Bridge including the north abutment, new UK Hospitality Clubs, upper arena chair back seats and parking structures. The construction project began last month and will be completed in November 2021. The project will be built in phases to allow Rupp Arena and much of the convention center to remain operating during construction.

52%

The original design was developed by NBBJ Architects and EOP Architects and includes more square footage of exhibit halls, ballrooms, flexible meeting space, pre-function and circulation space.

- Mayor Jim Gray at the Lexington Center groundbreaking ceremony

of people who visited downtown e ington did so to attend a special event, according to a survey conducted by the owntown e ington artnership

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Town Branch Park Town Branch Park will be a world-class community gathering space featuring gardens, one-of-a-kind children’s play areas, interactive water features, free performances, art installations, educational programs and a dog park. Picnic with the Pops recently donated a $1.2 million for a 5,000 seat amphitheater. The signature 10-acre park in the heart of downtown will be the trailhead for 22 miles of green infrastructure with uninterrupted bike and pedestrian paths – linking the urban core to Lexington’s iconic countryside. It will connect people and places alongside the expanded and historic waters of Town Branch Creek, where our city was founded. In just the last few months, the project has gained momentum. Two other gifts of more than $1 million each have been announced. An official website has been developed, where an animated video is available to view. Environmental studies will begin soon as planning and preparation are under way. The Town Branch Park partners are working to incorporate ideas they heard from the more than 2,000 residents who responded to the survey. With the community’s help, this truly will be the people’s park and the community’s living room. Locals can visit the website and sign up for the e-newsletter for updates: townbranchpark.org

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43%

of people identify parks as a primary site of connection to others. “A vibrant urban park is essential to any smart growth plan. Parks serve to strengthen the urban core and protect the suburban fringe from development.” - Bluegrass Community Foundation’s On the Table 2017


Community

When Gehl Studio conducted a Public Space Public Life Survey in 2015, it found that less than 5 percent of children in e ington spent time downtown. e own Branch Park aims to change that with great amenities and programming. e own ranch ark artners team is working to ensure that inclusion and access are integral to the design, programming and operations of own ranch ark.

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Community

City Center After almost a decade of uncertainty, the newly re-named City Center development is being built at an estimated cost of $200 million. Formerly known as Centre Pointe, The Webb Companies announced the name change in April. City Center is the first large mixed-use complex in downtown Lexington and will provide the best in urban living. The project consists of six major components: a full service Marriott Hotel with 223 rooms; a Residence Inn, downtown’s first extended stay hotel with 120 rooms; City Center office spaces consisting of 9 floors and approximately 165,000 square feet of office space; The Residences at City Center, 12 luxury condominiums providing the best in urban living; a three story underground parking garage consisting of 710 parking spaces that will serve the entire complex; and a Jeff Ruby Steakhouse located at the corner of Vine and Limestone. The Greer Companies, a partner in City Center, will manage a Starbucks onsite, in addition to other restaurant and retail spaces located on the corner of Main and Upper. The community is eager for the long-stalled project to be complete, and The Webb Companies and Greer Companies are not wasting any time. The parking garage will be finished by December 30, 2018. The office space will be complete by January 2019. Locals can expect Jeff Ruby Steakhouse to open in Spring 2019, while The Residence Inn and Marriott Hotel are slated to open in Fall of 2019.

“It’s a great time for downtown Lexington. I think that what you’re going to see in the next year ne t five years, ne t ten years will be even greater!”

- Dudley Webb, Chairman and Co-Founder of Webb Companies

e area around ity enter has a alk core® of 92 with access to public transit, better commutes and all the best that e ington has to o er.

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City Hall In December of last year, Lexington Fayette Urban County Government (LFUCG) issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) to solicit proposals from private developers for a new City Hall as requested by the City Council. The proposals were reviewed and scored by an independent committee. On June 7th, 2018 at a Council Committee of the Whole Meeting CRM Development’s proposal was announced as the selected proposal. During the meeting, Todd Slatin, the city’s purchasing director, said the selection committee showed “there was a clear winner.” On July 3rd, Bill O’Mara, the city’s finance commissioner, presented again to the Council and reiterated the CRM project will save the city an estimated $39 million over the next 20 years. When asked about this scenario during the Council meetings, O’Mara stated, “This cost comparison convinced me that the question is when do we want to start saving money? This [current] campus is very expensive.” The next step in the process is a public hearing on August 14th, at which time the City Council will seek any public input on the project before moving forward to act upon the selection and enter into lease negotiations with CRM Development Company for a new city hall project. The location at 100 Midland Avenue is a gateway to downtown and positions the city government at a literal crossroads of many of the city’s best new projects. The site anchors Town Branch Commons, a landscape that will be a defining feature of downtown’s resurgence. The building will be convenient for citizens when conducting business at city hall, with adequate public parking and ease of access unlike the current solution, while housing all city employees currently spread amongst five buildings into one campus. The building includes inviting, public spaces that will make Lexingtonians proud to enter the downtown corridor. Mayor Gray captured the benefit to the city when addressing the City Council, “I would say this is really important, not for the legacy of this administration, but for the future of the city. For the future of the city that we don’t continue to waste money and that’s what I urge you to really think about.”

is pro ect intends to eliminate the $22.5 million deferred maintenance obligation the city currently has and transition the $2.97 million of ongoing maintenance and operational costs to a lease payment for a brand new city hall building. e parking garage will also save the city appro imately $260,000 annually that it is currently paying to e ark for city employee parking. e lease payment of $5.1 million will not escalate for years, where, during that time and during the course of the lease, $36 million from those lease payments will go towards ongoing maintenance of the building in addition to $3.4 million that will be set aside for ma or capital improvements.

“The challenge for staying on the current campus buildings are they’re old and they have a lot of deferred maintenance. Even after fixing those items that have been identified, it’s an inefficient building and has higher utility costs and higher operating costs than going to a refurbished new building.” - Finance and Administration Commissioner Bill Omara

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new parking spaces will be added, to provide easy access for city workers and citi ens doing business at ity all as well as provide parking for the idland venue corridor on nights and weekends

RFP#55-2017 New Government Center

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Community

New &NOTEWORTHY Dr. Pearse Lyons awarded Kennedy-Lemass Medal This year’s Kennedy-Lamass Medal, awarded by the American Chamber of Commerce Ireland to honor U.S. leaders of Irish heritage who have helped strengthen the Irish-U.S. relationship, has been awarded to the late Dr. Pearse Lyons, founder of Alltech. After moving to Kentucky in the 1970s, Dr. Lyons, a scientist and entrepreneur, began Alltech out of his garage with nothing but an initial investment of $10,000. Today, his achievements live on, as Alltech is now a global team of more than 6,000 people in over 120 countries working to improve animal, crop, and human health and performance. Nicholasville, Kentucky is home to Alltech’s headquarters, the center for Animal Nutrigenomics and Applied Animal Nutrition, and many production facilities for Lyons’ various brewing and distilling companies. Other science research centers, distilleries and brewing companies of Alltech’s can be found all over Ireland. Dr. Lyons “truly lived the American dream,” said Barry O’Sullivan, president of the American Chamber of Commerce Ireland. “We

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will continue to be inspired by the legacy of individuals such as Dr. Lyons, who had the courage and skills to turn a vision into a reality.” His love for science and his Irish heritage is evident in all of his many accomplishments, which have united thousands of people from all over the world underneath the same roof of Alltech. “My father was passionate about Ireland and the United States, and he spent his life promoting both countries around the world,” said Dr. Mark Lyons, president of Alltech and son of Dr. Pearse Lyons. “He had an extraordinary ability to bring people from all walks of life together to make a difference in the world. This was especially true when it came to cultivating and supporting scientific, ag-tech and agricultural endeavors between the U.S. and Ireland.” Having been an inspiration to everyone around him, it is no surprise that this year’s Kennedy-Lemass Medal has been awarded to the extraordinary and well-deserving Dr. Pearse Lyons.


NEW IN TOWN:

Papi’s Mexican Restaurant Papi’s Mexican Restaurant and Bar is coming to the former Buenos Nachos location on Euclid. Papi’s Mexican Restaurant will be open everyday from 11am to 10:30pm, serving typical tex-mex favorites like burritos, taco, and fajitas. Customers can also expect new twists on classic Mexican favorites. Owner Marcos Valdes said he’s planning to feature a Mexican sandwich, that is kind similar to torta, made with pork and cooked in dried pepper sauce.The sandwich will feature black beans, meat, sauce and oaxaca cheese.

NEW IN TOWN:

Chick-fil-A on Richmond Road Get ready because a brand new Chick-fil-A is coming to Richmond Road! The new quick service restaurant is located at 2299 Richmond Road, in front of Southland Christian Church. The restaurant has been under construction since January 2018 and is scheduled to open in August 2018. Roderick Long is the owner/ operator of the Hamburg Place and Richmond Road locations. He is looking forward to bringing Chick-fil-A to the community. He plans to continue the tradition of community partners and service in the neighborhood. Richmond Road is excited to welcome a brand new Chick-fil-A!

NEW IN TOWN:

Spin Bike Share Have you heard of dockless bike share? Even if you haven’t heard of it, you’ve probably seen the orange bikes on streetcorners all over town. This summer, Spin has launched a pilot program in Lexington that is testing the city’s receptiveness to a new public right of way system. This short term rental program will allow Lexingtonians to rent a bike, then lock and leave it anywhere in the city when they’re finished with their ride. You can check out a bike by downloading the Spin app, or by visiting spin.pm (there are also options for people who choose not to link a credit card up to their profile.) After making a user profile, you can simply use the app to locate a bike near you then use the app to scan a code to unlock the bike. When you’re all done, just pull down on the physical lever to lock the bike. Joyride for only $1/30 minutes. Students, school faculty and staff that register with a .edu email will receive 50% off !

AROUND TOWN:

Celebrate the 30th Annual Roots & Heritage Festival Named one of the top 10 festivals in Kentucky, the 30th annual Roots & Heritage Festival is coming this September! For over 25 years, the Lexington Roots and Heritage Festival has been a pinnacle of regional diversity providing entertainment and education for all ages. The festival has high-quality offerings of cultural and educational programs with amazing events that your family won’t want to miss! Events will be held September 7th-9th on Elm Tree Lane, with the gospel celebration being held at The Lyric Theatre & Cultural Arts Center. The KidsFest on Saturday at the corner of Short Street and Elm will feature lots of interactive booths, games and entertainment that kids will love. All events during the Roots & Heritage Festival include activities for children to learn, play and grow. The festival also showcases the region’s most diverse vendors, including food, clothing, literature, music and art. Visit rootsfestky.com for a complete list of activities and ways to participate. stories by Emmaline Potter and Emily Brucken

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While driving around Lexington, it’s hard to miss the “I Buy Local” bumper stickers that many cars, trucks and shops proudly display. This initiative is one of Local First Lexington, which helps independent local businesses, consumers and the community. “Our bumper sticker is our most visible initiative and also what we consider our simplest one,” said Lauralee Crain Estill, board president of Local First Lexington. “When people drive around town and make decisions about what businesses to visit, the sticker is a reminder to shop at an independent local business instead of a big box store or to eat at a unique local restaurant instead of a national chain.” As Lauralee explained, choosing to spend money at local businesses helps the Lexington community in a wide range of ways. All profits of local businesses remain local and recirculate in the local economy, which studies have shown to have a powerful multiplier effect.

photo of Bandit by Laura Fuller Lacy

Non-Profit SPOTLIGHT:

LOCAL FIRST LEXINGTON story by Sarah Boerkircher

When Lauralee moved to Lexington from Flemingsburg to attend Transylvania University, she explained that Transylvania made her an activist, but Lexington made her a small business owner. Lauralee is currently the event manager at the Bluegrass Regional Marketplace. “These experiences gave me invaluable community connections and lifelong friends.” she said. “As board president for Local First Lexington, I am so excited about connecting Lexingtonians to the local economy they want to see and participate in.” Formed in 2008, Local First Lexington is made up of large and small independent businesses and nonprofit organizations who are interested in informing the public and local policy-makers about the significant economic, environmental and cultural contributions local businesses and nonprofits make to the community. As a non-profit business alliance of locally owned and independently operated Lexington businesses, the goal is to help keep Lexington an interesting, unique and economically stable place to live and work.

ENGAGING LEXINGTONIANS Local First Lexington is working to create the strongest network possible, so local businesses can learn from one another, build their networks and grow. “Most people don’t know that Local First Lexington is a membership organization, so we want to spread the word that a large percentage of our members provide services, in addition to those that own retail businesses or restaurants,” Lauralee said. “As a membership organization, we offer resources, networking opportunities and visibility for our member businesses and nonprofit organizations. Our members appeal to customers who value choice, individuality and quality service—they help make Lexington a truly unique place.” Dwayne Edwards, who is retired military, has lived in Lexington since 2001. He’s a big believer in giving back to the community. He has served on numerous community boards including BUILD (Building a United Interfaith Lexington through Direct-action), the Bluegrass Cycling Club and Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Lexington.

photo courtesy of Mulberry & Lime

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Community “I guess it is a personal philosophy of mine to buy American and to buy local,” Dwayne said. “As a member of Local First Lexington, I’m able to network with other local businesses while supporting and connecting with people in my community.” For more than two years, Dwayne has worked as a sales professional for Integrity IT, a local information technology company that supports other small businesses and companies with 20 to 100 workstations. Being in sales, Dwayne knows the importance of networking and has appreciated the opportunities to connect with Lexington-based businesses through Local First Lexington’s coffee meet-ups. Local First Lexington’s primary networking events are monthly coffee meet-ups and quarterly happy hours. They host coffee meet-ups the second Friday of every month at various coffee shops and diners around town. Each meet-up that Local First Lexington sponsors has a discussion theme and a featured local expert. Topics have included “Doing Business in the Age of Online Reviews”, “DIY Accounting (and When to Ask for Help)”, “Guerilla Marketing” and “Creative Win-Win Efforts with Other Businesses and Nonprofits”. “Along the theme of win-win efforts, our networking happy hours are all co-hosted by other local organizations, which helps expand contacts for our members,” Lauralee said. Local First Lexington encourages educational opportunities and “Buy Local” activities designed to instill an understanding of the impact and benefits of buying local. “Consumers always have a choice when they shop, but when they choose local and independent businesses, they not only enjoy a more personal experience, but help to build a stronger Lexington,” said Lauralee. Per the American Independent Business Alliance (AMIBA), an alliance that Local First Lexington is a member of, every dollar spent at an independent business returns three times more money to the local economy verses when a dollar is spent at a chain retailer. “Independent stores, restaurants and service providers shape the character of Lexington,” said Lauralee. “At Local First Lexington, we want our community to support independent, locally owned businesses, which will help central Kentucky flourish.” •

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photo courtesy of The Burl

WHAT IS LOCAL FIRST LEXINGTON? Local First Lexington is a grassroots, non-profit organization that is helping to spread the word about the value of patronizing locally owned, independent businesses. Local First Lexington engages Lexingtonians in educational opportunities and “Buy Local” activities designed to instill an understanding of the impact and benefits that buying local can have on the city of Lexington. Visit their website to see their membership directory, news about upcoming events and the application for membership: LocalFirstLexington.com. You can also “Like” them on Facebook.

photo courtesy of CD Central


INTERESTED IN JOINING? Local businesses and nonprofits can join Local First Lexington or renew their memberships online at in time to appear in the next printed directory, which will be distributed before the 2018 holiday shopping season starts. Visit LocalFirstLexington.com to get started! As a membership organization, there are several membership opportunities to choose from:

TYPES OF MEMBERSHIP: • The Standard Membership: This membership is for independent, locally owned businesses and nonprofit organizations. The annual membership cost for this group is $100. The requirements for this category are: at least 50 percent locally owned, with owners residing in Fayette County or the immediate surrounding counties. The company must be privately held, not publicly traded, ensuring revenues stay at home. All business decisions must be made locally, without reporting to a national office or franchise headquarters.

• Supporting Members: This new membership category is offered for businesses that fit some–but not all–of the criteria for Standard Membership. An example would be if a retail store is headquartered in Louisville, but has a storefront in Lexington, too, or a law firm with offices in several regional cities. Those businesses would pay $150 annually.

• Localist Membership: This membership opportunity is for consumers. By registering as a Localist, the cost is $25 annually. As a member, you’ll receive a T-shirt, bumper sticker and insider access to what’s new and exciting in Lexington.

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LUNDY’S SPECIAL EVENTS 1385 Pridemore Ct. • 859.255.0717 • LundysCatering.com Next year, Lundy’s Special Events will celebrate a banner year – 50 years in business! Abby Dobson and Alissa Tibe, sisters and business partners, owe the company’s success and longevity to their family-centered approach to catering events. To ensure successful operation, Lundy’s promises that a principal member is hands on for each event they design and produce, ensuring seamless, detail-oriented event production. From award-winning weddings, corporate and nonprofit events, large-scale galas and intimate dinners, Lundy’s specializes in off-premise catering, event design and rentals. No matter the event size, Lundy’s is equipped to handle everything from tents, tables and chairs, exquisite cuisine, to temporary power and support services. It’s no wonder their clients rest easy knowing all the details are taken care of from top to bottom. The LSE family of companies also encompasses The Carrick House, Lundergan Banquet and Restaurant Group, Emergency Disaster Services, and Signature Special Event Services. The common thread binding them all together is the family’s commitment to keeping customers happy and doing good things for the community. Rooted in their love for the Lexington community, Abby and Alissa are enthusiastic about the strength of Lexington’s local businesses. They said: “Our local business is able to provide customized customer service and attention to detail that provides added value to our clients and partners. Our successes allow us to give back to the Lexington community which in turn, strengthens our resources and partnerships.” They believe that their business has succeeded in Lexington due to its mix of small town charm and big city opportunities. It doesn’t hurt that Lexington has a nationally recognized food scene and a community that embodies Southern hospitality! They added: “The growing culinary scene and community events make Lexington a wonderful place to raise your family and own an independent business. The community support is abundant!”

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KENTUCKY EAGLE, INC. 2440 Innovation Dr. • 1.800.252.3434 • KyEagle.net Kentucky Eagle, Inc. is a Direct Store Distributor (DSD) that delivers malt beverages, wine and spirits and most recently, MooShine Beer Cheese to vendors across Kentucky. Chairman Ann Bakhaus’ grandfather, O.A. Bakhaus, purchased Kentucky Eagle in 1948. The company celebrates a 70-year anniversary this year. Ann adds, “We’re proud to be a third-generation family operation – family-built and locally-driven.” Over those seven decades, Kentucky Eagle has expanded in both service area and product offerings, but what has remained constant are their family values, dedication to serving the community and providing jobs for more than160 Kentucky employees. Additionally, they have supported organizations like Habitat for Humanity, Lexington Foundation, Hope Lodge, Horse Park Foundation and Kentucky Executive Mansion Foundation Board. Because Kentucky Eagle delivers beverages rain or shine, during the holidays and on the weekends to stock bars, grocery stores, liquor stores, drug stores and convenience stores to 18 counties, they like to to say, “We drive for your weekend.” Kentucky Eagle represent classic brands like Anheuser-Busch, Yuengling, Sierra Nevada and New Belgium, alongside Lexington favorites such as Lexington Brewing Company, Country Boy, Rock House Brewing, Blue Stallion, Ethereal, Pivot Brewing and Mirror Twin, among others. “But our work goes beyond distributing products,” says Tate Sherman, President of Kentucky Eagle. “As a local business ourselves, we take pride in supporting other local businesses. For new brewers, distillers and wineries, Kentucky Eagle provides a route to market so that consumers can try new products and enjoy the latest offerings. Additionally, we maintain the highest standards of products and ensure the quality of everything we deliver. When a recall occurs, we locate the product and pull it from shelves immediately.” Distribution professionals usually agree on many things — growing the beer, wine and spirits business, treating all suppliers with honesty, integrity and commitment, and ensuring only safe, fresh products reach consumers. But Kentucky Eagle goes further by exemplifying their people driven core values — teamwork, accountability, integrity and community — through their everyday work. “For us, this means supporting local business through partnerships, supporting our people through a positive work environment and supporting our community through service,” says Tate. She continues, “When local business is supported, those dollars stay local and generate more economic support and stability for our community. Thus making our cities, counties and state stronger. When a local beer, wine or spirit is purchased through a local retailer, that product was delivered by your local distributor, therefore impacting hundreds of local jobs just by one purchase! This is demonstrated best by one of our core values: community. To move forward, we have to give back”. Ann and Tate agree that Lexington is an amazing city in so many respects. Why? “Lexington harbors what most residents and visitors seek — sightseeing and entertainment, along with great places to work, attend college, see live sports and raise a family. When fun, family values, education and local businesses combine, Lexington can accomplish anything,” says Ann.

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THE SPEECH NETWORK PEDIATRIC FEEDING AND OROFACIAL MYOLOGY CLINIC 110 Dennis Dr. • 859.402.1553 TheSpeechNetwork.org The Speech Network was established in 2007 to assist adults and children with speech difficulties, swallowing, feeding and other orofacial challenges that impacted their overall quality of life. In 2009, Lexington opened our own Speech Network clinic, including the highly specialized Pediatric Feeding and Orofacial Myology Clinic, which serve more intensive challenges related to muscular complications of the mouth and face. Amanda Moore Chastain, MA, CCC-SLP, COM™ holds the distinction of being the only certified orofacial myologist in the state. Services provided by The Speech Network include occupational and speech therapy, nutritional support, lactation support, orofacial myofunctional programs and feeding programs. TSN Pediatric Feeding & Orofacial Myology Clinic focuses more specifically on advanced techniques: feeding challenges including difficulties with latch and transfer; transition to solids or transition to oral feeds from tube feeds; picky eating or selective diets; and structural differences like tongue, lip, and cheek ties that impact oral function for feeding at all ages. According to Amanda, improvement demands a multi-pronged lifestyle approach: “We focus on making systemic changes with our patients through preventative care including breathing patterns, posture, chewing, swallowing and speech sound interventions.” With great knowledge comes great responsibility. TSN Pediatric Feeding & Orofacial Myology Clinic sets high standards due to their specialized talent, said to be the most educated and experienced orofacial myologists in the Bluegrass. It has also been trusted locally as the most knowledgeable feeding clinic. The Speech Network also has the responsibility to support families and communities like Lexington’s. Amanda explained, “Supporting the community is a large part of what we feel we do by connecting families with resources and coordinated intervention from other professionals. Our community benefits from supporting each other, building strong relationships and expectations for excellence.” In Amanda’s opinion, Lexington has become a great city because of our caring, communal spirit. She explained, “We are large small town that truly care for each other. We are kind, generous, forward thinking, and supportive people!”

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LIQUOR BARN LiquorBarn.com Liquor Barn is Kentucky’s largest locally owned and operated retail chain of beer, spirits, wine and cigars. Liquor Barn currently operates 17 retail locations in Kentucky, including eight locations in Louisville, six locations in Lexington, as well as stores in Danville, Bowling Green and Elizabethtown. As Chairman and Managing Director of Blue Equity, LLC, Jonathan Blue was thrilled to acquire 15 Liquor Barn stores in November 2017 to consolidate their portfolios with two Party Mart stores in Louisville. He loves Lexington and the Liquor Barn commitment to happy customers. “Lexington is the heart of Big Blue Nation. It is a unique combination of Southern and Midwest cultures and traditions with a genuine group of people who love their community,” he says. Liquor Barn’s product selection is better than ever, and their already incredible shopping experience is now even more convenient. They recently launched a free Liquor Barn app and e-commerce component on their website. Customers of legal age can log onto their app or website and shop directly from their home, office or anywhere. Customers can place online orders for pickup at any Liquor Barn location. Even better? They now offer on-demand alcohol delivery in some Lexington areas! Most orders are delivered within an hour. “Our commitment to the customer experience sets us apart from competitors,” Jonathan explains. “Our goal is to ensure that each and every customer has the absolute best experience in our stores. Whether popping in for a quick purchase, stocking up on specials, participating in a tasting or event or stopping by for a routine visit, we pride ourselves on our commitment culture to provide the best service, selection and prices.” Jonathan understands how important it is to support local businesses. “Compared to national chain stores, locally owned businesses recycle a much larger share of their revenue back into the local economy, enriching the whole community and creating more jobs locally with better wages and benefits,” he says. “Locally owned businesses build strong communities by linking neighbors in economic and social relationships and contributing to local causes.”

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DESIGN LINK 2437 Fortune Dr. • 859.225.0310 • DesignLinkInteriors.us Design Link is a full-service commercial and residential design firm, co-owned by Nancy Elam and her niece, Jessica Cull. After Jessica graduated from UK with a BA in Interior Design, she and Nancy were approached by a friend and local architect Jerry Herndon, about forming a design firm. With Jerry’s experience as a commercial architect, Nancy’s years of residential design and Jessica’s work in commercial design, they make a powerful team. Their mutual passion for interior design has fueled their success: they have been running their business for 11 years now. The Design Link team consists of two additional degreed designers and a strong administrative staff. Samantha Willis is a junior designer who works on both commercial and residential projects. She graduated from Valdosta State University with a BFA in Interior Design. Ann-Alan Callahan, the newest team member, left the corporate world and the pre-law career track to pursue her passion for design; she obtained a BA in Interior Design at Western Kentucky University and now serves as one of the firm’s lead designers. Jessica and Ann-Alan also hold their NCIDQ and LEED AP certifications.

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Because Design Link specializes in both commercial and residential design, they are able to offer a unique service to their clients. They have accounts with hundreds of manufacturers to ensure the most competitive prices for their clients. They also refuse to pigeonhole themselves into one style. Jessica explains: “Many designers have a ‘signature’ style that is reflected in all of their projects. At Design Link, we pride ourselves on creating beautiful environments that are a reflection of the client’s style, not our own.” Some services Design Link provides include: client consultation, finish selections, interior architecture and space planning, renderings and CAD layouts, and the selection, procurement, and installation of furnishings, window treatments, lighting, and décor. They have partnered with local architects and contractors to create inspiring designs for many clients. Nancy says cooperation with other businesses in Lexington has furthered Design Link’s success. She says, “By partnering with other local businesses, we are not only able to support their success, but we are able to provide clients with quality work done by people that truly care. We genuinely love this place and the people in it.”

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SCOUT & MOLLY’S 120 Summit at Fritz Farm Ste. 140 859.309.9247 Lexington.ScoutAndMollys.com Scout & Molly’s is a high-end fashion boutique for women that sells clothing and accessories. Their Lexington location in the Summit, next to Cos Bar and Kendra Scott, has been welcoming fashion-forward women for over a year now. This franchise marks the 65th storefront location in the United States. It took two years for the Lexington location to come to fruition. After saving, drafting a business plan and signing the necessary paperwork, it would seem like owner Terri Stein was ready. But she couldn’t ignore the mantra that we hear from business advisors and realtors: “location, location, location.” When Terri heard about the Summit’s development on Nicholasville Road and Man o’ War, she knew she wouldn’t compromise. She held her ground and waited for what she felt was the right landing place for her future clientele. The two-year hiatus was over when she received occupancy rights last April, and the rush was on to style the boutique. It was all worth it when the boutique opened to its first customers. Scout & Molly’s excels within the local fashion market due to careful attention to which items truly make the cut. Each piece is handpicked by a team that curates specific pieces from fashion markets, bringing high fashion back home to Lexington. Stein calls these talented fashion curators her “advisory scouts.” She is looking for a few more to join the team! Terri enjoys serving the community because she feels as though she’s helping neighbors and friends. She says, “I was born and raised here and being a part of this town all my life, it is easy to see all the connections. It doesn’t take long to figure out around here that if you don’t know someone, the person sitting next to you probably does! We are super friendly and love a good time. I am so proud to be a born and raised Lexingtonian!”

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CRM COMPANIES 145 Rose St. • 859.225.3680 • crmco.com Craig Turner, founder and CEO of CRM Development Company, Inc, launched the corporation in 1997, laying down the foundational building blocks to revitalize the Bluegrass through simultaneous avenues of development, property and facility management, and establishment of unique restaurant and hotel franchises. Having been in business for over 21 years, CRM has established robust national and local relationships that have led to continuous growth and an exclusive array of clientele that have included Coors Brewing Company, Marriott and Hilton Hotels, Toyota Tsusho, AT&T, Johnson Controls, SmithKline Beecham, and many others. Some of CRM’s most notable recent investments include bringing MOD Pizza and Raising Cane’s, as well as the uniquely modern Aloft Hotels, to the Bluegrass and surrounding areas. Locally, in Lexington and Frankfort, CRM proudly developed the new Baptist Health building, the LEED efficient and architecturally unique buildings for the Commonwealth of Kentucky, and are in the process of developing the new Capital Plaza in Frankfort, all leading to a stronger Kentucky and a more vibrant place to work, spur growth, and attract talent to our cities. CRM currently employs over 825+ across its diverse portfolio and footprint. CRM is passionate about seeing Central Kentucky thrive through its developments, business management, and utilizing key talent and developing opportunities for people. Turner says: “Our goal is to provide employment opportunities in our community that will build our city’s economy, and drive economic growth regionally that creates civic pride and

makes it an even better place to call Home.” When asked what sets CRM Companies apart, Turner noted that “it’s our people, our hands on approach, and our commitment to give back to the community.” In his free time, Craig serves the city of Lexington and surrounding areas as Chairman of the Board at Eastern Kentucky University, his alma mater, and Chairman of the Lexington Center Corporation, which oversees Rupp Arena, the Convention Center and the Opera House. Together with his wife Madonna, who serves as Chair of the Bluegrass Community Foundation, are also the honorary chairs of the 2018 Fund for the Arts, for LexArts. Giving back is an underlying theme for both Turner and CRM. Turner believes we live in an environment that encourages entrepreneurship and business opportunities, and also believes that companies have a responsibility to give back to the community and those in need. CRM is deeply involved in community initiatives by contributing both their time and over $150k annually to aid numerous local charities including Habitat for Humanity, Fayette County Schools, Humane Society’s, Special Olympics, All God’s Children, CASA of Lexington, LexArts, Bluegrass Community Foundation, Foster Care Council, Lexington Police Foundation, and many others. The company also partners with UK and EKU, exceeding contributions of $100k annually. Turner says “CRM has many other projects on the horizon. As our portfolio grows, so should our commitment to the community. Our goal is to play a role and make a difference for others in the Bluegrass”.


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SKY ZONE 3644 Boston Rd. Ste. 130 • 859.629.4455 • skyzone.com/lexington In 2014 Chad & Chrissy Pannunzio took a chance and moved far away from family and friends to build Sky Zone Lexington. Sky Zone provides a physical form of entertainment for guests of all sizes and ages. Since opening in 2014, Sky Zone has built a strong reputation for all-inclusive birthday parties and has also been a popular destination for competitive dodgeball. Chad states, excitedly, “We built an amazing trampoline park, but we are not resting on that. We are planning on adding new innovative attractions this fall. Stay tuned!” When the Pannunzios said they custom built this facility for jumpers of all ages, they made sure there was something fun for every age group. Young professionals and adults will enjoy Sky Zone; there are competitive dodgeball leagues and a fun full-body fitness class called SkyFit. As Chad says, “We provide a clean and safe environment for Lexington to celebrate and have fun on our various attractions and physical challenges.” For the smallest members of the family, Toddler Time gives the little “tots” the whole place to themselves. The Pannunzios believe in supporting other small businesses because they know

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firsthand the grind and sacrifice it takes to keep a business moving. Business owners take financial risks to pursue a dream, and many have families to support. Without hesitation, they agreed what sets them apart from many other businesses in the area is their exceptional, customer-focused staff. Strong work ethic trickles down. “We pride ourselves in knowing there is no task too small or below us, and we always need to lead by example,” says Chad. Chrissy adds, “The young team members we employ are dynamic, intelligent and hard-working. We know that the experience that our team provides is what keeps our guests returning. We treat our team members like family and we push them hard to develop the necessary business and life skills that they can take with them throughout their lives.” The husband-wife team agrees that Lexington shines because of its family-first culture, exemplified by caring teachers, coaches, religious leaders and anyone that strives to have a positive impact on the community. They believe that Lexington’s leaders should take pride in their efforts toward our city’s youth for shaping future generations.

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LEXINGTON DINER 124 N. Upper St. • 859.303.7308 LexingtonDiner.com Karin West believes diners play a foundational role in a community. Lexington Diner, in the heart of downtown Lexington, is a quintessential family-friendly restaurant. It prides itself on being a gathering place that reflects the friendly vibe and diversity of its city. Lexington Diner, which opened more than four years ago, aims to combine perfected versions of comfort foods with surprising iterations featuring inspirations from diverse cuisines such as Thai, Mexican and others. The diner has received media attention by appearing on television shows like “Secrets of the Bluegrass Chef” and “Local Traveler.” They support local music through gems like Woodsongs and the Troubadour music series. Guests never know who they may see at the diner. Some of the most recent guests have been prominent names like Ron Perlman, Big Bad Voodoo Daddy, Al Snow and Alton Brown. Diner patrons usually don’t frequent diners for the sole purpose of experimenting with different flavor profiles, but Lexington Diner stands out. They do this through daily specials during the week. Karin says, “We like to play with food and give our guests a surprise. People feel comfortable trying new flavors here because we do it in a way that is approachable.” Lexington Diner is perhaps best known for its delicious, down-home breakfast. They now serve their famous breakfast all day and entertain many brunch-goers on weekends. Another acclaimed comfort food at the diner is the Kentucky Bourbon Burger, which won the 2015 Taste of the Bluegrass competition, among other awards. Karin says the diner’s secret to success is real food and real people. Made-from-scratch meals make all the difference, so that customers are literally getting a taste of Lexington. The diner still retains its family feel: the wait staff often can remember regular customers’ orders and recommend local tourist attractions and favorite destinations for out-of-town guests. “I think people like to know the faces behind the businesses they frequent,” Karin added.

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COMMUNITY TRUST AND INVESTMENT COMPANY 100 East Vine St. Ste. 501 • 859.389.5300 • ctbi.com/ctic Community Trust and Investment Company is headquartered in Lexington and holds outside locations in Versailles, Ashland and Pikeville. They provide investment services to families and businesses alike - operating on strong core values of stewardship, experience and insight. President and CEO, Andy Waters, firmly believes in their mission of “building communities, built on trust.” The company, which can trace its inception all the way back to 1903, is now one of the most prominent independent trust companies in Kentucky; their total assets, are now more than $2.6 billion. Despite the competitive nature of business, Waters says that losing an investment account to another local business is better than losing to a non-local competitor, because the client’s management fees will flow back into our local economy. However, he posits, “When a local organization hires an outsider to manage their money, Lexington loses.” Waters has lived here for nearly fifteen years with his wife and five children. Which is longer than anywhere else. They look forward to more memorable years in the Bluegrass.

ARCHITECTURAL KITCHENS & BATHS 345 Lafayette Ave. • 859.268.0800 • AKandB.com Architectural Kitchens & Baths, owned by Brent Richards, has been in business for 13 years. They are a design firm that provides kitchen and bath remodeling solutions with a unique focus on custom cabinetry. They’ve nicknamed their showroom on the corner of Lafayette and Euclid Avenue “the little yellow house of big ideas.” The experienced team at Architectural Kitchens & Baths has a special eye for the renovation process. As part of the overall architectural solution, they look at how the layout of the kitchen or bath affects and improves the surrounding spaces. Richards graduated with honors from UK’s School of Architecture and is a member of the American Institute of Architects. He works with a skilled team of designers at Architectural Kitchens & Baths: he believes that their combined architecture and design talent, as well as attention to detail and desire to serve customers, sets their business apart. Richards urges the community to empower small business right here in Lexington by spending our hard-earned money locally, thus strengthening our economy and the customer base for companies such as his.

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Community

PEPLUM 824 Euclid Ave. #103 • 859.269.0009 • PeplumLexington.com Peplum owners, Diane Henson and Lauren West, have enjoyed 18 months in business with their women’s boutique in Chevy Chase. West describes the Peplum style as feminine but not fussy, and always on-trend but not particularly trendy. The mother-daughter team curates pieces with a classic undertone to complement other clothing articles in the customer’s existing wardrobe. Because their mission is to have every customer leave the store feeling celebrated and confident, West has priced the high-quality clothing in Peplum with the average woman in mind. The store has a policy which only allows for items with a price tag under $150. The boutique handpicks each item with special care so customers can achieve multiple looks with just a few great pieces -- making the most of their Peplum purchases. The shop also sells accessories to enhance the clothing, from shoes to handbags and jewelry. West said supporting local businesses promotes a healthier local economy, especially in the clothing industry where so many consumers choose to shop

online. She also debunks a popular falsehood about local entrepreneurs: “I think there is a big misconception that business owners are all wealthy. The vast majority of small business owners have taken a huge risk to follow their passions and make a very modest living working long hours to operate their business. We’re all guilty of taking the easy route and ordering online, but I cannot tell you how impactful it is to spend your dollars locally instead. We are immensely grateful for each and every sale, and every customer who supports us. When you spend your dollars with a local business, you are making a difference in the lives of your neighbors and their families!” Lauren and Diane love working in Lexington because of the vast network of fellow entrepreneurs they have met within the city. West finds even more encouragement within the community of female business owners who work hard to make their dream companies come to life. She adds, “Since opening our store, we have been so impressed with all the other female business owners we have come into contact with. It is so empowering!”

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DRY ART SALON AND BLOW-DRY BAR 309 N. Ashland Ave. Ste. 160. • 859.303.5364 DryArtSalon.com Dry Art is a full-service salon and blow-dry bar located in the burgeoning Warehouse District of downtown Lexington and has been in business for five years. Owner Lindsay Bramel says that she takes pride in her place within the Warehouse District community because of the shared success of the hip, hard-working businesses operating there. As their name suggests, the salon views hair as an opportunity to create a stunning visual art — an art form that clients can show off at all times. Lindsay says, “Hair design is one of the most critical and criticized arts, always open for the world to see each and every day. It is not confined to a single exhibit, or the halls of a gallery, but is always on display. Hair designers paint, sculpt and design. Hair is their art, and we are the artists.” Dry Art specializes in various dry-and-wet-cutting techniques specific to the client’s individualized needs and hair type, as well as personalized color services, wedding and special event hair design, cosmetics applications, waxing and more. For clients that want to achieve that salon-fresh look, they also hold styling workshops for clients, so that they can learn how to recreate the salon’s hairstyles, such as beach waves and blowouts -- from the comfort of their own home. This empowers clients to look their best every day, armed with advanced professional techniques. Bramel believes that staff education also elevates the services and professionalism at Dry Art. Staying informed about current, and constantly changing, styles and trends, presents a challenge in a business rife with Instagram and Pinterest inspiration. Dry Art’s beautiful facility and inspired, knowledgeable staff also greatly enriches customer experience. “Aside from talent, the salon truly feels like home, and we want every guest to be a part of the family. We understand that life is hectic, and strive to offer our clients with the most relaxing, inviting, and positive experience that we possibly can,” Bramel adds. As a business owner, Bramel urges prospective clients across all industries to look to local talent first because supporting a local business also supports one the owner’s passion, talent and drive while inspiring other entrepreneurs in the community. She enjoys living and working in Lexington due to the abundance of art within its downtown and the unprecedented scenery in its surrounding areas. She also praises the culinary artwork of Lexington’s award-winning restaurant scene, which Bramel views as another art form to experience in this city.


Community

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THE WILDCAT GROUP 203 Big Run Rd. • 859.948.3553 • Wildcat-Group.com There isn’t much question as to what makes Raleigh Bruner’s blood run blue. Born and raised in Lexington, he takes great pride in his community and is a local businessman to the core. The University of Kentucky MBA graduate started his moving company with a Craigslist post and an old Ford Bronco. With hard work and determination, Wildcat Moving took off full force. “I didn’t have anyone telling me how to run a moving company. I hired clean-cut and responsible movers who were respectful to customers and I built my business based on common sense,” Raleigh said. After successfully launching the moving company, Raleigh sought to expand by starting new businesses that would complement Wildcat Moving. The Wildcat Group emerged offering services that provide a seamless moving experience from start to finish. The group currently consists of Wildcat Home Inspection, Wildcat Carpet Cleaning, Wildcat Clean Team, Wildcat Country Dog Retreat, Wildcat Moving, Ladycat Organizing and Wildcat Pressure Washing. The number one

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goal of each of the companies is to provide top-quality service. For example, Wildcat Moving has been the top ranked moving company in Kentucky on Angie’s List since 2012 (top 5% in the country) and retains an A+ rating from the Better Business Bureau. As his portfolio expands, Raleigh wants his workforce to grow with him and feel the impact of their contributions. This is the idea behind “the mover to manager to partner program” – the best and brightest employees get promoted and ultimately become partners in other territories with Raleigh providing guidance and acting as a silent partner for each new business. The Wildcat Group is proud of the reputation it has built in the community. Philanthropy and community service has been an important piece of the program, as well as building up the local economy through charitable efforts. Why Wildcat? “We’ve built our brand around providing the best service in Lexington,” said Raleigh.

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CARSON’S FOOD & DRINK 362 E. Main St. • 859.309.3039 CarsonsFoodandDrink.com Carson’s opened its “casual yet refined” downtown restaurant in 2016. They showcase a full-service restaurant and bar within their polished, yet welcoming atmosphere. Owner Mark Fichtner named his restaurant after his son, Carson, who he says embodies the principles he strives to emulate within the restaurant — kindness to others, a dedication to excellence and a penchant for hospitality. Carson’s specializes in new approaches to old favorite foods, Prohibition-era cocktails, handpicked wines and beers and an impressive selection of scotch and Kentucky bourbons. Carson’s serves lunch, dinner, brunch and happy hour, often accompanied by live jazz music. Mark says his secret to success lies in disregarding the efforts of competing restaurants and simply striving for the best possible work, every single day. His commitment to his customers shows in his personal attention to the small details that signify his values and love for customers. For example, within the foundation of the restaurant, lies Mark’s family Bible, with a dedication letter to Lexington and all restaurant patrons safely tucked within its pages. Similarly, they show their love for Lexington through their barn doors from Dixiana farm, their refurbished fencing from Sierra Farm, their murals painted by a local artist and the bourbon on their shelves. There is a story behind each mural inside the restaurant. Mark explains, “The Buffalo Trace mural was painted similarly to an old family portrait that hangs above the fireplace, with bright colors and countless hours of detail. The Woodford Reserve mural was made to look as if it had been painted years ago on the side of an old building, fading as the years pass. Finally, our mural of Stonestreet Thoroughbred Farm, featuring Rachel Alexandra, brings Kentucky and California together with Kendall Jackson and Stonestreet wines. We thank Mike Martinez, local artist, for his beautiful work.” Mark believes that by supporting local businesses, we can maintain a stronger economic base for a growing Commonwealth: “We keep our money in Kentucky which helps our economy. Supporting local business supports local employees.”

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CREATIVE KITCHEN AND BATH 1141 Industry Rd. • 859.255.6838 CreativeKitchenandBath.com Derrick Whitaker graduated from EKU with a Bachelor of Science degree in interior design. He has extensive experience in all areas of design but specializes in modernizing kitchen and bath spaces. As an employee owner of Creative Kitchen and Bath, Derrick is committed to ensuring his clients are ecstatic with the final results of their design project. Derrick enjoys creating and innovating with a business that is not only locally owned, but owned by its employees. He has worked with the sales and design teams since 1994 and considers them family. Other than the personal pride and responsibility that comes with ownership, Derrick believes that the store’s selection and expert staff give them a competitive edge for indoor and outdoor design consultation. He says, “Creative Kitchen and Bath has different ranges of products to fit all types of projects: we create beautiful kitchens and baths as well as other spaces with cabinetry needs including outdoor spaces.”

CREATIVE KITCHEN AND BATH 1141 Industry Rd. • 859.255.6838 CreativeKitchenandBath.com Debra Willett Hupman, CKD, CBD, ASID Allied has specialized in interior design for more than 35 years. She is proud to be part of an ESOP company that is owned by its employees. As one of the employee owners, Debra understands the importance of working alongside a dedicated team of experienced professionals. The design professionals at Creative Kitchen and Bath have degrees in interior design and decades of design experience, giving them an industry edge. Debra says this about her remarkable team: “We take a design project from start to finish. We start with the design concept and specify the products, cabinetry, countertops, tile and plumbing fixtures to the space. We also oversee the installation of those products in their home.” Debra says there is no better place to raise a family than in Lexington. She loves the vibrant college town surrounded by horse farms. She is keen on supporting local Lexington businesses and knows that online shopping poses one of the greatest threats to local businesses. “It is so important to keep that in mind when deciding on where to purchase items,” she says.

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PATIENT CHOICE ULTRASOUND AND THERMOGRAPHY 152 W. Tiverton Way, Ste. 120 • 859.554.7360 • PatientChoiceUltrasound.com Patient Choice Ultrasound and Thermography provides diagnostic services that combine both traditional and alternative health care without the high cost, lack of transparency and confusion often associated with insurance plans. Patient Choice’s ultrasound and thermography examinations include: adult echocardiology, general ultrasound, specific organ ultrasound, vascular, breast thermograms and more. Patient Choice just introduced a new service in July: home sleep study kits. All studies performed by Patient Choice are interpreted by qualified physicians in the specific fields of imaging. Kim founded her parent company, Ultrasound Consulting Services, which was introduced to Lexington in 1981 and still operates today. Ultrasound Consulting Services assists small hospitals, offices, and clinics in the Bluegrass by providing mobile ultrasound services. As the face of healthcare began to change, Kim began to explore the idea of a new way of doing business. She recognized that because many patients had such high deductibles, health care was often secondary to finances. “We offer complete transparency in our billing,” says Ms. Davis. Patient Choice is cash based, accepting HSA accounts. “We take Medicare as well, to ensure care for the elderly”. After her brother was diagnosed with cancer, her interest in non-traditional medicine grew. She was appalled at the shame and near ridicule that traditional medicine often implies towards alternative treatments. Thermography is a natural choice that paired well with ultrasound. Becky Chandler started Bluegrass Thermography in 2009 and specialized in a breast imaging option without compression or radiation. After discussing the benefits of combining practices, Kim and Becky agreed a merger felt like a natural fit. With Kim’s years of ultrasound experience and Becky’s advanced clinical thermography, they opened Patient Choice Ultrasound and Thermography on Tiverton Way. Their story is founded on an unwavering desire to care for the patient, with new equipment, a nationally accredited staff and reduced cost/cash-basis payments. Kim adds: “I felt it was incredibly important to open PCU to serve the many people that are forced to make a decision between their health care and their finances.”

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COUNTER CULTURE 944 National Ave. • 859.246.0007 • CounterCulturePlus.com Counter Culture, the most award-winning fabricator and installer of countertops in Lexington, has been operating for 12 years. Ellen and Irv Trachtenberg, GJ Gerard’s parents, founded the company in 2006. GJ used his sales acumen to assist the family business, and after five years of industry experience, his stepfather’s illness pushed him into a leadership role. His success led him eventual ownership, and in early 2018, GJ and his wife, Jena, officially became presidents. They owe their early success to a priority shift -- from production metrics to fantastic customer service. GJ adds, “We are big enough and systematically sound enough for intense production volumes but will always be small enough to truly help each client individually and thoughtfully.” With that customer-first mentality, GJ’s influence at Counter Culture quickly began to get noticed: by 2014, they had accumulated many awards for quality and service. Jena’s business management experience and merchandising education recently inspired a rebranding process for the company, resulting in a newly designed showroom, exterior renovation, website and an updated logo. According to Jena, “We have worked hard to reinvest in our brand to be able to offer the best looking, most resourceful showroom in Lexington.” GJ adds, “What sets us apart from others is our seasoned identity as Lexington’s only boutique experience in surfaces. We structured our business with an intent to out-perform every other business in our market. However, our resounding strength from sales to installation is our people and the level of expertise we can provide. Constantly delivering an experience that feels uniquely personal and well-executed is how you truly thank a client for their business.” The Gerards support local businesses just like theirs. Why? GJ says, “Our experience has shown that honesty, quality and passion keep clients shopping local. I think the kind of people working to incorporate those virtues into the personal experience are found at small, local businesses. Those are the people I enjoy working with, and that’s why my family shops local when possible.” Although the Gerards have had the opportunity to see much of the world, their hometown still inspires them as they impart the “boutique” charm of Lexington to Counter Culture. Jena says, “I think this city’s gift is its ability to maintain the harmony of ‘developed but personal’ more so than anywhere else I have been. Lexington is like Kentucky’s boutique city; maybe that’s why Counter Culture is such a great fit.”

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HOUSE 1148 Industry Rd. • 859.523.3933 • housebyjsd.com Opening their doors in March of 2010, House owners Jeremy, stuart and Dwayne have worked hard to provide design services that turn their clients’ houses into homes. Having recently moved locations to Industry Rd., “The Boys” offer design and remodeling packages as well as home accents such as lamps, wall decor and floral arrangements. The aptly named House owners value family and are pleased to extend their warmth and generosity to clients. Products and services are priced with affordability in mind, making the store a go-to option for Lexingtonians. Comfort, laughter and good design form the cornerstones of House, and The Boys can all remember times when customers have called House a “happy place” for them. Jeremy, stuart and Dwayne encourage locals to keep business flowing in Lexington because they’ve witnessed the harsh realities of corporate mergers and acquisitions. As Jeremy says, “All three of us are from small towns, and have witnessed locally owned businesses go out of business and corporations take over. With that, we’ve seen the communities change. The truth is that money spent with local business, STAYS in the community and doesn’t go to a corporate office somewhere else.” He also says that smaller businesses can empathize and act accordingly when presented with a client need because they are customers themselves. House’s owners site Lexington’s diversity, inclusivity and desire to improve as reasons to love our little big city. They believe that while Lexington has plenty room for improvement, it has enough enthusiasm to make the necessary changes. Jeremy adds, “We feel that the overall sense of the community is that we are open and want to make this community better for all. We consider it a ‘small batch’ city. It’s a small enough big city, that you can be part of the community and can see and feel the changes you make.”

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STONE SOURCE 101 Dewey Dr. • Nicholasville 859.881.0606 • StoneSourceKy.com Joel and Melissa Hawley have owned and operated Stone Source KY for two years. They provide countertop fabrication services for homeowners, businesses, cabinet makers, remodelers and more. They own the largest in-stock showroom in Kentucky, with more than 300 stone colors available for customer selection. More importantly, they offer a boutique experience, with beautiful, stunning displays in their showroom and friendly, experienced service that guides customers through every step of the way. “We pride ourselves on offering the highest level of quality and service available. No job is too big or too small for the professionals at Stone Source KY. We pledge to make your project important, no matter what size,” Melissa explains. “We know our customers have many choices in the marketplace and that is why we take the extra step to make a lasting impression on every job.” For a streamlined process from start to finish, they have design experts and installation professionals on staff who love working with customers. Their knowledgeable staff understands which materials work the best for each unique need, and they can make recommendations that will be both beautiful and longlasting. They have invested heavily in the most modern and efficient stone fabrication technologies so that jobs are finished efficiently while meeting exact customer specifications. Many other companies hand-cut their stone, but Stone Source KY utilizes Italian machine manufacturer OMAG with laser precision, ensuring that every edge is perfect and uniform. One of the materials they’re particularly excited to offer is Neolith 12cm porcelain slab for countertops. This incredible material is set with mitered edges and a gorgeous solid face. Now utilized induction cooktops, this counter offers the possibility of a seamless look. The Hawleys are committed to providing measurable results for their customers’ projects. As Joel states, “Our staff is always eager to assist you whether it’s a basic request or a very unique one. We realize your order is important to you and we are committed to providing solid solutions to meet your expectations.”

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CORMAN & ASSOCIATES 881 Floyd Dr. • 859.233.0544 • Cormans.com Dan Corman started Cormans in 1947 as a window trimming and decorating service for Lexington’s stores and homes. Seventy-one years later, Cormans manufactures wood products for customers across the country and around the world. Recently, Gates Corman graduated from UK and began working with his father and current owner Ted, making Gates the third generation to work for the family business. The Corman roots still run deep in Lexington as they have grown alongside the city for more than seven decades. Central Kentucky offers a wealth of resources for a small business from talented employees, great supply networks and loyal customers. Geographically, Lexington is also positioned perfectly to market locally produced goods and services on a national scale. Though their primary product is cabinets, Gates says that’s only a small part of what they produce: “We offer such a wide variety of woodworking and display products. Whether the Visitor Center at Buffalo Trace Distillery, the 4-H Cloverville exhibit at the Kentucky State Fair or Chuck E Cheese restaurants — our versatility, mixed with our staff of experienced craftsmen and designers, sets us apart from our competition.”

KENTUCKY FOOT PROFESSIONALS 2659 Regency Rd. Ste. #110 859.278.7313 • KyFootPros.net Dr. Chris Bryant, D.P.M., is the business owner and podiatric surgeon at Kentucky Foot Professionals. Dr. Bryant has owned and operated the business while practicing medicine for 18 years. He provides general foot and ankle care as well as MLS laser therapy for foot and ankle pain, specialty treatment for ingrowns, and offers the Aqua Roll, an alternative medicine treatment that increases circulation, improves pain and helps patients recover from surgery. Kentucky Foot Professionals prides itself on being the only podiatry office in Lexington offering Aqua Roll. Dr. Bryant also sells speciality shoes, including VIONIC footwear, for various foot and ankle support needs. Dr. Bryant says his practice excels because of its modern innovations and technology within a warm environment. He believes listening to patients’ complaints helps him find the most helpful treatment path. Dr. Bryant is proud to be part of a community that has created a vibrant culture that celebrates food, horses, bourbon and the uniqueness of its own people.

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Community

ARTHUR MURRAY LEXINGTON 1801 Alexandria Dr. #132 • 859.278.7711 LexingtonArthurMurray.com Hunter Lisle loves helping people feel like world-class dancing stars. As a volunteer worldwide ambassador for Arthur Murray International and owner of Arthur Murray Lexington, he’s letting people all over the globe know that: “Anyone can learn to dance!” Hunter grew up with a love of dancing. “My family has always been supportive of all my creative endeavors, from doing magic at a young age, to dancing, teaching, competing, judging and participating in all aspects of the dance industry,” he explained. Growing up in Lexington–going to Sayre School and then UK–it was always one of Hunter’s goals to come back to Kentucky and give to the community where it all began. When he opened the studio, his mission of “changing lives, one step at a time” became a reality. Arthur Murray Lexington is celebrating eighteen incredible years. One of the largest Arthur Murray Studios in existence, their staff includes four of the top five instructors in the world. Hunter was even asked to be at the premiere of this year’s Dancing with the Stars and has helped with choreography for the show. Hunter believes that today is the best occasion there is to learn to dance! Athur Murray offers classes in all types of dance–social, ballroom, Latin and even competitive dancing–for individuals, couples or groups. “As a single person, when you take dance lessons, you get to meet new people, and as a couple, you get to spend quality time together,” Hunter explained. “That is so rare in today’s world!” Many engaged couples seek out dancing lessons in preparation for their big day. Arthur Murray Lexington is one of the leading wedding choreographers in the nation for truly special first dances. They offer private lessons that help couples feel confident and supported, every step of the way. “Many people miss out on the fun of dancing and socializing simply because they have never been taught to do it well,” Hunter said. “We want you to discover how the Arthur Murray Dance Studios can help make your life more enjoyable and interesting by making more friends and becoming a better dance partner!” photo by Kristin Posner Photography

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CARL MEYERS 111 Clay Ave. • 859.252.2004 CarlMeyers.com Sherri Mosley and her husband, Neil, are proud owners of Carl Meyers luxury women’s clothing boutique, situated on the charming shopping block of Clay Ave. The store offers designer apparel, including special occasion, outerwear, sportswear and accessories, as well as every day basics. Sherri attributes the store’s excellence to the fact that they offer unparalleled customer service. They are one of a few local stores that offer personal styling and can custom order a wide variety of styles and sizes. The legacy and support built by the store’s namesake, Carl Meyers, is still apparent today. They welcome the same clients that have supported the store for decades as well as new shoppers who are looking for an enjoyable shopping experience. Carl Meyers has an experienced stylist that has an eye for quality fabrics, timeless design and relevant style that help contribute to the Carl Meyers experience. Working alongside Sherri is Lily Hansen, who began her career as an executive clothing buyer under Carl Meyers. Four years of training under him taught her the intricacies of quality fabrics and workmanship and how to dress every woman for success and confidence. As Lily explains, “I believe all women of every age and body type deserve to feel beautiful when they get dressed, no matter what the occasion.” Sherri says this about Lily: “Her passion for our clients is evident and contagious.” Sherri believes that local stores revitalize downtown and contribute to the community. Even with so much clothing available online and in big-box retail stores, female shoppers struggle to find clothing items that meet all their needs. At Carl Meyers, however, they make shopping pleasurable by delivering customer service and personal styling, whether the client needs the best-fitting jeans or the most flattering formal wear.

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BLUEGRASS MOVING CONCIERGE BethAnn@BluegrassMC.com 859.948.6124 • BluegrassMovingConcierge.com For nearly three years, Bluegrass Moving Concierge (new name, same service) has succeeded because of their mission, which prompts their staff to treat every new job as a friend, and every service to a client as a mutual gift for the company and the client. They take pride in supporting clients through one of the most unpleasant experiences of their lives — moving, a time that causes what owner Beth Ann Haydon calls RSS, or relocation stress syndrome. She adds, “Helping serve during a very difficult time in a family’s life is the foundation of why we developed our services for Bluegrass Moving Concierge.” With an attention to concierge service, they not only do the packing, unpacking and coordinating that moving entails; they offer unexpected value-adds like upsizing, downsizing, rightsizing, cleaning and so much more. For those unfamiliar with concierge moving, move managers do as much or as little as you like, from a quick consultation to a complete transition — starting with decluttering and ending with design. Beth Ann Haydon has held a variety of jobs that all tie into her expertise at Bluegrass Moving Concierge. The business management graduate of University of Tennessee at Knoxville has sold and managed online auctions, designed and planned events and served as a licensed female contractor for 20+ years. More importantly, her experience of moving her elderly parents into assisted living and moving her family around Tennessee and Kentucky validated her need to start a company with an emphasis on empathy and service. “We provide compassion and the management necessary to make a smooth transition for our clients. We know we have achieved our goal when we receive a hug and a referral,” she says. Though Beth Ann lived and worked in Tennessee for a while, she enjoys living in Lexington and owning her business here. She cites venues in and around our city — specifically, Keeneland, rural horse farms and our historic downtown — as reasons our city ranks high for tourism and sightseers. She also added TOPS Magazine to her list of reasons to love Lexington. (Thanks, Beth Ann!)

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LONGSHIP 1051 Newtown Pike Ste. 160 855.440.2828 • Longship.us Longship, a third party logistics company specializing in fresh, frozen and dry good shipments, has been operating since 2012. Owners KR Schomp and Will Holton agree that their main priority for their customers and carriers is seamless, punctual operation. Though they started shipping across the country from one double-wide trailer, they have amassed a large, diverse clientele and continue to develop their business. Through hard work and common sense, Longship has developed into a trustworthy transportation source for carriers and shippers throughout the United States, Canada and Mexico. Holton says this about their growth: “We cut our teeth on some of the toughest goods to ship, and we excelled! We can handle anything. We now have 300,000 trucks at our disposable. We move 20,000+ loads annually.” They excel due to their on-call, 24/7, 365-day shipment service. Schomp and Holton’s Crew Members inspire them because of their commitment to providing superior service for each customer. They take pride in employing upstanding individuals, many of which are native to the Lexington area, and seeing them flourish at Longship. Besides running an outstanding crew, Longship further enhances the customer experience by using state-ofthe-art technology, such as Beacon, an on-request GPS system that shows clients shipping progress for timesensitive orders. They incur no additional charge to use this service, which proves their transparency and efficiency when handling customer freight. They love Lexington because they consider it is a hotbed of rising corporate and entrepreneurial talent. Schomp adds, “The colleges and universities within this city play an important role by flowing educated people into the job market, which aids in making local businesses that much stronger. At Longship, we appreciate a healthy work-life balance, and Lexington provides a harmonious culture for our current and future employees to achieve this balance. What makes Lexington great is the people, and we look forward to what is in store for this diverse city as we continue to hire talented sales individuals Lexington and the surrounding counties have to offer!” Because of their success, they hope to see what other local enterprises bring to the area. “Local businesses are a direct reflection of entrepreneurship and hard work; two things we value highly here at Longship,” says Schomp.

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TRADITIONAL BANK business@traditionalbank.com • 859.225.7777 • TraditionalBank.com Traditional Bank has been serving central Kentucky since 1902, and their Client Services & Business Development team think that gives them an edge. Featured here are Jordan Parker, Chris Chaffin, Nicole Ware and Benjamin Coates. All four of them live in Lexington and regularly serve on local non-profits as volunteers and board members. “We have a long history of successfully serving bluegrass businesses,” said Jordan Parker, assistant vice president client relationships. Traditional Bank concentrates its expertise in loan and deposit solutions with an emphasis on helping business owners grow, sustain and transition their commercial ventures. Having deep roots in community banking does not mean that the organization has an aversion to change. “As an independent, privately-held organization, we have the flexibility to focus on individual client needs,” said Chris Chaffin vice president private client services. CEO Bill Alverson encourages sharing new ideas and leads an open-door policy for communication among employees. Management continues to invest in modern technology and new delivery channels; exploring creative ways to better serve their growing client base.

The Business Development & Client Services Team consists of a wonderful mix of banking experience, expertise and interests. Because Traditional Bank is locally owned, the employees are reminded that their business is all about real people not just numbers. They rely on each other to guide prospective and current clients in the direction that best fits their individual needs. The more each employee knows about the people who they do business with, and the more local businesses support each other, the stronger our communities become. When asked about what makes Lexington special, they all agreed that numbers don’t lie. Lexington was recently rated 21st on US News and World Report’s “Best Places to Live”, 12th on Nerdwallet’s “Best Cities to Live In” and 4th on Wallethub’s “Best-Run City in the Nation.” “We have something special going on, and the world is starting to notice,” says Chris. The team at Traditional Bank has witnessed Lexington’s robust growth and looks forward to seeing our city impact industry, art, technology and tourism. Jordan adds, “We think our city is going to continue getting better and better each year, and we’re excited to be part of it all.”

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ERENA & PETERSON, PLLC 620 Perimeter Dr. Ste. 100 • 859.268.4423 ErenaPeterson.com Native Lexingtonian, Dr. Gregory Erena opened his oral surgery practice nearly 35 years ago with a desire to provide exceptional surgical care in a comfortable and professional environment. Dr. Erena’s partners and fellow UK alums, Dr. Gilman Peterson and Dr. Michael Sexton, embrace that same philosophy of care as they serve patients across the Bluegrass with wisdom teeth extraction, dental implants and bone grafting procedures. In addition to practicing oral surgery, Drs. Erena, Peterson and Sexton are active in their local churches and their children’s schools. They also partner with Lexington non-profit organizations to provide oral surgical care to patients in need. Dr. Sexton explained, “Investing in the people of our community is important to us.” Dr. Peterson added, “We are fortunate to be part of a strong local community that values quality service, personal care, and professional integrity. When former patients bring their own children to our office for care or refer a friend or coworker, it is the greatest compliment our practice can receive.”

FARMER’S JEWELRY 821 Euclid Ave. • 859.266.6241 • FarmersJewelry.com Bill Farmer Sr. opened the doors of Farmer’s Jewelry in 1950. His legacy and vision of a full-service jewelry store is carried on today by his wife, Jean, son Bill and daughter Kristi. Farmer’s Jewelry specializes in unique pieces from engagement rings, birthday and anniversary gifts, custom pieces as well as jewelry repair and restoration. Farmer’s Jewelry has excelled over the years in part due to their deep community engagement, providing the family a better understanding of what shoppers value. Establishing long lasting relationships with their clients is important because it promotes return shoppers who desire jewelry for major life milestones. The Farmer family states, “Besides the benefits of economic investment, local businesses are a representation of Lexington’s voice. In supporting local business, you provide the opportunity to support what we value in our hometown.” Lexingtonians value a unique, vibrant culture that isn’t afraid of change. The Farmer family values Lexington as a city of “both the past and the future,” a concept that they can also relate to their successful, multi-generational business.

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EVERYBODYFIGHTS KENTUCKY 124 Malabu Dr. • 859.469.8152 everybodyfights.com/locations/kentucky Matt Veigl wants to change your idea of the gym from a place you dread going every day to a fun, communal way for Lexington to get healthier together. EverybodyFights was started in Boston by George Foreman III in 2013 and quickly rose to become one of America’s top-rated gyms. Matt joined the team recently to open the first EverybodyFights franchise in Lexington. Matt has trained in Kentucky and Tennessee for 18 years and worked with a wide variety of clients at every part of the fitness spectrum. Though he is a professional trainer, Matt understands that everyone has to start with small steps on their fitness journey — his unique gym has something for everyone and invites people of all skill levels to learn. EverybodyFights has 16 different class types of classes including, circuit training (TRAIN), heavy bag (BAGS), treadmill and endurance (ROAD), boxing technique (FIGHT) and yoga and recovery classes (FLOW) in addition to an Open Gym for members to get their own workout in at any point during the day. Matt explains the name of the gym: “We recognize that everybody fights every single day for something; we are here to support every individual’s fight as a community.” When asked what sets EverybodyFights apart, he said the difference lies in customer experience. Even if workouts produce results, if people aren’t enjoying their workout, they’re not likely to come back. He believes a positive association with exercise and healthy habits promote sustained wellness, and he’s made it his mission to build friendship, trust and fun into EverybodyFights’ training programs. Matt enjoys operating a business in Lexington because, as he says: “Lexington is a great place because you have a little bit of everything here: large business, small business, city life, rural life. It’s centrally located to a lot of other awesome places. It’s affordable and the people are amazing. People are always willing to help and work to make you the best you can be.” He urges people in Lexington to support small, local businesses because he believes this support mutually benefits the clients and companies. Besides, he adds, “Usually there is a little more love, care and passion put into local services and products, and who doesn’t want that?”

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HAMBURG VISION CENTER 2716 Old Rosebud Rd, #130 • 859.327.3701 HamburgVisionCenter.com Hamburg Vision Center (“HVC”) is a Hamburg-based, full-service optometric practice providing comprehensive eye care. This small, local, eye care gem is owned and operated by Karen Santos McCloud, O.D. HVC’s optical boutique is stocked with the latest trends in eyewear. Dr. Santos has an unparalleled knowledge of contact lens and lens technology which allows her to satisfy the diverse needs of her patients. The utilization of the latest diagnostic equipment and testing allows HVC to continually exceed patient expectations. Dr. Santos has been in business for seven years and juggles the practice of optometry and managing the business side of HVC. Dr. Santos started her career working in a large, multi-office, practice, where she was dissatisfied with the impersonal patient interactions. As a result, Dr. Santos decided to pursue a small, intimate practice, akin to her father’s practice in Toronto. When asked about why she enjoys working in Lexington, she responded: “Where do I start? I love the people, diversity, sense of community, and beauty; not to mention, the small-town feel with big city activities.”

MR. BREW’S TAPHOUSE 220 Ruccio Way Ste. 110 • 859.219.1931 MrBrewsTaphouse.com Nathan Canavera is proud to be the owner of a family-friendly pub that’s bringing something a little special to Lexington. “We’re a family-owned, craft beer focused restaurant on the south side of Lexington that offers all the great beer of downtown without having to drive and park. It’s important to us to be family-friendly because this is for our family,” he explained. “With us, you can try a taste from all the local and regional breweries without leaving your own neighborhood!” They have a rotating draft craft beer menu, and even host weekly beer events with local and regional breweries. They also dish up delicious food, including tasty burgers and fresh cut fries or chips. “Seeing the families and friends who come in week after week made me realize that we’re more than a business: we’re a part of the community,” Nathan said. “You get to see the people firsthand who support you and in turn need your support!”

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SPONSORED CONTENT


MARKET ON NATIONAL 730 National Ave. • 859.327.3876 MarketonNational.com Market on National, owned by Clare Henson, is a local furniture and home decor boutique, located on National Ave. Celebrating its 3 year anniversary, Market on National has a full inventory of name-brand items at affordable prices and a friendly, expert staff prepared to assist with home decorating needs. With a wide selection of home items from furniture to lamps to wall art, as well as highly personalized design consultations, Clare believes everyone deserves a space that reflects their own personality. Clare and her team give free service consultations to new clients to find the customized solution that works best with their home; color consultations and quick fix programs are two popular services among their customers. For clients that like to do most of their own decorating but prefer not to do the grunt work of measuring specifications, they also have a comprehensive floor plan service. Clare understands that complementing all the pieces within one space requires hard work and attention to detail, but her team works with customers until they find the best fit. She says, “Our work isn’t just about offering any furniture into your home, it’s about providing the best for you. We truly believe beautiful things are created when people share ideas, interests, and everything they love.” Seeing other small businesses succeed in Lexington makes Clare feel as though she’s part of a like-minded community that cares about customer outcome. She hopes that Lexington will turn to local businesses, like Market on National, before consulting national chain stores: “We know taking on a design project can be overwhelming and confusing. We believe practicing locally provides you with the best service around. We do all space planning in house, source from all of our manufacturers, and even are there to deliver your customized furniture. From beginning to end, we want to take the stress away from you.”

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Community

CONRHOD ZONIO PHOTOGRAPHY & LIGHT LIFE LOVE 859.299.6550 ConrhodZonio.com LightLifeLovePhotography.com “We get to be an integral part of stopping time, capturing history and allowing the amazing people that we get to work with to leave a legacy of their love behind,” owner Conrhod, a graduate of Asbury and UK, explained. As a photographer, Conrhod loves to connect with people. His focus is on photographing weddings. “We tell our couples that we love love, and that we’re all in it with them to capture the beauty within the story of their love.” For Conrhod, the business rose out of his passion for photography. As demand increased for his work, his wife, Leslee, took on the role of family/lifestyle photographer with Light Life Love. In addition to photographing portraits and families, she shoots along side Conrhod on wedding days. “We love it when our clients know how beautiful they are, and they are so comfortable in their own skin around us to let us fully capture who they are,” Leslee said. While school brought Conrhod to Lexington and marriage brought Leslee, they now love calling Central Kentucky home with their two daughters. “What has kept us here is the emerging grassroots culture of restaurants, small businesses and cultural arts activities. It is a wonderful place to raise a family,” Leslee explained.

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LIFESTYLE

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Fitness Forum: Local Walking Trails

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Wow Wedding: Katey + Noah

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OutďŹ t of the Month: Think Pink

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Getting Gor-Jess: Coral Crush

Weddings Unveiled: Kentucky Proud Weddings


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by: Emmaline Potter Kentucky Horse Park A classic Lexington attraction you don’t want to miss, the Kentucky Horse park showcases scenic horse country at its finest. Walk the grounds, or even ride horseback, for a history lesson on one of Kentucky’s finest industries. 4089 Iron Works Parkway | Lexington, KY 40511

The Arboretum State Botanical Garden of Kentucky You can find this 100-acre oasis right in the heart of Lexington on the University of Kentucky campus, where a 2 mile paved loop takes you on a “walk across Kentucky” that highlights native plants from different regions of the state. 500 Alumni Drive | Lexington, KY 40503

Legacy Trail Get a taste of the urban city and rural countryside that Lexington has to offer on this 12 mile interpretive trail that runs all the way from downtown to the Kentucky Horse Park. Also acting as an art venue, you can travel through different historic sites and parks while enjoying artwork from local artists. 318 West Loudon Avenue | Lexington, KY 40508

Hisle Farm Park Walk along the rolling pastures at Hisle Farm Park on their 1 mile or 2.5 mile trail. Don’t forget to enjoy their unique archery range equipped with two permanent targets and bows and arrows. Horses and pets welcome!

Lexington has miles upon miles of little-known walking trails hidden all around town, and with the fall season suddenly right around the corner, the temperature could not be any more permitting of an afternoon stroll in one of these scenic locations.

Raven Run Nature Sanctuary Bordering on the Kentucky River, Raven Run shows off 734 acres of Bluegrass beauty. Take their 10 mile trail passing through meadows, woodlands and streams for chance at sighting local wildlife or historic remnants from 19th century settlers. 3885 Raven Run Way | Lexington, KY 40515

Jacobson Park Right off of Richmond Road, this expansive park offers everything from walking trails to fishing and kayaking. Man’s best friend is also welcome to come along, as the park has plenty of open space and an eight acre dog park. 469 Parkway Dr. | Lexington, KY 40504

McConnell Springs Rich in history, this hidden gem is the perfect getaway when you’re looking for a quick break from the hustle and bustle of the city. This 26 acre plot of lush terrain features 2 miles of trails, a 250 year old oak tree, natural springs and a historic farm site. 416 Rebmann Lane | Lexington, KY 40504

3551 Briar Hill Road | Lexington, KY 40516

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in style!

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f

or our ‘What Makes Lexington Great’ issue we’re taking our Outfit of the Month for a local spin.

Cruise into August with this easy, breezy dress by Fifteen Twenty from Scout & Molly’s. This stylish piece features threequarter sleeves with tie cuffs, satin back crepe and a v-neck. For a little sparkle we added a shimmery, jeweled necklace by Southern Belle Glitz with pink and coral drop tassels, also available at Scout & Molly’s. Keeping our shoes understated, we chose a staple heel that every gal needs in her closet. Versatility reigns with the Stuart Weitzman minimalist Nudist sandals. This stylish pair offers a padded insole for comfort, adjustable ankle strap and a ¾-inch stiletto heel. We wanted our bag to be just as fresh and summery as the rest of our look, and this unique wooden clutch from The Prissy Peach is pure perfection. Medium in size and a real eye-catcher, this bag makes for the perfect conversation starter. We finished off our sweet and sassy ensemble with a pair of rose tinted Freyrs sunglasses and a cruelty free, candy hued lip courtesy of Glo Skin Beauty (Hourglass Lash & Skin Bar). Whether you’re having a tasty dinner downtown or catching a show at the Lexington Opera House, in this look you will be ‘Pretty In Pink’ anywhere you go.

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Lifestyle

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ummer is the perfect time to get playful with your makeup. By simply enhancing your usual color scheme you can look and feel like a brand new person. One of our favorite summer shades when it comes to cosmetics is coral. The pinky-red meets orange shade can be flattering on all skintones by simply changing up the level of it’s intensity. For this month’s beauty look we’ve put together a beautiful coral infused product list that will have you feeling like a summer goddess. Combine your coral lips and poppin’ flushed cheeks with warm bronzed skin, copper dusted eyelids and an unexpected flick of electric blue liner to take your summertime makeup to the next level. Head over to Cos Bar at The Summit at Fritz Farm to build your very own ‘Coral Crush’ look. 1

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6 | S I S LE Y- PARI S Phyt o B l ush Tw i st i n ‘ Pa paya’ 7 | B OB B I B ROWN E ye S hado w Tri o i n ‘ B e ach’ 8 | Y V E S S AI N T LAU R ENT Eye l i ne r E f fe t Faux C i l s S hock in g in ‘Maj ore l l e B l ue ’ 9 | Tom Ford Lip C olor i n ‘ Tr ue C o ral ’


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Lifestyle

B Y S A R A H B O E R K I RC H E R

Noah and Katey Keeton met while playing collegiate basketball at Northwood University in West Palm Beach, Fla. Noah was born and raised in Kentucky, and moved back after completing his undergraduate degree at Northwood University. In 2014, Katey moved to Kentucky and says she can’t imagine living anywhere else. The couple married on June 24, 2017 at Spring Valley Golf Club, which was the first venue they looked at and both loved from the start. “We figured we should probably look at other venues to be sure before picking the first one we visited, but after touring several others, none of them stood out to us or fit the mold of what we were envisioning more than Spring Valley Golf Club,” Katey said. “Between the beautiful rustic look of the clubhouse and the well kept landscaping of the lawn area, it was the perfect location for our special day.” It was important to Katey that the wedding decor was simple, but elegant with some natural and personal touches, including a cross that Katey’s dad made from old barn wood. Succulents were used throughout the centerpieces, as well as in the flower bouquets and boutonnieres. Katey’s bouquet was wrapped with a piece of lace from her mom’s wedding dress.

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Some of the moments from their wedding day that stood out to Noah and Katey were their first dance as a married couple, the father/daughter dance and being able to enjoy the presence of all of their family and friends being in one place celebrating their marriage. “This was the first time that we were able to have our immediate families, extended families and friends in the same building, let alone in the same state, so having them there was so special to us,” said Noah. While Noah and Katey agree that they wouldn’t change a thing about their wedding day, the weather leading up to their wedding day was reason for concern.

“We had so much rain in Lexington that there were news articles about people being stuck in their vehicles due to high water,” Katey said. “We had the rehearsal at the venue the night before and as we pulled in, there were ducks swimming in what appeared to be a pond, but it wasn’t, right where the ceremony was going to happen in less than 24 hours. Luckily, all the rain subsided by our wedding day. Thanks to the remarkable draining system at Spring Valley Golf Club, there wasn’t any standing water for our ceremony the next day.” If the Keetons could offer any advice to couples planning a wedding, they recommend not stressing about every little detail. “Everything will turn out just as you want it to,” Katey said. “And if for some reason it doesn’t, it gives you something to look back on and laugh at years down the road.”

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PHOTOG R A PH E R Taylor Yaste Photography CER EMO NY + R ECEPT I O N V ENUE Spring Valley Golf Club C ATE R I N G Dottie’s Catering FLOW ER S Carey Stevens CAKE/D ESSERT S Carey Stevens B R I DAL GOW N Lillian West, Anya Bridal | Atlanta, GA BR I DAL PART Y Lulus GRO O M/GRO O MSMEN Geno’s For mal Affair H A I R Tracey Pittman MAKEUP Misty Fields R ENTAL S/D ECO R Events with Design I N V I TATI O NS VistaPrint PL ACE CAR D S Cross Vine Designs

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Lifestyle

Embracing Far m-to-Aisle by Emmaline Potter

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entucky residents are notorious for keeping it local, and our loyalty is especially evident with the growing number of Kentucky Proud weddings that have taken place over the last few years. To honor devoted residents and further support local agriculture, Kentucky Proud recently held a contest where couples showed off their Kentucky Proud weddings for a chance to win $5000. To enter, contestants simply had to share a photo from their wedding showcasing a local farm on their social accounts, using the hashtag #KYProudWeddings and tag the agritourism venue or farm featured. Entries included weddings hosted at nearly 100 different venues ranging from local farms and wineries to botanical gardens and distilleries. But the Kentucky pride didn’t stop there. Almost every element of these weddings was celebratory of the great state of Kentucky, with menus featuring local chefs and produce, centerpieces and decor made from native flowers and greenery, and plenty of bourbon to go around. A second contest will be held this fall. Head to ketuckyproud.com/weddings for information on how to enter.

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Life + Style

M A K E YO U R W E D D I N G K E N T U C K Y P RO U D

VENUE: The agritourism venues truly set the scene for these Kentucky weddings that feature our local agriculture. “The deep history and the beautiful surroundings make Kentucky a perfect backdrop,” said Eric Stodghill of Sterling Planning and Staging. Kentucky offers dozens of authentic yet unique venues. A few local favorites are Evan's Orchard for its picturesque elegant farm, Talon Winery for its rustic country barn setting and Yew Dell Botanical Gardens for its lush landscape.

FOOD AND DRINK: Catering menus have taken on features and flavors commemorative of Kentucky cuisine. Kentucky Proud wedding contestants served hor'dourves like beer cheese and benedictine with crudités, and 3 Peas in a Pod Catering’s famous bluegrass hot brown dip. Classic country cooking like fried chicken, southern style green beans featuring Kentucky’s wonder beans, and country ham and biscuits using produce and meats from local farms are also popular menu selections. Wines, bubbles and brews can be brought in from Kentucky wineries and breweries, with Ale-8-One as a common kid friendly alternative.

TA B L E S C A P E S : Native and locally grown Kentucky flowers and greenery can add color and life to any special event. Local florists carefully craft bouquets, centerpieces and tablescapes that feature the latest seasonal blooms from nearby farms. Picture crisp white table cloths, adorned with locally grown hydrangea and roses. Top it off with some romance by adding locally made Kentucky beeswax or soy candles. Want to take it a step further? Arrange your florals in Kentucky bourbon bottles and barrels to add some extra local flair!

And what would any proper bluegrass wedding be without bourbon? Kentucky’s drink of choice is integrated into dishes through salad dressings, meat marinades and dessert syrups. “If we can get bourbon in a dish, we absolutely try to slide it in there” said Sarah Moore, owner of 3 Peas in a Pod Catering, which offers an extensive list of bourbon infused dishes, such as Buffalo Trace Bourbon Beef Tenderloin and Buffalo Trace Bourbon Caramel French Macarons. Let’s not forget the option to appreciate our state’s signature liquor the “old fashioned” way: on ice, mixed with Ale-8-One or in Kentucky’s favorite cocktail, the Mint Julep.

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P A RT Y F AV O R S : Thank your guests for attending by giving them a taste of Kentucky when they leave. Popular party favors include a mason jar filled with local honey, travel sized bourbon bottles, locally crafted soaps or bourbon balls from Old Kentucky Chocolates. By the end of the night, guests of a Kentucky Proud wedding have experienced the best of the Bluegrass through every single one of their senses.

Photo credit: Pg. 130 - (top to bottom) Honey Heart Photography, KY Proud Weddings, Love, The Renauds | Pg. 131 - (left to right) Kaylie Plummer Photography, Megan Wiebes, Honey Heart Photography | Pg. 132 - (left to right, top to bottom) Darling Tales Photography, KY Proud Weddings, KY Proud Weddings, Millay and Young Photography, Lucy Schaeer Photography, A Southern Mother Blog, Kelli Lynn Photography, Melanie Mauer | Pg. 133 - KY Proud Weddings

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llison and Benjamin Engelbrecht, winners of Kentucky Proud’s Wedding Contest, tied the knot at Echo Valley Winery, known for its historic barn on top of beautiful rolling hills in Flemingsburg, Kentucky. Allison is from Morehead and will be starting her first year as a medical student at the University of Louisville this fall. Ben, originally from Winchester, attended Morehead State University and is Active Duty Air Force. Local pride was evident on their wedding day. While their caterer sourced local ingredients for the dinner menu, Allison and Benjamin also served Kentucky Bourbon Barrel Ale on tap. Their wedding cake featured Four Roses bourbon flavoring. Allison and Ben heard about the contest, and decided to enter once finding out they were eligible thanks to their Kentucky Proud venue. The newlyweds will be using the prize money to help start their new life together. “It will help with rent, furniture for our new apartment, and living expenses. It’s really going to decrease our stress for our first year of marriage!”, says Allison.

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AT HOME

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Tour of Homes: Mid-Century Marvel

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Color Catalog: Caliente

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Super Mom: Heather Shaw


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Mid - C e n t u ry Marvel

I N SI D E JE F F A N D ME L ANI E ST I V E RS ’ CUSTO MIZE D MO DE RN H O ME .

Upon entering the Stivers’ home, my first question was, “Is this an Isenhour house?” I was referring to the Lexington architect who designed and built over 100 contemporary homes between the mid-1950s and the late 1970s. “No,” said Melanie Stivers, “But we’ve tried to make it look that way.” They had fooled me. The clean lines, open floor plan and large windows are all recognizable hallmarks of mid-century modern architecture. But when it comes to the design of their home, the Stivers have few others to credit but themselves. The Landsdowne property is home to Jeff Stivers, President of Ross Tarrant Architects, his wife Melanie, a Fayette County Public Schools Gifted and Talented Resource Teacher, and their youngest son, Callaway, a student at UK (their oldest son Coleman graduated and married in May and recently relocated to San Francisco). Every space in their home has been carefully considered, researched and designed for the family’s needs, wishes and lifestyle. Photos By | S H A U N R I N G

Written By | M I C H E L L E A I E L L O

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In this case, the word “remodel” is an understatement. Melanie explained that the home was originally built by the Cowden family in 1961. They raised their daughters there and lived there until their deaths. When the Stivers family purchased the home in February of 2014, it was a simple, straightforward ranch in original condition. Melanie and Jeff, who lived half a mile away for the last 16 years, had been searching for a property that suited them for a long time. “We had a very specific list of requirements and knew this was the one as soon as we saw it –which was the day it listed,” she said. “I had run and walked on Westchester Drive many, many times— yet I had never even noticed this particular property.” While the original home was not the Isenhour house of their dreams, it did have an ideal location and a lot that could support what they wanted to do. “Westchester is a lovely street, Lansdowne is a great neighborhood, and we would get established trees on a .68 acre lot. Many of the houses we looked at were larger than what we needed, while a kitchen addition would make this house just the right size,” said Melanie.

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One initial challenge to overcome was the fact that the house had 8-foot ceilings throughout the main floor. Given the truss-framed roof construction, in which the ceiling height is limited by the height above the floor of the truss, modifications would be difficult. “At the showing I practically cried when I stuck my head up in the attic and saw the trusses,” Melanie remembers. As an architect, Jeff had explained to her the challenges of trying to raise ceiling heights with truss-framed construction. But they knew that this house would be in high demand. “We were the first people to get a showing and when we heard someone else was making an offer, we raised our offer to above asking price. My husband assured me we would figure something out when it came to the

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trusses. He was right, but we had no idea of the unrelenting avalanche we were walking into.” After nearly two years of planning, designing and construction, the Stivers had created a completely unique home that has left no detail unconsidered. The three-bedroom home’s footprint was significantly changed. The kitchen, screened-in porch, carport and shop (where gardening and lawn care supplies are housed) were all additions. For most of the build, they continued to live in their previous home while actively acquiring special pieces that would be the focal point of each room. They moved into the new home, which was still very much a job site, in November of 2016.


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At Home Unlike most custom builds, this one was designed around their extensive collection of mid-century modern furnishings, vintage lighting and décor, not the other way around. The result is a completely customized modern home with notable mid-century elements. The Stivers have been attracted to the mid-century modern aesthetic for the last 20 years –before it became trendy. In the early days of Craigslist, they started collecting affordable pieces. “In those days, Craigslist was such a wonderful resource for beautiful and reasonably priced finds,” said Melanie. “It was the first platform people had as a free way to get stuff out of their basements or to clear out aging parents’ homes. Prior to Craigslist, I bought things from the Classified ads in the Herald Leader.” Additionally, many pieces were acquired at 20th Century Cincinnati, an annual modern design show, as well as great local shops like Scout Antiques and Modern and Street Scene. From the moment you walk in the door, the family room, dining room and kitchen all flow seamlessly into one another to create a space that is expansive but not overwhelming. In the family room, an oversized arched globe lamp hangs above a semicircular sofa. Eclectic art lines the walls. The large console, which takes up most of the left side wall of the family room, was a Craigslist find from Knoxville, Tennessee. The owner purchased in Germany, back when the military paid to have items shipped overseas. The pendant lights over the dining room table were originally in a church. In the far right corner, a bar has been set up with a vintage hutch that has been deconstructed, mounted on the wall and illuminated from behind, a technique they have used with a few other pieces. The art, furnishings and views into the landscape are enhanced with a neutral color palette. They used Sherwin Williams paint throughout, including “Snowbound”, a flat white, for the interior. For the exterior, they used “Gauntlet Grey” and “Cordovan” for the front door. The only splash of color provided by paint is “Determined Orange” which appears on an exposed steel beam that runs through every room in the lower level. This same burnt orange is repeated in the garden on lawn cushions, a gazing ball and in the plants themselves.

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At Home Without a doubt, the solarium between the family room and kitchen is a showstopping focal point. The impact of this 10’x10’ glassed-in space, landscaped and open to the elements, cannot be overstated. Aside from its obvious beauty, it provides an abundance of natural light. “Even after living here for a couple years, I am still startled by the complexity and sheer beauty of certain views”, said Melanie. “The solarium puts the first blooms of spring literally inches away so I notice subtle changes in the natural world, even during winter when I’m not outdoors everyday.” She went on to explain that when snow is falling, views of the garden on all four sides of the kitchen create the sensation of being in a reverse snow globe –as if she is inside a glass bubble and snow is falling all around her. “It is quite a magical experience and something we didn’t necessarily anticipate.”

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The Stivers cook and entertain frequently, so they wanted a kitchen that had the square footage and convenience factors to accommodate that. The cabinetry was designed by Kim Bragg of Kim Studio and built by Josh Gregory of Gregory Designs. The quartz countertops were fabricated and installed by GJ Gerard of Counter Culture Plus. They purchased the Thermador appliance package in Cincinnati. The kitchen and bath counters are built at 39 inches to suit the tall family. A culinary garden is only steps from the kitchen sink, so vegetables and herbs are quickly accessible during meal preparation. The family follows a plant-based diet so much of their food is fresh. Thus, they have a large amount of compostable leftovers, so the compost bin is located just a few steps away from the kitchen, yet out of sight. The kitchen also showcases their collection of vintage glassware and serving pieces.

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At Home The outdoor living space is accessed from both the kitchen/family room and the living room. Sheltered from the elements, the seating area is arranged for optimal relaxation and breathtaking views of the landscape. It is the ideal extension of the home for when they entertain. Views from the back patio are breathtaking. A large fenced in yard and garden give way to what used to be a two car garage. The homeonwers recently converted it into a guest house, complete with a bedroom, full bath, kitchen and living area. “The only requirement from the homeowner was that there be a stacked stone fireplace, which we added,� stuart explained. This is the ideal spot for visiting family and friends to have their own private space.

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During the rebuild, the home’s original three bedrooms were transformed into a master suite, including a laundry room, master bedroom, bath and walk-in closet. Jeff mentioned that conservation and eco-friendly practices are very important to them, so they have zoned the HVAC to conserve resources rather than heating or cooling spaces they may not be regularly using. “When we retire for the evening, our thermostats are programmed to condition only the master suite. We installed a geothermal unit and used all LED lights to conserve resources,” he said. Notable features here include Velux skylights that open and close, complete with rain sensors. “They were such a success,” said Melanie. “They make a huge difference in light and ventilation. On nice days we leave them open and it feels like we’re at the beach.” The ceiling fans by Big Ass Solutions help as well. Jeff designed all the built-in shelving in the home, adding architectural elements for function and character. Melanie said that to create a three-way dressing mirror, a special request of hers, she visited Fayette Mall looking for dressing rooms with the best angles. Later, Jeff measured them to create both a beautiful focal point and practical dressing area. It’s one of Melanie’s favorite aspects of her bedroom.

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The lower level of the home is designed as a comfortable guest space for visitors, which may soon include their sons and their families. Said Jeff, “This is the third house we have owned in our 30-year marriage and we plan for it to be our ‘forever house’. The space in the basement is separated so we do not have to heat, cool or even walk past this space when we’re not using it. To the extent that we could, we designed the house so we can ‘age in place’- no steps on the main floor and wide doorways that are wheelchair accessible.” The lower level has a number of interesting features, including glass panels on the ceiling that broadcast natural light from the solarium upstairs. Solar-tubes in the bathrooms bring additional natural light to the interior of the space. The carpeting in the basement, as well as in much of the rest of the home, was purchased from a company called Flor. They ordered samples, which were then incorporated into existing Flor carpet from their old home in a tile pattern. The result is a repurposed, modular product that coordinates perfectly with the new space.

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The burnt orange shade is also echoed in a vintage Adrean Pearsall chair that Melanie scored many years ago from a Lexington woman who originally won it on the television game show, “Let’s Make a Deal” in 1961. “The lady kept this great chair under a quilt in her basement that whole time,” said Melanie. “It just wasn’t her style, so it’s in mint condition with the original fabric.” Since they were designing the entire home from scratch, they took the opportunity to select materials based on quality, not size. This allowed them to use high-end building materials for a fraction of the cost. For example, the doors to the boys’ bedrooms were purchased at the Habitat for Humanity Restore. Jeff explained that the solid wood door with translucent glass insert was probably cut out of an office during a renovation. “Between hardware, the walnut trim and the glass, you are looking at over a thousand dollars worth of materials,” he explained. “The asking price at the Restore at the time was $150.” Most builders would reject the door based on its unusual size, but they just created the frames to accommodate it.


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Outside, the home’s flow for entertaining continues with plenty of destinations in the yard for private conversation or groups to gather. The size of the lot and thoughtful design allowed them to create several outdoor “rooms” and views that surprise as one moves through the house and garden. Melanie and Jeff have been gardening and collecting plants for the entire 30 years they have been married. Early on, due to limited finances, the garden grew through the incorporation of divisions and cuttings from older, more seasoned gardeners. These appear in every border and “put on a reliably wonderful summer show”. The vintage fireplace on the screened-in porch (constructed by Andy McChord of Prajna) is equipped with gas logs and heats up quickly with the click of a remote, so they can enjoy breakfast on a brisk fall morning, even if they have only a few moments to linger. TOPS Magazine | August 2018

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“One of my favorite things is walking around our yard and looking at our plants each day,” she said. “In a few weeks, Black Eyed Susans will be the stars of the yard.” In an interesting twist, Melanie says she never actually bought those flowers. Like so many of their plants, the Black Eyed Susans came from cuttings shared by the late turf specialist Dr. AJ Powell, and his wife Janie, almost thirty years ago. These flowers have been divided many times and have moved with the family to all three of their homes. Many of their plants share this same friendship heritage. Some came from Melanie’s grandmother’s garden, and some from their home’s first and only prior owner, Gertrude Cowden. While they reconstructed the house, Melanie spent most of one spring and summer picking up a few good men from the Hope Center to transplant favorites from their previous home to their new one. “Our initial rag-tag landscaping crew created new beds and situated everything under my direction. It wasn’t so much a design build project as a design-onthe fly sort of experience,” said Melanie. She added, “We couldn’t have done it without our wonderful excavator, Dale Perdue, who used his machines to move larger trees and shrubs from the old house and helped rearrange large plants already in this yard. The two-tiered landscaping walls were built using concrete blocks leftover from a commercial job. More recently, Jose Roblero finished edging all the beds with pavers which provides clean visual lines outside to match the inside.” Their current garden blends the previous homeowners pieces with their 30-year plant collection, with a few new purchases to round out the design. “Our garden, in its current iteration is a labor of love which I personally enjoy every bit as much as the house. While my husband and I both know the business end of a yard tool, he isn’t the plant nerd that I am. He just supports my gardening addiction.” Their “master garden” is in its’ final planning stage and will soon be fitted with an outdoor shower and all-white blooming plants, which can be enjoyed at night from their bedroom, bathroom and the solarium hallway. Their Honeywell Eco-timers are programed to make all of their art and landscaping lights come on and go off each evening so that “It looks like we are having a party every night, not just sometimes.” The LED backlit address number “brings a touch of South Beach to Lexington,” as Melanie put it.

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Looking back on the entire process from design to construction to finishing touches, Melanie and Jeff agree that while the project was a success, they had no idea what they’d signed up for. When asked about her favorite part of the construction process, Melanie said, “Honestly, being finished was the best part. Anyone who thinks construction will be entertaining or enjoyable has never been part of it. As time passes, you forget how exhausted you were for months on end and it begins to feel like it was worth it. But when you are in the midst of it, you really question if the payoff can ever equal the pain. An affair with a house really is that brutal.” Her father, now a retired UK professor, has built over 35 homes in the Lexington area, the first when she was in grade school, so she grew up on construction sites and going to open houses. “Even though my father encouraged me to maintain perspective while we worked on this project, it was difficult to step back from any single detail and think, this won’t really matter,” she remembers. “Every surface, every function, every material seemed to require in-depth research and there just weren’t ever enough hours in the day. Now I truly understand what DIY really means. Construction is unbelievably hard.” And Jeff ’s take? “There were many, many challenging aspects to designing and executing this project. While we were certainly our own worst enemies (it is much easier if you just do what everyone else has done before), we underestimated by quite a large margin just how difficult and time-consuming the construction process was going to be. It was a whole job unto itself that had to be squeezed in around our normal day-to-day lives, which already seemed pretty full.” He advises anyone considering a significant construction project to hire an architect. “Too often, clients and builders see design services as an easy target for budget savings. But the value that architects bring to the process, working closely with a skilled professional builder, is significant. It’s the difference between an off-the-shelf solution and a tailor-made solution designed for a specific individual.” What really brings the Stivers home together is the high level of detail and coordination. As self-described perfectionists, the couple attempted to think of literally everything before acting on it. Every piece of construction, from the location of a wall or an opening in the floor, is coordinated with every finish and furnishing. Every switch is located where they decided it would be. The proportions and dimensions of items such as guardrails are echoed in window patterns. While this level of detail may not be immediately apparent, they believe it all adds to a cohesive whole. And they are correct. Even someone who knows nothing about architecture or design can see that the home just looks “right”. “My favorite thing about the house project is my husband,” said Melanie. “He calls me ‘the client’. He is very much the architect, the designer, the problem solver. He designs what I want even when I cannot articulate what I want, and he has beautifully incorporated every vintage find I’ve hauled in.” Added Jeff: “This house is such a complete and thorough reflection of who we are —it is as unique as we are.”

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th e h o m e t e am

At Home

architect

JEFF STIVERS

general project managers

JEFF + MELANIE STIVERS

kitchen design

KIM BRAGG, KIM STUDIO

kitchen/bath cabinets

J O S H G R E G O R Y, GREGORY DESIGNS

countertops

C O U N T E R C U LT U R E P L U S

roofing/skylight/decks + fencing

MOSE + SHEILA ROBERTS

screen porch

A N DY M C C H O R D, P R A I N A

framing

D E W AY N E N A P I E R

sound system design/install

COLEMAN STIVERS

finish carpentry

JARBOE CONSTRUCTION

concrete

M U R R AY ’ S C O N C R E T E CONSTRUCTION

kitchen tile install

ONE PRO CONSTRUCTION

bath tile install

STRAIGHT LINE TILE

tile supplier

LOUISVILLE TILE

shower enclosure glass

SHOWCASE SHOWERS

hardwood floors

THE FLOORING GALLERY

carpets

FLOR TILES

upholstery

B O B WA L L A C E

solatubes

JIM KLAUSING, TRANSITIONS

interior screen walls/custom builds J E F F E G E L STO N

plumbing

KINGS HELPER

geo-thermal HVAC

E N G I N E E R E D H E AT I N G + A I R

electrical

LY N N C O L E

concrete landscaping wall

S H AW N M C C O L L U M

landscape edging/large plant install JOSE ROBLERO

excavating

DALE PERDUE

brick

MONDELLI MASONRY

windows/doors

PHOENIX DOOR + GLASS

furniture

SCOUT ANTIQUES + MODERN

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Emma Arm Chair Fox Hill Trading

Throw Pillow Polished Interiors

Color Catalog

Caliente

L

ooking to add a little radiance and power to a space in your home? Benjamin Moore’s 2018 Color of the Year, Caliente (AF-290) will certainly do the trick! This vibrant red adds energy and commands attention. “Caliente is the signature color of a modern architectural masterpiece; a lush carpet rolled out for a grand arrival; the assured backdrop for a book-lined library; a powerful first impression on a glossy front door,” explained Ellen O’Neill of Benjamin Moore & Co. “The eye can’t help but follow its bold strokes. Harness the vitality.” Adding a powerful color like Caliente to any space requires a careful balancing act. Airy white trim and flooring allows the red to shine while preventing it from seeming to take over the space. Choosing accessories in warm, natural materials and muted tones will allow the confident Caliente to work its magic in your space.

Volongo Table Lamp Market on National Needham Area Rug Three Posts

White Rectangle Bud Vase Set house

Pair with:

Actual colors may vary from this printed representation. Dreamy Cloud

Elk Horn

Coastal Path

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W

hile Heather Shaw doesn’t necessarily consider herself a “Super Mom”, she says she always tries to do the best that she can with her four-year-old daughter Hayley. “I know how lucky I am to have Hayley; she is truly a blessing I didn’t think was possible,” says Heather. “Hayley is the happiest kid—she just radiates joy to all of those around her.” Heather and her husband, Ben, make it a priority to stay active. Hayley enjoys gymnastics and swim lessons, and on the weekends, the Shaws like going to the pool, visiting the zoo or other local attractions. As a liver transplant recipient and a cancer survivor, Heather says making time to focus on her health is not only important to her, but her whole family. Heather attends Fit4Mom classes, including Stroller Strides, which is an exercise class that Hayley can attend, too. “My own mental health and physical health are two things that are important to me and allow me to be a good mom,” she says. “Fit4Mom has been wonderful in helping me make time for myself. I also think it’s important for moms to find their village, which I have found in Fit4Mom. By finding the right village, I realized we all need support in this crazy process called parenthood.” Heather says that like many moms, she struggles with trying to be the parent that does it all. As Development Director for Child Development Center of the Bluegrass, Heather says she is still figuring out how to manage work, family and social obligations. “As a working mom, I have a tendency to overcommit myself,” she says. “I am always working on my ability to say ‘no’ to activities and being okay with that decision.” Heather admits that she wants to be able to give Hayley everything and be able to do everything, but she knows that isn’t physically possible for any parent. “Balancing it all is a constant struggle, but I try to do my best at making sure I leave work at work and focus my time at home to be with my family,” Heather says. Family is very important to Heather and Ben. The Shaws are in the process of becoming foster parents, with the hopes of sharing their life with children in need.

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“Watching your child grow is the most rewarding moment of parenthood,” Heather says. “We love watching Hayley try new things and have those magical childhood experiences.” As a member of the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Action Network, Heather recently helped by sharing her story and advocating for Childhood Cancer Action Days in Washington, D.C. She was also recently nominated to serve as part of Kentucky’s Pediatric Cancer Research Trust Fund Committee. “I look at my medical past as a way to help others,” Heather says. “It is also a realization that I am very lucky to be a mom.”

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EATS &

ENTERTAINMENT

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Dining: Oscar Diggs

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BBN: Preseason Predictions

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Make a Meal Meaningful: Dining Out For Life

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Equine Update

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Top 5 Dining: Local Chefs


Eats & Entertainment

scar O

Dining Out:

DIGGS

The Gastro Gnomes’ Brick-and-Mortar is Decadent & Flavorful By Michelle Aiello | Photos by Keni Parks

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When Andrew Suthers and Kyle Klatka of the popular Gastro Gnomes food truck approached Ralph Quillin about opening a restaurant, it was a no-brainer. Since 2014, Quillin has owned and operated Rooster Brewing in Paris – a microbrewery and a taproom of the same name. Quillin often invited rotating food trucks to set up outside the taproom, and the Gnomes were always a hit. Plus, he said, they all got along great from the start. “We love working in Paris, but there is a limited market there,” he said of himself and his wife, Donna. “We enjoy doing this and want to continue, so we needed to be in Lexington.” The hunt for an ideal space was not an easy one. They looked at potential properties all over the city, from Jefferson Street to the Distillery District, but weren’t able to make anything work. Then one day, the Quillin’s architect, Rebecca Burnworth, called and said she’d found the perfect space. “I had my doubts,” he said, “but once I saw it, I knew she was right.” The large storefront building facing the Fayette County Courthouse had been home to Merit Furniture since the 1950’s. It took a year of extensive renovation, but in January 2018, the space was transformed into Oscar Diggs. Oscar Zoroaster Phadrig Isaac Norman Henkle Emmannuel Ambroise Diggs is the full name of the Wizard of Oz. But Quillin says he’s “No Oz freak by any means.” One night, they were sitting at Rooster Brewing throwing around names, and everyone liked the sound of Oscar Diggs. With green glazed tile over the fireplace, the décor plays a very slight homage to L. Frank Baum’s 1900 book, but “You won’t find Dorothy or Toto here,” said Quillin.

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Eats & Entertainment What you will find is a mouth-watering array of both classic and adventurous pub food that changes every Tuesday. Very much like the food truck fare for which Suthers and Klatka are known, the menu focus on burgers, appetizers, salads and sweets—all designed with humor and creativity. For example, their menu for the week of Fourth of July featured funnel cake chicken wings and a grilled watermelon ceviche with roasted corn, avocado and house-made deep-fried tortilla chips. The burger selection included the Red White and Blue (tomato, brie and blueberry barbeque sauce), The William Howard Taft (bacon, Virginia ham and cheddar on a glazed donut bun) and the Thoroughgood Special, which included a cheeseburger, a shot of bourbon, a beer and fries. Other notable offerings from that week’s menu were the Detroit Coney Island (bratwurst, Coney sauce, mustard and onion) a mushroom leek tart and apple pie. While the menu is completely reinvented every week, Quillin says that customers can always expect to see several burgers, as well as one or two vegetarian and/or vegan options. Every month, they also do a Chef ’s Dinner—a recent one featured Hidenori Yamaguchi of Yamaguchi’s, which sold out in under 15 minutes. Customers wishing to keep up with the offerings at Oscar Diggs can follow them on Facebook at OscarDiggsLex.

Q+A with Ralph Quillin

Where do you source your ingredients? We always use prime beef from Big Zeke’s in Bourbon County. We’re working on developing relationships with local growers to provide seasonal vegetables and we try to source as much Kentucky Proud as possible. What is your current favorite menu item at Oscar Diggs? I still gravitate to our half-pound burgers and anything on the Sunday Brunch menu. Favorite food from your childhood? My grandparents had farms in Bourbon County so Sunday dinners would be fried chicken, biscuits and gravy and brown sugar pie. 172

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...it’s a very inviting and friendly atmosphere downtown.”

Ralph Quillin, Kyle Klatka and Andrew Suthers What makes Lexington a great city? It surprised the heck out of me, living in small communities and farms since the late 70’s, just how “small town friendly” Lexington is. In Paris where we have the brewery and tap room, you can make a call and get the help you need. I’ve found that to be true in Lex, too. From the Mayor stopping by to check on us to our great customers and restaurant neighbors—it’s a very inviting and friendly atmosphere downtown. What would surprise people to learn about you? My father and son are physicians. I guess it skips generations! I’m retired from the Lexington Fire Department and was in the first paramedic class, then on to HazMat and PIO. I also farmed a couple thousand acres and own Quillin Leather & Tack, the largest customer halter shop in the United States. Show you are binge-watching? Man! If Donna and I make it to the farm in time to watch an episode of “Andy Griffith”, we call the day a WIN.


Oscar Diggs’

Watermelon Ceviche Ingredients 2 cups watermelon, rind removed Olive oil 1/2 cup sliced avocado 1/2 cup grilled corn 2 serrano chiles, sliced 1/4 cup chopped cilantro 3 limes, juiced Salt and pepper

Instructions Cut watermelon into 1� slabs. Brush with olive oil and char one side on grill, allow to cool, then chill in the refrigerator. Dice chilled watermelon into bite sized cubes. Add 2 cups diced grilled and chilled melon into a mixing bowl with avocado, grilled corn, sliced serrano peppers and chopped cilantro. Mix all and dress with a good quality Olive oil and the juice of 3 limes. Season salt and pepper. Serve with fried flour or corn tortillas

Oscar Diggs 155 North Limestone Lexington, KY 40507 (859) 523-8305

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Eats & Entertainment

Make a meal MEANINGFUL

AIDS Volunteers, Inc. (AVOL) collaborates with our local restaurant community to stop the spread of HIV and empower those affected. Founded by a dedicated group of volunteers in 1987 and incorporated in 1988, AVOL has spent 30 years engaging in grassroots advocacy, resource development, coalition building and direct services in Central and Eastern Kentucky.

365 Waller Avenue, Suite 100 Lexington, KY 40504 (859)225-3000

On September 13th, more than 50 local restaurants in Lexington, Frankfort, Midway and Winchester alongside presenting sponsor Woodford Reserve will support AVOL’s mission by participating in their annual fundraiser: Dining Out for Life.

avolky.org | dineoutlex.com

“We are extremely grateful that our community of restaurants not only serve amazing food, but also give from the heart,” said Jon Parker, executive director of AVOL.

Photos courtesy of AVOL

Participating restaurants will donate a minimum of 25% of each bill to support people in our community living with HIV and those at-risk for contracting the virus. Patrons will also have the opportunity to make independent donations. “I can’t think of a better way for a community to celebrate the strides made in the fight against HIV/AIDS over the years and draw attention to its remaining issues, than to gather together and share a meal,” Parker went on to share.

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THU R S DAY

We are extremely grateful that our community of restaurants not only serve amazing food, but also give from the heart.”

September

13 2018

All donations provide outreach to persons at-risk; HIV testing and other health screenings; harm reduction and empowerment education; crisis alleviation and support for stable housing for persons living with HIV; essential emergency services and ongoing connectivity to medical care, nutrition and wellness services.

PARTICIPATING RESTAURANTS A&W Burgers Chicken Floats (Hamburg, Leestown and Main)

Alfalfa Atomic Ramen Blue Door Smokehouse BRU Burger Bar Carson’s Food and Drink Coles 735 Main Columbia Steakhouse (Downtown) County Club Crank & Boom (Distillery District and The Barn at Fritz Farm)

Distilled Doodle’s Breakfast and Lunch Dudley’s on Short Good Foods Co-op Graze on Limestone Graze Market and Cafe

(Clark County)

rillfis Hanna’s on Lime Heirloom (Midway) J. Renders Southern Table Le Deauville Lexington Diner Liberty Road Cafe

Locals’ Craft Food & Drink Lussi Brown Coffee Bar Lynagh’s Irish Pub Mad Mushroom Pizza Mezzo (Midway) Mouse Trap Nick Ryan’s North Lime Coffee & Donuts (Clays Mill and North Lime)

Oscar Diggs Pasta Garage Red Light Kitchen Sage Garden (Frankfort) Saul Good (Downtown, Fayette Mall and Hamburg)

Sidebar Grill Smithtown Seafood (West Sixth) Soundbar (Official After-Party) Stella’s Kentucky Deli The Sage Rabbit The Sweet Spot Third Street Stuff Walker’s of Lexington West Main Crafting Co. West Sixth Brewing

#DINEOUTLEX

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TOP Dining By Amanda Harper

Eats & Entertainment

Local Chefs Johnathan Searle | LOCKBOX

Photo courtesy of 21c Museum Hotels

Searle’s culinary résumé includes legendary local eateries like Dudley’s on Short, Bourbon n’ Toulouse, Bellini’s and Proof on Main, the acclaimed restaurant at 21c Museum Hotel Louisville. Lockbox showcases fresh ingredients that are grown and produced locally. The seasonal menus make the most of Kentucky’s bounty, featuring dishes that reflect our state’s unique food culture. 167 W. Main St. | 859.899.6860 | lockboxlex.com

Tanya Whitehouse |THE FOOD CONNECTION

Photo by Sarah Caton

Part learning kitchen, part classroom, The Food Connection is a unique concept that fosters both the future of food and the connections between suppliers, growers, chefs and diners. Whitehouse graduated from the Sullivan University culinary program and worked as the evening Sous Chef at Ouita Michel’s Holly Hill Inn. Now, she teaches students and members of the community how to cook with local ingredients while understanding the importance of food. 440 Hilltop Ave. | 859.218.4987 | foodconnection.ca.uky.edu

Dan Wu | ATOMIC RAMEN

Photo by Anna Stepka

Dan Wu’s culinary career really took off when he participated on MasterChef season 5. “The Culinary Evangelist” began as a radio program on WRFL before eventually relaunching in 2016 as a podcast hosted by Wu. In each episode, he talks to local movers and shakers in the local food community. A Kickstarter campaign helped launch Atomic Ramen, Wu’s eatery in The Barn at The Summit. The Summit at Fritz Farm | 859.523.0903 | theatomicramen.com

Mark Wombles | DISTILLED, HEIRLOOM AND MEZZO

Photo by Conrhod Zonio

When he bought the space that would become his first restaurant, Wombles set out to use fresh, local ingredients to create Kentucky dishes with a global sensibility. That idea propelled Heirloom in Midway to local acclaim and resulted in Wombles becoming Chef, Owner and Operator of Mezzo and Distilled. He continues to make use of seasonal ingredients while creating dishes that are simultaneously comforting and elevated. Distilled: 120 W 2nd St, Lexington | Heirloom: 125 E Main St, Midway | Mezzo: 131 E Main St, Midway

Stella Parks | BRAVETART

Photo by Sarah Jane Sanders

Parks is the only chef on this list without a restaurant in town because she wants to make your home the next go-to spot for sweet treats. Her James Beard award-winning cookbook, BraveTart: Iconic American Desserts, is meticulously researched with decadent recipes that invite everyone to make world class pastries and desserts. Though she currently works as the “resident pastry wizard” for Serious Eats, her previous career highlights include working with Chef Ouita Michel at Wallace Station and Holly Hill Inn. facebook.com/BraveTart TOPS Magazine | August 2018

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PRESEASON PREDICTIONS By Larry Vaught | VaughtsViews.com

Junior offensive tackle Landon Young thinks consecutive sevenwin seasons have justified the belief he had in Kentucky football when he committed to the hometown Wildcats. “I think there is no ceiling for this program. I think it is going to go exponentially higher after this and I think this is just stepping stones and putting building blocks on top of one another,” said Young. “I think it will just keep getting better and better.” But will it? Kentucky has more experience and depth than coach Mark Stoops has had at Kentucky. He has two stars — running back Benny Snell and linebacker Josh Allen — that could play for any SEC team. Still, Kentucky has a lot to prove this year with what seems to be a more challenging schedule. First, no way I could pick UK winning at Tennessee or Florida. Kentucky has not won in Knoxville since 1984 so despite Tennessee’s 0-8 league mark in 2017, I have to see a UK win in Knoxville to believe it. Same with the Gators. The Cats have not won at Florida since 1979 and have not beat the Gators since 1986. Florida was only 4-7 last season, but history counts in my book. Second, Kentucky won’t beat Georgia. The Bulldogs should have won the national championship last year and will have more talent than any team UK faces all season. Third, Kentucky will beat Central Michigan, Murray and Middle Tennessee. Murray is 10-23 the last three years. Central Michigan has been to four straight bowls but lost a big-time quarterback. Middle Tennessee is no gimme. The Blue Raiders return quarterback Brent Stockstill, a prolific passer, and former UK offensive coordinator Tony Franklin has the same role for Middle. But this is a game UK should win.

BBN

The key is a four-game stretch where UK hosts Mississippi State and South Carolina, goes to Texas A&M and then hosts Vanderbilt. For a special season, UK needs to go 3-1 in that stretch — and I think they can. New coach Jimbo Fisher has a ton of talent at A&M, so that means UK needs to sweep the three home games. Mississippi State, 9-4 last year, probably has more talent than

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Running back Benny Snell hopes UK has a lot to celebrate during the 2018 season.Photo by Jeff Houchin

A&M. But it also has a new coach in Joe Moorhead and the game is in Lexington. Nick Fitzgerald is a big-time quarterback but if UK’s defense is going to be as good as Stoops hopes, Kentucky can win this game. South Carolina, also 9-4 last year, is the new darling of the SEC. But Kentucky won 23-13 at South Carolina last year and Stoops has four straight wins over the Gamecocks. That’s history on UK’s side. Vanderbilt, 5-7 last year, has not had a winning season under coach Derek Mason. This is a game UK has to win at home — and will. So if UK gets the six home wins I am counting on and loses on the road to Florida, Tennessee and Texas A&M as well as at home to Georgia, that leaves UK at 6-4 with games at Missouri and Louisville. Missouri, 7-6 last year, won its last six games and averaged over 50 points per game. It returns quarterback Drew Lock but the defense was shaky last year. Kentucky has won three straight over the Tigers, so I like the UK history here again. That leaves Louisville, 8-5 last year. Heisman Trophy winner Lamar Jackson is gone and the team has a lot of questions on defense. But remember, like him or not, Louisville coach Bobby Petrino has owned UK during his time at Louisville and, once again, I have to see UK beat him to believe it. So add it all up and I see another 7-5 season and bowl bid for Kentucky — which might not be as good as some want but certainly is better than a losing season. Plus, if UK can break some historical trends, maybe the season turns out even better than I anticipate.


Eats & Entertainment

EQUINE update

By Jen Roytz

38TH ANNUAL EGYPTIAN EVENT

USEF PONY FINALS

August 29 - September 1 Kentucky Horse Park - Covered Arena

What started as a challenge posed by British show pony riders to their American counterparts, the event has morphed into the most celebrated horse show for hunter/jumper ponies in North America. Today, the event is known as one of the ultimate tests for junior riders, many of which will one day aspire to compete in the Grand Prix show jumping ring. Learn more at usef.org (search “pony finals”).

Each year The Pyramid Society, the international breed registry for the Straight Egyptian Arabian, invites horses from throughout the U. S. and around the world to the Kentucky Horse Park for The Egyptian Event, a competition and celebration of one of the most ancient and most beautiful breeds of horses in the world. In addition to competition classes that showcase the spirit and versatility of this cherished horse, the event also offers seminars, demonstrations and the National Egyptian Breeders’ Conference. Learn more at pyramidsociety.org.

August 9-12 Kentucky Horse Park

BLUEGRASS INTERNATIONAL CUP POLO MATCH September 7 Mt. Brillian Farm

Benefitting the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Foundation and the Fayette Alliance, the Bluegrass International Cup has earned a reputation as being THE party of the summer in Lexington. Held at historic Mt. Brilliant Farm, guests can enjoy exquisite culinary offerings, cocktails and live music as they watch a fast-paced polo match played by some of the sport’s top competitors. To learn more or purchase tickets, go to fayettealliance.com.

ROCKY MOUNTAIN HORSE ASSOCIATION INTERNATIONAL HORSE SHOW September 6-8 Kentucky Horse Park

A unique and beautiful breed of horse originated in Kentucky, the Rocky Mountain Horse is known for its unique coloring and comfortable riding gates, which are ideal for navigating the mountainous terrain of the Appalachian Region. The Rocky Mountain Horse Association (RMHA) International Horse Show features exhibitors of all ages, with Grand Championship classes taking place on Saturday evening. Spectators can also experience the smooth gate of the Rocky Mountain Horse for themselves at the “Ride a Rocky” exhibit on the show grounds. For more information, go to rmhorse.com. 180

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KEENELAND SEPTEMBER YEARLING SALE September 10-23 Keeneland

One of the largest and most prestigious Thoroughbred auctions in the world, the Keeneland September Yearling Sale is held annually at Keeneland’s Sales Pavilion and has produced more graded stakes winners than all other auction companies combined. Each year buyers from all over the world come to Keeneland to purchase oneyear-old horses that they hope will one day win some of the sport’s biggest races. The auction is open to the public and attendees just might see a horse sell for hundreds of thousands of dollars, if not millions. Learn more at keeneland.com.


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Photos

LEXINGTON JUNIOR LEAGUE

HORSE SHOW Kentucky Horse Park - Rolex Arena | July 9-14 lexjrleague.com Photos by Woody Phillips & Ron Morrow

DAWN JENSEN, AMANDA BLACK AND ALEXANDRIA PANNETT

LAURA PREWITT AND NICOLE RIVERA KRISTA HADDAD AND AMELIA ADAMS

FRANKLIN PAISLEY AND KATY ROSS

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NANCI HOUSE AND EMILY HO

CARRIE PATTERSON, OLIVIA MCKINNEY, KATIE PORTER, NATALIE JONES AND COURTNEY SIZEMORE


Photos

ARTHUR MURRAY:

THE GREATEST SHOWCASE Embassy Suites Lexington | July 22 dancestudiolexingtonky.com Photos by Ron Morrow

HOLLY TUMBLIN AND BOBBY DOCHERTY

JANET FREEMAN AND DUNCAN KING

RHONDA YATES AND CHRIS STONE NORMA STANFORD AND STEVEN KING

JESSICA BARRIER AND JOHN SUTHERLAND

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LILLIAN TOVAR AND EVAN DEMESTIHAS

HUNTER LISLE AND ELESHA BURKHART


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Photos

SUMMER GALA

Keeneland | July 17 Benefiting the Woodford Humane Society woodfordhumane.org Photos by Paul Atkinson

MISSIE WOOD, KIM CRABTREE, LIST FLOYD, MARY HINTON, JEREMY SHADA, LIZ BARRETT, BO RAINBOW AND MELISSA DAVIS

BRERETON & LIBBY JONES

TED BASSETT

DEBBIE GRAVISS AND JACK KAIN

OLIVIA POIS AND JENNY HARRIS

LISA & GLENN ACREE

DONNA STURGEON AND RENA ELSWICK

JOSH, WYATT AND CASEY ECKERT-KIGHT

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LARRY CORNETT, JEFF O’BRIEN & JULIE O’BRIEN, JUDY CORNETT, SUSAN & KURT ADAMS, DAVID LONG AND SANDI LOFTUS


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Photos

THE GIFT OF COLOR: HENRY LAWRENCE FAULKNER

BOOK SIGNING WITH AUTHOR JOHN S. HOCKENSMITH Irish Acres | June 21 finearteditions.net Photos by Paul Atkinson

JANE DELAUTER, BAMBI BLANTON AND EMILIE MACAULEY

SARAH TSIANG AND JOHN S. HOCKENSMITH CAROLE HEMMINGWAY

NORMAN MORTON AND JOHN HUTCHERSON

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TERESA WILSON AND STEVE FARLEY

JIM ROUSE, BEN & JENNIFER CHANDLER


presents

Fest

ac g ele in n e bra tion of home gard

Saturday, August 25th | 12–6pm 3220 Lexington road | nicholasville Ky

Food Trucks and Beer • Salsa Contest with Celebrity Judges • Tomato Variety Tasting Children’s Activities with Award-Winning Face Painter • Live Music Square Dance & Salsa Dance Demonstrations • Gardening Help Desk • Tomato Battle To participate and enter the Salsa Recipe Contest and Tomato Battle contact Kathy at chattykathysink@aol.com or 859.533.4155

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Photos

LEXINGTON FAIRNESS

HALL OF FAME Hyatt Regency Hotel | June 29 lexfair.org Photos by Ron Morrow TUESDAY MEADOWS AND JR ZERKOWSKI

PHILLIP MARCUM AND TIM BURCHAM

DAVID JONES AND ISAAC KURS REGGIE THOMAS, RUTH ANN PALUMBO, SUSAN WESTROM AND KELLY FLOOD

DANNY & MELISSA MOORE MURPHY

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LANCE POSTON, SETH HALL, BART FRANCIS AND ANDREW TAN


CHRISTOPHER BAUER AND PAUL BROWN

DIANA QUEEN AND SUSAN LAMB

KENNY BISHOP AND JOSH MERS

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LEXINGTON

PRIDE FESTIVAL Robert F. Stephens Courthouse Plaza | June 30 lexpridefest.org Photos by Ron Morrow

TY MEDARIS

SHADY COUTURE

SYNERGY TWINS

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CORTNEY CARSON

SAVION LAROUX

CARMEN, EVAN AND SHANNON WAMPLER-COLLINS AND JACOB BOYD


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BODY STRUCTURE & GILL HEART INSTITUTE

20-YEAR CELEBRATION Body Structure Medical Fitness | June 27 bodystructure.com | ukhealthcare.uky.edu Photos by Woody Phillips

BEN HEK, JOHN BORDERS AND TIM HOWARD

ALLEN RODES AND KEVIN BALCIRAK JULIANNA HAUSER AND KAREN RODES

MARK STOOPS AND LEE RICKETTS

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DONNA FOSTER AND NIGEL SMITH

CHANTEL STOOPS, KARLA BALCIRAK, TRACEY COMBS


BILLY GATTON-JONES AND BAMBI TODD

DOUG & TAFT MCKINSTRY ROOD

STEVE POTTINGER AND BRANDON SIDWELL

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LEXARTS HOP Carnegie Center | July 20 galleryhoplex.com Photos by Paul Atkinson

MELISSA PITTS

WARREN BYROM

PATRICK MCNEESE AND RICHARD RAWDON

VERONICA FETH AND MARK SWEAZY

SARAH TSIANG

CHIP DUMSTORF AND BOB MORGAN

KIMBER GRAY AND KAREN GAUTHIER

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JAYNE MOORE WALDROP, JOHN S. HOCKENSMITH, NEIL CHETHIK AND JESSICA FAYE MOHLER


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KENTUCKY BANK TENNIS CHAMPIONSHIPS

SPONSOR PARTY Kentucky Bank | July 19 lexingtonchallenger.com Photos by Ron Morrow

LOUIS PRICHARD, BEN CAUDILL, JIM ELLIOTT AND GEORGE HOSKINS

BRENDA BRAGONIER AND KRISTEN OAKLEY

SUZANNE ELLIOTT AND CAROLYN RASNICK

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MASON MAYBORG, BROOKS LUNDY AND VICKI JENKINS

MONTE COSTES AND TERRI CARPENTER

GRAZIE VANDERWESTHUYZEN AND DENNIS EMERY


JEFF & DEE JONES

JOHN HUSTON AND MEGAN BARLOW

TYLER AND GREG FOX

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KEENELAND

CONCOURS D’ELEGANCE Keeneland | July21 keenelandconcours.com Photos by Ron Morrow

JUDGES AWARD WINNER: 1931 CHRYSLER CG IMPERIAL DUAL COWL PHAETON OWNED BY EVERGREEN HISTORIC AUTOMOBILES

CURT RICHARDS AND TOM JONES

TOMMY HARPER WITH1935 FORD TUDOR STANDARD SEDAN

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CONNIE JONES WITH 1930 AUBURN MODEL 8-95 CABRIOLET OWNED BY MANNS RESTORATION

PAUL & JANICE PHILLIPS WITH THEIR 1910 OAKLAND “30” MODEL 24 RUNABOUT


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KEENELAND

CONCOURS D’ELEGANCE Keeneland | July21 keenelandconcours.com Photos by Ron Morrow

1938 DELAHAYE 135 MS COUPE OWNED BY ROBERT & ALICE JEPSON

BOBBIE CREWS

CHAD & LENÉE PEACH

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BYRON & MICHELLE STRUCK

JIM CALDWELL

1934 DODGE DR SERIES DELUXE OWNED BY VELDA DYER & THE LATE BRYAN DYER


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CALENDAR of Events:

Aug. 2018

AUGUST 3RD

Kentucky Bank Tennis Championships Hilary J. Boone Tennis Complex

2018 Lexington Minority Business Expo 11am Lexington Convention Center

A Chorus Line Lexington Opera House

Saturday Night Live Music 9pm Red Mile

6pm Woodland Park

Enjoy free live music in the Grand Atrium from Benny J and Friends. Benny J and Friends will get you out of your seat and on your feet with some tantalizing tunes!

8pm Woodland Park

A Chorus Line 8pm Lexington Opera House

AUGUST 5TH

Kentucky Bank Tennis Championships Hilary J. Boone Tennis Complex

Fountain Films on Friday

Ballet Under the Stars

Triangle Park

8pm Woodland Park

The Night Market

A Chorus Line

6pm 714 North Limestone St

Lexington Opera House

AUGUST 4TH

AUGUST 6TH

Hilary J. Boone Tennis Complex

6:45pm The Lyric Theater

Kentucky Bank Tennis Championships

August 2018 | TopsInLex.com

8pm Woodland Park

Ballet Tea Parties

Ballet Under the Stars

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Ballet Under the Stars

WoodSongs Old-Time Radio Hour


AUGUST 7TH

AUGUST 10TH

11th Annual Lexus Smooth Jazz Fest

Pre-K Art Day

11th Annual Lexus Smooth Jazz Fest

7:30 Kentucky Horse Park

10am The Living Arts & Science Center

8pm Embassy Suites

AUGUST 9TH

AUGUST 13TH

Craft Brew Hop/ Tagabrew

Blue-White Game

11th Annual Lexus Smooth Jazz Fest

5pm Various Lexington Bars

6:30pm Kroger Field

7:30pm Kentucky Horse Park

Field to Table: Celebrate Kentucky Farmers

Concerts at the Castle

6pm The Historic Courthouse

AUGUST 16TH

7:30pm The Kentucky Castle

Fountain Films on Friday

Central Bank Thursday Night Live

Triangle Park

5pm Fifth Third Pavillion

AUGUST 11

AUG. 10TH - SEPT. 21ST

TH

Walk to Bridge the Gap to Success 9am Keeneland

5-8pm Pam Miller Downtown Arts Center

A Midsummer Night’s Run 4:30pm Downtown A Midsummer Night's Run is one of Lexington's signature summer events, bringing runners and walkers into the streets of downtown for a night of activities.

Local Farm Feast 6:30pm Shaker Village

5pm Fifth Third Pavilion

KY Bike Walk Summit

Reimagine Art Exhibition Open Bidding

This exhibit pairs children’s art with local artists who each interpret a single child’s piece using their own style and medium. Both the child’s art and the artist’s piece hang side by side. This gives our children a great opportunity to display their art in a public exhibit, and witness artists at work using the child’s piece as inspiration in a gallery setting. The proceeds from a silent auction of the collaborative originals will help provide arts-related resources for local public schools.

Central Bank Thursday Night Live

8am Transylvania University

AUGUST 17TH

5th Annual Burgers, Bourbon & Beer 7pm Malone’s Prime Events & Receptions Come out and enjoy great food, open bar, a fantastic silent auction, raffle and music provided by CD Productions! Tickets for the event are $75 and will go on sale soon! All proceeds benefit Arbor Youth Services who serve homeless, runaway and at risk youth in central Kentucky.

Fountain Films on Friday Triangle Park

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CALENDAR // AUG-SEPT Picnic with the Pops 6pm Keene Meadow at Keeneland An annual outdoor musical event each year! Featuring a fun and light-hearted atmosphere with picnic dinners, a table decorating contest and an idyllic Kentucky setting, 2018 performances will feature The Music of the Rolling Stones, performed by the Lexington Philharmonic with guest conductor Brent Havens, guest artist Brody Dolyniuk and other special guests.

AUGUST 18

TH

Waveland Cruise

5pm Waveland State Historic Site

Picnic with the Pops

AUGUST 20TH

Family Fun Night: Hall of Champions Show

WoodSongs Old-Time Radio Hour

5pm The Kentucky Horse Park

6:45pm The Lyric Theater

AUGUST 25TH

AUGUST 21ST Kids Art Day

12-6pm 3220 Lexington Road, Nicholasville

5pm Crank and Boom

AUGUST 23RD

This celebration of home gardening is a fun event for anyone to attend. Discover local resources to help make your garden flourish while being thoroughly entertained.

7:30pm The Kentucky Castle

A Night for The Nest

Concerts at the Castle

Central Bank Thursday Night Live 5pm Fifth Third Pavillion

6pm Keene Meadow at Keeneland

Woodland Art Fair

Night at the Legends Game 7pm Whitaker Bank Ballpark

10am Woodland Park

Nothing Down About it Gala 7pm The Speakeasy

AUGUST 19TH Woodland Art Fair

10am Woodland Park

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Bluegrass Tomato Fest

6pm Normandy Farm

Chevy Chase Street Fair 4pm 800 Block Euclid Ave The Chevy Chase Street fair celebrates the Lexington community with live music, street food, drinks, vendors, & family fun activities!

George Clinton and the Parliament Funkadelic Project Pink the Runway Fashion Show

8pm The Lyric Theater

AUGUST 24

TH

An Evening in a Magic Garden 6pm The Apiary

11am Embassy Suites

t nd A heimer’s 9am Fayette County Courthouse


AUGUST 26TH 14th Annual Kids Triathlon

7am C.M. Gatton Beaumont YMCA

The 45th Annual Kentucky Bash 6:30pm Kroger Field

2018 Seed to Feed Dinner Series 6:30pm Royal Spring Park

Red White and Boom

Lexington Jewish Food Festival

5pm Rupp Arena

11:30am Temple Adath Israel

SEPTEMBER 1

AUGUST 29TH

Pyramid Society Egyptian Arabian Event 8am Kentucky Horse Park

AUGUST 30TH

Central Bank Thursday Night Live 5pm Fifth Third Pavilion

Bluegrass Classic Dog Show

The Night Market ST

A Summer Soirée

5:30pm Cheapside Pavilion

7pm Mane on Main

Red White and Boom

Festival of the Horse

5pm Rupp Arena

Georgetown

UK Football vs. Central Michigan University

Roots & Heritage Festival

3:30pm Kroger Field

For over 25 years, the Roots and Heritage Festival has been a pinnacle of regional diversity providing entertainment and education for all ages. Get more details on specific events at rootsfestky.com!

SEPTEMBER 2ND

Wild & Scenic Film Festival

5pm Rupp Arena

7pm The Kentucky Theater

SEPTEMBER 6TH

AUGUST 31

International Nights at the Museum: Japan 6pm Kentucky Horse Park

6pm 714 North Limestone St

Lexington Fest of Ales

9am Kentucky Horse Park

ST

SEPTEMBER 7TH

Red White and Boom

Central Bank Thursday Night Live

SEPTEMBER 8TH Waveland Art Fair

10am Waveland State Historic Site

5pm Fifth Third Pavilion

Stills and Stallions: Festival of the Horse 9:30am Georgetown, KY

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CALENDAR // AUG-SEPT Lexington Habitat for Humanity 30th Anniversary Celebration

Dining Out for Life

The Play That Goes Wrong

DineOutLex.org

8pm Lexington Opera House

2pm Martin Luther King Park

Support AVOL while dining out at some of Central Kentucky's best restaurants! Participating restaurants will donate a minimum of 25% of each bill to support people in our community living with HIV and those at-risk for contracting the virus.

Doggie Paddle Woodland Aquatic Center Come out to the Woodland Aquatic Center for a splashing good time for you and your pup! Mingle with fellow animal lovers and enjoy petrelated vendors, games, food and drinks as well as Lexington Humane Society merchandise. The first 300 dogs that register will receive a free bandana at check-in.

SEPTEMBER 12TH

SEPTEMBER 14

TH

The Play That Goes Wrong

8pm Lexington Opera House

Festival Latino de Lexington

Jefferson Street SoirĂŠe

5pm 120 N Limestone

6pm Jefferson Street

SEPTEMBER 15TH

The Jefferson Street Soiree is back and is sure to be another exciting evening downtown! Come and enjoy Jefferson Street area restaurants, food tents, beer trucks and live music! Jefferson Street will be blocked off from Short Street to Maryland Street.

2018 Bluegrass Baby Expo

10am The Lexington Center

Festival Latino de Lexington

UK Football vs. Murray State University 12pm Kroger Field

SEPTEMBER 16TH High Hope Hunter Pace Series

9am The Kentucky Horse Park

SEPTEMBER 17TH

LHSC Sol & Glow Charity Golf Event 12pm Spring Valley Golf Club

SEPTEMBER 18TH Kids Art Day

5pm Crank & Boom

SEPTEMBER 19TH Lex Dinner Series

4pm 120 N Limestone

6pm Limestone Hall

Thursday Night Live

Moon Festival Celebration

Justin Timberlake

5pm Fifth Third Pavilion

4pm Moondance Amphitheater

7:30pm Rupp Arena

SEPTEMBER 13

TH

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LEXINGTON LEGENDS Family Fun & Learning Night: Fall Festival 5pm Carnegie Center for Literacy & Learning

SEPTEMBER 20

TH

SEPTEMBER 23RD High Hope Steeplechase

11am The Kentucky Horse Park

Central Bank Thursday Night Live

Amelia Earhart

5pm Fifth Third Pavilion

2pm Lexington Children’s Theater

Cyber Security & Technology Conference

SEPTEMBER 27TH

8am Distillery Square

Central Bank Thursday Night Live

SEPTEMBER 21

ST

Reimagine Gallery Hop/Auction and Final Bidding 5-8pm Pam Miller Downtown Arts Center

Claiborne Farm Runhappy 5k 6pm Claiborne Farm

Casino Night at The Livery 7pm The Livery

SEPTEMBER 22ND

UK Football vs. Mississippi State University Kroger Field

5pm Fifth Third Pavilion

SEPTEMBER 28TH

Battle in the Saddle Celebrity Team Penning 7pm The Kentucky Horse Park

Freaky Friday Flicks Moondance Amphitheater

50 Shades of Pain Masquerade Ball 8pm Lexington

SEPTEMBER 29TH

UK Football vs. University of South Carolina Kroger Field

August 7th-9th vs. Asheville Tourists August 10th-13th vs. Kannapolis Intimidators August 23rd-26th vs. Hagerstown Suns August 27th-30th vs. Augusta Greenjackets

LAKESIDE LIVE @7pm August 3rd Group Therapy August 4th Boogie G August 10th Wannabeatles August 11th The Twiggenburys August 17th Lauren Mink August 18th Ark Bank August 24th The Players Club August 25th The Wooks August 31st Zack Attack September 1st Sean Meadows September 7th Grayson Jenkins September 8th Raleigh Keegan September 14th Ben Lacy September 15th Hi-5 September 21st Sammy’s Left Eye September 22nd Frontier September 28th Kara Shepherd + Friends September 29th Aly’An

FOR MORE EVENTS:

Check out the TOPS Community Calendar... visit TOPSinLex.com and click on Calendar! Note: due to the changing nature of events, please check with hosting organizations before making plans.

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Photos

TS TOP SHOTS

Photo by TeamCoyle

Troy Merritt lines up a putt on the 8th green at the PGA Barbasol Golf Championships

Katie Michelle Bouchard is crowned Miss Kentucky

Norma Stanford, Diana Musgrave, Steven King, Teresa Cole and Kate Zaytseva at Arthur Murray: The Greatest Showcase Kip Cornett, Ann Bakhaus and Jim Gray at the Town Branch Fund Press Conference

Tubby Smith at the Barbasol Golf Tournament Awards Party

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Tops in Lexington - August Issue  

Who's Who, What's New and What to Do in Lexington, Kentucky

Tops in Lexington - August Issue  

Who's Who, What's New and What to Do in Lexington, Kentucky