Today's Transitions INSPIRATION Winter 2021-2022

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Inspiration WINTER 2021-2022

Toast the New Year!

MOVE SOMEPLACE BEAUTIFUL | POUR A GLASS OF BOURBON WINTERIZE YOUR BODY | FOSTER A PET | LEARN FROM A CAREGIVER WATCH A GREAT SHOW | HELP BUILD A HOUSE



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contents WINTER 2021-2022

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Letter From the Editor

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TodaysTransitionsNow.com Happenings

Passions

10 Playing Dress Up 14 I Love My... 16 Entertainment 18 A Visit With... 20 Pet Fostering 22 Volunteer

Wellness

24 A Toast To Comfort 28 Fitness 30 It’s Heck Getting Old 32 Winterize Your Body 34 Gut Health

Lifestyle

38 Calling Paradise Home 42 Making Space 44 What I Know Now

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46 Things To Do 48 Living Options Directory

Caregiver

54 Winter Readiness Guide 58 Solutions 60 There’s No Place Like Home 62 Home Health Services Directory 66 Care Community Directory 80 Try This!

GOT SOMETHING TO SAY? We’d love to hear from you! Send an email to editor@todaysmedianow.com and put “feedback” in the subject line. Also, don’t forget to visit TodaysTransitionsNow.com to read articles that can help you navigate your own transitions.

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WE’RE SOCIAL: GO BEYOND PRINT @TodaysTransitionsNow


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Today’s Transitions is highlighting a focus word in each quarterly issue. This word will serve as the theme of the issue, flavoring the content inside. The word for this issue is INSPIRATION — a force of Influence. Our hope is that this magazine, in the midst of providing helpful resources, will give you an idea about how to create your best life.

WINTER 2021-2022 | VOL. 18 | NO. 4

PUBLISHER Cathy S. Zion publisher@todaysmedianow.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Anita Oldham editor@todaysmedianow.com CREATIVE DESIGN DIRECTOR Jill Cobb jill@todaysmedianow.com CAMPAIGN MANAGER Jessica Alyea jessica@todaysmedianow.com EDITORIAL/CONTENT MANAGER Lindsay McDonald lindsay@todaysmedianow.com

Inspiration What inspires you? Maybe French Toast doesn’t set your world on fire. But we think you can find something in these pages that is exactly what you need to read. “Give yourself a present every day.” p.14 “We live in the sky. We are remote and I have learned to love the isolation.” p.38 “It’s so fulfilling to know I’m helping improve someone’s life.” p.22 “I feel better and I feel healthier.” p.28 “I really liked taking care of dogs that needed me.” p.20 With 15 free minutes… “I would listen to music.” p.44 — Anita Oldham, Editor-in-Chief We’d love to hear about something you do that would inspire others — or something you read here that inspires you. Email me at Anita@TodaysTransitions.com. Go to TodaysTransitions.com for more articles and directories.

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CLIENT SERVICES MANAGER Scheri Stewart Mullins scheri@todaysmedianow.com SENIOR MEDIA CONSULTANTS Teri Hickerson teri@todaysmedianow.com Joyce Inman joyce@todaysmedianow.com COVER PHOTO Melissa Donald Today’s Transitions is published quarterly by: Zion Publications, LLC 1640 Lyndon Farm Court, Suite 108 Louisville, KY 40223 Phone: 502.327.8855 TodaysTransitionsNow.com The opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the position of the publisher. Today’s Transitions magazine does not endorse or guarantee any advertiser’s product or service. Copyright 2021 by Zion Publications LLC, all rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited without permission from Zion Publications LLC.

ADVERTISE: Call 502.327.8855 or email advertising@todaysmedianow.com. REPRINTS: Call 502.327.8855 or email reprints@todaysmedianow.com.

SUBSCRIBE: Send $10 to the above address for 4 quarterly issues.


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TODAYSTRANSITIONSNOW.COM HAPPENINGS

What’s New at TodaysTransitionsNow.com:

POSITIVE THINKING:

MAKE THIS:

CAREGIVER SOLUTIONS:

TEACH OUR CHILDREN WELL

HOMEMADE APPLE PIE

PREPARE FOR THE HOLIDAYS

Read Bob Mueller’s latest on the importance of trust, authentic relationships, and how to pass it on to younger generations. Get the story here: bit.ly/3DGyZcD

Try Dorothy McGinty’s recipe for homemade apple pie this holiday season. Get the recipe here: bit.ly/3CKwg1b

Caring for someone with Alzheimer’s or another dementia? We’ve got tips to make the holidays easier for your loved one. Read more here: bit.ly/3r4Ft1y

GIFT GUIDE We have a whole list of gifts, experiences, and practical ideas for a not-so-young someone, perfect for any time of year. Get gift ideas here: bit.ly/31pNTpy

Engage With Us on Social Media

Looking for gift ideas for the grandkids? Check out this article on TodaysTransitions.com: bit.ly/31g31Wi

Comprehensive Directory Listings Find a new directory of options for retirement living on page 48. Caregiving and home health directories start on page 62. Search our directories online for caregiving and living options in Kentucky, Indiana, and Ohio at TodaysTransitionsNow.com. 8 Winter 2021-2022 / TodaysTransitionsNow.com

Stay Connected With Our Newsletters Go to TodaysTransitionsNow.com/ Subscribe-Enews to sign up for newsletters. You can choose the news you want the most — Beautiful Living, Caregiving and Health, Local Happenings, Digital Edition, or all.

@TodaysTransitionsNow #ConnectWithTT.

Grow Into a New Life Learning something new can be a very rewarding experience. While it may not go on to be published, sharing your story can have many healthy benefits. Read more for a few tips to get started: bit.ly/3xdbJQT


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passions

14 I Love My... | 16 Entertainment | 18 A Visit With... | 20 Pet Fostering | 22 Volunteer

The intricate beadwork of this 1920s fully sequined royal blue flapper dress took over nine months for Donna to restore.

PLAYING DRESS UP: THE STORY BEHIND DONNA LANGE’S VINTAGE CLOTHING COLLECTION By Megan Seckman | Photos by Erika Doll PAGE 12 >>

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PASSIONS PLAYING DRESS UP

Donna modeling one of her vintage pieces, including a 1920s hat adorned with black and red feathers.

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onna Lange’s collection of over 300 pieces of museum-quality vintage clothing is not frivolous...it is deeply personal. As a child, Donna grew up admiring her mother’s taste. “My mother was a sharp dresser and an amazing seamstress,” Donna says. “She had sewn her own clothes for years. As a secretary for the president of Bremner Biscuit Company, she wore suits and dresses to work each day. On Sundays her dress attire for mass always included a hat and sometimes gloves as well. I loved watching her get ready for a special night out with my dad to dine and go dancing. She was so elegant. My most favorite and vivid memory was of a strapless satin purple ball gown with green insets in the back she wore on one of those occasions. 12 Winter 2021-2022 / TodaysTransitionsNow.com

In college, I wore a suit mom had from the 1940s — we were big on hand-me-downs coming from a large family, but the clothes were made to last with broad beautiful seams that you could take in and out when you gained or lost weight.” Donna’s mother died young and the six children were left to grapple with their grief. And to add to Donna’s sorrow, “About two months after her death when I was 23, I was ready to go into her closet, touch and hold her things that would surround me. I wanted to remember her and just immerse myself in what was hers. But when I walked into her closet, I was stunned! My mom’s closet was completely bare, empty, stripped of any trace of her belongings. My father had given all of her things to Goodwill. I was devastated.” This event triggered Donna’s affinity for collecting vintage pieces, particularly the clothing of the 1900s-1940s that reminded Donna of her mother and grandmother. Left with only one wool plaid suit, she began to piece her mother’s legacy back together by searching out the fabrics, pleats, tucks, and fancy buttons her mother wore so well. Since 1971, Donna has scoured estate sales and antique shops amassing a museum-quality collection of over 300 pieces from the turn of the century through the 1940s. She has painstakingly repaired, catalogued, and preserved these gems in tissue paper and old pillowcases that she keeps in two closets in her home (Donna prefers pillowcases to plastic because they don’t leave the residue that plastic does over time). One beauty, rolled away in tissue paper, is a 1920s fully sequined and beaded royal blue flapper dress that was gifted to Donna by an antique dealer with the agreement that she would repair the dress to its original splendor. Donna managed to handstitch each string of sequins and replace the delicate lining — work


that took over nine months to complete. But as she unrolls the gown to show me the finished product, her eyes light up at the sight. Her fingers fan down the intricate beadwork — her labor of love. “I wore this backwards,” she says as she holds it up to her frame showing the plunging neckline that cascades navel-deep. “These pieces are meant to be seen,” Donna says of her treasure trove. These treasures include a 100-year-old art deco car coat, a 1920s straw bucket hat adorned with a real crow on the side, and a golden lame gown complete with a train. These stunners are meant for the runway, and Donna wants them to be freed from their meticulous storage boxes and cherished. Before COVID-19, Donna hosted elaborate fashion shows, complete with vintage records borrowed from her father’s collection, playing the soundtrack of the fashion’s heyday in the background. “I would never hire professional models. I liked to have real people — friends, family, volunteers from the organizations — wear and experience these clothes. I would tell them, ‘You are who you are. Just go out there and be yourself.’” And now Donna is reevaluating what to do with her treasures, and how to help them be seen again. During the quarantine, she decided to inventory her collection and document each item. She has over 1,000 photos and has checked hundreds of seams, mended stitches, ironed and whitened Victorian blouses. She has sold several pieces to vintage stores such as Nitty Gritty and Cactus Flower, has reached out to Jennifer Lawrence’s agency with the hope they might snag that elegant golden gown I was able to marvel at for a minute in Donna’s living room. “I don’t have any daughters — isn’t that awful!?” she laughs. Donna’s nephew and daughter-in-law have claimed a few pieces, but Donna is ready to find her collection a proper home just as her mother would have wanted for her classic pieces. “My mother was the middle of 10 kids, but was a dresser. She put so much pride into making an outfit. She didn’t have much money, so when she bought a piece, it was meant to last, and it was high quality. She taught us to buy two of something that you love in different colors. “I would watch her get dressed all the time. Once she said to me, ‘You’re so pretty.’ Well, I was gangly and awkward and went into the bathroom to see if I could see what she saw. I didn’t, but I think she could see what I would turn into. She made us feel good about ourselves.” When Donna wears one of her vintage pieces, form-fitting with tucks and pleats, she exudes that same confidence she learned from her mother. Now, Donna believes, it is time to pass on this fashion history. “It surprised me how emotional it was for me when going through these items. I want them to go to people who will appreciate them, and pass on what I’ve learned. I won’t make much on the sale, I just want them to go to someone who will hopefully wear them and get the same pleasure as I did from the experience. But I will keep mom’s 1940s suit, her hat, a purse, some gloves of hers, and a few classics. Each item had a life in a particular era, a second life with me, and now it is time for their next life.”

“I WANT THEM TO GO TO PEOPLE WHO WILL APPRECIATE THEM, AND PASS ON WHAT I’VE LEARNED.”

Donna modeling a bathing suit from the 1900s, consisting of a blouse top, pantaloons, and skirt that attaches at the waist.

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PASSIONS I LOVE MY...

By Megan S. Willman | Photo by Erika Doll

It All Starts With The Perfect Glass John using a Glencairn flight tray to serve bourbon. The tray is made from repurposed barrel wood and allows him to sample or serve several bourbons at one time.

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ohn Burgin loves a good story. As his family’s unofficial historian, he collects and appreciates family artifacts and anecdotes. He’s interested in everyone else’s stories too, demonstrating an honest interest in getting to know the people and the community around him. It’s engaging and most welcome in a world where the tendency can be to look away from one another. A visit to John and his wife Tracy’s home will find music, laughter, home-cooked food, and great conversation. At these gatherings, John never fails to open and share a bottle of bourbon. I knew John was going to tell me about his passion for our locally famous “juice” (a common term for bourbon I’d not heard before this conversation), but I didn’t anticipate 14 Winter 2021-2022 / TodaysTransitionsNow.com

the sentimentality and romanticism that is tied to the experience for him. What item does John love the most? It’s probably the thing that gets the whole experience started: an empty glass, hand-chosen for the occasion. “I have a friend and mentor named ‘H’ who gave me a terrific piece of advice 10 years ago,” John says. “Give yourself a present every day.” John has embraced this suggestion. “Some days it might be a cheeseburger or a great cup of coffee, but a sip of good bourbon is a true gift to me.” John explained that it all begins with selecting the right glass, and from there, it becomes a sensory experience. He might choose a Glencairn, a glass with a tapered top which is good for sipping bourbon, or perhaps one that displays the seal of a

favorite distillery. On special occasions when he’s with a fellow Freemason, John will choose a special glass engraved with that organization’s insignia. He has quite a collection, one of which dates back to 1944 and was given to him by another Freemason who turned 103 years old this year. “You start with a real glass (no cups!) and a few cubes of clear ice. It has to be clear ice,” John says. “I love the sound as the ice hits the glass, the pop as the bottle opens, and the copper color you see as you pour. I swirl it around and smell the vapor—the essence of what came out of the barrel. After a while, as the ice melts, the bourbon opens up and you get a slightly different flavor. It hits all my senses. But then,” John says, “comes the best part. Conversation and time with friends. A present is better when it’s shared.” John didn’t always love bourbon or even appreciate it. Years ago, he went on a distillery tour, taking part in the Bourbon Trail for which Kentucky is world-renowned. “You can’t go on a tour and not appreciate where it’s made. I love the smell in the rickhouse, all those wooden beams and barrels. I like the idea that really good bourbon takes time in the barrel. There is no substitute for the aging process. It simply requires time, discipline, and patience,” John says. Great bourbon has its own history. No barrel is exactly the same. John is a member of The Bourbon Society, which meets monthly at The Henry Clay in downtown Louisville. Although he initially feared it might be a very formal and “stuffy” meeting, John was thrilled to find an interesting and eclectic group of people. He met people from all walks of life who came together to share their love of bourbon, to network, to strike up great conversation, and to learn more about Kentucky distilleries. Time to invite some friends, open the bottle, and pull out the perfect glasses for the occasion. Another story begins…


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PASSIONS ENTERTAINMENT

By Vanessa Hutchison

What We’re… ...Reading THE BOYS BY RON HOWARD AND CLINT HOWARD While it might seem like Hollywood cranks out memoirs all the time, The Boys is truly a special specimen of the genre. Without the irony or snark that typifies such memoirs, this book feels like a truly heartwarming breath of fresh air. While it does contain great stories of the childhoods and early careers of the writers, it also sets itself apart by being extremely well written, and providing insight into the inner workings of Hollywood. ONCE MORE UPON A TIME BY ROSHANI CHOKSHI For those looking to escape from the reality of the daily grind, Once More Upon a Time provides an excellent outlet for escapist fantasies. For fans of Paulo Coelho or Gabriel Garcia Marquez, the magical feel of the prose will feel both familiar and altogether fresh and new, as it cleverly uses the fairy-tale structure to simultaneously delight readers and provide a tongue-in-cheek commentary on the genre. This is a short read that you won’t be able to put down until it’s finished.

...Listening To COLDPLAY, MUSIC OF THE SPHERES While naming songs with emoji titles seems either pretentious or gimmicky, depending on who you ask, the sound of Music of the Spheres is neither. Despite their strange marketing tactics, such as releasing the single Higher Power as a transmission from the International Space Station, Chris Martin and Coldplay do not disappoint when it comes to what really matters — the ethereal but accessible feel of their music.

DIANA ROSS, THANK YOU When Diana Ross releases her first album in 15 years, the world stands up and takes notice. Reportedly recorded entirely at Ross’ home during the lockdown of 2020, Thank You is full of collaborations with a wide variety of musicians. The single, Thank You, is a beautiful and nostalgic example of what the world has been missing from the original diva, and we are looking forward to everything else this album has in store.

...Watching MAID, STREAMING ON NETFLIX Beautiful writing and acting characterize what might otherwise feel like a serialized Lifetime movie in Maid. A young mother escapes an abusive relationship and struggles to find a way to care for herself and her daughter, both practically and psychologically, as she tries to heal her own childhood traumas. This slow-burn isn’t making it into the Netflix Top 10 like some flashier or more violent selections, but it is exceptionally good, and worth every minute of your time. GHOSTS, AIRING THURSDAYS AT 9PM ON CBS If you’re looking for something less serious, Ghosts is a charming dark comedy about a couple who inherit a mansion that is full of ghosts who don’t want their home invaded by people. While the concept might seem a little kitschy, the show is genuinely funny and worth some attention. It is an Americanized version of a British comedy, which has proven to be a formula that works, but Ghosts may have a somewhat narrower audience than The Office. 16 Winter 2021-2022 / TodaysTransitionsNow.com


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PASSIONS A VISIT WITH...

By Lucy M. Pritchett | Photos by Erika Doll

The Cross-Stitch Queen Of Clifton

Cross-stitch normally uses six strand cotton or silk embroidery floss. The array of colors is part of the charm of the craft.

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aundra Cox owns the building on Frankfort Avenue that houses The Finishing Touch, her counted cross-stitch shop that originally opened in 1978 as a handcrafted gifts and consignment shop. After a move to and 20 years at the store’s next space in Plainview, she and longtime employee Carol Huffman have come back to the historic Clifton location and are happily supplying colorful embroidery threads, fabrics, and patterns to seasoned needleworkers as well as those new to the craft. WHAT IS COUNTED CROSS-STITCH? With counted cross-stitch there is no pattern printed on the fabric. The embroiderer counts x-shaped stitches, usually out from the center of the fabric, to form a picture. IS IT DIFFICULT TO LEARN? Counted cross-stitch is one of the easiest forms of needlework as it combines a simple, straight stitch with a fabric that has evenly spaced holes to pass the thread through. The charts for cross-stitch designs are similar to paint-by-numbers. The design almost looks like it has been printed and it’s just fun to watch the image — a house, an animal, an angel — appear. 18 Winter 2021-2022 / TodaysTransitionsNow.com

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU NEED? Choose a pattern you like and use the colors of thread suggested by the designer or pick your own colors. A plastic Q-snap frame will hold the fabric taut and will not leave marks on the cloth. A needle, a good pair of sharp embroidery scissors, and maybe a pair of peepers (reading glasses). You can use a highlighter on the pattern paper to help keep track. HOW TO USE THE FINISHED PIECE? A wide variety of items: samplers, purses, decorative pillows, framed images, bell pulls, holiday ornaments. Some finished pieces incorporate charms or buttons and beads. I like to do seasonal patterns, especially winter and autumn, and Carol likes autumn colors and designs. WHAT IS THE APPEAL? People are excited about doing this type of needlework again. We have seen the craft grow and are finding new designers from Europe. Younger people are taking up the craft. During pandemic lockdowns, we were delivering patterns and supplies to customers and leaving orders on the front porch of the shop. These times spent at home have really brought on a resurgence of interest in counted cross-stitch with people picking up the craft again after many years.


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PASSIONS PET FOSTERING

By Carrie Vittitoe | Photos submitted

Pet Fostering: Why You Should Consider It

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here are lots of reasons why mature adults are the perfect people to foster animals. With

age comes wisdom, and you have learned what battles are worth fighting and which you aren’t likely to win. If you’ve raised children to adulthood you understand that fostering an animal isn’t going to be anywhere near that hard or time-consuming. If you have left the 40hour work week behind, you might also have more time to spend with animals.

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Today’s Transitions talked to three Kentuckiana foster extraordinaires, Janet Meek, Kate Greer, and Connie Coin, who have found the experience to be tremendously rewarding and not nearly as overwhelming as one might expect. EXTRA CARE FOR CANINES In 2013, Janet adopted a three-legged dog, which opened her eyes to rescues, transports, and animals with special needs. Many organizations work to get animals from open admission shelters, some of which will euthanize animals that don’t get adopted or are ill. She began doing transports of animals to rescue organizations when she still lived in Tennessee. Upon moving to Louisville in 2015, Janet, 68, began volunteering with a rescue organization and fostered four puppies. Eventually, she started her own nonprofit, Special Paws — A Small Dog Sanctuary, which provides a home to dogs that have special needs. “I really liked taking care of dogs that needed me. I’m an old social worker so I guess that’s where that comes from,” she says. Her house is now a sanctuary for dogs that might not otherwise get a forever home.


KITTENS AND KATE Kate’s granddaughter, Shannon, who lives with her, suggested the two of them foster kittens. “She said, ‘Wouldn’t that be fun?’” Kate says with a laugh. They began in November 2020 and are now fostering their sixth group of kittens. Some fostering relationships have lasted several months while others have lasted only a couple of weeks. Taking care of animals was certainly something Kate, 83, already had experience with. “There’s not much I didn’t have growing up. We even had goats that my uncle sent my dad as a practical joke,” she says. This past summer they took care of a momma cat and her seven kittens which required a little more flexibility. Kate wasn’t able to use her office and started to take her laptop into another room for meetings. “With seven of them, when I was on a Zoom conference, it was a little hectic,” she says. Fostering keeps Kate young at heart. Kate Greer and one of her foster kittens.

ROTTWEILER LOVE Connie Coin It was Connie’s adult and foster daughter, Savannah, who dog, Ron. got her into the MisPits and Friends fostering program. Savannah, who typically fosters puppies, showed her mom a picture of a senior Rottweiler who needed foster care. “I love Rottweilers, and I’ve had at least one Rottweiler in the house for the last 30 years,” Connie says. She decided to open her home to Ron. When she brought him home, he was sick. He had a urinary tract infection (UTI) and entropion, which is where the eyelids begin to fold inward and scratch the eyes. She honestly thought he might die the first week he was in her home, but she thought, “Even if that happens, at least he died in a nice warm place with someone that loved him.” He had surgery to repair his eyelids (which Connie called “his facelift”), received medication for the UTI, and happily adjusted to foster life with Connie’s other two dogs. Because he was older, Connie, 59, was aware that she might be his retirement plan, and she was fine with that. He was quiet and laid-back. When a family wanted to adopt Ron, Connie knew she would miss him, but she also knew he was going to have his best life as the only dog in his new home where he would get all the attention.

FOSTERING BASICS While each organization that works to foster animals may have their own guidelines or orientations, there are some similarities between them. First, foster parents are not responsible financially for the animals; food, medical care, and supplies are provided and/or covered by the organization. Second, fosters aren’t just left to figure things out on their own; they receive training and support to ensure they are ok throughout the process. Kayla Garland, foster program manager at the Kentucky Humane Society, says they offer an online orientation and video for foster volunteers. “If they have any additional questions, we can discuss those things. Most of the time, I find that our fosters receive the largest amount of information during the first or second foster pickup. That’s when we really dive into the questions they have,” she says. Foster volunteers may be given a general time frame of how long they will likely have the animal. Kayla says with puppies and kittens, it’s usually three to five weeks. “With adult animals, it really depends on why they need to go to foster,” she says. “We do have some cases that we expect [the animals] to be in foster [care] longterm, and we are upfront about that.” One of the best things about volunteering as a foster is that it allows a person to set the schedule that matches their lifestyle. For example, a person who is planning a long trip can take a break from fostering for several months. Kayla says some fosters only do so one or two times a year.

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PASSIONS VOLUNTEER

By Kym Voorhees Raque | Photos by Patti Hartog

Using His Hands To Build Homes... And Hope

J

ust before he retired in 2015, David Johansen began volunteering with Habitat for Humanity through his church, St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church. Once a month a team of volunteers from the church goes to work on a Habitat home under construction. It didn’t take long for David to realize he wanted to do more. In January 2016 he joined Chuck Sgro’s Habitat team and now every Thursday David can be found in a different Louisville neighborhood helping make a family’s dream home a reality.

Born in Denver in 1953, David Johansen came to Louisville with his family in 2002 as part of a job transfer with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE HABITAT FOR HUMANITY? I liked the idea that I could work with my hands. I’ve always been handy around the house; able to fix things, but had never done construction. When I started working with Habitat it just kind of clicked. It’s wonderful because we work side by side with the families who’ll be living in the homes. They’re all required to help build either their own home or someone else’s in the program. What better way to help lift someone up than by improving their living situation? Habitat does that.

HOW DO VOLUNTEERS LEAVE THEIR MARK ON THE HOMES THEY BUILD? Once the homes are framed and before the drywall is installed, volunteers use markers to write inspiring messages on the wooden studs. People write messages like “bless this house,” and “wishing you all the best.” The Habitat family gets to read the messages before the drywall goes up. They know the messages are always there to give them hope and inspiration.

WHAT INSPIRES YOU TO CONTINUE YOUR VOLUNTEER WORK WITH HABITAT? The families really inspire me. Their stories and how they’re overcoming their struggles and building a life for themselves is heartwarming. They have to be very committed to the process to get a Habitat home. They’re so grateful for the opportunity. I’m also inspired by Chuck and our team. All of us are retired and have a passion for giving back. Everyone is so good at what they do and so happy to be making a difference. It’s so fulfilling for me to know I’m helping improve someone’s life.

WHAT ADVICE DO YOU HAVE FOR OTHERS INTERESTED IN VOLUNTEERING? Find a place that feeds your spirit. Discover what your passion is. Start gradually, maybe once a month or once a quarter. Then if you really like it and have the time, volunteer some more. But start slowly. It’s easy to become overcommitted and burn out. Donating my time and talent to help other people gives me a lot of personal pleasure.

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wellness

28 Fitness | 30 It’s Heck Getting Old | 32 Winterize Your Body | 34 Gut Health

A toasted French brioche with a thick smear of butter and strawberry jam.

A Toast TO COMFORT By Anita Oldham | Photos by Melissa Donald PAGE 26 >>

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WELLNESS A TOAST TO COMFORT

W

hether you need a quick snack or a warm morning bite, we rediscovered a classic and simple solution. Toast. We tested and toasted some easy favorites with some new combinations to add more energy or protein to your winter diet.

TOASTING SUGGESTIONS The settings of your toaster have a lot to do with your end product. Try adjusting your heat knob. A bagel option on the toaster also adds the perfect crispy touch to bagels.

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A toasted Everything Bagel topped with Monterey Jack shredded cheese melted while still hot.


A toasted whole-wheat sprouted bread, topped with a generous dollop of peanut butter with added banana slices.

A toasted ciabatta roll spread with The Laughing Cow Swiss Cheese and rolled up ham slices.

Swiss cheese and sunny side up egg on whole-wheat toast. (Pictured in the middle of the board.)

Sliced French brioche dipped in egg batter and fried in a cast iron skillet with melted butter. Drizzled with maple syrup and topped with blueberries and raspberries. (Pictured on the cover.) A toasted pumpkin bagel, with a smear of cream cheese and topped with farm honey.

A toasted French brioche, with plenty of added butter, sugar (melted in), topped with a few shakes of cinnamon.

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WELLNESS FITNESS

By Tonilyn Hornung | Photo by Erika Doll

Fitness Inspiration DEBRA LIVELY Age: 66 Daily Routine: Morning: Yoga + Situps Lunch Break: Walk, Bike, or Swim Evening: Walk or Bike

“YOGA IS VERY CALMING FOR ME. I’VE ALWAYS SAID THAT YOGA SAVED MY SANITY AND MY LIFE,” SAYS DEBRA. This is why she starts her day with a grounding yoga practice. Debra works from home and during her lunch break she goes for a walk, a bicycle ride, or possibly even a 30-minute swim. In the evenings, she and her husband might take a walk or ride bikes to dinner.

Workout-inspired emotional pick-me-ups are another reason Debra maintains her workout routine (and has for more than four decades). “There’s a lot of stress involved in my job and so over the years, to manage the stress, I’ve found that exercise is the key for me,” she says.

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How does she stays on a healthy path? “I have a Fitbit and count my steps, and I always ate healthily, but I decided I wanted to eat organic.” So Debra overhauled her whole approach to mealtimes. Her diet consists of very little red meat and sugar but is high in organic fruit and vegetables.


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WELLNESS IT’S HECK GETTING OLD

By Tami Pyles

SOLUTION 1: DIET AND LIFESTYLE Healthy lifestyle and diet choices can help reduce the chances of developing incontinence or improve the condition. Maintaining an optimal weight and not smoking can decrease your risk. Food choices also make a difference. Opt for foods high in fiber and avoid caffeine, alcohol, and highly acidic foods, which can irritate the bladder.

I Gotta Go…. All of the Time!

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hanges with age, menopause in women, and an enlarged prostate in men can all result in incontinence. “Incontinence is urinary leakage of any kind,” says Julene Samuels, M.D., FACS. Both men and women can experience incontinence, although women are more likely due to stress on the body from childbirth. “By the age of fifty, 50% of women will have some form of incontinence,” says Dr. Samuels. There are several forms of incontinence. • Stress — leakage caused by pressure on the bladder, like sneezing, jumping, or lifting heavy objects. • Overflow — constant dribbling as a result of a bladder that does not empty completely. • Urge — involuntary loss of urine caused by an overactive bladder. This type of incontinence can be caused by other health issues, such as an infection. • Mixed — a combination of any of the types of incontinence, typically stress and urge. • Functional — inability to make it to the toilet in time because of a physical or mental impairment.

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SOLUTION 2: CLINICAL TREATMENTS Persistent incontinence may be a sign of other health issues and can impact your quality of life. If this is happening, talk to your doctor about the best treatment option for you. There are surgical and physical therapy options available. In addition, new technologies are emerging that offer nonsurgical options with results that have been shown in studies to be more effective than surgical procedures. One such technology, BTL EMSELLA, used primarily for women, is effective at treating urinary leakage. “It is a chair that you sit on, fully clothed, and it causes contractions in the pelvic floor. The strength of the contractions is stronger than what can be done on your own through Kegel exercises,” says Dr. Samuels, who has conducted studies and treated several patients with this therapy.


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WELLNESS WINTERIZE YOUR BODY

By Tonilyn Hornung

Winterize Your Body: Treat it with love

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inter brings with it cozy afternoons cuddling by the fire, evenings watching the snow gently fall, and cups of hot chocolate with just the right amount of marshmallows. What’s not to love? Well, how about constantly chapped lips, dry skin, respiratory issues, and feelings of blah that just won’t leave you alone. Wouldn’t it be great if you could “winterize” your body to protect yourself against those pesky winter elements that get you down? The good news is, you can. Dr. Rana Mays, a board certified dermatologist (BCD) and the founder and president of Mays Dermatology & Cosmetic Center, says the winter months bring with it dry skin and rashes. Rashes like eczema and seborrheic dermatitis are common during the winter months. The American Academy of Dermatology defines eczema as a group of conditions that cause inflamed, irritated, and often itchy skin. When looking for signs of seborrheic dermatitis, watch out for reddish, oily-looking patches that appear on the face, but there are treatments that can help. “It’s always important to see a BCD for proper diagnosis of skin changes so patients can receive proper treatment and avoid a waste of time and money with self or nondirected treatment,” Dr. Mays says. This way you and your doctor can come up with a custom plan to prevent uncomfortable skin flare-ups should they happen again. PREPARE YOUR RESPIRATORY HEALTH When looking to protect not only your skin but your whole body against the harsh wintry elements, Louisville Salt Cave provides a space for this very purpose. Founded by Nicole Bartlett in 2015, Louisville Salt Cave uses a halogenerator to grind and disperse tiny particles of salt (three times smaller than pollen size) which are antimicrobial in nature. “Bacteria and viruses don’t live well around salt,” Nicole begins, “so when you come in this space and breathe, this helps your respiratory health, and the Cave is designed for really deep mental rest as well.” Louisville Salt Cave is made of five tons of the “purest salt and the pink Himalayan salt crystals are over 250 million years old.” Nicole says Louisville Salt Cave sessions help reduce inflammation which

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assists in keeping you well throughout the winter months. “We recommend doing salt sessions prior to getting sick. The Cave helps keep your lung microbiome really healthy so that you have a better chance of combating any type of stressor,” Nicole says. The Cave also supports your mental health by using color therapy. Color therapy has been known to boost feelings of well-being and this can be of value during the dreary winter months, “The color in the room actually has great mood-enhancing qualities so there’s a multitude of benefits to coming here in the winter,” says Nicole.


STUDIES SHOW THAT STAYING MOBILE IS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS YOU CAN DO FOR YOUR HEALTH.

POP UP YOUR MOOD Want to keep that good mood flowing? Preventing aches and pains that go along with the colder weather is a step in the right direction, so begin your wintertime recovery at Louisville’s new Club Recover. Billy Davis, the owner of Club Recover, says the services they provide are to keep everyday people feeling healthy every day—and the winter is no exception. The cold weather outside can lead you to spend more time sitting around inside. Studies show that staying mobile is one of the most important things you can do for your health and this is where Club Recover’s Assisted Fascial Stretch Therapy can keep you feeling flexible. Billy explains, “A stretch therapist uses traction and breathing which increases your mobility.” This one-on-one stretch session will also improve posture, and with consistent treatment, you’re going to be able to improve your strength and range of motion. “It helps you stay healthier and keeps you moving,” Billy says. Club Recover offers many treatments to assist in your wintertime wellness from sauna bathing to cold water immersion, to red/NIR light therapy to IV therapy. Staying hydrated in the dry winter months can be a challenge due to sweat evaporating faster and feeling less thirsty. Of course, being dehydrated can lead to headaches and fatigue, but Club Recover has you covered. “Sometimes you really want something that can hydrate you in a quick manner and our nursing staff and medical director oversee our IV hydration services,” Billy says. IV therapy also contains micronutrients so you can choose from elements like electrolytes, vitamin B, vitamin C, or zinc. If you’re looking for at-home ways to prepare your body for the cold weather, Billy suggests investing in a blue light. “Desktop blue lights used in the morning help with seasonal affective disorder (SAD),” Billy says. SAD includes symptoms such as fatigue, depression, and social withdrawal. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says, “Bright visible-spectrum light therapy has proven effective in the treatment of seasonal affective disorder and recent basic research suggests that blue wavelengths approximately 470 nanometers account for that effectiveness.” If you experience these symptoms, you can always reach out to a doctor for further discussion. Protecting your body from the harsh cold season can support you in experiencing a happier, healthier wintertime.

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WELLNESS GUT HEALTH

By Tami Pyles

It’s Time to

Think About Your Gut HOW CAN YOU IMPROVE YOUR GUT HEALTH? 1. Getting plenty of fluids is critical for gut health. “Fluids keep the digestion track moving. One way to know if your body is getting enough fluid is to look at the color of your urine. If the color is close to the color of water (colorless) or lemonade (light yellow) you are likely hydrated. If the color of urine is closer to dark yellow/orange, it’s time to have another glass of water,” says Jenny Nixon, MBA, RDN, LDN, of NexJen Consulting, LLC.

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ow many times have you been told to “listen to your gut,” that feeling inside that helps guide your decisions? While that sixth sense guidance can be helpful, listening to your actual gut could be one of the best health decisions you make. The gut microbiome, made up of the microorganisms that live in our intestinal tract, and gut health have gained attention in the medical community for their links to whole body health and wellness. Research supports us supporting our guts. WHY SHOULD YOU CARE ABOUT YOUR GUT? Poor gut health has been linked to everything from digestive issues such as IBS (irritable bowel syndrome), heart disease, colon cancer, and depression and anxiety. “The health of each part of our body is interconnected. The health of our gut is deeply linked to the overall health of our body,” says Dr. Sunana Sohi, gastroenterologist at Gastroenterology Health Partners. Our gut, which is composed of thousands of strains of bacteria in our intestines and colon, is responsible for breaking down the foods we eat and providing the nutrients needed by the rest of our body to function properly. If your gut health is suffering, it will have other negative health consequences. Your gut contains both good and bad bacteria. The good bacteria keep your digestive system functioning properly. If gut bacteria are off balance you enter into a state of dysbiosis. In this state, the unhelpful bacteria that live in the gut overpower the helpful bacteria, which can lead to a host of health issues. The good news is that you can take action and get your gut back to a healthy state. “Dysbiosis is reversible! Studies have shown that by switching to a plant-rich diet, changes in the microbiome can happen in as little as a few weeks,” says Dr. Sohi. “Our gut is sometimes considered our ‘second brain’, so just like we protect our head with helmets and rest, we need to do the same with our gut. Giving it proper nutrition, probiotics, and balancing our fat and sugar/carbs is so important, as well as rest,” says Angie Endler, nutrition programs coordinator at Dare to Care Food Bank. Making a conscious decision to treat your gut right is key to keeping your entire body healthy.

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2. Critically important to gut health are the foods you eat. Food can either feed your gut and help the good bacteria flourish, or it can fuel the growth of bad bacteria. “Large influxes of fat and/or sugar tend to disrupt gut health and upset the gut microbiota, simple sugar especially,” says Angie. 3. A diet high in fiber is needed to keep your gut healthy. “Fiber is the element that helps move food through our digestive tract, leading us to healthy colons. The majority of Americans do not consume enough fiber in their diet, only 10 grams a day,” says Angie. The recommended amount of fiber a day for women over 50 is 21 grams and 30 grams for men over 50. 4. Consume a diet that includes plenty of variety. “The diversity of plant fibers is what matters. We want a diverse microbiome, and a diversity of plants is required for that,” says Dr. Sohi. Eating the same fruits or veggies over and over will not be as beneficial as consuming a wide array of plant-based options. As a goal, Dr. Sohi suggests trying to consume 30 different plant-based items each week. This total includes not only fruits and vegetables, but also herbs, spices, legumes, and grains.


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lifestyle

42 Making Space | 44 What I Know Now | 46 Things To Do | 48 Living Options Directory

CALLING PARADISE HOME: HOW TWO COUPLES MADE A TRAVEL DESTINATION INTO A HOME By Megan Seckman PAGE 40 >>

Rio Chama near Abiquiu, New Mexico.

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LIFESTYLE CALLING PARADISE HOME

Photos submitted

Maggie and Gary’s straw-bale and stucco home is wellinsulated with biodegradable walls and a metal roof to keep it cool in the southwest heat.

Living in the Sky: From Louisville to New Mexico In 1931, Georgia O’Keeffe first laid eyes on the stark and enchanting terrain of Abiquiu, New Mexico. She was so taken with the rugged and tranquil vistas, with paths peppered in glistening rocks and bones, with the sandstone mesas and buttes, that she made it her home for more than three decades. This ancient land depicted in her paintings was once inhabited by the Tewa Pueblos and later became a settlement of the Genizaros, an amalgamation of Indigenous peoples enslaved by the Spanish who were granted land ownership there on the dangerous frontier. Today, the Native and Spanish influences remain, and the region draws many artists with its mystical aesthetic and outlaw ambiance. Like O’Keeffe, ceramicist and retired Kentucky Country Day art teacher Maggie Towne was also drawn to the region at a young age. In the late ‘80s she attended graduate school in Taos, New Mexico and vowed that she would someday go back. As luck should have it, Maggie inherited a nest egg after her mother’s passing in 2011 and was able to build her dream retirement home in 2013: a straw-bale and stucco home atop the Sierra Negra on 11 acres of wild, rugged northern New Mexico terrain. “I always dreamed of having an adobe-style home, but we built a straw-bale and stucco house because it was cheaper and faster,” Maggie explains. Straw-bale construction, invented in the 19th century by farmers as a way to use the harvest waste (barley, wheat, rye, or oats), takes tightly-packed straw-bales, wire, and stucco to erect flame retardant, well-insulated, and biodegradable walls. The benefits of this construction are that all of the materials are sustainable and that the organic material remains surprisingly cool in the summer and holds in heat in the winter. Maggie and her husband, Gary, dream of living off the grid someday, so their straw-bale house was a first step in this direction. Their home, which took seven months to build, also features solar panels, a wood stove for heating, and fans and a light-metal roof to keep it cool in the summer months—but Maggie’s 40 Winter 2021-2022 / TodaysTransitionsNow.com

electric kiln and need for a lithium battery, keep them tied tangentially to the grid for now. When I caught up with Maggie, she was on her way back from an impromptu weekend camping trip with her husband, a photographer. The two were hauling their vintage travel trailer behind them, fighting the October highway winds and spotty cell service. Winter, since leaving Louisville for good in 2016, is now filled with adventure and tranquility. “We live in the sky,” Maggie says of her new life 6,300 feet into the New Mexican skyline. “The skies are always blue and the air is so clean. I love living away from the city. Our road [1.5 miles up a steep hillside] sucks, but our views are worth it. Sometimes I’ll say ‘I’m not going down that hill today’ to get groceries in Santa Fe, which is an hour away. We are remote, and I’ve learned to love the isolation.” The home, a 1,000-square-foot cottage perched under a peaked roof, houses their living quarters and artist studios (Maggie has a kiln shed and ceramics studio while her husband has a darkroom). Winters are quiet in this remote locale and filled with expansive blue skies and weather in the teens. Since their move, they have rented out their camper to friends who desire to winter in the southwest, but most days are filled with solace and retreat. “We’ve had to have a yard sale virtually every year just to pare down our stuff. Our house here has a lot less storage than our house in Louisville, which we thought we took into account but obviously not.” The couple had to build a shed since moving to stash camping gear, a kayak, and tools. But to Maggie, the simple and adventurous life is the life worth living, no matter what season. “Many come here for the winter, especially artists—maybe too many artists—but people are drawn to being in this area. People come here for retreat, for holiday, and to live in an artistic community. “Although I miss the foodie scene of Louisville [Maggie says there are virtually no nearby restaurants or convenient stores], the arts and culture here have a fascinating history. Gringos are the minority, and I like it that way. The mix of cultures is sometimes strained, but towns are trying to break down barriers through a mutual interest in art.”


Since the pandemic, Maggie has seen an influx of real estate sales in the area. When she and her husband first moved to New Mexico, properties would sit for a year or more on the market, now they are selling in weeks to residents living on the west coast. If the west has always appealed to your artistic heart, Maggie recommends waiting a few years until the market depresses. Until then, Maggie will winter another year atop her mountain, living with her head amongst the New Mexican clouds and her feet spanning across its sands.

On Island Time: From Southern Indiana to St. John If you’ve ever dreamed of retiring or spending your winter days on a luxurious island, Helen Faith has some advice for you. Helen and her husband, John, now live full time on St. John, located in the U.S. Virgin Islands. The couple had purchased several investment vacation rentals over the years, so they always had a winter retreat at their fingertips and spent their summer days at their southern Indiana home, where they thought they’d spend the rest of their lives. “Our home in Indiana was so special to us, so we tried living on St. John for three years before we committed to selling it and moving full time to the island,” Helen explains. The move, Helen says, was a challenge. “Everything on an island is a logistical challenge. It was a twomonth process to ship our belongings to St. John.” Helen explains that since St. John does not have its own airport, all essential furniture had to be shipped first to Florida, then put on a barge to St. Thomas, and then put on another freight to St. John. In preparation for the move, the couple sold most of their belongings. Like moving their items to the island, the experience of building a home on the island was equally as tricky. All materials must be brought to the island and labor is difficult to come by, since the population is only between 2,0003,000 people.

“You definitely have to learn sacrifice and patience to move to an island. The states have so many conveniences we take for granted, like supermarkets,” Helen says while on a quick two-day Louisville visit, she scheduled some dental work. “On an island, you need to depend on yourself for maintenance; labor is always very busy. You have to learn to work with what you have. There is no such thing as following a recipe, for instance— you learn to make a meal with what is offered at the store on that given day. You can’t have food delivered for dinner; there is no fast food. You have to be able to sacrifice conveniences, such as consistent electricity. We have frequent outages...at least one every week or so for up to four hours. You have to be flexible and patient—Island Time is REAL!” But that, Helen explains, is the trade-off. While the mainland economy offers many conveniences for the consumer, the fast-paced, high-pressure work environment is unsustainable—and exactly what made them want to head to the islands. “In the states everyone is rushing around to get a job done. That’s why you move to an island, you remove the pressures of immediacy. You have to accept the lifestyle and learn to enjoy it. It is more relaxed, there is no traffic, you can swim at an amazing beach whenever you have free time, it is 80 degrees all winter long. The quality of life makes up for the inconveniences.” John and Helen have since built a cottage they rent out to visitors that features a private pool and one of the best views on the island. While the rental and the weekly tasks of maintaining their home keep them busy, they still find time to take a beach swim a few evenings a week. After all, they now live on island time.

If moving to an island is not in the cards for you, consider taking a trip to one of these top warm weather destinations.

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LIFESTYLE MAKING SPACE

By Tonilyn Hornung

Everything Has A Place… and sometimes it’s not in your house! PEOPLE CAN KEEP ITEMS FOR MANY REASONS: UNRESOLVED GRIEF, A LIFELONG STRUGGLE TO ORGANIZE, OR EVEN A HABIT OF HOLDING ON TO THE PAST CAN BE A CAUSE.

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ne day your kitchen table is free and clear for family dinners and then suddenly piles of outdated mail, last year’s birthday presents, and a sea of grocery bags are your new place settings. Clutter has a magical way of multiplying. Once the chaos has taken over the cracks and crevices of your closets and cabinets, it’s difficult to know where to begin to make room. How can you create the space you need to feel free again? If the mere mention of decluttering sounds daunting, know that you’re not alone. Colgan Tyler, psychotherapist, and one of the owners of Mandala House, says, “Clutter can be emotionally overwhelming because it means something to the person to whom it belongs or who is keeping it.” Colgan goes on to say it’s important for people to know what their so-called clutter represents. People can keep items for many reasons: unresolved grief, a lifelong struggle to organize, or even a habit of holding on to the past can be a cause. When you’re ready to begin decluttering, Sally Scott, founder and owner of the Southern Indiana-based business PA For A Day, says, “Starting is the hardest part.” PA (personal assistant) For A Day focuses on tasks like house management, decluttering, organizing, and transitioning folks to a new living space. Sally says people can overanalyze the decluttering process and become stuck, “I tell people to just start moving and don’t overthink it.” When helping her clients, Sally starts simple. She says, “… 42 Winter 2021-2022 / TodaysTransitionsNow.com

begin by categorizing and putting stuff in piles.” You can group your piles in any way you prefer. First, Sally places items that are definite keepers into a “save” pile. Next, place objects that you’re not so sure about into a separate pile to be appraised later. Sally always saves the emotional decisions of what stays and what goes for last, “Then ask yourself, ‘Do I really need this?’” Sally says. Another one of Sally’s pro tips for organizing is working backward. “Let’s go through it (household objects) first then we can decide what receptacles you need for the things you keep. It will all become clear as we organize,” she says. Once you decide what stays, what can be donated, and what can be thrown out, Sally says baskets and storage bins keep life tidy. “Receptacles can save all the world’s problems,” she quips. There are definite advantages to organizing the space in which you live. Colgan says, “Having a household that reflects a healthy balance of ‘holding on and letting go’ has benefits.” He goes on to say that a person will likely feel they have more power, more control in their lives. Sally witnesses this shift and says, “It makes you feel good because you’re doing something that has been on your list forever.” If saying goodbye to mementos and objects still feels overwhelming, know that you can ask for help from friends, family members, or a kind neighbor. As Sally says, “Once you start moving and organizing, it’s unbelievably motivating.”


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LIFESTYLE WHAT I KNOW NOW

By Lucy M. Pritchett | Illustration by Dan Kisner

A Lifetime Spent In The Stacks

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ee Burchfield has pretty much spent his whole life in libraries — first as a volunteer in grade school and now as director of the Louisville Free Public Library. He joined the library in 1997 and served in various roles up to being appointed director in 2019. YOUR FIRST LIBRARY JOB? In eighth grade, instead of having to go to study hall, I volunteered to work in the school library and got hooked. I learned to appreciate the atmosphere and the environment and continued with my library volunteer work in high school. I was also the audiovisual guy along with shelving books and library general maintenance. WHAT WOULD PEOPLE BE SURPRISED TO LEARN ABOUT YOU? I considered becoming a professional musician. In the third grade I started playing the trumpet, and in fourth grade started the French horn. Instead, I got two graduate degrees — one from the University of Kentucky in library science and one from Southern Seminary in historical studies focused on 19th century American religions. A WORD THAT DESCRIBES YOU? Empiricist. The only thing we truly know are things we can experience firsthand. It doesn’t mean we don’t believe in things, but we have to acknowledge the difference between knowing and experiencing. SOMEDAY... ...I’ll retire. I’ve worked in libraries for a long time, and I have wanted to keep finding a challenge. As director, the biggest challenge today, of course, is funding operations. I would like to solve the long-term funding problems and failed referendums that have hindered the work of the library for 100 years.

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HOW TO KEEP YOUR SPIRITS UP? My core beliefs and values about the world. Even in these polarized, pandemic times, we’re still living in the Golden Age of human existence. Though the short-term outlook may seem bleak, I have to focus on the big picture as well. I know the library is helping people find jobs and learn things. I also have a lovely wife and two fun cats. LEARN FROM YOUR PARENTS? From my mother I learned to make lists, and from my dad I learned that people depend on you. If you say you will show up for something, then you show up. I have tried to be that person, and I feel that that has been a key to my career success. I have been counted on to get done what needed to get done. A TECH TOOL YOU FIND USEFUL? Trello. As a lover of lists, Trello allows me to categorize my lists, and I can have lists of lists. WHERE WOULD ONE FIND YOU BROWSING IN THE LIBRARY? The 19th century American history section and the arts section. When I’m out of town I always look at books in other libraries that might have more money than we do to spend on art books. A PET PEEVE? I keep a window open in my office, and it seems like people are driving the loudest cars ever up and down Broadway. It’s very startling.

WHAT ARE A FEW OF YOUR FAVORITE LIBRARIES? The Seattle Public Library is a spectacular downtown facility. It is the central library that every community deserves. Also the Nashville Public Library. It combines a classic exterior with a beautiful interior that features exhibits patrons can enjoy. WITH 15 FREE MINUTES... ...I would listen to music. I feel like music is a glimpse into a world we can’t see or understand. It changes the way your brain works. WHAT DO YOU LIKE BEST ABOUT BEING DIRECTOR? I love the library. We have 17 locations, and I get to spend time in all parts of the city. People everywhere tell me how much they love the library. It’s encouraging to hear how our staff has done such a great job.


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LIFESTYLE THINGS TO DO

By Lucy M. Pritchett | Photo by Melissa Donald

Lunch Plus One

Serving lunch on fine china adds a touch of elegance, and is an easy way to make your guest feel special.

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n the past, our Lunch Plus One feature suggested a midday meal at a local restaurant and one other activity to enjoy, whether that be relaxing in an outdoor spot, browsing in a shopping area, or visiting an historic location. An outing to enjoy with friends or family members that was not too taxing. However, about a year into the pandemic lockdown and after most of my contemporaries and I had received the vaccination, I was inspired to invite one friend over, at a time, for an easy lunch or a cozy tea. The point, I thought, was to connect face to face and not show off any (nonexistent) culinary skills. I decided to make things easy and offer a plate of different tastes making the meal light and simple. To add a touch of elegance, I served lunch on my mom’s fine china, used my grandmother’s water goblets, and even dug out cloth napkins. The menu consisted of foods quick to prepare or pick up: chicken salad from Paul’s Fruit Market on slider buns, a few peanut butter-filled pretzel nuggets from Costco, crisp celery cut into hefty pieces to give the crunch of chips without the chips (a terrific idea offered by my neighbor), an olive or pickle, a couple of colorful cherry tomatoes, and for dessert

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a handful of Hershey’s Kisses, fruit, or a small cookie or two. Perfect and just filling enough. Some days, if I was in the mood for a later afternoon visit, I would invite a friend to stop by for a cup of Earl Grey or an herbal tea. I could easily pick up mini cupcakes from The Fresh Market and small scones from Breadworks to serve. If I really wanted to get fancy, I would prepare tiny Benedictine sandwiches and top off our heart-to-heart chat with a piece or two of dark chocolate. So the One in Lunch Plus One became not an activity but a person. My friends appreciated the invitation, and I appreciated the company. I certainly was in favor of the uncomplicated preparations and have continued to expand my guest list. During these upcoming winter months, you might give this easy entertaining enterprise a try, and remember to keep things simple and stress-free. After all, this Lunch Plus One suggestion is all about conversation and connection, not culinary skills.


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LIVING OPTIONS:

PICK THE BEST SPOT TO LIVE Looking for a colorful background for your life? It is time to move into a home that offers less maintenance and more services? Whether you are actively looking for your next home or making plans for the future, our Living Options directory lists local apartments, condos, independent living communities and other specific living situations available. Some find that they flourish in an active community of like-aged individuals. Some communities offer gyms, artistic rooms, and food options. Others might be located in an area that allows for accessibility to the local community. These living options allow you to stay active and independent without the regular maintenance of a house. See more on pages 50 and 52. Also search online at TodaysTransitions.com. FEATURED LISTING

Miralea and Meadow Active Lifestyle Communities 3701 Frankfort Ave Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 915-2204 masonichomesky.com Enjoy handcrafted senior living with chef-led on-site restaurants, concierge, fitness and aquatic centers, personal transportation, salon and spa, art gallery and studio, woodworking shop, movie theater, putting green, 24/7 security, and other upscale amenities. Campus includes medical clinic, home care and dialysis. Life Care offers priority access to a full continuum of care on campus (assisted living, personal care, memory care, skilled nursing). Cost: $2936-$4597 Min. Age: 62 Owner: Masonic Homes Kentucky

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LIVING OPTIONS

CLICK THE LISTINGS BELOW TO VIEW MORE INFORMATION.

Looking for a new place to call home? This directory of low-maintenance housing options includes condos, garden apartments, retirement and independent living communities. Find more at TodaysTransitionsNow.com/searchliving. All costs are per month.

The Altenheim

Brownsboro Park Retirement Community

The Altenheim has apartment suites for independent living. Apartments have an efficiency kitchenette, full bath with shower and spacious living quarters with a separate bedroom. All apartments have emergency call cords to pull in case of emergency. Linen service, housekeeping, personal laundry service and meals are provided at no additional charge. Recreational, educational, social, and religious services are also available.

Family owned & operated since 1986, several spacious floor plans, located on 14 beautiful acres with a park, walking trail and fishing pond. Warm, friendly residents, spacious apartments with great closets, activities to keep your mind entertained and your body in shape, housekeeping, extensive shuttle program that runs 7 days a week and excellent chef-prepared meals. All-inclusive pricing (includes all utilities, phone, cable, internet & personal alert pendant).

Cost: $1856 Owner: The Altenheim

Cost: $2150-$3500 • Min. Age: 62 Owner: Bunker Hill Assoc. III, LLC

936 Barret Ave, Louisville, KY 40204 (502) 584-7417 • thealtenheim.org

2960 Goose Creek, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 429-7700 • brownsboropark.com

Christian Care Communities – Middletown

Forest Hills Commons

Our active seniors live very independently in lovely garden home and spacious apartments. Take advantage of all a senior living community has to offer, including maintenance-free homes, wellness programs, spiritual care and security. Our serene setting is close to shopping and dining, yet offers a private park-like feel in a close-knit community with plenty of delicious food and fun, engaging activities. Assisted Living suites available.

Forest Hills Commons delivers a carefree lifestyle designed to simplify your life without compromising your freedom. Some of our unique services and amenities include: THRIVE Wellness Program, NEW Energy Wellness Gym, SMART Solutions (Moving & Transition Specialist), on-site therapy options available, happy hour and social opportunities, all-day dining in our restaurant-style dining room, weekly housekeeping and linen services, theater, library, media room, game room and Internet café

Cost: $1080- $112,500 • Min. Age: 62 Owner: Christian Care Communities, Inc. (since 1884)

11530 Herrick Ln, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 254-1799 • Middletown.ChristianCareCommunities.org

Cost: $2495-$5495 • Min. Age: 50 Owner: American Senior Communities

9107 Taylorsville Rd, Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 499-5533 • asccare.com/community/forest-hills-commons/

Forest Springs Health Campus

The Forum at Brookside

Steps away from our full-continuum of care, villa patio homes offer housekeeping; lawn maintenance; fitness center and clubhouse; medical alert pendant, a full calendar of activities and excursions; Villa Lifestyle Director; pet-friendly.

Everything you love and need — a beautiful forty acre gated senior living community! People walk into our community feeling a sense of warmth and welcome. A place that feels like home. The Forum at Brookside is about hospitality, and a carefree lifestyle. Amenities include chef prepared meals, room service, housekeeping, social activities,indoor heated pool, pet friendly, transportation, security, an experienced management staff,and support with medical care as needed.

Cost: $3147+ • Min. Age: 55 Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC

4120 Wooded Acre Ln, Louisville, KY 40245 (502) 243-1643 • forestspsringshc.com

Cost: $2440-$4825 • Minimum age: 55 Owner: Five Star Senior Living, Inc.

200 Brookside Dr, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 245-3048 • theforumatbrookside.com

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LIVING OPTIONS

CLICK THE LISTINGS BELOW TO VIEW MORE INFORMATION.

Looking for a new place to call home? This directory of low-maintenance housing options includes condos, garden apartments, retirement and independent living communities. Find more at TodaysTransitionsNow.com/searchliving. All costs are per month.

The Grand Senior Living

Lake Forest Village Retirement Community

Resort style living, luxurious apartments, spacious closets, extra storage available, garage & golf cart garage rental, utilities & appliances included, patios/balconies, weekly housekeeping, 24-hour concierge, pet spa, salon & barber shop, fitness center, indoor heated pool, sun deck, putting green, club house, recreational activities, theater, cocktail lounge, terrace, shuttle service, continental breakfast, chef prepared gourmet meals, easy access to dining, shopping, entertainment, & health care, Signature Passion Program.

All apartments have full kitchens, washer/dryer hookups. Our all-inclusive rates cover meals, weekly housekeeping, scheduled transportation, complementary valet services, all utilities, and a 24/7 medical alert system. Room service, concierge service, 150-seat movie theater, happy hours, and resident travel program. No buy-in fees. Live-in Managers. Pet friendly with no additional fees for pets.

Cost: $3540-$5890 • Min. Age: 55 Owner: Management, Civitas Senior Living

9300 Civic Way, Prospect, KY 40059 (502) 310-1542 • thegrand-sl.com

Cost: $2900+ • Min. Age: 55 Owner: Resort Lifestyle Communities

2400 Arnold Palmer Blvd, Louisville, KY 40245 (502) 340-1909 • lakeforestvillageretirement.com

Miralea and Meadow Active Lifestyle Communities

Sacred Heart Village Apartments

Enjoy handcrafted senior living with chef-led on-site restaurants, concierge, fitness and aquatic centers, personal transportation, salon and spa, art gallery and studio, woodworking shop, movie theater, putting green, 24/7 security, and other upscale amenities. Campus includes medical clinic, home care and dialysis. Life Care offers priority access to a full continuum of care on campus (assisted living, personal care, memory care, skilled nursing).

Secured 540 sq. ft. 1 BR efficiency units located in both the Clifton & Cane Run Road areas. Dining room, meeting rooms, library and sitting areas and on-site laundry, appliances, walk-in shower, individually controlled heat and A/C, pets accepted with restrictions. Handicapped accessible units if available. Water & electric included. Income limitations apply. Call for details.

Cost: $2936-$4597 • Min. Age: 62 Owner: Masonic Homes Kentucky

3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 915-2204 • masonichomesky.com

Cost: income based • Min. Age: 62 Owner: Mercy Housing

2110 Payne St, Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 895-6409 • facebook.com/SacredHeartVillage

StoryPoint Middletown

Village Active Lifestyle Community

For 40 years, we’ve spent our days making sure our residents get the most out of theirs. From maintenance-free living to convenient amenities and more, everything at StoryPoint is designed to help you discover your ideal retirement — whatever that may be.

Three lifestyle options provide financial flexibility: Life Plan, market rate and affordable. Offering a theater, arts and crafts studio, game room, resident dog park, walking paths, raised community gardens, amphitheater, medical clinic, home care, dialysis and 24/7 security. Life Plan residents have access to a full continuum of care on campus (assisted living, personal care, memory care, skilled nursing) and amenities offered at Meadow and Miralea Active Lifestyle Communities.

Cost: starting at $2995 Owner: StoryPoint Senior Living

500 Meridian Hills Dr, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 306-3827 • storypoint.com

Cost: $1679-$2461+ • Min. Age: 55 Owner: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc.

3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 894-0195 • masonichomesky.com

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caregiver 58 Solutions | 60 There’s No Place Like Home | 62 Home Health Services 66 Care Community Directory | 80 Try This!

WINTER READINESS GUIDE

HOW TO BEAT THE COLD, THE DOLDRUMS, AND THE STUCK-IN-THE-HOUSE FEELINGS By Carrie Vittitoe

54 Winter 2021-2022 / TodaysTransitionsNow.com


T

he cold and gray of the winter months can be hard for anyone, but they can feel especially grueling to individuals who are stuck in their homes without much interaction. Winter can also be hard on caregivers who can’t even get their loved ones outside for some sunshine. This winter readiness guide provides ideas to help beat the bleary weather blues and keep everyone warm, comforted, and content.

Advice About Cold Safety

When the weather gets chilly, people often think of space heaters as a way of saving on energy bills, but Jeffersontown Fire Department Fire Marshal Tom Carroll says “space heaters are a source of lots of winter fires,” and most of the time it is because they are used incorrectly. While he suggests turning the thermostat up or putting on warmer clothes as the safest ways to warm up in the winter, he and other firefighters know that people are likely going to buy space heaters anyway. With that in mind, he recommends that people do the following if they are determined to use a space heater: • Make sure the space heater has the approval of Underwriters Laboratories. • Follow all of the manufacturer’s instructions for operating the space heater. • Keep the space heater 36 inches away from anything combustible (including the floor beneath the space heater. Do not use a space heater on carpet, linoleum, or wood.) He also recommends that anyone who has any kind of fuel-fired appliance, such as a natural gas furnace, water heater, or kerosene heater, needs to invest in a carbon monoxide detector. Carbon monoxide, an odorless, colorless gas, is a silent killer; some 430 people die every year in the United States due to carbon monoxide poisoning, according to the CDC. Like smoke detectors, carbon monoxide detectors can be hardwired, battery-powered, or can plug into wall outlets.

Advice About Routine

Katherine Autin, longtime caregiver and CEO of Parkinson Partners and Visionary Caregivers, says chronic illness and caregiving can both feel like long winters even when the weather isn’t cold and the sky isn’t gray, but keeping to routines can be helpful. Individuals who have just had surgery or who have chronic illnesses feel like so much is out of their control. They can’t control their health, their healing, or their prognosis, but keeping to a routine each day is something they can manage. A change to their routine, either accidental or intentional, can cause them a great deal of anxiety. “Anytime you change their routine, they get stressed out which makes any symptoms that they’re experiencing worse. And it also makes them feel like they’ve lost any kind of power,” she says. Caregivers also need to keep to routines, especially when those routines involve taking care of themselves and their own health needs. It is essential for caregivers to refill their medications on time and get checkups with their own doctors. Another important routine for caregivers to stick to is their own hobbies or interests they enjoy, whether it be taking an hour for knitting, jewelry-making, or doing yoga.

Advice About Movement

It is all too easy to become sedentary during the winter months, but keeping the body moving is essential to keeping aches and pains at bay, as well as preventing injuries. “Falls tend to happen in the winter because people are moving less,” says Julie Snowden, physical therapist and owner of Advanced Orthopaedic Physical Therapy. She suggests stretching, postural strengthening, and aerobic exercise as part of a winter fitness plan. “Most people in the day don’t even put their arms over their heads, so put your arms over your head and bend side to side,” she says. Getting a hamstring stretch in is a good idea too. Julie suggests putting one foot on a chair and stretching forward and backward, but she says it is important to hold onto the back of the chair or the wall to avoid getting wobbly (or to have someone nearby to spot you). Stretches should be held for 30 seconds. An easy way to build some upper body strength is to do some wall pushups. Julie says to place both hands on the wall at shoulder height and bend your elbows, trying to touch your nose to the wall and then push back. Kicking your legs out sideways slightly up into the air as you stand next to the wall is a great way to strengthen the side of the hips (glutes). “That’s the most important muscle for pivoting and shifting,” Julie says. When it comes to aerobic exercise, Julie suggests walking up and down the hallway of or even marching in place for 10 or more minutes. She says some people are more task-oriented; they don’t want to do random exercises, but are happy to move around as part of their regular activity. Cleaning out a closet during the winter can get a person moving. PAGE 56 >>

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CAREGIVER WINTER READINESS GUIDE

Advice About Positivity

It isn’t uncommon for people to be excited about winter up until December 26; after that, however, they are over the cold and gray which means that January, February, and March are long and tedious stretches of time. “The weather is what it is, and it certainly doesn’t care what you or I think about it,” says Bob Mueller, Bishop of the United Catholic Church and Today’s Transition’s contributor. “Instead of being open and accepting of whatever we are experiencing, we resist it, push it away, and demand that it be different. But like fighting the weather, it’s a losing battle.” In winter, we sometimes feel like we’re fighting the weather, boredom, and loneliness. And while we should try to find something productive to do with ourselves or reach out to friends to alleviate our loneliness, accepting that the doldrums of winter are sometimes going to happen is also a good idea. “Acceptance reduces pressure and anxiety. As you embrace what’s going on in life instead of demanding that it be somehow different, you’ll spend far less time being frustrated because you’ll be so much more open, accepting, and interested in what’s really going on,” Bob says. It is also important to remember that winter, like all things, eventually ends. Bob says his favorite scripture passage is “‘And it came to pass.’ It’s because all things do come to pass.” While today may be icy and gray, tomorrow the sky may be blue and the warmth of the sun through the windows will perk you up a bit. Just wait.

Advice About Telehealth

One positive that has come out of the pandemic is people’s increasing acceptance of telehealth as part of their health care. Terri Paige, co-founder and CEO of Medical Transformation Center, says only about 10% of their patients did telehealth before the pandemic now telehealth appointments can be between 30%-50% of appointments. Terri says there are many benefits to telehealth, especially for older adults in the winter. Some patients can’t drive themselves which can make in-person appointments tricky and time-consuming. Patients with mobility issues may find that during the winter, when they feel particularly cold and achy, doing telehealth is less tiring and less stressful. Adults who work full time find that telehealth is simply more flexible for their schedules. In most cases, it is optimal for a physician to see a patient in person, and there are some things that simply can’t be done via computer like blood work or urine samples. But doctors can still tell a lot about a person from seeing them on a screen and getting a history of their symptoms and complaints. “You can see facial expressions, affect, the face and neck, puffy eyes,” Terri says. “When faced with the choice of no care or telehealth appointment, the choice is to do telehealth.” A telehealth appointment is a much better option for a patient than simply not seeking care for an issue that concerns them. 56 Winter 2021-2022 / TodaysTransitionsNow.com

WHILE TODAY MAY BE ICY AND GRAY, TOMORROW THE SKY MAY BE BLUE AND THE WARMTH OF THE SUN THROUGH THE WINDOWS WILL PERK YOU UP A BIT.


Advice About Changing Your Surroundings

When you see the same surroundings all the time, especially during the winter months, it can begin to make you feel bored and blah. Jessica King, owner of JN Brown’s in Middletown, Kentucky, has a number of ideas to spruce up one’s living space and add some interest. She suggests going for a walk and clipping some cedar or pine branches. “Getting some fresh air is always nice, but clipping these beautiful trees and bushes brings lots of people joy this time of year. It’s one of my favorite things to do, it’s free, and [it] instantly makes me happier,” she says. When you are inside the house due to the cold, put that time to good use and declutter your space. “If you take away items from bookshelves and tabletops, it will make your space feel more open and airy. Light has more opportunity to bounce around the room when there aren’t as many objects,” she says. After decluttering, you may even be able to act on Jessica’s next suggestion, which is to rearrange furniture and accessories. If you’re willing to spend a little money to make changes to the home during winter to keep spirits up, Jessica suggests buying new light bulbs. “A warm white, a cool white, and daylight bulbs can change the feel of a room,” Jessica says. Another idea is to purchase lightcolored slipcovers for couches and chairs, which will make the room seem lighter and brighter.

Advice About Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and Winter Moods It is very common for people to develop feelings of sadness when the seasons change. Barbara Martin, director of social services for the Integrative Counseling and Wellness Center at Heuser Hearing Institute, says SAD is also tied to experiences that people may have had during specific seasons. For example, the Thanksgiving, Christmas, Hanukkah, and Kwanzaa holidays tend to make people think about loved ones they have lost which also tends to make people feel a little down. SAD is a form of depression so the symptoms can include not having the energy or desire to do things you usually enjoy doing, having problems concentrating, difficulties sleeping (either too much or not enough), and experiencing fluctuations in weight. Unfortunately, not dealing with SAD can lead to worsening feelings of sadness and even less energy to get up out of bed or off the couch. “Those sedentary lifestyles give us problems with nutrition, diet, and exercise [and] then that turns into diabetes and cardiac issues,” she says. A light box can be a fairly easy and inexpensive way to get some extra vitamin D into your life to help ease SAD symptoms. Barbara recommends a box with a minimum of 10,000 lumens. “You don’t want to have UV rays [so] I’m not a fan of suntanning on a bed,” she says, due to the risks of skin cancer from these devices. An individual doesn’t have to sit directly under these lights or look into them (that is actually not advisable) to get the benefit of the light source. Increasing one’s intake of fresh fruits and vegetables is another way to help mitigate SAD symptoms and improve one’s mood. An easy-to-make smoothie of non-dairy liquid, berries, power greens such as kale or spinach, and lowsugar yogurt several times a week can help.

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CAREGIVER SOLUTIONS

One Daughter’s Story: And Why She is Glad She Uprooted Her Life When I arrived, Dad was still in the neurological unit of the hospital. He had a left hip replacement after he fell and broke his hip. At some point, he also suffered a stroke that took away the use of his left arm. I had just driven with my two cockapoos and my cat 800 miles to get to town. For the next month and a half, Dad was taken back and forth between hospitals and rehab/nursing care for a variety of reasons. Once, because they thought he had aspirated, once because the incision on his hip became infected, once because of an UTI (urinary tract infection), which appeared to be an on-going battle because of the catheter, once because he fell out of bed. In a span of 45 days, my dad was transferred 10 times. With every move came changes in staff, in buildings, in protocol. For someone who has just had a fall, a stroke and surgery, even small changes such as the remote control, can cause much confusion. Read more about what Cathy Wise has learned from being a daughter/caregiver for the past three-plus years on TodaysTransitions.com. Search: Cathy Wise

CAREGIVERS, WHAT DO YOU NEED? The responsibility for another’s physical and emotional well-being can be draining. It’s important to draw strength from a source of faith, knowing God sees your care and love of another. Have one or two close friends who will listen to you and offer encouragement. Keep laughter and joy in your life. Eat well. Get rest and exercise. Remember you do not need to do this alone. —Kayla Cook, RN and Owner of Caring Excellence Personalized Home Care Services 58 Winter 2021-2022 / TodaysTransitionsNow.com


ENCOURAGE RELUCTANT BATHERS There are all kinds of reasons someone might be hesitant to take showers. If you find that your loved one is not bathing as regularly as you feel necessary, here are some suggestions. 1. Be patient. Avoid escalating conversations that can make them more resistant to bathing. 2. Talk with them. Have a conversation to identify the problem so you can work toward a solution. If they are cold when using the shower chair, add a small heater in the bathroom to keep them warm. 3. Invest in the right equipment. Make sure to have grab bars and shower chairs to help your loved one feel safe. 4. Use a calendar to help them remember when they have bathed. 5. Respect their privacy. Allow them to wash their own private parts if they are able, and use towels and robes to help maintain their privacy as much as possible. — Elisabeth Knight, Clinical Manager, MSSW, Caring Excellence

Look And Feel Your Best With These Tech Solutions Devices to Help With Dressing and Grooming By Vanessa Hutchison

For some, daily dressing and grooming may seem like an exhausting obstacle. Physical and mental challenges can make self-care tasks difficult. The importance of daily grooming and dressing, however, is clear; it not only boosts self-esteem and mood, but helps to establish a daily routine, which can help with memory and alertness, and provides a natural form of exercise, which can help to maintain strength and decrease muscle and joint stiffness. For those struggling to continue dressing and grooming themselves, technology can provide some helpful solutions. HANDS FREE HAIR DRYER STAND Drying hair after a bath or shower can be a challenge. Hair dryers can feel heavy after several minutes, and hair can be difficult to reach. But a Hands Free Hair Dryer Stand can relieve much of the strain associated with grooming. Without having to hold the hair dryer, drying hair becomes a far easier process for those with weakness in the arms. $25, arthritissupplies.com WEIGHTED RAZOR CUFF While older adults may want to shave themselves, this task might be made difficult by shaky hands. The Weighted Razor Cuff has a pocket that holds a disposable razor, as well as a comfortable strap that keeps it secure in hand, while hidden weights help to steady unwanted shaking for shaving. $33, thewrightstuff.com DRESSEZ DRESSING STICK If limited mobility and flexibility are causing difficulty with getting dressed, a dressing stick may be the solution. While there are a number of these on the market, the long stick, comfortable grip, and s-hook end on the DressEZ Dressing Stick make it useful for those struggling with socks and shoes, as well as other aspects of dressing. Starting at $36, rehab-store.com

LEARN ABOUT SOMEONE’S STORIES ​​ Everyone has interesting stories to tell. Start simple. Start from the beginning by asking: "When and where were you born? Tell me about your parents, siblings, childhood home, school, memories...." Let one thing lead to another and watch the expressions on their faces as they slip between happy and sad memories and proud moments of a lifetime. Record those stories and give a copy to their family if you have permission to do so. It's a wonderful way to learn about the past and record it for future generations. — Joanne Flatt, Regional Director, Bluebird Homecare

ADAPTIVE CLOTHING Some of the most interesting and useful technology for helping older adults get dressed may be in the clothes themselves. Adaptive clothing helps those with mobility issues by incorporating magnetic closures, adjusted hems and openings, and mindful design. While adaptive clothing used to be limited to a few brands that focused solely on creating clothes for the elderly and disabled, mainstream brands have more recently risen to the challenge of making adaptive clothing stylish. Tommy Hilfiger now carries the Tommy Adaptive line, while the UGG Universal collection includes boots that are easy to get on and off, ensuring that older adults needn’t sacrifice style for simplicity. While dressing and grooming may be difficult, advances in assistive technology ensure that older adults can maintain their independence longer. Challenges with mobility and flexibility do not have to be obstacles to independence and aging in place. These tools and others can help older adults continue living a fulfilling and inspiring life. Today’s Transitions / Winter 2021-2022

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CAREGIVER THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE HOME

By Kym Voorhees Raque

Get It Delivered!

T

he increased availability of home delivery services is making it easier for someone with decreased mobility to remain in their comfortable surroundings and retain independence. From fully prepared meals to prescriptions, area businesses can offer the convenience and support many older adults need to remain at home.

PREPARED MEALS Proper nutrition is important at all stages of life, maybe even more crucial as we age to help keep our physical and mental faculties in top shape. Prepared meals take the guesswork out by providing balanced meals. Louisville-based Home Cuisine offers several meal plan options based on your individual tastes and nutritional needs. Meals include lean proteins, grains, and fresh, seasonal vegetables and fruits cooked by a professional chef and delivered to your home twice a week. homecuisineonline.com Another local service, Chef Prep Meals, allows you to choose your own custom meal packs or go with Chef Ryan’s choice. The menu changes weekly and features seasonal ingredients and a healthier version of comfort foods and international fare. thechefprepmeals.com Fresh n' Lean delivers prepackaged meals that are ready to heat and serve in three minutes. Meal plans include Keto, Paleo, and Vegan options. freshnlean.com Customers will need to be able to use a computer or iPad to place orders online. They must also be able to warm their meals in either an oven or microwave. 60 Winter 2021-2022 / TodaysTransitionsNow.com

GROCERY/PERSONAL CARE ITEMS Green Bean delivers organic foods from local farm sources in Kentucky and Indiana. Offerings include produce, dairy, meat, seafood, and bakery items. greenbeandelivery.com On FarmBox, you can order fresh organic produce, dairy, meat, pantry items, and prepared meal kits all delivered to your door once a week. farmboxdelivery.com Major grocery chains like Kroger and Meijer, and retailers like Target and Walmart offer grocery delivery. In addition to food items, you can also purchase paper products like napkins and toilet paper and personal care items, such as toothpaste and deodorant. kroger.com, meijer.com, target.com, walmart.com Customers will need to be able to order online and carry deliveries from the doorstep into their home and put items away. They will also need to dispose of expired food items regularly.

PRESCRIPTIONS Locally owned and familyrun Middletown Pharmacy & Wellness offers prescription and wellness supplement delivery. Pharmacists are available on-site or via phone to answer questions. middletownpharmacyandwellness.com Retailers like Walgreens and CVS offer prescription home delivery that includes multi-month supplies of medication and automatic refills (if allowed by physician). walgreens.com, cvs.com Amazon offers two options. PillPack is a full-service pharmacy run by Amazon that delivers your pills organized and prepackaged by day of the week and time of day you need to take them. Amazon gives Prime members up to 80% off generic and 40% off brand-name medications if paying without insurance. It also allows you to compare prescription costs using insurance or the Prime discount to see which is cheaper and provides 24/7 access to pharmacists who can answer questions about your medications. pillpack.com, pharmacy.amazon.com Customers will need to order online and keep track of when to take their medications. Daily pill organizers can help keep track of which medications to take on what day; however, the older adult must be able to track the days of the week and not forget to take their pills on time. Assistance and reminders from a caregiver or family member may be needed.

It’s important to note that these services are not appropriate for everyone, and you may consider having your loved one evaluated by a professional to determine what their needs are, what they can manage on their own, and where they may need extra assistance.


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HOME HEALTH:

BRINGING CARE INTO YOUR HOME Our homes are so personal, and we know that bringing someone inside for care is both an adjustment and a relief. It allows for someone to stay in the home they know and for different levels of independence, depending on their needs. It makes sense to look for the perfect level of care for someone who needs some assistance. Whether it be skilled nursing care or companionship, care by people who have been vetted and trained and backed by a reliable company allows for ease of mind. Search on pages 64 and 65 as well as online at TodaysTransitions.com.

FEATURED LISTINGS

Hosparus Health 6200 Dutchmans Lane Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 456-6200 HosparusHealth.org

Senior Helpers - Louisville/ Southern Indiana 4043 Taylorsville Rd Louisville, KY 40220 (502) 690-2648 seniorhelpers.com

“Hosparus Health has been a fixture in the Louisville community since 1978 and has provided care to tens of thousands of patients and families in our community. Our goal is to help people live better and longer — and the earlier you call us, the more we can help.” Offering quality hospice and palliative care and grief counseling services to people living with serious and life-limiting illnesses. A not-for-profit hospice organization providing compassionate care. See our ad on back cover. Services: nursing & physician services, pain & symptom mgt, social workers, spiritual care, CNA’s, grief counseling services and volunteer programs Cost: Medicare accepted rate | Min. time required: N/A Type: medical | Owner: Hosparus Inc.

62 Winter 2021-2022 / TodaysTransitionsNow.com

“When planning care for a loved one, it can often be difficult, stressful and confusing to understand the type of care that’s truly needed. Establishing when, where and who will be providing care can be equally challenging. But it doesn’t have to be. – Nancy Galloway Locally owned, licensed and insured, compassionate caregivers trained how to keep seniors safe at home. Call today for a complimentary Life Profile consultation- the first step in reducing risks for your loved one. Services: Compassionate care by quality caregivers and excellent service. Flexible schedules with caregiver matching (3 hour minimum per visit). Cost per hour: $20-$24 | Min. time required: flexible Type: non-medical | Owner: Nancy Galloway


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HOME HEALTH SERVICES BrightStar Care 406 Blankenbaker Pkwy, Ste G Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 893-4700 louisvillehomecare.org

CareBuilders at Home 2210 Goldsmith Ln, Ste 209 Louisville, KY 40218 (502) 458-2273 carebuildersathomelouisville.com

Caring Excellence Personalized Home Care Services 1169 Eastern Pky, Ste 1134, Louisville, KY 40217 (502) 208-9424 caringexcellenceathome.com

Commonwealth Nursing Solutions 904 Lily Creek Rd, Ste 202, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 814-3111 cnursingsolutions.com

Helping Hands Companion Care Services 2301 Hurstbourne Village Dr #100 Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 426-9783 home-companions.com

Home Instead Senior Care 4101 Taylorsville Rd, Ste 200, Louisville, KY 40220 (502) 515-9515 louisvillehomecare.com

Homewatch CareGivers 2001 Stanley Gault Pkwy, Ste C Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 244-1212 hwcg.com/Louisville

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Joint Commission Accredited. High quality skilled & non-skilled in home care for people of all ages. All care is overseen by a Registered Nurse and is available 1-24 hrs/ day with Guaranteed Caregiver Compatibility. Compassionate care, excellent service. Services: personal care, homemaker, transportation, errands, Alzheimer’s/dementia care, Parkinson’s, ALS, respite, med reminders, meal prep, end of life care, RN/geriatric case management, skilled nursing. Cost per hour: $22-$25 | Min. time required: 1 hr Type: non-medical, skilled nursing | Owner: Christian & Leslie McCutcheon Compassionate, customized, coordinated care; State Certified Personal Service Agency, Help at home for independence, post-rehab recovery, Alzheimer’s/Dementia Care, Parkinson’s, respite, sitter service any location; 1-to-1 for med appointments, companion Services: personal care, homemaker, transportation, errands Cost per hour: $23-$26 | Min. time required: 3 hrs Type: non-medical | Owner: Laura Curry and Michael Coffey

Locally owned, Consistent Caregivers, Caregiver Matching and RN Case Management. Senior Care, Parkinson’s Care, Alzheimer’s Care and After-Hospital Care in your home. All care directed by Registered Nurse and Master Level Social Worker. Services: All personal care, all mobility needs,meal preparation, homemaking, medication reminders, exercise assistance, errands,transportation, respite care. Cost per hour: $23-$24 | Min. time required: flexible up to 24/7 Type: non-medical | Owner: Kayla Cook, RN, Elisabeth Knight, MSSW

Locally owned, State Certified as Personal Service Agency providing non-medical compassionate and excellent service. Convenient on-line scheduling access. 24/7 staff supervision. A+ BBB rating. Services: personal care, companionship, light housekeeping, meal prep, transportation, errands, medication reminders, Alzheimer’s and dementia care, respite, end of life care at home or in facility setting Cost per hour: starts at $22 | Min. time required: 1 hour Type: non-medical | Owner: Greg Ciliberti, M.D., Alex Moore, M.D., Barbara Newton Personalized loving care available in home, assisted living, nursing home or hospital; scheduling up to 24 hours 7 days a week; trained and experience caregivers; free assessments; serving Kentucky and Southern Indiana since 1996. Services: personal care, home making, transportation, errands, respite, med. reminders Cost per hour: $24 and up | Min. time required: Flexible Type: non-medical | Owner: Terry Graham, RN; Dawn Smithwick, BSW

We have proudly provided Home Care Services to the Louisville Community for over 22 years. We are committed to delivering compassionate, high-quality care to seniors. To us, it’s personal! Call today for a complimentary consultation. Services: Available 24/7; our CarePros provide personal care, post-rehab support, companionship, transportation, Alzheimer’s/dementia care, and end of life support. EVERY client will be assigned a Case Manager directed by Nursing Leadership. Cost for Service: Based on Level-of-Care. Services start at $29/hr. Type: Non-medical Home Care Services | Owner: CEO, Steve Hendricks Fully trained and experienced CNA’s/Caregivers, on-staff Certified Dementia Practitioners, complimentary evaluations, customized care plan, company with 30 years of home care experience, Alzheimer’s/Dementia expertise, Five Star reviews Services: personal care, homemaker, transportation, errands Cost per hour: $27-$30 | Min. time required: 4 consecutive hours Type: non-medical | Owner: Steve and Trish Kochersperger


CLICK THE LISTINGS BELOW TO VIEW MORE INFORMATION.

Hosparus Health

Offering quality hospice and palliative care and grief counseling services to people living with serious and life-limiting illnesses. A not-for-profit hospice organization providing compassionate care. See our ad on back cover.

6200 Dutchmans Lane Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 456-6200 HosparusHealth.org

Services: nursing & physician services, pain & symptom mgt, social workers, spiritual care, CNA’s, grief counseling services and volunteer programs Cost: Medicare accepted rate | Min. time required: N/A Type: medical | Owner: Hosparus Inc.

Malone Home Care 2932 Breckenridge Ln, Ste 1 Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 637-5474 malonehomecare.com

Flexible Scheduling, No Contracts, 24 Hour Coverage, complimentary in-home assessment and Care Plan provided by a Registered Nurse. We help clients maintain independence in the comfort of their own home. Services: Licensed Private Duty Nursing Agency providing skilled nursing services (RN/LPN) and Personal Care Assistants (PCA) to help with activities like meal preparation, bathing and grooming, housekeeping, and medications. Cost per hour: RN/LPN $47+, PCA $22+ Type: medical and non-medical | Owner: Locally owned and operated

Senior Helpers Louisville/Southern Indiana

Locally owned, licensed and insured, compassionate caregivers trained how to keep seniors safe at home. Call today for a complimentary Life Profile consultation- the first step in reducing risks for your loved one. Services: Compassionate care by quality caregivers and excellent service. Flexible schedules with caregiver matching (3 hour minimum per visit).

4043 Taylorsville Rd Louisville, KY 40220 (502) 690-2648 seniorhelpers.com

Cost per hour: $20-$24 | Min. time required: flexible Type: non-medical | Owner: Nancy Galloway

Visiting Angels

Customized Care by reliable, experienced caregivers. Visiting Angels allows you to select your own caregiver and conducts an in-home assessment prior to starting care. Client feedback and family communication are an integral part of our customer service.

126 S. Sherrin Ave Louisville 40207 (502) 897-6547 VisitingAngels.com

Services: personal care, housekeeping, meal prep, laundry, errands & transportation, Alzheimer’s care, fall prevention, med reminders, respite, 24-hour care Cost per hour: $17-23 | Min. time required: Flexible Type: non-medical | Owner: Andrew Block, locally owned & operated

VNA Health at Home 5111 Commerce Crossings Dr Ste 110 Louisville, KY 40229 (502) 584-2456 chisaintjosephhealth.org/ vnahealthathome

Providing care to the adult and geriatric populations in Louisville/Jefferson County, Southern Indiana, and surrounding areas. Services: nursing, therapy, social worker, home health aide Type: medical | Owner: Catholic Health Initiatives

“Always be there for others. Always inspire them with your dreams and hope, vision and mission, attitude, and aptitude.” — Debasish Mridha

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CARE COMMUNITY DIRECTORY Today’s Transitions seeks to help you find the right care you need for a loved one when you need it. The Care Community Directory contains both short- and long-term care-related resources. More details can be found at TodaysTransitions.com. For Home Health Directory see page 62. For retirement Living Options Directory, see page 48.

TYPES OF CARE COMMUNITIES: Adult Day Care programs provide care and companionship to those who need supervision or assistance. Aging-In-Place Communities offer several levels of care on one campus.

Personal Care residential living offers mobile residents minimal assistance for daily activities.

Assisted Living is residential living for those who need help with daily activities and health services.

Rehabilitation Services is physical treatment in an inpatient or outpatient clinic.

Hospice provides pain relief for those with a terminal illness and a life expectancy of six months or less.

Skilled Nursing Care is 24-hour nursing services for residents in a care community

Memory Care residential living is for those with dementia at different care levels

Find Help By Location

Search the Location Chart (on the right page) for specific types of care by location. The Map (right) coordinates with the Zone column. More details for all care communities listed in the chart can be found in the full directory listing starting on page 68. If you are interested in a listing, call 502.327.8855 or email Advertising@TodaysMediaNow.com. *Published rates are given by company.

Payment Options: These definitions can help you navigate the payment options in each directory: Private – consumer pays out-of-pocket. Private Ins. – could include Medicare supplements or HMOs/health insurance. LTCi – long-term care insurance; helps cover the cost of services for people who have an extended physical illness, extended disability, or cognitive impairment. VA – Veterans Administration; provides financial assistance to retired veterans needing medical, surgical, and rehabilitative care.

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Palliative Care is specialized medical care for people living with a serious illness.

Respite Care provides shortterm care in order to provide relief for primary caregivers.


in -P lac e ist ed Liv in Ho g sp ice Ca re Me mo ry Ca re Pa llia tiv eC ar e Pe rso na lC ar Re e sp ite Ca re Re ha bi lit at Sk io nS ille er dN vic ur es sin g As s

ay Ca re UofL Health – Frazier Rehab Institute 40202 Christian Care Communities – Christian Health Center, Friendship House and Chapel House 40203 The Altenheim 40204 Eastern Star Home 40204 Nazareth Home 40205 Twinbrook Assisted Living 40205 Nazareth Home – Clifton 40206 ElderServe Adult Day Health Center 40211 Creekside on Bardstown 40218 Masonic Homes Kentucky – Louisville 40207 (Crescent Grove Memory and Personal Care, Grove Pointe Assisted Living Community, Miralea and Meadow Active Lifestyle Community, Sam Swope Care Center, Village Active Lifestyle Community) Westport Place Health Campus 40207 Magnolia Springs Louisville Senior Living 40222 Anthology of Louisville 40223 Creekside on Whipps Mill 40223 Park Louisville by Charter Senior Living 40223 Christian Care Communities – Middletown 40243 The Forum at Brookside 40243 StoryPoint Middletown 40243 Forest Springs Health Campus 40245 The Legacy at English Station 40245 Franciscan Health Care Center 40219 Wesley Manor Retirement Community 40219 (The Aldersgate, Health Care Center, Hoskinson House) The Springs at Stony Brook 40220 Barton House 40241 The Willows at Springhurst 40241 Morning Pointe of Louisville 40291 Forest Hills Commons 40299 Glen Ridge Health Campus 40299 Heartsong East Adult Day Health Care 40299 Heartsong Memory Care and Adult Day Health Care 40272 Park Terrace Health Campus 40272 Green Valley Care Center 47150 BeeHive Homes of Goshen/Prospect 40026 Sanders Ridge Health Campus 40047 The Grand Senior Living 40059 Hallmark House 40059 StoryPoint Prospect 40059 Shelby Farms Senior Living 40065 Cooper Trail Senior Living 40004

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Adult Day Care

Aging-in-Place Communities

Assisted Living

Hospice Care

Memory Care

Palliative Care

Personal Care

Respite Care

Rehabilitation Services

Skilled Nursing

The Aldersgate at Wesley Manor

Barton House

Price Per Month: $4945-$5375

Price Per Month: $6430

Personal Care, including rehab and physician services, geriatric psychiatrist, daily activities, chapel, beauty salon, cable TV and phone service, longtenured staff for best care. Priority placement for short-term rehab and skilled nursing. No long-term contracts, entrance fees or deposits. Located on 35 beautiful acres. No long-term contracts, entrance fees or deposits.

Designed for Alzheimer’s & memory impairments. Dignified & individualized care, from meals to the activities they participate in, and how their room is decorated. Pets to love & care for, frequent meals promoting socialization, tree-filled backyard with a patio and walking path. Staff trained in dementia. Medical care by our nurses, therapists, psychiatrist & doctor.

Owner: Methodist Retirement Home, Inc.

Owner: Goodworks

Payment: Private, LTCi, VA

Payment: Private, LTCi

Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, 24-Hr Care, Physical/ Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces

Features and Services: Showers, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, 24-Hr Care, Physical/ Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Chef on Staff

5012 E Manslick Rd, Louisville, KY 40219 (502) 969-3277 • WesMan.org

6830 Overlook Dr, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 423-7177 • bartonlouisville.com

BeeHive Homes of Goshen/Prospect 12336 US Hwy 42, Goshen, KY 40026 (502) 292-3200 • beehivehomes.com/goshen Price Per Month: $4100

The Altenheim

936 Barret Ave, Louisville, KY 40204 (502) 584-7417 thealtenheim.org Price Per Day: $100-$315 Number of beds: 32 (N/R, MC), 30 (PC) Enjoy our beautiful Highlands park-like setting with updated furnishings no matter your living arrangements – independent, assisted, personal care, memory care, nursing/rehab or short-term stay. Our selective menus with salad/cold bar offer a ton of variety. Staffing levels are above expectations and truthfully make us what we are today! Our Aging-in-Place community offers an above average staff-to-resident ratio, allowing time for visits with residents as well as necessary care. Hosparus care supports our staff when requested. We have a secure Memory Care unit, specializing in activity programs for residents offered by trained staff and volunteers. Our Personal Care option provides the independence of living at home. Owner: The Altenheim Payment: Private, LTCi Features and Services: Laundry, 24-Hour Care, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Tours/Trips, Medication Given, Pets Allowed, Chef on Staff

Your loved one will be safe 24/7 with our trained, caring staff. Our home is small for an easier transition. With our low resident to staff ratio we get to know your loved one quicker. Many activities include professional singers and exercise provided by the YMCA. Hair salon. Free cable TV and WiFi. Owner: Eric and Catherine Sherrard Payment: Private, LTCi, VA Features and Services: Transportation, Available, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Laundry, Meal Prep, 24-Hr Care, Physical/Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Game Night, Tours/ Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Chef on Staff

Christian Care Communities – Christian Health Center, Friendship House and Chapel House 920 S 4th St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 583-6533 • ChristianCareCommunities.org/Louisville Price Per Day: Varies by Level of Care We offer affordable and recently renovated apartments in Old Louisville. Easy access to nursing and support services at Health Center next door. Owner: Christian Care Communities, Inc. Payment: Medicare, Medicare Advantage Plans, Medicaid, private Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, 24-Hr Care, Physical/Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Movie Room, Chef on Staff

Anthology of Louisville

Christian Care Communities – Middletown

Price Per Day: $113-$145

Price Per Month: $3500+

The Personal Care apartments provide the stability and safety needed for residents’ independence. Our memory care utilizes innovative programs, including IN2L and FITMINDS. The supportive memory care we deliver is reflective of the resident’s lifestyles, routines and comfort levels.

Private 1 and 2-room suites, dressing and bathroom assistance, medication reminders, whirlpool spa and salon, laundry and housekeeping, chefprepared meals, staff on site 24/7, beautiful outdoor spaces, chaplain and worship services, daily activities and wellness programs, transportation assistance.

1105 Dorsey Ln, Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 966-7077 • anthologyseniorliving.com

Owner: Anthology Senior Living Payment: Private, Private Ins., LTCi, VA Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Laundry, Meal Prep, Errands, 24-Hr Care, Physical/ Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Open Kitchen, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Movie Room, Chef on Staff

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11530 Herrick Ln, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 254-1799 • Middletown.ChristianCareCommunities.org

Owner: Christian Care Communities, Inc. Payment: Private, LTCi, VA Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing Assistance, Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, 24-Hr Care, Dining Room, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Chef on Staff

CLICK THE LISTINGS TO VIEW MORE INFORMATION.


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Adult Day Care

Aging-in-Place Communities

Assisted Living

Hospice Care

Memory Care

Palliative Care

Personal Care

Respite Care

Rehabilitation Services

Skilled Nursing

Cooper Trail Senior Living

Eastern Star Home

Price Per Month: $3083-$5539

Price Per Day: $120-$207

Compassionate staff; chef-prepared meals; activities designed to nourish the mind, body and spirit; beautiful courtyards; salon; respite & outpatient services on-site. Personal Care and Memory Care also offered.

Located in beautiful Highlands! We offer Person Centered Care, strongly believing our residents and their family should have direct involvement in care decisions. Since 1952, we have been dedicated to offering a positive environment while promoting health and social interactions to exceed our resident’s expectations and enrich their lives in a traditional home setting.

325 Lincoln Way, Bardstown KY 40004 (502) 572-4329 • coopertrailsl.com

Operated by: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment: Private, LTCi Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, Errands, 24-Hr Care, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Open Kitchen, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Chef on Staff

Creekside on Bardstown

3535 Bardstown Rd, Louisville, KY 40218 (502) 919-7715 • creeksideonbardstown.com Price Per Month: $3500-$5500 Family/home like atmosphere that is all inclusive. We provide scheduled transportation to and from doctor appointments, telephone, cable, wifi, compassionate caregivers to assist with toileting, and more. We also provide 3 home-made meals per days with 3 snacks. Owner: Elmington Senior Living Payment: Private, VA, LTCi Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, Errands, 24-Hr Care, Physical/Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Movie Room, Chef on Staff

Creekside on Whipps Mill

9701 Whipps Mill Rd, Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 919-8470 • creeksideonwhippsmill.com Price Per Month: $3450-$4500 Family/home like atmosphere that is all inclusive. We provide scheduled transportation to and from doctor appointments, telephone, cable, wifi, compassionate caregivers to assist with toileting, and more. We also provide 3 home-made meals per days with 3 snacks. Owner: Elmington Senior Living Payment: Private, VA, LTCi Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, Errands, 24-Hr Care, Physical/Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Pets Allowed, Chef on Staff

Crescent Grove Memory and Personal Care 3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville KY 40207 (502) 897-4907 • masonichomesky.com Price Per Day: $176-$240 Crescent Grove provides safe and secure community living and daily life enrichment activities. The community serves residents with mild to advanced memory disorders as well as those who need daily assistance and access to 24-hour nursing care.

923 Eastern Star Ct, Louisville, KY 40204 (502) 451-3535 • easternstarhomeky.com

Owner: Order of the Eastern Star Payment: Private, VA, LTCi Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, Errands, 24-Hr Care, Physical/Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces

ElderServe Adult Day Health Center 631 S. 28th St, Louisville, KY 40211 (502) 776-3066 • elderserveinc.org Price Per Day: $60 Activities meeting needs who are frail, disabled or facing memory loss. Owner: ElderServe, Inc. Payment: Private, VA, Medicaid Waiver

Forest Hills Commons

9107 Taylorsville Rd Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 499-5533 • ASCCare.com Price Per Month: $2495-$5750 Variety of floor plans with patio or balcony options. Personalized support services by licensed nursing staff. Wide range of social and recreational programs. Specialized memory care neighborhood catering to all residents. Owner: American Senior Communities Payment: Private, LTCi, VA Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Laundry, Meal Prep, Errands, 24-Hr Care, Physical/Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Open Kitchen, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Movie Room, Chef on Staff

Forest Springs Health Campus

4120 Wooded Acre Ln, Louisville, KY 40245 (502) 243-1643 • forestspringshc.com Price Per Month: $3147-$4787 Full continuum of care, compassionate, tenured staff; 24/7 nursing care; chef-prepared meals; activities designed to nourish the mind, body and spirit; courtyards; salon; skilled nursing, short-term care, therapy services on-site. Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment: Private, Medicare, Medicaid, LTCi Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, 24-Hr Care, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Pets Allowed, Chef on Staff

Owner: Masonic Homes of Kentucky Inc. Payment: Private, Private Ins. Features and Services: Transportation Available, Showers Available, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing Assistance, Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, 24-Hour Care, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Game Night, Happy Hour, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Chef on Staff

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CLICK THE LISTINGS TO VIEW MORE INFORMATION.


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Adult Day Care

Aging-in-Place Communities

Assisted Living

Hospice Care

Memory Care

Palliative Care

Personal Care

Respite Care

Rehabilitation Services

Skilled Nursing

The Forum at Brookside

The Grand Senior Living

Price Per Day: $165-$247

Price Per Month: $4400-$6850

Number of units: Ambassador Suites, 24 Apts

Number of units: 24 (MC), 62 (PC)

There are 24 apartments in Personal Care Ambassador Suites. Newly renovated Alcove and One Bedroom residences. Elegant restaurantstyle dining room and a private landscaped courtyard with gazebo. Personal Care is a licensed “step-up” from typical assisted living, since Personal Care permits the administration of medication by licensed professionals.

Housekeeping, laundry services, 24/7 staff on site and nursing staff trained in Dementia care, activity program, fitness center, secured outdoor courtyard, menu items to delight a variety of tastes with 3 meals daily, assistance with dining, medications and incontinence management. All-inclusive pricing. Short term stays available. Signature Passion Program with family care services and support groups.

200 Brookside Dr, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 245-3048 theforumatbrookside.com

We partner with Ageility, a national leader in developing specialized rehabilitation and fitness training solutions. Through our onsite Ageility clinic, we provide easy-to-access outpatient rehab and fitness training. If you’re recovering from injury or surgery, you’ll appreciate our physical and occupational therapy that focuses on prevention and wellness. Owner: Five Star Senior Living, Inc. Payment: Private, LTCi Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Laundry, Meal Prep, Errands, 24-Hr Care, Physical/Occupational/Speech Therapy, Water/Aquatic Exercise, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Open Kitchen, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Movie Room, Chef on Staff

9300 Civic Way, Prospect, KY 40059 (502) 310-1542 thegrand-sl.com

Owner: Management, Civitas Senior Living Payment: Private, LTCi, VA Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, House Cleaning, Bathing Assistance, Dressing Assistance, Laundry, Meal Prep, 24-Hr Care, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Water/ Aquatic Exercise, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Movie Room, Chef on Staff

Franciscan Health Care Center

Green Valley Care Center

Price Per Month: $3146

Price Per Day: $282-$385

Full continuum of care, compassionate, tenured staff; chef-prepared meals; activities designed to nourish the mind, body and spirit; courtyard; salon; chapel with services; skilled nursing, short-term care, therapy services onsite.

All rooms include free basic cable, free phone line for local phone calls, and free Wi-Fi. We provide short-term rehab to home, long-term care and have a secured memory care unit.

3625 Fern Valley Rd, Louisville, KY 40219 (502) 964-3381 • franciscanhc.com

Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment: Private, LTCi, Medicare, Medicaid Features and Services: Transportation, Showers (AL), Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Laundry, Meal Prep, 24-Hr Care, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Medication Given, Open Kitchen, Outdoor Spaces, Pets Allowed (AL), Chef on Staff

3118 Green Valley Rd, New Albany IN 47150 (812) 945-2341 • greenvalleycarecenter.com

Owner: Life Care Centers of America Payment: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins., LTCi Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing Assistance, Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, 24-Hr Care, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Pets Allowed, Chef on Staff

Glen Ridge Health Campus

Grove Pointe Assisted Living

Price Per Month: $4167

Price Per Month: $4700-$6750

Full continuum of care, compassionate, tenured staff; 24/7 nursing care; chef-prepared meals; activities designed to nourish the mind, body and spirit; courtyard; salon; skilled nursing, short-term care, therapy services on-site.

Grove Pointe allows you to enjoy the privacy of your own apartment with access to all our activities and amenities. Grove Pointe offers assistance with daily activities, such as bathing, dressing and medication reminders. Most importantly, you have peace of mind knowing a friendly face and helping hand are close by and you’ll feel safe with 24/7 campus security.

6415 Calm River Way, Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 297-8590 • glenridgehc.com

Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment: Private, Medicare, Medicaid, LCTi Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, 24-Hr Care, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Chef on Staff

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3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 753-8255 • masonichomesky.com

Owner: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc. Payment: Private Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Laundry, 24-Hr Care, Physical/ Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Game Night, Happy Hour, Emergency Assistance, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Chef on Staff

CLICK THE LISTINGS TO VIEW MORE INFORMATION.


Hallmark House

Hoskinson House at Wesley Manor

Price Per Month: $5750-$6000

Price Per Month: $2990-$5310

Our 32-apt community is for individuals with memory impairment. The open floor plan consists of two large living rooms, kitchenettes, nurses station and library. Our all-inclusive rate consists of assistance with daily activities (dressing, bathing, grooming), laundry, medication management, housekeeping, and meals. Salon services available. Respite stays welcome!

Activities, salon, spa, outpatient rehab, chapel, library, ice cream parlor, WiFi, cable TV and phone service. 5 floor plans. Long-tenured staff. No longterm contracts, entrance fees or deposits. Respite stays welcome. Life Plan community with priority placement for Personal Care/Memory Support, Skilled Nursing/Rehab and Patio Homes on beautiful 35-acre campus.

Owner: J.A. Street & Associates

Owner: Methodist Retirement Home, Inc.

Payment: Private, LTCi, VA

Payment: Private, LTCi, VA

Features and Services: Showers, Separate Units, Eating Help, Meal Prep, 24-Hr Care, Physical/Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Outdoor Spaces, Pets Allowed, Movie Room, Chef on Staff

Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, 24-Hr Care, Physical/ Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Pets Allowed

Health Care Center, Wesley Manor

The Legacy at English Station

Price Per Day: $280-$320

Price Per Month: $6218

Short-term/inpatient rehab in private rooms; long-term skilled nursing care in semi-private rooms. Weekly visits by geriatric physician, psychiatrist who are on call 24/7. Regularly scheduled podiatry, dental, vision and hearing clinics. Full time chaplain. Free Wi-Fi, cable TV and phone service. Sensory stimulation and state of the art virtual reality activities. Life Plan community.

Alzheimer’s and dementia care provided by compassionate, highly trained caregivers; programs and amenities designed to honor unique life stories. Gated courtyards; family style dining; gorgeous surroundings.

10301 Coneflower Ln, Prospect, KY 40059 (502) 290-6706 • hallmarkhouseky.com

5012 East Manslick Rd, Louisville, KY 40219 (502) 969-3277 • WesMan.org

Owner: Methodist Retirement Home, Inc. Payment: Medicare, Private, Medicaid, LTCi, VA Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, 24-Hr Care, Physical/ Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces

Heartsong Adult Day Health Care 9260 Stonestreet Rd, Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 935-3300 • heartsong-mc.com Price Per Day: $66-$74 | Type: medical Activities to promote cognitive, physical, social, and spiritual well-being. Owner: Heartsong Memory Care, LLC Payment: Private, Medicaid, VA, LTCi

Heartsong East Adult Day Health Care 10720 Plantside Dr, Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 935-3300 Price Per Day: $78 | Type: medical Activities to promote cognitive, physical, social, and spiritual well-being. Owner: CJL Group, LLC

5012 E Manslick Rd, Louisville, KY 40219 (502) 969-3277 • WesMan.org

13700 English Villa Dr, Louisville, KY 40245 (502) 254-2361 • legacyatenglishstation.com

Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment: Private, LTCi Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Laundry, Meal Prep, 24-Hr Care, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Chef on Staff

Magnolia Springs Louisville Senior Living 8225 Whipps Mill Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 716-5160 • mslouisville.com Price Per Month: $2995-$7200 Home-like setting with all private apartments. Our specialized program, Heartfelt CONNECTIONS, enhances the lives of our residents by providing a safe and comfortable environment for your loved one with dementia. Owner: Life Care Services, LLC Payment: Private, LTCi, VA Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Laundry, Meal Prep, Errands, 24-Hr Care, Physical/Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Open Kitchen, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Movie Room, Chef on Staff

Payment: Private, Medicaid, LTCi

Heartsong Memory Care

9260 Stonestreet Rd, Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 935-3300 • heartsong-mc.com Price Per Month: $4950-$5250 Geriatric psych specialist & primary MD/NP visits. SHORT TERM STAYS. Owner: Heartsong Memory Care, LLC Payment: Private, LTCi

AT TODAYSTRANSITIONS.COM YOU WILL FIND: • A list of all local caregiving communities: nursing home care, home health care, assisted living, memory care, and living options. • Comprehensive directories of care communities and resources complete with features, photos, and reviews. Today's Transitions / Winter 2021-2022

73


Adult Day Care

Aging-in-Place Communities

Assisted Living

Hospice Care

Memory Care

Palliative Care

Personal Care

Respite Care

Rehabilitation Services

Masonic Homes Kentucky — Louisville Campus

Nazareth Home

Price Per Day: Varies depending on level of care

Price Per Day: $201-$340

Capacity: Independent living – 402 apts; assisted living – 48 apts; personal and memory care – 51; skilled nursing – 167

Number of beds: 48 (MC), 87 (SN), 25 (RS), 33 (PC)

3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 259-9627 masonichomesky.com

Masonic Homes Kentucky offers a full continuum of aging care services including independent living, assisted living, personal care, rehabilitation therapies, memory care, skilled nursing care, home care, dialysis, and on-site medical clinic. It offers the region’s only Life Care and Life Plan programs offering priority access and discounts on health care services for entry fee residents. Louisville Campus is situated on 82-acres and includes paved walking paths, community gardens and a resident dog park. Residents enjoy 24/7 security, chef-prepared meals, transportation, life enrichment activities, art studio and craft shop, salons and spa, movie theaters and the Lusk Family Amphitheater. Owner: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc. Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, Errands, 24-Hr Care, Physical/Occupational/Speech Therapy, Water/Aquatic Exercise, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Open Kitchen, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Movie Room, Chef on Staff

Skilled Nursing

2000 Newburg Rd, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 459-9681 nazhome.org

Nazareth Home offers rehab and restorative therapy, specializing in dementia care and personal care with an award-winning therapeutic recreation and exercise program. Experience a neighborhood living design with caring and professional staff, gourmet dining, on-site religious services, secure green spaces, daily activities, beauty shop and rehab services. Open to persons of all faith traditions. Free tours. Personal Care program includes apartments and activities designed for independence and choice. All rooms are spacious to promote recovery, privacy and family involvement. Skilled and long-term nursing care, all private rooms, exercise, social activities, massage and holistic therapy. Short stay Medicare recovery program bridging hospital to home. Owner: Nazareth Home, Inc. Payment: Private, LTCi, Medicare, Medicaid Features and Services: Showers Available, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing Assistance, Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, 24-Hr Care, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Open Kitchen, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Chef on Staff

Morning Pointe of Louisville

Nazareth Home – Clifton

Price Per Day: $106+

Price Per Day: $176-$320

Number of beds: 44 (MC); 73 (PC)

Number of beds: 12 (PC), 26 (Rehab), 69 (LTC)

Conveniently located between Watterson Trail and Bardstown Road, a single level, state-of-the-art Senior Living/Personal Care community on nine acres. Comfortable home-like environment. 24-hour licensed nursing and aide staff to assist with clinical needs in addition to personal care services.

Award-winning staff provides nursing care, short stay and outpatient rehab, activities, dining and transportation. Easy access from I-64 on U.S. 60. Therapeutic recreation and exercise programs. On-site religious services. Skilled and long-term nursing care, private rooms, exercise, social activities, massage and holistic therapy. Fine dining and activity programs. Short stay Medicare recovery program bridging hospital to home. Personal Care program includes apartments and activities designed for independence and choice. All rooms are spacious to promote privacy and family involvement.

4711 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40291 (502) 873-3800 morningpointe.com

Morning Pointe of Louisville offers early, mid and memory care services, all on our South Hurstbourne campus. 24-hour nursing care, personal care plus many services and amenities of the traditional assisted living community with the added safety and security of a specialized Alzheimer’s Center of Excellence.

2120 Payne St, Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 895-9425 nazhome.org

Owner: Nazareth Home, Inc.

Owner: Independent Healthcare Partners/Morning Pointe

Payment: Private, LTCi, Medicare, Medicaid

Payment: Private, LTCi, VA

Features and Services: Showers Available, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing Assistance, Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, 24-Hour Care, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Open Kitchen, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Chef on Staff

Features and Services: Transportation Available, Showers Available, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing Assistance, Dressing Assistance, Laundry, Meal Prep, 24-Hour Care, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Game Night, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Chef on Staff

74 Winter 2021-2022 / TodaysTransitionsNow.com

CLICK THE LISTINGS TO VIEW MORE INFORMATION.


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Adult Day Care

Aging-in-Place Communities

Assisted Living

Hospice Care

Memory Care

Palliative Care

Personal Care

Respite Care

Rehabilitation Services

Skilled Nursing

Shelby Farms Senior Living

100 Williamsburg Dr, Shelbyville KY 40065 (502) 257-9485 • shelbyfarmssl.com Coming in 2022! Compassionate staff; chef-prepared meals; activities designed to nourish the mind, body and spirit; beautiful courtyards; salon; respite & outpatient therapy services on-site. Personal Care and Memory Care also offered. Operated by: Trilogy Health Services, LLC

Park Louisville by Charter Senior Living

Payment: Private, LTCi

Price Per Month: $3500-$4700

Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, Errands, 24-Hr Care, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Open Kitchen, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Chef on Staff

10451 Linn Station Rd, Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 423-8776 parklouisville.com

Park Louisville’s goal is simple, “to enhance the human spirit.” Our values are demonstrated by our dementia experts and passionate care partners who deliver unparalleled life experiences. Park Louisville provides premier personal care services that empower residents to live their life with dignity. As one of Louisville’s first stand-alone memory care communities, our renowned memory care program sets us apart. Flourish Memory Care is supported by leading-edge research – that people living with Alzheimer’s and dementia can grow and flourish, regardless of where they may be on their journey. Our exclusive memory care program provides therapeutic activities that focus on cognitive, creative, community, motivation, physical, social, and spiritual wellness. We offer furnished, move-in ready suites for immediate residency. All-inclusive care is provided: medication administration, bathing, dressing, grooming, housekeeping and meals (cueing provided), a spacious courtyard, weekly bus outings, on-site therapy services (Physical, Occupational, and Speech Pathology), in-house therapy gym, with 24-hr medical and psychiatric staff available. Transportation to physician appointments with escort services offered. Owner: Charter Senior Living Payment: Private

The Springs at Stony Brook

2200 Stony Brook Dr, Louisville, KY 40220 (502) 491-4692 • springsatstonybrook.com Price Per Month: $2476-$5871 Alzheimer’s and dementia care provided by compassionate, highly trained caregivers; programs and amenities designed to honor unique life stories. Full continuum of care; gated courtyards; family style dining; gorgeous surroundings. Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment: Private, Medicare, Medicaid, LTCi Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, 24-Hr Care, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Happy Hour, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Movie Room, Chef on Staff

Park Terrace Health Campus

StoryPoint Middletown

Price Per Day: $283

Price Per Month: $3400-$4300

On-site skilled nursing and secured memory care services delivered by a compassionate, tenured team. Private and semi-private rooms; 24/7 nursing care.

From assistance with medication to support with daily activities, coordinating appointments and more, assisted living at StoryPoint offers 24-hour support to provide our residents with the care they need, when they need it.

9700 Stonestreet Rd, Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 995-6600 • parkterracehc.com

Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment: Medicare, Medicaid, Private, Private Ins. Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, 24-Hr Care, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Chef on Staff

500 Meridian Hills Dr, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 306-3827 • storypoint.com

Owner: StoryPoint Senior Living Payment: Private, VA, LTCi Features and Services: Transportation Available, Showers Available, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing Assistance, Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, 24-Hour Care, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Open Kitchen, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Movie Room, Chef on Staff

Sanders Ridge Health Campus

StoryPoint Prospect

Price Per Month: $3404-$7740

Price Per Month: $3500+

Full continuum of care, compassionate staff; 24/7 nursing care; chefprepared meals; activities designed to nourish the mind, body and spirit; beautiful courtyards; salon; skilled nursing, short-term care, therapy services on-site. Personal Care and Memory Care also offered.

Designed for those experiencing dementia or other memory impairments, our memory care service offers intentional programming, specially trained employees, unique community features and more.

119 E Sanders Lane, Mt. Washington KY 40047 (502) 251-3821 • sandersridgehc.com

Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment: Medicare, Medicaid, LTCi, Private Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, Errands, 24-Hr Care, Physical/Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Open Kitchen, Garden, Pets Allowed, Chef on Staff

76 Winter 2021-2022 / TodaysTransitionsNow.com

6901 Carslaw Court, Prospect, KY 40059 (502) 907-3778 • storypoint.com/community/prospect-ky

Owner: StoryPoint Senior Living Payment: Private, VA, LTCi Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing Assistance, Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, Errands, 24-Hour Care, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Open Kitchen, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Movie Room, Chef on Staff

CLICK THE LISTINGS TO VIEW MORE INFORMATION.


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Adult Day Care

Aging-in-Place Communities

Assisted Living

Hospice Care

Memory Care

Twinbrook Assisted Living

3525 Ephraim McDowell Dr, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 452-6330 • twinbrookassistedliving.com Price Per Month: $2750-$3150 Private apartments with emergency call cords, planned activities, medication reminders, assistance with bathing, dressing, grooming, three meals daily, transportation to shopping, charges for additional services may apply. Staff on duty 24 hours. Family owned & operated. Mass 6 days/week. Owner: Bryan S McCoy, Inc. Payment: Private, VA, LTCi Features and Services: Transportation Available, Showers Available, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing Assistance, Dressing Assistance, Laundry, Meal Prep, Errands, 24-Hour Care, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Game Night, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Chef on Staff

Westport Place Health Campus 4247 Westport Rd, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 893-3033 • westportplacehc.com Price Per Month: $5112 Full continuum of care, compassionate, tenured staff; 24/7 nursing care; chef-prepared meals; activities designed to nourish the mind, body and spirit; courtyard; salon; skilled nursing, short-term care, therapy services on-site. Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment: Private, Medicare, Medicaid, LTCi Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, 24-Hr Care, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Chef on Staff

The Willows at Springhurst

3101 N Hurstbourne Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 412-3775 • willowsatspringhurst.com Price Per Month: $4550-$5878 Full continuum of care, compassionate, tenured staff; 24/7 nursing care; chef-prepared meals; activities designed to nourish the mind, body and spirit; courtyards; salon; skilled nursing, short-term care, therapy services on-site. Independent living Villas at Cornell Trace also available. Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment: Private, Medicare, Medicaid, LTCi Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, 24-Hr Care, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Chef on Staff

UofL Health — Frazier Rehab Institute 200 Abraham Flexner Way, Louisville, KY 40202 (502) 582-7400 • UofLHealth.com Price Per Day: $1800 Inpatient/stroke/brain injury/spinal cord injury/cancer rehab; PT/OT/ST. Owner: UofL Health Payment: Medicare, Medicaid, private ins., LTCi, VA

FIND CARE OPTIONS Search for care options by locations, keywords, and categories. TodaysTransitions.com offers comprehensive directories of care communities and resources complete with features, photos, and reviews. 78 Winter 2021-2022 / TodaysTransitionsNow.com

Palliative Care

Personal Care

Respite Care

Rehabilitation Services

Skilled Nursing

Active Day of Hikes Point 3403 Breckenridge Ln, Louisville, KY 40220 Cost per day: $50-$72 Active Day of Watterson Park 1920 Goldsmith Ln, Louisville, KY 40218 Cost per day: $50-$72 Alternative Adult Day Health Care Center 147 Wilma Ave, Louisville, KY 40229 Cost per day: $50 (varies) Amber Oaks Assisted Living 156 Haven Hill Rd, Shelbyville, KY 40065 Cost per month: $1950-$2900 Atria Elizabethtown 133 Heartland Dr, Elizabethtown, KY 42701 Cost per month: $4850+ Atria Springdale 4501 Springdale Rd, Louisville, KY 40241 Cost per month: $4850+ Atria Stony Brook 3451 S Hurstbourne Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40299 Cost per month: $4850+ Atria St. Matthews 120 S Hubbards Ln, Louisville, KY 40207 Cost per month: $4850+ Autumn Woods Health Campus 2911 Green Valley Rd, New Albany, IN 47150 Cost per day: $238+ Azalea Hills Assisted Living 3700 Lafayette Pkwy, Floyds Knobs, IN 47119 Cost per month: $1825-$4125 Baptist Health La Grange Rehab and Skilled Care 1025 New Moody Ln, La Grange, KY 40031 Cost per day: $332 Baptist Health Louisville Acute Rehabilitation 4000 Kresge Way, Louisville, KY 40207 Cost per day: varies based on ins. coverage BeeHive Homes of Brandenburg 103 Commerce Dr, Brandenburg, KY 40108 Cost per month: $3400-$3600 BeeHive Homes of Goshen/Prospect 12336 US Hwy 42, Goshen, KY 40026 Cost per day: $125 BeeHive Homes of Lyndon 8401 La Grange Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 Cost per month: $3400-$4000 BeeHive Homes of Smyrna 8800 Smyrna Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40228 Cost per month: $3400-$5100 Belmont Village Senior Living Community 4600 Bowling Blvd, Louisville, KY 40207 Cost per day: $105-$224 Bennett Place Senior Living 3928 Horne Ave, New Albany, IN 47150 Cost per month: $2400-$3000 Brookdale Stonestreet 9521 Stonestreet Rd, Louisville 40272 Cost per month: $2420-$3930 Cherokee Park Rehabilitation 2100 Millvale Rd, Louisville, KY 40205 Cost per day: $257-$428 Christian Health Center – The Meadow 920 S 4th St, Louisville, KY 40203 Cost per day: $285-$307 Clark Rehabilitation & Skilled Nursing Facility 517 North Little League Blvd, Clarksville, IN 47129 Cost per day: $170-$275 Clifton Oaks Center 446 Mt. Holly Ave, Louisville, KY 40206 Cost per day: $215-$239 CountrySide Meadows 640 Jericho Rd, La Grange, KY 40031 Cost per month: $2350-$4350 Crescent Place 148 Allen Dr, Shelbyville, KY 40065 Cost per month: $2400-$3500 Dominion Senior Living of Louisville 6000 Hunting Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 Cost per month: $3725-$4990


Elmcroft of Mount Washington 520 Woodlake Dr, Mount Washington, KY 40047 Cost per month: $3000+ Enclave of East Louisville 100 Shelby Station Dr, Louisville, KY 40245 Cost per month: $4441-$7361 Episcopal Church Home 7504 Westport Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 Cost per day: $173-$316 Essex Nursing and Rehabilitation Center 9600 Lamborne Blvd, Louisville, KY 40272 Cost per day: $250 Exceptional Teens & Adults P.O. Box 1051, Louisville, KY 40201 Cost per day: $50-$80 Freedom Adult Day Healthcare 4511 Bardstown Rd, Louisville, KY 40218 Cost per hour: $12, half-day min. Gathering Club 4940 Hazelwood Ave, Louisville, KY 40214 Cost per day: $67 Genesis Crestview Center 1871 Midland Trail, Shelbyville, KY 40065 Cost per day: $245-$270 Genesis Kensington Center 225 St. John Rd, Elizabethtown, KY 42701 Cost per day: $262-$406 Genesis Klondike Center 3802 Klondike Ln, Louisville, KY 40218 Cost per day: $298-$323 Genesis Regency Center 1550 Raydale Dr, Louisville, KY 40219 Cost per day: $240-$283 Georgetown Manor Nursing and Rehab 900 Gagel Ave, Louisville, KY 40216 Cost per day: $197-$211 Green Meadows Health Care Center 310 Boxwood Run Rd, Mt. Washington, KY 40047 Cost per day: $220-$305 Harrison Healthcare Center 150 Beechmont Dr, Corydon, IN 47112 Cost per day: $245 Hellenic Senior Living 2632 Grant Line Rd, New Albany, IN 47150 Cost per month: $3600-$3900 Helmwood Healthcare 106 Diecks Dr, Elizabethtown, KY 42701 Cost per day: $218-$252 Highlands Health & Rehabilitation Center 1705 Stevens Ave, Louisville, KY 40205 Cost per day: $185-$200 Hillcreek Rehabilitation and Care Center 3116 Breckinridge Ln, Louisville, KY 40220 Cost per day: $255-$280 Hillcrest Centre for Health and Rehabilitation 203 Sparks Ave, Jeffersonville, IN 47130 Cost per day: $159-$250 Hometown Manor Assisted Living of Bardstown 103 Manor Dr, Bardstown, KY 40004 Cost per month: $2200-$2500 Hometown Manor Assisted Living of Shelbyville 74 Mack Walters Rd, Shelbyville, KY 40065 Cost per month: $2000-$2400 Ideal Care Inc. 1702 Gardiner Ln, Louisville, KY 40205 Cost per month: $3900-$5400 Indian Creek Healthcare Center 240 Beechmont Dr, Corydon, IN 47112 Cost per day: $155-$240 Jeffersontown Rehabilitation 3500 Good Samaritan Way, Jeffersontown, KY 40299 Cost per day: $218-$253 Just Family Adult Day Center 127 Lees Valley Rd, Shepherdsville, KY 40165 Cost per day: $61.60 Landmark of Louisville (formerly Parkway) 1155 Eastern Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40217 Cost per day: $220-$245

Lifestyle Adult Care Home 1610 Blackiston View Dr, Clarksville, IN 47129 Cost per month: $2250-$3750 Lincoln Hills Health Center 326 Country Club Dr, New Albany, IN 47150 Cost per day: $184-$214 Louisville East Post-Acute 4200 Browns Ln, Louisville, KY 40220 Cost per day: $246-$358 Lyndon Woods Care and Rehabilitation 1101 Lyndon Ln, Louisville, KY 40222 Cost per month: $6772-$7787 Magnolia Springs East Louisville Senior Living 13600 La Grange Rd, Louisville, KY 40245 Cost per month: $3615-$7035 The Mansion on Main 1420 East Main St, New Albany, IN 47150 Cost per month: $3465-$4095 Maple Manor Christian Homes, Inc. 643 West Utica St, Sellersburg, IN 47172 Cost per day: $180 Masonic Home of Shelbyville 711 Frankfort Rd, Shelbyville, KY 40065 Cost per day: $236-$295 Masonic Home of Shelbyville – The Pillars 711 Frankfort Rd, Shelbyville, KY 40065 Cost per month: $2174-$3043 New Albany Nursing & Rehabilitation 201 E Elm St, New Albany, IN 47150 Cost per month: $1500-$2400 New Castle Nursing & Rehab 50 Adams St, New Castle, KY 40050 Cost per day: $217-$204 Oaks Assisted Living 1010 Richwood Way, La Grange, KY 40031 Cost per month: $3080-$3410 Peggy's Place Adult Life Center 1730 Audubon Dr, Ste 100, New Albany, IN 47150 Cost per day: $75 Providence — A Diversicare Community 4915 Charlestown Rd, New Albany, IN 47150 Cost per day: $222-$332 Regis Woods 4604 Lowe Rd, Louisville, KY 40220 Cost per day: $275-$523 Richwood Nursing & Rehab 1012 Richwood Way, La Grange, KY 40031 Cost per day: $202-$233 Riverbend Assisted Living 2715 Charlestown Pike, Jeffersonville, IN 47130 Cost per month: $2150-$4995 Rivers Edge Nursing & Rehabilitation Center 6301 Bass Rd, Prospect, KY 40059 Cost per day: $202-$208 RiverSide Meadows 308 E. Chestnut St, Jeffersonville, IN 47130 Cost per day: $55 Riverview Village 586 Eastern Blvd, Clarksville, IN 47129 Cost per day: $135-$160 Rolling Hills Healthcare Center 3625 St. Joseph Rd, New Albany, IN 47150 Cost per day: $224 Rose Anna Hughes Home at Westminster 2120 Buechel Bank Rd, Louisville, KY 40218 Cost per day: $65-$134 Sam Swope Care Center 3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 Cost per day: $295-$360 Sellersburg Healthcare Center 7823 Old Hwy 60, Sellersburg, IN 47172 Cost per day: $143-$241 Seneca Place 3526 Dutchman’s Ln, Louisville, KY 40205 Cost per day: $231-$273 Signature Healthcare at Jefferson Manor 1801 Lynn Way, Louisville, KY 40222 Cost per day: $255-$278

Signature Healthcare at Jefferson Place 1705 Herr Ln, Louisville, KY 40222 Cost per day: $295 Signature Healthcare at Rockford Rehab & Wellness Center 4700 Quinn Dr, Louisville, KY 40216 Cost per day: $223-$240 Signature Healthcare at Summerfield Rehab & Wellness Center 1877 Farnsley Rd, Louisville, KY 40216 Cost per day: $242-$266 Signature Healthcare of East Louisville 2529 Six Mile Ln, Louisville, KY 40220 Cost per day: $250-$310 Signature Healthcare of South Louisville 1120 Cristland Rd, Louisville, KY 40214 Cost per day: $240-$450 Signature Healthcare of Sts. Mary & Elizabeth Hospital 1850 Bluegrass Ave, Louisville, KY 40215 Cost per day: $500 Southern Indiana Rehab Hospital 3104 Blackiston Blvd, New Albany, IN 47150 Cost per day: $600-$1300 St. Matthews Care Center 227 Browns Ln, Louisville, KY 40207 Cost per day: $214-$254 Sunrise of Louisville 6700 Overlook Dr, Louisville, KY 40241 Cost per day: $98-$110 Sycamore Heights 2141 Sycamore Ave, Louisville, KY 40206 Cost per day: $224-$258 Symphony at Valley Farms 10201 Valley Farms Blvd, Louisville, KY 40272 Cost per month: $3754-$5330 Thornton Terrace Health Campus 188 Thornton Rd, Hanover, IN 47243 Cost per month: $3495+ Traditions at Beaumont 10210 Long Home Rd, Louisville, KY 40291 Cost per month: $3075-$4700 Treyton Oak Towers 211 W. Oak St, Louisville, KY 40203 Cost per day: $154-$400 Tri-County Community Action Agency Adult Day Program 1015 Dispatchers Way, La Grange, KY 40031 Cost per day: $72 or $9/hr Twin Oaks Assisted Living 98 Adams St, New Castle, KY 40050 Cost per month: $1950-$3000 Valhalla Post Acute 300 Shelby Station Dr, Louisville, KY 40245 Cost per day: $290 The Villages at Historic Silvercrest 1 Silvercrest Dr, New Albany, IN 47150 Cost per month: $4161+ The Villas of Guerin Woods 1002 Sister Barbara Way, Georgetown, IN 47122 Cost per day: $120-$310 Wedgewood Healthcare Center 101 Potters Ln, Clarksville, IN 47129 Cost per day: $221-$270 Westminster Health & Rehab Center 2210 Greentree North, Clarksville, IN 47129 Cost per day: $210 Westminister Terrace 2116 Buechel Bank Rd, Louisville, KY 40218 Cost per day: $253-$284 Westminster Village 2200 Greentree Blvd N, Clarksville, IN 47129 Cost per month: $2875-$3985 Wickshire Blankenbaker 903 Blankenbaker Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40243 Cost per month: $2395-$4925 Windsor Ridge Assisted Living 2700 Waters Edge Pkwy, Jeffersonville, IN 47130 Cost per month: $2850-$3250

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CAREGIVER TRY THIS!

By Carrie Vittitoe

Eat This!

S

tacey Freibert, owner of Seeds and Greens Natural Market & Deli in New Albany, Indiana, has a simple smoothie recipe that is perfect for breakfast or a midday snack, especially in fall and winter when we’re craving pumpkin-flavored everything. In addition to tasting great, this smoothie is chock-full of ingredients with anti-inflammatory properties.

Anti-Inflammatory Pumpkin Smoothie ITEMS/INGREDIENTS NEEDED: • Blender to mix all ingredients • 8 ounces unsweetened almond milk or any unsweetened milk of your choice (cow/soy/nut) • ½ banana, pre-sliced and frozen* • 4-5 slices of frozen peaches (can be purchased in frozen food section of grocery) • 2 pumpkin cubes** • Collagen peptide powder, 1 scoop (8-10 grams) • Ginger, dash or two • Turmeric, dash or two • Cinnamon, dash or two *Do not use fresh fruit in this smoothie. Frozen fruits make the consistency smooth and creamy. Fresh fruits will be too runny. You can slice and freeze your own bananas (a perfect use for too-ripe ones) or purchase a bag of frozen pre-sliced bananas from your local grocery. **To make pumpkin cubes, take an ice cube tray and in a small bowl mix equal parts canned pumpkin with water. Scoop the mixture of pumpkin/water into the tray and freeze. Using frozen pumpkin without adding water is hard on blender equipment.

Take This!

Collagen is a health supplement that provides a number of benefits, especially to athletes and individuals over age 60. It is a protein that plays a role in a number of body functions, including the health and flexibility of connective tissue and the strength of nails and hair. When joint aches and pains are worsened by the cold of winter, and hair and nails are brittle from the dry air, a collagen peptide powder can be added to smoothies, soups, or even a cup of coffee. 80 Winter 2021-2022 / TodaysTransitionsNow.com

Do This!

Take a class to keep yourself flexible during the winter months. The UofL Trager Institute Republic Bank Foundation Optimal Aging Clinic offers classes, both in person and virtually, to help keep you flexible during the winter when it is all too easy to sit around and become stiff. On Wednesdays at 9am, the Trager Institute offers virtual Slow Flow Yoga. If the cold of winter really gets to you, Trager offers massage therapy services on Fridays from 12pm - 5pm. For more information on these and other wellness services, contact Trager at 502.588.4340 or tragerinstitute.org.


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