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CONTENTS

OCTOBER

the inspiration issue

Volume 12 Number 10

COMMUNITY 40

Who’s Who: Lisa Adkins

44

Nonprofit Spotlight

84

New & Noteworthy

92

Art in the Bluegrass: I Was Here

94

In the Buf: In Little Pink Gowns

99

Local Cancer Warriors

40 99

LIFESTYLE

18

119

Health Report: I Was Diagnosed with Cancer, Now What?

124

TOP Dressed

127

Outfit of the Month: Diamonds are a Girl’s Best Friend

128

GorJess: Kim Kardashian West’s Smoky Eye Look

130

Beauty Buzz: Safer Beauty Products

132

Wow Wedding: Shannon + Pete

136

Weddings Unveiled: Fall Foliage Bouquets

October 2018 | TopsInLex.com

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CONTENTS 161

AT HOME 140

Tour of Homes: Tranquil Townhome

161

Color Catalog: Pantone’s Ash Rose

162

Super Mom: Charity Ford

166

Five Strategies to Raising Generous, Charitable Kids

168

Pets: National Walk Your Dog Week

EATS & ENTERTAINMENT

172 186

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172

Dining: Napa Prime

176

popculture recipe: Sweet Potato Grits with Chicken Sausage

179

Top 5 Dining: Appetizers + Small Plates

181

Dining Guide

182

Beer + Wine of the Month

185

BBN Football: Bouvier Rises

186

BBN Basketball: Keldon Tough

188

Equine Update: Breeder’s Cup


CONTENTS PHOTOS 34

Out & About

192

TOPS September Preview Party

194

Women Leading KY After Hours

196

Kentucky Bash

198

Night with the Stars

200

Salute to Small Business Awards Luncheon

204

McDazzle

208

Lexington Habitat for Humanity 30th Anniversary

212

Casino Night at the Livery

214

Recycle the Runway

218

Garden Gala

226

Top Shots

196

204 214

CALENDAR 220 26

October - November 2018

October 2018 | TopsInLex.com

Event photo captions are typically provided to TOPS by the event organizers. We do our best to check names and spelling‌but we are all human and make mistakes. Please contact kristen@topsmarketing.com with any corrections and we will make note of it in the next issue.


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The best and latest Who’s Who, What’s New and What To Do. topsinlex.com | topslouisville.com

October 2018

PICTURE THIS Book one of our talented photographers at topsinlex.com/book-a-photographer.php. vol. 12 no. 10

ADVERTISE TOP Marketing Group can get your message in front of Central Kentuckians everywhere, through print, digital, email and social media. Email us at advertising@topsinlex.com.

COVER On the Cover: Lung Cancer Survivor, Teddi Smith Robillard

Wearing earrings from Peplum Photo by Erica Lee Photography

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STAFF Keith Yarber, Publisher kyarber@topsmarketing.com

Camile Turner, Digital Specialist camile@topsmarketing.com

Kristen Oakley, President/COO kristen@topsmarketing.com

Savannah Blank, Digital Specialist savannah@topsmarketing.com

Danielle Pope, VP of Communications danielle@topsmarketing.com

Amanda Harper, Production Manager amandah@topsmarketing.com

Megan Hillenmeyer, Editor megan@topsmarketing.com

Jen Brown, Graphic Designer jen@topsmarketing.com

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Megan Martin, Account Executive mmartin@topsmarketing.com

Maredith Woods, Assistant maredith@topsmarketing.com

Diana Gevedon, Business Manager billing@topsmarketing.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Next Month

NOVEMBER

go red + meet the millennials

Photographers: Paul Atkinson, Rob Bolson, Ron Morrow, Keni Parks,

Danny Pendleton, Woody Phillips, Ruth Weinstock and Erica Lee

Writers: Sarah Boerkircher, Jesse L. Brooks, Amanda Harper, Michelle Rauch, Jen Roytz, Larry Vaught, Donna Ison, Kathie Stamps, Barbara Meyer and Buffy Lawson Interns: Jordan Holt, Mckenzie Miller and Kaisha Ray

The views and comments expressed by the authors are not always that of our editors or publishers. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this publication, TOP Marketing Group accepts no responsibility or liability for any errors, omissions or resultant consequences, including any loss or damage arising from the reliance on information in this publication. All images contained in TOPS in Lexington Magazine are subject to copyright of the artist or photographer as named, but not limited thereto. Reproduction of any part of this magazine without prior written permission is prohibited.

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Photos

DV8K Run

OUT and ABOUT

Yudofsky Fur & Leather Ribbon Cutting

Kentucky Chinese American Association Moon Festival

United Way of the Bluegrass Campaign Kickoff

Belle Vie Celebration

From new technology to creating a cyber safe culture, participants learned what is available to boost their cyber-defense at the Cybersecurity and Technology Conference 34

October 2018 | TopsInLex.com


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40

Who’s Who: Lisa Adkins

92

Art in the Bluegrass: I Was Here

44

Nonprofit Spotlight

94

In the Buf: In Little Pink Dresses

84

New & Noteworthy

99

Local Cancer Warriors


Community

who’s who:

Lisa Adkins

of the Blue Grass Community Foundation story by Sarah Boerkircher

When Lisa and her family moved from Kansas City to Lexington in 2009, she said that it was serendipitous that the position of president was vacant at the Blue Grass Community Foundation. For thirteen years, Lisa had worked for the Greater Kansas City Community Foundation while her husband, David, served as a Kansas senator. “It’s fate that my work at the Greater Kansas City Community Foundation was the best preparation for serving as president and CEO for BGCF,” she said. “It is a dream come true to further BGCF’s mission by creating generous, vibrant and engaged communities both in Lexington, where the Foundation is headquartered, and in the many great communities we serve across the Bluegrass and Appalachia in Kentucky.” Lisa also notes that growth doesn’t occur in a vacuum. “With vision from a great board of directors, engaged donors and highly committed staff with passion and deep expertise, there’s no limit to how charitable our city can become,” she said. During Lisa’s tenure, BGCF has received a number of awards, including Commerce Lexington’s Small Business Nonprofit of the Year (2011), Kentucky’s Innovative Nonprofit of the Year (2012) and the Lauren K. Weinberg Humanitarian Award (2017). As an attorney, Lisa has been recognized as a leader in growing philanthropic and community engagement, and in 2016, she received

the Community Vision Award from the Kentucky Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects. Besides local and regional accolades, BGCF has also received national recognition. In 2014, BGCF was ranked the fifth most active community foundation grantmaker in the United States. “We were thrilled, but not completely surprised, to learn that BGCF is among the top five community foundations when it comes to making grants for community good,” Lisa said. “Our mission is to invest in our communities through catalytic grantmaking and strategic community leadership. Our donors are extraordinarily generous, which means we are committed to being the best stewards for the funds our donors entrust to us.” For more than 50 years, philanthropic individuals, families, businesses and nonprofits have partnered with Blue Grass Community Foundation to create hundreds of charitable funds. As the oldest community foundation in Kentucky, BGCF holds more than $130 million in assets across nearly 600 charitable funds. Blue Grass Community Foundation’s mission is to enhance the quality of life in Lexington, and the broader region, for both today and tomorrow. “Beyond growing the charitable giving and engagement culture in Lexington, our efforts are centered around downtown and neighborhood revitalization, healthy food access, and thanks to meaningful partnerships with city government, nonprofits, philanthropists and grassroots leaders, we are committed to making Lexington’s downtown more people-focused, welcoming and inclusive,” Lisa said. With this vision of creating a culture of charitable giving and growing civic engagement, BGCF365 launched in August 2017, at the Foundation’s 50th anniversary celebration. Beloved philanthropists

our donors are extraordinarily generous, which means we are committed to being the best stewards for the funds our donors entrust to us.

Since joining the Blue Grass Community Foundation (BGCF) in 2009, President and CEO Lisa Adkins has increased the Foundation’s charitable assets by more than 400 percent. Lisa prides herself on leading BGCF’s successful transformation by growing Lexington’s charitable culture, with a focus on building community generosity, vibrancy and engagement.

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Community

John and Donna Hall, who are deeply invested in nurturing the next generation of leaders in Lexington, established the BGCF365 endowment with a gift of $365,000. “By engaging the emerging generation of civic and philanthropic leaders, BGCF365 is thinking and planning for the future,” Lisa said. “BGCF365, which is like a giving club, offers the opportunity for anyone who cares about Lexington to learn more about grants and charitable giving, and socialize and engage with other forward thinkers.” BGCF365 connects the next generation of civic and charitable leadership in Lexington. By contributing $1 per day for 365 days (gifting $365 annually), one becomes an active member. Pooled with fellow BGCF365 members, a dollar-a-day commitment compounds, creating a powerful grantmaking engine for nonprofits and civic projects. Half of a member’s daily/annual donation goes to immediate grantmaking while the other half goes to the BGCF365 Endowment, which serves as a perpetual charitable asset and

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When it comes to charitable giving... we’re ready to make the most of every gift, large or small.

provides additional grantmaking resources for generations to come. “Charitable giving and civic engagement are equally dear to my heart,” Lisa said. “BGCF365 hits all my sweet spots because it is fun, simple and accessible for all. It gives the next generation of emerging leaders the information and tools they need to engage in effective and rewarding charitable giving.” As Lisa explained, a misconception of a community foundation is that only high-net-worth individuals can bring an offer to their table. Lisa’s goal is that anyone and everyone who wants to be charitable has the opportunity to do so. “Bottom line, we are in the business of building a stronger culture of charitable giving, so we want to work with anyone who wants to be charitable,” she said. “When it comes to charitable giving, whether it is individuals, families, nonprofits, businesses or professional advisors, we’re ready to make the most of every gift, large or small.•


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LOCAL

NONPROFITS Helping hands make Lexington a strong community. YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE.


Lexington Shriners Medical Center shrinerslexington.com

L

exington Shriners is a recognized leader in treating orthopaedic conditions in children from birth until age 18. We provide pediatric specialty care in the areas of clubfoot, hip disorders, scoliosis, hand and upper extremity disorders, limb deficiencies, spina bifida, cerebral palsy, osteogenesis imperfecta, neuromuscular disorders, sports injuries and other orthopaedic related conditions with a goal to restore each child physically, emotionally and socially. All care and services are provided in a family-centered environment regardless of the families’ ability to pay. The medical staff at Lexington Shriners Medical Center consists of board-certified physicians and surgeons who are highly qualified, caring and prominent in their specialties. Multiple services associated with orthopaedics; such as, physical therapy, occupational therapy, prosthetics, orthotics, radiology, motion analysis, care coordination, social services, outpatient, and ambulatory surgery care are all provided under one roof.

Presented by

member FDIC

UnitedBankKY.com 800.227.1602

WesBanco Bank, Inc. is a Member FDIC

UNITED BANK IS JOINING THE WESBANCO TEAM

wesbanco.com 800.905.9043

Same smiles. More Services Coming Soon!

FAYETTE | JESSAMINE | SCOTT | WOODFORD

TOPS Magazine | October 2018

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Community

American Cancer Society Melinda Puckett and Lisa Goode

cancer.org

A

fter Melinda Puckett, a Nicholasville resident, was diagnosed with breast cancer, she needed transportation to her treatments in Lexington. She was connected with the American Cancer Society’s (ACS) Road to Recovery® program and started to receive rides from one of their volunteer drivers, Lisa Goode. Lisa began volunteering for ACS in 2014 when she moved back to Lexington. After experiencing an overwhelming amount of love and support from family and friends during her father’s colon cancer and sister’s breast cancer diagnosis, she knew it was her turn to give back. Lisa and Melinda formed an immediate bond upon their first introduction. They shared stories and supported one another. Lisa recalls one vivid car ride when they listened to the radio. The message being shared was so closely related to the topic the two women were discussing that she remembers Melinda graciously telling her, “You were meant to be in this car with me.” “Lisa was fantastic,” Melinda added. “She was always good at listening to me, hugging me, and reminding me to ask God for guidance and help.” The two have remained friends. They text one another and meet up for lunch from time to time. Right now, one of the biggest barriers to cancer care is transportation. Even the best treatment can’t work if a patient can’t get there. A successful transportation assistance program can be a tremendous asset to the community. The Road to Recovery® program offers cancer patients free transportation to and from their cancerrelated treatment. Volunteers donate their time and the use of their personal vehicle to give cancer patients in their community a much-needed ride. Lisa has already donated over 70 rides to cancer patients. If you are interested in learning more about Road to Recovery please contact Kelsey Lewis (kelsey.lewis@cancer.org, 859-260-8285). The American Cancer Society’s mission is to save lives, celebrate lives and lead the fight for a world without cancer. Until that is a reality, they are funding and conducting research, sharing expert information, supporting patients and spreading the word about prevention.

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Community

Lexington Humane Society AdoptLove.net

L

HS is the largest pet adoption agency and provider of lowcost spay/neuter services in Central Kentucky. We are a 501(c)3 organization solely dependent on private donations, grants, and community support to fulfill our lifesaving mission to advocate the compassionate treatment of animals; educate the community on responsible, lifelong pet ownership; and promote adoption as the best option when searching for a new pet.

Meet Holly Holly, a senior Yorkie, found herself at the Lexington Humane Society (LHS) by no fault of her own. Her owner was barely able to care for herself let alone an aging dog. After months of neglect, Holly’s owner finally did the right thing and surrendered her to LHS so this poor pup could receive the care she so desperately needed. Holly received immediate medical care to address a variety of health issues including emergency surgery to amputate her severely infected leg. She is now in one of our many foster homes healing from her surgery and loving all of the TLC she is receiving. Holly is just one of the 5,000 homeless but hopeful animals we care for each year thanks to the support of friends like Don Jacobs. She is an example of how our life-saving programs provide for young and old. Every year, we provide emergency care for hundreds of Second Chances animals, place 700 animals into foster homes, and provide enrichment programs that allow us to care for our animals for however long it takes to find their forever homes. Holly is just one of the many happy love stories we encounter while fulfilling our mission to Give Love, Teach Love, and Adopt Love.

Presented by

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Community

UK Markey Cancer Foundation’s Markey Women Strong ukmarkey.org

Markey Women Strong members and Distinguished Researcher Award Recipients Katie Alford, Dr. Rina Plattner, Josefine Young, Dr. Kathleen O’Connor and Lois Reynolds

O

n average, one in two men and one in three women will hear the words “you have cancer” in their lifetime. It’s a sobering statistic, but one that many at the UK Markey Cancer Center are working tirelessly to change. As renowned physician-scientist, Dr. Edward Romond, MD of the UK Markey Cancer Center once stated, “the best hope a cancer patient has is good research.” With that as their mantra, a group of women banded together in 2016 to change the face of cancer in Kentucky. Spearheaded by founding members Lois Reynolds, Sally Humphrey, Katie Alford and Josefine Young, Markey Women Strong is a philanthropy group comprised of women who have and will continue to make a meaningful difference in cancer research.

Two of Markey Women Strong's founding members Lois Reynolds (outside left) and Sally Humphrey (outside right) flank 2018 grant recipients Drs. Sally Ellington and Kathleen O'Connor.

Each member of Markey Women Strong contributes $1,000 annually, and with their pooled funds, the group offers grants to support groundbreaking research that will not only help those facing cancer in Kentucky, but quite possibly the world. Throughout the year, the UK Markey Cancer Foundation, which manages the Markey Women Strong fund, hosts a lecture series that features updates and scientific advancements that are being made as a result of their funding. The UK Markey Cancer Center is among the top 5 percent of all cancer centers in the country, and a major reason for that is its highly-accomplished research staff. Thus far the members of Markey Women Strong have granted $200,000 in research grants to some of Markey’s top researchers, whose work is focused on breast cancer, melanoma and cancer drug interactions. To learn more about Markey Women Strong, contact Sarah Ronniger at the UK Markey Cancer Center office at (859) 257-1753 or Sarah.Ronniger@uky.edu.

Markey Women Strong member Daisy Phipps Pulito, along with her husband, David (left) and Dr. Aju Mathew. Mathew oversaw Daisy’s treatment during her treatment for breast cancer at the UK Markey Cancer Center

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American Heart Association heart.org

T

he American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women movement is quickly approaching its 15th year of sharing awareness and action regarding the number one killer of women in our country: cardiovascular disease. When the movement began, awareness of this fact hovered in the mid teens, but now, with the help of many great national and local sponsors, chairs, committee members and event attendees, the word is out: women must take care of their hearts! Some 80% of cardiovascular issues can be impacted by lifestyle change. Not smoking, watching what you eat and moving a little more can have major positive results. Also, knowing your numbers—weight, blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar—and then taking steps to improve them, can also lead to better heart health. Finally, knowing what to do in the event of a cardiac emergency—calling 911 and knowing how to perform CPR— is something for which everyone should be prepared. For more information about Go Red for Women, contact Emily Blair at (859) 317-6882.

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Laila Ali and Nancy Cox at Go Red for Women


New Life Day Center newlifedaycenter.org

N

ew Life Day Center (NLDC) is a faith-based, daytime homeless shelter and connecting point in downtown Lexington, KY. The Day Center aims to meet the physical and spiritual needs of their homeless clients, by either connecting them to vital services across the city or bringing those services directly to them. These services include but are not limited to:

Access to free preventative medical care including health screenings, vaccinations and primary care. Eight weekly Narcotics Anonymous and Alcoholics Anonymous addiction meetings.

NLDC operates the “End Panhandling Now” van which provides day labor to homeless panhandlers as an alternative to begging on the street corners.

NLDC is the only provider of breakfast for the homeless. Along with a daily continental breakfast, NLDC offers 6,000 sq. feet of daytime shelter space.

Volunteers Larry & Debbie Jones with Tyler Hurst, Director of New Life Day Center

Presented by

3 weekly church services which include a Thursday morning Bible study, a Friday night fellowship service, and a Sunday afternoon worship service.

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Community

AIDS Volunteers, Inc. (AVOL) avolky.org

M

eredith begins her day like any typical wife and stay-at home mom, helping her husband and children get ready for their day. Like roughly 1,200 other women in Kentucky, she begins her day aware that she is living with HIV. When first diagnosed, Meredith felt anger and fear and worried that her HIV status would be a defining characteristic that would prevent her from having fulfilling relationships and from having more children. Six months after diagnosis, she sought treatment for substance use. After completing treatment, she visited AVOL for housing assistance and supportive services. Meredith credits AVOL and other organizations – like the Chrysalis House and Bluegrass Care Clinic – for helping her restore her sense of hope. Meredith shares, “AVOL has helped in my healing process so much. I was able to be open about who I am. I started volunteering and now my husband is an employee. Because of AVOL, HIV is a common word in our home that we are not ashamed of.” Meredith’s husband, Aaron, now draws on his experience providing education and HIV testing, and connecting newly diagnosed individuals to treatment. He recalls when Meredith first disclosed her HIV status to him, “I needed to take time to process it but I was aware enough of HIV to know it wasn’t the death sentence that it used to be. I really liked her and knew she was worth it. She and our kids are my world.” Meredith learned she could have more children without passing the virus on to them. With proper treatment, the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV is less than 2%. Today, Meredith enjoys a full life as a mom to three children, all of whom are HIV negative. “HIV does not define who I am but it is a part of who I am,” Meredith says. “My relationship with my husband is beautiful and fulfilling for us both. We have both overcome addiction and many would think we were hopeless but each day we are reminded to stay focused on what is important in life – home, family, love, each other.”

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Presented by


thank you you made it

from

MEANINGFUL

Thank you Central Kentucky for Dining Out For Life on September 13th in support of HIV/AIDS services provided by AVOL. Your generosity and the hospitality of our partnering restaurants and sponsors made it possible to raise critical funding that will assist many like Meredith. Over 125 volunteers and thousands of diners made the evening a huge success. September 13th was AVOL’s 9th annual event that celebrated AVOL’s 30th year in this community serving those living with HIV through emergency services, case management and housing support services; and providing extensive HIV testing. We couldn’t do what we do without the loving support of our local community.

you made it

POSSIBLE

you made it

DELICIOUS A&W Burgers Chicken Floats (Hamburg, Leestown, Main St.) Alfalfa Arcadium Bar and Friends [Trucks and Tents: Atomic Ramen, Fida’s Caribbean Cafe, Rise Up! Pizza andTuk Tuk Sri Lankan Bites] Atomic Ramen (The Summit) Backroads Bakery Blue Door Smokehouse Broomwagon Coffee and Bikes BRU Burger Bar Carson’s Food and Drink Coles 735 Main Columbia Steakhouse (Downtown) County Club, Crank & Boom (Distillery District + The Summit) Distilled Doodle’s Breakfast and Lunch Dudley’s on Short Good Foods Co-op Graze (Limestone & Clark County) Grillfish Hanna’s on Lime Heirloom (Midway) J. Render’s Southern Table Le Deauville Lexington Diner Liberty Road Cafe Locals’ Craft Food & Drink Lussi Brown Coffee Bar Lynagh’s Irish Pub Mad Mushroom Pizza Mezzo (Midway) Mouse Trap Nick Ryan’s North Lime Coffee & Donuts (all locations) Oscar Diggs Pasta Garage Red Light Kitchen Sage Garden (Frankfort) Saul Good (all locations) Sidebar Grill Smithtown Seafood (West 6th St. and The Summit) Soundbar (Official After Party) Stella’s Kentucky Deli The Sage Rabbit The Sweet Spot Third Street Stuff Walker’s of Lexington West Main Crafting Co. West Sixth Brewing Whiskey Bear (The Summit)


Community

Bluegrass Care Navigators bgcarenav.org

B

luegrass Care Navigators is a national leader in delivering high quality care to the seriously ill and a pioneer in developing new programs that are responsive to the evolving needs of seriously ill patients and their families. In addition to providing hospice services in 32 counties across central, southeastern and northern Kentucky, Bluegrass Care Navigators operates Bluegrass Extra Care, Bluegrass Transitional Care, Bluegrass Palliative Care and Bluegrass Grief Care. All of these programs offer invaluable services that enhance the quality of life of patients and families.

Meet Sarah Sarah Guthrie never imagined she would become familiar with Bluegrass Care Navigators at such a young age. At just 28 years old, Sarah found herself speaking to a hospice nurse about care for her father, who had been admitted to UK Hospital with a serious illness resulting in a terminal diagnosis. “I was totally unprepared for how to handle it,” she said. “I have loving and supportive friends and family, but as an only child, I’ve never felt more alone and helpless.” Bluegrass Care Navigators helped Sarah through a tremendously difficult time, developing a plan to keep her father comfortable during his final days. Sarah Guthrie speaks at the opening of the Bluegrass Care Navigator’s inpatient Hospice Care Center at UK

Sarah’s relationship with the organization continued as she utilized bereavement services. During this time, Sarah began to think about ways she could give back. She became a volunteer first helping with the annual Bundle Up with Bourbon & Blues event and recently worked with children at Camp Hope, a grief camp for children who experienced a loss like she did. “I started volunteering for Bluegrass Care Navigators because I wanted to try and give back what they gave to me—a sense of hope,” Guthrie said. “It never crossed my mind how much children needed this feeling until I volunteered at Camp Hope. There aren’t words to describe watching a child’s eyes fill with hope again. It was my most favorite volunteer experience.”

Presented by

Sarah Guthrie and her father

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Community

Cure KY Kids curekykids.org

C

ancer is the leading cause of death by disease among America’s children. Over 150 Kentucky children are newly diagnosed with cancer each year and thousands are being treated every day. In light of these overwhelming statistics, Cure KY Kids is a non-profit organization created to raise funds for childhood cancer research and services in Kentucky. The organization is dedicated to supporting children with cancer and other illnesses as well as their families. It is their mission to work tirelessly to fund lifesaving research until there is a cure and to provide Kentucky’s children suffering from cancer the most advanced and comprehensive support services available. Funds raised through Cure Ky Kids are used to support research, education efforts and programs at Kentucky’s pediatric cancer centers in addition to funding services that provide support to children with cancer and their families. Cure KY Kids is inspired by the thousands of children and their families in Kentucky that wake each day, put one foot in front of the other and fight this battle. They are the founders of this organization and Cure KY Kids is blessed to be one part of the doctors, nurses, scientists, researchers, caretakers and countless others who help to support their cause. Cure KY Kids is proud to have worked with the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet to design and develop the Curing Childhood Cancer license plate as a specialty license plate in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. After years of work by Cure KY Kids board members, families battling cancer and numerous others passionate about this cause, the Curing Childhood Cancer License Plate is now available at all local tag offices in Kentucky and can be seen on vehicles on the roads from Bowling Green Presented by to Florence and Ashland to Paducah raising awareness and funds for Childhood Cancer.

CURE KY Kids board members help raise awareness about childhood cancer at a local fundraising and awareness event

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God’s Pantry godspantry.org

G

od’s Pantry Food Bank is based in Lexington, Ky., where it was founded in 1955 by Mim Hunt. It began as a small pantry to serve hungry Lexingtonians and has grown to become Kentucky’s largest food bank with 50 counties within its service area. GPFB now reaches more than 200,000 Kentuckians annually through more than 400 programs and partner agencies. The Food Bank, a member of Feeding America, sources, stores, and distributes groceries, with the goal of reaching anyone who is hungry or at risk of hunger in their service area. Last year those groceries became more than 28 million meals for Kentucky children, senior citizens, and families. Those meals included a variety of meat and vegetarian protein items, dairy products, fresh fruits and vegetables, and canned and dry goods with the intent of positively affecting client health by giving access to the building blocks of a balanced diet.

Presented by

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Children’s Charity of the Bluegrass

childrenscharityofthebluegrass.org

T

he Children’s Charity Fund of the Bluegrass was founded in 1981 to help provide needed funds for the Child Development Center of the Bluegrass, an agency that provides a full range of services for children from birth to five years of age who have disabilities. The first Children’s Charity of the Bluegrass fundraising activity was the Children’s Charity Celebrity Golf Classic and it became an immediate success. Since then, it has evolved into one of America’s most enduring celebrity golf tournaments that has donated over $14 million to various children’s charities around the Bluegrass. Led by an all-volunteer based charity, more than $350,000 was donated in 2018 alone, which will touch the lives of over 18,000 children locally.

Presented by

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Community

Old Friends

oldfriendsequine.org

I Danthebluegrassman and Fighting City Hall

n a little more than a decade Old Friends, the Thoroughbred Retirement Facility in Georgetown, Kentucky, has put a new face on the concept of equine aftercare. Founded in 2003 by former Boston Globe film critic Michael Blowen, the organization has grown from a leased paddock and one horse to a 236-acre farm and a herd of over 200 rescued and retired horses, including 25 pensioned stallions. Blowen had long believed that horses past their prime could still be valuable—money-earning, even—if the venue was right. And so Old Friends tested the concept by opening its doors to the public, inviting fans to come and revisit their turf heroes. And come they did. These days the farm attracts over 20,000 visitors annually who come to swoon over such champions as Breeders’ Cup Classic winner Alphabet Soup, Belmont Stakes winners Touch Gold and Sarava, three-time Santa Anita Handicap winner Game On Dude, and Kentucky Derby and Preakness champions Silver Charm and War Emblem. While such rock stars draw crowds, the revenue they raise supports hard-knockers like Easy Grades, a one-time Kentucky Derby contender who ended up struggling in low-level claiming races at the age of nine. Or Mikethespike, a River Downs-Beulah Park warrior with 125 starts on his resume.

Chris McCarron with Touch Gold

In 2014 Old Friends was rewarded with a Special Eclipse Award honoring “Extraordinary Service in the sport of Thoroughbred racing.” But perhaps the greatest reward of all has been the respect and support of the owners, trainers and fans who not only donate to the cause of protecting these amazing athletes but come out to the farm often to pay homage to our champs. To make a donation visit the website or call (502) 863-1775.

Presented by War Emblem Photos by Laura Battles; Chris McCarron by Joyce Patci

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Community

Lexington Dream Factory lexingtondreamfactory.org

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o a seriously ill child, the opportunity to enjoy the simple pleasures of childhood can be the best medicine of all. It may be the inspiration that motivates the child to hang in there through a time of great suffering and burdensome treatments. The Dream Factory, Inc. was founded in 1980 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky, by Charles Henault. Today, through over 38 chapters nationwide, including the local Lexington, Kentucky chapter, the Dream Factory grants dreams to children ages 3-18 who have been diagnosed with critical or chronic illnesses. The Lexington Chapter of the Dream Factory grants dreams to children in the Lexington, Southern and Eastern Kentucky area. The organization receives dream requests and the time-frame for granting those dreams are often dictated by physician’s permission and health restraints. Since the Lexington chapter was founded in 1988 it has granted more than 800 Dreams and those dreams have varied wildly over the years. The Lexington Dream Factory has granted Dreams ranging from trips to Disney World to concert tickets and backstage passes, to shopping sprees, to a variety of vacations and even a trip to meet the Pope.

Meet Savannah Savannah Cooper’s dream was to go see Hamilton on Broadway in New York City. “When I was seven years old I was diagnosed with tethered cord syndrome, which caused me to be in constant pain and I was having frequent bladder and kidney infections—that was pretty miserable. Then I had my first major surgery, which was a spine surgery in 2008. Then four years ago I ended up getting pretty sick again. I ended up losing my hair and have had about 40 kidney infections. I have an amazing physician and she knew how much we had been struggling and how much we needed a break so she contacted the Dream Factory. I have always been in the performing arts, so my Dream was to go see Hamilton. Getting tickets is pretty much impossible, so I was thrilled. And then when I got there they surprised me with a private tour of Yankee Stadium. I am a huge Aaron Judge and baseball fan so being able to go in the dugouts and batting cages was just amazing. It’s really hard when you are chronically ill because I am constantly in and out of the hospital...so to be able to go and just have fun...was just amazing. The Dream Factory is just an incredible organization and I really encourage people to support the Dream Factory because it was just honestly a Dream come true!

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Community

Thursday’s Child thursdayschildky.org

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n September, 1989, a need was filled to support the waiting children in Kentucky’s Special Needs Adoption Program by creating Thursday’s Child, Inc., a non-profit 501(c)(3). Board members are volunteers allowing all funds to be dedicated to supporting the waiting children. The Board’s mission is to recruit adoptive parents; support waiting children; and provide post-adoption support. Thursday’s Child is blessed to have filled many needs; foster youth graduation celebrations, Christmas gifts, clothing requests and scholarships. However, their biggest challenges remain, finding special homes for special children. Fortunately, there are many caring people looking to make a “Forever Family” with a waiting child. Ken and Loralee Ridge are not exactly sure when their familial goal changed from “having a family” to building one. They married in 1982 and had what some view as the ideal household by 1988. “Yes, we had a daughter, son, a cat and a dog. Yet, somehow we knew two children were not a full house for us,” said Loralee. At some point in the few years following the birth of their second child, they attended an informational meeting to explore adoption. This was based on a desire to provide a family for additional children, knowing there were, and still are, children waiting for families. “While not the case for everyone, we simply felt there was no need to have more children when we could adopt children who had a desire to be part of a family they could call their own...forever,” Loralee recalled. The 20-plus years since that first meeting have been full ones indeed. Instead of only adopting, the Ridge family made the decision to foster as well. Fostering has its unique set of challenges because many children won their hearts and were later reunited with their birth families, leaving Ken and Loralee with hearts that needed to mend. Of the children with whom they shared a home through fostering, seven became part of their family forever. “Thanks to Thursday’s Child and the integral part they play in the Foster and Adoptive Parents of Lexington support group, we have been able to remain balanced and informed as we navigate this roller coaster we call parenting,” Loralee said. Presented by Parenting is much like a world-class roller coaster. This applies to parenting biological children, children who have been in foster care, and adopted children. The ride includes joy, thrills, plummets, curves, and much anticipation. “When we finish the ride, unbuckle the seat belt, and step off, we find ourselves saying, “‘I would definitely do that again!’” shared Loralee.

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Brain Injury Alliance of Kentucky biak.us

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s part of the statewide nonprofit Brain Injury Alliance of Kentucky we bring help, hope and healing to all Kentuckians affected by brain injury. Brain injury is unpredictable in its consequences. It affects who we are and how we think, act and feel. In a matter of seconds a person’s life is changed forever. Every 9 seconds, someone in the United States sustains a brain injury. Our mission is to promote awareness of the prevalence of brain injury; to give a voice to survivors to help change public policy, identify gaps in services and needs; prevention efforts; and education regarding self-advocacy and legislative advocacy. We seek to empower and help those individuals whose brain injury has left them feeling powerless and alone to realize the power of working together can achieve meaningful change in public policy and lives. For more information or to volunteer, please visit our website, biak.us or call 502.493.0609.

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Lexington Woman’s Club lwckentucky.org

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he Lexington Woman’s Club (LWC), through its Children’s Clothing Center, provides a week’s worth of school clothing, including new underwear and winter coats, to over 1,000 disadvantaged K-5th grade children in Fayette County public schools each year. Club members stock and staff the Clothing Center. In a one-on-one shopping experience with an LWC member or volunteer, each child visiting the center receives at least two new clothing outfits and several gently-used outfits.

LWC also funds a full-tuition college scholarship annually for a Fayette County female over 25 years of age and one smaller scholarship for a graduating Fayette County high school senior excelling in service to her community and school. LWC members share fun and friendship and gain leadership skills as we strive “to make a positive difference in our community,” the core goal of LWC, a member of the General Federation of Women’s Clubs.

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Community

Kentucky Equine Humane Center kyehc.org

“Please help me with my horse. I don’t know where else to go.” Those are words the staff at The Kentucky Equine Humane Center hear way too often unfortunately. The KyEHC is a safe haven for horses whose owners can no longer care for them, or are victims of abuse, abandonment and neglect. One winter day, the Center received a call from a woman who was desperate to find a home for her horse. Sadly, she was in the midst of a difficult financial situation, and was trying her best to find a safe place for her gelding. Because of his boarding situation, she had taken to sleeping in her car in order to make sure he was safe. Alvin P showed up, all 16.1h of him, a beautiful chestnut gelding with a kind and soft eye. He raced eighteen times as a three, four and five-year-old, before being retired. He is now 19 yrs old. Because of his age and current condition, Alvin P is not very suitable for riding and is one of the Center’s companion horses. His calm and loving demeanor is his greatest asset. Because horses like Alvin P have much to contribute, The Kentucky Equine Humane Center is launching Heads Up, Hearts Open, a program of equine-assisted growth, awareness, and communication clinics using these companion horses, to give them a chance to be of value to those who understand them and need them. To kick this program off, Hoofbeats, a benefit concert on October 26, is planned featuring Brandon Ray, Abby Anderson and Dustin Collins! Visit kyehc.org for more information and tickets.

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Community

Ampersand ampersandky.org

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ounded in 1974, Ampersand provides free and confidential therapeutic services to anyone in our community impacted by sexual violence. Through prevention education and advocacy efforts Ampersand gives every member of our community, from students to law enforcement to medical professionals, the tools to better support survivors and prevent sexual violence. Ampersand is here for everyone. Ampersand provides a 24 hour crisis line, counseling, medical accompaniment, legal advocacy, long term psychotherapy, and trauma informed equine and yoga group therapy programs. At Ampersand Sexual Violence Resource Center, our vision is freedom from sexual violence. We believe that everyone is impacted by sexual violence can take small steps towards a different culture. Ampersand’s 24/7 support line is often one of the first points of contact for a survivor, and is primarily staffed by volunteer advocates.

Meet Emma Ampersand would have a hard time meeting the needs of our community without the aid of volunteers. Volunteering at Ampersand is intimidating to some, but not to people like Emma. Emma recognizes the hard work necessary to the program, but also sees the benefits. “I was a teenager, I was very flippy floppy and I didn’t really stand for much but I feel like I’ve grown in my beliefs and value systems.” Advocates are on the ground building relationships with community partners. “I enjoyed…getting to see behind the curtain and…how Ampersand and Lexington come together.” Empowering community members to serve as advocates in this way brings so many unique perspectives to Ampersand. Because we believe everyone is impacted by sexual violence, that also means we know everyone can play a role in building a different culture. Join this work by visiting ampersandky.org to learn more and reach out for support 24/7 at 859-253-2511.

Presented by Photo by Sarah Caton of Space, Place & Southern Grace

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Community

Building Industry Association Cares biacentralky.com

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hen Amya Catching’s 12th birthday celebration in her friend’s home turned into an unthinkable tragedy in July 2017, the Lexington community was burdened with sorrow and fear. All eyes turned to the young victim, who’s smile and courage flipped this terrible accident into a reason to give people hope where it seemed none could be found. A bullet from a drive-by shooting struck Amya’s spinal cord, leaving her paralyzed from the sternum down. Despite this tragedy, Amya’s unrelenting spirit inspired the 501c3 charitable organization, BIA Cares, together with members of the Building Industry Association of Central Kentucky, community leaders and other local businesses to rally support to build a fully accessible home for Amya. It’s been over a year since Amya began radiating courage in the face of her daunting situation, and now, her remarkable positivity reflects out into the community inspiring others. This BIA Cares project, under the direction and oversight of three top BIA of CKY builder members, DB Homes, Andover Construction, LLC, and Crawford Builders, is nearly completed. BIA Cares and contributing companies will have achieved their mission of making this home one that Amya can thrive in so that she may continue to grow and inspire people with her optimism for many birthdays to come. BIA Cares has reached their fundraising goal for Amya’s house will be able to donate the home. There are others that need help. BIA Cares now calls upon Kentuckians to help build a better future for more Central Kentucky deserving families. Your support will ensure that BIA Cares can achieve their mission. BIA Cares was founded to build a better future through active participation in community service projects that support and promote the physical, emotional, and social well-being of Kentucky families.

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Bluegrass bluegrass.org

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luegrass provides services to help children, adults and families live their best lives. Since 1966, we have served Central Kentucky with mental health, substance use and disability services. Bluegrass employs 200 psychiatrists and licensed therapists to assist 25,000 Kentuckians each year. We believe each person deserves supportive, respectful, integrated care and that all individuals have the ability to improve their lives. Our team of caring professionals makes our clients their number one priority. The emotional, mental and physical well-being of our community is at the center of everything we do. Bluegrass is on the front lines of the opioid crisis in Kentucky with a full continuum of evidence-based services beginning with prevention and intensive outpatient programs and residential services for pregnant women, to quick response teams working with individuals who have recently overdosed, to 28-day residential programs and medication assisted treatment. We are Bluegrass. We can help. Call our 24-Hour Helpline 1.800.928.8000.

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Makenna Foundation makennafoundation.com

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he Makenna Foundation was creative to honor and remember the child that Greg and Sheila David lost; 20-month Makenna suffered from a fatal disease called Pulmonary Veno Occlusion. Janice Mueller, owner/broker of RE/MAX Creative Realty, joined forces with the David’s in 2001 to form the foundation. With the help of this great community and many fundraising efforts, the Makenna Foundation has continued to grow and give to The Kentucky Children’s Hospital. A pediatric bronchoscope was purchased in 2003, and in 2004 funds from the Foundation helped to renovate the Children’s Sedation Suite. In 2006, the Junior League of Lexington renovated the Toddler Room in honor of the Makenna Foundation. The Makenna David Pediatric Emergency Center opened in 2010, then the Makenna Foundation Welcome Center opened in 2018 at the entrance of the Kentucky’s Children Hospital.

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Community

LexArts lexarts.org

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ifferent people need the arts for many different reasons. For many, it’s an essential creative outlet. For others, it’s their tribe—the group with whom they feel most themselves, most at home. And for still others, the arts are a source of healing and inspiration. For Leslie Keller-Biehl, the arts are all of these things.

Leslie Keller-Biehl

In February 2018, Leslie had just signed on with LexArts as development manager, tasked with the nuts and bolts of the annual Fund for the Arts Campaign. She was bubbling over with successful examples from her time at Loveland, Ohio’s Murphy Theatre and with fresh ideas for inspiring generosity in Lexington through her own love of the arts. But on her second day of work, she received life-altering news: a diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Over the next six months, Leslie worked as she could—at LexArts’ office on Mill Street, through teleconferences from home, even once from the chemo chair. The difference she could make through raising funds for the arts and the camaraderie of her coworkers, she says, kept her spirits up, even when she had too much pain and fatigue to type on her laptop. Her first line treatment completed, Leslie is starting again from her “new normal.” She is ramping up for LexArts’ spring campaign and helping with this fall’s ARTY PARTIES. Not every day is easy, and the vigilant self-care she must practice is a project in itself. But for Leslie, working in the arts is itself creative expression that is healing. And it’s her home.

Di Boyer and Leslie Keller-Biehl attend ArtyParty Martini Monday

ARTY PARTIES are just one way LexArts makes fundraising fun, showing arts lovers a good time while they do good. Now through mid-November, join LexArts for an ARTY PARTY of your very own choosing. Read about all the PARTIES and download your personal party planner at ArtyPartyLex.com.

Presented by

Artwork by Dawna Scripps at Arty Party Drag Me to South Beach

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Community

Susan G. Komen Kentucky KomenKentucky.org

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or many people, when they see the color pink, they think of Breast Cancer Awareness Month—with pink ribbons, pink apparel and everything that comes with the month of October. What they may not think about is what all that “pink” makes possible in the community. Susan G. Komen is the world’s largest breast cancer organization, funding more breast cancer research than any other nonprofit, while providing real-time help to those facing the disease. The Komen Kentucky affiliate is a local nonprofit dedicated to combating breast cancer right here in our community. Komen Kentucky funds grants to local hospitals and community organizations, providing screenings, diagnostics, treatment support, education and survivorship programs for underserved women and men in Kentucky. The nonprofit also funds global research programs to develop new treatment strategies and screening tools. Even though general awareness of the disease is high, Komen Kentucky continually works to educate the community, as there are still many misconceptions about breast cancer. Many believe that “it only affects older women” or “if it doesn’t run in my family, I am safe.” Breast cancer does not discriminate when it comes to who is affected. Approximately 1 in 8 women and 1 in 1,000 men in the U.S. are diagnosed with breast cancer during their lifetime. It strikes people of all races and ethnicities. Ninety to 95 percent of people diagnosed with breast cancer do not have a family history of the disease. Every donation to Komen Kentucky is used to achieve the organization’s Bold Goal: to reduce the current number of breast cancer deaths in the U.S. by 50 percent by the year 2026. The nonprofit is working to achieve this goal by making research a priority and providing quality care for all. As the Lexington community begins to see a lot of pink this month, please think about “what pink makes possible” and join the movement at the 23rd Annual Lexington Race for the Cure. Register as an individual or team to walk or run in the race on Saturday, October 27. If you’re not race ready, you can volunteer for the event. You can also donate in honor or memory of someone you love – your funds can be directed to a specific person or team, or go to general race day donations. Visit KomenKentucky.org to learn more. Every step, every dollar and every voice matter. Join us in the fight against breast cancer.

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Kentucky Law Enforcement Memorial Foundation klemf.org

The Kentucky Law Enforcement Memorial Foundation maintains the only statewide monument listing the names of every known fallen law enforcement officer in Kentucky’s history. The foundation also provides an immediate death benefit to any certified law enforcement officer killed in the line of duty. The foundation provides financial assistance to officers and their families experiencing personal and medical tragedies. Lastly, the foundation grants educational scholarships for the commonwealth’s law enforcement officers and their families. Over 70% of KLEMF Funds come from the purchase of specialized Kentucky license plates which display our logo. Currently there are over 17,000 vehicles displaying the plates. You can donate to the foundation via our website klemf.org or our Facebook page. Please help us by donating to our fund or purchasing a KLEMF specialty license plate so we can continue aiding the commonwealth’s men and women serving in law enforcement.

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Lexington Clinic Foundation LexingtonClinicFoundation.org

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exington Clinic Foundation’s Randy LeMay Scholarship program, named in honor of former Lexington Clinic CFO Randy LeMay, provides support for the study and practice of healthcare administration. Emerging leaders in healthcare administration are granted support through scholarships or graduate level administrative internship opportunities. Scholarships such as the LeMay program and hands-on opportunities are essential as the healthcare industry continues to evolve. Additionally, Lexington Clinic Foundation is the premier provider of allied-health scholarships in Central Kentucky granting aid to students with the Fergus Hanson Scholarship. A point of distinction for both scholarships is the student may attend school anywhere in the U.S. or abroad as long as they intend to return to the Bluegrass region. The Foundation is committed to supporting education opportunities and bringing the most qualified practitioners to the workforce. These achievements are made possible with generous support from the physicians, staff, vendors and grateful patients of Lexington Clinic.

Heath Abney 2017 LeMay Scholarship Recipient

Brenton Hill 2018 LeMay Health Administration Intern

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“ New &NOTEWORTHY

I’ve had the chance to resurrect the heart of these hallowed grounds and to truly create a unique and thoughtful brand that will honor history in a modern and relevant way.

Castle & Key open for business After more than four years of restoration, Castle & Key Distillery officially began hosting curated experiences for bourbon tourists on September 19th. The dedicated team has worked hard to ensure that the guest experience onsite is just as premium as the spirits they make. Formerly known as the Old Taylor Distillery, the property is said to be the birthplace of bourbon tourism. Legendary distiller Colonel Edmund Haynes Taylor, Jr. built the distillery in 1887. Much like the property’s current owners, Taylor wanted guests to enjoy their experience. On the property, he built a Europeaninspired castle, peristyle springhouse and sunken gardens. By the time founding Partners Will Arvin and Wes Murry bought the property in 2014, it had been abandoned for 40 years. Overgrown and decrepit, the industry outsiders had their work cut out for them. They spared no expense in restoring the property to its original glory, keeping as many original elements intact as possible. Every detail, from the gardens designed by Jon Carloftis

to the interiors designed by Donna Winfield, was carefully curated to enhance the customer experience and celebrate the history of the 113 acre property. “The opportunity to revive this historic property to its original glory and build a company from the ground-up was too enticing to turn down,” said Murry. We can’t wait to show our guests this property and all we’re doing to create spirits with conviction over pocketbook.” “For the last four years we’ve worked incredibly hard to create a destination where discerning tastemakers can experience history in motion,” said Arvin, Founding Partner. “Many people thought this day would never come, but we’re proud that we had the courage to keep pursuing this dream.” Guests can enjoy the property’s iconic structures, sunken gardens, botanical trail and an in-depth look at Castle & Key’s principled distilling approach and a unique tasting of cocktails made with Castle & Key’s Restoration Release Gin and Vodka.

courtesy of Castle & Key

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Community

In 2015, the founders hired Master Distiller Marianne Eaves, Kentucky’s first female to hold the title of Master Distiller of bourbon since Prohibition, to create thoughtfully made spirits with locally-sourced ingredients. Castle & Key’s principled approach to distilling its spirits goes back to the roots of the bourbon industry and honors the historic site where they are made. Working with locally sourced ingredients, all Castle & Key products are made from scratch and on premise without ever using bulk GNS. Their conviction to use local farmers and ingredients allows more control over the quality of each bottle, from the grain or garden to the glass. “As Castle & Key’s Master Distiller, I’ve had the chance to resurrect the heart of these hallowed grounds and to truly create a unique and thoughtful brand that will honor history in a modern and relevant way,” said Eaves. “Being here from the start allowed me to

work with our contractors to ensure that we built a distillery that suited the products we had envisioned. This includes our vision to create a uniquely local gin and vodka, using the same locally grown grains, while also including locally grown botanicals, many of which are grown onsite.” Castle & Key’s Restoration Release Gin and Restoration Release Vodka are currently available for purchase at Castle & Key and select locations throughout Kentucky and Tennessee. The limitededition spirits are made with a base of Castle & Key’s bourbon or rye recipes. The main line of Castle & Key Rye, Gin and Vodka will be released in 2019. Castle & Key Bourbon is currently aging until ready. All of Castle & Key’s spirits must meet the distillery’s high standards before they will be released. They will not be released to the market prematurely.


Community

NOTES FROM THE FOOD SCENE: Town Branch Distillery is diving into the world of experimental bourbons! The exclusive new spirit, TOWN BRANCH® BOURBON: SHERRY CASK FINISHED, is a 9-year-old Kentucky straight bourbon whiskey from the early days of Town Branch Distillery. Finishing the bourbon in Spanish Oloroso sherry casks gives this new expression an exceptionally smooth finish with a depth of flavor, including notes of roasted pecans with dried plums and raisins. This limited-release edition’s launch coincided with the induction of late distillery founder Dr. Pearse Lyons into the Kentucky Bourbon Hall of Fame. A second location of SAKURA will occupy the former Smashburger spot on Nicholasville Road late this year. It will be a sit-down restaurant with a slightly more upscale menu than their current Winchester Road eatery.

New &NOTEWORTHY SMOKIN’ ACES COFFEE COMPANY is coming to 471 Jefferson Street. The coffee micro-roaster will have coffee from various countries, allowing guests to discover new tastes. EIGHT HORSE BAKERY will open at 442 South Ashland Avenue in Chevy Chase. The gluten-free bakery will feature cakes, pies, breads, cookies and candies. They will also accommodate other food allergies with select offerings. DRAKE’S is now in Brannon Crossing! Known as a restaurant that loves beer and a bar that loves food, Drake’s is everyone’s favorite place to come play. RANADA’S, THE BISTRO AT CHENAULT VINEYARDS opened in midSeptember. Chef Ranada Riley, formerly of Lexington Diner, is pouring her creative efforts into the new bistro.

NEW IN TOWN:

Cowboy Brazilian Steakhouse rides into town When Coba Cocina closed, everyone wondered what would fill the massive space. COWBOY BRAZILIAN STEAKHOUSE stepped up to the challenge, bringing their award-winning Churrascaria to Lexington. The concept is already much-loved in Hilton-Head, Charleston and Columbia, South Carolina and Winston-Salem, North Carolina, featuring a “parade” of 16 USDA Prime cuts of beef, lamb, chicken and pork plus salad bar with some hot items in an all-you-can-eat style indulgence. On the second floor, spiked milkshakes and tapas will make for fun get-togethers. And for anyone wondering, the jellyfish tank will house some other kind of aquatic creature, but it will surely be as much of an attraction as Cowboy Brazilian Steakhouse’s delicious fare!

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New &NOTEWORTHY MOVING:

Logan’s of Lexington opening in Lexington Green With a history in Lexington dating back over 54 years, LOGAN’S OF LEXINGTON is thrilled to usher in the next chapter of their story. This fall, Logan’s will be moving to the Mall at Lexington Green, bringing their time-honored tradition of excellent customer care to the popular shopping and entertainment destination. Logan’s had previously been at their Tates Creek Centre location for 25 years. They are excited for their future at the Lexington Green location, which will span 8,600 square feet! In addition to the great lines you’ve always found at Logan’s, like Peter Millar, Vineyard Vines, Allen Edmonds and Southern Tide, they will now offer classic collections like Barbour. In fact, Logan’s at Lexington Green will offer the largest in-stock suit and sport coat selection in the state of Kentucky with the finest names in men’s clothing like Hart Schaffner Marx, Hickey Freeman, Southwick, Baroni and more!

NEW IN TOWN:

CoolBluLex offers expert CoolSculpting care COOLBLULEX is setting a new standard in patient care for non-invasive fat reduction. They have one of the most experienced CoolSculpting teams in the area, allowing them to offer a level of expertise and knowledge that is unmatched. As a Board-Certified plastic surgery office in the Waldman Schantz Turner Plastic Surgery Center, patients can rest assured knowing that their care providers are the best. CoolSculpting is the safest FDA-cleared non-surgical treatment for more areas of the body than any other fat-freezing treatment on the market. It can be used on back, bra and armpit fat, the abdominal area, upper arm, inner and outer thighs and more. The CoolBluLex team is thrilled to offer top-notch care and absolute expertise.

CITY NEWS:

Water quality projects provide benfits along the Legacy Trail The Legacy Trail has a lot to say about the beauty of the Bluegrass farmland. But in Coldstream Park, it also has something to say about the environmental work that is keeping Lexington’s farmland beautiful. The Legacy Trail in Coldstream Park now includes small rest area for pedestrians and cyclists. “We saw this project as an opportunity to provide conveniences that the public wanted,” said Charles Martin, Acting Commissioner of Environmental Quality and Public Works. “We needed to build the tank, but we wanted it to be more than a plain piece of infrastructure due to its prominent location along the Legacy Trail.” The city partnered with HDR, Element Design and SCAPE Landscape Architecture on the additions. After meetings with community stakeholders, Water Quality settled on a practical design that includes restrooms, a water bottle filling station, bike racks and seating, along with trees and landscaping to provide shade. “We know the importance of the world-class farmland that surrounds our city,” Mayor Jim Gray said. “So we are cleaning up our streams in one of the biggest environmental projects any city our size has ever undertaken. Just like the trail, the overhaul of our sanitary sewers is a legacy to future generations.” Near the Legacy Trail in Coldstream Park, there is a large concrete tank that is one key part of Lexington’s sewer system overhaul. Also nearby, a stream has been restored, with wetlands that filter the water naturally. Lower Cane Run Creek is one source of water that supplies downstream communities. SYSTEMWIDE OVERHAUL As part of the sanitary sewer work, broken pipes are being replaced and bigger pipes are being installed, where needed. (One of the projects now under construction involves the replacement of sanitary sewer pipes on East Main.) Through the Capacity Assurance Program, the city evaluates each proposed development project to make sure there is enough wastewater treatment capacity before the plans are approved. “This is an enormous sanitary sewer initiative throughout our City. It is a commitment to the environment and to the future,” Gray said. The work is expected to be largely complete by 2026. This (stormwater) project was undertaken in connection with the settlement of an enforcement action under the Clean Water Act, United States et al. v. Lexington- ­Fayette Urban County Government, brought on behalf of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. courtesy of Susan Straub TOPS Magazine | October 2018

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New &NOTEWORTHY NEW IN TOWN:

New Frontier Outfitters has great Appalachian gear for adventurous people Specializing in fun apparel for your everyday adventure, NEW FRONTIER OUTFITTERS offers products that celebrate Kentucky and Appalachian culture. Their designs have a cool retro vibe that will make for great gifts, and their comfortable, livable fabrics mean they’re perfect whether you’re rock climbing or mall hopping. Owners and Co-Founders Joshua and Jared Ravenscraft invite everyone to “enjoy every journey, one season at a time.” No doubt their stickers and decals will be popping up all over the Bluegrass, and their hoodies are perfect for the fall hiking season! From soft tees and tanks to trucker hats, New Frontier Outfitters has something for every adventurer. Shop online, or at their new Morehead, KY brick and mortar location.

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NEW IN TOWN:

Frenchies Modern Nail Care offers a new nail experience Now open in Lexington Green, FRENCHIES MODERN NAIL CARE offers a modern, clean, healthy mani/pedi. They offer a bright, modern interior and everything is clean beyond regulation requirements: Frenchies believes in exceeding industry standards when it comes to customer health and comfort. They do not offer acrylics, instead focusing on nail services that don’t cause harsh chemical smells. That makes the experience a great one–and a safer one–for clients and nail techs alike! With locations in Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, North Carolina, New Mexico and Oregon, Frenchies is making a big splash in the nail care world. Discover the difference at Frenchies.


Community

New &NOTEWORTHY NEW IN TOWN:

Lexington Clinic welcomes two new physicians LEXINGTON CLINIC is excited to announce that two new physicians are now a part of Central Kentucky’s largest, multi-specialty medical group. Dana Barnett, DO is a part of the Pediatrics department and sees patients at Lexington Clinic Beaumont, where she is accepting new patients. She completed a residency in Pediatrics at the University of Kentucky after receiving her medical degree from the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine. Dr. Barnett is board-eligible in Pediatrics. Amy Higgins, MD has joined their Internal Medicine/Pediatrics department and is seeing patients at Lexington Clinic Richmond. She completed a residency in Internal Medicine/Pediatrics at the University of Louisville after receiving her medical degree from the Medical College of Georgia. Dr. Higgins is board-eligible in Internal Medicine/Pediatrics and is accepting new patients.

NEW IN TOWN:

Battle Axes coming to the Distillery District A residential remodeler and elementary school teacher seem like unlikely people to love throwing axes around, but Shawn and Mary Courtney are thrilled to bring this fantastic recreational activity to town. The first hatchetthrowing venue in the area, the sport hails from Toronto and is played in 55 cities and 7 countries. BATTLE AXES will open in October in the James E. Pepper Distillery District. They will host corporate events, teambuilding activities, birthdays, bachelor/ bachelorette parties and venue rentals for private events. They also invite curious individuals, couples and friends to make advance reservations online to throw some hatchets and learn why this sport is growing around the world so quickly!

NOW OPEN:

Downtown Drs. Brown brings a new kind of primary care Upbeat primary care? It almost sounds too good to be true, but that’s exactly what DOWNTOWN DRS. BROWN promises. Drs. Cady and Ryan Brown took their practice to the former Jefferson Center building at West on 2nd. They aim to offer a high level of individualized care, allowing them to provide a deeper level of focus and service for every patient. Patients will receive a host of specialized care items, including an Annual Wellness Visit where the doctor will help prepare a year-long care plan that they will monitor throughout the year. The plan may include health coaching, yoga, meditation, acupuncture, therapy, nutrition education and various other holistic approaches.

NEW IN TOWN:

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Field hearing on opioid recovery in Kentucky

Congressman Andy Barr welcomed Financial Services Subcommittee on Housing and Insurance Chairman Sean Duffy to Lexington for a field hearing on opioid recovery and transitional housing on Thursday, August 16th. They were joined by a panel including former Governor Ernie Fletcher, housing authority officials, doctors, and leaders of drug treatment centers. As the state with the third highest opioid overdose mortality rate in the country, Kentucky is on the front lines of the opioid epidemic. The field hearing provided the Subcommittee with insight on the research, treatment and prevention initiatives the organizations in the Sixth District utilize to help those in recovery live a life free from addiction after they get out of treatment. With the goal of better understanding how to deliver hope to Americans suffering from addiction, the Subcommittee heard testimony from the panel and determined that meaningful employment and stable housing are key to long-term recovery.

Congressman Andy Barr listening to testimony during the field hearing on August 16th in Lexington

The panel of experts, including Edwin King, Jerod Thomas and Gov. Fletcher, who testified during the hearing

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“Too many individuals find themselves with limited housing options after completing inpatient rehab and are forced into housing situations where they are surrounded by people who are using the very same illegal substances that they went into rehab to stop using,” said Barr. “We owe it to our families, friends, and neighbors to provide the critical solutions to combat this epidemic and we cannot continue to focus our federal efforts on prevention and treatment without looking towards long-term recovery through housing, job placement, financial literacy, and life skills training.” While recovery housing options exist in Lexington, many have long wait lists. For example, Shepherds House has a 6-month wait list. At the hearing, Shepherds House President Jerod Thomas talked about a 28-year-old man who was two weeks away from his “bed date” in their facility when he fatally overdosed. With enough housing, this death could have been prevented. The THRIVE Act, a bill introduced and passed by Barr in the House, would expand evidence-based transitional housing models, similar to many throughout the Sixth District, to better assist those in recovery transition back into society with the skills needed to obtain employment and live independent lives. Currently, leaders in both the House and Senate are working to finalize an opioid legislative package, which will include advancements in transitional housing options to better assist communities and those in recovery.


Community

Art

in the

Bluegrass:

i was here story by Jen Roytz

Known today as the site of community events like the Lexington Farmers’ Market and Thursday Night Live, Cheapside Park wasn’t always the all-inclusive, “come as you are” place it’s known as today. In the 19th century atop the Cheapside Auction Block, African Americans were sold as slaves in what was at the time one of the largest slave auctions in the country. It was an image that artist Marjorie Guyon, whose studio overlooks Cheapside Park, could not shake. “Day after day, I kept looking down at Cheapside Park and around the surrounding buildings. I’d have images of a mother and son appearing and disappearing in the windows of the buildings,” said Guyon, whose art is described as visual poetry or classical graffiti. It was over the course of several meetings with Ashley Grigsby, executive committee chair for The Nest, that the two talked not only about the history of Cheapside Park and Public Square, but of the racial, ethnic and other fractures in our country today. The two also discussed the possibility to visually represent all they were discussing and feeling. “Ashley brought her son in for a photo session. It wasn’t anything special. I just used my iPhone to take the photos, but what it ultimately created certainly was,” said Guyon.

Guyon played with the photos to give them a more raw, dated look that she felt began to tell the story, then showed them to photographer Patrick J. Mitchell and poet Nikky Finney, who were both immediately drawn to the idea. Together, the trio has produced “I Was Here,” an art exhibit depicting the realities of slave trade. They have expanded beyond the broken bond between a mother and son to include men, and the “ancestral spirit portraits” look out to Cheapside block from the windows of the surrounding buildings and businesses. Many of them include excerpts from one of Finney’s poems, Auction Block of Negro Weather, which paints a heartbreaking portrait of families being torn apart and spread across the country and likens it to the devastation a hurricane can cause, ripping apart homes and businesses and leaving the pieces broken and strewn about, never to be reconnected and made whole again. “In recent years, the spirit of our country has shifted,” said Guyon. “We felt this was something we could do that could bring people together, to help them understand and appreciate what it’s like to be one of the ‘others.’” The 21 portraits in the “I Am Here” exhibit will be installed in early October in windows and doorways that surround the Old Courthouse. Visit i-was-here.org for locations and more information. •

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In the Buf...

in little pink Gowns by Buffy Lawson | photos by Keni Parks

Pink

is the color that as a free spirited little girl I had always romanticized as perfect. The pale pink ribbons that my mother elegantly tied into my long blonde ponytails, the pink tutu that turned me into a magical fairy princess and ooh, how I loved those pink ballet slippers that pirouetted me across the room like a cascading butterfly. As I got old(er), I preferred black, because…well... it made me look thin…(er)…it was bold and mature. And who could possible dislike red… the color of a delicious, sweet apple and sexy hot dress. I related to green, yellow, blue, turquoise, white…however, one thing was certain: I had become too sophisticated and strong for pink. Funny, how I’ve never actually thought about any of this until now. One lovely weekend several months ago, three fabulous girlfriends

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and I took a trip to the stunning deep mountains of Kentucky. No phones! No WIFI! It was fantastic and much needed for us all. The view from the hot tub was stunning as we were situated on what seemed to be the top of the greatest mountain ever. Morning, noon and night… we gossiped, nagged and laughed about men, kids, our jobs and pretty much everything imaginable in our effort to have fun, enjoy simplicity and return home rejuvenated. I suppose it is inevitable when you cross the threshold of forty-something, that aches and pains become a natural source of discussion. Sore knees, swollen feet, elderly elbows, chin hairs and unfair weight gain…just to name a few. At some point in our conversation, we retired from aching bones to more serious matters… and that is when the confessions began. We soon realized that we were all behind on our yearly check-ups.


Community I was the first to share the fact that I had not yet had a mammogram, which put me way behind the recommended age by several years. My explanation (and excuse) was simple: no history of breast cancer in my immediate family. To lighten the mood I joked that the thought of getting my breasts compressed like a couple of squished pancakes sounded atrocious. My confession was followed by passionate support among my girls along with a swift kick in the butt to go get that mammogram ASAP. The three other ladies had similar confessions concerning their own health issues.

However, it didn’t take long before the mammogram became the least of my worries as I couldn’t help but notice the look on the woman’s face. Legally, she couldn’t tell me anything. But I could read her uneasy left eyebrow moving about and slightly discontented face enough to know that that she saw something she did not like. She left with an awkward smile and I was left in the room alone for quite a while. I tried to study the feet of those walking beneath the two inch door gap wishing somebody would come in soon to let me know what was going on, but they just kept walking by.

Needless to say, that hot tub full of successful moms and business women made a toast to getting our various medical issues in order when we returned home from the mountain.

Mister Man and I began texting back and forth. Although he tried keeping things light, it was obvious that he too was becoming concerned as the primary waiting room was beginning to clear out. I did not share with him my perception of the technician’s expressions. My tummy began feeling upset, but all of the sudden Chinese food was the last thing on my mind.

First thing Monday morning, I kept to my promise and was ready to check this mammogram “thing” of my list. I made the appointment and was set to go the following week. For some reason, even though I was confident everything would be just fine, I felt uneasy about the pancake squish thing and asked Mister Man if he would mind going with me to my doctor visit and he happily obliged. I was told the process should take about an hour. We would enjoy lunch together afterwards. That lovely Thursday, the waiting room of the pancake squish place was completely full. I signed in and began filling out paperwork, providing all of my family history and every medical detail imaginable. When my name was called, I followed the nice lady who took vitals and weight…(of course I took off my shoes) and she sent me down the hall into a private dressing room. I then slipped into my very first little pink gown as a grown woman. I glanced at myself in the mirror and thought how precious this robe was and how innocent I looked. It was so soft and comfortable. Obviously worn my hundreds of women before me, as it had clearly been washed so many times that the fabric was thin and delicate on my skin. I placed my street clothes in the provided baggie and tucked them into my given cubby locker and was then advanced into yet another waiting room area with about a dozen women of all ages wearing the same outfit as myself. It seemed odd to me that none of the ladies looked at each other, rather at their feet, phones, the walls, floors... similar to the oddity of being in an elevator. I wished for a connection and suspected we all did. But we didn’t make one. However, as each woman left for her procedure and returned, words were not needed. Some came back literally praising God and others fighting back tears. At that moment, the seriousness of the situation was beginning to sink in. My name was finally called and I was kindly escorted to the pancake squish machine. The mammogram was not as yucky as I had imagined. Very uncomfortable for sure, although I tried to keep my sense of humor, bantering back and forth with the imaging specialist to pass time. At that moment I suspected this would be the most invasive experience I would ever have and I felt relieved because it was almost over.

Finally, a gentle knock, tapped on the door of my private room and the text messages with Mister Man came to an abrupt end. The nurse informed me that the doctor had ordered another imaging test. She did her best to explain what would happen in this procedure, however things were starting to feel very real and slightly fuzzy. Something wasn’t right. Two more imaging tests were ordered that same day. What began as an “hour-ish” appointment turned into a five-hour afternoon. I was the last one to leave the procedure area and Mister Man was the last person sitting in the waiting room when I walked out. I will never forget the look on his face. He will likely never forget mine. We would then wait for results. My phone rang a few days later from the same woman that had previously instructed me NOT to read anything into her voice when she called. She indicated that no matter what the results were, her tone would not change. She would ask if this was a good time to talk, in the event that I was driving, at work or an otherwise vulnerable situation. “Hi! Is this Buffy?” she said cheerfully. “Yes.” I replied with a lump in my throat. “I am calling from the cancer center and was just wondering if this is a good time to talk.” “Yes. This is as good a time as ever!” I said with a half-hearted laugh. She softly spoke the words... “Well, I am so sorry to tell you Buffy, but we did find that you have breast cancer.” I was so numb at first that I was TOTALLY FINE. I literally behaved as if I had just been stung by a bee. Thank God the body and mind will allow a human time to remain in shock so that your brain can gradually accept something of this magnitude. My shock remained in tact as I explained the news to my husband. I described the situation as if I were relaying the miniscule fact that I had just discovered a water leak in our garden hose, which would easily and quickly be repairable. However it did not take much time before we ultimately realized what we were facing. CAT scans, Ultra Sounds, MRI tests, biopsies, surgeons, nutritionalitsts, oncologists, mental help therapists, booklets full information and cancer

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processing coordinators later… we were no longer in shock. We cried until we laughed and we laughed until we cried. Over, and over again until it finally took.

So many beautiful breast cancer patients have reached out to me, sharing stories, offering perspectives and encouragement, treatment opinions…passing the torch of their marvelous strength.

Talking to our children was next. Being thirteen and fourteen year old boys, they listened carefully but didn’t ask many questions. As parents, it is our job to teach our children lessons mostly based on our personal experiences. The problem was, I had no experience with breast cancer. I put forward a very positive, brave outlook towards the situation without making unrealistic promises. But these amazing boys were learning right along with us because as much as I tried to remain strong through all of the tests, procedures, surgery, multiple daily treatments and information overload… it was impossible to be perky all of the time. They could tell I was afraid, tired and overwhelmed no matter how concrete I tried to remain. But they saw my strength plow through the fear and reality of breast cancer every single day.

Since my diagnosis I have been told…stay positive, stay positive, stay positive, be strong, “you’ve got this girl” so, so many times. And yes that is all true.

On the day of my surgery that would remove the tumor, my boys got a kick out of the fact that I laid my phone on my lap so that I could hear music as I was being carted down the halls of the hospital. The music took me away from the stark white walls. If I was scared, I certainly didn’t let myself or my children know it. My friends… In a world that has become lazy with idle chitchat, social media and other informal means of communication, cancer has brought me closer to those sweet peeps more than ever. Home cooked meals, flowers of every color, cozy nightgowns, cards, cookies, bath balms, wind chimes, candles…everything that I love has been sent to this family from my friends. My friends truly know me well and the simple little things that bring me joy were graced upon this heavy situation. The conversations have been so special. Every time. My lifelong best girlfriend managed somehow to attend every single appointment. A true rock. Another of my very best friends has literally walked me through the process every step of the way, being a cancer survivor herself.

Although so much is already behind me, my journey with cancer has just begun. Being strong means something very different to me these days. Being strong is not trying to be a super hero mother, friend, wife, daughter, sister or person. Being strong means waking up and doing my best to find grace and fierceness within myself. Being strong does not mean that I cannot have frustrating moments of overwhelming weakness. Being strong is being realistic and honoring my human process. Some day’s “I’ve got this girl”. And some days I don’t. But then, I’ve always been that way. Even though my career in music has placed me in a public format for most of my life, I am actually a very private person. The reason I have chosen to write about the most personal experience of my life is because I wrote one very short post on Facebook. “Well, damn…I’ve got breast cancer.” Within four hours of that post, nearly two-dozen women private messaged me and indicated that because of that post… they booked their mammograms. I cried a million happy and heartfelt tears. Perhaps that post will have saved one life. Perhaps these words today will save one more. My fabulous girls and I are due for a trip back to the Kentucky Mountains. I can’t wait to share some good wine, southern recipes…nag about men, kids, and life…but I can tell you something. When it’s time for bed, I’ll be wrapping myself up beneath those magical mountains in my little pink gown. The pancake squish machine isn’t the end of the world, as you know it. But not going could be. •

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The American Cancer Society reports that 38% of women will be diagnosed with cancer at some point in their lifetimes. During Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we’re reminded of another staggering statistic: one in eight women will face breast cancer, which is by far the most common cancer among women. Each October, TOPS features the stories of local cancer survivors. This year, we invited eleven women to share their cancer journeys. Not only did they tell us about how cancer changed their lives, but they also offered words of encouragement, hope, strength and support for other women who face cancer. For our photoshoot, we wrapped them in soft fabrics to represent the ribbons that raise awareness for the types of cancer that each of these women fought and continue to fight. photos by Erica Lee Photography profiles by Jordan Holt makeup by Cos Bar


Kristen is a wife and mother of three. At 31 years old, she was diagnosed with DCIS Grade 2 er+/pr+ breast cancer. In September 2017, Kristen noticed a small lump during her monthly self-exam and went in for a mammogram. From there, it was determined she needed five biopsies. Three biopsies came back with atypical cells or DCIS. She opted for an aggressive treatment of bilateral mastectomies, with axillary lymph node removal.

What advice would you give to other women who were recently diagnosed with cancer? My advice is to understand that your only “job” is to survive by any means necessary. There are so many life altering decisions you have to make in such a short amount of time and it is easy to feel regret or doubt throughout this process. However, be easy on yourself and remember you made the decision you felt was your best chance to beat cancer. Your life will be forever changed, and attitude is a key piece of survival.

What was the most challenging part of your cancer battle? Beyond understanding the gravity of this life altering diagnosis, my most challenging part was the emotional toll of rebuilding your outward appearance. I felt so proud and strong when I was healing between my mastectomies (going flat) and my expanders for delayed reconstruction. However, when I had my implant exchange, I emotionally crashed. It was the realization ‘this is me now’ and although I was fortunate enough to have a great plastic surgeon, I was upset for what cancer stole from me. Since I am in my early thirties, cancer stole my option to breastfeed any future children. Cancer stole my sense of self, which I am learning to rebuild. However, through all the awful things cancer has taken, it has also opened my life up to a new sisterhood and friendships I would have never had before.

How were you able to find the strength to fight? My children and family were my strength to fight and push through all the appointments and the four surgeries. I remember sitting my kids down to tell them I had breast cancer and making sure, even with the unknowns, we would work together to win. Since then, my 9 year old daughter wanted to cut her hair to donate to wigsforkids.org, and we have started attending breast cancer events as a family. I am so lucky to have such an amazing support team behind me. 100

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Teddi Smith Robillard, 79-years-old, is raising her great granddaughter, Nevaeh, who keeps her on her toes. She was diagnosed with Stage 3 lung cancer at age 78. The discovery of cancer came as a daunting shock, but Teddi’s spirit was unphased. With her steady faith in God, she believed that anything was possible, even overcoming an obstacle as formidable as cancer. By this past April, Teddi had completed 35 rounds of radiation. She now has a new perspective on life; it’s short, and can never be taken for granted.

What advice would you give to other women who were recently diagnosed with cancer? With God, all things are possible. My faith sustains me on this journey. Also, educate yourself about your disease. Do not be afraid to ask questions.

What was the most challenging part of your cancer battle? Worrying about my loved ones and how they deal with my cancer diagnosis.

What local resources did you utilize to help get you through this journey? I was educated on the Road to Recovery program by Melanie Hunter, American Cancer Society Patient Navigator at UK Markey Cancer Center. The American Cancer Society’s Road to Recovery program was a vital part of my journey. Without the generosity of the volunteer drivers at the American Cancer Society, I would not have been able to complete my life saving treatments. Also, the staff at Markey Cancer Center has been kind and helpful.

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Shiela Lee works for Commonwealth Family Services and enjoys spending time with her family, listening to music, going to the movies, shopping and playing with her dog Milo. In 1998, she was diagnosed with thyroid cancer at a routine dentist visit. Shiela received radiation and had her Thyroid Gland removed. Thirteen years later, she was diagnosed with ductal carcinoma breast cancer of the left breast. Shiela’s OBGYN doctor noticed a cyst that seemed to be growing. The cyst was removed by Central Baptist Breast Imaging within two weeks of discovery, and the result came back positive for cancer. Her diagnosis was followed by chemotherapy and radiation.

What was the most challenging part of your cancer battle? The most challenging part for me was to be in a happy place because I had a sixteen-year-old looking at me, not sure what was going to happen next. So, I had to stay strong and fight back some tears to reassure her that it was going to be okay, that mommy is a fighter and that I had her back. I went to all the school events even when I was drained from treatments. She kept me going. Not only was I living for me, but for my daughter.

What advice would you give to other women recently diagnosed with cancer? Give it to God. He is a healer. Research all the info on your type of cancer and make sure you understand what the doctor is saying to you. Never go to appointments alone. It’s a lot to take in and you will need another listening ear because you can be overwhelmed with the fear of it all.

How were you able to find the strength to fight? Every morning, you wake up and you’re able to put your feet on the floor. That is a blessing, to be able to dress yourself and feed yourself. That’s what you want.

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Community

Amy Lakes is a Lexington native and the manager at Locals’ Craft Food & Drink. She enjoys reading, writing, baking and cooking and spending time with her family. She has two sisters, one brother and one sister-in-law. She also considers her boyfriend’s family to be her own. At the age of 40, Amy was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer in July 2017 followed by stage 4 brain cancer in July 2018. She immediately started aggressive chemotherapy, followed by a modified radical mastectomy, radiation and steroids.

What did you learn from your cancer journey? The most important thing I gained from all of this is perspective. You learn VERY fast what is actually important in life.

How were you able to find the strength to fight? I come from a long line of willful, stubborn women, and I think that iron will served me nearly as well in my treatments as the medicines did!

How has cancer changed your life? The best thing that cancer has done for me is to remind me to never stop going after the things you are passionate about. We only have so much time in our lives; it’s up to us to use it the best way we can!

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Community

Before she was diagnosed with stage 4 breast cancer at the young age of 39, April worked in healthcare philanthropy. A travel enthusiast, April had a summer trip planned to Spain until her treatments took priority. She was first diagnosed in April 2014 when she noticed skin on her one breast puckering and scheduled her first mammogram. The cancer eventually metastasized to her spine, brain and liver. Chemotherapy, radiation and a mastectomy followed.

What did you learn from your cancer journey? Cancer has affected every aspect of day to day activities. I have had to completely readjust my goals and thoughts for the future. Don’t be worried about offers of help. I have had a wonderful support system. Anything from a quick text to college sorority sisters organizing a dinner and bringing it to my home.

What local resources did you use to help get you through this time? I am blessed to have Dr. Jessica Moss and her treatment team at Saint Joseph East on my side. The staff at the Breast Center at Saint Joseph East also were wonderful to walk me through the crazy day of diagnosis when you truly have no idea what is going to happen next. I also joined a support group something I thought “wasn’t my thing.” The support group meets twice a month at the cancer center at Saint Joseph East. Meeting others who are struggling or thriving has been a blessing.

What was the most challenging part of your cancer battle? The most challenging part of this battle has been the feeling of wanting to go and to do like I did before but just not feeling well ALL THE TIME.

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Community

Tina Hasty has been married to the love of her life, Charles, for 31 years. She is the mother of two boys and one girl, and is the director of the wound care center at Saint Joseph Hospital in Lexington. Tina loves jeeping, boating and camping with her family. She was diagnosed with breast HER2+ at age 48. Tina had put off her mammogram after life got in the way of caring for herself. Her diagnosis was a result of a lucky mammogram screen sign-up when Kentucky Cancer Link happened to be conveniently in Tina’s path outside the cafeteria. Ultimately, the screening led to a mastectomy and chemotherapy.

What did you learn from your cancer journey? That if I don’t take care of myself I can’t take care of the ones I love.

What local resources did you use to help get you through this time? Kentucky Cancer Link supported me with my screening, surgical camisole, wig and a class on self-care during chemo.

How were you able to find the strength to fight? My strength comes from God and my loved ones. My husband has been my backbone and God my beacon light.

How has cancer changed your life? I now know who sincerely cares about me and it has made my relationship with my loved ones and God much stronger.

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Community

Mina is a retired executive director of convention and entertainment venues. In 2010, she and her husband moved to Kentucky to be near their eldest son and grandson. Their other son and daughter-in-law reside in Florida. She has been blessed to serve at ACS Lexington and Hope Lodge for eight years. She enjoys reading, tutoring, artwork, serving in her church and teaching at Bible Study Fellowship International. Mina was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 63. Pre-diagnosis, she felt a painful knot that would not go away, so she scheduled an appointment. Her diagnosis was followed by chemotherapy and radiation.

What did you learn from your cancer journey? I learned that although technology has made very significant strides in the treatment of cancer, maintaining a positive attitude is also extremely important during the treatment process. I learned then and now to turn my problems over to God, and He will sustain me through any challenge that I may encounter.

What advice would you give to women recently diagnosed with cancer? An annual mammogram is very important, but do not ignore something that does not feel right even if you have had a recent mammogram.

What was the most challenging part of your cancer battle? I had only been in my new job for two weeks when I was diagnosed, so finding time to receive treatment, and feeling fatigued during radiation was extremely challenging.

How has cancer changed your life? As a result of my cancer and subsequent remission, I cannot take life for granted. I try to help others by giving my time and attention to ACS Hope Lodge guests who are receiving cancer treatment.

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Community

Phyllis Nash Williams recently retired from a 31 year career in the behavioral sciences department at UK this past April. She enjoys spending time with friends, traveling, reading and watching sports. In July 2018 she married her high school sweetheart at the age of 71. Six years earlier, she was diagnosed with breast cancer at a regularly scheduled mammogram appointment. Irregularities led to a biopsy that confirmed the cancer was malignant just a day after Christmas. Phyllis underwent chemotherapy and radiation.

What advice would you give to other women recently diagnosed with cancer? Take care of yourself during your treatment. Do what is best for you. For example I continued to work most days. My work at UK was very accommodating. Some days I needed to lie down for a few minutes and so I bought a pallet in my office that I could use.

What was the most challenging part of your cancer battle? I had recently gone through a divorce after 47 years of marriage. In addition, my mother who had dementia was living with me. She was so concerned about me but couldn’t really understand what was happening. It was a time of high stress.

How has cancer changed your life? I certainly understand how vulnerable we are and how precious life is every day.

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Community

Vivian Lasley Bibbs is an epidemiologist and branch manager of the of the Office of Health and Equity at the Kentucky Department for Public Health. She is a sports enthusiast who loves to travel, and enjoys working with community organizations. She is the mother of twin daughters and has been married to her husband, Phillip, for 29 years. Vivian was diagnosed with Hodgkins Lymphoma at age 32, and is now 56. Entering medical school at UK, student health services noticed a warm lump in her neck. Tests came back positive for Reed-Sternberg cells and a biopsy the next day confirmed Hodgkins Lymphoma. Eleven months of chemotherapy at Markey Cancer Center followed.

What advice would you give to other women recently diagnosed with cancer? I have cancer, but cancer does not have me. You are braver than you believe, stronger than you seem, smarter than you think and twice as beautiful as you’d ever imagined.

How were you able to find the strength to fight? I found strength from family, prayers and a husband that came to every treatment with me.

How has cancer changed your life? It has made me appreciate every day and take nothing for granted. I would not trade one day of my journey!

What did you learn from your cancer journey? I learned to prioritize what was most important to me and how to truly trust and have faith. I let go and let God.

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Elizabeth Bartlett and her husband Marvin have two children; Cooper, 12, and Eliza, 9. Her family enjoys attending arts events, playing board games and watching talent shows on television. This past March, at just 40 years old, Elizabeth was diagnosed with an early form of breast cancer called DCIS through a routine mammogram. Elizabeth had not experienced any symptoms and did not have any concern of family history. She had a lumpectomy, followed by radiation treatments, and now takes daily medication.

What did you learn from your cancer journey? I learned to be strong and courageous, but at the same time, I learned that it was okay to be weak and vulnerable. I learned that I am capable and powerful, but that I am also in need of the support of those around me. I learned to let others take care of me, to allow people to see me cry, and to give myself the space to fall apart if I needed to. It was such a powerful experience to feel so independent and strong while also depending on those around me. I never knew you could be both things at the same time.

What advice would you give to other women recently diagnosed with cancer? Focus on the blessings along the way. In the midst of the storm, there is also so much beauty, and it is the beauty that stays with you when the cancer is gone. I cherish the memory of phone conversations with friends, quiet dinners with my husband, funny moments with my children, and deep counseling sessions with my pastor. These are the things that sustain you, and the things you want to remember for the rest of your life.

How has cancer changed your life? When I was first diagnosed, I had such a terrible fear that my life would change forever. Now, that is one of my greatest hopes. I emerged from the cocoon feeling like a beautiful butterfly, and I don’t want that feeling to ever go away. There is just so much to appreciate in life – the relationships we have with our families, the friendships we cherish, the strangers that take care of us, the comforts of our home, the beauty of our surroundings.

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Community

Severn Miller has been a bartender at Ramsey’s for 18 years. She and her boyfriend of over 10 years enjoy hiking, camping and kayaking together. She also loves to garden, cook and read. Eight days before her 40th birthday this year, Severn was diagnosed with stage 4 metastatic breast, HER2-positive. She had a mammogram and a biopsy on the same day in March 2018. She was given her diagnosis in May 2018, just two days before her boyfriend’s birthday, and proceeded to complete many tests over the following five weeks. She began chemotherapy and immunotherapies shortly after. Severn will receive a targeted chemotherapy for the rest of her life.

What advice would you give to other women recently diagnosed with cancer? Please stay strong and believe in yourself. Know that all of us who have been through this are with you in spirit. Never give up! Believe me, you can do this!

How were you able to find the strength to fight? I found my strength in the love of my family, friends and work community. Everyone made me feel loved and supported during this process.

How has cancer changed your life? Cancer made everything more difficult for periods of time but made me stronger. Cancer has made me feel even more connected to my loved ones. Cancer has made me more grateful and positive.

What was the most challenging part of your diagnosis? The most challenging part for me were the limitations. I am very determined, stubborn and active. Slowing down isn’t something I do easily and in this situation, I had to.

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Health Report: I Was Diagnosed with Cancer, Now What?

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Beauty Buzz: Safer Beauty Products

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TOP Dressed

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WOW Wedding: Shannon + Pete

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Outfit of the Month: Diamonds are a Girls’ Best Friend

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Weddings Unveiled Fall Foliage Bouquets

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GorJess: Kim Kardashian West’s Smoky Eye Look


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I WAS DIAGNOSED WITH

CANCER,

NOW WHAT?

TAKING CHARGE AFTER YOUR DIAGNOSIS You’ve just heard the three words that will change your life forever—“You have cancer.” From this point on, you’ll be overwhelmed with strong emotions and important decisions. Here are some important first steps to help you get started in your treatment journey. WRITTEN BY: BARBARA MEYER

NEARLY ONE IN THREE PEOPLE WILL DEVELOP CANCER IN THEIR LIFETIMES. TOPS Magazine | October 2018

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UNDERSTAND YOUR EMOTIONS After a cancer diagnosis, your initial feelings will probably be disbelief or shock. After the news sinks in, it’s normal to also experience anxiety, anger, grief, fear, despair, helplessness, guilt and a sense of loss. “When meeting newly diagnosed cancer patients, I urge them to embrace their emotions,” says Vicki Blevins-Booth, executive director of Kentucky CancerLink, Inc. “I want them to understand they are not alone, and that they have family, friends, and an experienced healthcare team that are there to support them.”

BUILD YOUR SUPPORT SYSTEM Cancer can make you feel isolated, so it’s important to reach out to those around you from the start. It may be helpful to begin with family first, and then friends. Choose a place and time where you can focus on them and won’t be hurried or interrupted. Be prepared for a variety of reactions and decide ahead of time how you want to respond. Marta Hayne, radiation oncologist at Baptist Health, Lexington, recommends that friends and family take their cue from the patient, saying “You, like us, are there to support them. At some point what you think they should do and what the patient wants might differ. We need to support the patient.” Friends will ask if there is something that they can do. Yes! Let them know they can help by dropping off food or meals, cleaning and doing yard work or laundry, running errands, offering to take care of kids and pets or by giving you a ride to a doctor’s office or errand. Sometimes the greatest help a loved one can provide is simply listening. “The role of family and friends is to provide a support team for the patient,” Blevins-Booth observes. “The patient also needs a point person who will relay updates to other family and friends. The team member may accompany the patient to appointments and ask questions and take notes for them. It takes a village to manage a cancer diagnosis and navigate the healthcare system.” If you choose to tell the workplace about your cancer, start by talking to your boss directly. Speak to HR about company policies and your employment rights. HR can also advise you on arrangements for covering your work during and after treatment. Putting your diagnosis out on social media is very personal, and there’s no right or wrong way. For some, it’s an easy and effective way to keep their social network informed on their situation and they’re comfortable sharing details and photos of their treatments. Others may want to relate only the most basic information or use a separate network like CaringBridge to chronicle their health journey. Or, you may prefer not to say anything at all, at least initially. Ultimately, what you share, when and to whom, should be your decision alone.

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FIND THE BEST DOCTOR FOR YOUR PARTICULAR CANCER There are many different approaches to testing for and treating cancer and each oncologist will have different experience. Getting a second opinion may help you feel more secure in your decision-making, and some insurance companies even require it in order to provide coverage. When selecting the members of your cancer care team, do your research carefully and be willing to travel if necessary. Ideally, you should not only feel like you’re getting the most knowledgeable specialists but those you’re comfortable with too.

GET ORGANIZED Create a physical or digital file to keep and organize all the details-contact numbers and addresses, appointment schedules, test results, notes and to-do lists. Keep it with you always and continually update it. When visiting your doctor, prepare questions in advance and record conversations. Chemotherapy can temporarily impact memory and concentration, so it is helpful to have everything in one place to refer to.

KNOW THE TERMS OF YOUR HEALTH INSURANCE POLICY Understand your policy and bring up any questions with your insurance provider. Determine your policy’s co-pay, deductible, coinsurance and out-of-pocket amounts and lifetime limits. Learn which providers and services are in and out of your network. Ask what must be pre-certified before your insurance provider will cover it. Find out whether your plan is calendar year ( January-December) or fiscal-year based-this will help you manage costs. Keep records complete and organized and carefully review all insurance bills and statements as they come in. Short-term and long-term disability insurance can help you compensate for lost wages during the times when you can’t work but must be purchased separately from health insurance.

DEVELOP A FINANCIAL PLAN FOR COVERING THE COST OF TREATING YOUR CANCER Even with the best insurance, treating cancer is expensive. You’ll need to plan for medical costs like provider visits (including follow-ups after active treatment), testing, treatments, drugs, surgery, hospital stays and inhome care. In addition, budget for insurance premiums and costs, legal fees, travel expenses and lost wages. Other costs could include wigs, medical equipment and nutritional supplements.

DEVELOP A MEDICAL SUPPORT NETWORK Many facilities conveniently offer a multitude of services all under one healthcare system. “I’m very fortunate to work at a hospital that provides many resources for oncology patients,” Hayne says. “We have oncology dietitians to maximize nutrition. We have genetic counselors. We have nurse navigators to steer patients through diagnosis and treatment. We have social workers to help alleviate the stress of a medical illness whether it is with housing, medications or transportation. We have multidisciplinary conferences including all of the above plus physicians from pathology, surgery, hematology oncology, radiology, pulmonology, pharmacy and radiation oncology so that patients can be discussed by physicians and staff for our best recommendations. We also have a palliative care team to maximize symptom control and hospice support.” Cancer support groups, both in person and online, can be a safe and comforting place to connect with others who are going through the same thing you are and provide empathy and guidance. For more personalized care, some therapists specialize in counseling people with cancer and their families. You can also reach out for spiritual guidance from a minister or clergy member at your church.

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DECIDE UPON A TREATMENT PLAN Every cancer and patient is unique and you and your treatment team should choose what’s best for you. “You are in control,” Hayne emphasizes. “The medical team is on your side to let you know your choices and options. There are many resources available, let us help you through this. We are in this together.” Determining what you could realistically get from treatment: cure, stabilization or symptom relief will help direct next steps. Research both traditional and alternative therapies and clinical trials. Factor in any other health conditions that you might have.

TAKE CARE OF YOU Cancer treatments like chemotherapy can weaken the immune system. Always keep cooking utensils and countertops clean, prepare and store food at the proper temperatures, and avoid salad or sushi bars with raw items which could contain harmful bacteria. Exercise is safe during cancer treatment and may help improve fatigue. Stay as active as you can while gradually increasing exercise levels after treatment. If your treatment has compromised your immune system, you should avoid public workout areas like gyms until your white blood cells have returned to safe levels. Those getting radiation should avoid pools because chlorine can irritate the skin at the treatment area. Focus on staying comfortable. There are many wonderful products made just for increasing ease during treatment, from chest port access shirts to colorful PICC line covers. Look for specialized skin care treatments formulated for those undergoing chemotherapy and extra-soft bedding for scalps newly sensitive due to hair loss.

SHOW CANCER YOU’RE IN CHARGE The National Cancer Institute reports that in 2016, there were an estimated 15.5 million cancer survivors, and by 2026, that number is expected to go up to 20.3 million. So as you’re preparing your own cancer “to-do” list, remember you’re the one with the power. “The patients I have met with cancer are brave and strong and have a grace that is a privilege to witness,” Hayne reflects. “Every day working with cancer patients reminds me to keep my priorities straight.” Survival rates are better than ever due to earlier detection and improved treatments, and the choices you make impact your outcome. “In my experience, the one common thread that binds cancer patients is the discovery of their inner strength that they themselves did not know existed,” Blevins-Booth explains. “Their faith in a higher power and expressions of hope seem to be an important part of their acceptance and healing.”

...IN 2016, THERE WERE AN ESTIMATED 15.5 MILLION CANCER SURVIVORS, AND BY 2026, THAT NUMBER IS EXPECTED TO GO UP TO 20.3 MILLION.

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Life + Style

A lot of fashionable looks starting out the fall season!

TOP

DRESSED

The TOParrazi were out and about capturing the most stylish looks as we bring in the fall! It might be getting cooler outside, but that doesn’t mean the fashion stops! Here are our TOP Dressed for this month!

A Winning Pair!

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f there are two things we love, it’s high fashion and Halloween; and this month’s outfit is all about making those two worlds collide. One of the most beloved stars of all-time is Marilyn Monroe. From her bombshell good looks to her unforgettable film costumes, Marilyn will forever be a Hollywood legend. We wanted to pay tribute to the late starlet with a fashion infused Halloween costume that reeks of glitz and glamour. Starting things off is a runway piece from the fabulous designing duo Viktor & Rolf. This dramatic bow back column gown immediately reminded us of Marilyn’s iconic scene in “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes” and was an obvious choice for our look. We don’t really see much of Marilyn’s shoes in the film, so any pair of black heels will do. But we do see plenty of jewels! Since this ensemble is created in the spirit of Halloween, there’s no need to break the bank on accessorizing. The key pieces in Marilyn’s glittering look is a blinged out choker, chunky bracelets, and shimmering drop earrings. All of which we found for reasonable prices online (although we did splurge on the cuffs). The next most important thing to nail is her beauty look. Ms. Monroe’s makeup is classic glam, but the most important features are her long, wispy lashes and her signature cherry red lip. We also wanted to add in a hint of black magic. Since the dress does not have the dark detailing on the bow as it is seen in the film, we chose a pair of onyx hued opera gloves as the finishing touch on this old Hollywood look. Just looking at this outfit will have you singing “Diamonds Are A Girls Best Friend” right into Halloween.

by Jesse L. Brooks

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ince it is the month of spectacular, spooky Halloween we wanted to share a beauty look that is all about exuding a dark and mysterious vibe. Nothing says that better than a sultry smoky cat-eye. If there is one celebrity known for delivering incredible beauty looks, it’s Mrs.West. While Kim’s look was worn to this year’s ‘Heavenly Bodies’ Met Gala and was hugely inspired by the 90’s supermodel era (think Versace catwalk circa 1997), the look is also perfect for a Halloween costume. Whether you are going as Cleopatra or Queen of The Damned you could easily perform a few tweaks to make it work for your desired look. Kim’s longtime makeup artist Mario Dedivanovic used the beauty mogul’s own KKW Beauty line to make her eyes pop, along with Rodial skincare for that perfect airbrushed finish.

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1 | R o dial Be au ty D ra g on Bl ood Cl ean si n g Wat er 2 | R o dial Vita min C Bri g ht en i n g Pads 3 | R o dial Vita min C En er g i si n g Sheet Mask 4 | R o dial D ra g o n’s B l ood Sc u l pt i n g G el 5 | KKW Be au ty x M ari o 10 Pan Eyeshado w Pal et t e, t he shade ‘Alban ian’ 6 | Lill y Lashe s in ‘Goddess’ 7 | KKW Be au ty C re me Con t ou r St i cks i n ‘ Medi u m 1 an d 2’ 8 | KKW Be au ty Po w der Con t ou r an d H i g hl i g ht Pal et t e i n ‘ Mediu m ’ 9 | KKW Be au ty C re me Li pst i ck i n ‘ Cl assi c K’ 10 | K K W Be au ty X Ar g en i s Crèm e Col or St i ck i n ‘ Dram at i c o’ 11 | K K W Be au ty C o n c eal Bak e an d Bri g ht en Ki t i n ‘ #7’

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BEAUTY

Lifestyle

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BEAUTY PRODUCTS

T

hroughout history, people have sought out innovative ways to apply new ingredients and techniques to achieve flawless, glowing skin and a more beautiful overall appearance. But in our rush to find the perfect beauty product, we’ve often made missteps.

For centuries, cosmetics were formulated with an incredible ingredient that was touted to do everything from brightening skin to creating the ideal base for cosmetic colors. That “miracle” ingredient–lead–is now shunned and regulated in almost every application because of the extensive harm we now know it causes. Fortunately, we now benefit from the work of thousands of researchers across the globe who have taken it upon themselves to better understand the ingredients that go into our skincare routines. While some groups say there’s a lot of work yet to be done on that front, we’re learning something new nearly every day about what common cosmetic and personal care products are doing to our bodies and overall health. Choosing a safer beauty regimen is the newest trend, and it’s one that everyone should jump on! Learning more about the products you use every day will help you make better choices and will allow you to enjoy the self-care even more.

DO A LITTLE RESEARCH

NAIL IT!

The right place to start is by arming yourself with knowledge. Learn about common ingredients that cause concern, as well as how to best identify which products in your routine are safest.

In the past, nail polishes have been one of the biggest offenders of utilizing potentially unsafe ingredients. Fortunately, things are changing! Nail brands are among the leaders in the movement to make cosmetic ingredient safety more transparent for consumers and beauty professionals.

When you’re ready, start going through your beauty stash. Take time to Google the ingredients, or use an online resource like the one available from skincare brand Paula’s Choice. The Environmental Working Group’s “Skin Deep” Cosmetics Database rates common consumer products as a whole and provides information about their potential effects. Made Safe is an organization that aims to stick labels on products that were produced using “safe” ingredients. Their website has lots of tips on identifying problematic ingredients. The Campaign for Safe Cosmetics offers guidance on selecting the right beauty products. A licensed skin care professional can offer guidance regarding the safety of ingredients, as well as how those products may be affecting your skin.

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If you do your nails at home, choose a nail polish that proudly proclaims its status as a 3 (or more)-Free formulation. Remember to also check the ingredients in your top coat, base coat, nail treatments and nail polish remover. Get your nails done by a professional? More and more salons are opting to use products with safer formulations. If you’re not sure what your nail salon uses, you can always ask. If you get artificial nails, it’s likely that you won’t be able to find a routine that’s completely free of questionable chemicals. Instead, focus on a salon with state of the art ventilation to keep you and your nail tech as safe as possible during the manicure.


Life + Style

KNOW THE LINGO 3-FREE A formulation–typically, of nail polish–that is free of dibutyl phthalate (a plasticizer that has likely long and short-term toxicity affecting developmental and reproductive health), toluene (a highly-hazardous paint thinner that may cause neurological damage or impaired breathing) and formaldehyde (a preservative that can cause chronic health problems with frequent exposure).

5-FREE On top of being 3-Free, this formula does not contain formaldehyde resin (which can cause skin irritation and allergic reactions) or camphor (which can cause skin irritation and allergic reactions, and prolonged exposure may cause organ damage).

7-FREE This formula goes a step above 5-Free, also avoiding ethyl tosylamide (a plasticizer that was banned by the EU because it may exacerbate our antibiotic resistence problems) or xylene (a possible organ system toxin and neurotoxin, as well as lung and eye irritant). Some brands claim to be as much as 12-Free. That just means those products have elected to eliminate even more questionable ingredients.

PARABENS A group of synthetic compounds frequently used as preservatives, preventing microbial growth. The FDA worries that cumulative exposure to these chemicals–even at “safe” levels–could cause hormone disruption, which is linked to increased risk of breast cancer and reproductive issues.

SULFATES These salts are common in detergents and cleaning products, including shampoos. Their production and use is controversial because of its effects to the environment. While there is no evidence that sulfates are dangerous, many people prefer the results when using sulfate-free products because sulfates can build up on hair and skin, causing a dull, heavy appearance.

LEAD Yes, even in this day and age, you still have to make sure your beauty products don’t contain this heavy metal. Known for causing developmental delays, reproductive problems, decreased kidney function and cardiovascular effects, this ingredient is limited by the FDA. It can still be found in higher amounts in cosmetics produced outside the US, often in knock-offs.

“TOXIN” It’s a trend to worry about “toxins” in our products, food and environments. But the word toxin has a very specific definition, and it’s often misused by people who are trying to capitalize on the trend, using a scary word to suggest that many substances are more harmful than they really are. Toxins are poisonous substances produced within living cells and organisms. Toxicants may be man-made, biologically produced or naturally occurring. Toxicants aren’t necessarily poisonous, but do have some effect on living organisms over time.

HEALTHIER BATH & BODY The products that you probably come into contact with most are your soaps, body washes, lotions and hair care goods. Because of that, these may be the most important products in your beauty routine to ensure are free of hazardous ingredients. These products usually have lengthy ingredient lists that can seem impossible to sort through. Fortunately, lengthy chemical names aren’t necessarily an indication that a product is a danger. When you research the ingredients, you may find that the products you’re using are reasonably safe. If your products are giving you some concerns, try to find alternatives that don’t use the ingredients you’re worried about. But be sure you’re doing your due diligence with the replacement you choose: companies sometimes trade one more recognizable “bad” ingredient for a lesserknown–but not necessarily safer–ingredient. When it comes to swapping out products in your beauty routine, it’s always wise to do a check-in with your dermatologist or a trusted skin care professional. They can advise you about how the new product may interact with other items in your current skin care routine.

BEWARE BUZZWORDS & GIMMICKS A product that calls itself organic, all-natural, healthier, cleaner or safer isn’t necessarily what’s safest for you. It might be a good place to start when searching for a replacement for a problematic product, but you still need to take a good look at the ingredient list. The truth about the beauty world is that there is very little regulation or oversight. Buzzwords like “natural” are often completely meaningless. Organic ingredients could still be irritants or allergens. When it comes to beauty products, the old addage applies: if it seems too good to be true, it probably is. Products with a proven track record of success and safety beat snagging the latest and greatest innovations any day. Remember that if the application, packaging or ingredients are super cool and like nothing you’ve seen before... odds are, it’s just a gimmick. Stick to what works!

IS DIY BETTER? If Pinterest is to be believed, the best way to avoid scary chemicals is to have a beauty routine that’s full of DIY creations. Like with “natural” products, DIY isn’t necessarily safer. While it’s still important to look up all of the ingredients you’ll be using, you will also have to do your research to better understand how combinations of ingredients will affect your skin. For example, one common Pinterest recipe involves exfoliating your nose with sugar and lemon. While those ingredients are perfectly safe health-wise, they’re absolutely terrible for your skin: sugar is too abrasive, causing microtears, and lemon is too acidic, causing damage and irritation to your skin. Plus, lemon is phototoxic, meaning if you walk out into the sun after an exfoliation, you might end up with blisters! •

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Introduced by mutual friends, Peter and Shannon Weiss met in April 2012. Shannon, who was born in Louisville, went to Transylvania University for her undergraduate degree and the University of Kentucky for pharmacy school. Peter was born in Versailles, Ky., and works in the bourbon industry. They both lived in Lexington while dating, so decided to marry in the city that brought them together. The couple married on March 31, 2018 at Limestone Hall in downtown Lexington. “Our wedding was only the second wedding held at Limestone Hall, a brand new event space in the old courthouse,” Shannon said. “We were first taken aback by Limestone Hall’s beauty, and then the size was perfect for us to be able to have both our ceremony and reception in one place.” With approximately 180 guests, Limestone Hall created the perfect setting for the ceremony and reception. The couple also got a kick out of telling their guests that they were having a “courthouse wedding” since the space used to serve as the former Lexington courthouse. As Peter and Shannon explained, they wanted to create a fun and whimsical atmosphere for their family and friends. “We used a lot of white and light pink flowers and greenery against navy linens,” Shannon said. “Our dinnerware was pink and gold with polka dots. Our centerpieces had pink and white flowers and crystals.” Besides the bride, the balloon arch at the reception was the real showstopper. Created by the Weiss’ wedding planner, Alicia Collins from Great Expectations and Lighter than Air, the arch was adorned with flowers that matched the centerpieces. Since Peter is in the bourbon industry, the couple incorporated bourbon barrels wherever they could. Bourbon barrels were at the entrance to the ceremony space with large flower arrangements on top, the wedding cake when cut looked like a bourbon barrel and the couple gifted guests a pint glass with their monogram on it. From start to finish, the evening was lighthearted and full of laughter. It was important to Peter and Shannon that every guest enjoyed themselves. The couple’s favorite moment from the night was their first dance. “All along, Shannon had told me she wanted to dance to ‘Perfect’ by Ed Sheeran, but worked with the DJ to surprise me with one of my favorite songs, ‘Steady as We Go’ by Dave Matthews Band,” Peter said. “Only a few people knew about the surprise and I’ve been told my reaction was priceless.” Peter wasn’t the only one who was surprised. He surprised Shannon with a picture book he had created with some of their favorite memories throughout their relationship. He coordinated with Lexington’s 21c Museum Hotel to have the book, a bottle of champagne and a handkerchief waiting in Shannon’s suite. If the couple could pass on any advice, they said that using a wedding planner was most helpful in the planning process. “We definitely recommend getting a wedding planner,” Shannon said. “Alicia from Great Expectations was so helpful in making decisions and giving us advice. She also kept us on track so we didn’t get overwhelmed with all the decisions that had to be made. Most importantly, be sure to have fun while planning your special day. It can be super stressful, but remember that the ultimate reason for all the planning is that you end up married to your best friend at the end of the day.”

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PHOTO G R A PH E R Brandi Potter Photography V ENUE Limestone Hall PL ANNER /FLO R I ST Great Expectations, Alicia Collins CAT E R I N G Darae & Friends Catering CAKE/D ESSERT S Caramandas BR I DAL GOW N Hayley Paige, Twirl Boutique G RO O M/ G ROOM SM E N Howard & Miller HAI R + MAKEUP Kentucky Wedding Belles and Irish Reams, Posh Salon & Spa R E N TA L S/ D E C OR Bryant’s Rent All I NV I TAT I O NS/CAL L I GR APHY Sheffield House by Jami Velez D J Mykraphone Mike ACCO MMO DAT I O NS 21c Musuem Hotel Lexington

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The air is getting cooler and the trees are starting to change. Fall weddings are the perfect chance to truly play with those natural textures and color palettes.

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Incorporating organic fall foliage like dried magnolia leaves, wheat stems or willow eucalyptus into your bouquet will help create a unique and gorgeous autumn wedding. 5

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Life + Style

P h o t o by A r i a n a Jo rd a n P h o t o g r a p hy F lorals by Zachary Brady Designs

PH OTO C R E D I T S

1 | Chri s Sc u f fi ns Pho t o g ra phy, T he Fl o w e r G i rl s 2 | M elan i e D u erk o pp Pho t o g ra phy, A man da O ' Shan ne ssy Cre at i v e 3 | Clayton A ust i n Pho t o g ra phy Cl ayt on Aust i n Fl o ral s 4 | Al ixan n Loo sl e Pho t o g ra phy U rban Chat e au Fl o ral 5 | M on Che ri Bri dal . co m 6 | Clayton A ust i n Pho t o g ra phy 7 | Gen e v e H of f man , Sw e e t e st Occasi o n 8 | A rian a Jordan Pho t o g ra phy Zachar y Brady De si gns

BY: HALEY N ORRIS Recent Bride and Owner of Haley Michelle Designs www.haleymichelledesigns.com

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AT HOME

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Tour of Homes: Tranquil Townhome

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Color Catalog: Pantone’s Ash Rose

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Super Mom: Charity Ford

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Five Strategies to Raising Generous, Charitable Kids

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Pets: National Walk Your Dog Week


At Home

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At Home

town

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SCENIC SURROUNDINGS PROVIDE THE EXPERIENCE O F A N O N G O I N G VA C A T I O N . Upon stepping into Cinda and Rodes Brown’s home, you cannot help but feel a sense of serenity. Perhaps it’s the large breathtaking painting of a beachscape by artist Jordan Zanes that greets you. Or the open and airy floorplan. Or the expansive view out the windows of a placid lake surrounded by trees and backed by the rolling hills of Warren Rosenthal’s Patchen Wilkes Farm. Regardless, it induces a deep breath and relaxed sigh. Rodes, a practicing attorney at the Jackson Kelly law firm with a focus on real estate law, agrees, “We feel like we’re on vacation.” Cinda adds, “Sometimes it doesn’t even feel like we’re still in Lexington, but downtown is only about ten minutes away.” It was the natural surroundings coupled with convenience that made their Patchen Wilkes Townhome irresistible. Initially, the Browns were looking at the home as an investment property, but decided it was too perfect not to keep for themselves. Cinda, a nurse practitioner, who recently retired from the VA Hospital after 21 years, was ready for maintenance-free living. They have since purchased a second Patchen townhome, which they are currently renting. Photos By | K E N I P A R K S Written By | D O N N A I S O N

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At Home

Upon moving in, the Browns immediately turned to longtime friend and interior designer with Hubbuch & Company, Carolyn Threlkeld. The trio then collaborated with realtors Maria Gillette and Joey Svec, who represent The House Store Realty Group, to fulfill their vision of a dwelling that was clean, classic and comfortable. They also wanted the essence of Sea Island, Georgia, one of their favorite places, captured in the color palette, furnishings, upholstery and other décor. All agreed that transitional design— the meshing of modern and traditional elements—would best suit their needs. Carolyn states, “When I started on this project with Rodes and Cinda, we looked at their furnishings and came up with a floor plan and a color palette. Neutrals, corals and aquamarine. These colors are reflected in almost every room, which gives a cohesive look to their townhouse.”

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At Home

Over an eight-month period, Cinda and Carolyn achieved the desired “coastal and traditional blend.” This seamless style starts in the entryway and moves just beyond into the capacious great room, which contains a living room and kitchen. The décor is a blend and balance of prior-owned possessions and more recent acquisitions. Cinda knew from the start she was interested in “combining old and new. And, creatively reusing and enjoying furniture and art we had at our previous home.” After spending over two decades on Indian Mound Road, they had amassed a wide array of furnishings, art and collectibles. The paring down process involved choosing what to keep, what to sell and what to give away. They hosted neighborhood yard sales and donated many items to their church, Apostles Anglican. Rodes laughs, “I must have delivered a dozen loads.” Afterwards, the couple was left with only their most beloved belongings. This is where Carolyn’s creative expertise came into play through rethinking and repurposing the items. For Carolyn the goal was to “mix it up and it make it look brand new.” She goes on to say, “I have worked with them for years, and I knew what they wanted to use in their previous house. So, we used their furniture and artwork in a new setting. We were able to create a more transitional look by concentrating on fewer larger pieces of artwork and accessories.” Throughout the house, custom window treatments from Renee Chess, fixtures from Kentucky Lighting & Supply and River Ridge preengineered wood flooring in the terra natia finish from The Flooring Gallery enhance the transitional feel.

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At Home

The kitchen also embodies the transitional style utilizing both classical and contemporary components. The dominant wall consists of BJ Tidwell cabinetry from Kitchen Concepts with a Bianco Romano granite countertop and functional farmhouse sink from Bluegrass Tops & Casework. An accommodating island provides more than ample room for food preparation and casual dining. Delta plumbing fixtures from Ferguson’s and state-of-the-art Whirpool appliances from Pieratt’s round out the look. But, arguably, the most eye-catching element is the Artigiano backsplash from Daltile Tile & Stone Gallery. The tile’s glossy, hand-painted appearance and irregular edges add a rich, old-world charm.

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Off the great room is a spacious screened-in porch overlooking the lake where Cinda enjoys coffee in the morning, curling up with a good book in the afternoon, and winding down with a cocktail with Rodes at the day’s end. “This is where we live,” Cinda says. The porch is well-appointed with furnishings from Housewarmings, potted tropical and flowering plants, and a unique table constructed of a colorful, Japanese planter topped with glass. When making the decision to screen the porch, Cinda and Rodes’ main priority was to make certain the view was minimally altered. Aladdin’s Glass delivered with a screen treatment that is next to invisible.

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At Home

The main floor also boasts a master bedroom with master bath, walk-in closet and laundry room, making one-floor living an option. The third floor is comprised of an additional two bedrooms, a full bath with walk-in shower, and lofted multi-purpose room with a desk, roomy sofa, and wide windows providing a vista to the lake. This has proved the perfect place for the grandchildren to play on their visits to Kentucky.

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At Home

Descend downstairs and you find yourself in a full, walk-out basement, a feature of all the Patchen Wilkes Townhomes community’s waterfront properties. Though technically correct, with floor to ceiling windows that let in the sun and direct access to a sizable patio, the term basement seems inaccurate. The lower level also has a full bathroom and additional room which could be used as an office, craft/play room or study.

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Rodes refers to the main area as his man-cave, though that term is somewhat misleading. The space, which was influenced by a suite in the Cloister Resort on Sea Island, is the picture of easy elegance with a comfortable couch situated in front of a fireplace, a dining table and sleek wet bar for entertaining. Another of Jordan Zane’s spectacular shoreline paintings occupies a wall in the sitting area.


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Again, it is the proximity to the outdoors that the couple finds most appealing. “We love our lakefront patio,� Cinda says. The patio, where grilling and relaxing take place, is situated beside the private, seven-acre lake with its one-mile walking trail for residents, variety of plants and wildlife. Avian visitors include ducks, geese and blue heron. The original landscape design was implemented by Barrett Partners Inc. Now, Landscape Workshop (formerly Henkel Denmark) keeps the property pristine. Since becoming part of the Patchen Wilkes Townhomes community, which was created by Warren Rosenthal and developed by Andover Construction, Cinda and Rodes could not be more content. For others craving this harmonious way of life, there are still ten waterfront townhomes available. Each can be completely customized within The House Store design center, which is fully equipped with the latest styles of finishes, as well as a team of realtors, designers, interior designers and builders to aid in the process. As for Cinda and Rodes, they look forward to the ongoing experience of enjoying a luxury vacation right in their own home.

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CINDA BROWN,

CAROYLN THRELKELD,

H O M E OW N E R

DESIGNER

D E S I G N E R , C A R O LY N T H R E L K E D O F H U B B U C H & C O M PA N Y S AT D O W N W I T H U S TO S H A R E H E R I N S P I R AT I O N S A N D T I P S F O R AC H I E V I N G A B E AU T I F U L H O M E .

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR DECORATING STYLE?

I would say my style is generally classic, which can be mixed with contemporary artwork, or combined with other furnishings to give a room a very distinct look, which reflects the client. WHO IS YOUR PERSONAL STYLE ICON?

Bunny Williams. She has a fresh style that reflects a classic background. Always interesting and unexpected. WHY IS COLOR SO IMPORTANT AND HOW CAN A CLIENT FIND THEIR PERFECT PALETTE?

Usually a client will have favorite colors they have used in artwork or special collections. Once you establish your favorite colors, you can add interesting accent colors to make your personal palette very unique. WHICH DESIGN TRENDS ARE YOU MOST EXCITED ABOUT IN 2018?

Bolder colors used with a neutral palette wallpaper is making a comeback, especially in kitchens, baths, and dining rooms. I also like large scale florals with botanical references used in fabrics, wall art, and wallpaper. More colorful kitchens are a great new trend with using a pop of color on an island, countertop or black splash. NAME THREE THINGS EVERY ROOM SHOULD HAVE:

• A pop of color. Monochromatic schemes are fine, but it is good to inject a little energy with pops of color in accessories, pillows or artwork. • Plants or flowers are another need for a home. Houseplants and flowers do wonders for a space. Trees add height and life to a room. Fresh cut flowers add color as well as offer a welcoming touch. • Layers of texture. Try bringing in texture through baskets, throws and rugs. These elements add interest and make a room more inviting. WHAT IS A COMMON MISCONCEPTION ABOUT WORKING WITH A DESIGNER

I think people are worried their house will look like the designer’s house and not their own. This is not true. A capable designer will get to know the client and interpret their style and colors they like into a beautiful space that is a reflection of the client.


At Home

Jack Tufted Tuxedo Accent Arm Chair Jennifer Taylor Home

Dessert Plates in Rose and Gold Splattered Porcelain SuiteOneStudio

Ash Rose W

hen “millennial pink” first began popping up in fashion and décor, it seemed like an inevitable one hit wonder. It hit on a trend, but the name seemed to pigeonhole it to a particular aesthetic. Fortunately, the color proved to have staying power, just like the rose gold tech accessories that inspired it. As it turns out, the pretty, yet not too sweet shade of pink appeals to just about everyone. Pantone’s Ash Rose is the perfect iteration of this buzzworthy hue. It’s warm, inviting and accessible for a variety of home styles. Set it against a deep, desaturated purple for a really unexpected style. To accessorize Ash Rose, look to pieces with geometric influences. Think clean lines and lush materials. Graphic rugs are another trend that keeps on going for good reason: they add instant visual interest and show a lot of personality. Something in beige and not-quite-black will prove to be a timeless pick.

Loloi Adler Area Rug Market on National Rose Gold Passione Floor Lamp Versanora

Surya Accessories Orianna Throw Pillow My Favorite Things

Pair with:

Actual colors may vary from this printed representation.

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S

uper Mom Charity Ford says that being called a “super mom” is beyond flattering, but to her three sons, she is just “mama”.

“We are all ‘super-moms’, I just think we do super in different ways,” Charity says. “I’m thankful that I have several super moms who always have supported me, including my mom Janet, stepmom Kathryn, my motherin-law Kathy, my MawMaw, and my Grammy, who has passed away.” Charity and her husband Keith, an investigator with Kentucky’s Alcoholic Beverage Control, have three sons: Sawyer (13) and twins, Cooper and Logan (11). Charity is a mom, cancer survivor and business owner. She runs Cookies by Charity, which gives her the flexibility to drive her three sons to and from all their practices and activities. Luckily for Charity, she has always been a night owl, so she tends to do the cookie decorating after all is quiet in the Ford house. “I have been the mom with a full-time job outside of the home, and a stay-at-home mom with a part-time job. It’s all hard, stressful, exhausting, but being a mom is the best gift ever,” she says. In December 2014, Charity was diagnosed with stage 2 breast cancer. Charity’s mom, Janet, is a two-time breast cancer survivor. During Janet’s second diagnosis, she and Charity underwent chemotherapy at the same time. The next year was consumed with chemotherapy, radiation and surgeries, and a lot of time spent in bed. “My family is in Louisiana, so my mom and I went through a lot together, just miles apart,” Charity says. “It’s safe to say that 2015 was the hardest year for our family. Learning to let go, and let people help me and my family, was a lesson I had to learn really fast.” After chemotherapy ended, Charity started a project called Bags of Sunshine. She delivers bags filled with items to use while undergoing treatment. To date, Charity has delivered more than 1,300 bags to cancer patients and their families. In 2017, she was honored by the American Cancer Society at their Belles and Beaus Gala for her efforts. “My hope is that my boys have learned what it means to fight, what it means to help, and what it means to give back,” she says. From football to soccer to playing trumpet, the Ford boys are very active, but Charity and Keith make it a priority to have regular dates with their sons to regroup.

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At Home

“If I’ve learned anything as a mom, it’s this: while we may strive for perfection, our kids don’t care about perfect, they just want our attention. I have regular dates with my boys. It’s either lunch or dinner at Schlotzsky’s, followed by a trip to Half-Price Books and Target. It’s just our thing,” she says. “All five of us being free at the same time is rare, but when possible we enjoy going out for pizza or Mexican food, and of course attending the boys’ sporting events.” As Charity explains, keeping calm, knowing when she needs a break and learning to let things go are challenges she recognizes in motherhood. “Believe me, I am the mom who needs alone time, time for myself and time to recharge,” she says. “I think knowing the need for these things makes me a better mom. But seriously, I think the most challenging part of being a parent is preparing your children for adulthood. That’s what we are doing, making adults. I am trying to be aware of this on a daily basis while keeping in mind they are still kids. Sometimes it can be a tough balance, but I am raising three sweet, caring young men.” While motherhood brings its unique set of challenges, Charity says that the rewards are well worth it. “Watching my boys work hard at something is so rewarding—it could be jamming in the school variety show, kicking a personal best field goal or acing a test at school. My boys are pretty amazing and they are by far my best creations,” she says.

“My boys are pretty amazing and they are by far my best creations.”

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ids aren’t born generous. Ask any parent who has ever tried to get a child to share. But they can learn. And one of the most effective ways to teach them, according to a study from the Women’s Philanthropy Institute at Indiana University, is to simply talk to kids about giving. Blue Grass Community Foundation (BGCF) has several suggestions for starting, and continuing, the conversation. 1. Help your kids learn about local charities Go online together and check out GoodGiving.net, a free resource brought to you by BGCF. You’ll find attractive, colorful, user-friendly profiles of over 400 hard-working Central Kentucky nonprofits. You can search by mission, location or nonprofit name. Kids will especially love the profiles of nonprofits helping animals. 2. Help your kids give BGCF’s yearly online fundraiser, the GoodGiving Challenge, is a great way to give as little as $10 to one or more of over 120 nonprofits. Every gift is important! Since 2011, the Challenge has raised over $8.5 million for local causes. Pop-up match challenges add to the fun. Go to bggives.org between November 27 and December 2 to explore this year’s featured nonprofits. Also, check out the GoodGiving Challenge print guide containing photos and write-ups of nonprofits in the 2018 Challenge. 3. Create a charitable vision statement for your family The Giving Guide, a resource from BGCF, walks you through a simple, step-by-step process to create your own unique statement about what’s important to your family when it comes to giving. Pick up your free copy at the Community Foundation’s office at 499 East High Street, Lexington, or email ryan@bgcf.org to receive one by email. 4. Set a good example Parents, you can create change in Lexington for just $1 a day (or $365/ year) by joining BGCF365, a giving circle that also offers networking and development opportunities. BGCF365 members chose the charitable causes their collective dollars support and get a seat at the grantmaking table. Learn more at bgcf.org/bgcf365. 5. Organize your family giving Open a donor advised charitable fund at Blue Grass Community Foundation, then involve the entire family in meaningful discussions about the charities you’ll support. Use the opportunity to discuss strategic, impactful gifts. For older children, talk to them about the possibility of succeeding you as the advisor to your family fund.

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Blue Grass Community Foundation creates more generous, vibrant and engaged communities, growing charitable giving throughout the Bluegrass and Appalachia Kentucky. To learn how BGCF can be your philanthropic partner, contact Lisa Adkins, President/ CEO at 859-225-3343.


At Home

National Walk Your Dog Week

T

he week of October 1-7 is National Walk Your Dog Week. In 2010, Colleen Paige, an animal advocate and lifestyle expert, established this to be a daylong event. She quickly realized that one day was insufficient to encourage a lifestyle change and later expanded it to a weeklong initiative. The goal of National Walk-Your-Dog Week is to foster the animal-human bond by walking together in nature, raise awareness about canine obesity, and ultimately improve the health of our canine companions, as well as their human counterparts. The Association for Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP) designated October 10 as National Pet Obesity Awareness Day. APOP reports that approximately 56% of dogs’ and 60% of cats’ body condition scores meet the criteria considered either overweight or obese. Excess fat increases pets’ risk for a variety of medical conditions including cancer, diabetes, arthritis, high blood pressure, skin disorders, respiratory issues, kidney dysfunction and more. In addition to medical-related problems, overweight animals may experience a reduced life expectancy and diminished quality of life. Therefore, maintaining your pet’s body condition score within a healthy range is optimal for their wellbeing. As with humans, exercise, diet and portion control are the best methods for doing so. Even if your dog has the ideal body condition score, October is a great month to start a walking regimen with your dog. The temperature is ideal. The scenery is breathtaking, and the air is refreshing. To make the most of your walk, consider using a harness

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Erica Radhakrishnan Hospital Administrator, BVS

instead of a leash and collar. A harness will protect your pet’s airway from unpleasant pressure and possible injury in the event your dog pulls. Be sure to carry poop bags, water and a collapsible bowl for thirsty walkers. Be conscious of your dog’s pace and level of exertion. For beginners, be prepared that your dog may get tired, sit down and refuse to get up causing your to carry them home. To be safe, do not overestimate you dog’s initial endurance level. If your pet is classified as either overweight or obese, you will need to gradually increase the number of days in the week that you walk, the number of minutes spent walking, as well as pace. A general veterinarian can provide owners with a recommended walking schedule for pets with specific health concerns like obesity, advanced age and chronic disease. APOP recommends the following time goals and 5-day/week walking plan for overweight dogs with no preexisting conditions, normal heart and lung function, and normal blood pressure:

Wk. Duration Pace 1

30 Min

10 brisk min. followed by 20 casual pace min.

2

30 Min

15 brisk min. followed by 15 casual pace min.

3

30 Min

20 brisk min. followed by 10 casual pace min.

4

35-40 Min

30 brisk min. followed by 5-10 casual pace min.

5+

35-60 Min

Two 20-30 min. walks/day 15-25 brisk min. followed by 5 casual pace min.


EATS &

ENTERTAINMENT

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Dining: Napa Prime

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Beer + Wine of the Month

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popculture recipe: Sweet Potato Grits with Chicken Sausage

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BBN Football: Bouvier Rises

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Top 5 Dining: Appetizers + Small Plates

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BBN Basketball: Keldon Tough

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Dining Guide

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Equine Update: Breeder’s Cup


"

I wanted to create a menu that you cannot duplicate at home

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Eats & Entertainment

Dining Out:

NAPA PRIME heads downtown By Kathie Stamps | Photos by Keni Parks

Whether you have a craving for a gourmet burger with a local craft beer or fresh seafood with a California wine, you’re going to love Napa Prime in downtown Lexington. Three venues are opening under one roof this month at Napa Prime. It’s on the corner of Broadway and Cedar Street, next to Clean Sweep Car Wash. In addition to extra parking at the carwash in the evenings, Napa Prime has a designated parking space for Uber and Lyft drop-off. They also offer valet parking on Friday and Saturday evenings. So where did the name Napa Prime come from? “When people think of Napa Valley wines they think of a higher-end wine,” said owner Darrell Lewis. “The emphasis is on prime ingredients. We wanted to reinforce that with fresh seafood and prime burgers.” Lewis has 30 years’ of culinary management experience. He opened his first Napa Prime in early 2014 in his hometown of Versailles. That location employs 30 team members; 60 more have been hired in Lexington. Built in early 2013, the Cedar Street space started out as JDI Grille & Tavern and then Alexander Bullitt’s Winery, Brewery & Bistro before Lewis took over the space in July. He refurbished the building with new lighting from Brecher’s and Pottery Barn, new furnishings from local gems like Scout Antique & Modern, and fresh paint to brighten up the feeling of the first-floor restaurant. Each floor has its own vibe for diners, party-goers, and event planners and attendees. The first-floor restaurant, which opened on October 2nd, has seating for 90, plus 30 on the patio, with a menu specializing in prime beef burgers and fresh seafood. By mid-October, Rocks Bourbon Bar will be open on the second floor, serving up handcrafted cocktails from 5 p.m. to midnight, Tuesday through Saturday, and live music on weekends. Napa Prime Events opens on the third floor in late October for private dining and events, with seating for 30 to 90 guests. There’s a complete A/V setup, a bar with customizable offerings, professional

chef service with charcuterie stations available, and any number of ways to configure tables and chairs to the host’s liking for baby showers, rehearsal dinners, corporate events, pharmaceutical sales entertaining and more. “If you have a private party on the third floor, valet parking is going to be offered to your guests,” Lewis said. Napa Prime Events’ mobile kitchen food truck has been on the road since 2016 and is still going strong as an arm of the Napa Prime catering operation. The food truck has served up to 500 people at one function and to prove just how popular it is, Lewis said the truck is already booked for May 2019. “September of next year is almost sold out,” he said. “We’re already booking for April 2020.” Lewis is as business-savvy as he is customer-friendly. In early 2019 he’ll be bringing in guests from California vineyards and Bourbon distillers from Kentucky for a series of private dinners featuring bourbon and wine pairings. Next year he’s also franchising Napa Prime. This second location in downtown Lexington is quite the showcase for interested franchisees. Lewis hired Franchise Marketing Systems, an Atlanta-based business that has already projected selling 50 to 60 Napa Prime franchises within the next five years. Now, back to the Napa Prime menu. The restaurant uses USDA prime beef for all burgers, from a classic cheeseburger to a PB&J burger. “Prime” is a designation of superior quality by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Fresh seafood for Napa Prime is sourced on a weekly basis from boats in Miami, Los Angeles and Costa Rica. It’s not all beef and seafood though. For a “burger of the month” experience, Lewis has featured ostrich, camel, kangaroo, water buffalo and other exotic species. “I wanted to create a menu that you cannot duplicate at home,” he said. “If you can make these items at home, then we offer no value to you as a guest.” Guests would agree Napa Prime is one-of-kind. For online ordering, gift card purchases and carryout for large parties, visit NapaBurgerBar.com.

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Q&A

with Darrel Lewis

What drives you?

What do you do on your days off?

A relentless pursuit of excellence. In everything.

I like to bass fish and duck hunt.

What is your favorite year-round ingredient?

What is the last thing you cooked at home?

Bourbon.

Filets on a Weber grill with sushi grade pan-seared diver scallops.

What is your favorite dish at Napa Prime?

What quote gets you through the day?

New York steak with chimichurri sauce, and french fries.

“You can only coast one way, and that’s downhill.”

Favorite childhood food?

What do you tell your children when they leave the house every morning?

PB&J.

“Go make a difference.”

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Recipe:

Blackberry Bourbon Lemonade Ingredients: 1 jigger of Buffalo Trace 4 to 6 ounces of lemonade Handful of blackberries, muddled Instructions: Shake in a cocktail shaker. Top with soda water and garnish with lemon wedge.


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Cuisine

Sweet Potato en Grits with Chsiacgke Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 12-15 minutes

Sau

Ingredients: 1 large sweet potato (about 1 pound) ¼ cup fat-free milk 2 cups water ¼ teaspoon salt ½ cup grits 4 links low-fat fully cooked spicy chicken sausage ½ cup sugar-free maple syrup 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon ⅛ teaspoon cayenne pepper (optional) black pepper, to taste

Preparation: Wash the sweet potato and poke it multiple times with a fork. Wrap it in a paper towel. Microwave the potato for 5 minutes. Check it, and if you cannot easily insert a fork into it, microwave it for another 1 to 2 minutes. (It will be very hot!) Wait until the cooked potato is cool enough to touch, then cut it in half. Scrape out all of the flesh, and discard the skin. Mash it in a bowl with the milk to make it smooth, then set aside. (Optional: puree the potato with the milk in a food processor if you want to ensure optimal smoothness). Bring the water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Add the salt and grits, and stir to combine. Cover and reduce the heat to medium-low, stirring occasionally until thickened, 5-7 minutes. While the grits are cooking, slice the chicken sausage at an angle. Heat a grill pan or nonstick skillet over medium heat. Grill the sausage slices until they get some color on them and are heated through, 1 to 2 minutes on each side. When the grits are done, remove them from the heat and fold in the set-aside sweet potato with the syrup, cinnamon, optional cayenne, and black pepper, to taste. Add more milk ¼ cup at a time if you prefer a thinner consistency. Spoon about 1 cup of the grits into each bowl and serve 1 sliced sausage link on top of each bowl of grits.

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Cuisine

NUTRITION FACTS Yield: 4 servings Nutrition Facts based on 1 cup grits and 1 sausage link Calories: 190

Sodium: 474mg

Calories from fat: 28

Carbohydrates: 28g

Fat: 3g

Fiber: 2g

Saturated Fat: 1g

Sugar: 2g

Cholesterol: 20mg

Protein: 13g

Recipe Courtesy of Popculture.com is the nation’s go-to source for all things pop culture and speaks to fans that eat, sleep and play amidst today’s prevailing trends and provides an authentic, one-of-a-kind view of the contemporary landscape.

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Eats & Entertainment

TOP Dining

Small Plates Big Tastes

By Amanda Harper

Babalu

Love tapas? Babalu promises “Tapas Worth Sharing”. Take their 3 Meat Albondigas, which includes braised lamb, chorizo and beef meatballs with a chipotle tomato sauce and cotija cheese–there’s a perfect bite for just about everyone! They also have a great selection of tacos, including a sweet seasonal fruit option. 4040 Finn Way Ste. 150 • Lexington • 859.309.4780 • EatBabalu.com

Corto Lima Slide into Corto Lima and sample their Platos Pequeños. Their Papas en la Latta features hand-cut fries with queso blanco, jalapeño, smoked salt and pico de gallo, but it’s even better with their barrel smoked pork carnitas added. Looking for something vegan and gluten-free? Try the Green Plantain Empanadas featuring barbequed jackfruit and cashew crema. Corner of W. Short & N. Limestone • Lexington • 859.317.8796 • cortolima.com

SRO For the uninitiated, the name is short for Standing Room Only. This eatery by Hidenori and Shima Yamaguchi offers delicious sushi, Japanese tapas and drinks served from behind a counter. Guests are invited to mix, mingle and nosh, but as the name suggests, there are no chairs. If the buzz on social media is any indication, every bite is worth standing for! 106 W. Sixth St. • Lexington

Creaux This New Orleans-inspired bar has been slowly working food bites into their menu, and the results are tasty. Their chicken and sausage gumbo, creole meat pies and lobster beignets are perfectly portioned for eanjoying while you mingle and listen to the live music. They’re perfect for enjoying alongside one of Creaux’s signature cocktails. 310 W. Short St. • Lexington • 859.469.8960 • creauxlex.com

CRÚ Food & Wine Bar An essential piece of CRÚ’s ongoing mission to make wine more casual is their list of “Taste & Share” plates. These shareable bites are perfect for enjoying while sipping and savoring wine. From their indulgent Fritto Misto of calamari, rock shrimp, zucchini, fresno chilies served with Comeback sauce to their signature Artisan Cheese Flights, it’s a perfect choice for Girl’s Night Out or a casual date. 107 Summit At Fritz Farm #120 • Lexington • 859.971.9463 • CruAWineBar.com

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TOPS Dining Guide

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kyeagle.net

Call Kentucky Eagle at (859) 252-3434 or visit us at kyeagle.net for information about these and other premium beers, wines and spirits!


WINE & BEER OF THE MONTH

Moobuzz

PINOT NOIR

Monterey, California

Gorgeous aromas of earthy mushroom and bright red fruit are highlighted by notes of fresh violet and ripe plum. The palate expands to include a savory abundance of red currant, dark cherry, rich mocha and wild strawberry on a long, velvety finish. Bright and fresh, this Pinot Noir pairs wonderfully with various dishes such as grilled eggplant bruschetta, roasted mushrooms with herbs, or pork chops with fresh peaches and basil.

October

Celebrations SweetWater

420 STRAIN G13 IPA Super Hybrid Sticky IPA • ABV:6.0%

Sweet Water is a top brewery; beloved for the culture they have created around their brewery and their corporate philosophy to get out doors and enjoy good beer. The 420 Strain G13 IPA is an aromatic super-hybrid sticky IPA is a phenomenally delicious and drinkable beer, with the added bonus of an olfactory experience that mimics that of the legendary G13 cannabis strain. The IPA base brew has a great body, good head and nice amount of haze at a pleasurable 6% ABV. To work with the malt bill, the brewers added some of their dankest hops, Columbus and Simcoe, plus two dry hop additions. To achieve the aroma, the brewers found the perfect botanically-sourced, strain specific terpenes and married them with propriety natural hemp flavor, both perfectly complementing the hops in the IPA.Â


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By Larry Vaught VaughtsViews.com

T

here was no magic formula that turned former Lexington Catholic receiver David Bouvier into a starting receiver and punt returner at Kentucky this season after he played a limited role in just six games his first four years with the Wildcats. “I just made sure I worked. I knew it was my last year. I really wanted to work with all the quarterbacks and they were all so willing to throw with me all summer,” said Bouvier. “I trusted them. They trusted me. That’s where it started.”

Bouvier is lifted in the air by teammate Dorian Baker after scoring a touchdown in UK’s win at Floriday Photo by Vicky Graff

Bouvier hopes it will end with one of the best Kentucky football seasons in recent years. He had a touchdown catch in UK’s first two games, including the historic streak-busting win at Florida, and has gone from an unknown player to most UK fans to a player who now sometimes gets recognized on campus. He’s also had a lot of congratulatory text messages from friends, including some he hadn’t heard from in years, since the season started. “My parents’ phones have been constantly blowing up. They are super proud of me, and that really has made me happy,” Bouvier said. Bouvier grew up dreaming of playing football at Kentucky. He knew if he ever got the chance, he would take it. The opportunity came when former UK offensive coordinator Neal Brown, now the head coach at Troy, came by Lexington Catholic to ask if he would like to become a UK walk-on. “I immediately said yes. I told all the other people recruiting me I was going to Kentucky. I just couldn’t pass that up,” Bouvier said.

Brown also went to Louisville and made the same offer to Charles Walker, who also went from walk-on to starting receiver and punt returner last year. “Coach Brown is a Kentucky kid and played for our rival Boyle County,” Bouvier said. “He just looks at guys that work hard and have a positive attitude. That’s what he has playing for him at Troy. You can tell they like playing for him. I knew I would like playing for him, too.” Bouvier became good friends with Walker even though both were battling for the same opportunity to play. "We would always be competitive with each other. We both wanted to play really bad, but he is one of my best friends. He did teach me a lot of things because he did get to play early. I am thankful he was my teammate and for what he taught me,” Bouvier said. “Once I saw he was doing it, I knew I could do it. I believed it from time I stepped on campus that if I was given a shot, I would make the most of it just like I know Charles did.”

BBN FOOTBALL

BOUVIER RISES

Eats & Entertainment

Now Bouvier has become the role model and inspiration for other UK walk-ons. Sophomore running back Dee Smith is making his mark on the scout team in practice hoping to eventually get a chance like Walker and then Bouvier did. “It gets me fired up to see the success he’s having. I see guys ahead of me that started as walk-ons and then they kept working hard, staying down and they are reaping the benefits on Saturdays,” Smith said. “He (Bouvier) has been great. I see what he has done and hope that’s what I can do one day. He has talent, but he also worked so hard. Then once he got his chance, he took advantage in a way every walk-on dreams of doing one day.” Bouvier is living his dream playing for Kentucky Photo by Wade Upchurch

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Eats & Entertainment

KELDON

TOUGH

By Larry Vaught | VaughtsViews.com

I

f you wonder how Kentucky freshman Keldon Johnson developed his toughness on the basketball court, his father can tell you.

Chris Johnson still remembers when his youngest son was a little boy and would be playing basketball outside — sometimes when the temperature was close to 100 degrees — and had to be forced to quit playing before he would come inside. “No matter how hot it was, he wanted to keep playing,” Chris Johnson said. “His work ethic was just amazing. We were truly blessed with how hard he wanted to work to be the best player he could be.

BBN

“His two older brothers kind of beat up on him in the yard to toughen him up. I would send him right back out if he came in crying and complaining. Then one day my oldest son ended up coming in the house crying. After that, Keldon never came back in crying. I’m still not exactly sure what happened that day but those things are where his toughness came from at an early age.”

“I wanted to play again when I got older, but my dad wouldn’t let me because I was good in basketball,” Johnson said. That toughness can also lead to a bit of trash talking from the Kentucky freshman wing. He readily admits he talks trash — even during practice to teammates. Those who have played with or against him know it’s just part of his game. “I would say I am a pretty big trash talker,” Johnson said. He certainly was at the McDonald’s All-American Game in Atlanta in April when he was competing against several Duke signees. “I just wanted to let them know we are coming for them at Kentucky. I don’t let them, or anybody, run over top of me. I am a nice person. It’s nothing personal,” Johnson said. He showed just how good he could be at times during Kentucky’s four-game exhibition trip to the Bahamas in August. He’s an explosive playmaker getting into the lane, can run the court with ease and is not afraid to lock down anyone on defense. He played his senior year at Oak Hill (Va.) Academy for legendary coach Steve Smith, who has coached numerous high school All-Americans and future NBA players. Smith knows Kentucky has an elite player in Johnson.

He can hold his own with

anybody.”

“I have coached a lot of players, guys who have won the Naismith Trophy, become (NBA) lottery picks, been named player of the year (in college),” Smith said. “He’s that same level of player. He’s really good. He can hold his own with anybody.”

Keldon Johnson thinks he started playing basketball with his brothers when he was about 7 years old. He had to find a way to compete with them, and did with his physical play.

He also plays with a chip on his shoulder that shows with the intensity he has not only in games, but even in practice or weight room workouts.

“I am definitely the physical player I am today due to playing with my brothers in the back yard. They pushed me around, so now I push other people around. Seems only fair to me,” he laughed and said.

“He always felt he was underrated,” Chris Johnson said. “It has never been just about scoring for him, either. He will get down and play defense. If you score on him, he will take it personal.”

He played football when he was younger until his father made him quit.

And probably even let you know about it because that’s just the personality he has that Kentucky fans are going to love. Photo by Chet White/UK Athletics

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Eats & Entertainment

EQUINE UPDATE

By Jen Roytz

Breeders’ Cup Returns to Kentucky Be a part of it all!

TRICK-OR-TREAT AT THE TRACK October 28 | 11:30am - 5pm Churchill Downs | Louisville, KY

Part of Family Adventure Day at Churchill Downs, kids are invited to show off their Halloween costumes and enjoy trick-or-treating, stick horse races and more than 20 other activities perfect for children 12 and younger. A variety of ticket options are available, including single tickets and Family Adventure Day packages, which includes four admission tickets, four meals from the concession stands and two racing programs. For more information or to purchase tickets, go to breederscupfestival.com and click on “Events.”

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ROOD & RIDDLE BREEDERS’ CUP POST-POSITION DRAW

October 29 | 4 - 9pm KY International Equine Center Louisville, KY Watch as the fields come into focus for each of the 14 Breeders’ Cup races as, race-by-race and horse-by-horse, each is assigned their post position for the start of their race. Several ticket options are available, including those with food and drink options. For more information, visit equestricon.com.


Eats & Entertainment EQUESTRICON

October 29 - 30 KY International Equine Center Louisville, KY A unique two-day international convention that celebrates the lifestyle, business and sport of Thoroughbred racing, Equestricon brings together all aspects of the industry. From owners, trainers and breeders to media, aftercare, fans and other stakeholders, Equestricon will offer presentations, social events, breakout and networking sessions, autograph signings, a trade fair, meet-and-greets, off-site events and more, all focused on innovations in the sport, new media, marketing, wagering technologies, second careers for retired racehorses and more. For more information or to explore the full schedule, visit equestricon.com.

TEAM JUSTIFY MEET-AND-GREET AND AUTOGRAPH SIGNING October 30 | 11am - 1pm Kentucky Convention Center Louisville, KY

The world cheered as Justify galloped into history to become the 13th Triple Crown winner in American history and now you can meet his connections in person. Those scheduled to appear include Bob Baffert, Mike Smith, representatives from WinStar Farm, Starlight Racing and others. Guests will also have the opportunity to take photos with the trophies Justify was awarded for his wins in the Kentucky Derby, Preakness Stakes and Belmont Stakes. All proceeds from signing and photo opportunities benefit the Permanently Disabled Jockeys Fund. For more information, visit equestricon.com.

MIMOSAS AND MILLINERY FASCINATOR WORKSHOP October 31 | 9am - 1pm Kentucky Convention Center Louisville, KY

Create a custom fascinator in your signature style and colors just in time for the Breeders’ Cup! Guests will sip on champagne as San Diego-based designer Diana Cavagnaro walks them through stepby-step the process of creating the perfect race day millinery. To purchase tickets, visit equestricon.com.

DAWN AT THE DOWNS

November 1 | 6:30am - 8:30am Churchill Downs | Louisville, KY

NOV 2 & 3

Watch the sun rise and the Breeders’ Cup horses train from below the Twin Spires. Guests will get to see many of the Breeders’ Cup contenders on-track as they prepare for the biggest test of their careers. Racing analysts will identify and provide commentary on the horses as they pass, offering insight on their previous racing performances and wagering angles, all while you enjoy a hearty Kentucky-style breakfast in the Churchill Downs dining rooms. For more information or to purchase tickets, go to churchilldowns.com.

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EQUINE UPDATE

Eats & Entertainment

HANDICAP THE BREEDERS’ CUP WITH DAILY RACING FORM November 1 | 7 - 10pm Marriott Downtown | Louisville, KY

Enjoy cocktails and heavy hors d’oeuvres as NBC horseracing analyst Randy Moss and Daily Racing Form’s Mike Watchmaker and Mike Welsch offer their opinions on how to handicap each of the Breeders’ Cup races. The event will also include appearances by racing celebrities and a silent auction filled with racing memorabilia, horse halters and racing experiences. All proceeds benefit the Permanently Disabled Jockeys Fund. To learn more and purchase tickets, go to breederscup.com.

BOURBON ROCKS & RUINS ELEVATED EXPERIENCE November 1 Leaves from the Galt House Hotel Louisville, KY

You’ll travel on a luxury bus to Buffalo Trace Distillery, where you’ll get an extensive guided tour of the distillery grounds, courtesy of bourbon archeologist Nick Laracuente, who will lead your tour of the excavation site of the O. F. C. Distillery. After, you’ll enjoy a bourbon tutorial and tasting of Buffalo Trace’s current offerings, followed by a craft cocktail and appetizers at the distillery. For more information, visit mintjuleptours.com.

BASH AT THE MUSEUM November 2 | 6 - 10pm Kentucky Derby Museum Louisville, KY

After the races on Friday, party into the night at the Kentucky Derby Museum. Benefiting Thoroughbred Charities of America, guests will enjoy cocktails, Bluegrass-inspired hors d’oeuvres, live music and a live auction of coveted racing memorabilia and experiences. Tickets will sell out and can be purchased in advance at tca.org.

HORSE COUNTRY TOURS Dates and times vary

Lexington, KY - Keeneland | October 31, 2015: American Pharoah with Victor Espinoza aboard wins the $5 Million Breeders' Cup Classic for trainer Bob Baffert and owner Zayat Stables, LLC (Ahmed Zayat) here today, Saturday during the Breeders' Cup World Thoroughbred Championships. Photo by © Breeders' Cup/Austin Lassell 2015

Get an up-close and personal view of how this year’s Breeders’ Cup contenders were raised by booking a farm tour with Horse Country. Many of the breeding farms in Central Kentucky are represented in this year’s Breeders’ Cup races through horses their farms own, bred, raised, sold or sired. Or, take a tour of one of the equine hospitals or training facilities in the area to see how these Thoroughbred champions were cared for and prepared for competition. Tour dates and times vary. For a full list of offerings, go to visithorsecountry.com.

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Photos

TOPS

SEPTEMBER PREVIEW PARTY The Barn at the Summit at Fritz Farm | September 5 topsinlex.com Photos by Ron Morrow

HANNA COLDIRON, SUSIE MERIDA, SUSIE PATRICK AND ANNA HARTJE BUTCHER

JEFF, ALICE AND GREG HONCHELL

MATTHEW STODDART, RON MORROW AND KELLIE STODDART

LE’SHAE ROBINSON AND CAMILE TURNER

AMANDA HARMS

J.L CANNADY, JOHN DOUGLAS, CAMERON FREEMAN, SCOTT CVENGROS AND JAMIE ADAMS

MEGAN AND NICOLE MARTIN

JENA & GJ GERARD

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AMY & MATT WILLS

CARISSA AND CARLEIGH SCEARCY

JORDAN HOLT AND TANYA BOLTON

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Photos

WOMEN LEADING KENTUCKY

AFTER HOURS Highgrove at Tates Creek | August 29 womenleadingky.com Photos by Ron Morrow

VALERIE SWAN, CHERYL MCKEOWN ADAMS, GINA MULVANY AND LORI ADKINS

BETH E. MACCHESNEY

MICHELLE DEANS

SONIA BONIFACE, CAROL SILER AND DAVONNA SAIER

VICTORIA HALE AND BILL ATKINS

ANTOINETTE M. DAVIS

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OZLEM EVA DAVIS

AUTUMN DOMINSKI AND ALICE SIMMONS


Photos

CARDINAL HILL

KENTUCKY BASH The Club at Kroger Field | August 31 cardinalhill.org Photos by Ron Morrow

CHRIS BAILEY, JENNIFER PALUMBO AND MARK STOOPS

KATHERINE WHEELER, COACH JOE B. HALL AND KAREN WHEELER

TIFFANY & BEN BROWN

ANGIE THOMAS, KAREN WALKER, GENE FERGUSON, MICHELLE WILSON, HEATHER FERGUSON, DAVID THOMAS, WHITNEY & TOM JOHNSTON

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PAT & ROGER COLE


CHANTEL STOOPS AND GWEN HART

PAM & STEVE DONOVAN

DREW FRANKLIN AND ABBY LEONARD

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Photos

THURSDAY’S CHILD

NIGHT WITH THE STARS Hilton Lexington Downtown | August 29 thursdayschild.org Photos by Keni Parks

LISA FATH AND JAY SHIDLER

LANCE & LATONYA HOCKER

LOLA AND VICTORIA GIROUX ERIC MINTON AND ERIKA ABE

SALLY MALMER ALISHA & WIL WINSTEAD

SAM DICK AND KAY COLLIER MCLAUGHLIN

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JENNA HAYES AND SHARON MUSE

LESLIE & HANS MENTZER


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Photos

COMMERCE LEXINGTON

SALUTE TO SMALL BUSINESS AWARDS LUNCHEON

DON ADAMS, ERIC ZABILKA AND JODY BOELHAUF

Hilton Lexington Downtown | September 7 commercelexington.com Photos by Woody Phillips

LIZ BENNETT, ANGELA CARLOS AND DANA ZINGER

KATIE COOLEY, SAMANTHA LUSE, JAKE ADAMS, JAMES OCHSENBEIN AND MIKE FRIEDMAN

DAN RUSSELL

JOHN MCINTOSH AND KYLE WHALEN

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KURT & BRIDGETT FRANCIS

MIKE HAGGARD, DANA ADAMSON AND RYAN FOSTER


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Photos

COMMERCE LEXINGTON

SALUTE TO SMALL BUSINESS AWARDS LUNCHEON Hilton Lexington Downtown | September 7 commercelexington.com Photos by Woody Phillips

KRISTY MAGGARD, LAUREL MARTIN AND GUY HUGUELET

CRAIG OLIVE, CATHRYN GIBSON AND MARK TURNER

BARRY STUMBO AND MARK RUDDELL

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NOEL OSBORN AND GREG BROWN

BOB QUICK, KAREN HILL, ROB HUNDLEY, KYLE WHALEN AND HOUSTON HALL

TOMMY OWEN AND TODD ZIEGLER


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Photos

MCDAZZLE

Hilton Lexington Downtown | September 8 Benefiting Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Bluegrass rmhclexington.com Photos by Woody Phillips MARK MUSGOVE, CLAUDIA, KELLY AND CATHERINE HEALY

STEPHANIE JOHNSON, CAROLE NAHRA AND DARLENE SILVESTRI

PRESTON & LANGDON WORLEY

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BRIAN & DANIELLE EVANS, YING & JERRY JOHNSTON

TYLER WILSON AND ALEX LENNON

BETH WHITE AND ALLISON HELSINGER


ELLIS HOSFIELD

BOBBI TURNER AND NICOLE TARPOFF

ERICA & DAVID CECIL

MARY & QUIN BROADBENT

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Photos

MCDAZZLE

Hilton Lexington Downtown | September 8 Benefiting Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Bluegrass rmhclexington.com Photos by Woody Phillips

SCOTT VOLLET, TYLER NAHRA AND NATE GRAHAM

AL NAHRA, ELIZABETH & CHRIS LEWIS

CHRISTA COLLINS, ERIN HARNEY, CATHY HOURIGAN AND KELLI THOMPSON

JULIE OWENS, SARAH WARNER LISTER AND MURRAY MCCANDLESS

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KATIE VIETH, JENICA DEBOER HALL AND TED RUTKOWSKI


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Photos

LEXINGTON HABITAT FOR HUMANITY

30TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION Martin Luther King Park | September 8 lexhabitat.org Photos by Ron Morrow

JOSH MONROE, CLINT MORRIS AND CATHERINE MITCHELL

JULIANNA REAGAN, RACHEL SMITH CHILDRESS, CLAIRE REAGAN, DELANEY AND ALEX CHILDRESS

PETE CAREW AND DWAN MACK

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ALAN SUTHERLAND AND CHRIS CRUMRINE

LEXINGTON HABITAT FOR HUMANITY STAFF


CHRIS FORD

ELAINE LUHR AND MARK REYNOLDS

ZACH CURRY AND ELEANORE MELARAGNO

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Photos

LEXINGTON HABITAT FOR HUMANITY

30TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION Martin Luther King Park | September 8 lexhabitat.org Photos by Ron Morrow

AMY PREECE, HUSTON ROYSTER AND JON SEAMAN

KEVIN FLORES

TINA PUGEL AND MISTY HESS

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THE HENDRICKS FAMILY

HEAVEN PENNEY

ROBERT ALEXANDER, CONNOR WILLIAMSON, TARA BURRIS AND LARRY KUHARICK


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Photos

CASINO NIGHT AT THE LIVERY

The Livery | September 21 Benefiting Blue Grass Farm Charities bgfcky.org Photos by Ron Morrow

LANE OREM, GAIL & BEAU LANE, MIKE & J.B. OREM

CHRIS BACARRI AND STEPHEN HILLENMEYER

JESSE ULLERY AND TOM THORNBURY

NATALIE & DENNIS BRAWNER

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SAMANTHA WILL-BACARRI

AMI HILLENMEYER. CHRISTY MCCOY AND BRANDICE HARRISON


CARTER & GWEN CARNEGIE

LAUREN ULLERY AND MORGAN WHITNEY

LOUIS & SHERRY LOGAN

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Photos

DRESS FOR SUCCESS

RECYCLE THE RUNWAY Grand Reserve | September 21 lexington.dressforsuccess.org Photos by Ruth Weinstock

KATIE STALLONS, ISOBEL CHEWNING, HARRIETT HENDREN AND EMILY HO

DEMETRIUS WATSON AND SAMANTHA JEAN MOORE

TRISHA DAILEY

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MICHAEL HESTER, ELISE PHIFER AND GRACE HESTER

DIANE VERHALEN, SASHA BOWLBY, HEATHER PACK HOWELL, LINDSEY HUGHES THURSTON AND NANCI HOUSE


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Photos

DRESS FOR SUCCESS

RECYCLE THE RUNWAY Grand Reserve | September 21 lexington.dressforsuccess.org Photos by Ruth Weinstock

NATALIE CUNNINGHAM AND PAMULA HONCHELL

ONE MORE POSE FROM THE RUNWAY MODELS

KELLI PARMLEY, AMANDA BLACK AND ALICE BOWEN

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AUDREY BOOHER AND DONNA MEADOR

ROB PARMLEY, DEBORAH SLATON AND MARILYN GALL


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Photos

GARDEN GALA Fairyhouse Hall | September 15 Benefiting Glean KY gleanky.org Photos by Woody Phillips

MARCIA HOPKINS, STEPHANIE WOOTEN, RACHEL SAWYER AND MEGAN CRAFT

JAMES & BONNIE GAGEL

BRIDGET SZCZAPINSKI AND BEKAH WORSTER

BEVIN & BENJAMIN MORGAN

ERICA HORN AND JASON SMITH

ANDREA WALKER

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DONALD BAIN AND JILLIAN PYATTE

GAYLE MURRAY AND MEREDITH PLANT


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OCTOBER 4

Thomas Rhett featuring Brett Young and Midland 7:30pm Rupp Arena

OCTOBER 5

St. James Court Art Show Historic Old Louisville This juried fine arts and contemporary crafts show features over 700 artists. This free admission show is rain or shine.

First Day of Fall Meet Keeneland

OCTOBER 6

St. James Court Art Show Historic Old Louisville

Black Jacket Symphony: Back in Black 8pm Lexington Opera House

Kentucky Reptile Expo 10am-4pm Heritage Hall

Pugkin Bash 12pm-4pm Kentucky National Guard Armory

KTFMC Godolphin Gallop 5K 9:30am Gainsborough Farm

OCTOBER 7

St. James Court Art Show Historic Old Louisville

Making Strides Against Breast Cancer 3pm Kroger Field

OCTOBER 8

Arty Party: The Day Atlanta Stood Still 6:30pm LexArts

OCTOBER 11

Thursday Night Live: Five Below Band 5pm-8pm Fifth Third Pavilion, Cheapside Park

Make-A-Wish Day Keeneland

OCTOBER 12

Alberijes: Pedro’s Magical Spirit Creatures 7pm Lexington Opera House

Big Blue Madness 7pm Rupp Arena


Chicago: The Musical 7:30pm EKU Center for the Arts

OCTOBER 17

Disney Junior Dance Party Tour

Ghost Hunt at Waveland

6pm EKU Center for the Arts

8pm-12am Waveland

OCTOBER 18

College Scholarship Day Keeneland

OCTOBER 13 Yes, Mamm! 5K

8am-12pm RJ Corman Railroad Group

Alberijes: Pedro’s Magical Spirit Creatures 2pm Lexington Opera House

Arty Party: New Street Ballet 6pm Taylor Residence

Little Goblins Galore McConnell Springs

Camp Nelson Ghost Hunting Experience 7pm-9pm Camp Nelson

OCTOBER 14 Light the Night

5:30pm-9pm Kroger Field

Camp Horsin’ Around’s Camp Out 6:30pm Blue Grass Stockyards Regional Marketplace Help health-compromised children enjoy an outdoor camp adventure. Enjoy a buffet while participating in a silent and live auction. Put on your jeans and boots or fun camp attire for this great cause!

Dan Tyminski 7:30pm The Kentucky Castle

OCTOBER 19 Fall Festivals

6pm-8pm YMCA Central Kentucky Locations

seeblue Day at the Races Keeneland

OCTOBER 20

Arty Party: Old-Fashioned Art Swap 11am-1pm LexArts

Market 301 10am-4pm Manchester Music Hall

Opening Night: Bernstein & Gershwin

7:30pm Lexington Opera House LexPhil opens the 2018/2019 season with a centennial celebration of Leonard Bernstein and Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue”.

KAPAAW Annual Conference

9am-4pm Clarion Hotel Black Career Women from all levels in their careers will gather for this one-day event to engage, inspire and empower!

5K for the 5 Senses to benefit VIPS

8am-11am The Club at Spindletop Hall

OCTOBER 21

Blue/White Game Men’s Basketball 7pm Rupp Arena

Heroes Day Keeneland

OCTOBER 23 The Byrds

7:30pm EKU Center for the Arts

Due to the changing nature of events, please contact hosting organizations before attending any event. Thanks for understanding if our information is out of date!


CALENDAR // OCT-NOV OCTOBER 26

National Horse Show

8pm-12am Waveland

Arty Party: Night of the Living Dead

Ghost Hunt at Waveland

Hoofbeats Concert to benefit Kentucky Equine Humane Center 6:30pm Thoroughbred Center Pavilion

The Wizard of Oz 8pm Norton Center for the Arts

OCTOBER 27

Chris Stapleton with Marty Stuart and Brent Cobb 7pm Rupp Arena

The Pumpkin Run 3K for Easter Seals Cardinal Hill 9:30am Wellington Park

Thriller and Halloween Festival 2pm-11pm Downtown

LexPhil PB&J: Concert Music Builds Mindfulness 10am & 11am ArtsPlace

CKRH Halloween Trail Ride & Used Tack Sale 8am-4pm Kentucky Horse Park

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Kentucky Horse Park

7pm-10pm LexArts

Last Day of Fall Meet Keeneland

Susan G Komen Race for the Cure 8am Robert Stephens Courthouse Plaza

OCTOBER 28 National Horse Show

Kentucky Horse Park

Arty Party: A Most Southern Sunday Brunch 12pm Sparrow/Wahlgren Residence

OCTOBER 29 National Horse Show

Kentucky Horse Park

Equestricon Kentucky International Convention Center, Louisville

OCTOBER 30 National Horse Show

Kentucky Horse Park

Equestricon

Kentucky International Convention Center, Louisville

PumpkinMania!

6pm-7pm Transylvania University

OCTOBER 31 National Horse Show

Kentucky Horse Park

NOVEMBER 1 Ball Homes Night of Hope

7pm-9pm Lexington Opera House Enjoy featured speaker, comedian and entertainer Mark Ludholm. From a humble beginning on the streets of Oakland as a homeless criminal battling addiction and mental illness to a world-renowned entertainer, his story is incredible.

National Horse Show

Kentucky Horse Park

Festival del Dia de los Muertos

5pm-9pm The Living Arts & Science Center

NOVEMBER 2 Breeders' Cup

Churchill Downs


A Signal Affair 5:30pm Copper Roux

NOVEMBER 6 Paw Patrol Live!

National Horse Show

6pm Rupp Arena

Kentucky Horse Park

NOVEMBER 7

Gold for Gray Gala 6:30pm The Carrick House

NoLi Night Market 6pm 700 Block of Bryan Avenue

NOVEMBER 3 Breeders' Cup Churchill Downs

A Perfect Circle 8pm Rupp Arena

National Horse Show

Paw Patrol Live!

10am, 2pm & 6pm Rupp Arena

NOVEMBER 8

Go Red for Women Experience 8am-1pm Lexington Convention Center This empowering event focuses on preventing heart disease and stroke by promoting healthy lifestyles, building awareness and raising critically-needed funds to support research and education initiatives‌ while having fun and getting inspired!

NOVEMBER 9

Kentucky Horse Park

Home Free

NOVEMBER 4

All-in to End Cancer: Casino Night

Tobymac & Diverse City Band 7pm EKU Center for the Arts

National Horse Show Kentucky Horse Park

7:30pm EKU Center for the Arts

6:30pm The Grand Reserve

Girls on the Run Silent Disco Fundraiser 6pm The Mane on Main

Barrels & Broads Ladies’ Night

UK FOOTBALL

October 6th at Texas A&M University October 20th vs Vanderbilt University October 27th at University of Missouri November 3rd vs University of Georgia November 10th at University of Tennessee November 17th vs Middle Tennessee November 24th at University of Louisville

UK MEN'S BASKETBALL

October 7th Pro Day October 12th Big Blue Madness October 21st Blue/White Game October 26th vs Transylvania University November 2nd vs Indiana University of Pennsylvania November 6th vs Duke University November 9th vs Southern Illinois University November 14th vs University of North Dakota November 18th vs Virginia Military Institute November 21st vs Winthrop University November 23rd vs Tennessee State University November 28th vs Monmouth University December 1st vs U. of North Carolina at Greensboro December 8th at Citi Hoops Classic December 15th vs University of Utah December 22nd at CBS Sports Classic December 29th at University of Louisville

6:30pm Copper Roux

Due to the changing nature of events, please contact hosting organizations before attending any event. Thanks for understanding if our information is out of date!


CALENDAR // NOV-DEC Silent Night: the Remarkable Christmas Truce of 1914 7:30pm Singletary Center for the Arts

NOVEMBER 10 Jeff Dunham

NOVEMBER 14 Peppa Pig Live!

6pm EKU Center for the Arts

NOVEMBER 15 Hope Center Hoops for Hope

5pm Rupp Arena

Evening with the STARS 6:30pm Lexington Center

Silent Night: the Remarkable Christmas Truce of 1914 7:30pm Singletary Center for the Arts

NOVEMBER 11 Bad Bunny

4:30pm Rupp Arena Save lives and shoot hoops at Rupp – it’s a win-win! You and your teammates will have five minutes to hoop it up and rebuild lives on the Rupp Arena floor during the third annual Johnny Carino’s Hoops for Hope to benefit the Hope Center.

LCRF’s Free to Breathe Run/Walk 12pm Coldstream Park

Bob Dylan and His Band 8pm EKU Center for the Arts

Silent Night: the Remarkable Christmas Truce of 1914

7:30pm Lexington Opera House The hilarious tale of Buddy, a young orphan who mistakenly crawls into Santa’s bag of gifts and is transported to the North Pole and raised as an elf. He travels to New York to find his father, and along the way, helps everyone embrace their inner ELF!

NOVEMBER 17 Elf: The Musical

1pm & 7:30pm Lexington Opera House

REO Speedwagon

7:30pm EKU Center for the Arts

Straight No Chaser 8pm Lexington Opera House

NOVEMBER 18 Elf: The Musical

Southern Lights Stroll

8pm Rupp Arena

ELF: The Musical

5pm Kentucky Horse Park

1pm & 6:30pm Lexington Opera House

NOVEMBER 16

NOVEMBER 24

March of Dimes Signature Chef Auction

Luminate Lexington: Tree Lighting Festival

6:30pm Marriott Griffin Gate Bringing culinary excellence together to help moms and babies. Support this wonderful cause with a night of good taste.

3pm-7pm Triangle Park

NOVEMBER 30 The Roadshow Christmas Tour 7pm Rupp Arena

2pm Singletary Center for the Arts

T R A D I T I O NA L BA N K PR E SE N T S T H E

12th Annual

Presenting Sponsor

Silver Sponsors

www.hollydaymarket.com

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Holly Day Market

10am-7pm Heritage Hall Presented by Junior League of Lexington. Ushering in the holiday season, this festive market brings together vendors from across the country and Bluegrass to give shoppers a head start! Daily events include cookies and pictures with Santa, door hanger workshops, Friday happy hour a wreath auction and more.

DECEMBER 6

The Nest’s Reindeer Express

7:30pm Rupp Arena

DECEMBER 15

The Nest

Trans-Siberian Orchestra

DECEMBER 7

The Nutcracker

2pm & 7:30pm Lexington Opera House

Handel's "Messiah"

7:30pm Singletary Center for the Arts

The Nutcracker in One Act

DECEMBER 1

DECEMBER 8

2pm Singletary Center for the Arts

Holly Day Market

Snoop Dogg

An Acoustic Evening with Jason Isbell

10am-7pm Heritage Hall

7pm Rupp Arena

8pm EKU Center for the Arts

Harry Connick, Jr.

YMCA Reindeer Ramble 5K/10K 9am Keeneland

DECEMBER 16

7:30pm EKU Center for the Arts

DECEMBER 2

A Magical Cirque Christmas

Holly Day Market

11am-5pm Heritage Hall

The Nutcracker

2pm Lexington Opera House

7:30pm EKU Center for the Arts

Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker

DECEMBER 12

7pm Singletary Center for the Arts

Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer: The Musical

Ozuna

7:30pm EKU Center for the Arts

8pm Rupp Arena

Main Street between Midland Avenue & Mill Street

DECEMBER 14

DECEMBER 21

A Christmas Carol

7:30pm Lexington Opera House

7:30pm Lexington Opera House

DECEMBER 4

Lexington Christmas Parade

7:30pm EKU Center for the Arts

The Nutcracker

The Nutcracker

The Nutcracker in One Act

7pm Singletary Center for the Arts

November 30-December 2nd

Lexington Convention Center • Heritage Hall, 430 W Vine St.

Check us out on Social Media for daily event schedules

Admission is $10 plus tax

@hollydaymarketlex

Looking for more fun? Visit TOPSinLex.com and click on "Calendar" for the latest events around Central Kentucky!

@Hollydaymarket


Photos

TS

One last summer party and concert at Proud Mary BBQ

TOP SHOTS

TOBA National Awards Dinner

High Hope Steeplechase

We knew Abe was a fan! Spotted at the KET Fund for Excellence Tailgate

Tee Dee Young wows at the Jefferson Street Soiree

AVOL Dining Out for Life

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Profile for TOPS Magazine

Tops In Lexington - October  

Who's Who, What's New & What to Do in Lexington, KY

Tops In Lexington - October  

Who's Who, What's New & What to Do in Lexington, KY