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TOPS

AUGUST 2017

W h o ’s W h o //

W h a t ’s N e w //

W h a t To D o August 2017

WHAT MAKES LEXINGTON GREAT Local Businesses. Local Art. Local Non-Profits.

Plus LAURA BELL BUNDY vol. 11 no. 8

Shares Her Love of Lexington


August FEATURES what makes lexington great

Tour of Homes:

Reinvented Ranch

48

Back in the Bluegrass:

Laura Bell Bundy

81

Non-Profits:

Profiles in Hope 181

PHOTOS

242

Out + About

28

TOPS Preview Party

30

KY Bank Tennis Championships Sponsor Party

34

10th Annual Fairness Awards

36

Ashland Lawn Party

38

2017 PACA Charity Ball

40

Junior League Horse Show Dinner

42

Saddlebred Stars & Seersucker Stripes

44

Miss Kentucky Pageant

216

State of Fayette County Schools

220

Concours D’elegance

222

Lexington Pride Festival

226

TOP Shots

242

Event photo captions are typically provided to TOPS by the event organizers. We do our best to check names and spelling…but we are all human and make mistakes. Please contact kristen@topsmarketing.com with any corrections and we will make note of it in the next issue.

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FUNDAMENTALS AT HOME

Up & Coming: 86

Tour of Homes: Reinvented Ranch

48

FloriCULTURE: The Perfect Lawn

74

Color Catalog: Blue Grass

77

FACES + PLACES Back in the Bluegrass: Laura Bell Bundy

81

Up & Coming

86

Hot Pockets

96

Keep It Local

100

Meet The Media: Rob Bromley

126

New & Noteworthy: Sugarboo & Co.

130

Hot Pockets: 96

CUISINE Dining: Back to School

134

Top 5 Dining: Local Producers

138

Womanista: Roasted Veggie Buddha Bowl

140

Beer of the Month: Pico to Mexico

142

Wine of the Month: Moobuzz Pinot Grigio

143

Meet the Media: 126

CONTRIBUTORS Photographers Paul Atkinson Ben Burchett Michael Huang

Interns:

14

Writers

Ron Morrow Keni Parks Woody Phillips

Michelle Aiello Sarah Boerkircher Jesse L. Brooks Amanda Harper

Marsha Koller Meredith Lane Michelle Rauch Jen Roytz

Beau Spicer Erica Radhakrishnan

Cody Pratt, Adam Stinnett, Kacie Brockman Jordan Long and Erin Christopher

August 2017 | TopsInLex.com

On The Cover: Laura Bell Bundy Photographed by: Conrhod Zonio


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FUNDAMENTALS LIFE + STYLE

Art in the Bluegrass: 146

Art in the Bluegrass

146

WOW Wedding: Lauren + Gordy

150

Wedding Trends: Mirrored Tables

156

Gor-Jess: Get the Look

158

Outfit of the Month: Red Haute Summer

161

FAMILY Super Mom: Kasi Soto

165

Pets: Snake Bites

168

EQUINE Super Mom:165

Filly of the Month: Rachel Sowinski

172

Colt of the Month: Jacob West

174

Horse Park Happenings

176

COMMUNITY

Filly: 196

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Non-Profits: Profiles in Hope

181

What’s New, Kentucky?

232

Calendar: Lex In The City

236


everywhere you go,

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August 2017 | TopsInLex.com

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NEXT MONTH

September

equestrian life + fall fashion It’s September Sales time, and that means we’re gearing up for horses to be the main topic of conversation in the Bluegrass. We’ll cover everything equestrian from competition to style. Speaking of style, our annual Fall Fashion extravaganza is back. Our Dining article will dive into pizza pie at newly opened Grimaldi’s.

est. 2005

Top Marketing Group 465 East High Street, Suite 201 Lexington, KY 40507 859.543.TOPS (8677) | 859.514.1621 (fax) TopsInLex.com

Keith Yarber Publisher kyarber@topsmarketing.com

Megan Hillenmeyer Editor megan@topsmarketing.com

Amanda Harper Production Manager amandah@topsmarketing.com

Kristen Oakley President/COO kristen@topsmarketing.com

Debbie Hodges Director of Promotions debbie@topsmarketing.com

Jen Brown Content Manager & Graphic Design jen@topsmarketing.com

Danielle Pope Vice President, Communications danielle@topsmarketing.com

Bonni Jiunta Advertising Account Executive bonni@topsmarketing.com

Haley Walls Graphic Design haley@topsmarketing.com

Volume 11 No. 8

Maredith Davis Assistant maredith@topsmarketing.com

The views and comments expressed by the authors are not always that of our editors or publishers. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this publication, TOP Marketing Group accepts no responsibility or liability for any errors, omissions or resultant consequences, including any loss or damage arising from the reliance on information in this publication. All images contained in TOPS in Lexington Magazine are subject to copyright of the artist or photographer as named, but not limited thereto. Reproduction of any part of this magazine without prior written permission is prohibited.

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OUT + ABOUT

Owners Melissa & Joel Hawley at the Grand Opening of Stone Source

28

SOCIETY

Homegrown Collectives

Thursday Night Live

Applauding at Lakeside Live

Taft & Doug Rood at Keeneland Concours d’ Elegance

Celebrating the 4th of July

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Photos

TOPS JULY PREVIEW PARTY Whitaker Family YMCA | July 5 | topsinlex.com | Photos by Keni Parks

More photos at topinlex.com!

Jeff Koonce and Larry Jones

Lise McFarlane, Lynette Woodridge and Jeannine Petell

Martine & Jim Holzman

Cash enjoing the ‘Y’!

Hank and Emelia

Danielle Pope, Jay & Kristen Oakley, Brenda Bragonier 30

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Viki & David Martorano


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Photos

TOPS JULY PREVIEW PARTY Whitaker Family YMCA | July 5 | topsinlex.com | Photos by Keni Parks

More photos at topinlex.com!

Barney & Renee Miller, Bryce Gibson Bret Melrose, Ralph Coldiron and Luther Andal

Brandi Doss, Dana and Hannah Ensley

Dan Koett and Erin Jones

Allie, Avery and Kristyn Disponette 32

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Berry & Susan Popp, Davonna Saier

Bonni Jiunta and Carl Tackett


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Photos

KY BANK TENNIS CHAMPIONSHIPS SPONSOR PARTY Kentucky Bank | July 20 | kybank.com | Photos by Woody Phillips

Jackie Banahan, George & Alyce Hoskins

Carolyn Rasnick, Ford Lankford and Mary Diane Hanna

Cary Rubin and Dennis Emery 34

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More photos at topinlex.com!

Brooks Lundy, Amy Hisle and Susan Dean

Susannah Harris, Keith Yarber and Kristen Oakley

Megan Smith, Suzanne Elliott and Lisa Smith

Terri Carpenter and Brenda Bragonier

Jim Elliott and Louis Prichard


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Photos

10TH ANNUAL FAIRNESS AWARDS Hyatt Regency Patterson Ballroom | June 23 | lexfair.org | Photos Ron Morrow

Dana Goldberg and Josh Mers

Rob Morgan, David Jones and Amanda Parsons

Stephanie Oghia and Brian Hawkins

Doug Smith and Glenn Blind

More photos at topinlex.com!

Clint Morris and Josh Monroe

Alison Lundergan Grimes and Roy Harrison

Richard Maloney, Joseph Coleman and Craig Cammack

Reggie Thomas

John Curtis, Anthony Smallwood and Scottie Clark

Angela Evans, John Davis and Ernesto Scorsone

Vicki Stanley

Donna Moore, Ruth Ann Palumbo and Carol Raitz

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Photos

ASHLAND LAWN PARTY Ashland, the Henry Clay Estate | June 24 | henryclay.org | Photos Amanda Chapman

More photos at topinlex.com!

Nana and Leah Mensah Deirdre Lyons, Cathy Clay Neal, Jana Joseph and Donna Moloney

Solly Van Meter and Viane Lizza

Joseph Hillenmeyer, Andrew Gentile and Shannon Hillenmeyer

George Zack with fans 38

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Tom Biederman, Frank and Mina Mattone


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Photos

2017 PACA CHARITY BALL BeneďŹ ting Baptist Health | EKU Center for the Arts | June 17 | supportbaptisthealth.org

Lauren & Todd Jones

Seema Capoor and Ashish Patel

Cassie & Matt Beach 40

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Bucky Buchanan, Josh Land and Chad Davis

Colleen, Hadley and Stuart Spencer

More photos at topinlex.com!

Kelly & Reagan Taylor

Skip Daugherty and Joy Chanley

2017 PACA Ball Junior Hostesses Photos by Woody Phillips


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Photos

JUNIOR LEAGUE HORSE SHOW DINNER Red Mile | July 6 | lexjrleague.com | Photos by Benjamin Burchett

More photos at topinlex.com!

Carla Mulvaney, Susan Ware and Susan Rayer

Kelli Parmley and Nanci House

Laci Poulter and Robyn Miller Katy Ross and Scarlet Murphy

Aarin Beckerle, Jessica Hall, Elizabeth Lewis, Blair Eads and Laurel Martin

Carol Komara, Paige Kikuchi and Sue Ann Truitt 42

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Kathy Wachs Reynolds and Dorothy Wachs

Gail Park, Kathy Ecton and Jane Gettler


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Photos

SADDLEBRED STARS AND SEERSUCKER STRIPES The American Saddlebred Museum | July 8 | asbmuseum.org | Photos by Ron Morrow

More photos at topinlex.com!

Sue James and V. Taylor Foster Patricia Altschul, Ron Morrow and Carson Kressley

Jason Gershman and Donna Pettry-Smith TJ Santaferra

Annette Grisante and Jeff Hunter

Ruth Ann Childers and Kaylee Gaspard 44

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T. Vernon Foster and Cynthia Torp

Ashley Elizabeth, Cindy Carcione, Twila Brown, Taylor Camacho and Jennifer K. Foster

Tracy Garcia, Leslie O’Sullivan, Janet Sterba, Ceil and Catherine Wheeler


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AT HOME

Tour of Homes: Reinvented Ranch

48

FloriCULTURE: The Perfect Lawn

74

Color Catalog: Blue Grass

77


At Home

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At Home

Tour of

HOMES

Rei n vented RANCH By Michelle Aiello | Photos by Shaun Ring

This home, with its gorgeous neutral tones, modern finishes, and classic comfort, was designed by j. stuart hurt, one of the design masterminds at House by JSD Designs. Aside from popular retail space in the Warehouse Block district on Walton Avenue, House specializes in high-end silk floral arrangements, monogrammed home dÊcor items, and other beautiful products to enhance and embellish living spaces. Hurt explained that the homeowners, who live in Jessamine County, had been looking for a property for two years. When they found this one, they did a complete rehab. Over the course of 18 months, they changed just about every element of the property. Hurt worked with the homeowner to create a space that is fresh, inviting, and comfortable, making sure to pay special attention to the family’s needs.

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At Home

The single story ranch home, located on a quiet, tree-lined street, features the same beautiful neutral color palette outside as it does inside. The gently winding driveway leads to dual attached garages, whose doors are painted the same shade of charcoal as the window shutters. The molding on the doors and windows add an ornamental touch. The front door is framed by two industrial chic lantern-style lights, and the brick paved patio is enhanced with topiaries and comfortable seating, perfect for enjoying a quiet morning coffee. A separate seating area with a soft outdoor rug and comfortable outdoor sofas creates an additional conversation area.

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At Home

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At Home

It really

helps make the

home’s new layout

FLOW together The home was renovated to create an open floor plan, with the dining room, living room, and kitchen flowing seamlessly. One of hurt’s favorite elements of the home is the crown molding and ceiling details. “It really helps make the home’s new layout flow together,” he said. Comfortable gray fabric sofas accented with faux animal skin rugs, a tufted oversized cream ottoman, and modern lamps atop antique accent tables complete the living room.

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At Home

The gorgeous stone fireplace is accented by a black and white equine art print, and a reclaimed wood mantel.

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At Home

The dining area, with its whitewashed hutch, cowhide upholstered chairs, natural wood bench, and romantic chandelier, bring together elements of French country, American Western, rustic, and traditional styles. The two cozy armchairs at the dining table have a gray and white geometric pattern that perfectly complement the rug and window treatments. A tufted bench with dual framed prints above create a cozy corner.

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At Home

Most of the furnishings and home dĂŠcor are from House, Market on National, and Signature Furniture in Nicholasville.

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At Home

Grays and geometric patterns add a pop of interest to a smaller conversation nook off the kitchen. A beautiful antique brass chandelier adds a touch of sparkle. 60

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At Home

The modern kitchen is a stunner in shades of white and marble countertops. The choice of adding gold-toned hardware to the cabinets, along with a gold-toned sink faucet and pot-filler really elevates the look and creates glamour in an oft-used area of the home. Tufted fabric stools line the breakfast counter, and a trio of geometric pendant lights add a fantastic modern touch. Taking the marble up to the ceiling was a great choice—and accents the stainless steel range hood. Built in stainless steel appliances, a porcelain farmhouse sink and bleached wood plank flooring are the perfect choices for this classic-meets-modern space.

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At Home

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At Home

A hallway leading to the bedroom features linen closets and a cozy bench with plenty of storage. A powder room with a marble sink, gold-toned fixtures, and gray grasscloth wallpaper is located in this area as well.

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At Home

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At Home

The master bedroom is outfitted with more lovely crown molding and tray ceilings, plenty of built in shelving, and more well-appointed chandeliers.

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At Home

In the master bath, a beautiful free standing tub is positioned in the center of the sunny room. Here, we see additional white cabinetry accented with gold toned hardware and marble countertops. A walk in shower is tiled in fresh faux marble tile. A vintage style chandelier, a full-length mirror, tufted ottoman and peach colored shag rug are the only accents this room needs. Off the master bedroom is a great walkin closet with racks, shelves, and cubbies, as well as a full dresser and large mirror. It’s rare to see a home in which the design style blends so seamlessly from room to room. Each detail is carefully chosen with the overall style of the home in mind. Nothing looks out of place, but at the same time, the home isn’t too perfect or overdone. Everything is in balance. But then again, that’s exactly what the design team at House does best.

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At Home

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At Home

Flori CULTURE

W

e all want that perfect lawn! A lawn that is free of weeds, soft to the touch, and the envy of the neighborhood. We draw up big plans, gather up all the necessary supplies, and march outside. But by this time of year, we are left standing, scratching our heads over the dandelion patch the weed killer won’t kill. This year, it’s going to be different. With the use of appropriate control sprays, reseeding with a blended fescue grass seed, and a deep fall feeding at the appropriate time, your yards are going to make the neighbors think you hired professionals. One of the keys to having a happy and healthy lawn is keeping the weeds at bay. Common broadleaf weeds are not only unsightly but they are also detrimental to the overall health of your lawn. Weeds become direct competition, absorbing much needed moisture and nutrients the lawn depends on. The easiest and most efficient way to control this problem is by using foliage sprays. Weed killers containing the chemical 2-4-D seem to work the best on a large variety of broadleaf weeds. If stubborn crabgrass is the problem, look for products containing Quinquarlac. This has been tested and proven to be one of the best controls of active crabgrass. As always make sure to use lawn products as labeled. Different brands may have different ratios or instructions. Remember that you don’t have to spray the entire lawn; you may only need to spray the sections that have active weeds. This will cut down on the cost and the amount of chemicals used. Once the weeds are under control, selecting the appropriate grass seed for Kentucky lawns is the next step. The old saying “you get what you pay for” comes into effect: if you go straight for the cheap

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stuff, then expect cheap results. In Kentucky, you want a blended fescue grass mix. Fescue is a durable drought tolerant grass that can stand up to hot summers and unpredictable winters. Going with a blend of between 3 and 4 types of fescue will create a lawn that is healthy and able to withstand what Mother Nature throws at it. Hold off planting your grass seed until between mid-August to midSeptember: this is the golden window of opportunity! Planting then will give the newly planted grass time to establish deep; healthy roots before winter. When it comes to the overall health of your lawn, the most important piece of the puzzle is the use of the appropriate fertilizer at the appropriate time. Central Kentucky lawns need a fertilizer high in Nitrogen but containing NO Phosphates. Fertilizers made of a 270-3 ratio make for great Kentucky lawns. The trick is spacing out the application of fertilizer over 3 months during the fall, once a month; this safely raises the level of available nitrogen in the soil going into winter without burning the lawn. Follow the instructions on the product. We all want a weed-free, dark green, thick, lush lawn. We want to be proud and enjoy what a little work and effort can do. It seems that the lawn is the one area where we tend to struggle. It doesn’t have to be that way. It may take a season–or maybe two–but don’t give up! A heathy lawn is something that may take time, but it will be worth your while.

By Beau Spicer Louis Flower Power


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At Home

Benjamin Moore’s

BlueGrass By Jordan Long

With a name like Blue Grass, how could Kentuckians not love this paint color for the summer? This nod to our beloved state reflects both tranquility and versatility. A cool seafoam with subtle hints of aqua and grey, Benjamin Moore’s Blue Grass will set a scene of serenity in any space.

Cerena Ceramic Stacked Table Lamp Pottery Barn

Reclaimed Metal Globe Sugarboo

This unique color is light enough to add a flush to a room without taking away from any of the decor. Depending on how the light hits it, the hue varies enough to allow integration of shades of blue and green to help intensify Blue Grass. For a deep contrast against this delicate shade, try pairing the wall color with darker greys to add balance and dimension to the space. The beauty of Blue Grass is its timeless palette that will express a quaint elegance in any season, space, or outlet. Try it in an outdoor veranda as a refreshment during the summer or in a more shaded area to bring in light. Just as with the Bluegrass area itself, this color will be a favorite of many for years to come.

Pair with:

Cowhide Blue Patch Square Pillow Arhuaus

Windswell Vanity Collection Anthropologie

Actual colors may vary from this printed representation.

French Beret

Maritime White

Wythe Rose

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FACES + PLACES

Laura Bell Bundy

81

Up & Coming

86

Hot Pockets 96

Keep It Local

100

Meet the Media: Rob Bromley

126

New & Noteworthy: Sugar Boo

130


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To quote Elle Woods, “sisterhood is forever.” Laura Bell Bundy is pretty familiar with lines from Legally Blonde, so when one of her closest childhood friends called her about starting The LEXington Theatre Company (The LEX), she immediately jumped on board to support her. Lyndy Franklin Smith, Artistic Director of The LEX, met Laura when they were just toddlers. Lyndy’s mom, Luanne Franklin, ran Town and Village School of Dance, where Laura and Lyndy both trained. “The people I went to the dance school with became a family” said Laura. Both ladies moved on to successful Broadway careers. “We both evolved and had these different experiences in New York,” Laura explained. “Now we have come full circle, and are capable of producing a full scale production, which just happens to be Legally Blonde, a story that is true to my heart and a huge part of my career.” Laura starred as Elle Woods in Legally Blonde on Broadway in 2007 and 2008. She is now on the Honorary Board of Directors for The LEX, and she and Lyndy co-directed Legally Blonde

together in Lexington. The show ran July 2023 at the Lexington Opera House. This was the third full-scale production from The LEX, following acclaimed productions of 42nd Street and Mary Poppins. We can’t wait to see what they do next! The company is the first of its kind in Lexington. Lyndy and her husband, Jeromy Smith (Producing Director of The LEX), bring professional actors, directors and choreographers from New York City, and combine them with local actors as well as collegiate theatre students from across the country. The LEX is giving Central Kentucky a true taste of Broadway level talent right in our own backyard. I sat down with Laura Bell–who appeared on the cover of the first-ever issue of TOPS magazine–to catch up on her busy life as a newlywed, TV star and first-time director! Interviewed and written by Megan Hillenmeyer | Photos by Conrhod Zonio


TOPS: First of all, a big congrats! Your wedding looked gorgeous! Was it everything you dreamed of? LBB: It was more than what I dreamed of. It ended up being so quintessentially “us” and even the things that did not go as planned have now entered our repertoire of hilarious stories to tell at dinner. I planned a majority of the wedding and what happens when you do that is EVERYONE calls YOU. That was hard to manage leading up to the wedding, but once the ceremony started, I was fully present and enjoying myself. I have said a couple of times that I wish the wedding day was like Groundhog’s Day and I could just keep doing it over again until it’s perfect… but then, I wouldn’t have any good stories to tell. TOPS: It looks like you added some Kentucky flavor to the wedding! LBB: We did! We wanted to get married in California against the mountains, and we thought it would be fun to have our families come out to our home and visit. A destination wedding of sorts. We also happen to live about 10 minutes away from Santa Anita Racetrack, and being a Breeders’ Cup Ambassador, I’ve spent quite a bit of time there. So we got married after a race day and had the first wedding and reception in the infield that Santa Anita has ever had. It most definitely had a Kentucky Thoroughbred racing theme. Some of our guests actually went to the races during the day, and then walked through the tunnel to the infield for our wedding. We had so many amazing Kentucky elements. My step father built these barn door façades made from reclaimed barn wood that I found here in Kentucky. That’s what we got married in front of and now they are hanging in our house, which is so special. I was most excited and proud of that element, because it was so authentically Kentucky. Angel’s Envy made all the signature cocktails and put them in mason jars that people got to take home. We used authentic horse shoes that we spray painted gold and put on every place setting. Each table was named after a Stakes race (Bluegrass Stakes, Kentucky Derby, etc). In order to find your table, you had to look in a racing program to find your race (table) and your horse (seat). We used bourbon barrels in the décor for the bars, cocktail tables and lighting. We had large silver mint julep cups and silver horse trophies as vases. We had lawn jockeys at every entrance, and built a large wall to look as if it were an open air barn. We made sure to incorporate Kentucky food into the wedding, too. One of my best friends is the owner of Olivia’s Beer Cheese so we served that at the cocktail party. There were three cakes. The main cake, I wanted to taste like Derby Pie. We also had a University of Kentucky Wildcat

“To quote Elle Woods, ‘Sisterhood is forever.’ You don’t forget where you came from.”


Faces + Places basketball cake and a Yankees cake… my husband hardly ever takes his Yankees cap off. Oh, and I came in on a horse carriage! TOPS: It sounds amazing! You’ve been busy! After your wedding and a European honeymoon, you came back to Lexington to co-direct Legally Blonde. Tell us how you got involved in the show. LBB: Lyndy Franklin Smith called me and proposed the idea and I said,“I’m in!” Now, I have to say… I am an idea person. Idea people source everything through the imagination, with their heads in the clouds. But, I am not necessarily a followthrough person. I need people like Lyndy in my life to take the seeds of an idea and make them grow. Lyndy has the follow through. To be able to accomplish creating a theatre company like this takes feet on the ground, incredible patience, persistence and resilience. Just the day in and day out, the focus and drive. It is an amazing accomplishment, and I am just in awe of her and Jeromy for it. I get to come in with ideas and now they have a place to land. TOPS: How did you two meet? LBB: We met when we were toddlers! Lyndy’s mom, Luanne, was running Town and Village School of Dance. I started dancing at Town and Village when I was tow and a half. She was a little older than me and much more advanced. When we got to the age where we were both competing in dance competitions together, we became really close. We were both super creative and silly. We would put on shows and re-create scenes from Dirty Dancing and other movies. Looking back, I realize we both had fun in the same way. Our fun always came in the form of putting on a show. It was and always has been the kind of connection that doesn’t come along a lot in life. I know that now. We haven’t changed a bit. We just have more tools in the tool kit. The people I went to dance school with became a family. To quote Elle Woods, “Sisterhood is forever.” You don’t forget where you came from and you don’t forget your roots… pun intended. If it weren’t for Luanne, Pat Bell and those specific people seeing a talent in me and cultivating it, I would not be doing what I am doing at all. I will never forget that and I will never take it for granted. TOPS: So it must feel great to be back together! Tell us about the moment Lyndy proposed the idea of starting The LEX. LBB: Lyndy called me and said she was starting The LEX, a regional and professional theatre company. I thought it was so amazing that she was bringing professional actors, directors and choreographers to Lexington. It’s never been done! She asked if I’d get involved and I immediately said yes. She said, “And will

Lyndy Franklin Smith and LBB working with actors on the set of Legally Blonde 83


Faces + Places you be on the board?” I said yes again. “And will you help with our fundraiser?” I said yes again. Then she said, “Aaaand we are thinking about doing Legally Blonde...” I said, “No. I will not play Elle Woods, but I would be willing to do something else.” We decided that co-directing was the right fit.

TOPS: Any interest in making another album?

TOPS: Now that you’ve experienced both sides of the stage, do you like being in the director’s chair or on the stage better?

TOPS: When you come do Lexington, do you have any local favorites that you always make time for?

LBB: There is nothing like the drug of a live audience. There is nothing like performing live, because it is not until then, in front of a live theatre, that you know the final product. The actor is the editor in theatre. The editing takes place when you aren’t there for television and film. There is something really satisfying about editing yourself on stage, and being responsible for what comes out.

LBB: Frisch’s. I gotta go to Frisch’s and get my tartar sauce, okay? When I come home, I am getting Uncle Robbie’s beer cheese, bourbon, Frisch’s tartar sauce, and making time for my family and friends. I usually spend my time in Lexington going from house to house. I have to see Grandma, my parents, my aunts, uncles, cousins, sisters, brother, nieces and nephews. Of course, if the Cats are playing, I am going to a game! And I love to go out to Keeneland when the races are going on, too!

That being said, it’s pretty satisfying to help an actor discover and uncover something about their character and watch it unfold in their performance. My favorite part of the musical theatre process has always been the creation, evolution and collaboration of story telling. I get to do that as a director. It is really fun to come up with brand new ideas, even for a show that I know so well. There is endless discovery in performance, so it never gets stale. Watching it from this new perspective was really interesting.

“Lexington is such a unique place because it is an everexpanding city that stays true to its traditions.” TOPS: You’ve gone from performing on Broadway to singing in Nashville to acting in LA. You are a true triple threat! Tell us what you’ve been working on. Any exciting projects coming up? LBB: I am currently filming the 2nd season of the show Good Behavior on TNT with Michelle Dockery. I have a show called The Guest Book premiering on TBS in August, where I have a recurring character. I play the really awful almost ex-wife of Garret Dillahunt. I am in Pure Country, Pure Heart, the George Straight movie that comes out in August. I am developing Honeymooners: The Musical this fall. And there are a few projects that I can’t quite talk about yet that I am on the other side of the camera. But I feel really excited about what’s coming up!

LBB: I have interest in doing another album, but I don’t want to do one without a purpose. So right now, my music is taking form in musical theatre and other projects.

TOPS: This is our What Makes Lexington Great issue. In your opinion, what makes Lexington so great? LBB: Bluegrass, bourbon, basketball and black barns. Thoroughbreds and beautiful women. Lexington is such a unique place because it is an ever-expanding city that stays true to its traditions. Even though we are an urban fair, we are surrounded by the most manicured horse farms, beautiful green hills, black fences and huge thoroughbreds… Lexington has well kept traditions that the whole community takes pride in and takes advantage of. Every April & October, expect more people to “call in sick” on Friday because they will be at the races. And yes, fathers will take their five-year-old daughters to the betting window so they learn how to place an exacta box bet. Kentucky makes great bourbon, and Lexington knows and understands great bourbon. We drink what’s locally grown and we take pride in that. With the revitalization of downtown, I think Lexington is finally seeing how cool it is. Every Tuesday night and Saturday afternoon in the winter when the Wildcats play, you know what everyone is doing. And don’t even think about calling the house because your grandmother will be cursing at the TV. People are leaning into that uniqueness and taking advantage of all the things to do here, which is why it was an honor to come back and to be put on a production with my dear friend for a theatre company that is truly expanding Lexington. The LEX is adding to the culture of Lexington. It is bringing a caliber of theatre that was never here when I was growing up. I hope that people appreciate it and take advantage of it so it doesn’t go away. •

Learn more about The LEXington Theatre Company: LEXINGTONTHEATRECOMPANY.ORG

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IN HER WORDS

we asked lbb to tell us some of her LOCAL LOVES best bourbons:

favorite lexington treat:

favorite restaurant:

best beer cheese:

favorite shop:

your TOP 3 ways to enjoy LEX:

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one thing that makes lexington great:

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exington is always growing. It seems that there is always something new popping up, creating buzz all around town. While Lexington is already a remarkable city, there are many things coming that remind us that the future of Central Kentucky is definitely bright...

story by Michelle Aiello

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evamping the Lexington Center

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Making Downtown Even More Amazing

The heart of any successful community is its downtown, and Lexington Center—which oversees Rupp Arena, the convention center and the Lexington Opera House—is a backdrop of Lexington’s most celebrated events. Each year, hundreds of thousands of visitors from around the world and local residents visit Lexington Center for events. Rupp Arena has been host to some of the greatest award-winning musicians and chart-topping artists in the world including U2, Elton John, Tina Turner, KISS, Kenny Chesney, Taylor Swift, and many others. The Lexington Opera House, with its storied history, brings a wide variety of world-class shows to our city each year. Now, the downtown focal point and one of the region’s most widely-recognized entertainment venues has been approved for a makeover. The $200 million Lexington Convention Center expansion

Renderings Courtesy of: EOP Architects

will include a brand new 100,000 square-foot exhibit hall, with the potential for additional growth in the future. It will also boast a new 22,500 square-foot ballroom and an additional 30,000 square feet of meeting facilities. (The complex underwent its last renovation and expansion in 2003, with the addition of street-facings shops along Vine Street.) According to LCC President & CEO Bill Owen, since Lexington Center is in its 40th year of operation, they are currently taking steps to expand their facility to better serve the next forty years. He said, “The importance of the new Convention Center as an economic engine for the continued growth and prosperity of the city of Lexington, the Bluegrass region and the state of Kentucky cannot be overstated. We are appreciative of the support that is lining up behind this project from our city and state leaders.”

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own Branch Commons

A Downtown Urban Park + Waterway

Many Lexingtonians are dreaming of a beautiful urban park we can all enjoy—and that dream is coming a little closer to reality. Updated renderings for Town Branch Commons were revealed in a public meeting in June. Infrastructure work will begin along Midland Avenue later this year, with most of the construction is planned for 2018 and 2019. Plans call for it to be finished in 2020. Mayor Jim Gray addressed the city at that time, saying, “Town Branch will be a link between our beautiful countryside and our urban core—a strip of history that will be a path to private investment and economic development.” Lexington has secured $40 million in federal, state and local grants and loans. Ann Bakhaus of Kentucky Eagle and the Blue Grass Community Foundation are working to raise another $30 million in private funds for some of the park facilities. The greenway is

publicly funded and the 10-acre park will be privately funded. Programming, maintenance and management will be funded through revenue from space rental, concessions, and sponsorships—a model that other cities have successfully adopted. “Every great American city has a great park,” Kate Orff, founder of SCAPE (the New York form in charge of the project) said in a press release. “We are very excited for this park to put Lexington in a competitive environment and further enhance the quality of life.” In recent years, downtown has experienced a renaissance. Jefferson, Short and Limestone streets, National Avenue and the Distillery District are popular destinations. By adding Town Branch Park to this dynamic mix, the entire Lexington community will benefit, and our new green spaces will be a valuable asset for generations to come.

Renderings Courtesy of: SCAPE Landscape Architecture DPC

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he Historic Courthouse

Renovating a Piece of Lexington’s History

Last year, it was announced that the old Fayette County Courthouse will be the subject of an adaptive reuse project, which will restore and repurpose the historic building for new and exciting things. And if you’ve driven downtown since then, you’ve seen that construction has been underway for some time. The courthouse, first erected in 1900, was closed in 2012 due to lead paint contamination. With an updated completion date of spring 2018 and an estimated cost of $38.3 million, the project will include improvements to both the inside and outside of the building, including a rebuild of the building’s rotunda space, one of the most visually interesting aspects of this historic structure. Locals can expect the outside to be just as beautiful as the inside. Stephen Hillenmeyer Landscape Services donated the landscaping as a special project for their

175th anniversary. By next spring, the renovation should make the building a picturesque landmark and a hub of activity once again. The ground floor will host the building’s major tenant—celebrated Lexington Chef Ouita Michel, founder and owner of six Lexington restaurants. The restaurant will be a second Windy Corner (the original is at the corner of Muir Station and Bryan Station, off of Paris Pike). Like its sister eatery, Michel’s casual café will focus on locally produced food and beverages like po’ boys, salads, and bakery items. The building’s outdoor terraces will serve as additional dining space, and the restaurant will feature a bourbon bar as well. The courthouse will also be home to the VisitLex visitor’s center with a tour bus stop set to pick up sightseers on Upper Street. The second level will house the Breeders’ Cup Headquarters.

Renderings Courtesy of: K. Norman Berry Associates Architects and Deborah Berke Partners

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owntown Ballpark for the Legends?

While downtown has experienced tremendous growth in recent years, there are still plenty of spaces that beg the question, “Why isn’t anything there?” One such space is the 17-acre parking lot across the street from Rupp Arena. Recently, a number of proposals have been submitted to the Lexington Center to develop the lot. One of those proposals came from a company called Grand Slam Development. Master developer and principal partner Phil Holoubek said that his plan would include moving the Lexington Legends stadium from its current location on North Broadway to downtown. The $200 million project would also include a hotel, three parking garages and mixed-use developments with retail stores on the first floors and residential units on the upper floors. Some of the mixed-

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use buildings would be able to view directly into the baseball stadium. Lunchtime at the ballpark, anyone? “Literally since the first week that I’ve moved here, I’ve had people say ‘Oh man, I wish [the ballpark] was downtown’ or ‘I can’t believe it’s not downtown’,” Shea told WKYT. He believes the project would create up to $25-30 million of added economic growth to the city. “The vibrancy that it would create and allow and enhance in downtown would just be absolutely fascinating,” he continued. “I mean, when you pair that with Thursday Night Live, when you pair that with the Convention Center, when you pair that with all of the bars, restaurants, Emporium—everything that’s downtown—it would just add so much to what’s going on.”

ield & Main: Offices, Condos and Recreation

Yet another mixed-use development is in the works for downtown, this time at 367-375 Main Street, where the former A1A Sandbar & Grill complex was. Scheduled to open by the end of this year, the five-story Field & Main building is a $7.5 million project spearheaded by developer Jeff Morgan. It will house Field & Main Bank offices, along with 24 two-bedroom condos with a rooftop garden and recreation area. The project will be the first residential development on East Main Street since Phil Holoubek’s Main & Rose Lofts opened over a decade ago. The architect, Todd Ott of CMW, also designed the former Coba Cocina building and the former JDI Grille & Tavern building on South Broadway (also developed by Morgan). According to him, the style will be “New York or Chicago vintage, not a loft.” He plans to have

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masonry touches that give a nod to Lexington’s historic Main Street. On the other side of Main Street, Morgan is starting another condominium project: The Townhomes at Jefferson Street. Located in the former Jefferson Wellness Center building, the $8.5 million project will feature 16 condominiums and two restaurant spots in the popular Jefferson Street dining corridor. Jeff Fugate, President and Chief Operating Officer of the Lexington Downtown Development Authority, said he was pleased to see so much activity on the east end of Main Street, with planned development along Midland Avenue and at Main and Vine streets. “Clearly it’s difficult to develop downtown, and we applaud anybody who takes on the challenge,” Fugate said. “All the projects complement one another, and they add up to something pretty impressive.”

All the projects complement one another, and they add up to something pretty impressive.

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enter Pointe: Eyes on the Future

Even before the near decade of delays, Centre Pointe has been a controversial subject. The project has had more than its share of legal, financial, and physical setbacks, and keeping up with the latest news is no small feat. Last year, Dudley Webb and Webb Companies’ CEO Ronald Tritschler spoke with TOPS about the past, present, and future of the project. This year, they were not available for comment, but the group was able to provide updated renderings for publication. The renderings offer a better idea about how the four buildings are to be connected. They show that the Marriott hotel and the Marriott Residence Inn will share some common spaces. Webb also said in an interview that there will be “interconnectivity from Main to Vine streets.” In late 2016, the Courthouse Area Design Review Board, which approves designs of buildings in greater downtown Lexington,

gave the green light for some minor changes to the design of the proposed project. Those changes include allowing apartments or condominiums on top of the proposed office tower instead of the two hotels. In June, the Herald-Leader reported that according to project coordinator Ralph Coldiron, the 700-space garage is scheduled to be finished by the beginning of September. And around one month later, depending on the status of financing, construction will begin either on the Mariott hotel or office building planned above it. Plans now call for CentrePointe to be finished by the end of 2018. As was confirmed last year, major tenants include the aforementioned Marriott hotel, a Residence Inn, a Jeff Ruby Steakhouse and a 12-story structure that will have nine levels of offices and three levels of luxury condominiums.


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UK

Campus: Build-a-Thon

From student housing to new classrooms, medical facilities and administrative offices, it seems like Big Blue Nation is growing more quickly than ever. In fact, in June the Herald-Leader reported that since 2011, UK has spent more than $2.2 billion—or more than $1 million a day—on 126 campus projects. Last fall, two large projects were completed—the $100 million Jacobs Science Building and a $65 million privately funded renovation and expansion of the Gatton College of Business and Economics. The $74 million University Flats student housing development and the $37.1 million Lewis Honors College will open this month. Perhaps, most noticeably, a renovation and expansion of the Student Center and Alumni Gym is underway. The $200 million-plus project includes renovation of the 1938 portion of the old Student

Center. The new facility is expected to be 370,000 square feet including an atrium, recreation area, lounges, conference facilities, entertainment venues, retail space, food service, bookstore, student organization space and administrative offices. The adjacent 1924 Alumni Gym has been incorporated into the complex, and its classical façade is being restored. Scheduled for completion in 2018 are a new $265 million research building and a $49 million baseball stadium. In April, Shriner’s Hospital for Children moved from Richmond Road to a new five-story medical office building on South Limestone across from Chandler Hospital. And Nutter Football Training Facility is being renovated for the track, gymnastics, and golf programs, and a lab is being developed for the Sports Science Research Institute.

ommunity Ventures Corp.’s

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This spring, Community Ventures Corp. began construction on a new mixed-use development in Lexington’s East End at the corner of Midland Avenue and Third Street. The project includes a threestory, 90,000-square-foot building that will connect to the existing Community Ventures facility on the opposite corner. The building, designed by EOP Architects, will include 25,000 square feet of street-level retail and 10,000 square feet of office space, along with 125 parking spaces and an open plaza facing Midland Avenue. The upper floors will include 43 one-bedroom residential apartments, as well as dedicated event space, including a large rooftop terrace extending over the existing CVC building, with capacity to accommodate up to 350 people. A second building, designed by integrity/Architecture, is in this works as well. It will be built across Third Street between Withrow

Mixed Use Development

Way and Nelson Avenue and will include an additional 5,000 square feet of retail along with 16 residential units and parking spots. “A lot of the time in development, you come up with a development and then you look to see if it meets the plan,” developer Phil Holoubek said in a recent interview. “We did the opposite—we looked at the plan and created the development specifically to match those objectives.” A long time in the making, this project is a big step forward in terms of reinvigorating a large portion of the Third Street commercial corridor. But beyond the goal of creating a vibrant mixed-use development, CVC’s mission is to provide Lexington’s East End community with renewed energy and investment in a way that benefits its residents, while celebrating its culture, its character and its historical contributions to the city. •

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Faces + Places

By : Michelle Aiello

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ince opening in April, The Summit at Fritz Farm has been a popular outdoor shopping and dining destination for Lexington and surrounding areas. The property currently contains over 30 shops, restaurants and services, as well as beautiful outdoor seating, and a creatively designed children’s play area. The Barn, an all-local food hall, is coming in September 2017 and will include local favorites like Athenian Grill and Crank & Boom. When complete, the property will boast over 70 retailers and restaurants, 40 of them new to the market. So what’s new? Whole Foods Market has now completed the move from their former Lexington Green location and promises a larger selection across all departments with an emphasis on organic and locally-sourced products. Open restaurants now include Blaze Pizza, Grimaldi’s Brick Oven Pizzeria, Steel City Pops, Ted’s Montana Grill, Texas de Brazil, and World of Beer. The Summit is also hosting a Farmer’s Market every Wednesday from 3-7 p.m near Whole Foods.

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lmost 100 years old, Chevy Chase is still one of the most desired areas in Lexington. The mixed use neighborhood features pedestrian friendly tree-lined streets, classic residential architecture, beautiful parks and top rated schools. There is no shortage of things to do in Chevy Chase! The famed Henry Clay Estate borders the neighborhood to the east. Woodland Park, Ecton Park and The Arboretum are also nearby. While Chevy Case is close to downtown, it features its very own dining and shopping district. Euclid Avenue and High Street are lined with boutiques, bars and restaurants. It seems a new store or restaurant is popping up every month. The area welcomed Louie’s Wine Dive, Peplum and Prissy Peach this year. The Behr family will open a new restaurant concept, Bear & The Butcher, on Euclid later this summer. Chevy Chase’s historic and contemporary characteristics create a unique and distinctive aesthetic which serves as the identity of Chevy Chase.

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eaumont Centre was one of the last undeveloped areas off New Circle Road, having begun development in the early 1990s. In the last few years, Beaumont has seen tremendous growth. In addition to single-family homes, townhouses and apartments, Beaumont includes a U.S. Post Office, a Kroger, Rosa Parks Elementary School, the Carol M. Gatton Beaumont YMCA, MoonDance Amphitheater, several hotels and dozens of other retail shops and restaurants. With its close proximity to the airport, city amenities, and with plenty of parking to spare, the Beaumont area has a lot to love. One of the biggest developments in recent years is Provision Living — a 91,000-square-foot assisted living senior facility on 4.2 acres. Slated to open this summer, it features restaurant-style dining, a library, and a bistro on the second floor that will open to a patio overlooking MoonDance Amphitheater. It will also feature a large, indoor courtyard where residents can have access to the outdoors in an enclosed and safe environment.

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t’s a little known fact that the first registered distillery in Central Kentucky, the Ashland Distillery (R.D. #1) later known as “Old Tarr”, was located in Lexington. Constructed in the mid-19th century on Manchester Street, one of its warehouses is currently home to Manchester Music Hall. Every year, more businesses are unveiled in the trendy area just west of the Lexington Center and Rupp Arena. This growing neighborhood offers an exciting combination of Lexington’s historic past and active present, and recently, the campus was awarded the Blue Grass Trust Clyde Carpenter Award for Adaptive Reuse. Among newcomers are Goodfella’s Distillery- a multi-level, industrial chic pizza parlor and craft cocktail bar, and Bluegrass Distillers, a craft bourbon distillery. But one of the biggest projects –the reopening of the James E. Pepper Distillery – is still underway. The owners are in the process of renovating and rebuilding the 1879 distillery and are on track for production to commence by October 2017.

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ormerly known as Victorian Square, the complex located at the corner of North Broadway and Main Street has seen its share of changes over the years. But since its rebranding a few years ago, there has been a multi-faceted effort to redevelop the downtown area, which fell on hard economic times during the recession. Several years ago, The Webb Companies and Cincinnati-based Jeffrey Anderson Real Estate took over the development and revamped the ground floor to attract fresh customers and tenants. At that time, new tenants included Urban Outfitters and several local and regional restaurants, such as Tony’s of Lexington, Saul Good, and Vinaigrette Salad Kitchen. This summer, three new companies will move into office space at The Square —the National Thoroughbred Racing Association, Colonial Life, an insurance company, and C-Forward, a Covington-based information technology company. Will The Square be Lexington’s newest business center? Only time will tell.

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efferson Street is the best of both worlds. The charm of old Lexington combined with modern restaurants, bars, retailers and event spaces makes for a vibrant social scene. In the last five years or so, old favorites like Stella’s Kentucky Deli, The Green Lantern (under new management and now serving coffee), and Nick Ryan’s have been joined by Enoteca, The Gray Goose, Blue Stallion Brewing, Wagon Bones, Wine + Market, Wingspan Gallery, The Apiary, and The Blue Heron. Right now, Jefferson Street businesses are gearing up for their most exciting day of the year. In conjunction with the Keeneland Yearling Sale and presented by Beyond Grits, The Jefferson Street Soirée will celebrate local food, drink and music from 6 to 10 p.m. on Wednesday, September 13. “Keeneland and the Jefferson Street culinary corridor are uniquely Lexington,” said Mary Quinn Ramer, president of VisitLEX. “For the third consecutive year, this party will showcase one of the community’s culinary and cocktail hot spots for visitors and locals alike.”


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ocated east of downtown at I-75 and Man O’ War Boulevard, the Hamburg district is known throughout Lexington as a great place to work, eat, and of course, shop! The Hamburg Place development is home to over 2,000,000 square feet of retail space, 160 acres of professional and 1,000 acres of residential development. In addition to all the great shopping, Hamburg has a wide variety of restaurants to choose from including sit down and fast-casual, a 16-screen movie theater, and quiet subdivisions. Hamburg also contains plenty of lovely green space, including a horse cemetery. There are also several beautiful biking and walking trails throughout the area. But perhaps one of the most exciting developments in recent years is the brand new 62,000 square foot Whitaker Family YMCA. It features a state-of-theart Aquatic Complex with 25-yard lap pool, a recreational pool with spray features and water slides, and spa area which includes a sauna, steam room and a whirlpool. It also includes a youth development wing for after school programs, camps and academic activities.

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he area encompassing Kenwick, Mentelle Park, and Bell Court and bordered by the railroad tracks and Winchester road is a perfect example of creative urban restructuring. As the name suggests, the district’s businesses are comprised of a variety of rehabbed warehouses and industrial spaces. They now house a flourishing mix of restaurants, retailers, residential spaces, and service providers. National Provisions, housed in an old factory facing National Avenue, has gone out of business, and what will move into the space remains to be seen. Long-time Warehouse Block residents include House by JSD Designs, Blue Door Smokehouse, Dry Art Blow Dry Bar & Salon, Lucia’s World Emporium, and Kentucky Mudworks. New kids on the Block include Legendary Games (gaming shop), Bluegrass GreenSource, Dapple (advertising agency), The Breakout Games (escape game facility), Everything But The House (auction house), and Bella Forza Fitness (aerial arts studio).

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djacent to Target and Fayette Mall, Lexington Green’s lakefront shopping provides an oasis in the midst of one of Lexington’s busiest intersections. The outdoor upscale retail center is ideally located at the intersection of New Circle and Nicholasville Roads. Some of their best-known tenants include JosephBeth Booksellers, one of the region’s largest bookstores; LOFT; EVEREVE; White House | Black Market and Chico’s. But did you know that it’s possible to plan a “staycation” at Lexington Green? You can grab dinner at Palmer’s Fresh Grill — a chic lakeside lounge offering delicious grilled meats and seafood. Then catch one of the nation’s leading comics at Comedy Off Broadway (August acts include Ralphie May, Tiffany Haddish and Adam Newman), listen to live music at Lakeside Live and then spend the night at the Hilton Lexington Suites. The next day, you can even enjoy a day of shopping followed by a treatment at Be Medispa, all without leaving town!

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Forcht Bank 2404 Sir Barton Way 859.263.6525 | ForchtBank.com Houston Hall is the Lexington Market President with Forcht Bank. As a husband with four children, balancing it all can be a challenge. “My biggest accomplishment is having a stable and successful private and professional life,” he said. Forcht Bank is a full service, privately-held community bank created by Forcht Group Chairman, Terry Forcht. Their headquarters are in Lexington and they are committed to giving back to their hometown. “I’m continually inspired by seeing the passion and commitment my coworkers have to making our community a better place to live through their countless volunteer hours,” Houston said. “It’s truly inspiring!”

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J. Galt Eyewear 800 Euclid Ave. 859.294.2020 jgalteyewear.com Owners Dr. Dawn C. Stratton and Dr. Heechung Ko were inspired to start their practice as something fresh and exciting. “We wanted to fill a void here in Lexington and bring in something new. We had a desire to make a difference in the community where we live and work,” explained Dr. Ko. “We wanted to break the mold of sacrificing quality for cost by providing a high quality product at an affordable cost. We call that our affordable luxury.” A big part of that mission was to offer eyewear that can’t be found anywhere else in the area. “All of our frames are handmade and many are made from very unusual materials like wood or recycled paper,” explained Dr. Stratton. “Some of our glasses are funky, some are more traditional, and we can guarantee that they are all unique and almost impossible to find anywhere else in the country.” Giving back was an essential part of their vision For every pair of glasses bought at J. Galt, they donate a pair to Mission Lexington to help an individual in need. Many of the vendors are also proud to give back: one company uses part of their profits to buy vitamins for children in third world countries while another donates to the Hellen Keller Foundation for the Blind.

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M2

knight.jane@gmail.com melzer.wyatt@gmail.com Twitter: @M2Strategies_ M2 was formed to be a voice for the millennial generation. “We believe our generation has the potential to truly shape our country and our world with our innovative thinking and holistic approach towards life,” Jane Knight said of the group’s mission. “We want to bridge the gap of disconnect between different groups around Lexington, the country and the world in order to continue to make our community thrive in a positive direction.” M2 is a strategic platform for millennials that offers PR and consulting services. Jane and fellow owner Wyatt Melzer know that millennials often feel pressured to move to big metro markets post-graduation in order to find a job, but often don’t realize the opportunity for a thriving life often lies in smaller urban areas just like Lexington. “When a city is willing to grow and change while simultaneously keeping true to its roots, opportunity becomes abundant,” Jane said. “Having spent the last 5 years in the hustle-and-bustle of New York City, what I have immediately realized about Lexington is how genuine and caring each person is in this great city,” Wyatt explained. “In a world where relationships mean everything, seeing over the past few months how much people want to help and make Lexington an even better place to live has been energizing and refreshing.”

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J. Render’s

Southern Table & Bar 3191 Beaumont Centre Circle 859.533.9777 | jrendersbbq.com “Being a restaurant owner is definitely a challenge, but we enjoy every minute of it,” said Gwyn Everly. Together with her husband Ren, they enjoy meeting new people, seeing familiar faces, and having “regulars” in the restaurant. They believe Lexington and the people who live here are the reason for their success. “Lexington is a Small Big Town and Lexingtonians have embraced us. We couldn’t be more thankful.” J. Renders catering business has grown tremendously. People enjoy live music on the patio, smoked prime rib on Tuesdays and brunch on Sundays. “There is no place we would rather own a business than in Lexington. We appreciate everyone supporting our small, locally owned business!”

Scout & Molly’s 120 Summit at Fritz Farm, Ste. 140 859.935.5929 | lexington.scoutandmollys.com Ami Bertrand and Terri Stein opened Scout & Molly’s at The Summit this spring. The boutique carries beautiful women’s clothing and accessories. Terri and Ami love putting a smile on their customers’ faces. Terri said, “People smile at each other for no reason and I would love to think I help spread that smile around this wonderful place to live!” Since Ami and Terri both have full time jobs, they feel lucky to have a wonderful staff led by manager, Adam Handy. “I love being able to provide jobs for our community, and I love seeing people grow and learn,” Ami said. “I hope to be able to do more for this amazing city!”

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Fayette County Farm Bureau Federation 1316 Versailles Rd. fayettecofarmbureau.com Fayette County Farm Bureau Federation is a non-profit grassroots organization that serves as the “voice of agriculture” in Fayette County. “We help to advocate for the farmers here in our county on issues pertinent to their business and livelihood. We work to educate the public about agriculture and how important it is to our economy,” explained Carrie McIntosh, Executive Director. “We provide numerous leadership and youth enrichment programs within our organization, as well.” Kentucky Farm Bureau was formed in 1919 with the intent to improve rural schools, stabilize farm prices, study the means for reducing the cost of production and provide the most profitable system of agriculture. In 1944, Kentucky Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Company was formed and has over 500,000 members across the state. “Fayette County alone has a little over 12,000 members. It is the unified voice of farmers that still make us a very effective organization,” Carrie said. One of the organization’s challenges is promoting agriculture in Fayette County’s urban setting. “A recent study conducted by Dr. Alison Davis, Ag Economist at the University of Kentucky revealed that 1 in 12 jobs is directly tied to agriculture in Fayette County, resulting in $2.3 billion dollars in annual economic activity!” She added, “I would just like for every Lexingtonian to stop and think about how agriculture might play a role in their everyday lives. Agriculture is all around us, everywhere.”

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Violets 1060 Chinoe Rd. Ste. 120 859.281.1100 | shop@violetsgifts.com Owners (and sorority sisters) Julie Carlisle and Kim Bryant love being connected with their customers. They often help accessorize outfits for customers’ life events and special occasions, in addition to helping them pick the perfect gift for their loved ones. “Our customers appreciate the personal service we offer,” Julie explained. “We both wanted to open a gift store in a great, established, Lexington neighborhood,” Kim said. “We named the store Violets after our sorority flower, which were given as gifts and tokens of appreciation to our sisters.” With gifts, accessories and clothing from Spartina, Mud Pie, Tyler Candle, Corkcicle and more, it’s easy to pick the perfect token of appreciation from Violets!

Jack Rudy Cocktail Co.

403 Marquis Ave. 843.814.9286 | jackrudycocktailco.com Taylor Huber and his cousin, Brooks, saw a need for quality ingredients in a growing cocktail industry. “I brought business expertise and Brooks brought experience in the Food and Bev industry. Together we created Jack Rudy, taking long forgotten staples of the American bar and reinventing them.” Still growing after seven years, Jack Rudy can be found in a number of local favorites, such as L.V. Harkness, Wine + Market, Keeneland Gift Shop, Wines on Vine, and Liquor Barn. With national distribution, Taylor appreciates when Kentuckians send him photos of Jack Rudy on store shelves across the country. “Lexingtonians have a rooting interest in our success, and those positive vibes push us even harder.”

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Faces + Places

Hops2go 211 Rosemont Garden 859.888.BEER (2337) hops2go.com As the first beer, wine and liquor delivery service in the state, Hops2go is excited to add something new to the community. “We hope to improve the city of Lexington and contribute to less drunk drivers on the roads and provide a unique, helpful service to the area,” explained President Thomas Towles. “We want the people of Lexington to feel a sense of pride when talking about or using Hops2go. Our dream is to be a symbol of how awesome Lexington is.” Thomas decided to start Hops2go when he came to a point in his life where he saw a lot of doors closing, despite his hard work and drive. So he decided to take a dream and make it a reality for his community and family. “It was important to me to not only allow my family to live a full life, but that my daughter will see that she can accomplish anything with dedication and hard work,” he explained. “I’ve heard that people compare Lexington to San Francisco a lot because it is very local-centric. That is something I think the city should be very proud of. It’s a city of opportunity. I know a few people who have opened their own businesses or have serious plans to,” Thomas said. “There is something to say for a city that provides so much opportunity for its citizens.”

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Faces + Places

Teresa Blakeman

United Real Estate, Lexington 859.619.9069 LexingtonKyHouses.com Being a real estate agent means being flexible and proactive. Sometimes, a listing will test the agent’s resolve, but Teresa is proud to say that for this home, she went above and beyond to secure her client’s dream home. Her friend, Mike McBeath, called and asked to see a home on the Reservoir. “We were both in awe of that gorgeous view,” Teresa recalled. When he wasn’t excited about that particular listing, he asked her to find something nearby. “I saw that there was the most gorgeous home on Lakeside Drive.” Teresa contacted the agent representing the home, and was informed that an offer had already been made on the home. “If we were going to make an offer, we needed to make it soon,” Teresa said. Mike made an offer and it was accepted–contingent on the sale of Mike’s home within 24 hours. Teresa was able to make it happen so that Mike could have his dream home on the lake. Teresa said, “Mike says he loves living at the lake and wakes up every morning counting his blessings and thanking the good Lord for the opportunity to live in such a beautiful and inspiring setting!”

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Faces + Places

House 250 Walton Ave. 859.523.3933 housebyjsd.com For Jeremy Rice, Dwayne Anderson and j. stuart hurt, a successful business is constantly evolving and changing. “We always listen to customers and pay attention to trends, but we don’t rely on any one thing to drive our decisions,” said stuart. The “Boys” own a boutique store on Walton Avenue, offering a wide variety of goods, from ladies’ accessories, earrings, wraps, and scarves, to custom silk arrangements, lamps, artwork, and accent furniture at various price points. The store is ever changing, from the home décor pieces to the Christmas in July sale where they turn the store into a winter wonderland, full of holiday décor. They offer interior design services as well. The Boys agree that Lexington is a great place to live and work because of the small-town atmosphere, the diverse make up of its residents, and the best countryside views the eye can see. “We wanted to bring a genre of retail that Lexington didn’t have. We can incorporate any style from traditional to contemporary. Many of our customers say we have an ‘easy look,’” stuart explained. Whether a client is updating their home with pillows and accessories or taking on a full remodel project, the gentlemen at House are eager to develop a plan that helps the client fall in love with their home. When they aren’t busy at the store or designing a client’s home, stuart can be found instructing at Cycle YOU Lexington; Dwayne is telling the next story about life –over and over; and Jeremy is laughing, sharing and sprinkling joy.

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Faces + Places

The Wildcat Group 203 Big Run Rd. 859.948.3553 wildcatmoving.com Upon graduating from UK’s MBA program in 2010, Raleigh “RJ” Bruner decided to take the summer off to relax and plan for his future. “About a week after graduation, I helped my sister move,” he said. “That night, I decided that moving would be a fantastic summer job.” RJ started Wildcat Moving with his old Ford Bronco and a motorcycle trailer. Now, he has 22 trucks and a staff of over 80 during busy season. Their excellent pay scale ($15-$25 per hour) allows them to recruit and retain respectful, responsible and athletic movers that customers can trust. “We pay our movers better than any other moving company because we know that happy movers make happy customers. As a result we’ve been the top-ranked Moving company in Kentucky on Angie’s List for 5 years running. I love being the best at what we do,” he explained. In addition to Wildcat Moving, The Wildcat Group includes Wildcat Auto Repair and Wildcat Home Inspection. RJ says his wife has had a huge impact on his career. “My wife Sylvie has been my best friend and biggest cheerleader for over a decade. We do everything together with our two kids, Juliette and Roman,” he explained. “I am very proud that my children are going to grow up knowing that I run several successful local businesses honestly.”

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Faces + Places

Gratz Park Inn 120 West Second St. 859.231.1777 gratzparkinn.com “I love what I do. Hospitality is a great job–meeting new people every day and working with a superb community,” said Gratz Park Inn manager Zedtta Wellman. A native of Ashland Kentucky, Zedtta loves showing off our beautiful city and giving guests at The Gratz Park Inn a fantastic experience. “We’re truly a hidden jewel in horse country. We’re nestled in a historic area and surrounded by wonderful homes and businesses. We have served governors, Supreme Court Judges, authors, comedians, basketball stars, senators, sports broadcasters, actors, and a few HGTV designers. Our doors are always open to all guests.” Zedtta also enjoys lending a hand in the community. When she’s not working, Zedtta spends time with her family and attends Southland Christian Church. “Family is the most important part of my life. It’s a blessing seeing my children become wonderful adults and to watch my grandchildren grow.”

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Faces + Places

Melinda Drake

with Milestone Realty Consultants 859.312.9005 Melinda-Drake.com Melinda Drake, seen with her listing in Cambridge Estates, is a Realtor at locally owned Milestone Realty. Melinda is rooted in hospitality and passionate about real estate. Before getting into real estate, she worked alongside her husband, Bruce, in the restaurant industry. “As Bluegrass Hospitality Group evolved, there was an opportunity for me to assist the company and the BHG family with real estate needs,” she explained. Since her start in real estate, Melinda has earned designations in MRP, Million Dollar Club, E-Pro and RENE. She loves working with people from all walks of life. “From a first-time buyer looking for the perfect place to start to a retired couple who is ready to relax, I love helping people in Central Kentucky find the perfect home,” said Melinda. There’s no place like home. Melinda and her husband have travelled for both business and pleasure, yet are happiest in Lexington. “Early in our marriage, we had businesses in other cities. No matter where we’ve lived or where we travel, Lexington will always be home to us,” Melinda shared. Melinda is a proud member of the Lexington community. She and her family are active in many local organizations including Southland Christian Church, University of Kentucky, Lexington Christian Academy, Bible Study Fellowship and other charitable organizations. Her involvement in the community has helped make connections with people in Kentucky and all over the world, for which she is grateful.


Faces + Places

Peplum 824 Euclid Ave. Ste. 103 859.269.0009 | PeplumLexington.com Lauren West and Diane Henson are the mother-daughter duo that co-own Peplum. Lauren and her mom worked on the concept for their boutique for almost a year before opening at the end of March 2017. They love seeing a smile on their customer’s face when she feels stunning in a Peplum outfit. “We feel so lucky to have our business here! As a business owner, it’s so nice to see that such a large portion of our population feels passionate about shopping local,” Lauren said. “Our customers have made us feel so welcome. We can feel that the community is really rooting for us to succeed.”

Hair Nation Salon & Spa 152 W. Tiverton Way Ste. 130 859.252.HAIR (4247) hairnationsalonandspa.com

Angie and Jay Ballard wanted to open a business where they could work together while building careers for a wonderful team of professionals in an industry that they love. The Hair Nation staff is also committed to offering every guest an “Ultimate Experience” by offering a full range of pampering services. “Lexingtonians are focused on local business and promoting each other,” Angie said. “We are a special community full of people who want to support one another, and who want to give back to our city.” Angie and Jay hope to contribute to Lexington by becoming a household name in town!

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Faces + Places

Interior Solutions

with Carol Pippen Interior Design 175 Dennis Dr. 859.277.4482 kyfloors.com carolpippeninteriordesign.com Interior Solutions owners Beth and Chris Poulton are UK grads who chose to stay in Lexington after graduation to pursue their careers. “We have always loved Lexington for its beauty, southern charm, and closeknit community,” Beth explained. Inspired by their parents who both owned their own businesses, Beth and Chris decided to open a full service flooring and cabinet business that serves residential as well as commercial and healthcare facilities. “We are constantly challenged with staying on the cutting edge of new products and services,” Chris explained. “Having the opportunity to own our own business here utilizing our mutual experience in the construction and design fields has been a dream come true.” They are also excited to offer interior design services through their onsite partnership with Carol Pippen Interior Design. “When a customer comes into the showroom shopping for flooring or cabinets, we can now easily offer interior design assistance as well to help them pull together their best look,” Beth said. Carol, a UK graduate who has been in business since 1996, loves working with the Poultons to make Lexington homes and businesses even more beautiful. She said, “We continue to build on the positive energy of our relationship and look forward to what the future holds!”


Faces + Places

South Central Bank’s history dates back to 1889 when Deposit Bank of Monroe County was first chartered. James Kenneth Bale purchased the bank in 1972 and founded South Central Bank to fulfill his dream of providing truly community-centered banking services to the individuals, families and business people of the area. Over the years, South Central Bank has evolved and grown by leaps and bounds, all while maintaining that vision. The Lexington office of South Central Bank was first a Loan Production Office. It served as a residential and commercial lending office until March 2016. It became a full-service financial institution, offering deposit services and lending opportunities for the people of Lexington. Brandon Fogle, Chief Business Development Officer for the Northern Regional Market; Kelley Wiley, Branch Manager/Assistant Customer Service Officer and Rebekah Welch, Residential and Commercial Loan Officer are all natives of Lexington. President- Lexington/Fayette County, Bill Feltner, has been 114

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South Central Bank

lending in Central Kentucky for 40 years. Philanthropy is a core value of South Central Bank: they are major sponsors of SKyPaC, the Center for Courageous Kids, Kentucky High 386 Waller Ave. #110 School Hall of Fame and the 859.223.0170 Western Kentucky University SouthCentralBank.com Scholarship Program. Their employees are also involved with a number of local organizations. South Central Bank is designed to make a difference in the prosperity of their customers and communities. They believe deeply in their company slogan: “Small enough to know you, BIG enough to help!”

Lexington


Faces + Places

Since its inception, South Central Bank has grown and thrived through all kinds of market conditions. When it was purchased in 1972, South Central Bank had $10 million in assets and was comprised of five individually chartered banks across South Central and Western Kentucky. On January 1, 2015, South Central Bank became a single entity with 25 locations and total transactional assets approaching $1.3 billion. The South Central Bank of Louisville is a Loan Production Office, concentrating on and specializing in consumer and commercial lending. Patrick Padden, President – Greater Louisville, joined the company in June 2014 and his career in banking spans 25 years, much of it working in commercial and real estate lending. Amy Rausch, a Regional Mortgage Lender, has worked in banking for over 30 years. Mark George, Vice President-Senior Relationship

South Central Bank

Manager of Commercial Lending, has been in banking for over 30 years and specializes in commercial and real estate lending. They are all from Louisville and know 6500 Glenridge Park Pl. the local communities well. “The city is imbued with Ste. 11 | Louisville great energy and entrepre- 859.223.0170 neurial spirit,” explained SouthCentralBank.com Patrick. “One of my greatest accomplishments has been opening the Greater Louisville Market and offering people a community banking alternative that reflects our local people.”

Louisville


Faces + Places

“Big City Fashion meets Small Town Charm” is the best way to describe Bella Rose to the Bluegrass. Mother-daughter duo, Betty Spain and Haley Williams, are passionate about cheering up women and assisting them to look and feel their best everyday, especially for those big life events. “Our clients are always pleased with our unique selection. We pride ourselves in dressing three generations of women. Nothing pleases us more than when a grandmother, mother, and daughter find something special when visiting our store,” said Betty. Bringing the exclusivity of designers to Lexington, Bella Rose has a selection of dresses found nowhere else. Bella Rose carries design-

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Bella Rose

ers such as Milly, Shoshanna, Nicole Miller, Sara Campbell, and Teri Jon. Known as the “pretty dress shop,” Bella 126 West Maxwell St. Rose can take any woman, 859.255.2565 of any age, for any event and bellarosestyle.com make her feel like the prettiest girl in the room. Over the past 37 years, the styles have changed, but the personal service and friendly atmosphere at Bella Rose has remained the same. Betty and Haley invite everyone to come in, kick off your shoes, stay awhile, and play dress up!


Faces + Places

Metropolitan Donuts & Coffee 3070 Lakecrest Circle Ste. 600 859.309.9342 | metdonuts.com Lexington is becoming well known for its donuts. Drew and Evelyn McCoy aim to offer a fun new take on this sweet treat. They whip up handcrafted donuts and serve them alongside world class coffee from some great specialty roasters. “Choose your batter, coating, topping and drizzle, then watch it be made from start to finish,” Evelyn explained. “And enjoy it with exceptional coffee or espresso!” “We are a small family owned business and the Lexington community has been very welcoming to our ‘create your own donut’ concept,” Drew said. “The best part of being a local business owner is the support that we get from the community!”

Arthur Murray Dance Studio

1801 Alexandria Dr. Ste. 132 859.278.7711 LexingtonArthurMurray.com “My family has always been supportive of all my creative endeavors, from doing magic at a young age, to dancing, teaching, competing, judging and participating in all aspects of the dance industry,” Arthur Murray Lexington owner Hunter Lisle explained. Growing up in Lexington, it was always important to come back to Kentucky and give back to the community where it all began. Starting a business was always his dream because he hoped to teach people to enjoy the fun, joy and challenge of dance. He and his amazing staff now run one of the most successful and largest teaching organizations for Arthur Murray in the nation.

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Faces + Places

“We get to be an integral part of stopping time, capturing history and allowing the amazing people that we get to work with to leave a legacy of their love behind,” owner Conrhod, a graduate of Asbury and UK, explained. As a photographer, Conrhod loves to connect with people. His focus is on photographing weddings. “We tell our couples that we love love, and that we’re all in it with them to capture the beauty within the story of their love.” For Conrhod, the business rose out of his passion for photography. As demand increased for his work, his wife, Leslee, took on the role of family/lifestyle photographer with Light Life Love. In addition to photographing portraits and families, she shoots along side Conrhod on wedding days. “We love it when our clients know how beautiful they are, and they are so comfortable in their own skin

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Conrhod Zonio Photography & Light Life Love

around us to let us fully capture who they are,” Leslee said. While school brought Conrhod to Lexington and marriage brought Leslee, they now love calling Central 859.299.6550 Kentucky home with their conrhodzonio.com two daughters. “What has lightlifelovephotography.com kept us here is the emerging grassroots culture of restaurants, small businesses and cultural arts activities. It is a wonderful place to raise a family,” Leslee explained.


Faces + Places

Beth Hourigan, owner Hourglass Lash + Skin Bar, knows from experience that other cities just can’t compare to Lexington. “Leaving Lexington for a decade and coming back, I was able to truly appreciate our wonder­ful community. I have lived a few other places with more people, glitz and glamour and at the end of the day I would still choose Lexington over all of them!” said Beth. Hourglass is a unique concept in town, offering a wide range of services designed to make eyelashes, eye­brows and skin glow. Services include DEX makeup application, HydraFacials, microneedling, waxing, micro­blading and more. “All three of my employees do amazing skincare, and each has an area that she has a particular passion for,” explained Beth. Whitney is the team’s eyelash pro; Sarah is the resident skincare guru; Jamie is the makeup and waxing queen. “We feel blessed beyond measure to have an amazing team,

and hope to continue to grow and keep getting better for our neighbors here in Lexington,” said Beth.

Hourglass

Lash + Skin Bar 867 E. High St. Ste. 230

Beth opened Hourglass in July, 859.904.5374 but her family will always be her HourlgassLex.com first priority. “Balancing family and business is something I have been doing for some time now, and I take it all in stride. Being pregnant with baby number three while opening Hourglass has helped me to slow down a bit and enjoy each and every milestone we reach. I am bursting with pride for our business, our children and the life my husband and I have made in Lexington,” said Beth.

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Faces + Places

James Monroe and his dedicated team make building a dream home easy. Crystal Towe, Cassie Beach, Jen Hawkins and Natalee Mason of RE/MAX Elite Realty help customers find the perfect location in neighborhoods all over Central. James Monroe graduated from UK with a degree in Business Economics and Business Management. He was quickly hired by a local home builder, where he absorbed an abundant amount of information about the construction business. “Most of all, I learned what not to do,” he said. After gaining valuable experience, James and his wife started their own company, Via Vitae Development, LLC. “We promised never to promise more than we can deliver, always do what is right and just, never turn our backs to our customers, suppliers, vendors, or subcontractors, and always stand behind the product we build,” said Monroe.

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James Monroe Homes

Recently, James Monroe Homes opened a design center off of Winchester Road in Hamburg. Monroe explained, “We have created a process so seamless that we think it will change the way people 2250 Thunderstick Dr #1206 look at building their next 859.629.2962 home.” The design center JamesMonroeHomes.com offers a world of possibilities from countertops to tile, fixtures and natural stone: their team of professionals can explain the options so that every choice is the right one. A James Monroe Home Specialist is there 7 days a week.


Faces + Places

Napa Prime 508 Lexington Rd. | Versailles 859.873.0600 napaburgerbar.com Founded in 2013 by restauranteur Darrell Lewis, Napa Prime was named after Napa Valley, a place he and his wife love to vacation and enjoy great wine and food. The vision was to create a unique concept along the Bourbon Trail that offered amazing burgers and fresh seafood with an emphasis on hospitality in an energetic, upbeat, warm and friendly atmosphere. “People come from all over to experience our ‘burger of the month’ specials. We’ve been known to feature burgers such as Elk, Bison, Kangaroo or Buffalo. We offer chef driven specials such as Wild Caught Alaskan Halibut to Sushi Grade Diver Scallops,” explained Darrell. “After opening our doors in 2013, we soon realized that our guests were driving from all over Kentucky to dine with us. It is very humbling and we feel honored to see our regulars.” When catering requests started coming in, it didn’t take long for Darrell to realize that they needed a mobile kitchen and bar to offer onsite cooking, thus ensuring that the food was fresh and served hot every time. “Owning your own business is extremely rewarding. Being able to have an idea and make the appropriate changes immediately,” Lewis explained.

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Faces + Places

Haley Michelle Designs haleymichelledesigns.com haleymichelledesigns@gmail.com Haley started her custom stationery design business a little over two and a half years ago. “Being a graphic designer, I have that strong passion for design and all that goes into creating something unique and beautiful,” Haley explained. “HMD has grown into something I can truly call my own. Meeting and working with beautiful brides from all over the US is what makes this journey so special.” In addition to completely customized wedding/special event invitations, save the dates, place cards, menus and more, Haley also offers hand calligraphy services for envelopes, custom signs and more. She was named a TOP Paper Goods Vendor by Southern Weddings in the 2017 Best of the South Awards. photo by Amy Wallen

Peoples

Exchange Bank 859.269.0235

pebank.com

Matthew White specializes in commercial real estate transactions. He’s been in the banking industry for 20 years, eight of which have been at Peoples Exchange Bank. In that short time, Matthew and his team have grown from 8 million in loans to almost 100 million. “My employees have been an incredible asset and have contributed immensely to this effort. It makes coming to work fun and exciting,” he said. Peoples Exchange Bank has been a community-oriented financial institution since they opened in 1912, and provide a broad variety of financial services. “We make a point of supporting the communities we serve,” White said. “Without the community, there is no Peoples Exchange Bank.”

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Faces + Places

Norwalk Furniture & Design

2200 War Admiral Way 859.263.0322 norwalklexington.com Norwalk Furniture & Design specializes in full design services. From room layouts and furniture placement to completed looks, their talented team is dedicated to turning dream homes into reality. With carefully chosen furniture, accent pieces, wallpaper, draperies and more, Norwalk is able to suit virtually any aesthetic or need. In addition to their design services, Norwalk also offers a variety of home dĂŠcor products to make any room beautiful and unique. They offer custom upholstery of all price ranges, accent pillows, bedding and window treatments. Their upholstery is 100% made in America! They also offer antique rugs, lights, mirrors, gifts, furniture, as well as outdoor furniture and accessories. Owners Kellie Clarke and Tawana Palmer have been best friends since high school. As co-owners of Norwalk Furniture & Design, the two have enjoyed building relationships with customers and members of the community over the years. Since joining the Norwalk family, designers Justin and Phillip have greatly expanded the range of services the store offers. No matter the project, large or small, Norwalk Furniture & Design can help make it special. With full design services and a bevy of stunning pieces in store, Norwalk can help make any home a dream home.


Faces + Places

Kentucky Dermatology and Cosmetic Specialists

177 Burt Rd. 859.276.1511 kentuckydermatology.com Kentucky Dermatology was started 44 years ago as a dermatology practice with emphasis on cancer surgery and cosmetic procedures. Over those years, it has grown from 1 to 7 providers and has expanded greatly both its dermatological services and its cosmetic services. Dr. Clifton Smith, a native Kentuckian, began his solo practice in 1973. “From the very first I wanted to provide first class services to my patients without being part of a group or clinic that might interfere with the exceptional services that I wanted to provide to my patients,” Dr. Smith explained. “The best part about being a business owner is that I’ve been able to clearly see direct results of my efforts regarding the patient care that Dr. Roth and I strive to provide,” Dr. Smith said. “The biggest and best reward that I have is being able to take care of the same patients over a long period of time and connect with these patients like they’re family.” Dr. John G. Roth grew up in Louisville. After finishing a stint with the U.S. Navy Reserves, he decided to move to Lexington and joined Kentucky Dermatology in 1992. He enjoys going into his practice every day and seeing patients with a variety or ages and personalities.

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Meet the

Media:

rob bromley

SET TO RETIRE THIS SEPTEMBER, THE SPORTS NEWS HALL OF FAMER REFLECTS ON A RICH LIFE & CAREER by Michelle Rauch | Photos courtesy of Rob Bromley and Gary Moyers Rob Bromley has stories to tell. A lot of stories. He recalls them so eloquently as if it was yesterday, yet Bromley’s stories date back more than six decades. He grew up in upstate New York. Bromley was the younger of two sons. His father was an electrical engineer at Griffiss Air Force Base and his mother was a teacher. It was the 1950s.

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would come in pretty clearly, if you adjusted the rabbit ears just right. “That’s where the memories started,” Bromley said. Bromley’s parents weren’t interested in sports, but he and his older brother were.

“I remember the day that the TV came to the apartment. I remember the weather was good. The sun was shining,” Bromley recalled.

“I owe a lot to him. I always had him to lead the way. We grew up sitting on that rec room floor on that old couch, watching black and white TV. That’s how we got interested in sports together,” he said.

Bromley was just a wide eyed five-year-old when he sat on the living room floor of their five-room apartment in an old mansion, watching his dad take the TV out of a big box. There were three stations that

Sports viewing was limited to weekends. Typically, pro football and baseball were the go-to teams to follow. “This wasn’t Kentucky after all,” Bromley joked.

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That’s where the vivid memories were made and are etched in his mind, ready for recall. Historic memories. There was the 1958 Colts-Giants NFL championship–regarded as the greatest game ever played. Bromley remembers that. He has a vivid memory of a 1959 major league game in Cleveland. It was his first. “It was a real thrill. That old stadium. It was a weeknight. Indians and the Yankees,” he recalled. It was one of only two years between 194964 that the Yankees had not won a pennant. “There were 50-thousand there that night. I will never forget it,” he said. And like that, Bromley has instant recall, like an announcer, taking you there. “The Yankees got up four to one lead and then Minny Minoas hit a grand slam home run over left field fence. I never heard a crowd erupt like that,” he remembers. Cleveland won that night. Bromley was just 9-years old. By then, the memories were being formed in the families dream home, on the rec room floor. “I was sitting on that rec room floor glued to that TV when Roger Maris hit 61 in October of ‘61. He hit it early in the game. I have that memory,” he said. It was a historic one, as it was the moment Maris beat the record set by the legendary Babe Ruth. 1962. “I remember seeing Jackie Robinson from a distance outside the exhibition game. The only reason I remember was he had greying hair. That was pretty unusual to see. The Braves–Yankee game got rained out which was a big disappointment,” he remembered. There was the 1964 AFL National Championship game in Buffalo. The Bills versus the San Diego Chargers. Bromley remembers that. He was there. “I was as close to Jack Kemp as you could get,” he said. The memories are endless. “There are things you remember,” he said. But Bromley admits he wouldn’t be as good at recall these days. But when you see something that’s a first, that’s different. “First time sticks with you,” he said.

took us to games,” he said. As Bromley’s interest in sports as a spectator blossomed, thoughts of a career connected to it were not on the radar until high school. A part in a school play gave Bromley the confidence to participate in a public speaking contest. That confidence continued to build. By the time he was a junior in high school in the late 60’s he considered a career in sports broadcasting. Wanting to move away from upstate New York, Bromley applied to Butler University in Indiana and was accepted. He packed his bags, sight unseen. “I’d never set foot in Indiana. I’d never been to Indianapolis. It was one of the smarter things I ever did in my life,” he said. He learned a lot at the student run radio station. His senior year Bromley was hired part time to work at a local radio station. After graduating Bromley was hired for his first full time job in Lima, OH at the rock station, WCIT radio. Bromley approached the owner of the station about letting him cover high school games. He liked the idea and that was the beginning of Bromley’s career in sports broadcasting. Bromley’s first week on air at WLIO in Lima as a TV sportscaster was memorable for more than his career advancement; it was also the week President Nixon resigned. A phone call in December of 1976 was a game changer. WKYT sports director, Denny Trease, was visiting his family in Ohio and Bromley was on the air. He liked what he saw and the timing was perfect. Channel 27’s sports department was growing from a one-man staff and a part timer to two full timers. “That’s how I ended up here. I started January 17th, 1977 filling in for Denny on a Monday night. It was cold. The basketball team was playing in Florida that night,” he remembers. “That’s how I got from Rome, NY to Lexington KY. Eighteen years in New York. Four in Indianapolis. Four and a half in Lima and forty and a half in Lexington.”

Whatever it was about sports, Bromley and his brother we were intrigued even though his parents weren’t. But they cultivated their son’s interest.

The timing was great. When Bromley arrived at WKYT, the station had the contract for games and the coaches’ shows. Bromley made many wonderful connections during his 20 years working on the those programs, and even more covering basketball for 30 years.

“They didn’t have an interest in sports. They knew we were so they

“It was a special ten years with Tubby. I think I can credit some of my

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Faces + Places

longevity to the fact he was here and I had a good relationship with him. I was very lucky with the coaches show,” he said. In 1988, he married his wife Diane Scanlon of Lexington and in 1991, they had their only son, Robbie. “No matter what I have done or how many years I’ve lasted or how many games I have seen, he remains the biggest accomplishment of our lives,” Bromley said. His son never asked about a career in sports and Bromley never pushed. Instead, he is enjoying a career as a mechanical engineer in Frankfort, a source of great pride for Bromley. “Seeing him mature, it’s more than I could’ve done,” he said. Bromley is modest about his own accomplishments. This past June he was inducted into the Kentucky Sports Hall of Fame. “You never set out to be in a Hall of Fame,” he said. “It’s overwhelming. I’m very humbled by it. It never would’ve happened if I hadn’t come to this station and been able to move into the position I was in,” he said. Bromley credits the WKYT management with letting him be himself. He embodies a straightforward, credible approach. He doesn’t try to attract attention by blowing horns. “That style has been accepted and appreciated,” he said.

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Bromley will retire and sign off one last time on Friday, September 29th. He will take the rich memories he made working at WKYT with him. The list includes more than a hundred NCAA games, three world series, the championship Coach Cal won, Tubby’s team coming up from 18 down to get to the Final Four, and the 2008 Ryder Cup at Valhalla. “To be able to experience that, I tell any media person they should experience that event. It’s a very, very special event,” he said. There is one big event Bromley has not attended, a Super Bowl. “I don’t feel like anything is lost. I’ve seen my share of games,” he said. “I’ve been there. Done that.” So many memorable moments. Too many great people to name who made a difference in his career and life. “It’s been good. People have been wonderful. It’s hard to get in names. I have been treated so well by people,” he said. Bromley has advice for up and coming sportcasters: “Get ready for long hours. Get ready for a business that is changing. I could not have predicted eight or nine years ago the addition of social media. I can’t predict what it will be in eight or nine years from now,” he said.

He also believes it was the key to being accepted into the Hall of Fame where there are only eight other announcers who have been inducted.

It can be a hard road. “It’s a young person’s business. A lot of businesses are. It’s a young person’s country. Not all societies are like that. I will be 67 in the fall. There are reasons to stay, being around the action and the people,” he said. But he also appreciates the benefits of retiring now.

“’I’ve been lucky. I was lucky where I grew up with the people I grew up with. My parents let me do what I wanted to do,” he said.

“It’s been a good run. It’s time to turn it over to somebody who is a little younger. It will be in good hands here,” Bromley said. •

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Sugarboo & Co.

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I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: “Oh great, another awesome home goods and accessories store!”

(You know how it goes when you’re out gift shopping… “One for you, two for me.” It’s funny, but kind of true, right?!)

Sugarboo, one of The Summit at Fritz Farm’s fabulous new shops, is definitely one of those places. Believe me–it does not disappoint! Everything in the store is just so darn cute. The family-owned boutique, which originated in Georgia, also has locations in Florida and Alabama. The Summit at Fritz Farm is their first location in Kentucky.

There are truly fabulous gift items like engraved compasses, a pad of love notes, books, metal signs, art prints, all types of jewelry, garden decor, front door mats with fun messages, sunglasses, collars and leashes for your pets, furniture both big and small, beautiful framed love letters, accent pillows, light fixtures and lamps, glassware, serving pieces, entertaining goods and party supplies, handmade ceramics and bath products. I could go on… it’s all just so fabulous!

Everything they sell is carefully curated and unique. Owner and artist Rebecca Puig explained, “Sugarboo & Co.’s tagline is ‘Dealer in Whimsy’ so we have to live up to this name! Our specialty is adding value and happiness to our customers’ day. We work really hard to keep the store fresh and we are constantly getting in oneof-a kind items.” Mission accomplished! I actually felt happy when I was perusing the store, picking up trinkets and gazing at the art on the walls. From uplifting art prints, to charming home goods and whimsical paper products, their goal is that each fun piece will “add a little good to the world”. How could they not? Just walking through their store, it’s hard not to get a smile on your face. When I visited, with each piece I saw, I could imagine wrapping it up and giving to a friend as a gift, or displaying it in my own home.

Puig is proud of her staff here in Lexington. “We have a really diverse group of people on our team, but everyone is on board with our mission to put good things into the world. They work really hard to make ‘the Boo’ a place where people can slow down, pay attention to our little whimsical world we have created, recharge their batteries, and hopefully leave a little better than when they came,” she said. Check out Sugarboo’s first-ever Kentucky location at 113 Marion, Suite 160, in The Summit at Fritz Farm, online at sugarbooandco.com, on Facebook @ fritzfarmsugarboo or Instagram @ sugarbooandco.•

“ Above all, we believe in putting good things into the world.”

by Meredith Lane, City Scout photos by Keni Parks

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CUISINE

Dining: Back To School

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Top 5 Dining: Local Producers

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Womanista: Roasted Veggie Buddha Bowl

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Beer of the Month: Pico to Mexico Wine of the Month: Moobuzz Pinot Grigio

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back to s c h

o

o

l

By Michelle Aiello | Photos by Keni Parks

S

ushi fans rejoice. After a two-year hiatus, the popular Japanese restaurant has relocated from Old Todd’s Road to the former Shorty’s building at 163 West Short Street. After owner Tamoka Ito closed the Old Todd’s road location (which was open from 2008-2015), she had been looking for the ideal place to resurrect her restaurant in a more central location. When the old Shorty’s space (the original Traditional Bank building) became available, she knew it was perfect.

Ito, who was born and raised in Tokyo, left Japan in her early twenties when she married a man from Columbus, Ohio. “He was an English teacher, but I wasn’t his student!” she laughed. Before opening School, she worked in the automotive industry for 18 years. Her husband, an employee of Toyota, was transferred to Georgetown in 1999. They live in Richmond. School offers elegant sushi and other traditional Japanese specialties made from scratch. They also have a full wine list including whites, reds, and champagne, along with cocktails, sake, and shochu (a Japanese distilled beverage typically made from barley or sweet potatoes).

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Unlike the previous location, sushi will no longer be served on a conveyor belt (“That was a custom made piece and impossible to move,” said Ito), but the former bank-turned-grocery store has been given a modern makeover by Chevy Chase architecture firm Pohl Rosa Pohl.

Like 21c’s Lockbox restaurant, which is also housed in a former bank, the old bank vault (with its signature massive door) has been converted to a private dining room. The main dining room seats 100, and another, larger room with karaoke is also available. Ito admits to getting in on the karaoke action once in a while. So far, she says, the response has been great. “Downtown is an ideal location – we love having the crowds from Thursday Night Live and other events.” Ito hired Chef Shin Idei, a native of Okinawa, to create a menu focused on the freshest, most flavorful fish, which is flown in twice weekly from Japan. According to Chef Ito, the key to good sushi preparation is freshness. “The way the fish is stored and prepared


Cuisine

We are excited to be here, and look forward to welcoming all of our customers back to School. makes all the difference,” he said. When asked how long it takes the fish to be shipped from Japan to School’s tables, he said, “About twenty four hours.”

baked savory pancake made with fish and ramen noodles. The dish is beautifully presented and served on a hot stone to keep it warm throughout the meal.

So far, popular rolls have been the Crunch & Munch (spicy crab roll topped with shrimp, spicy mayo and crunchy tempura), and the Fire & Ice (spicy tuna roll with alternating tuna and white tuna, topped with red and green flying fish roe). Diners are also loving the SSS (School Special Scallop) roll – a California roll topped with baked scallop.

“We are excited to be here, and look forward to welcoming all of our customers back to School,” said Ito.

Aside from typical sushi and maki, the menu also includes a variety of Japanese dishes that are unique to School. For example, guests can start with small plates like edamame or bacon wrapped asparagus; or for a light meal or larger sharable plate, the menu offers gyoza (pan fried dumplings), truffle fries with garlic mayo, tori tatsuta age (fried chicken marinated in soy sauce) and tempura veggies. The lunch menu features several California rolls, ramen, beef and shrimp curries, kale salad, and bento trays. Dinner entrees include rice and noodle dishes, chicken teriyaki, ribeye steak, and tonikatsu (deep fried pork). This month’s featured recipe, Okonomiyaki, is a

School Sushi 163 West Short St., Lexington schoolsushilex.com (859) 368-0660 School is open 11 am to 2 pm for lunch and 5 to 10 pm for dinner Monday through Wednesday and 11 am to 2 pm and 5 pm to midnight Thursday through Saturday. It’s closed Sunday. Call 859-368-0660 for reservations.

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Okonomiyaki

Tonkatsu Sauce:

(Japanese Pancake)

1/3 cup ketchup

Ingredients:

1 tablespoon soy sauce

1 cup cabbage

1 tablespoon mirin (rice wine)

4 uncooked shrimp

1 tablespoon sugar

4 oz sliced pork

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

3/4 cup flour

1/4 teaspoon garlic powder

3/4 cup water

2 tablespoons mayonnaise

1 egg

1 tablespoon bonito (dried tuna) flakes

2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

Instructions: In a large bowl, mix first 3 ingredients. In a separate bowl, beat together eggs, flour, water. Pour batter over mixture and toss to thoroughly coat. Heat vegetable oil in a skillet over medium. Scoop about 1/4 cup of the batter into skillet, enough to make a 2 1/2 inch circle. Cover and cook 4 minutes, or until bottom is golden brown. Flip and continue cooking 4 minutes, or until cooked through. Drain on paper towels. Serve with sauce and garnished with bonito flakes.

Q&A with Executive Chef Shin Idei What is your hometown? Okinawa, Japan. How did you become a sushi chef? Self study. Nobody would tell you how and what to do in their industry. Usually it takes 10 or more years to be able to touch fish. Steal with your eyes. Traditionally, Japanese consider watching to be the best way to learn. They say that as long as you pay enough attention to what’s in front of you, everything you need to know is right there. Your curiosity makes you a future chef. What inspired you to choose this career? My family. My parents had their own restaurant in my hometown. What is your favorite menu item at School? Sapporo beer. How do you think School distinguishes itself from the other sushi restaurants in town? There is no comparison. School has the best, freshest sushi in town. How we prepare and store fish makes all difference. Where do you source your fish? Mostly from Japan. They fly into Lexington via Chicago. Also, some items can be better from the West Coast, like Uni (sea urchin). What’s something that you think people don’t know or understand about Japanese cuisine, particularly sushi that you think they ought to know? Fish quality can be changed very quickly. It’s very important to serve immediately from our sushi bar to the customer. What is your favorite meal to make at home? I don’t cook much at home. What is your favorite place to dine out in Lexington? Texas Roadhouse. What do like to do on your time off ? I enjoy playing golf.

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l a c Lo Top 5 Dining

producers By Amanda Harper

Ruth Hunt Candies Ruth Tharpe Hunt whipped up little confections to serve her bridge club. In 1921, she decided to make sweets her business. Today, there are around 70 different candies produced by the company that bears her name. Still located in Mt. Sterling, the factory remains a Kentucky landmark. They have since added a retail store in Lexington on Walton Avenue to make it easier than ever to pick up a Blue Monday Bar (featuring a pulled cream candy center coated in rich, dark chocolate), some of their Woodford Reserve bourbon balls or a gift basket for almost any occasion. 550 N. Maysville Rd. | Mt. Sterling | 800.927.0302 213 Walton Ave. | Lexington | 859.268.1559 ruthhuntcandy.com

Weisenberger Mills Owned and operated by six generations of the Weisenberger family, this brand has been “the bakers choice� since 1865. Located on the banks of South Elkhorn Creek, the mill has been grinding flour, cornmeal and grits for over a century and a half. Their baking mixes are a must-have for any Kentucky-themed gift basket or care package; their Spoon Bread Mix is one of their most popular cornbread mixes. They also offer oat bran, yeast and wheat berries. Their mixes can be purchased online or at a number of local stores, including some Lexington Kroger locations. 2545 Weisenberger Mill Rd. | Midway | 859.254.5282 weisenberger.com

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Cuisine

Ale-8-One Early in the 20th century, inventor G.L. Wainscott found himself in a pickle: the cola alternative he created, Roxa-Kola, landed in a legal mess. The industrious Wainscott set out to find a new flavor for his soft drink business. In his travels across Europe, he collected recipes that blended ginger with other flavors. After some tinkering, Wainsott’s ginger pop was ready to launch in July of 1926. The strange brew got its name from a slogan contest at the Clark County Fair and has been a local legend ever since. The recipe is a closely-guarded family secret, mixed up in Winchester right from Wainscott’s handwritten notes. The process can be seen (and sampled) in person during a tour of the famous plant. 25 Carol Road | Winchester | 859.744.3484 ale8one.com

Alltech Lexington Brewing & Distilling Co. Alltech founder and president Dr. Pearse Lyons acquired the 200-year-old Lexington Brewing Company in 1999, helping to resurrect Lexington’s brewing and distilling tradition. The site houses Town Branch Distillery, which is part of Kentucky’s Bourbon Trail. Alltech Lexington Brewing houses the gleaming brew kettles that produce the numerous varieties of Kentucky Ale; while the Bourbon Barrel Ale may be what they are most known for, they have something for everyone in their flavor lineup. The company’s new partnership with Western Kentucky University is training tomorrow’s brewmasters while producing College Heights Ale and IPA. 401 Cross Street | Lexington | 859.225.8095 kentuckyale.com

Marksbury Farm Market A pressing need in Kentucky’s fast-growing local food economy is what spurred the Marksbury partners to band together. Their commitment to producing high quality local, grass-fed meats that are free of antibiotics, steroids and hormones mean their customers bring the very best to the dinner table. They not only sell beef, pork and sausages online and at their butcher shop, but Marksbury also supplies protein to over 100 restaurants throughout the region. They also have a restaurant, Pasture at Marksbury Farm, featuring burgers, sandwiches and salads. 7907 Nicholasville Rd. | Lancaster | 859.548.2333 marksburyfarm.com

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Cuisine

Roasted Veggie Buddha Bowl Ingredients: 1 small head cauliflower, cored and cut into bite-sized pieces (about 4 cups) 2 broccoli crowns, cut into bite-sized pieces (about 2 cups) ½ red onion, cut into bite-sized pieces 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil 2 cups kale, torn into bite-sized pieces salt, to taste black pepper, to taste ½ cup shredded green cabbage, or a small handful (green, Napa, or red) Spiced Chickpeas: (makes 1½ cups)

Preparation: Preheat the oven to 400° F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicon baking mat. In a large mixing bowl, toss the cauliflower, broccoli and red onion together with the oil. Spread them on the baking sheet, in a single layer (use 2 baking sheets if it is too crowded). Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Roast for 20 minutes, then remove from the oven. Add the kale to the large mixing bowl that the other vegetables were mixed in, to soak up the residual oil left in the bowl. You may need to add an additional drizzle to lightly coat the kale. Spread the kale on top of the partially roasted vegetables, and season the kale with an additional pinch of salt and pepper, and roast for 5 minutes. While the vegetables are roasting, prepare the chickpeas by heating a large nonstick skillet over medium heat and adding the remaining 1 teaspoon of oil.

1 (15-ounce) can chickpeas, drained, rinsed, and patted dry

Add the chickpeas, cumin, garlic powder, and chili powder to the skillet and stir the chickpeas for 6-8 minutes, or until fragrant and golden brown. Then set aside.

½ teaspoon ground cumin

Prepare the quinoa by bringing 2 cups of water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Add the quinoa, and bring back up to a boil, then reduce to a simmer, cover and cook for 13-15 minutes.

½ teaspoon garlic powder ¼ teaspoon chili powder 1 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil Quinoa Bowl Base with Vinaigrette: (makes 3 cups) 1 cup quinoa, dry (any color) 2 cups water 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil pinch of salt pinch of black pepper

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Prep Time: 20 minutes | Cook Time: 30-40 minutes

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Remove quinoa from the heat and let stand for 5 minutes; uncover and fluff with a fork. To make the quinoa vinaigrette: Whisk together the red wine vinegar and oil in a small mixing bowl, or pour them into a container with a tight fitting lid and shake until combined. Stir the vinaigrette into the cooked quinoa, and season with salt and pepper, to taste. To assemble, evenly divide between 4 large bowls: ¾ cup quinoa, ¼ of the roasted vegetables, ¼ of the raw green cabbage and about ⅓ cup chickpeas. 4 servings | Nutrition Facts based on 1 bowl Calories 448 | Fat 15g | Fiber 14g | Cholesterol 0mg | Sodium 190mg | Carbohydrates 61g Sugar 8g | Protein 16g | Smart Points: 11

Womanista is a lifestyle brand that inspires and encourages women by delivering informative content, recommendations and entertainment through the lens of wellness, fashion, beauty, living and current events.


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Beer

August Picks by Zach

OF THE MONTH

Golden Road Brewing

Pico to Mexico Why Zach Enjoys this Beer…. “Golden Road Brewing has been a welcome addition to my beer selection rotation since the day they hit Kentucky. This Southern California brewery has yet to disappoint. From their Palisades pineapple wheat beer to the Sunset Coffee Oatmeal Milk Stout I have been impressed every time. Their new seasonal beer Pico to Mexico is no exception! This beer had me hooked from the first drink, the cool cucumber flavor hits bold up front and is quickly followed by the fresh zest of lime citrus. On the finish you are left with the slightest hint of habanero heat on the tongue, not over powering but just enough to make you crave the cool from the next drink! This beer is full of fantastically fresh flavors that leave you craving one drink after another until every drop is gone. Don’t miss out on this one, Pico To Mexico won’t be around long so grab some today!” Style: Cucumber Lime Lager with a hint of Habanero Alcohol By Volume: 4.8% IBUs: 18 Taste Profile: SoCal meets South of the border. This smooth crisp lager is cucumber forward, complemented by a touch of lime, a pinch of salt and a hint of heat.

www.KYeagle.net | Please call Kentucky Eagle at 859-252-3434 for local purchase locations!

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Wine OF THE MONTH

3 Badge

Moobuzz Pinot Grigio

This wine begins with fruity aromas of cantaloupe and lemon custard and hints of crushed citrus leaf. It is bright on the palate with sweet flavors of candied lemon drops, lemongrass and a hint of grapefruit juice — a perfect balance of sweet and tart, leading to a delightful finish. This Pinot Grigio was harvested primarily from Paso Robles vineyards including Fossil Creek, Rava Vineyards and Villa Toscana. The blend also features a touch of Monterey County fruit from Chular Vineyard. Harvest took place during the third week of August, which is generally average for Pinot Grigio in these areas. With lower-than-average yields, the vintage offered highly concentrated flavors, as only the most pristine grapes were included in the blend. The wine was 100% stainless steel fermented prior to bottling. Varietal: 100% Pinot Grigio Alcohol by volume: 13.5% Appellation: 95% Paso Robles, 5% Monterey County Food pairing: This wine pairs wonderfully with light seafood dishes such as risotto and shrimp sautÊed in butter, grilled Hilibut topped with citrus remoulade, or crab salad with cucumber and grapefruit.

Proudly distributed by Kentucky Eagle, Inc.

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LIFE + STYLE

Art in the Bluegrass

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WOW Wedding: Lauren + Gordy

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Wedding Trends: Mirrored Tables

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Gor-Jess: Get the Look

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Outfit of the Month: Red Haute Summer

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Life + Style

in th e Bluegrass ART Street Art: PRHBTN & Brocoloco When you think of Lexington, what comes to mind? Probably Bluegrass horse country, bourbon, basketball… but what about street art? In the last five years or so, Lexington has earned a reputation for being one of the nation’s leading cities for the this medium. Since their inception in 2011, PRHBTN has brought over a dozen artists from around the world to create murals. One of their most well-known works is the 2013 mural of Abraham Lincoln by Brazilian artist Eduardo Kobra. The massive, colorful mural is located behind the Kentucky Theatre. The work has drawn international interest and is now a regular photoop for tourists. BroCoLoco is a Lexington-based design group whose headquarters are on Washington Street, off of North Broadway and Loudon Avenue. Founded in 2012, brothers Aaron and Jared Scales are passionate about “storytelling services through art, architecture, branding, marketing & design.” They are responsible for a dynamic work on their building called “Origami Tsunami” which gives the appearance of Origami birds flying along the side of the building. Man O’ War 100th Birthday Mural Commissioned by LexArts and sponsored by Mt. Brilliant Farm, a 30’ x 30’ mural painted by Mexico City native and longtime Lexington resident

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Life + Style

Agustin Zarate was unveiled on June 29. Based on a historic photograph during his racing years, the mural spans the entire side of the two-story Village Idiot building and memorializes Man o’ War’s victory in the 1920 Belmont Stakes. The beautiful work is part of a season-long celebration of the beloved racehorse, and a series of events highlighting his life have been taking place in various locations around town. “Man O’ War was truly a remarkable horse, and many people don’t realize that he’s actually buried at the Kentucky Horse Park,” Kentucky Horse Park Executive Director Laura Prewitt said in a statement. “We hope this mural will become a downtown fixture that raises awareness of his life and legacy, and will also drive traffic to the Kentucky Horse Park to visit his gravesite and the ‘Mostest Horse That Ever Was’ Exhibit.’” LexArts Gallery Hop One of Lexington’s most ingenious ways to make art more accessible to the public, Lex Arts Gallery Hop is a fun monthly event in which Lexington art galleries open their doors for special viewing parties each month. During this popular event, thousands of local residents and tourists alike gather at galleries and non-traditional spaces in downtown Lexington to celebrate art. Many locations offer food and drink, and there are usually special events planned throughout the evening. Admission is free, and patrons can visit as many or as few locations as they like. With over fifty participating galleries, there’s sure to be something for everyone. Gallery Hop officially begins at 5 p.m. and runs until 8 p.m., but many restaurants, bars, and other non-traditional venues will keep the party going later. “After nearly twenty five years, Gallery Hop is a signature Lexington event,” said President and CEO Nan Palmer. “It’s the best evidence of the depth and breadth of our visual arts culture. Our thriving downtown is es-

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Life + Style

pecially lively on the third Friday of every month, thanks to the almost fifty venues that have something new to offer for every Hop.”

outreach programs. In 2013, they launched Kentucky’s first Community Supported Art program, a grassroots program connecting Kentucky artists to new audiences.

The Woodland Art Fair

This year, the Woodland Art Fair will be held on August 19 and 20, inside the Woodland Park grounds at 601 East High Street.

The Lexington Art League and LFCUG Parks & Recreation are gearing up for their biggest event of the year —the 2017 Woodland Art Fair. Sponsored by WestBanco, the event gives community members the opportunity to shop the creations of over 200 artists, enjoy live music and food, beer gardens, and create their own family art — all with free admission. The Woodland Art Fair has received several national, regional and local honors including being voted a Top 200 Fine Art & Design Show in the nation in 2007-2016 by Sunshine Artist Magazine, a Top 20 Event by The Southeast Tourism Society, and a Top 10 Festival by The Kentucky Travel Industry Association. The Lexington Art League provides free, quality contemporary art programming, including exhibitions, youth education and

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Kroger Mural Project In 2014, LexArts and Kroger announced the artists that were commissioned for large-scale murals for the Euclid Avenue store: Lexington residents John Lackey of Homegrown Press for the exterior mural, and UK associate architecture professor Liz Swanson and BroCoLoco’s Aaron and Jared Scales for the interior murals. “I’ve completed two murals for Kroger to date–the mural in the cafe at the Euclid location; and the mural above the entryway at the Leestown location, said Swanson. When asked if there will be other murals, she said, “Hopefully! I would love to work with Kroger again; it’s a great company and everyone there is totally committed


Life + Style

to becoming a part of the communities they serve.” Kroger worked with LexArts and ArtWorks to build a selection committee that included store management, Lexington City Council members, and local students. They received over fifty submissions, selecting three pieces to be placed above the produce section, in the café, and across three panels on the outside wall of the store. The murals reflect the local community, depicting scenes from nearby Woodland Park. 21c Museum Hotel Housed in the completely renovated and repurposed Fayette National Bank Building in downtown Lexington, 21c Lexington is a multi-venue museum and hotel, with 7,000 square feet of gallery and event space. As with its sister properties in Durham, Louisville, Nashville, Bentonville, Cincinnati, and Oklahoma City, the art galleries are open to the public, free of charge, twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. 21c welcomes both visitors and locals to experience its rotating exhibits, programming and culinary

offerings. Their beautiful onsite restaurant, Lockbox, showcases Executive Chef Jonathan Searle’s commitment to sourcing local, high-quality seasonal ingredients and thoughtful yet simple cooking preparations and techniques. 21c’s current exhibition, “Hybridity: The Supernatural” explores the concept of the landscape from a surrealist perspective. According to a statement on 21c’s website, “... invoking past and future in a critique of the present, these paintings, photographs, sculptures, and videos document observed, current realities while referencing the aesthetic traditions of 19th and 20th century art. Influenced by Romanticism and Surrealism, science and commerce, these artists envision how the dreams and detritus of the industrial era have generated the promise and peril of the digital age.” ... and beyond! There are countless local galleries in Lexington and Central Kentucky, each bringing something unique to our local culture. Get out and see them all! •

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Lauren and Gordy Hoagland met at the University of Kentucky in a communications class. Several weeks after mutual friends introduced them, Gordy asked Lauren on their first date and as the couple explained, “the rest is sweet history.” Lauren grew up in Lexington and Gordy is from Louisville, Ky., but he came to Lexington for college in 2008. When they graduated, they both shared a love for Lexington so they decided to stay and plant their roots in the heart of the Bluegrass. Gordy, a commercial real estate broker, and Lauren, a second grade teacher, enjoy spending time with their family and friends, and love playing and walking with their one-year-old mini golden doodle, Huck. The couple married at Tates Creek Presbyterian because as Lauren said, “Tates Creek Presbyterian played a huge part not only in our relationship, but it also played a huge part in helping us each personally grow closer to the Lord.”

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The minister that officiated the wedding was the head of the campus ministry, Campus Outreach, which Gordy and Lauren were very involved in throughout their time at UK. It was very special to the couple that he officiated because he saw their relationship from the beginning and watched it develop into the true love that they have for each other. One of the couple’s dear friends, Bebo Baxter, played music during the ceremony. He played and sang their favorite hymn, In Christ Alone, for the entire congregation to worship together. Lauren and Gordy agree that this was one of the most special moments of their wedding day. Lauren wore her mother’s cathedral length veil for the ceremony as well as her mother-in-law’s garter that had been passed down and worn by each daughter-in-law on their wedding day. Lauren loves flowers, so it was very important to her to have a lot of beautiful flowers and colors at the reception at Lexington Country Club. Erica Svec from Hide and Seek Design used various shades of coral and peach that really made the arrangements pop. Throughout the reception décor, gold mercury glass was incorporated in the vases, votives and candle sticks. When Lauren was 15 years old, her dad passed away. For the father daughter dance, Lauren danced first with her younger brother, John. Then, each of Lauren’s dad’s four brothers took turns cutting in. It was an emotional, but very special moment.

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As Lauren explained, she and Gordy love Graeter’s ice cream so much that they decided to have a Graeter’s ice cream cart come out towards the end of their reception so that guests could enjoy one of their favorite treats. For couples planning their own weddings, the Hoaglands advise taking moments throughout your wedding day to stop and soak it in. “It truly does go by so quickly,” said Lauren. “We had so much fun dancing and celebrating with our friends and family, we would have loved to have had more time. It was so helpful to stop and look around and take in all the joy, love, beauty and excitement, which helped us remember and savor the sweetness of it all.”

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Life + Style

by Marsha Koller Wedding Consultant

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Life + Style

create the look:

by: Jesse L. Brooks

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Life + Style

Channel you inner flamenco dancer with this head turning side flower top by Bambah. The fiery shade of red combined with the ornate shoulder design is muy caliente!

Looking chic and feeling like a true fashionista can be rough during the warmer months. You never want to be too covered and risk roasting, but you also never want to show too much skin. Finding the perfect balance for an evening out can become quite stressful, but this month’s outfit will hopefully give you a burst of inspiration.

Adding a little more spice to the ensemble is a matching Bambah polka dot ruched skirt. Not only is this piece figure flattering, the slight leg slit injects an instant hint of sexiness.

A marbled Edie Parker clutch and a pair sparkling ruby and diamond stud earrings from Zales help round out our accessories.

Splash into summer with Glossy Stain Pop Water by YSL for sheer color and intense hydration. It’s formulated with water brilliance to provide 10 hours of hydration and a translucent splash of color. Stuart Weitzman’s ‘Nudist’ sandals make a vibrant, understated addition, and help pull this look together.

by Jesse L. Brooks

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FAMILY

Super Mom: Kasi Sato

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Pets: Snake Bites

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Family

Kasi Sato, co-owner of Strong Shop Fitness and co-owner of Dixie Cafe and Quick Stop, says that she always tries to find the beauty in the chaos. “The two most important roles in my life are being a wife and mother,” she says. “Even though on most days I go from sun up until sun down without stopping, I get to snuggle on the couch and say my prayers with my favorite people.” Kasi’s husband, Josh, works hard running their fitness studio, but it’s the work at home that means the most.

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Family

Josh is my safe place,” Kasi says. “He is always there to celebrate life’s little moments or to remind me to breathe when those moments seem bigger than me. He still holds my hand, opens my door, kisses me on the forehead, and takes me on dates. He helps me to be a better mom!” While Kasi doesn’t see herself as a “super-mom,” she feels blessed to know many women who are. “I have an amazing mom-she and I talk to everyday. At 39, I still need her,” says Kasi. “I am very close to my parents and I pray that when our kids are grown, they will look at Josh and me the way that I look at my mom and dad.” Kasi says she has been given three of the most precious gifts in her three children and that it’s her job to show them God’s love, to teach them forgiveness, to be grateful, and to be kind. “When I say it out loud, I realize that my kids end up being the teacher on most days,” she says. “I love learning from them and getting to share moments of innocence with them. I love when they want to snuggle or when they can’t wait to tell me something that happened in their day. My favorite thing is when they laughthat true belly laugh that is so infectious is one of the most rewarding parts of being a momma.”

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Family

Like many moms, Kasi finds it to be an everyday challenge trying to fit it all in and feeling like she is giving enough to all of the important people in her life. She says the upside to that is that she has been blessed with a lot of people to love. Kasi has found that raising kids in an iPhone and social media world is extremely difficult but to combat this, Kasi says that she makes communication a priority. “We talk a lot and there really isn’t anything that is off the table. It is definitely a challenge trying to teach kids the importance of privacy, true-friendship and self-worth when at the same time, the opposite is at their fingertips. I know that they are going to make mistakes, but hopefully the more information they have, the less traumatic those mistakes will be.�

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Family

Erica Radhakrishnan Hospital Administrator, BVS

S

ummer in the Bluegrass brings ample opportunity for countless outdoor adventures and fun. From hiking in the Red River Gorge, lake boating, canoeing down Elkhorn Creek, or simply camping in your own backyard, Kentucky has the potential for all things nature. There is no better way to spend time in the outdoors then with your favorite canine friend. When doing so, it is important to be aware of Mother Nature’s pest control predators – snakes, especially the venomous variety. Kentucky is home to four varieties of pit viper venomous snakes – Copperhead, Western Cottonmouth, Timber Rattlesnake, and Western Pigmy Rattlesnake. The Copperhead is our most common venomous snake and inhabits every county in the state. They get their name for their coppercolored heads. Their bodies contain hourglass-shaped bands that vary in color from chestnut to dark brown to copper. They live on the forest floor and hide in dead leaves for camouflage. Hiding is their preferred method of defense. When hiking keep your dog on a short leash walking on welltrodden trails to prevent the unexpected startling of a lounging Copperhead. The Timber Rattlesnake has the second largest habitat range excluding northern Kentucky and the inner Bluegrass Region. They are also the largest variety of venomous snake in the state growing to an adult size of five feet in length. They are thick snakes that can be solid black in color or banded with a chevron-type pattern. They reside in the heavily wooded areas of western, central southern, and eastern Kentucky preferring rocky cliffs or bluffs. As with the Copperhead, use caution when hiking with your dog in the Timber Rattlesnakes territory avoiding rocky outcrops or tall grass. Most importantly, if you hear a rattle, do not approach. Leave the area in the opposite direction and never let your dog explore caves or tree stumps.

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The Western Cottonmouth, more commonly called the water moccasin, is Kentucky’s third most prevalent venomous snake and most aggressive. When agitated, the cottonmouth may gape its mouth to reveal its white, cotton-colored interior. This species resides in western Kentucky in the Jackson Purchase and Western Coalfield regions. They prefer swamps, wetlands, and lakes in warmer spring and summer months. They migrate inland during cooler months. When boating or swimming in their territory, use caution and exit the vicinity if you or your dog sees a snake swimming with its head out of the water. Nonvenomous snakes swim with their heads on the water’s surface. The Western Cottonmouth does not. The most rare species of venomous snake in Kentucky is the Western Pygmy Rattlesnake. They grow to only 1.5 feet in length and are grey in color with black spots. Their rattle is very small and sounds like a buzzing insect. They live in western Kentucky in the Land Between the Lakes region. The likelihood of a Western Pygmy Rattlesnake encounter is very low. However, if a snake bites your dog while enjoying Kentucky’s great outdoors, seek immediate medical attention. Identify the type of snake, if safe. Never allow your dog to play with a dead snake. Although deceased, the venom of a snake is still toxic. Biting a dead venomous snake could be lethal to your dog. Should your dog experience swelling, bleeding, pain, shortness of breath, weakness, low blood pressure, or dead tissue surrounding a wound after hiking or swimming in a lake, seek immediate medical attention. Check you dog for puncture wounds potentially indicating a snakebite. At the veterinary hospital, antivenim may be administered, hospitalization required, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy recommended. Although uncommon, snake bites can happen to your dog. Use caution when enjoying the outdoors with your best friend.


EQUINE

Filly of the Month: Rachel Sowinski

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Colt of the Month: Jacob West

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Horse Park Happenings

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Equine

Filly of the Month:

Rachel Sowinski Have you ever read a book that

changed your life? Maybe it offers you a perspective you never considered, or maybe it offers you clarity and purpose for which you didn’t even know you were searching...

For Rachel Sowinski that book was a children’s classic titled A Horse Called Wonder from the “Thoroughbred” series, and it opened her eyes to a magical place that she was determined to someday see for herself. Today, the Pittsburgh native has not only seen it, but is immersed in it, enjoying all the things that she read about Lexington so many years ago.

Turning Dreams into Reality For Sowinski, the trajectory of her life was set with a simple trip to the book store. “I used a Barnes & Noble gift card to buy the book when I was about 8-years-old,” she recalled. “It was the start of my love of Lexington, and since the book begins with racing and later is about sport horses, it made me a racing fan and introduced me to show jumping and eventing as well. At the time I didn’t take riding lessons, but became obsessed with doing so, eventually taking my first lessons when I was 11.” Sowinski rode throughout her childhood and eventually earned a degree in Equine Management from Bethany College in West Virginia. From there, she made her way to her personal “land of opportunity”–Lexington, Kentucky–where she landed a job working as a groom and rider for Grand Prix dressage rider/trainer Reese by Jen Roytz | Photos by Keni Parks

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Equine Koffler-Stanfield at her Maplecrest Farm and later at Walnut Hall Farm working with their foxhunters. In 2014, however, Sowinski underwent her second back surgery to repair a ruptured disk, and the experience forced her to take a serious look at her career options. “I decided that riding and grooming as a career was not a wise decision for me,” she said. “I decided to fall back on some skills I had in graphic design.”

Turning Over a New Leaf Sowinski was hired by Derek Braun to assist with marketing and event planning for his inaugural Split Rock Jumping Tour horse show series, a high-end show jumping event held several times throughout the year. “I worked there for the first three shows as a combination of graphic designer and assistant event coordinator before ultimately deciding that graphic design was the path I wanted to follow,” said Sowinski, who soon after transitioned out of her role at Split Rock and into her current position as Graphic Designer for the United States Hunter Jumper Association (USHJA), which she started in January of this year. At the USHJA, the national equestrian organization for hunters and jumpers, Sowinski creates the organization’s advertisements and marketing materials, which are featured at horse shows throughout North America, as well as their social media graphics and displays for their Wheeler Museum, an in-house museum chronicling the history of the equestrian discipline. The position is quite an accomplishment, especially for someone like Sowinski, whose design skills are self-taught through books, online classes and YouTube videos.

An Eye and a Passion When not creating works of art on her computer, Sowinski remains an avid equestrian, specializing in eventing. It was in 2015,

however, that her passion for riding morphed into a passion for equestrian photography due to an unfortunate set of circumstances. “My horse, Rebel, suffered a tendon injury at the beginning of the season that year, then an unfortunate setback in his recovery around the same time the following year,” said Sowinski. “I wanted to remain involved at the horse trials, so I started taking photos of friends who were in training with me at Team CEO Eventing as they competed.” It wasn’t long before Sowinski’s images were seen not only on friend’s Facebook pages, but in equestrian publications and websites, and her popularity as an equestrian event photographer quickly grew. While her interest in photography continued to grow, she was eager to get back in the saddle. While Rebel’s tendon injury will prevent him from competing in eventing in the future, Sowinski hopes to compete with him in dressage and enjoy riding him on trails. She also acquired a new horse, Outlaw, in August of last year and had plans to begin his eventing career this year. “Unfortunately, due to some bad luck I had an injury of my own and am sitting out the 2017 season as well,” she explained. “Photography helps ease the sting [of not competing]. My goal is always to create a piece of artwork starring my friends and their equine partners. I want my photos to rival paintings and for people to hang them on their walls as pieces of art.” While Lexington was once a far-off place she read about in books, Sowinski has made the leap most can only dream of from fantasy to reality. “I think it’s really cool that I’ve found my way to Lexington since a novel about it sparked my interest as a child,” she said. “I think it’s the most beautiful place to live. In the area I grew up, we didn’t have horses. I like that I am no longer the weird horse-crazy girl. I’ve found my people.” •

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Equine

Colt of the Month:

Jacob West by Jen Roytz | Photos by Keni Parks

Eclipse Thoroughbred Partners has quickly gained a reputation over the past decade as one of the leading Thoroughbred racing partnerships in the world, allowing their partners to enjoy the view from winner’s circles around the country and the world, including at this year’s Belmont Stakes with Tapwrit. While Eclipse Thoroughbred’s principals and partners are spread throughout the country, the newest member of their management team, Jacob West, is based in Lexington, Kentucky and will be tasked with identifying racing prospects at public auctions in both the U. S. and internationally.

An Unusual Path West’s career path in the horse industry has been anything but traditional. While many involved with Thoroughbreds are following in the footsteps of generations of family members before them, West did not get his first job working with horses until after graduating from college. “I have the most untraditional way of getting into the horse business as anyone I’ve ever met,” said West. “I graduated from school and was working as a teller for a local bank. It was when the economy was crashing and everyone thought the sky was falling and the world was coming to an end. It was as miserable of a job as I could imagine.” West had also been coaching high school baseball throughout college and after graduation and sought the advice of fellow coach and mentor Herb Hammond, who had also noticed West’s sullen demeanor as he would arrive at practice directly from his bank job. Hammond encouraged West to think about what he was truly passionate about, and that led the to a conversation about Thoroughbred racehorses. “I loved horseracing, but from the outside looking in. In college, I would go to Keeneland in the mornings to watch the workouts,” said West. “Back then I really didn’t even know how the whole racing thing worked, but I would grab coffee and watch, taking it all in.”


Hammond connected West with a former player of his, Patrick Mahan, who at the time worked at Taylor Made Sales. Mahan suggested West test his interest in a career change by working one of the horse sales. “I took my vacation time to work the 2009 January Sale. That was the year of the polar vortex and it was one of the coldest sales Keeneland ever had. Everyone was miserable, except for me. Mark Taylor [of Taylor Made Sales] asked how I liked working the sale in the brutal cold and I told him I loved it. He laughed and said, ‘If you love it now, you’ll really love it when the economy and the temperature picks back up.’”

The Chance of a Lifetime Once the sales ended, West put in his notice at the bank and began working for Taylor Made full time. Starting from the ground up as a groom, he learned the basics of horsemanship. Eventually he was promoted from groom to barn foreman, then to a divisional management position and eventually was brought into the office to work on the business side of the farm, focusing on client relations and auction purchases. He remained in the Taylor Made office for nearly five years before accepting a position at Three Chimneys Farm as their Director of Bloodstock. “I can’t say enough about Taylor Made, especially Mark Taylor. He is the key to the horseman I am today,” said West. “Leaving Taylor Made was one of the hardest things I had to do.” In his positions at both Taylor Made and Three Chimneys, West gained a following. He developed an impressive reputation for being able to identify potential talent in young Thoroughbreds, many of whom went onto race at the highest level. People were taking notice of his talent, one of which was Aron Wellman,

managing partner of Eclipse Thoroughbreds. “The Thoroughbred sales scene is kind of like a traveling circus. You see all the same people at the major sales and races all over the country. Aron and I crossed paths at the sales quite often and on more than a few occasions we were bidding against each other for the same horses,” said West. “We got to know each other and over time we talked more and more about his vision for Eclipse and my career goals. There was a lot of similarity between the two.” In July of this year, Eclipse Thoroughbred Partners announced West as their new Vice President of Bloodstock, a position that will see him helping Eclipse to recruit both new investors and elite caliber horses that will hopefully win at the highest levels globally. “This is the opportunity of a lifetime for me, and it all started with Herb pushing me to want more for myself and my career,” said West.

Unconditional Support Throughout out West’s career journey from bank teller, then groom, then bloodstock director and eventually vice president of one of the most successful Thoroughbred partnerships in horseracing history, West’s wife, Lauren–who recently opened Peplum, a clothing boutique in Chevy Chase–was by his side to help him weather the storms. “Lauren and I were dating at the time and she supported me massively when I went to Taylor Made. I was a yearling groom making minimum wage. I could barely make ends meet and a few times I questioned whether I was doing the right thing. She was there for me emotionally, financially–in every possible way. She knew I would work hard and make it to bigger and better things,” said West.•

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Horse Park Happenings

Man o’ War 5K & 10K Run/Walk

August 5 • Kentucky Horse Park Presented by UK HealthCare, this fun race winds through the park’s grounds and includes a tour of the Man o’ War exhibit. Walkers and runners of all ages will enjoy this competitive and casual event.

USEF Pony Finals

August 8 – 13 • Hunter-Jumper Complex/Walnut Ring The United States Equestrian Federation Pony Finals is a show that’s perfect for all ages! This 6-day Hunter/Jumper championship features the nation’s top ponies and riders. There are also clinics that are free and open to the public.

Bluegrass Festival Horse Show

August 15 – 20 • Hunter-Jumper Complex This 6-day Hunter/Jumper show is part of the Kentucky Horse Show 2017 series. Local riders and international riders compete (even former Olympians!) Don’t miss the 2017 International Hunter Derby Championship.

KHJA Horse Show

August 23- 27 • Rolex Stadium Also part of the Kentucky Horse Show 2017 series, this 4-day hunter/ jumper show draws local and out-of-state riders.

Labor Day Campout

August 30 – September 3 • KHP Campground During the dog days of summer, the KHP Campground is the place to be. While the park hosts the annual Bluegrass Classic Dog Show, many of the participants stay at the campground. In addition to seeing the four-legged stars, the park offers family friendly activities to campers.

Kentucky Horse Park Run/Walk Club

Mondays • Kentucky Horse Park Visitor Center Kids, joggers/strollers and leashed dogs are welcome. Check-in is between 5-8pm. Every week will feature a different variety of local craft beers, food trucks, music, vendors, yoga, information tables and horse meet-and-greets. There will also be previews of some of the Kentucky Horse Park’s many attractions. This is a free event!

Save the Date: KHP Foundation Battle in the Saddle

September 29 • Covered Arena This celebrity team penning event benefits the Kentucky Horse Park Foundation. Pairing two amateur riders with a celebrity guest rider, this event is a delight for spectators and riders alike! General admission is $10 at the door while children 12 and under get in free with the purchase of an adult ticket. Guest riders will include local media personalities, former jockeys, equine trainers and other surprise personalities! To learn more, visit khpfoundation.org •

Kentucky Horse Park Magazine:

The official visitor’s guide to the Kentucky Horse Park is coming September 21st! To learn more about getting your business in front of the park’s 800,000+ annual guests, contact advertising@topsinlex.com | 859.543.8677

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COMMUNITY

Non-profits: Profiles in Hope

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What’s New, Kentucky?

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Calendar: Lex in the City

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NON-PR OFIT S

PROFILES HOPE


Community

A M ER I C A N H EART ASSOCIATION

CINDY On November 17th, the American Heart Association will be celebrating a decade of Go Red for Women in Lexington when they host the 10th anniversary Go Red for Women Experience at the Lexington Center – Heritage Hall. Go Red for Women, nationally sponsored by Macy’s and CVS Health and locally sponsored by Kentucky One Health and Passport Health Plan, has grown exponentially over the years and has shared inspiring stories of hope with thousands of central Kentucky residents. KentuckyOne Health has been a major sponsor of the event since its beginning in Lexington, ten years ago. The Go Red for Women Luncheon in Lexington has grown in both attendance and fundraising dollars each year. It began as a small event with several hundred guests and today is a half day experience that includes informative breakout sessions, a survivor fashion show and a wonderful gourmet luncheon as well as live entertainment. Nearly 1,000 men and women attend to learn how they can become involved in the fight against women’s no. 1 killer, heart disease. The event will be chaired by Cindy Whitehouse.

(859) 492-9411 HEART.ORG/LEXINGTON

“My journey with Go Red for Women in Lexington has been uplifting,” said Whitehouse. “As an engaged business owner, nurse, mother, and wife, I’ve learned the importance of serving others and caring for myself. Go Red is an organization that gives back to our community through research, education, events, and innovation. We are building healthier lives and empowering women in the Commonwealth. I believe in Go Red because it gives us hope.” Go Red for Women is a movement that involves everyone! Cardiovascular diseases kill 1 in 3 women each year, about one women every 80 seconds. 80% of these diseases are preventable through lifestyle changes. For more information about how you can join the Go Red for Women cause or attend the 10th anniversary Go Red for Women Experience in Lexington on November 17, contact Jordan Yates at 859-317-6874 or email Jordan.yates@heart.org.

The American Heart Association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. They fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies, and provide critical tools and information to save and improve lives. The American Stroke Association was created as a division in 1997 to bring together the organization’s stroke-related activities.

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B L U EG R A S S

CARE NAVIGATORS

BESSIE You have probably heard that Hospice of the Bluegrass is now Bluegrass Care Navigators. Hospice remains at the heart of their mission, but they now guide and provide care to more people in more ways at earlier stages of serious illness. They still have the same compassion and commitment – their new name simply reflects their growing range of services. Joan Palmore Key, a Bluegrass Care Navigators board member, met her friend Bessie nearly a quarter century ago in a support group offered by Bluegrass Grief Care. “Both of our husbands had recently passed away. At the time, I was 32 and Bessie was 75. Bessie didn’t have children or any family nearby so we became great friends and we sort of adopted each other – mom and kid,” recalled Joan. Years later, Bessie was 97 and still living by herself when she experienced some small strokes and needed help. Bluegrass Extra Care came to the rescue and provided some assistance on a holiday weekend. Sadly, Bessie’s condition deteriorated and she had to go to a nursing home. (855) 492-0812 BGCARENAV.ORG

PROUDLY SPONSORED BY:

“Years ago I promised Bessie when the time came I would make sure she was able to be in her own home when she became unable to care for herself. Thanks to Bluegrass Extra Care, we were able to transition her from the nursing home to her own home. They even provided a nurse to manage her medications and monitor her health,” said Joan, adding that the extra help made it possible for Bessie to live the life she wanted. As Bessie’s health deteriorated, the Bluegrass Extra Care team suggested they consult with Bluegrass Hospice Care. “They told us about all of the additional services and support Bessie could receive. I am so glad we connected with them early on. She loves those caring for her, is comfortable and at peace in her own home, and I was able to keep my promise,” Joan explained. Bluegrass Care Navigators is committed to delivering the right combination of care for seriously ill patients – the right care at the right time at the right place.

Bluegrass Care Navigators is a national leader in delivering high quality care to the seriously ill and a pioneer in developing new programs that are responsive to the evolving needs of seriously ill patients and their families. In addition to providing hospice services in 32 counties across central, southeastern and northern Kentucky, Bluegrass Care Navigators operates Bluegrass Extra Care, Bluegrass Transitional Care, Bluegrass Palliative Care and Bluegrass Grief Care. All of these programs offer invaluable services that enhance the quality of life of patients and families.

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Community

B I A CA RE S

+

SCOTT BROOKLYN Meet Scott and Brooklyn Heideman. The Heideman’s have just been named successful candidates for the third “Home for a Veteran” to be built by BIA Cares, the non-profit arm of the Building Industry Association of Central Kentucky. The new 2 story, 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath home is currently being built on Walcot Way in the Coventry Subdivision and will soon be ready for occupancy. The Heideman’s are pictured choosing paint colors for their new home!

(859) 273-5117 BIACENTRALKY.COM

Scott served in the U.S. Army straight out of high school. Separating from Service in August 2016, Scott currently is a full-time student working on a double major in preparation for becoming a local business owner. Professionally, Brooklyn is a cardiopulmonary technician. She also volunteers at the Thompson Hood Veterans Center in Wilmore, KY, assisting with events for the Veterans, such as outings to Keeneland, cookouts, or just spending one-on-one time. Scott and Brooklyn met in middle school at Fort Campbell, KY where both of their fathers were stationed at the time. Considering themselves Army brats, moving around often has always been a way of life and therefore, the opportunity to have a “home” is a dream come true for both of them. BIA Cares does more than just build homes for Veterans. In the past four years, over 1000 Kentucky Military Families have experienced a Christmas they would not have had with the help of the “Operation Military Cheer” toy and clothing drive, in partnership with the KY National Guard. Families in our community with special needs have received repairs and renovations on their homes to make them more accessible and easier to live in.

PROUDLY SPONSORED BY: BIAcares strives to build a better future through active participation in community service projects that support and promote the physical, emotional, and social well-being of Kentucky families. “Enriching Lives, One Project at a Time.”

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Community

B L U EG R A S S RAP E C R I S I S C ENTE R

COURTNEY Courtney Straw examines justice every day. She currently serves as a prosecutor in Louisville handling domestic violence and child abuse cases. “Utilizing resources in the community and the ability to make choices to be safe and move on with your life – for survivors these are components of justice,” Straw says. Courtney shares this message with law enforcement. “We lead a training with law enforcement and campus public safety on the impacts of trauma and we give them the tools for trauma informed interview techniques. First responders serve a key role,” Straw says. Before Straw was a prosecutor she was a client at BRCC. Straw says, “I was a victim. My case wasn’t investigated the way it should have been. I knew that law enforcement could do better.” Courtney received crisis counseling with BRCC after she experienced sexual violence, and later when she needed more support she joined BRCC’s equine group therapy program. “The relationship with the horses allowed me to heal in ways that would have never been possible in a traditional group setting,” Straw says. This allowed Courtney to move from victim to survivor. She now harnesses her story to make an impact during training.

(855) 253-2511 BLUEGRASSRAPECRISIS.ORG

“I’ll never forget the officers’ faces at the first training. After we took them through my hypothetical scenario, I revealed that it is my story. When I saw the look on their faces, I saw it click,” says Straw. After partnering with BRCC to improve advocacy and education, Courtney joined the agency’s Board of Directors. “BRCC is building momentum and I believe in the direction we are going. BRCC does so much more than just crisis counseling,” Straw says.

PROUDLY SPONSORED BY:

Straw was emboldened by her experience to become a prosecutor; her story has brought her full circle. She is now returning to Lexington to join Fogle Keller Walker PLLC this summer. “My heart has remained in the bluegrass. This opportunity allows me to expand my work with BRCC. Much of this work has been about collaborations and I am excited to see what collaborations can grow out of my work with FKW.”

Founded in 1974, the mission of the Bluegrass Rape Crisis Center is to eradicate sexual violence through counseling, advocacy, and education in the 17 counties of the Bluegrass Region. BRCC provides comprehensive services to individuals directly or indirectly impacted by all forms of sexual violence, including human trafficking. The BRCC provides a 24-hour crisis line, counseling, medical accompaniment, legal advocacy, psycho-educational groups, long-term psychotherapy, and prevention and awareness education.

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Community

THE FOSTER CARE COUNCIL

JODY This is Jody, a Lexington foster child that was severely struggling in the classroom until the Foster Care Council’s Education Advancement Program provided him with a tutor. Jody has shown tremendous improvement in his reading and writing since the tutoring started. He went from barely reading children’s books to reading grade level chapter books. “He showed very little confidence in himself in the beginning but slowly progressed to feeling very comfortable asking questions in the classroom,” explained Jody’s tutor. “He still has more to work on and achieve but he is doing well and has greater confidence in himself. He’s going to continue to work hard and will progress in school, graduate and not become a statistic; we’ll all make sure of that!” Jody has always had a passion for music and he desperately wanted to learn to play the guitar. The FCC’s Enrichment program agreed to help make that dream come true. The program provides funding so a child can pursue his or her passion, whether it’s music, sports, the arts or summer camps. They provided Jody with a guitar and lessons. A local musician, Rhyan Sinclair, even came and played a few cords with Jody to get him started. Both Jody and his foster mom had huge tears in their eyes when he received this amazing gift. Being able to pursue a passion truly helps children in foster care cope and begin to heal.

(239) 248-7699 THEFOSTERCARECOUNCIL.COM

PROUDLY SPONSORED BY:

Cassie Slone, Executive Director of the FCC, began the organization upon learning that foster children in our community were not being sufficiently funded to pursue their passions or to get extra academic help when needed. “Foster children deserve a chance to a have a normal childhood,” Cassie explained. “FCC continuously advocates for local foster children, like Jody, through intense community involvement and by seeking resources that support opportunities for normal growth and development.”

The Foster Care Council was founded in 2012 by Cassie Slone, a Tates Creek and UK graduate, with the sole purpose and passion of helping our local at-risk children persevere. The Foster Care Council believes in providing every foster child with the opportunity of a brighter future. They pay for children to attend summer camp, participate in enrichment activities and most importantly they provide individualized tutoring to a foster child not testing on grade level. They strive to provide these precious children with the opportunity to become strong healthy adults and not another statistic.

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Community

G O D’ S P A NT RY FOOD BANK

LITTLE LADY She was one person among the 170 families who were fed that day. But she was unforgettable. God’s Pantry Food Bank had unloaded more than 16,000 pounds of fresh produce and bakery products in the parking lot and invited the neighborhood families to come help themselves. Cucumbers, corn, tomatoes, watermelon, potatoes, onions, squash, cabbage and watermelon were bagged and lugged to waiting cars by grateful kids, seniors and families. One tiny, white-haired lady scanned the bounty there for the taking. She was hungry, but she had a problem. It was a hot July day and she had just walked a long way to get the food her aching stomach and empty cupboards told her she needed. Approaching a helper she let them know she was hungry, but could only take as much as she could carry since she was “on foot” nearly three miles from home. That watermelon, head of cabbage and bag of potatoes were needed, but would be impossible to tote that distance.

(859) 255-6592 GODSPANTRYFOODBANK.ORG

PROUDLY SPONSORED BY:

A volunteer couple offered her a ride home and told her to load up on whatever she needed. Soon the trunk of the volunteer’s car was filled with healthy vegetables, fruit and bread. During the five minute drive to her tiny house at the edge of the cemetery, she shared her circumstances. She received a disability check for about $700 monthly plus $16 in food stamps. Her rent was $350 a month and she had a large monthly medical expense. After utilities, there was very little left for groceries. It was the middle of the month and there was very little cash left when she heard of the produce distribution so close to her home, and yet so far. Compelled by her hunger, she made her way to receive help on foot, figuring she would only receive what she could carry. As she stood on her porch among bags of garden fresh food and staples, she thanked her volunteer drivers, thrilled she had nutritious food to eat and to share.

The mission of God’s Pantry Food Bank is to reduce hunger in Kentucky through community cooperation making the best possible use of all available resources.

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Community

H OP E CE NT E R

CHRIS When Chris was 33 years old, he was in a car accident that hurt his shoulder very badly. Before then, Chris lived a normal life like most people. He worked every day, paid taxes, owned a house and a car. He had good relationships and never used drugs. “After surgery, the doctors prescribed pain medication. I took them normally for two years, then both of my parents became ill. I took off work to care for them, and watched helplessly as they died within months of each other,” he recalled. Chris began taking more pills to cope, and got to a point where all he cared about was getting high. “The worst part was that my son no longer wanted to have anything to do with me,” he said. Chris slept in the Hope Center emergency shelter for six months. After his third time through detox, two of the counselors helped him find the courage to enter into the Recovery Program of his own will. “This program has taught me to recognize when I am doing something harmful to myself or my family, how to cope with my emotions and learn from my mistakes. I know I can become a functioning member of society again,” Chris said. Today Chris is a peer mentor, and is teaching his first class about learning to deal with resentments, fears and harms to self and others. He is two weeks from being one year sober. “I’m working to pass my DOT physical so I can renew my CDL and start driving professionally again. My son actually called me for fatherly advice!” Chris expressed. (859) 252-7881 HOPECTR.ORG

“It feels really good to live an honest life. I want others to know that no matter what you have done, living clean and being around positive people can change your life. I found hope here in the Recovery Program,” Chris said.

PROUDLY SPONSORED BY:

Since 1993, the Hope Center mission has stayed the same: to care for homeless and at-risk persons by providing life-sustaining and life-rebuilding services that are comprehensive and address underlying causes. The Hope Center is not just a homeless shelter, but a comprehensive group of programs designed to get the homeless off the streets and keep them off. The root causes of homelessness vary widely. Each person who enters the Hope Center’s doors is unique, and in need of a unique set of resources. The goal is to provide each of them with the tools they need to rebuild their lives.

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Community

K E N T U CK Y

EQ U I NE H U MAN E CE N T E R

ANNORA

(239) 881-5849 KYEHC.ORG

Annora is a lovely young Thoroughbred mare who had a bright future as a racehorse. She had been practicing hard and even had a few timed workouts at the track. Unfortunately, due to circumstances beyond her control, she never made it to a race. She was subjected to neglect and abandonment by her owner/trainer and her future started to look dim. Would she starve? Would she ever enjoy the comforts of a good owner and loving care or would she slowly fade from this world, tucked away on the remote farm where she lived with 42 other unfortunate abandoned horses? Thankfully, The Kentucky Equine Humane Center (KyEHC) stepped in and rescued Annora from a very uncertain fate. Upon arrival Annora was in desperate need of rehabilitation due to overall body soreness, lameness, and neglect. Luckily, The KyEHC takes in horses that need extensive rehabilitation. Thanks to the fantastic staff, and access to top veterinarians at Park Equine Hospital, Rood & Riddle Equine Hospital, and Haygard Equine Medical Institute, as well as equine chiropractors; Annora recovered and was ready to begin her re-training. The trainer at the KyEHC, Olivia, saw so much promise in Annora that she entered her in the 2017 Thoroughbred Makeover, where her talents will be showcased. Annora will show that great feats can be accomplished when you give a chance to a horse in need. After the completion of The Thoroughbred Makeover, Annora will be available for adoption into her new, forever home. Annora is now strong, healthy, safe, and her future has never looked brighter!

PROUDLY SPONSORED BY:

The goal of the Kentucky Equine Humane Center is to Help, Heal, and re-Home horses of allbreeds in Kentucky. Their mission is to provide humane treatment and shelter while working to seek adoptive homes and provide second chances for Kentucky’s equines, regardless of breed; to educate the public and raise awareness for responsible equine ownership so that fewer horses end up in crisis; to work with and serve as a model for organizations with the same mission in other states; to save America’s equines from inhumane treatment.

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Community

K ENT U C K Y G U I L D O F A RT I ST S & C RAF T S ME N

BETHANY Bethany Butters of Steam-Bee Pottery is the new Artist in Residence at the Kentucky Guild of Artists & Craftsmen! Bethany joined the Guild in February 2017, making her one of the newest members. The KGAC “artists in residence” program is for artists who want to become a part of the art community, in Berea and surrounding artisan areas of the Commonwealth. The KGAC has worked with approximately 15 artists, over the past few years and many have already established their own businesses in the art world. Bethany describes the inspiration for her work as, “an integration between both the industrial history and the vibrant nature in Kentucky by reflecting the textures and colors found in old rivers, industrial parks, coal mines, and the vibrant shades of the hillsides. It is an ode to the hard workers both human and inhuman, the steam mechanics and the bees.” As a first-year student enrolled in Ceramics 101, Bethany had no experience with ceramics. After falling in love with the idea of functional art, she continued to learn about ceramics and grow as an artist. Bethany’s favorite piece was created her senior year after an inspiring trip to Japan; “it’s very personal, a culmination of my experience in Japan with its stacked lantern form, which I saw a lot of in historical Japanese architecture, and my proud Kentucky heritage with the dogwood blossom adornments.”

(859) 986-3192 KYGUILD.ORG

Bethany can now be found on Saturdays and Mondays at the Kentucky Guild Gallery, where people of all ages can enjoy watching her work! When asked why she was interested in joining the Kentucky Guild of Artists & Craftsmen, Bethany said, “I love being in a community of artists; I can gain meaningful connections and experiences, I really think it will help my growth as an artist. I’m also so excited to have a space to share the process of my work and even teach classes in the Kentucky Guild Visual Arts Academy!” The KGAC Visual Arts Academy, which started in 2015, provides a learning experience for those who want to learn the techniques of their art or trade. This new academy hosts classes April through November that teach beginning to advanced skills, in hopes to encourage the next generation of artisans to carry on the rich and historic history of the premier, state-wide, visual arts movement right here in Kentucky.

The mission of the Kentucky Guild of the Artists and Craftsmen, Inc. is “to establish art and craft, as a vital influence, by promoting excellence through education, collaboration, leadership and service” throughout the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

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This year brings the Kentucky Guild of Artists and Craftsmen to its 56th birthday. The organization, along with its countless supporters in the local community and their 350+ artists, is still holding true to its original mission: to establish art and craft as a vital influence by promoting excellence through education, collaboration, leadership and service. The guild was established as a non profit in 1961 when Former Governor Bert T. Combs, the guild’s first president, Lester Pross, and an enamellist from Louisville, Virginia Minish, helped with the acquisition of two train cars from the L&N Railroad, which became known as “The Kentucky Guild Train” in 1961. Traveling the rails and being dropped in communities across the Commonwealth of Kentucky, the community and students from the surrounding area could come to the train cars to observe fine artworks and craft demonstration. They were taught how to make products and instructed the techniques, of making all the visual art mediums. Later, in 1966, the “guild train” movement brought the people, in these art communities, of the

Commonwealth, together and organized co-ops for the artists, to sell their work to the public. Many became members of the Kentucky Guild of Artists and Craftsmen. The “guild train” travelled all over the state with the L & N Railroad until 1967. In 1967, the KGAC held its first spring and fall fairs at the Historic Indian Fort Theatre in Berea. The Fall Fair, which is still held at the fort on the second full weekend of October, will be celebrating 50 years of fine art and crafts this year. The event gives guild artists the opportunity to sell and market their artisan goods and works while connecting the public with the beautiful products and the artisans who create them. For over half a century, the Kentucky Guild of Artists and Craftsmen has stayed true to their mission by following in the footsteps and traditions of those who came before and creating a path for future generations who will carry on the mission into the future. To learn more about the Kentucky Guild Visual Arts Academy or to help support their mission, visit kyguild.org or call 859.986.3192.


Community

L E X I N GT O N

H E A RI NG

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SP EE C H

CE N T E R

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TRAVIS LILLIAN “We love Lexington Hearing & Speech Center (LHSC)! You couldn’t ask for a better place for a child to go if they have hearing loss. Everyone at LHSC is familiar with the challenges associated with hearing loss. They teach and nurture each child.” Lillian’s parents brought her to LHSC when she was nine months old after being diagnosed with mild to moderate hearing loss. Audiologist, Dr. Miller, evaluated Lillian and talked with her family about her diagnosis, options for hearing amplification, and early intervention services offered by LHSC for children with hearing loss. At one year of age, Lillian was fit with her first set of hearing aids and enrolled into the LHSC Early Learning Center. Lillian remained in school at LHSC until she graduated in 2016 and continues to receive audiology services. With early detection and intervention through hearing amplification, and her language enriched school and family lifestyle, Lillian never needed the speech/language therapy services also offered by LHSC. At one of Lillian’s audiology appointments, Travis talked about issues he was having understanding speech. Travis was in law enforcement for many years and wondered if this lifestyle affected his hearing. At the time Travis was unaware LHSC provided audiology services for adults, which serves hundreds of adults a year across the community. Travis had a hearing evaluation at LHSC and results showed a high frequency hearing loss in both ears. Travis noticed immediate results after he was fit with his hearing aids. “After I got them, I walked through the grass and heard it crunching under my feet. I teared up because I had not heard those sounds in such a long time.” (859) 268-4545 LHSCKY.ORG

PROUDLY SPONSORED BY:

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Today, Lillian and Travis continue to come to LHSC for their audiology services. “LHSC has provided a foundation for Lillian’s lifelong success and have made a tremendous difference in my ability to do my job and communicate effectively with family and coworkers. I can’t thank them enough for everything they have done for our family!”

Lexington Hearing & Speech Center is a non-profit organization with a mission of teaching children with hearing loss and speech/language delays to listen and talk. LHSC provides education services for children 6 weeks of age through Kindergarten, speech/language therapy, and audiology services. The LHSC audiology team provides full family healthcare for the community with a motto of helping individuals with hearing loss from twinkle to wrinkle. With the help of the community, LHSC is able to ensure that no child or adult is ever defined by their communication delay and will have a sound beginning.


Community

LEXIN G TON PU BLIC LIBRAR Y

CARLOS It’s a tradition generations old: students going to the library after school to do their homework. That tradition has taken a new form as dozens of volunteers at two branches of the Lexington Public Library help scores of students from 4:30 to 7 pm every Monday through Thursday when school is in session. The program, simply called Homework Help, began six years ago at the Village Branch, where as many as 60 students receive assistance each day. With funds from KentuckyOne Health, the library was able to continue Homework Help at Village last school year and expand the program with the same schedule at the Northside Branch. At the Village Branch, many of the students who seek homework assistance come from Spanishspeaking homes and need extra help to start learning in English. For Carlos, an eighth grader at Lexington Traditional Magnet School, Homework Help meant the difference between repeating sixth grade or moving on to seventh grade.

(859) 231-5500 LEXPUBLIB.ORG

“When I entered sixth grade, it was a lot more difficult than I had expected. I started to go back to Homework Help and my teacher got surprised by it. It started to make me motivated,” he said. “When there’s someone there to help, I feel like I really do matter. In addition to Homework Help, God’s Pantry’s Kids Cafe program provides snacks prior to Homework Help sessions at both Village and Northside, from 3:30 to 4:30 pm. Teachers say they see the difference in the students who attend Homework Help. Librarians hope students who come for Homework Help will come back to the library at other times, making library visits a regular part of their lives. Keeping the program going requires recruiting more than a hundred volunteers. Adults interested in volunteering should contact the library at rcallen@lexpublib.org.

Lexington Public Library connects people, inspires ideas, and transforms lives. Seven days a week at six locations throughout town, the Library serves as the community’s meeting place, a place where people can keep reading, keep learning, keep doing, and keep growing. There’s Homework Help for students and Job Help for job seekers. There’s a makerspace for crafters and a makerspace for tech geeks. There’s story times for preschoolers and computer classes for seniors. There’s something for everyone at the Lexington Public Library. You can help fund the Lexington Public Library’s endeavors here lexpublib.org/foundation.

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Community

L EX I NG T O N R ES C U E M I S SI O N

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ALFRED ALESIA Alfred and Alesia worked hard all their lives. Growing up on farms, they were used to long days and little “down time.” As a married couple, they liked taking on jobs together, whether it was highway flagging or long-haul trucking. So when Alfred’s leg was amputated last year, it dramatically changed their lives, leaving him in a wheelchair, with no income, and with only their pick-up truck to call home. Not knowing where to turn for help, they came back to the Lexington Rescue Mission. Years ago, they had come to the Mission for help. “We needed gas, and Abigail took us to the gas station to fill up our tank,” Alfred said of Abigail, who worked here at the time. “We became friends. We started eating together, going to church together, praying together.” They had lost touch when they started driving a truck again, but then Alfred had the scare of his life last summer. He fell headfirst out of his freight truck with his foot caught under the pedal. The fall left him unconscious, and he was rushed to the hospital, where doctors said he had lost feeling in his leg due to gangrene, a side effect of his diabetes. While Alfred was in the hospital, Alesia stayed in a motel, turning over the freight truck they had been living in. Eventually, he was moved to a nursing home for physical therapy. By the time he was released, most of their money was spent, and it wasn’t long before they were living out of their pick-up truck. (859) 381-9600 LEXINGTONRESCUE.ORG

PROUDLY SPONSORED BY:

Being in a wheelchair added to the stress of homelessness. “It was hard to find a bathroom,” Alfred said. “She’d have to take me to Wal-Mart in the middle of the night just to go to the bathroom.” When they came back to the Mission, they found Abigail had moved, but Erica, our social worker, was ready to help. She worked with the Social Security office so they could start receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), and she began helping them search for an affordable apartment. Once they found a place to live, she was able to assist them with their rent. “She helped us get off the street to where we can rent our own place,” Alfred said. Today, they are working on making a budget…for the first time in their lives. “It’s above me,” he said. “We always worked so we never lived on a budget. I was telling Erica all we spent our money on this month, and after food and everything, we’re still $500 short. But she’s going to help us.” Because of your support, Alfred and Alesia had a place to turn when they had lost everything. Your gifts made it possible to help them move from homelessness to housing…and to keep their home!

The Lexington Resuce Mission exists to serve and glorify God through Christ-centered ministry that meets the physical, emotional and spiritual needs of people that are hurting in the greater Lexington area.

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Community

OP E RA T I O N J OY

RACHEL “A child’s joy is contagious. It is the best feeling in the world. It cannot be described with words nor is it a tangible object that can be shared. You just have to feel it for yourself,” said Andrea Greathouse on describing the drive behind her donation. Andrea, in collaboration with Josh Bowen and Andrew Clark, personal trainers with Aspire Fitness have established Operation Joy, a non-profit dedicated to purchasing therapy bikes for children in Central Kentucky so all children can experience this everyday miracle. Therapy bikes typically cost $700-$3,000 depending on the specific needs of the child. Operation Joy contacted Shriners Hospitals for Children Lexington after watching a news story on a Louisiana resident who builds therapy bikes to the specific needs of children with disabilities. Andrea was moved to tears and immediately decided that she would donate a therapy bike to experience a child’s joy of no longer being limited by their condition. Therapists at Lexington Shriners Hospital suggested that Operation Joy donate the bike to Rachel Napier. Rachel, a recent high school graduate, has cerebral palsy and has been a patient of the hospital for many years. She has spent countless hours receiving therapy and utilizing a therapy bike during sessions. “Rachel has wanted this since second grade and I’m so excited to give it to her. The wait has been too long”, says Andrea.

(859) 519-6542 OPERATIONJOYINC@GMAIL.COM

Therapy bicycles allow children with limited mobility to experience the joy and freedom of bike riding while providing a safe way to exercise and increase muscle strength and tone. “Rachel’s enthusiasm and appreciation for the bike is heartwarming. She has told me on numerous occasions that the bike has improved her overall health and wellbeing,” Andrea said. Rachel has dropped 3 dress sizes since receiving her bike. “My dream is to never stop giving. Our organization is not doing this for recognition or publicity. We are only doing this to give back and experience a child’s joy,” said Andrea.

PROUDLY SPONSORED BY: Aspire Fitness was built on community service and charity involvement. From their inception in 2014, Aspire has raised nearly $100,000 for local and national charities. In 2016, Aspire with collaboration with a client, Andrea Greathouse, decided to start their own charity, Operation Joy. The idea came from Andrea’s service heart when she saw a similar charity in Michigan and wanted to do something for Central Kentucky. Operation Joy is a charity serving the community by buying specialty bikes for children with special conditions to keep them active and spreading joy to them.

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Community

SU RG E RY O N SU ND A Y

MARTIN Martin is a chef at a local restaurant and often works 12-14 hours per day, sometimes unable to take a break. He wasn’t able to perform his job 100% because it was painful for him to stand at times and he always had it in the back of his mind, wondering what was wrong with him. He admits “the worry was often worse than the pain.” Without health insurance, he lived with the condition for almost a year but was eventually diagnosed in early 2017 with an inguinal hernia. When a co-worker told him about Surgery on Sunday, he had the Salvation Army clinic where he was diagnosed refer him to the program. Martin acknowledges that when he was first referred to Surgery on Sunday, he was nervous about getting the news of “how bad everything was going to be.” But, he says, “as soon as I met Dr. Kearney, he took all my worries away. He was so confident and positive about the procedure that I knew I was in great hands.” Dr. Paul Kearney, a volunteer surgeon who also serves as Surgery on Sunday’s board chair, operated on Martin in June and Martin’s life was changed. “The worry is gone, the pain is gone, and I’m back!” he replies when asked how he feels now. He can now move around normally again and not worry about picking things up, possibly worsening the hernia, and needing a visit to the emergency room.

(859) 246-0046 SURGERYONSUNDAY.ORG

Martin is so grateful to Surgery on Sunday and says “the whole experience was professional from start to finish” and that the volunteer staff was so welcoming and caring that he felt like he was with family. “I have been so blessed with finding this organization. My guardian angel has definitely been putting in overtime.” He is so appreciative that he has offered his culinary skills to serve lunch to Surgery on Sunday volunteers on surgery days.

Surgery on Sunday was created for people just like Martin and it is an honor each day to care for patients like him.

Surgery on Sunday is a not-for-profit organization that provides outpatient essential surgical services at no cost to income eligible, uninsured or under-insured individuals who are not eligible for federal or state assistance.

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Community

T H U R S DA Y ’ S CHILD

RIDGE FAMILY Ken and Loralee Ridge are not exactly sure when their familial goal changed from “having a family” to building one. They married in 1982 and had what some view as the ideal household by 1988. “Yes, we had a daughter, son, a cat and a dog. Yet, somehow we knew two children were not a full house for us,” said Loralee. At some point in the few years following the birth of their second child, they attended an informational meeting to explore adoption. This was based on a desire to provide a family for additional children, knowing there were, and still are, children waiting for families. “While not the case for everyone, we simply felt there was no need to have more children when we could adopt children who had a desire to be part of a family they could call their own...forever,” Loralee recalled.

(859) 361-8827 HURSDAYSCHILDKY.ORG

PROUDLY SPONSORED BY:

The 20-plus years since that first meeting have been full ones indeed. Instead of only adopting, the Ridge family made the decision to foster as well. Fostering has its unique set of challenges because many children won their hearts and were later reunited with their birth families, leaving Ken and Loralee with hearts that needed to mend. Of the children with whom they shared a home through fostering, seven became part of their family forever. “Thanks to Thursday’s Child and the integral part they play in the Foster and Adoptive Parents of Lexington support group, we have been able to remain balanced and informed as we navigate this roller coaster we call parenting,” Loralee said. Parenting is much like a world-class roller coaster. This applies to parenting biological children, children who have been in foster care, and adopted children. The ride includes joy, thrills, plummets, curves, and much anticipation. “When we finish the ride, unbuckle the seat belt, and step off, we find ourselves saying, “‘I would definitely do that again!’” shared Loralee.

In September, 1989, a need was filled to support the waiting children in Kentucky’s Special Needs Adoption Program by creating Thursday’s Child, Inc., a non-profit 501(c)(3). Board members are volunteers allowing all funds to be dedicated to supporting the waiting children. The Board’s mission is to recruit adoptive parents; support waiting children; and provide postadoption support. Thursday’s Child is blessed to have filled many needs; foster youth graduation celebrations, Christmas gifts, clothing requests and scholarships. However, their biggest challenges remain, finding special homes for special children. Fortunately, there are many caring people looking to make a “Forever Family” with a waiting child.

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Community

W OO D FO RD H U MA NE SO CIE TY

PUNCHY The first year of Punchy’s life is a mystery, but one thing’s for sure: his life changed forever in February of 2016 when he arrived at Woodford Humane. Punchy is a young, energetic Rottweiler with big, brown puppy dog eyes and a bottomless appetite for squeaky toys. At first glance, his 98-pound frame may seem intimidating; but spend even a few minutes with him and you’ll discover that he’s a goofy, sensitive, oversized lapdog. He loves long walks and tearing around the yard at top speed. His favorite game is tug-o-war, and he usually wins.

(859) 873-5491 WOODFORDHUMANE.ORG

PROUDLY SPONSORED BY:

Back in the winter of 2016, Punchy was the same sweet, silly dog at heart, but physically his life was very different. He came to Woodford Humane Society after being found as a stray in Woodford County; when he was picked up, he couldn’t walk. His hind legs had so little mobility that, initially, he was thought to be the victim of a hit-and-run. But after a visit to the VCA Woodford Animal Hospital, the staff at Woodford Humane received some very different news: at just one and a half years old, Punchy had such severe hip dysplasia that he would require a full hip replacement on at least one hip. Hip replacement is not a common surgery for dogs, and is almost unheard of for humane societies. But Woodford Humane operates on the notion every pet deserves a second chance – and in temperament and personality, Punchy was as good a dog as they come. A year and two months after his arrival, after countless consultations, x-rays, exams, and therapy sessions, Punchy traveled to Ohio State University and received a brand new titanium hip. During his carefully-controlled recovery, Woodford Humane Society staff kept him comfortable and safe, monitored his progress, and best of all, helped him find his footing again. In June of 2017, Punchy’s time at Woodford Humane came to an end. During his recovery, he stole the hearts of the family that would adopt him; and now, the dog who couldn’t walk is running things in his forever home.

The Woodford Humane Society is a non-profit animal adoption center in Versailles, Kentucky that maintains an annual placement rate of over 93% and places no time limit on any animal in its care. Woodford Humane receives no government funding at any level, relying entirely on private donations to fund the housing, veterinary care, and all other needs of the animals in our care. Every year, approximately 1000 dogs, cats, and other pets depend on Woodford Humane for a safe, happy, healthy temporary home.

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G et

Involved wi th More Loca l Non-P rof its

ABLE, INC (Assisting Better Living Everywhere) 3175 Custer Drive #302, Lexington, KY 40517 (859) 684-9611 ablemission.org

Church Under the Bridge Corner of 4th and MLK Blvd. 125 Clay Ave, Lexington, KY 40502 (859) 533-0380 churchunderthebridge.net

Restore people’s spirit, confidence and belief in their own abilities with the help we provide.

Come together in downtown Lexington to love God and our neighbors through food and worship.

AIDS Volunteers, Inc. (AVOL) 365 Waller Avenue, Suite 100 Lexington, KY 40504 (859) 225-3000 x26 avolky.org

Creative Alliance for Arts Education, Inc. 635 Gingermill Lane, Lexington, KY 40509 (859) 321-2559 creativealli.com

Collaborate with communities to stop the spread of HIV and empower those affected.

Help build stronger arts foundations for kids through community collaboration.

The ALS Association Kentucky Chapter 8640 Haines Drive, Suite F, Florence, KY 41042 (859) 331-1384 alsaky.org

Down Syndrome Association of Central Kentucky 1050 Chinoe Rd., Suite 204 Lexington, KY 40502 (859) 494-7809 dsack.org

Discover treatments and a cure for ALS, and serve, advocate for, and empower people affected by ALS to live their lives to the fullest.

Bluegrass Opera PO Box 910527, Lexington, KY 40591 (859) 940-9379 bluegrassopera.org Present new and challenging musical theater works for enthusiastic audiences.

Bluegrass Youth Ballet 1595 Mercer Road, Suite 150 Lexington, KY 40511 (859) 271-4472 bluegrassyouthballet.org Engage and Inspire youth by providing access to the art of dance throughout our community.

Carnegie Center for Literacy & Learning 251 West Second St., Lexington, KY 40507 (859) 254-4175 carnegiecenterlex.org Empower people to explore and express their voices.

Children's Law Center 215 W. Short Street, Ste. 205 Lexington, KY 40507 (859) 253-3353 childrenslawky.org Protect children’s rights and help them overcome barriers and transition into adulthood and self-advocate.

Chrysalis House, Inc. 1589 Hill Rise Dr., Lexington, KY 40504 (859) 977-2502 chrysalishouse.org Support women and their families in recovery from alcohol and other drugs.

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Celebrate and support people with Down syndrome and their families and educate ourselves and others throughout Central and Eastern Kentucky.

Dress for Success Lexington, Inc. 1165 Centre Parkway, Suite 100 Lexington, KY 40517 (859) 231-7848 lexington.dressforsuccess.org Empower women and changes their lives - every day!

FoodChain, Inc 501 W Sixth St, Suite 105, Lexington, KY 40508 (859) 428-8380 foodchainlex.org Forge links between our community and fresh food with education and demonstration of sustainable food systems.

Girls on the Run Central Kentucky 446 E High St Suite 130, Lexington, KY 40507 (859) 619-9796 gotrcentralky.org Inspire girls to be healthy, joyful and self-confident using a program that integrates running.

God's Closet PO Box 34001, Lexington, KY 40588 (859) 533-1945 godscloset.org Provide women with career assistance and professional clothing to gain adequate employment and achieve selfsufficiency.

GreenHouse17 PO Box 55190, Lexington, KY 40555-5190 24-hour Crisis Line: (800) 544-2022 GreenHouse17.org Committed to ending intimate partner abuse in families and our community. Nurturing lives harmed in 17 central Kentucky counties.

Growing Together Preschool, Inc. 599 Lima Drive, Lexington, KY 40511 (859) 255-4056 growingtogetherpreschool.org Provide children of varying abilities and advantages with safe, nurturing care and the foundation for school and life readiness in an inclusive environment.

Headley-Whitney Museum of Art 4435 Old Frankfort Pike, Lexington, KY 40510 (859) 255-6653 headley-whitney.org Foster knowledge, enjoyment and the appreciation of the decorative and fine arts.

Jubilee Jobs of Lexington 1450 N Broadway, Lexington, KY 40505 (859) 977-0135 jubileejobsoflexington.org Offer hope to those who desire to work through job search education, job placement and ongoing career support.

Kentucky CancerLink, Inc. 2425 Regency Rd Ste B, Lexington, KY 40503 (859) 309-1700 kycancerlink.org Reduce and/or remove barriers to screening, diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

Kentucky Horse Park Foundation, Inc. 4037 Iron Works Parkway, Suite 180 Lexington KY 40511 (859) 255-5727 khpfoundation.org Enhance, expand and improve the Kentucky Horse Park.

Lactation Improvement Network of Kentucky, Inc. PO Box 1, Harrodsburg, KY 40330 (859) 576-1062 breastfeedkentucky.com Make breastfeeding easier for all Kentuckians.

Legal Aid of the Bluegrass 300 East Main St., Ste. 110 Lexington, KY 40507 (859) 233-4556 lablaw.org Resolve important problems of low-income and other vulnerable people by providing high quality civil legal assistance.

Lexington Catholic High School 2250 Clays Mill Road, Lexington KY 40503 (859) 277-7183 lexingtoncatholic.com Serve students of all faith traditions by providing a high quality Catholic college preparatory education that fosters the spiritual ideals and moral values of the Gospel. Nurture the development of the mind, spirit, and body of our students.


Lexington Chamber Orchestra 3326 Wood Valley Court, Lexington, KY 40502 (501) 339-6050 lexingtonchamberorchestra.com Call people into higher awareness and deeper community through the beauty of chamber music.

Lexington Humane Society 1600 Old Frankfort Pike, Lexington, KY 40504 (859) 233-0044 AdoptLove.net Advocate the compassionate treatment of animals and promote adoption as the best option when searching for a new pet.

Lexington Pride Festival 389 Waller Ave, Suite 100, Lexington KY 40504 (859) 253-3233 lexpridefest.org Raise funds for the Pride Community Services Organization; work to improve the lives of people in the LGBTQ* communities.

Lyric Theatre & Cultural Arts Center 300 East Third Street, Lexington, KY 40508 (859) 280-2201 lexingtonlyric.com Provide high quality, accessible arts, music, and educational programming to the Lexington community.

Making A Difference Now (MADN) (859) 559-2466 madnky.org Help homeless, abandoned, feral animals, the volunteers/organizations that serve them; support other organizations with similar goals; advocate for animals everywhere.

Military Missions, Inc. 3650 Boston Rd, Suite 138 Lexington, KY 40514 (859) 221-9477 Military-Missions.org Support and honor deployed military personnel by sending care packages year-round as an expression of appreciation and gratitude.

Miss Kentucky Scholarship Organization 251 Chippen Dale Circle #1133 Lexington, KY 40517 (859) 420-6193 misskentuckypageant.com The Miss Kentucky Scholarship Organization is a nonprofit scholarship program and the state preliminary of the largest scholarship organization for women in the world, the Miss America Organization.

Mitchell Family Foundation 499 E High Street, Suite 112 Lexington, KY 40507 (859) 225-3343 mitchellfamily-foundation.org

New Beginnings, Bluegrass, Inc. 225 Walton Avenue, Suite 120 Lexington, KY 40502 (859) 245-2400 newbeginningsbg.org Improve the lives of individuals with serious mental illness by providing quality, recovery-based housing and support services.

Newton's Attic 4974 Old Versailles Road, Lexington, KY 40510 (859) 368-7334 NewtonsAttic.org Provide STEM resources to parents, students and teachers. Stimulate interest in science &engineering through exciting hands-on projects, classes & summer camps.

Pride Community Services Organization 389 Waller Avenue, Suite 100 Lexington, KY 40504 (859) 253-3233 pcsoky.org

The Aviation Museum of Kentucky 1029 Airport Road, Lexington, KY 40510 (859) 231-1219 aviationky.org Serve the Commonwealth with dynamic aerospace education programs; promote the state’s aviation industry; and serve as Kentucky’s focal point for the presentation of aviation history.

The Nursing Home Ombudsman Agency of the Bluegrass 3138 Custer Drive, Suite 110 Lexington, KY 40517 (859) 277-9215 ombuddy.org

Improve the quality of care for residents of long-term care facilities.

The United States Pony Clubs, Inc. 4041 Iron Works Parkway, Lexington KY 40511 (859) 254-7669 ponyclub.org

Work to improve the lives of LGBTQIA people by enhancing visibility, empowering individuals, and educating the public.

Develop character, leadership, confidence and a sense of community in youth through a program that teaches the care of horses and ponies, riding and mounted sports.

Radio Eye 1733 Russell Cave Road, Lexington, KY 40505 (859) 422-6390 radioeye.org

The Well of Lexington 110 E Third Street, Lexington, KY 40508 (859) 338-3740 ThewellLexington.com

Alleviate isolation and improve the quality of life for print-disabled listeners through access to current newspapers and printed material.

Stop the cycle of sex trafficking, addiction, and homelessness; transform lives; and heal our communities...one woman at a time.

Shriners Hospitals for Children Medical Center – Lexington 110 Conn Terrace, Lexington, KY 40508 (859) 268-2101 shrinerslexington.com

Thoroughbred Charities of America (TCA) PO Box 910668, Lexington, KY 40591 (859) 276-4989 tca.org

Provide specialized care to children with orthopaedic conditions regardless of the family’s ability to pay.

Step By Step 465 East High St. Suite 109 Lexington, KY 40588 (859) 258-7837 sbslex.org Improve the lives of young single mothers and their children through healing, encouragement, faith and education.

The Arboretum State Botanical Garden of Kentucky, University of Kentucky and LFUCG 500 Alumni Drive, Lexington, KY 40503 (859) 257-6955 Arboretum.ca.uky.edu Showcase Kentucky landscapes and serve as a resource for environmental and horticultural education, research and conservation.

Provide a better life for Thoroughbreds, both during and after their racing careers, by supporting qualified repurposing and retirement organizations and by helping the people who care for them.

United Way of the Bluegrass 100 Midland Ave. Suite 300 Lexington, KY 40508 (859) 233-4460 uwbg.org Fight for the health, education and financial stability of every person in every community.

Uplifting Children's Ministries Inc 2295 Jones Nursery Rd, Lexington, KY 40509 (859) 230-9743 upliftingchildren.com Provide food, clothing, medical care, and schooling support for needy children of Guatemala through child sponsorship and youth programs.

We believe in strength of character, and we work tirelessly for its cultivation in our community. TOPS Magazine | August 2017

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Photos

MISS KENTUCKY PAGEANT Singletary Center for the Arts | July 1 | misskentuckypageant.com

More photos at topinlex.com!

Hayley Leach, Caroline Ford, Jacquelyn Crawford, Emily Sharp and Katie Bouchard

Molly Matney wins Miss Kentucky

McKenzie Ross

Jenna Day

Hannah Robb Kim Canter and Andrea Walker

Debbie Savage and Janie Olmstead 216

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Jenna Evans and Victoria Giroux

Laura Jones Photos by Keni Parks & Paul Atkinson


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MISS KENTUCKY PAGEANT Singletary Center for the Arts | July 1 | misskentuckypageant.com

More photos at topinlex.com!

Talia Horn, Allyson Ledford and Cynthia Thomas

Makayela Banks

Haley Wheeler, McKaylah Robinson, Abigail Quammen

Charlee Schaefer, Hope LeMaster and Georgia Gardner Lola Giroux and Lisa Fath

Jaryn Noble and Kennedy Sabharwal 218

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Heather French Henry and Tawnya Mullins

Emily Sharp Photos by Keni Parks & Paul Atkinson


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STATE OF FAYETTE COUNTY SCHOOLS Embassy Suites | June 29 | fcps.net | Photos by Ron Morrow

Reginald Thomas, Christol & Manny Caulk

Jim Host and Melissa Bacon

Ty Brown and Margaux Reilly 220

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Carol O’Reilly, Kelli Parmley and Ann Hammonds

C.B. & Roz Akins

Shelley Chatfield and Bob Babbage

P.G. Peeples and Elaine Hangis

Kim Sweazy and Katie Williams


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KEENELAND CONCOURS OPENING DINNER Residence of Taft & Douglas Rood | July 13 | keenelandconcours.com | Photos by Ron Morrow

More photos at topinlex.com!

Sue Ann & Jerry Truitt

Doug Rood and Connie Miller

Lisa Maffet and Vickie Warren

Connie Jenkins and Curt Richards

Taft Rood, JR & Joy Roper

Tom & Connie Jones and Titian

Bill and Zella Daugherty 222

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Lori & Fred Rutherford

Jay Zwischenberger, Chris Cashen and Bruce Harnish


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2017 CONCOURS BASH The Grand Reserve | July 14 | keenelandconcours.com | Photos by Keni Parks

Cindy Nabors, Sue Entwisle and Connie Jones

Jim Lawrence and Brian Engle

Myah Winbush and Maui Crane 224

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More photos at topinlex.com!

Porsche from Bluegrass Motorsport

Shelby Mulholland and Michele Ramey

Susan & Ralph Coldiron

Mike and Dawn Scanlon, Phillip Tibbs and Robert DiPaola


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CONCOURS D’ELEGANCE Keeneland | July 15 | keenelandconcours.com | Photos by Keni Parks

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Summer Lovin’

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Community

New Miss Kentucky Crowned On July 1st, the Miss Kentucky Pageant crowned its 2017 winner, Metcalfe County native and Western Kentucky student, Molly Matney. Matney won over the judges with her looks, personality, talent, and unique community improvement platform: “Farm Fit”, an initiative for healthy eating with an emphasis on Kentucky Proud produce. While Matney is already off donning her crown all over Kentucky, her most exciting appearance will take place in Atlantic City in September, under the bright lights of the Miss America stage. Locals will be rooting for her at the Miss America pageant this September. The charisma, beauty and intellect she showed in the Miss Kentucky pageant will surely take her far. Caroline Ford, winner of the Miss TOPS in Lex pageant, also had a great showing at the Miss Kentucky pageant. Though she didn’t take home the crown, she represented herself extremely well. “Caroline placed 3rd runner up, and also won the Swimwear competition and Best Smile! She also placed in the top 5 of Heather French Quality of Life, working her platform for hunger and community service. She sang her heart out, modeled amazingly and answered

her on-stage questions with intelligence and personality,” said Lisa Fath, director of the Miss TOPS in Lex pagaent. Although the contestants, and ultimately the winner, are the most notable figures, it’s important to recognize the behind-the-scenes superheroes who help make the event more magical. Adam Handy, manager at Scout & Molly’s, was very involved in the fashion side of the pageant. He dressed all the girls for the Miss Kentucky Fashion Show in clothes from Scout & Molly’s. The 2017 pageant marked Handy’s sixth year as a dresser for Miss Kentucky. Handy said, “The most rewarding part of working with the pageant is seeing thirty young women, representing the best of what Kentucky has to offer.” He commends the contestants for their dedication to community service, and states they are “participating in Miss Kentucky for the right reasons”. The Miss America Pageant will be held at the Boardwalk Hall in Atlantic City, New Jersey on Sunday, September 10. The competition will be broadcast on ABC. Best of luck to Molly Matney!

www.misskentuckypageant.com

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story by Erin Christopher


Community

Lexington Arthur Murray–Showcase 2017 Guys and dolls, get ready for a stunning night of ballroom dancing! For over 15 years, the Lexington Arthur Murray Studio has been bringing a Summer Showcase to the community, highlighting the joys and excitement of Ballroom dancing. Stars of the dancing world, such as Bob Powers, Julia Gorchakova, Emmanuel Pierre Antoine and Liana Churlilova are among the well-known dancers who have performed their world-famous performances at this local event in our amazing city.

freestyle and all-day dancing with an instructor, entry into the professional performance, a staff show, an awards ceremony and dinner with the Arthur Murray Lexington family! Spectator tickets are also available.

This year, the event is set to be even more spectacular! This Showcase is going to be a smash with a Great Gatsby theme on August 12th at the Grand Reserve in the Distillery Square. Featured dancers include Kyle and Christina Campbell, professional Ballroom Dance competitors and instructors. During the awards ceremony, the Rising Star Award, Arthur Murray Award and the Kathryn Murray Award will all be presented.

Arthur Murray International, Inc. is the second oldest franchise organization in the U.S. Since 2000, Arthur Murray Lexington owner Hunter Lisle has been teaching Central Kentuckians Waltz, Fox Trot, Swing, Salsa, Hustle, Argentine Tango, Cha Cha, Social, Nightclub, Country Western, Ballroom Dancing, and more! The team of professional instructors make learning to dance fun and uplifting. They offer one-on-one private lessons, semi-private group lessons and practice sessions for private groups as a fun party. Personalized lesson plans help everyone learn what they want at their own pace. From folks with two left feet to already skilled dancers, everyone can learn something from the highly-trained, friendly staff.

Fedoras and flappers are welcome for a festive day and event full of Social, Ballroom and Latin dance! Each Showcase ticket includes 1

Celebrate 15 years of Showcases with Hunter and the gang for an event full of spectacular dancing and lots of fun!

859.278.7711 | 1801 Alexandria Dr, Ste 132 | lexingtonarthurmurray.com

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Golf Fore the Hungry August 20-21st Golf Fore the Hungry is not just another golf event. It’s an opportunity to make a significant difference in the lives of others. Since its inception in 2004, this two-day event has raised more than half a million dollars for God’s Pantry Food Bank. Hunger is an issue that touches too many lives right here in our local community and throughout Central and Eastern Kentucky. Golf Fore the Hungry was created to raise awareness in the fight against hunger and to provide individuals, businesses and churches an outlet to work together to deliver hope. God’s Pantry Food Bank serves 50 counties, distributing $100 worth of food for every $10 donated. Last year, the organization and its member agencies helped more than 190,000 individuals. The Golf Fore the Hungry event is one of the organization’s biggest fundraisers of the year, enabling them to ensure that more families have access to balanced diets and nourishing food. The Golf Fore the Hungry Benefit Dinner will be held on Sunday, August 20th at 6pm at the Signature Club at Lansdowne (3256 Lansdowne Dr.). Guests will enjoy dinner and a live and silent

auction to benefit the cause. Nick Mignione, head coach of the Kentucky Wildcats baseball team, will be the evening’s keynote speaker. This year’s Golf Fore the Hungry Golf Scramble will be held on August 21st at the University Club of Kentucky, located just minutes west of New Circle Road on Leestown Road. Lunch will be provided at 11:30 by Cosi and snack dinner by Chick-Fil A. A Shotgun start will get things rolling at 1 PM. All 36 holes at the University Club are utilized to create more opportunities to participate and to expedite play. The scramble welcomes four-person teams or individuals, who will be teamed up on the day of play. The 2017 scramble includes the women’s division, where any allfemale teams will be eligible to complete for a women’s division award and prizes. Tickets for four-person teams and individuals include tickets and plus one tickets to the dinner. Dinner-only are also available. RSVP is required. Tee off for an incredible cause at the God’s Pantry Golf Fore the Hungry event!

godspantryfoodbank.org | 859.255.6592

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presented by

PICNICS, CONCERTS, MARATHONS & MOVIES... just a few of our favorite things about summer in the Bluegrass. This month brings a helping of each of these activities to our fun filled calendar. On the music front, legendary singer/ songwriters James Taylor and Bonnie Raitt are teaming up for a show that can only be described as iconic. The Red, White, & Boom festival will offer some of Nashville’s finest at the Whitaker Ball Park with stars like Jason Aldean and Blake Shelton. Picnic With The Pops plans to pay homage to one of the most popular movie franchises and unforgettable singers in the world. Indiana Jones and Michael Jackson will each get a themed evening at the annual event, which is always an absolute blast to attend. One of Lexington’s most popular races, the Midsummer Night’s Run, will take place downtown, catering to participants age 3+. If you’ve always wanted to channel your inner Katniss Everdeen, The Hunger Games exhibition in Louisville will be right up your District 12 alley. Whether you find your pleasure outdoors in the sun, or indoors staying cool this month offers a range of events to keep you busy and entertained! JESSE L. BROOKS Calendar Highlights

THRU SEPT. 10

The Hunger Games: The Exhibition Frazier Museum | Louisville Come step inside and explore the world of Panem as created in the Hunger Games films. More than one thousand authentic costumes and props, high-tech and hands-on interactives, and detailed set recreations reveal the amazing artistry and technology that brought the incredible story to life. Visitors follow Katniss Everdeen’s inspirational journey, from her humble beginnings in District 12 to her emergence as the Mockingjay. But hurrythe exhibition will close on September 10th.

AUGUST 6

James Taylor with Bonnie Raitt 7pm | KFY Yum! Center Two of music’s finest are joining together to give their fans an evening they will never forget. Legendary singer/songwriter James Taylor and special guest, Rock and Roll Hall of Famer, Bonnie Raitt are coming to Louisville for one intimate and memorable night! James Taylor has touched people with his warm baritone voice and legendary guitar-playing for more than 40 years, while 10 time Grammy winner Bonnie Raitt has become an institution in American music. This is one summer show you won’t want to miss.

Diamond Rings & Pretty Things Bridal Show 11am | Lexington Convention Center


Community

Big3 2pm | Rupp Arena The BIG3 is a highly-anticipated 3-on-3 professional basketball league with four back-to-back games featuring All-Star basketball icons and celebrated fan favorites coming to Rupp Arena this month. Featuring professional basketball’s first four-point shot, BIG3 games will be packed with highly skilled, intensely competitive matchups. Thanks to Rashard Lewis, any child can attend FREE with an adult ticket purchased.

entertainment and activities. The evening begins with the Fastest Kid in Town race (ages 3+) at 4:30pm, followed by the One-Mile Fun Run/Walk at 6:30pm Concluding the night is the main event, the 5K A Midsummer Night’s Run, at 8pm Register online and come and participate in the fun!

Walk to End Lupus Now 8am | Keeneland

Lexus Smooth Jazz Fest

AUGUST 12

7:30pm-11:30pm | Kentucky Horse Park Campground

A Midsummer’s Night Run

Arthur Murray Great Gatsby Showcase 2017

4:30pm-10pm | Downtown Lexington

7-9pm | Distillery Square at The Grand Reserve

A Midsummer’s Night Run is one Lexington’s most celebrated events. Runners and walkers will take to the streets of downtown Lexington for a night of

Kentucky Soccer Fan Day

[ Visit TopsInLex.com for our full calendar ]

2-5pm | The Bell

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Community

presented by

AUGUST 18-19

Picnic With The Pops

6pm | Grimes Mill Winery

6pm | Keene Meadow

AUGUST 20-21

Join the Lexington Philharmonic for two consecutive nights of electrifying pop orchestra. On Friday night, see the classic “Indiana Jones: Raiders of the Lost Ark” with the score performed live. Then, on Saturday evening, enjoy a dazzling homage to the Music of Michael Jackson. Get ready to theme it up for a weekend of good, clean summer fun.

Golf Fore the Hungry

AUGUST 18 A Summer Soirée 7pm | 21c Museum Hotel Lexington

AUGUST 19-20

Woodland Art Fair Woodland Park Shop over 200 artists, enjoy live music, Kentucky food, beer gardens, and create your own family art-all with free admission. Brought to you by WesBanco.

AUGUST 19

Kicking Butt 5K 7:30am-10:30am | Kentucky Horse Park The 2017 Kicking Butt 5k is an event to raise awareness and funds to eliminate preventable colon cancer by increasing screening rates. The Colon Cancer Prevention Project is a non-profit organization that works to lessen the impact of colon cancer through advocacy, health systems improvement, and patient support. The race includes a 5K (3.1 miles) run/walk or an untimed, 1-mile walk. Register, celebrate survivors, and join in to walk, run, or jog for a world without colon cancer!

CMA Rocks the House 2017 7pm | Hilton Downtown

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The annual Golf Fore the Hungry event combines great food, fun and golf on a gorgeous championship course, a live and silent auction and fun fellowship, all to support a great cause. The concept of GFTH is to connect Central Kentucky golfers to God’s Pantry Food Bank to reduce hunger in Central and Eastern Kentucky. The dinner and auction will be held on Sunday, the golf scramble and lunch on Monday.

AUGUST 25

Midsummer Nights in Midway Get ready for Friday evening filled with music, food & local goods in beautiful Downtown Midway. The event will provide wholesome family fun and serve as a platform for local businesses, artists, and nonprofits to reach new audiences. Midsummer Nights will also highlight the historic, small town warmth of the community. Come enjoy local shops and street vendors, kids activities, live music, and much more. (Free street parking is available throughout downtown.)

AUGUST 26

Belles & Beaus Ball 6pm-12am | Keene Barn at Keeneland The Belles and Beaus Ball is a one-of-a-kind evening featuring great food, dancing, a spectacular auction, and much more. Several beaus and belles will be honored for their significant contributions to the fight against cancer. What better way to celebrate a “Summer in the Bluegrass” theme than in the beautiful Keene Barn at Keeneland in Lexington, Kentucky? All proceeds from this event will fund the American Cancer Society’s mission.


Community

2017 Walk to End Alzheimer’s 9am | Fayette County Courthouse This inspiring event calls on participants of all ages and abilities to join the fight against the disease! Registration starts at 9:00am, the ceremony at 9:45am and the walk starts at 10:00am. When you participate, your fundraising dollars fuel the mission which helps to change the level of Alzheimer’s awareness in your community.

A Night for The Nest 6-11pm | Normandy Farm Join The Nest for an elegant evening as they celebrate 40 years of helping families! All proceeds help provide a safe place for education, counseling and support to women, children and families in crisis.

Moontower Music Festival 11am-11pm | Masterson Station Park

AUGUST 27 True To Their Nature: The Lives of Sweet Evening Breeze and Henry Faulkner 2pm | Central Lexington Public Library

AUGUST 31-SEPTMEBER 4 Bluegrass Classic Dog Show Kentucky Horse Park

[ Visit TopsInLex.com for our full calendar ]

Don’t Miss... AUGUST 10,17,24 & 31 Central Bank Thursday Night Live 4-8pm | Fifth Third Bank Pavilion

AUGUST 11 & 18 Fountain Films on Friday DUSK | Triangle Park

AUGUST 11-12, 18-19, 25-26 & 31 Lakeside Live 7pm | Lexington Green

AUGUST 11, 18 & 25 Summer Nights in Suburbia 7pm | Lexington Green

AUGUST 8, 15, 22 & 29 Big Band & Jazz 7pm | Ecton Park

AUGUST 7,14,21 & 28 Kentucky Horse Park Run/Walk Club 5pm-8pm | Kentucky Horse Park

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Community

presented by

SEPTEMBER 1-3

Red, White & Boom Whitaker Bank Ballpark Kick off Labor Day weekend with a star-studded music festival that any country music lover is sure to enjoy. Friday through Sunday some of the biggest names in Nashville will grace the Red, White, and Boom stage to put on a show fans will go wild for. Blake Shelton, Luke, Bryan, Brett Eldredge, Sam Hunt, and more are bringing their winning talent to Lexington for one unforgettable event.

SEPTEMBER 1

Lexington Fest of Ales 5:30-8:30pm | Cheapside Park Over 150 beers to sample from over 60 breweries, including a special area featuring Kentucky breweries!

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SEPTEMBER 7-10 Disney on Ice: Dream Big Rupp Arena

SEPTEMBER 8

The Kentucky BASH 6:30pm-10:30pm | The Club at Kroger Field Easter Seals Cardinal Hill Kentucky BASH has long been a staple to the Bluegrass, celebrating over 44 years of fundraising success in the Lexington community. The evening includes music, open bar, sophisticated tailgate menu, exciting live and silent auction, and more! The BASH continues to be in conjunction with the University of Kentucky’s first home football game. Proceeds support the programming at Easter Seals Cardinal Hill.

March of Dimes Little Princess Ball 6:30-8:30pm | Griffin Gate Marriott


Community

SEPTEMBER 9

SEPTEMBER 10

Slow Food Dinner Party

Bluegrass Autism Walk

Fairyhouse Hall

2pm | Whitaker Bank Ballpark

SEPTEMBER 11

Fairyhouse Hall is receiving the Kentucky Proud Award for Fayette County and they’re celebrating! Chef Jonathan Lundy is partnering up with them to create an evening of “slow” food and fun. Every ingredient will be Kentucky Proud. Mingle with distillers, enjoy music and learn about the great food that Kentucky has to offer.

BC Woods Properties Golf Classic for the he Foster Care Council of LexKY

UK Football vs. EKU

SEPTEMBER 12

NOON | Kroger Field

CASA Superhero Run 8:30am | Kentucky Horse Park

Waveland Art Fair 10am | Waveland

11:30am | Griffin Gate Golf Club

Recycle the Runway 11:30am | The Grand Reserve Guests will enjoy a unique “recycled” fashion show, silent auction and luncheon where local designers unveil runway-ready fashions made out of “unsuitable” garments. This great event supports Dress for Success Lexington!

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TOP SHOTS

SOCIETY

TOPS Preview Party at the “Y”

Flapper Girls at the 2017 Concours Bash Lexington Fund for the Arts Campaign Finale

Lakeside Live Patriotic Concert 242

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Lexington Pride Festival


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Profile for TOPS Magazine

Tops In Lexington August 2017  

Who's Who, What's New, and What to do in Lexington, Kentucky

Tops In Lexington August 2017  

Who's Who, What's New, and What to do in Lexington, Kentucky