Today's Transitions RENEWAL Spring 2022

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Renewal SPRING 2022

Paint

A BRIGHT LIFE

FIND A NEW DIRECTION GROW THE BEST PLANTS TRAVEL SOMEWHERE NEW KEEP YOUR LOVED ONES CLOSE



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contents SPRING 2022

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The Shady Dell in Bisbee, Arizona

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Letter From the Editor TodaysTransitions.com Happenings

Passions

10 Renew Your Spirits With A Road Trip 14 I Love My... 16 Entertainment 18 A Visit With... 20 Retirement 24 Volunteer 26 Gardening

Wellness

28 Three Food Groups That Can Change Your Life 32 Fitness 34 Renew Your Skin

Lifestyle

38 Add Some Sizzle With An Outdoor Kitchen 42 Things To Do 44 Spring Cookout 46 People 47 Making Space 48 Living Options Directory

Caregiver

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GOT SOMETHING TO SAY? We’d love to hear from you! Send an email to editor@todaysmedianow.com and put “feedback” in the subject line. Also, don’t forget to visit TodaysTransitions.com to read articles that can help you navigate your own transitions.

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Building A Backyard Addition Solutions Schedules There’s No Place Like Home Home Health Services Directory Care Community Directory Try This!

WE’RE SOCIAL: GO BEYOND PRINT @TodaysTransitionsNow


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SPRING 2022 | VOL. 19 | NO. 1

PUBLISHER Cathy S. Zion publisher@todaysmedianow.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Anita Oldham editor@todaysmedianow.com CREATIVE DESIGN DIRECTOR Jill Cobb jill@todaysmedianow.com

Renewal What needs to be replaced or repaired in your world? Maybe it is as simple as a paint job. Or perhaps your life has something bigger to repair, rebuild, or replace. The first step to renewal is clarity — the realization that you want to live differently. Turn the pages to find someone or something to inspire a renewal in some area of your life.

ORANGE: FUN, STRENGTH, COURAGE, CREATIVITY • Take a road trip. p.10 • Start a new “job” or way of living. p.20 • Build an outdoor kitchen. p.38

GREEN: HEALTH, WISDOM, NATURE • Find out some great things to eat for your health. p.28 • Take a walk every day — like this woman. p.32 • Look into skin beauty products for yourself. p.34

RED: PASSION, ENERGY • For the love of the stars — she looks up. p.14 • She loves creating food in her new cafe. p.18 • Grow a beautiful garden with these secrets. p.26

PINK: CARING, PLAYFUL • She volunteers to help with marriages. p.24 • Learn from others who are caring for those they love. p.58 • Create a good day. p.60 — Anita Oldham, Editor-in-Chief 6 Spring 2022 / TodaysTransitions.com

Yellow is featured on the cover to symbolize happiness and warmth during this spring season. We encourage you to welcome a range of colors into your life for balance and brightness.

CAMPAIGN MANAGER Jessica Alyea jessica@todaysmedianow.com EDITORIAL/CONTENT MANAGER Lindsay McDonald lindsay@todaysmedianow.com CLIENT SERVICES MANAGER Scheri Stewart Mullins scheri@todaysmedianow.com SENIOR MEDIA CONSULTANTS Teri Hickerson teri@todaysmedianow.com Joyce Inman joyce@todaysmedianow.com COVER PHOTO iStock Photo by Grafner Today’s Transitions is published quarterly by: Zion Publications, LLC 1640 Lyndon Farm Court, Suite 108 Louisville, KY 40223 Phone: 502.327.8855 TodaysTransitions.com The opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the position of the publisher. Today’s Transitions magazine does not endorse or guarantee any advertiser’s product or service. Copyright 2022 by Zion Publications LLC, all rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited without permission from Zion Publications LLC.

ADVERTISE: Call 502.327.8855 or email advertising@todaysmedianow.com. REPRINTS: Call 502.327.8855 or email reprints@todaysmedianow.com.

SUBSCRIBE: Send $10 to the above address for 4 quarterly issues.


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TODAYSTRANSITIONS.COM HAPPENINGS

What’s New at TodaysTransitions.com:

TODAY’S TASTE:

GREEN GODDESS SALAD Each month on TodaysTransitions.com, you will find a new recipe developed just for our audience.

Derby Ready? We didn’t forget the Kentucky Derby — we know it is the hallmark of spring in Kentuckiana. We will have the inside scoop on what to do, what to wear, and what to eat during the month of April at TodaysTransitions.com. POSITIVE THINKING:

HOW TO FIND YOUR ZEAL

Read wisdom from Bob Mueller about living with a zest that could change your day-to-day life. Listen to A Podcast Want to hear more from Joanne Berryman (featured in this issue on page 46)? Check her out on the podcast Aging With Grace 55+, an audio podcast for upbeat, mature adults. Listen at AWG55.com or search on places you listen to podcasts (such as Spotify, Apple, or Google). 8 Spring 2022 / TodaysTransitions.com

Stay Connected With Our Newsletters Choose the news you want the most — Beautiful Living, Caregiving and Health, Local Happenings, Digital Edition, or all. Sign up for our newsletters by scanning the QR code.

Engage With Us on Social Media @TodaysTransitionsNow #ConnectWithTT


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passions

14 I Love My... | 16 Entertainment | 18 A Visit With... | 20 Retirement | 24 Volunteer | 26 Gardening

RENEW YOUR SPIRITS WITH A ROAD TRIP PLACES YOU DIDN’T REALIZE YOU SHOULD GO. By Megan S. Willman | Photos submitted PAGE 12 >>

Over the years the red cabooses of The Red Caboose Motel & Restaurant in Ronks, Pennsylvania were painted bright colors to represent classic railroads across the United States.

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PASSIONS RENEW YOUR SPIRITS

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hhhh, do you feel it? That sense of rebirth and hope; the inkling to embrace something new. In the spring, that feeling is everywhere if we take time to notice. As the world around us begins to renew itself, what a great time for us to do the same, treating ourselves with something new and different— a vacation! Now more than ever we may be looking for chances to see and do things we’ve never done before. We’ve been reminded that our time is precious, and we should celebrate it. Today’s Transitions spoke with Beth Chaffin, travel specialist with Unlimited Travel Consultants, who shared some unique trip ideas for those who are willing to trade in their sunscreen and beach towel for some adventure. “A vacation refreshes our spirits, but what I think of these days is how to foster a renewed sense of hope. We’ve had a rough few years, but we can have the new adventures of our dreams. There is a lot going on, and many wonderful and unusual places to go,” Beth says. Here are just a few possibilities.

THE SHADY DELL IN BISBEE, ARIZONA Perhaps you fancy a road trip on historic Highway 80, which spans from Savannah, Georgia to San Diego, California. In the 1920s, Bisbee, Arizona had a trailer park that served as a camping and resting spot for those traveling the long road. In keeping with that heritage, The Shady Dell Vintage Trailer Court has been in operation for more than 30 years. Their uniquely decorated trailers are practical, functional, and retro chic. Dot’s Diner is well known for its delicious fare. This is a laid-back, modernized trip to the past that will engage couples and families alike. And you can get there on an airplane if the idea of that long road trip doesn’t bring joy to your heart. theshadydell.com

Photo by Kelley and Sergio Photography

“I HOPE THESE OPTIONS REMIND EVERYONE THAT THERE IS SO MUCH TO SEE AND DO IN OUR COUNTRY, OFTEN IN TUCKED-AWAY PLACES WE NEVER KNEW WERE THERE.” – BETH CHAFFIN

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HE WISTERIA TREE HOUSE CABIN T IN DORA, MISSOURI For those who want to relax and revel in the beauty of the Ozarks, Beth recommends The Wisteria Tree House Cabin in Dora, Missouri. Nestled high in the trees, some might choose to curl up with a good book by the fireplace or grab a pair of binoculars to observe the scenery and wildlife in the area. For those seeking more adventure, options such as hiking, fly-fishing, kayaking, and canoeing abound. “This trip can be a grand outdoor adventure or a peaceful commune with nature. It can be both of those things all at once. At the end of every day, you get to sleep in a treehouse–your very own cabin in the sky,” Beth says. treehousecabins.com/missouri-wisteria-cabin

L’BANCA ALBERGO IN LAKE ARTHUR, LOUISIANA Tucked into the Louisiana countryside is L’Banca Albergo (The Bank Hotel) where the motto is May All Who Enter as Guests Leave as Friends. Named for its original purpose, this historic site was once a bank. Now a boutique hotel with eight luxury suites, L’Banca offers a family-friendly and welcoming experience. Just a quick walk from the hotel brings you to a sandy beach, complete with playgrounds and picnic areas. Visitors can choose from area highlights such as the Bayou Rum Distillery, Lake Charles, the Tupper Museum, and authentic southern cuisine. For the more adventurous traveler, there is even the chance to hold a baby alligator! labankhotel.com

HE RED CABOOSE MOTEL & RESTAURANT T IN RONKS, PENNSYLVANIA All Aboard! If you’ve always wanted to know what it’s like to stay on a train, the Red Caboose Motel in Ronks, Pennsylvania can fulfill that wish. The individually decorated caboose cars have been modified to accommodate individuals, couples, and families large and small. They even offer a honeymoon caboose. Travelers sleep and dine on the train for a very authentic experience. Ronks, nearby Strasburg, and other surrounding towns in Lancaster County are the heart of Amish country. Visitors can shop, tour, and immerse themselves in Amish tradition, history, and culture. The town is also home to the famous Gospel Jubilee, which hopes to open for performances this year. There is a great deal to see and do in Ronks. “It’s a simple thing, but I’m a fan of the old Nickelodeon player piano that sits on the front porch at the Red Caboose,” Beth says. “It makes me happy.” redcaboosemotel.com Did you know? Travelers with autism can request accommodations that make their trips more pleasant for them. Beth, who is also a Certified Autism Travel Professional, knows that travel apprehension can be a factor for people with autism. “I had a client a few years back who never took family trips because her grandson had autism. This doesn’t have to be a barrier to creating family vacation memories. I want people to know they can seek agents like me who are certified to help.” Today’s Transitions / Spring 2022

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PASSIONS I LOVE MY...

By Megan S. Willman | Photo by Erika Doll

Look Up! “SCIENTISTS ARE LEARNING NEW THINGS ALL THE TIME, AND I CAN LISTEN, LEARN, AND BE PART OF THAT.”

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o you remember Casey Kasem and his oft-repeated mantra: “Keep your feet on the ground and keep reaching for the stars”? This could very well be Pat Stewart’s motto, who serves as a volunteer and board member at large for the Louisville Astronomical Society (LAS). After retiring as a teaching assistant from Jefferson County Public Schools, Pat began to look for new ways to keep learning and stay engaged in the community. A friend suggested that she check into the Astronomical Society where Pat quickly found her passion. “I love everything about it,” Pat says, “It’s science in the making!” Pat was in seventh grade when John Glenn orbited the earth, and she had just graduated high school as Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. She has been fascinated with space ever since. Her love of our outer atmosphere was rekindled about five years ago when Pat attended an event called Bernheim at Night: Spring Star Stories and Sky Watch led by astronomer and LAS Board Chairman, Don Spain. “By the end of the evening, I was hooked! The sky was perfect; we didn’t even need a flashlight. He pointed out so many planets and stars, and truly got everyone excited,” Pat says. She joined LAS shortly thereafter. The group meets at the planetarium at E.P. Tom Sawyer State Park, and at the LAS Dark Site, an observatory in Curby, Indiana. At first worried that she would need her own telescope, Pat quickly found that purchasing one was not necessary. In addition to group gatherings, Pat works with the kids at LAS events, hands out stickers, takes their photos with life-size astronaut cut-outs, and helps point out the features in the night sky that the astronomers are discussing. “Just to be in this ever-changing atmosphere is incredible. Scientists are learning new things all the time, and I can listen, learn, and be part of that,” Pat says. She has seen planetary conjunctions, which occur when two or more planets can be observed at one time in the sky. “They have found there is now water on Mars, and it’s so exciting to hear the scientists speculate on what that could mean for the future.” Pat has enjoyed learning more about space travel, the speed of light, and the International Space Station. She eagerly awaits the day when the first photos return from NASA’s Golden Eye Telescope. Not only does Pat feel she has a front-row seat to the latest scientific happenings, she loves other benefits to her sky-study hobby. “Being part of LAS gets me out, keeps me active, and gives me a chance to mix and mingle with new people,” she says. “I’d like to invite everyone to come out and join the Louisville Astronomical Society. Where else can they get a chance to walk among the stars?” 14 Spring 2022 / TodaysTransitions.com

While she treasures all that space and sky have to teach her, Pat stays close to the ground when asked to choose one earthly item that brings her joy. “I collected a lot of special stamps, framed them, and put them in my living room to enjoy. There are solar system stamps, as well as ones picturing the sun, the moon, and Pluto. I also included the Star Trek Final Frontier stamps,” Pat says. Pat can’t spend every day in an observatory (although she goes as often as possible), but these special mementos allow her to appreciate on a daily basis the hobby that has come to mean so much to her.


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PASSIONS ENTERTAINMENT

By Vanessa Hutchison

What We’re Listening To, Reading, and Watching…

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f you’re like me, your New Year’s resolutions may have already been slipping by the end of January. Fortunately, spring is a perfect time for renewal and reinvention. So whether you’re trying to renew your commitment to read a book every month, or just wanting to explore how others may take the opportunity to reinvent themselves, these entertainment picks are for you. CHECK OUT THIS ALBUM: The Lumineers: Brightside While The Lumineers became popular in 2012 for their self-titled album featuring catchy earworm hits like Ho Hey, more recent releases have marked a slow departure from their start in some really inventive ways. Brightside is no exception. And yet, on this short album, fans will still find the same commitment to creative storytelling that has always been part of the band’s persona. Here, however, the result is stripped down and raw, with an underproduced sound that feels almost like sitting around the fire and hanging out with the band. The last two years, if nothing else, have brought us seemingly increased intimacy with our favorite artists as they’ve streamed entire concerts from their living rooms, and invited us to follow them on social media. This fits The Lumineers’ laid-back folksy vibe more than most, and I, for one, am totally here for it.

CHECK OUT THIS BOOK: Violeta by Isabel Allende Chilean-American writer Isabel Allende is often compared to Gabriel Garcia Marquez for her poetic use of prose and depictions of magical realism in her work. But her last book, The Soul of a Woman, is a nonfiction meditation on what it means to be a woman in a patriarchal society. It is exciting to see Allende return to the world of fiction with Violeta, a novel about a woman whose 100 years of life have afforded her many great opportunities to see the world change and grow around her. Comparisons to Marquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude will be inevitable, but fans of Virginia Woolf ’s Orlando may find love within the incredible character that Allende has created here as well. 16 Spring 2022 / TodaysTransitions.com

CHECK OUT THIS SERIES: Inventing Anna In 2017, in a truly remarkable and unbelievable story of reinvention, Anna Delvey managed to convince the elite socialites of New York that she was a German heiress; that she was one of them. This is the story that is told in the Netflix limited series, Inventing Anna. Starring Julia Garner (Ozark) and Laverne Cox (Orange is the New Black), Inventing Anna is one of those rare series that manages to somehow keep you in suspense even when you know the ultimate outcome. Lovers of true crime will want to binge-watch all 10 episodes in one sitting, but anyone who enjoys watching the “elite” get outsmarted at every turn should definitely tune in.


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PASSIONS A VISIT WITH...

By Lucy M. Pritchett | Photos submitted

Serving Up Creativity On A Plate

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ometimes opportunities will arrive at the oddest moments. In Terri Lynn Doyle’s case, her longtime dream of opening a cafe came true in the midst of a pandemic. Since 1999, her company, Terri Lynn’s Catering by Design, grew from a 6-foot table in a kitchen in Jeffersonville to a spot in Highlander Point in Floyds Knobs to exclusive catering services for The McCulloch House in Clarksville. Then, in 2021 — COVID-19 or not — she opened Terri Lynn’s Cafe & Catering in downtown New Albany.

Terri Lynn with one of her catered box lunches and signature purple ribbon.

PLAN FOR THE CAFE? In my mind the cafe will be a bougie little place where you can spend time over lunch with your friends or have tea and a muffin. CAN’T QUITE GET THE KNACK OF? I do struggle with decorated cakes. I can do a four-layer salted pumpkin cake dessert but not the fancy buttercream roses-and-leaves type of cake. OOPS! MOMENT? In August — a month after we opened — I broke my foot! I was really depressed after that because I was so looking forward to being at the cafe and creating a soup of the day and a special of the day. 18 Spring 2022 / TodaysTransitions.com

WHAT’S CHANGED IN YOUR CAREER? I’ve been in food service for 40 some years — 23 years as a caterer. I’ve done all sorts of jobs in the business, and I was in food sales for five years which was a valuable experience. Catering by Design expanded from box lunches to adding hot buffets and 5 to 7pm parties — retirement parties, award ceremonies — those kinds of events. It took a lot out of me to put together those events — we’re talking sometimes feeding 900 people breakfast, lunch, and providing for an evening cocktail party. WHERE DOES YOUR LOVE OF FOOD COME FROM? I consider my work to be very artistic. Food is art. The way the cafe is decorated shows my passion for food and my artistic outlook on life. I was a Fine Arts major in college and consider myself very artistic in the way things look — both food and decor. My family celebrated everything around food. My aunt was a gourmet cook. My dad loved to cook and entertain and eat. I would love to be a food TV personality.

HOW DID COVID AFFECT YOUR CATERING BUSINESS? Since I was doing mostly corporate events, when the pandemic hit, those stopped. I started offering family meals for pickup and marketed special occasion events. Now, we are not doing full-service events. We provide the catering but the customer picks it up. CHALLENGES YOU FACED IN OPENING THE CAFE? Broken foot aside, it’s definitely been an eye-opening experience. I thought moving from strictly catering to catering and the cafe would be a little easier but it wasn’t. We ended up closing for a month in October when we pivoted the way we ran things — from having servers and china plates and silverware to having customers order at the counter. Someone delivers their food but customers get their own drinks and we use disposable utensils and plates. WHAT ABOUT YOUR OWN KITCHEN? If I had unlimited funds, my home kitchen would include two ovens and two dishwashers, a step-in refrigerator, a KitchenAid mixer, and lots and lots of counter space.


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PASSIONS RETIREMENT

By Tonilyn Hornung | Photos by Erika Doll

Veering Away From Full-Time Work

The Great Transition

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hat if retirement doesn’t feel like freedom? What if it looks more like a great loss of something you love? We started this conversation with Cathy Zion, owner and publisher of this magazine, who just last year sold off a big part of her business. She’s had a lot of feelings, but overall, she is discovering that she is finding her path along with the others we feature on the following pages. “As you will see from several of those featured in this issue, growing older can mean growing greater,” she says. Photo by Melissa Donald

When did your work life change start? In 2020, as I considered selling Today’s Woman magazine, the sister magazine of Today’s Transitions, I was filled with a myriad of emotions. Letting go of the magazine I had owned and nurtured for nearly 25 years was daunting. And having to tell my staff was devastating. But more than all that, it was forcing me to look at my own life transition, and it was terrifying. How would this change your full-time work role? To be honest, I really hadn’t let myself think beyond selling Today’s Woman. It scared me too much. Like others, I felt my identity and my worth were tied to Today’s Woman. While I was glad to still be owner of Today’s Media which publishes Today’s Transitions, I couldn’t visualize what my role would be. What did you do to cope with the feelings? An unplanned 10-month stint as co-interim CEO of Hosparus Health helped preoccupy my life, but as that gig came to an end in October, the reality set in. What was the next chapter of my life going to look like? I spent one week in panic mode, signing up for Ancestry.com, considering a part-time job, starting a paint-by-number craft. What do you feel you get from your job/work that makes it important to you? I want/need to know that I’m making a difference in my community whatever that looks like. 20 Spring 2022 / TodaysTransitions.com

Cathy Zion bought Today’s Woman magazine in 1996 and started Today’s Transitions in 2004. Both were part of Today’s Media, which works to help businesses tell stories. She maintains ownership of Today’s Transitions and Today’s Media.


Do you think what you felt was normal? I’m not alone as I’ve learned from several of my friends who are also considering semi-retirement or retirement. They are struggling with the same emotions and concerns. While it sounds heavenly to sit around with no schedule and no to-do list, it’s not the lifestyle for everyone. What does the word retirement mean to you (before and after)? Retirement before meant kicking back, traveling, relaxing. Many of my friends kept telling me I was going to love being retired. Deep down I knew I wouldn’t… couldn’t…stop working. I think I must be channeling my late mother who still owned her own business when she passed away at 79. Why do you think the idea of retirement (from one thing to another) was so terrifying to you? I’ve worked every day since I graduated from college. For the most part, I’ve enjoyed working. And I’ve loved owning my own business and feeling like our magazines are making a difference in people’s lives. What have you discovered about yourself/your life as you change your weekly schedule? I’m realizing that this is a time of reflection and reinvention. I’m spending more time working with the nonprofits I love, reading more books, and taking longer walks with my dog while trying to limit my office time to three days a week. I’m reimagining my life and rejoicing in each new day. What kinds of goals are you setting for yourself? As I turn 74 this year, I find myself setting fewer goals and just staying fluid. I want to be spontaneous to the opportunities that await me. Favorite Nonprofits? I’ve been on the Hosparus Health Board for nearly 17 years, since my mother passed away in their care. It’s an amazing organization serving those at the latter stages of life. I’m also chair of the Friends of Metro Animal Services Board and vice chair of the regional Midwest Board of the American Lung Association.

A Plan and Purpose In Retirement

For these retirees who we met through Leadership Louisville Center’s Encore program, retirement has led to a renewed sense of purpose. They shared their retirement stories with Today’s Transitions.

Chris Hermann spending time with his grandsons as they learn to work the cheese grater.

“YOU HAVE THIS LIFELONG SET OF EXPERIENCES THAT YOU CAN USE TO HELP SOMEONE.” – CHRIS HERMANN

FIND THE GREATEST REASONS TO GET UP IN THE MORNING Before Chris Hermann retired, he decided he would find the greatest and best reasons to get up in the morning. “I wasn’t going to be someone who sat around,” Chris begins, “I was going to find things to do that energized me or took advantage of my skills.” So, Chris envisioned a retirement plan that would keep him busy and interacting with people. Chris says initially he didn’t know how this would come about, but it was this mindset that guided him. For Chris, the catalyst for saying goodbye to a career in the utility industry was spending time with his baby grandson. “I didn’t want to miss any of that. I just wanted to be a part of his life,” he says. Chris retired at 66 years old and is now the proud grandfather to two grandsons. He loves to cook meals for his grandkids who are 7 and 9 years old and even tackles household projects for his daughter. “I offer to help if there’s a project that needs to be done, and we’ll have family time at the same time,” he reveals. Chris is staying true to his retirement plan by keeping a packed schedule. He’s very active in his church community operating an emergency food pantry while also serving on the church governance council. He says those activities occupy a great deal of time, but Chris doesn’t stop there. As a mechanical engineer, Chris works closely with his alma mater, the University of Louisville, on their board of advisors assisting with engineering education and development needs. Then he still finds time to provide knowledge and expertise to community organizations like Metro United Way and the Leadership Louisville Center’s Encore program. “There’s a lot of great things that can happen in your retirement because you have this lifelong set of experiences that you can use to help someone,” Chris says. PAGE 22 >> Today’s Transitions / Spring 2022

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PASSIONS RETIREMENT

Ginger Wallace and the newest member of the family enjoying the evening air.

“GETTING INVOLVED IN THE COMMUNITY IS A DIFFERENT TYPE OF LEADERSHIP.” – GINGER WALLACE

MOVING AND ADAPTING SKILLS When Ginger Wallace retired, there were elements she needed to make the transition go smoothly, and one was moving home. “I grew up in Western Kentucky,” Ginger begins, “I wanted to come back to Kentucky because this is home for me as a state, and I’m back, which is what I always wanted.” Planting roots back home supports Ginger in meeting her retirement expectations — which is to serve in her local community. After a successful 30-year career in the Air Force, and retiring as a colonel, Ginger is following her passions and one way she’s accomplishing this is by doing nonprofit work. Ginger holds a part-time job with a nonprofit which also allows her time to volunteer with organizations and causes that interest her. Programs like Encore and serving as an advisory member on Louisville Metro Councilwoman Cassie Chambers Armstrong’s District 8 Advisory Council are two ways she invests her time. Ginger says she’s feeling lucky in her retirement because she’s able to participate in projects that inspire her. For Ginger, stepping into retirement was bittersweet. She loved her time in the Air Force and has missed the camaraderie she shared with her co-workers. Ginger believes the hardest part of retiring was learning how to translate the life experience she acquired in the military into different areas. “Getting involved in the community is a different type of leadership,” Ginger says. Once she came to understand the balance required, she says, “I’ve been almost five years retired, and I’m very much enjoying what I’m doing now.” Ginger and her wife love traveling and are planning trips for their future, but while at home they’re enjoying taking care of the newest addition to their family: their beloved dog. Ginger does have a tip for that immediate time between waving goodbye to your workday and saying hello to your free time — and it’s taking a little break. “Take some time off and some downtime! You’ve earned it,” she encourages.

RETIREMENT GOALS Kevin Wardell had retirement goals. At 65 years old, Kevin retired from his career as a healthcare executive with a vision to guide him. “I had some lessons from grandparents and my parents who stayed busy during their retirement,” Kevin says. His goal of staying active has helped him move easily into this life phase and he says, “I have something on my calendar every day.” Kevin’s calendar lists activities such as volunteering with organizations like the Encore program, Rotary Club, and Hosparus Health. Giving back to the community is a belief that his family passed down through the generations. “I was taught by my grandfather and father to become involved in organizations that you think make a difference,” Kevin says. Upholding this outlook keeps Kevin inspired and engaged as he collaborates with friends past and present in the community. One retirement goal that stays on the top of his list is creating time for family. “Having grandchildren around is a big deal and that’s a big part of my life right now,” says Kevin. There are three grandkids all under the age of 9 in Kevin’s life, and two live locally. Kevin sees all his grandkids as much as possible, “Those are times I really look forward to,” he says. Kevin and his wife also sneak in some travel time, but Kevin advises not waiting until you retire to begin your travel adventures. 22 Spring 2022 / TodaysTransitions.com

Kevin Wardell keeps his schedule full, making sure there is something on his calendar every day.

“...BECOME INVOLVED IN ORGANIZATIONS THAT YOU THINK MAKE A DIFFERENCE.” – KEVIN WARDELL


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PASSIONS VOLUNTEER

By Kym Voorhees Raque | Photo by Patti Hartog

A Marriage Mentor

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arriage is hard. No one knows that better than Cassie Soete who has been a volunteer marriage mentor through Southeast Christian Church for more than 30 years. In that time, she’s ministered to more than 1,000 couples. She says about half the couples stayed together and half divorced. While those odds may discourage some, Cassie is a fighter, having fought to keep her own marriage intact while building a better and stronger relationship with her husband of 50 years. Cassie married the love of her life, George Soete, just two years after graduating from Assumption High School. The couple had six children — five girls and one boy. Then on their 20th wedding anniversary George left Cassie for her best friend. For more than four years, the couple teetered on the brink of divorce before finally reconciling. Their personal struggles and ultimate reconciliation became the basis for a Christcentered ministry that helped married couples weather their challenges and put the pieces back together. When George died suddenly in 2015, Cassie wasn’t sure she could continue the ministry, but her passion for marriage and a calling to help others has kept her going. “If someone is hurting, I just drop everything to help them,” said Cassie. “I’m thankful George and I went through that valley to arrive at where we did. God brought us back together, and we had 30 wonderful years of marriage after that. It was so worth it. I want to help folks to avoid what I’ve been through. I want to help them heal their marriages.”

After dealing with her own marriage problems, Cassie Soete has helped many couples cope with marriage issues. She received a WLKY Bell Award in 2020 for her volunteer work.

WHAT CAN COUPLES DO TO RENEW THEIR MARRIAGE? “Be a better listener. Listen to what your partner is saying and pay attention to their likes and dislikes. Have realistic expectations. People let you down sometimes, but you have to be willing to sacrifice for the other person to make it work. Keep your lives interesting to one another. Try doing what your partner likes. Put the other person first. I got everything I ever wanted because I gave George everything he ever needed.”

24 Spring 2022 / TodaysTransitions.com

WHAT ADVICE DO YOU HAVE FOR COUPLES WHO ARE NOW EMPTY NESTERS AND HAVING TROUBLE RECONNECTING? “I hear this all the time. After the kids leave the couple looks at each other and doesn’t recognize the person they see. You have to keep the embers going and pay attention to your partner. Try to make time to be alone together. Value what the other person brings to the table. Take classes, go on retreats, or go to counseling to find that spark again. Be honest with each other and most importantly, learn to forgive. Holding on to a grudge will ruin a relationship.”


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PASSIONS GARDENING

By Lindsay McDonald | Photos submitted

Garden Secrets Revealed

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ow is the time to get your garden in shape for the outdoor season. Today’s Transitions caught up with Cheryl Susemichel, owner of the Secret Garden, for some real garden talk. From tips and tools to her favorite perennials, she shared her secrets to a beautiful garden.

“DON’T BE AFRAID TO TRY NEW PLANTS IN YOUR LANDSCAPE.”

WHAT TO DO THIS SPRING • Trim back hybrid hydrangeas, butterfly bushes, and grasses, including liriope. • Clean up perennial beds and discard dead foliage. • Apply a pre-emergent such as Preen, then layer mulch on top of the pre-emergent. This will prevent weed seeds from germinating.

Dwarf hydrangeas

Dwarf buddleia

• Remove old nesting from birdhouses as early as possible. Birds begin nesting in late winter to early spring so doing this early will avoid disrupting any new nests. Birds are very important to your garden because they eat insects that can destroy your plants.

Not sure what you should plant in your garden?

Dwarf crape myrtle

Here are Cheryl’s five favorite perennials. Dwarf hydrangeas: These do well in the ground or in a large pot. Dwarf buddleia (butterfly bushes): Pugster and Lo & Behold ‘Blue Chip Jr.’ Dwarf lilacs

Dwarf crape myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica): Infinitini Watermelon and Magenta which grow to a height of 2 to 4 feet and bloom all summer. Dwarf lilacs (syringa): ‘Bloomerang Dwarf Purple’ which grow 21/2 to 3 feet tall and wide and bloom in spring and again in late summer. Hakonechloa macra: ‘All Gold’ Japanese forest grass is Cheryl’s favorite shade plant, growing 10 to 14 inches tall with a yellow color that seems to glow in the garden.

Hakonechloa macra

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Insider tip: All of Cheryl’s favorites are the Proven Winners (PW) brand and suitable for Kentucky’s climate (zone 6). PW plants are tested in greenhouses (including Cheryl’s own greenhouse) to ensure quality and performance before being sold to the commercial market. provenwinners.com


Need help?

Here are answers to a few common garden questions. 1. How often should I water my plants? If newly planted in the ground, 1” of slow watering once a week is adequate. For established ground plants, the roots are deeper allowing for moisture uptake, so water if no rain for over 2 weeks. For potted plants, do the finger test by placing finger into the soil and water if dry. 2. How often should I fertilize? Fertilizing is vital, especially for blooming plants. Cheryl says, “heavy bloomer = heavy feeder,” meaning if the plant blooms continually, it will need more fertilizer. For garden beds, put down an organic time-release fertilizer in spring and late summer. For pots and baskets, fertilizing every two weeks is needed. Insider tip: Use a quality fertilizer like locally produced Monty’s Plant Food for best results. Many commercial fertilizers are harsh and can burn the plant. montysplantfood.com

WHAT ARE CHERYL’S GARDENING SECRETS? Stay ahead of the season. Clean up your garden beds before the new season starts. Get organic Preen down early to keep the weed seeds from sprouting. Remove damaged winter foliage from perennials and remove any broken branches. Make notes in a garden journal about your successes and failures from each season. Learn from your journal! If a plant is not performing in a particular area, MOVE IT. If you move it and it doesn’t perform then compost it!

“ENJOY YOUR GARDEN! IT’S THE ONE PLACE YOU CAN BE ASSURED NO ONE WILL BOTHER YOU WHEN YOU ARE WORKING AND PLAYING.” Cheryl recommends using quality garden tools. “Life is too short to use bad tools that won’t perform properly.” Gardening gloves are at the top of her list. “I love Sun Grips and my Bionic gloves from Hillerich & Bradsby Co. I also love my Felco pruners and my Dutch hoe.”

3. Difference between a perennial and an annual? A perennial is a plant that regrows each spring, usually blooming for only one season each year. Annuals are plants that germinate, flower, set seed, and die all in one season. 4. What about weeds? Chemical sprays can be harsh for the environment so Cheryl recommends using Preen to keep weeds from sprouting. Adding Preen to your decorative beds in winter, mid-summer, and fall with a layer of mulch over it should keep the weeds at bay. 5. Difference between compost and mulch? Compost is a soil enhancer used mostly in vegetable gardens. In addition to enhancing curb appeal, mulch is used in perennial beds to hold in moisture. Cheryl recommends using a non-dyed hardwood mulch, cedar mulch, or pine straw. 6. Why do my flowers look brown and unhealthy? Usually the cause is related to lack of water and fertilizer. Hanging baskets can dry out quickly so doing the finger test and fertilizing every two weeks can help keep them looking vibrant. Insider tip: To keep them looking fresh all summer, give them a haircut in mid-July by cutting off the hanging flowers to generate new growth. Proven Winners plants and Cheryl’s favorite garden tools are available at the Secret Garden. secretgardenshop.com

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wellness 32 Fitness | 34 Renew Your Skin

THREE FOOD GROUPS THAT CAN CHANGE YOUR LIFE THE BEST CHOICES AT THE STORE. By Tami Pyles PAGE 28 >>

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WELLNESS HEALTHY FOOD GROUPS

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he foods you consume make a difference, both in how you feel today, and your long-term health. “Our bodies have to be nourished to function properly,” says Susan Borders, registered dietitian. What foods should you incorporate into your diet? As a general rule, choose a variety of plant-based foods. Eating just a few healthy foods over and over will not provide the same benefit as a varied diet. “Eating a variety of foods ensures that you get the nutritional benefits of all of them,” says Susan. If you are just starting to add healthy foods into your diet, it’s OK to take it slow. “Small changes we make over time, lead to big changes in our health,” says Chris Boyd, registered dietitian. If you don’t love a new food the first time you try it, commit to trying it again. “Most individuals have to experience a dish at least seven times to incorporate it into their eating pattern,” says Chris. Ready to get started? Here are three categories of foods you should be eating and ideas on how to incorporate these foods into your daily diet. CRUCIFEROUS VEGETABLES Arugula, Bok Choy, Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Kale, Collard greens, Mustard greens, Radishes, Turnips, Watercress. This large group of vegetables, with a funny sounding name, are some of the most nutritious veggies you can eat. In his book, How Not to Die, Dr. Michael Greger recommends having one serving of cruciferous vegetables a day. They have several health benefits, including helping to prevent certain cancers and detoxifying the body. “Cruciferous vegetables support the body's natural detoxification pathways,” says Susan. In addition to helping your body rid itself of toxins, they are low in calories, high in fiber, and contain several needed vitamins and minerals. Did you know that broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and cauliflower contain more vitamin C than an orange? How to prepare cruciferous vegetables: Try roasting or sauteing to get the best flavor. People often boil these vegetables which can result in loss of nutrients and taste. “Leafy vegetables start to lose their nutrients after three minutes in boiling water,” says Chris. Buying cruciferous veggies fresh and in-season is ideal, but don’t shy away from pre-cut or frozen. “If preparing fresh is a challenge due to time or physical limitations, using a washed ready-to-use version is an excellent option. And frozen veggies are always good to have on hand,” says Susan.

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“SMALL CHANGES WE CAN MAKE OVER TIME, LEAD TO BIG CHANGES IN OUR HEALTH.” – CHRIS BOYD


BEANS Black, Black-eyed peas, Cannellini, Chickpeas (Garbanzo), Fava, Great Northern, Kidney, Lentils, Lima, Mung, Navy, Peas, Pinto, Soybeans. Beans pack a nutritional punch. They are low in fat, high in fiber, and as a plant-based food have no cholesterol or saturated fat. “Beans are an inexpensive source of protein, and are shelf stable so they can be kept in your pantry for a long time,” says Susan. Beans are known for their gas producing side effects. “Slow and low is the way to incorporate beans into your diet,” advises Chris. Start off eating beans a few times a week and gradually increase your intake. How to add more beans into your diet: Incorporate them into foods you already enjoy. Susan suggests adding beans into soups and stews. Consider making your own refried beans by cooking down beans and mashing them. Mashed beans are a great substitute for meat in Mexican dishes, like tacos.

NUTS AND SEEDS Almonds, Brazil Nuts, Cashews, Chia Seeds, Flax Seeds, Hazel Nuts, Hemp Seeds, Macadamia Nuts, Peanut (technically a legume but often included in the nut category), Pecans, Pistachios, Pumpkin Seeds, Sesame Seeds, Sunflower Seeds, Walnuts. Adding one serving a day of nuts and seeds, which are high in fiber and packed with healthy fats, provides health benefits such as improving your heart health, lowering cholesterol and reducing inflammation. “This is a large category, not every nut or seed will have the same nutrients,” says Chris. To gain the maximum health benefit from nuts and seeds, make sure you eat several different types. There is a downside to nuts and seeds — they are high in calories and people can be allergic. While nutrient dense, nuts are also calorically dense. “Measure out a quarter cup serving if you are going to have a snack. Don’t mindlessly eat out of the container,” advises Susan. While people can have nut and seed allergies, the good news is that all of the nutrients in them can also be found in other foods. Consult an allergist or nutritionist if you need substitutes. How to eat more nuts and seeds: Nuts are a great topping to add to yogurt, salads, or stir-fry. Both can be incorporated into batters, like pancakes or muffins. Or, create a trail mix for snacking that contains multiple nuts and seeds. If you eat flaxseed, make sure it is ground. “If flaxseeds are not ground, the body can’t break them down,” says Susan.

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WELLNESS FITNESS

By Tonilyn Hornung | Photo by Erika Doll

A Walk A Day… “I’VE DEVELOPED A NEW NATURE PHOTOGRAPHIC HOBBY, SO THAT HAS INSPIRED ME TO BE OUTSIDE EVEN MORE.” – TERRI WEBER

Listening to the birds singing or stopping to take photos of the changing wildlife has helped Terri become more aware of her surroundings.

“M

y inspiration is outside in nature because I need that sunshine — or the clouds even,” Terri Weber says. After retiring almost two years ago, no matter what the weather forecast, you’ll find Terri walking 3 to 4 miles a day in the rain, snow, or high summertime humidity. When it’s below freezing, Terri will shorten her walks, but 10,000 steps a day is her minimum. She works hard to reach her goal walking first in her area and then adding another trek through a local park like The Parklands of Floyds Fork or Cherokee Park. Terri starts her day in the early morning hours in her neighborhood. “I walk one lap around my circle every morning,” Terri says. She adds that this is a great way to watch the sunrise, and while getting in her steps, she helps out neighbors by moving the newspapers that sit at the end of their driveways up to their front porch. “That walk is more purposeful now, and it gives me the motivation to get up and do it,” she says. 32 Spring 2022 / TodaysTransitions.com

Terri has kept exercise an important part of her life for over 30 years and says, “I used to run a lot, but now that I’m 64 years old, I’ve learned to keep a pretty good walking pace. “I lift weights at home at least every other day,” Terri says. She goes on to say that she incorporates small weights, body squats, and crunches in order to stay toned. She suggests trying some sort of physical exercise a minimum of 10-15 minutes a day, “I think exercise, whether it’s 10 minutes or 20 minutes, is beneficial for a person’s mental health,” Terri begins, “once people get outside with just a little bit of fresh air—it’s so good for you.”


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WELLNESS RENEW YOUR SKIN

By Carrie Vittitoe

Ways To Renew Your Skin

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s with most things, skin care can be as basic or as complicated as a woman wants. For women who have generally gone the basic route, they may find that as they age, their skin begins to require a little more specialized care beyond just buying something from the beauty aisle at Target. Fortunately, there are expert local aestheticians who can provide one-on-one consultations to help no matter your age.

NO INTIMIDATION Some women may feel intimidated by the idea of seeking individualized care for their skin. They may worry that there is no point; that nothing can help their skin look better. They may feel like they shouldn’t spend the money on something they may consider a little frivolous. There are generational differences in how women have been taught to think of their skin. Jamie Bryant, co-owner of Avanti Skin Center of Louisville, says younger women are focused on preventive skin care, where Gen Xers and baby boomers often weren’t taught to be as careful about their skin. “It’s a very different mindset,” she says. Those of us who sunbathed with baby oil or used tanning beds as teenagers may now be needing help to address the resulting fine lines and age spots. There is no shame in seeking skin care help. As Denise Willinger, owner of Serenity Spa says, “the days of the snooty girl at the cosmetic counter are gone” so there is no need to feel embarrassed or intimidated. “Women deserve to feel their best. Coming to the experts to learn more makes perfect sense,” she adds.

BEFORE A VISIT Most local aestheticians offer some kind of consultation to learn what a client’s skin is like and explain the options for what can be done, but it is important for women to have thought about several things before they go. “Think about what skin issues bother you the most,” says Ashley Snellen, co-owner of Avanti Skin Center of Louisville. She also encourages women to think about where they want to start [for example, eyebrows or chin], how much downtime they have, and what their price point is. While some procedures have zero recovery time, others may require a week or more for the skin to begin looking less red.

YOUNGER WOMEN ARE FOCUSED ON PREVENTATIVE SKIN CARE. “IT’S A VERY DIFFERENT MINDSET.” – JAMIE BRYANT

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Here are some areas of the skin that might have you seeking help. FACIAL HAIR Of course, even when some hair is thinning on our aging bodies, most of us have unwanted hair in other places such as on the chin or around the lips. Some techniques for dealing with wrinkles, such as dermaplaning, can also get rid of the tiny vellus hairs that cover a woman's face, although these hairs will grow back. For a longer fix, waxing might be an option or laser treatments that can remove hair altogether. TOPICAL OPTIONS The beauty aisle in every grocery or drugstore has tons of products, and it isn’t uncommon for women to have countless bottles of creams and ointments in their medicine cabinets. But are those bottles and tubes full of products that actually work? Even if a woman visits an aesthetician and opts not to do any kind of procedure on her skin, she may very well benefit from the topical products that can only be found at aesthetic spas. Often, the products sold by aestheticians contain more of the active ingredients than what you can find at a local drugstore. Plus, aestheticians know these products, what they do, and can provide that education to clients. “We know the products inside and out. A good aesthetician can eliminate the guesswork,” Denise says. Preferred brands like SkinMedica and Skin Script are typically only available through a skin care professional.

WRINKLES Depending on one’s skin and goals, something as simple as a facial can make a world of difference, but there are many options for reducing fine lines and wrinkles. Dermaplaning is a technique whereby a tiny blade is used to scrape dead skin and tiny hairs from the skin, leaving a smooth surface. Some women might benefit from a chemical peel to exfoliate their skin and remove scars or skin discoloration. Still others might like the idea of Botox injections to smooth frown lines. For women who have more time to recover and money to spend, they might find that laser resurfacing, a technique that removes thin layers of skin to encourage the growth of new skin, is their best option. EYEBROWS Hair thins as people age, and this includes the eyebrow area, but there are options to help. Eyebrow tinting is one possibility, but some women prefer microblading which involves injecting pigment into the skin with tiny needles to form a semipermanent tattoo that typically dissolves in 18 to 36 months.

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lifestyle

42 Things To Do | 44 Spring Cookout | 46 People | 47 Making Space | 48 Living Options Directory

ADD SOME SIZZLE WITH AN OUTDOOR KITCHEN By Lindsay McDonald | Photos submitted PAGE 40 >>

Full kitchen with island, grill, sink, pullout trash bin, refrigerator, NatureKast silver birch cabinetry with louvered doors.

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LIFESTYLE OUTDOOR KITCHEN

3D rendering for outdoor kitchen with grill, pullout trash bin, refrigerator, and custom hood.

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reating an outdoor oasis seems to be at the top of everyone’s wish list these days. Along with comfortable seating and attractive landscaping, adding an outdoor kitchen heats up your backyard space. Today’s Transitions wanted to check in with a local expert to find out what you should include in your outdoor kitchen plan. Jeremy Curran, owner of Cornerstone Kitchen & Bath, has seen the demand for outdoor kitchens increase. “With the pandemic, we’ve definitely seen an uptick in people looking to transform their outdoor space to provide better cooking options so they can enjoy family dinners and entertaining,” says Jeremy. To get the most out of your outdoor kitchen design, Jeremy says there are several things to consider. He recommends creating a Pinterest or Houzz page to provide inspiration and serve as a starting place. Add pictures or ideas that you like and then when it’s time to begin designing your outdoor kitchen, these inspiration pages can guide you. In addition to your inspiration page, you should consider what type of kitchen you want based on your needs and expectations for the space. The appliances and features you desire will dictate which type will work best for you. From a small serving cart to a full kitchen with all the amenities, an outdoor kitchen can turn your outdoor space into a useful extension of your home.

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TOP TRENDS IN OUTDOOR KITCHENS: • Weatherproof features to protect against the elements. • High-grade resin cabinetry designed to look like wood, in painted and stained styles, offering a similar look to indoor cabinetry. • High function outdoor kitchens that allow for full meal prep. • Islands that offer functional cooking, storage, and gathering space. • Built-in or free-standing pizza oven to complement other cooking appliances.


Outdoor kitchen with island, hibachi, grill, wine refrigerator, NatureKast silver birch cabinetry with louvered doors.

KNOWING WHAT YOU HOPE TO GET OUT OF THE SPACE IS AN IDEAL PLACE TO BEGIN FOR ANYONE CONSIDERING AN OUTDOOR KITCHEN.

TYPES OF OUTDOOR KITCHENS: • A kitchen extension flows into your outdoor space, providing additional cooking elements, like a pizza oven or grill, to supplement the main interior kitchen. For convenience, they are often situated right outside the indoor kitchen for easy access. • An independent kitchen includes prep space, sink, storage, and refrigeration, as well as cooking elements, so it can be used independently of the indoor kitchen. • A grilling station provides cooking options, with prep space and storage for grilling tools, ingredients, and other must-have grill gadgets. • A simple bar cart can serve as a functional mini-kitchen, offering storage for all of the drink-making essentials, or it can double as a snack serving area, with additional storage space for outdoor kitchen gadgets.

Outdoor beverage station with refrigerator drawers, ice maker, NatureKast silver burch cabinetry with louvered doors.

Regardless of which way you go, an outdoor kitchen can upgrade any backyard, creating an outdoor retreat for dining, entertaining, and relaxing. Knowing what you hope to get out of the space is an ideal place to begin for anyone considering an outdoor kitchen. For Jeremy, he let his passions guide him. “I love to cook outdoors so a grill and smoker were must-haves for me, along with a refrigerator.” Depending on size of space and appliances, an outdoor kitchen can range from $15,000-18,000 on average.

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LIFESTYLE THINGS TO DO

By Lucy M. Pritchett | Photos by Melissa Donald

Lunch Plus One L

unch Plus One is a simple outing to enjoy with friends or visiting relatives or guests. It’s always a treat to explore one of Louisville’s many historic neighborhoods, so for this Lunch Plus One, let’s visit the Germantown area with its collection of shotgun and camelback houses, restaurants and bars, and front porch swings.

Oscar’s Germantown Hardware 1515 South Shelby Street 502.636.3621 oscarshardware.com Who doesn’t love a hardware store? I remember as a young girl walking with my grandfather to Spangler’s Hardware at the Douglass Loop to pick up a needed tool or even just a light bulb for the front porch. I recall being fascinated with the shelves and bins of thingymajigs or doodads, the use for which I had no clue but was intrigued nonetheless. A veritable feast for my young senses. Although Spangler’s is no longer around, fortunately there are still a few locally owned hardware stores in Louisville. The one featured in this Lunch Plus One is Oscar’s Germantown Hardware, a neighborhood mainstay at the intersection of Shelby Street and Burnett Avenue. For spring renewal, in addition to hand tools, plumbing supplies, and paint, Oscar’s is the place to go to find garden tools, seeds, flower pots, hoses, or anything needed for a project around your house. You can also pick up helpful advice from one of the employees to make sure you purchase the exact item you need to complete your grand design.

Check’s Cafe Neighborhood Bar and Grill 1101 E Burnett Avenue 502.316.7668 checkscafelouisville.com Once you’ve made your purchases at Oscar’s and gotten your car loaded, head down the street for lunch at Check’s Cafe at the corner of Hickory and Burnett. If it’s a pretty day, use the chance to walk — it’s just a block or two. Check’s, which has been around for six decades, is another pillar of the Germantown neighborhood. It is the type of place where everybody knows your name. Patrons include neighborhood regulars sharing tables and stories with others who come in for lunch from surrounding businesses or those who just want a friendly atmosphere and a hearty comfort-food meal. Nothing pretentious about Check’s. Step up to the bar under the Order Here sign and choose from the menu which includes everything from bratwurst to fried chicken to pan-fried oysters. Or maybe your taste runs to a bowl of the cafe’s famous chili or bean soup and cornbread. A server will yell out your name and deliver your plate right to your table. There are plenty of TV screens — I counted at least 10 if not more — so no matter what seasonal sport is being played, you never have to miss a home run, a putt, a touchdown, or free throw. Before you leave, take a look at the galleries of vintage photos of the neighborhood characters who have wandered in and out of the cafe over the years. I guarantee you won’t regret your Lunch Plus One excursion to Oscar’s and Check’s. 42 Spring 2022 / TodaysTransitions.com


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LIFESTYLE SPRING COOKOUT

By Anita Oldham | Photos by Melissa Donald

Light the Grill

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eady to cook outside? This warmer weather just begs for the doors to be opened and the grills to be lit. To get you inspired, we tried a little of everything — and found that no matter what we threw on the grill, it ramped up the flavor to create an easy meal full of spring tastes.

What’d We Cook?

Grilled on either a regular gas grill or a gas flat top grill. MEAT Wings — Purchased refrigerated 3-pack from Costco and marinated with Primo Maple Balsamic Vinaigrette and salt for a bit before putting on the flat top grill. We went with a simple marinade but feel free to experiment with the many marinade options available. Steak — Purchased from a local butcher and prepared with some kosher salt and cooked on the grill. We timed it for medium-rare (about 4 minutes per side). Cod — Purchased from a frozen supplier and cooked on the gas grill with some salt.

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FRESH VEGETABLES AND FRUITS Tomatoes, green beans, and peppers — Cooked on the flat top grill with a slight vegetable oil base and seasoned with kosher salt. Asparagus and corn — Cooked on the grill with a spray butter seasoning. Lemons — Cooked on the grill. Limes — Cooked on the flat top grill. Strawberries — Cooked lightly on the grill. *All fruits were cooked for just a few minutes. BREADS Tortillas — Lightly crisped on flat top grill. Lemon pound cake — Purchased from a local grocery store and cut into slices and lightly toasted on the grill.

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LIFESTYLE PEOPLE

Joanne Berryman:

By Lucy M. Pritchett | Illustration by Dan Kisner

What I Know Now

Listen to Joanne talk more about her life at AWG55.com podcast.

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enewal? Retirement? Can one experience both? Let’s ask Joanne Berryman. She retired in 2019 after serving as provost of Spalding University. And yet…for Joanne, retirement turned into renewal and gives her the chance to continue putting her leadership skills to good use as president of her company JMB Coaching LLC. This means working some days face to face in Louisville and some days screen to screen from a winter spot in Florida. YOUR NUMBER ONE STRENGTH? I’m a relator. I reach out for deeper relationships and am able to connect and influence people. As provost, I worked through the dean’s office and with the program directors. With JMB Coaching I work primarily through Spalding University and Kosair Charities and with mid-level leaders in nonprofit organizations that serve children and families. It’s been a great opportunity for me. RETIREMENT AND COVID-19 CAME ABOUT THE SAME TIME FOR YOU. Even though I retired from Spalding just months before COVID hit, I stayed on the board and now my coaching work keeps me focused on leadership and philosophy of leadership for nonprofits. I threw myself into that by phone and Zoom meetings and built a coaching and leadership curriculum. So I wasn’t just leaving…I was still engaged and doing important work. WHAT HAVE YOU LEARNED ABOUT YOURSELF DURING THIS NOTQUITE-RETIREMENT TIME? That I don’t mind being by myself. I’ve known that, but mostly I enjoy being and creating with others. I will say that the move to technology that has come with COVID scared me. I need face-to-face connections with people so I struggled with online meetings. I depend a lot on expressions and body language in communication and those are not the same online. But, it works. I guess basically I’ve also learned that I am flexible. 46 Spring 2022 / TodaysTransitions.com

LEARN FROM YOUR PARENTS? That hard work pays off no matter what course in life you take. My mom was a stay-at-home mother although she did have a small in-home business. My dad was a first responder and a captain with the fire department. I learned that it was important to be doing something that was useful. PET PEEVE? Inertia or maybe I should say procrastination in others…and myself. I tend to push people along, and I have to try to make time for myself. WHAT MIGHT PEOPLE BE SURPRISED TO KNOW ABOUT YOU? I love country music and the stories the songs tell. I spent two years in Dallas in the ‘80s. It was a town of line dancing and the two-step. Even today I’m a country music concert goer. In the ‘90s, I got to attend the CMA Awards at Opryland. I sat right behind Alan Jackson and met LeAnn Rimes and Faith Hill and others. It was all very, very exciting for me. PERFORMER YOU WOULD BE? Reba McEntire. WHAT ARE YOU READING? American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins. It’s about Mexican drug cartels and it has opened up my eyes to what some people have gone through. WATCHING? Yellowstone. It is one of the best series. I also enjoyed Being the Ricardos on Amazon.

Before becoming a provost, Joanne Berryman was also dean of Kosair Charities College of Health and Natural Sciences at Spalding and before that was senior vice president of Jewish Hospital and St Mary’s HealthCare, and CEO of Frazier Rehab Institute.

A TREASURED POSSESSION? I have a Spalding University mission coin that was given to me by a graduate student at her commencement. The mission coin is used by President Tori Murden McClure as a recognition coin. It comes with a handshake and at graduation a student can hand theirs off to someone who has made an impression on them. I treasure that coin. WHAT CHANGES ARE YOU HAPPY TO SEE IN LOUISVILLE? I grew up in Portland in the West End, and it’s encouraging to see people roll up their sleeves and bring programs and businesses west of the 9th Street Divide. One I could mention is AMPED, founded by Dave Christopher Sr., that provides a free music program for kids, a free technology training program for adults, and Louisville’s first and only Black business incubator. Also I am grateful for the opportunity to work south of Broadway for 10 years. The city needs to take advantage and build on that corridor.


LIFESTYLE MAKING SPACE

By Tonilyn Hornung

Inviting Calm Into Your Closet

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hen the flowers are blooming and birdsong becomes your new morning alarm, it’s easy to experience the inspiring changes spring is springing on you. All that outdoor inspiration can manifest indoors too and guide you to your own path of change — or just an uncontrollable urge to clean out your closet. Spring cleaning has sprung and decluttering an overcrowded closet is one way to renew and revitalize the energy in your home. “Decluttering is a decision waiting to happen,” says Ashley Gude, owner of the Louisville business Ashley Organizes. Ashley has been organizing all of her life, but finally focused her life’s passion into a successful business six years ago. Ashley defines clutter as anything that stops you from having calm in your life. So, if your closet of clothes is a source of stress, it might be time to let go of items that are gathering dust. WHY IS IT HARD? Thinking about which clothes to purge can bring up as many emotions as you have shoes hidden on your closet shelves. Feelings like sadness, loss, and guilt can come up when opening your closet door to decluttering. “People are sentimental about their clothes,” Ashley begins, “they’re emotional about a certain time in their lives and find it hard to let go.” If you’re dealing with the loss of a loved one, the loss of a job, or the loss of weight, it can be painful to say goodbye to the garments that connected you to those times. WHERE TO START A good place to start spring cleaning is with items that don’t hold as much emotional value. Ashley suggests going through items like socks, shoes, and T-shirts first, “So, we pivot to something easier that lets you get the feel for the process. This builds momentum,” Ashley says. Next, instead of pulling your entire closet apart (which is overwhelming), Ashley recommends putting items into categories — taking out one group and then continuing to subdivide. “If you take out all your shoes, keep subdividing into categories like formal shoes, winter shoes, sandals, tennis shoes, etc.,” Ashley says. When you see all your belongings together, this gives you a better idea of what items are keepers. When it comes to deciding what leaves your wardrobe, Ashley says to ask questions like, “Would you buy it again today? Are you excited to have it?” If you’re still on the fence ask, “When did I wear this last?” Guilt can arise when letting go of items that were expensive and fluctuations in weight can lead many to keep more clothes than needed. “In this instance, we pick the closest size up and down to where you are,” Ashley says. Springtime closet cleaning can certainly feel overwhelming, but remember the goal is to have a workable wardrobe and bring some calm into your world. Ashley reminds you to take plenty of breaks and be forgiving of yourself during the process. “Really be realistic and honest and know it’s okay to let things go,” says Ashley.

ASHLEY DEFINES CLUTTER AS ANYTHING THAT STOPS YOU FROM HAVING CALM IN YOUR LIFE.

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LIVING OPTIONS:

PICK A BRIGHT BACKGROUND FOR YOUR LIFE Looking for a colorful background for your life? Is it time to move into a home that offers less maintenance and more services? Whether you are actively looking for your next home or making plans for the future, our Living Options directory lists local apartments, condos, independent living communities, and other specific living situations available. Some find that they flourish in an active community of like-aged individuals. Some communities offer gyms, artistic rooms, and food options. Others might be located in an area that allows for accessibility to the local community. These living options allow you to stay active and independent without the regular maintenance of a house. See more on pages 50 and 52. Also search online at TodayTransitions.com. FEATURED LISTING

The Forum at Brookside 200 Brookside Dr Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 245-3048 theforumatbrookside.com People walk into our community feeling a sense of warmth and welcome. A place that feels like home! The Forum at Brookside is about hospitality, and a carefree lifestyle. The longevity of our management staff is extraordinary! The beautiful forty acres of green space, security gate at entrance, and complimentary room service are amenities you will not find elsewhere. Other amenities include chef prepared meals, housekeeping, Lifestyle 360 Recreation Program, indoor heated pool with aqua fitness classes, transportation, pet friendly, and support with medical care as needed. With over 35 years of experience, we have an excellent reputation in Louisville, and the surrounding area. Everything you love and need! Cost: $2550-$4930 Minimum age: 55 Five Star Senior Living, Inc.

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Search our living options directory online by scanning the QR code.

LIVING OPTIONS

Looking for a new place to call home? This directory of low-maintenance housing options includes condos, garden apartments, retirement and independent living communities. Find more at TodaysTransitionsNow.com/searchliving. All costs are per month.

The Altenheim

Brownsboro Park Retirement Community

The Altenheim has apartment suites for independent living. Apartments have an efficiency kitchenette, full bath with shower and spacious living quarters with a separate bedroom. All apartments have emergency call cords to pull in case of emergency. Linen service, housekeeping, personal laundry service and meals are provided at no additional charge. Recreational, educational, social, and religious services are also available.

Family owned & operated since 1986, several spacious floor plans, located on 14 beautiful acres with a park, walking trail and fishing pond. Warm, friendly residents, spacious apartments with great closets, activities to keep your mind entertained and your body in shape, housekeeping, extensive shuttle program that runs 7 days a week and excellent chef-prepared meals. All-inclusive pricing (includes all utilities, phone, cable, internet & personal alert pendant).

Cost: $1856 Owner: The Altenheim

Cost: $2150-$3500 • Min. Age: 62 Owner: Bunker Hill Assoc. III, LLC

936 Barret Ave, Louisville, KY 40204 (502) 584-7417 • thealtenheim.org

2960 Goose Creek, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 429-7700 • brownsboropark.com

Christian Care Communities — Middletown

Forest Hills Commons

Our active seniors live very independently in lovely garden home and spacious apartments. Take advantage of all a senior living community has to offer, including maintenance-free homes, wellness programs, spiritual care and security. Our serene setting is close to shopping and dining, yet offers a private park-like feel in a close-knit community with plenty of delicious food and fun, engaging activities. Assisted Living suites available.

Forest Hills Commons delivers a carefree lifestyle designed to simplify your life without compromising your freedom. Some of our unique services and amenities include: THRIVE Wellness Program, NEW Energy Wellness Gym, SMART Solutions (Moving & Transition Specialist), on-site therapy options available, happy hour and social opportunities, all-day dining in our restaurant-style dining room, weekly housekeeping and linen services, theater, library, media room, game room and Internet café

Cost: $1080- $112,500 • Min. Age: 62 Owner: Christian Care Communities, Inc. (since 1884)

11530 Herrick Ln, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 254-1799 • Middletown.ChristianCareCommunities.org

Cost: $2495-$5495 • Min. Age: 50 Owner: American Senior Communities

9107 Taylorsville Rd, Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 499-5533 • asccare.com/community/forest-hills-commons/

Forest Springs Health Campus

The Forum at Brookside

Steps away from our full-continuum of care, villa patio homes offer housekeeping; lawn maintenance; fitness center and clubhouse; medical alert pendant, a full calendar of activities and excursions; Villa Lifestyle Director; pet-friendly.

Everything you love and need — a beautiful forty acre gated senior living community! People walk into our community feeling a sense of warmth and welcome. A place that feels like home. The Forum at Brookside is about hospitality, and a carefree lifestyle. Amenities include chef prepared meals, room service, housekeeping, social activities,indoor heated pool, pet friendly, transportation, security, an experienced management staff,and support with medical care as needed.

Cost: $3147+ • Min. Age: 55 Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC

4120 Wooded Acre Ln, Louisville, KY 40245 (502) 243-1643 • forestspsringshc.com

Cost: $2550-$4930 • Min. age: 55 Five Star Senior Living, Inc.

200 Brookside Dr, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 245-3048 • theforumatbrookside.com

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Search our living options directory online by scanning the QR code.

LIVING OPTIONS

Looking for a new place to call home? This directory of low-maintenance housing options includes condos, garden apartments, retirement and independent living communities. Find more at TodaysTransitionsNow.com/searchliving. All costs are per month.

The Grand Senior Living

Harmony at Tucker Station

Resort style living, luxurious apartments, spacious closets, extra storage available, garage & golf cart garage rental, utilities & appliances included, patios/balconies, weekly housekeeping, 24-hour concierge, pet spa, salon & barber shop, fitness center, indoor heated pool, sun deck, putting green, club house, recreational activities, theater, cocktail lounge, terrace, shuttle service, continental breakfast, chef prepared gourmet meals, easy access to dining, shopping, entertainment, & health care, Signature Passion Program.

Harmony at Tucker Station is designed so residents can live the lives they choose in a beautiful, enriching, and supportive environment. Our stylish community provides the ideal springboard to all the pleasures of our picturesque city, with spacious, maintenance-free apartment homes, restaurant-style dining, and plentiful resources for staying fit and feeling good. This is the place to live your best life.

Cost: $3540-$5890 • Min. Age: 55 Owner: Management, Civitas Senior Living

9300 Civic Way, Prospect, KY 40059 (502) 310-1542 • thegrand-sl.com

Meadow, Miralea and Village Active Lifestyle Communities Enjoy handcrafted senior living on Masonic’s 82-acre Louisville Campus. Life Care and Life Plan offer priority access and discounts to Masonic’s full continuum of care services for entry fee residents. Community highlights include chef-prepared restaurant-style dining, salon and spa, movie theaters, life enrichment activities, fitness and aquatic center, creative arts studio, dog park, on-and off-campus transportation and 24/7 security. Cost: $1679-$4597 • Min. Age: 55-62 Owner: Masonic Homes of Kentucky. Inc.

Cost: $2750+ Owner: Harmony Senior Services

12523 Taylorsville Rd, Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 694-4673 • HarmonySeniorServices.com

Sacred Heart Village Apartments Secured 540 sq. ft. 1 BR efficiency units located in both the Clifton & Cane Run Road areas. Dining room, meeting rooms, library and sitting areas and on-site laundry, appliances, walk-in shower, individually controlled heat and A/C, pets accepted with restrictions. Handicapped accessible units if available. Water & electric included. Income limitations apply. Call for details. Cost: income based • Min. Age: 62 Owner: Mercy Housing

2110 Payne St, Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 895-6409 • facebook.com/SacredHeartVillage

3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 915-2204 • masonichomesky.com

THIS CAN BE YOUR AD! This is a great space to feature your independent living or condo community. We want to help connect your community to people looking to move to a maintenance — free living space. We have a comprehensive list of Living Options online at TodaysTransitions.com. 52 Spring 2022 / TodaysTransitions.com


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caregiver 58 Solutions | 60 Schedules | 62 There’s No Place Like Home

63 Home Health Services Directory | 66 Care Community Directory | 80 Try This!

BUILDING A BACKYARD ADDITION: SMART, ACCESSIBLE, AND PERFECT FOR A LOVED ONE By Megan Seckman | Photos submitted PAGE 56 >>

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CAREGIVER BUILDING A BACKYARD ADDITION

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hen Robin Wagoner’s larger-than-life father was diagnosed with cancer at 76, a shell game of living arrangements began. Within three months of his diagnosis, her father, the rock of the family, would pass—and everything her family knew to be true about home would forever change. After her husband’s passing in 2017, Robin’s mother Susan didn’t want to continue residing in the family home her husband had built in the 70s. She had been wanting to build a new home for years, but the absence of her husband there brought on an unbearable yearning to reinvent her space. In addition, his rapid decline opened the family’s eyes to just how important proximity is when a crisis occurs. Despite the fact that Robin’s childhood home was only a seven minute drive through Floyds Knobs from her Starlight, Indiana residence, it was just too far. So, right at one year, the period advised for contemplation by Susan’s grief counselor, Robin’s sister found a patio home in the build process in her neighborhood. Susan, without hesitation, moved right in…and immediately hated it. “My mother was in deep grief and living in a new patio home made her feel lonely. There was nothing there that spoke of my dad,” Robin explains. “So, I talked to my husband to see if he would be OK with moving my mother onto our property as long as she had her own space. He thought it was a great idea, so I called my mom to see what she thought. All she said was, ‘Can we put this house on the market this weekend?’” And that was that. Susan sold her new patio home before the end of her first year there and moved in with Robin’s family while her Granny-Flat-Pool-House was being built in 2019. Robin, an interior designer by trade, started the initial blueprints of her mother’s dwelling, a private home attached to Robin’s house by a breezeway. Even though the build began amidst the pandemic shutdowns of 2020, the timing was almost divine: Robin’s youngest child left for college that same year and her empty-nest longing was assuaged by the presence of her mother.

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The Granny-Flat-Pool-House connects to the original home via a breezeway, as shown in the rendering above, with a front porch that overlooks the pool.

Within a year, Susan had her own private, 868-square-foot space, complete with a front porch overlooking the pool. “Two things were really important to me in the design of this property,” Robin says. “My mother is an outdoorsy gal, so I wanted her to have a space to be outside. She lives on that front porch, reading every morning there. And I wanted the space to look like it had always been there–I didn’t want it to look like an add-on.” Robin worked to echo the design features of her original home’s exterior and to plan for a safe space to age for her mother. “My father didn’t suffer long, but the last two weeks of his life were so challenging. I couldn’t imagine if that process was prolonged — I knew we wouldn’t be able to care for my mother like that, and we all want to avoid assisted living. Now, she is right with us, just through the breezeway.”


ACCESSORY DWELLING UNIT The Granny Flat is another name for an Accessory Dwelling Unit (ADU), a smaller, independent residential dwelling located on the same property as a single-family home–and these trends in aging-in-place apartments are making a splash across the county. The San Diego-based company Modern Granny Flat specializes in these creative secondary suites that can be found in garage conversions, basements, attics, or new construction in the backyard. Their builds boast minimalist tiny homes that feature rooftop vegetable gardens, modular furniture that can slide in and out of walls to maximize space, and modern design features that blend in with the landscape and elevate the property’s value. In San Diego, these units are extra attractive due to the shortage of rentals throughout the city. Families are erecting these structures for added space, to meet the residential needs of extended family, and as an added rental income opportunity. Just a look at the design features and you will be awed at the possibilities. I stayed in one of these units on a recent trip to Los Angeles. The 500-squarefoot space comfortably slept four people thanks to some innovative multi-use furniture. It had a private entrance that avoided the fish-bowl feel despite sharing the same backyard as the family’s primary residence, and it met all the needs of a vacation rental with some amazing high-end features (fully stocked kitchen and floor-to-ceiling tiled bathroom). Pocket doors and stackable furniture made the tiny space functional and ironically open. Robin’s Granny Flat is equipped with handicap bars in the bathroom and has no stairs (aside from the two that were necessary to offset the grade of her backyard). Access to the primary home is easy and efficient should there be an emergency. Susan is 74 and vibrant, so the privacy and design features of the home meet her needs for independence. Robin took the dimensions of her mother’s patio-home kitchen and master bedroom and made sure to keep these similar. “I didn’t want it to feel like a mother-in-law suite,” Robin says. Inlaw suites oftentimes do not feel like a private, complete dwelling space, and Robin wanted to avoid that.

This Modern Granny Flat rendering highlights the functionality of the living space.

THE ULTIMATE SMART HOME The aging baby boomer population is inspiring much research in the area of agingin-place residential options. At the University of Southern Indiana, Lisa Fournier’s team is working to develop the ultimate smart home at USI’s innovative Minka Lab, designed in 2018 by nationally-renowned aging expert Dr. Bill Thomas. Minka is a prefabricated housing system to address affordable housing options that meet the needs of people with different ages and abilities. “Minka” stems from a Japanese term meaning “house of the people” and was used to refer to the dwellings of farmers, artists, and merchants. Lisa, the current project coordinator, is using the home as a testing lab for interdisciplinary approaches to integrative technology. Pulling from her own experience as the primary caregiver for her mother before she died, and from her background in entrepreneurship and technology, Lisa is working to investigate ways that smart technology can create an “ambiance of positivity and light” for the aging population. Inspired by the LivABLE Environment Conference, Lisa abides by the WELL Building Standard that considers factors such as light, air, water, creativity, and movement to enhance well-being and functionality. In essence, the home is equipped with sensory technology that reads a resident’s movements in order to address their needs. For instance, if a resident walks in the home shuffling their feet, the home might begin playing their favorite uplifting music or broadcast pictures of loved ones on a display screen in order to increase positivity. “I play the role of Ruth, our role-playing older person,” Lisa explains about the prototyping research she conducts there in tandem with other interdisciplinary departments at USI, such as Occupational Therapy, Social Work, Gerontology, Healthcare Administration, and Nursing. “My mother responded well to staying busy. She had always liked to draw, so she began creating these portfolios of all her childhood memories. I was always interested in discovering how I could encourage my mom to be her true self and manifest unfulfilled goals,” says Lisa. She kept her mother, who had Alzheimer’s, stimulated by offering her art supplies and encouraging her productivity, and now has a cherished tangible reminder of her mother. “Her portfolios are my favorite possession,” Lisa says. Robin, like many others across the country, is recreating the residential needs of aging parents and discovering the mutual beneficiality of having the final chapter of life on premise. “I have had lots of girlfriends with parents in assisted living. I have watched these families work their whole lives to pay for this service — navigating the attorneys, consolidating the funds, evaluating the quality of care — I just didn’t feel this was the best decision for my family. I’ve always been a mommy’s girl…when we dropped my 18-year-old off in Bloomington for college, I had many tearful talks with my mom. All I had to do was walk over to visit, and we would share some tears together about my baby leaving the nest. I am very close to her,” Robin says about creating her mother’s nest just a stone’s throw away. Today’s Transitions / Spring 2022 57


CAREGIVER SOLUTIONS

When Mom Moves In

One couple’s experience of living with dementia. By Vanessa Hutchison

“M

om needs to move in with us.” Despite being a relatively intelligent person, and despite having experienced my own grandfather’s dementia as he aged more than a decade earlier, I had no idea how much that sentence would completely change my life in a myriad of ways. On the day that my husband came home and told me that his mother needed to move in with us, she did not yet have an official diagnosis, but we knew, in the way that you know the smell of the sky before it rains in the summer. Recent visits had found lunch meat in silverware drawers, piles of undone laundry, and a lingering pall of loneliness that could not be mistaken. We moved her in quickly. In the two weeks after the decision was made, a room was cleared, walls were painted, and furniture was moved. Naively, we believed she’d want to spend much of her time alone and our lives would not be upended. This did not turn out to be the case. And a pandemic had just begun. Quickly, we learned that we had, perhaps unwittingly, assigned ourselves to round-the-clock support of a questionable reality, shifts in and out of lucidity, mood swings, anger, despair. The thing that outsiders do not realize about dementia is that it’s not just about memory. The loss of memory is, indeed, the easiest aspect of dementia for caretakers to handle. While it is not fun answering the same question eight times in as many 58 Spring 2022 / TodaysTransitions.com

minutes, it is also not difficult. No, the difficulty comes with the displaced anger for things out of your control, and the sadness about things you wish you could save them from. In the months that followed, my husband became the consummate caretaker. Always good in a crisis, it became his mission to keep us all safe — from the pandemic as well as from the darkness that might cloud the mind. I imagine that having another adult living in our home would have challenged our marriage even under the best of circumstances. But those we found ourselves in were not the best. The government was begging us to stay home. Even the holidays were over Zoom. There was nowhere to go, and the world inside our home felt increasingly small. Since 2020, I have read nearly every article ever written on being a caretaker for a person with dementia, so I can say with confidence that my husband and I did nearly everything wrong. Our boundaries were flimsy, at best. We took things personally. We argued. As I write this, my mother-in-law, the tiny woman who took up so much space in our life, has been living in a nursing home for three weeks. Our house is quieter. The dogs miss the way she would sneak them treats at the dinner table. I miss the bizarre old songs that she would ask Alexa to play. But when we see her, she is happier. She is healthier. And so are we.


VISITING THE SICK: DOS AND DON’TS What do you do for and say to people who have a life-limiting illness? I was very fortunate early in my ministry to have a wonderful mentor — Father Jim Hendricks — who was amazing in his care for the sick. I learned from him by following his good example. When you find out that someone has a serious illness, hold the gasps. They’re still among the living. Simply ask, “What can I do to be most helpful?” Then listen for an answer. WHAT TO DO Stay in touch by phone, visits, cards, and emails. Allow the person to respond as energy allows. Help the main caregiver by giving the caregiver a chance to go for a walk, take a nap, and talk about something besides illness. Rather than ask, “What can I do?” offer a few specifics. Ask if you can drive them to the library, take them to a movie, or bring them something they are craving. Send movies, books, flowers, and meals in containers that the person doesn’t have to return. It’s hard for most of us to ask for help. Make it easy for them. Offer to run an errand. Bring over a meal. Do the laundry. Fill the fridge. Listen. You don’t have to offer answers, advice, or a plan of action. Get comfortable with silence and always look the person in the eye no matter how they look. They are still your friend, sister, brother, or co-worker. WHAT NOT TO DO Don’t disappear. Don’t be that friend who leaves. Stay involved for the long haul. The longer the sickness lasts, the lonelier it can get. Don’t share horror stories about people who didn’t make it. Too many people want to tell long, drawn-out stories with bad endings. Don’t go there. There are no right words. Keep it simple and say, “I’m here for you,” and mean it. Sometimes no words are best. Your presence alone matters more than anything you can say. Don’t blame the person for being sick. Don’t point out that it might be from lack of exercise, smoking, too much red meat or wine, or negative thinking. Don’t say you know how the person feels. You really don’t. Don’t take anything personally. Being sick can make a person irritated, tense, sad, depressed, and angry. Remember, the burden of friendship is on the well person. By Bob Mueller Bob Mueller is the bishop of the United Catholic Church. bobmueller.org

Virtual Reality Technology Offers Health Benefits For Seniors By Vanessa Hutchison

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hile virtual reality (VR) has been around for quite awhile, the technology has only entered the realm of consumer technology in the past decade or so. Since then, neurologists and psychiatrists alike have been interested in exploring the potential health benefits of VR. Recent studies have specifically looked into potential benefits of virtual reality technology for those with dementia and Alzheimer’s, and the results are promising. If you or a loved one have ever experienced dementia, then it is easy to understand the appeal of potential treatments. While many think dementia is related only to memory loss, those who have experienced it on a more personal level understand that the more insidious aspects of the condition include violent mood swings, persistent angry episodes, and significant bouts of depression and anxiety — all of which affect quality of life for dementia patients as well as their caregivers. The search for relief from these symptoms can often feel like a desperate plea — one which advanced virtual reality applications may be able to answer. Multiple studies in the past five years have looked into virtual reality treatment for dementia and Alzheimer’s with impressive results. One such study out of the University of Kent in 2019 found that VR was able to improve patients’ quality of life and helped the patients to recall lost memories through the use of new visual stimuli. Others have found results such as elevated mood and overall reduction of depression by providing patients with sensory experiences in interesting locales that their health or physical constraints may not otherwise let them experience. Rendever is a VR platform which has been shown to reduce depression and loneliness in patients by fostering personal connections with others. rendever.com

UprightVR uses virtual reality to improve balance and help fall prevention in those with limited mobility. uprightvr.com While adaptive VR platforms often come with a steep price tag, there are signs that virtual reality is becoming more affordable and accessible. PlayStation has dipped its toe into virtual reality and Meta’s Quest 2 has marketing applications that go well beyond gaming, inviting users to explore new worlds or exercise in community spaces. It is only a matter of time before these companies and others also find a way to be more inclusive of their aging clientele and create applications that help to facilitate memory care and learning. In the world of VR, the possibilities really are endless. Today’s Transitions / Spring 2022

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CAREGIVER SCHEDULES

By Carrie Vittitoe

Creating a Good Day

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hat does a day look like for your loved one? Routines give us a sense of control over our lives and are especially critical for those who are largely homebound or who have dementia. Whether you are a caregiver yourself or directing those who do the daily caring, it is important to have some rules around meals, exercise, mental stimulation, hygiene, and connection during each day.

Type of Routine: Rigid or Loosey-Goosey Some people love a strict schedule; they like to know what the day holds on an hour-by-hour basis. Other people dislike the rigidity of a schedule; they prefer a more fluid approach that allows them some flexibility and creativity. If you’re a caregiver, it is essential to get input from your older loved one about what type of routine they prefer. “Planning is going to be your key. Involving each other in the planning routine increases compliance,” says Terra Coomer, heart failure coordinator at Baptist Health Floyd. She says this involvement is especially important when it comes to nutrition and meal preparation, especially for older adults who have to follow specialized diets due to chronic health conditions. The fluidity of a routine may also depend on whether the individual has cognitive disease. “When you’re working with someone that has dementia, routines are especially important. It adds structure and predictability for someone whose senses and cognition can’t be relied on,” says caregiver Lisa Smith. A routine may help reduce feelings of anxiety and minimize agitation. If an older adult prefers a strict schedule, it might be appropriate to have an hourly schedule with everything written down. An individual who prefers a more flexible routine might do better with a checklist schedule. As long as items on the list get done that day, it may not matter at what time (medications might be the exception). The most important thing about whichever routine is chosen is that it is planned and not a haphazard approach. MEALS: SMALLER, MORE FREQUENT FOOD When Lisa is caring for someone in their home, she often works small servings of finger foods into the daily routine versus large amounts of food on a plate. “Sometimes it’s pieces of cut up fruit or meat cut into strips,” she says. If a client is sitting and watching TV, Lisa will bring them a small plate of food to snack on. “We all do that mindless eating sometimes, but for someone who is not getting enough nutrition, that is a way to get some calories,” she says. Dementia patients who don’t have big appetites may be easily distracted when it is time to eat, so Lisa recommends having a clean, uncluttered table and using plain colored plates without designs or patterns. 60 Spring 2022 / TodaysTransitions.com

DON’T OVERLOOK HYGIENE Hygiene is an often overlooked part of the routine, but it is extremely important. “[Good] oral hygiene becomes very important and decreases the chance of pneumonia,” Terra says. “Open sores on the skin increase the risk of infection.” Caregivers need to, of course, consider their loved one’s privacy and independence, but there is also the need for some form of inspection, especially for difficult to see places, like the feet or back. Keeping up good hygiene is important to physical health, but it can also be important to emotional well-being. Getting a shower, washing one’s hair, and shaving often make a person feel better especially if they are homebound and feel sluggish.

“WHEN YOU’RE WORKING WITH SOMEONE THAT HAS DEMENTIA, ROUTINES ARE ESPECIALLY IMPORTANT.” – LISA SMITH

EXERCISE It can be a challenge to work exercise into a routine for a mostly homebound individual, but it can be important to overall movement and continued quality of life. A person will be more willing if they are doing physical exercise that they want to do, whether that is dancing, walking around the yard, lifting small hand weights, or using an exercise bike. Someone who hates walking on a treadmill is going to resist even if they know exercise is important for their physical and emotional wellbeing. There are multiple exercises created specifically for different chronic conditions — mostly found through searching online — though it can take some time to find ones that work.


CALM FOR THE CAREGIVER “If the person has significant mobility issues and you can’t leave them unattended, you might have to be within view of them. But you might be able to sit and read quietly while they are doing their activity,” Lisa says. “You really have to tune into self-care. You need to be deliberate about learning what brings you relaxation in short periods of time.” Lisa says when her father was a caregiver for her mother, he enjoyed listening to birds but couldn’t be far from her. “We found a speaker that broadcasted sounds from the outside into the house,” she says. This small speaker brought her dad a sense of peacefulness throughout his day when he was largely inside with his wife. “A lot of times, the patient’s well-being has a lot to do with the caregiver’s well-being,” she says.

FUN AND GAMES: MENTAL STIMULATION Keeping one’s brain active relieves boredom and helps reduce the chance of future cognitive decline. It takes some effort to keep it part of a day. Here are some ideas. Start with 15 minutes and work up to a few 30 minute times throughout the day. •C rossword puzzles or regular puzzles • Reading or listening to audiobooks • Knitting, quilting, sewing, woodworking, whittling, or repairing items in the house • Listening to music or watching an orchestra perform in a televised concert • Sitting on the porch and bird-watching • Writing a note/card to someone • A short drive to see some local sites

INTERPERSONAL CONNECTION Anyone homebound has a need to connect with others. Make a schedule and plan a phone call from family or friends each day or every other day. Plan visits the same way if possible. Caregivers could read their loved one’s church newsletter to them about happenings in their community as a way to make them feel more connected or help someone get on a Zoom call to get updates about various community concerns.

MEDICAL MONITORING Decide on a routine for medical monitoring, which can include taking medications, checking blood sugar, taking one’s blood pressure, or for heart failure patients, weighing themselves each morning. Also have a way of recording it — it can be a spreadsheet that you create or a daily calendar that has a place to check off each thing.

“YOU REALLY HAVE TO TUNE INTO SELF-CARE. YOU NEED TO BE DELIBERATE ABOUT LEARNING WHAT BRINGS YOU RELAXATION.” – LISA SMITH Today’s Transitions / Spring 2022

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CAREGIVER THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE HOME

By Kym Voorhees Raque

Bedtime Blues For those worried about break-ins, the addition of motion sensor lighting outside the home, extra locks, or an easy-touse security system may be enough to ease their fears. Check into overnight care options like those offered by Home Instead Senior Care. Having someone around at night can help reduce fears and anxiety.

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fter a long day, who doesn’t anticipate falling into those soft sheets for a good night’s rest. This wellneeded respite can be hard to come by. Nearly half of adults 65 and over report having problems falling asleep or staying asleep through the night. While it’s normal for older people to sleep less and wake more frequently, getting a full night’s sleep, regardless of age, is important for overall health and well-being. In addition to age-related physical changes and ailments, nighttime can bring with it a whole host of fears. Issues that may not be of concern during the day can be magnified at night. Many worry what will happen if they fall or need help and can’t reach anyone. Some fear for their general safety in a home alone. These fears increase stress and anxiety making sleep impossible. Let’s look at some technology and lifestyle modifications that offer support so older adults can maintain independence and remain at home.

ADDRESS NIGHTTIME FEARS WITH PRACTICAL SOLUTIONS Falls are the leading cause of injury and death for those 65 and older. To help prevent nighttime falls, use a night light, make sure the path from bed to bathroom or bedroom door is clear, and remove rugs or other trip hazards. If your loved one is prone to falls, consider a fall detection alert device by Medical Guardian or Bay Alarm Medical. A smartwatch such as Garmin fenix 6 or Apple Watch Series 4 or 5 includes fall detection as well as health monitoring options. 62 Spring 2022 / TodaysTransitions.com

WHAT YOU DO DURING THE DAY MATTERS AT NIGHT Sleep is vitally important at all stages of life. According to the American Sleep Association, your body restores itself during sleep, boosting your immune system, consolidating memories, and regenerating cells and tissues. Lack of quality sleep can affect everything from your attention span and cognitive function to your mood and how much and what you eat. There are a number of things you can do to reduce anxiety at night and promote better sleep. Get social and stay busy. Filling your days with social activities will make you more tired at night. Mental activities like crosswords, puzzles, reading, or writing letters help stimulate your brain during the day so it’s ready to rest at night. Exercise. Get moving 30 minutes or more every day. Create a sleep routine. Keeping yourself on a daily sleep and wake schedule and creating a nightly routine can help reset your internal clock and make falling asleep easier. Stick to a basic daily schedule. Maintaining a predictable schedule which includes mealtimes, socializing, exercise, and bedtime can reduce confusion and anxiety at night, especially for those suffering from dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. Check your medications. Some have stimulants in them which can keep you awake at night. Consult your doctor to see if a different medication or dosage schedule will help. Turn off electronics. Shut down the TV, iPad, or computer at least 30 minutes before you get into bed. Eat better. Cut down on sugar and refined carbs such as white bread, pasta, and rice. Stop eating three hours before you go to bed and limit liquids an hour or so before bedtime. If you’re still having trouble falling asleep and staying asleep, talk to your doctor or seek the advice of a counselor. SIGNS YOUR LOVED ONE MAY BE HAVING PROBLEMS AT NIGHT: • More irritable during the day • Taking frequent naps throughout the day • Complaints of being tired • Trouble with recall or memory • General forgetfulness not associated with a disease • Voices fears about being alone at night • Aggressive behavior


HOME HEALTH:

FINDING CAREGIVERS When you need help caring for someone you love, trust is important — you are trusting the person with someone you hold dear. Whether it be skilled nursing care or companionship, care by people who have been vetted and trained and backed by a reliable company allows for ease of mind. Search on pages 64 and 65, as well as online at TodaysTransitions.com

FEATURED LISTINGS

Home Instead Senior Care

BrightStar Care

4101 Taylorsville Rd, Ste 200 Louisville, KY 40220 (502) 515-9515 louisvillehomecare.com

406 Blankenbaker Pkwy, Ste G Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 893-4700 louisvillehomecare.org

“Families need us to be their solution when a loved one is aging at home and they cannot be the fulltime caregiver. There is no greater feeling than when our clients share we not only meet their needs but we also provide their family peace of mind.” – Lynn Welch, Executive Director

“The care we provide enables our clients to live independently at home as long as it is safe. Families have support & peace of mind knowing loved ones are well cared for at every stage of life & in every setting. Our nurse-led care team treats each client as they would a member of their own family.” – Christian McCutcheon, Owner

We have proudly provided Home Care Services to the Louisville Community for over 22 years. We are committed to delivering compassionate, high-quality care to seniors. To us, it’s personal! Call today for a complimentary consultation.

Joint Commission Accredited. High quality skilled & non-skilled in home care for people of all ages. All care is overseen by a Registered Nurse and is available 1-24 hrs/day with Guaranteed Caregiver Compatibility. Compassionate care, excellent service.

Services: Available 24/7; our CarePros provide personal care, postrehab support, companionship, transportation, Alzheimer’s/dementia care, and end of life support. EVERY client will be assigned a Case Manager directed by Nursing Leadership.

Services: personal care, homemaker, transportation, errands, Alzheimer’s/ dementia care, Parkinson’s, ALS, respite, med reminders, meal prep, end of life care, RN/geriatric case management, skilled nursing.

Cost for Service: Based on Level-of-Care. Services start at $29/hr. Type: Non-medical Home Care Services | Owner: CEO, Steve Hendricks

Cost per hour: $22-$25 | Min. time required: 1 hr Type: non-medical, skilled nursing Owner: Christian & Leslie McCutcheon Today's Transitions / Spring 2022

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HOME HEALTH SERVICES BrightStar Care 406 Blankenbaker Pkwy, Ste G Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 893-4700 louisvillehomecare.org

CareBuilders at Home 2210 Goldsmith Ln, Ste 209 Louisville, KY 40218 (502) 458-2273 carebuildersathomelouisville.com

Caring Excellence Personalized Home Care Services 1169 Eastern Pky, Ste 1134, Louisville, KY 40217 (502) 208-9424 caringexcellenceathome.com

Helping Hands Companion Care Services 2301 Hurstbourne Village Dr #100 Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 426-9783 home-companions.com

Home Instead Senior Care 4101 Taylorsville Rd, Ste 200, Louisville, KY 40220 (502) 515-9515 louisvillehomecare.com

Homewatch CareGivers 2001 Stanley Gault Pkwy, Ste C Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 244-1212 hwcg.com/Louisville

Hosparus Health 6200 Dutchmans Lane Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 456-6200 HosparusHealth.org

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Joint Commission Accredited. High quality skilled & non-skilled in home care for people of all ages. All care is overseen by a Registered Nurse and is available 1-24 hrs/ day with Guaranteed Caregiver Compatibility. Compassionate care, excellent service. Services: personal care, homemaker, transportation, errands, Alzheimer’s/dementia care, Parkinson’s, ALS, respite, med reminders, meal prep, end of life care, RN/geriatric case management, skilled nursing. Cost per hour: $22-$25 | Min. time required: 1 hr Type: non-medical, skilled nursing | Owner: Christian & Leslie McCutcheon Compassionate, customized, coordinated care; State Certified Personal Service Agency, Help at home for independence, post-rehab recovery, Alzheimer’s/Dementia Care, Parkinson’s, respite, sitter service any location; 1-to-1 for med appointments, companion Services: personal care, homemaker, transportation, errands Cost per hour: $23-$26 | Min. time required: 3 hrs Type: non-medical | Owner: Laura Curry and Michael Coffey

Locally owned, Consistent Caregivers, Caregiver Matching and RN Case Management. Senior Care, Parkinson’s Care, Alzheimer’s Care and After-Hospital Care in your home. All care directed by Registered Nurse and Master Level Social Worker. Services: All personal care, all mobility needs,meal preparation, homemaking, medication reminders, exercise assistance, errands,transportation, respite care. Cost per hour: $23-$24 | Min. time required: flexible up to 24/7 Type: non-medical | Owner: Kayla Cook, RN, Elisabeth Knight, MSSW Personalized loving care available in home, assisted living, nursing home or hospital; scheduling up to 24 hours 7 days a week; trained and experience caregivers; free assessments; serving Kentucky and Southern Indiana since 1996. Services: personal care, home making, transportation, errands, respite, med. reminders Cost per hour: $24 and up | Min. time required: Flexible Type: non-medical | Owner: Terry Graham, RN; Dawn Smithwick, BSW

We have proudly provided Home Care Services to the Louisville Community for over 22 years. We are committed to delivering compassionate, high-quality care to seniors. To us, it’s personal! Call today for a complimentary consultation. Services: Available 24/7; our CarePros provide personal care, post-rehab support, companionship, transportation, Alzheimer’s/dementia care, and end of life support. EVERY client will be assigned a Case Manager directed by Nursing Leadership. Cost for Service: Based on Level-of-Care. Services start at $29/hr. Type: Non-medical Home Care Services | Owner: CEO, Steve Hendricks Fully trained and experienced CNA’s/Caregivers, on-staff Certified Dementia Practitioners, complimentary evaluations, customized care plan, company with 30 years of home care experience, Alzheimer’s/Dementia expertise, Five Star reviews Services: personal care, homemaker, transportation, errands Cost per hour: $27-$30 | Min. time required: 4 consecutive hours Type: non-medical | Owner: Steve and Trish Kochersperger

Offering quality hospice and palliative care and grief counseling services to people living with serious and life-limiting illnesses. A not-for-profit hospice organization providing compassionate care. See our ad on back cover. Services: nursing & physician services, pain & symptom mgt, social workers, spiritual care, CNA’s, grief counseling services and volunteer programs Cost: Medicare accepted rate | Min. time required: N/A Type: medical | Owner: Hosparus Inc.


Search more home health services online by scanning the QR code.

Malone Home Care 2932 Breckenridge Ln, Ste 1 Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 637-5474 malonehomecare.com

Flexible Scheduling, No Contracts, 24 Hour Coverage, complimentary in-home assessment and Care Plan provided by a Registered Nurse. We help clients maintain independence in the comfort of their own home. Services: Licensed Private Duty Nursing Agency providing skilled nursing services (RN/LPN) and Personal Care Assistants (PCA) to help with activities like meal preparation, bathing and grooming, housekeeping, and medications. Cost per hour: RN/LPN $47+, PCA $22+ Type: medical and non-medical | Owner: Locally owned and operated

Senior Helpers Louisville/Southern Indiana 4043 Taylorsville Rd Louisville, KY 40220 (502) 690-2648 seniorhelpers.com

Visiting Angels 126 S. Sherrin Ave Louisville 40207 (502) 897-6547 VisitingAngels.com

Locally owned, licensed and insured, compassionate caregivers trained how to keep seniors safe at home. Call today for a complimentary Life Profile consultation- the first step in reducing risks for your loved one. Services: Compassionate care by quality caregivers and excellent service. Flexible schedules with caregiver matching (3 hour minimum per visit). Cost per hour: $20-$24 | Min. time required: flexible Type: non-medical | Owner: Nancy Galloway

Customized Care by reliable, experienced caregivers. Visiting Angels allows you to select your own caregiver and conducts an in-home assessment prior to starting care. Client feedback and family communication are an integral part of our customer service. Services: personal care, housekeeping, meal prep, laundry, errands & transportation, Alzheimer’s care, fall prevention, med reminders, respite, 24-hour care Cost per hour: $17-23 | Min. time required: Flexible Type: non-medical | Owner: Andrew Block, locally owned & operated

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CARE COMMUNITY DIRECTORY Today’s Transitions seeks to help you find the right care you need for a loved one whenever you need it. The Care Communities Directory contains both short- and long-term carerelated resources. More details can be found at TodaysTransitions.com. For Home Health Directory see page 63. For retirement Living Options Directory, see page 48.

TYPES OF CARE COMMUNITIES: Adult Day Care programs provide care and companionship to those who need supervision or assistance. Aging-In-Place Communities offer several levels of care on one campus. Assisted Living is residential living for those who need help with daily activities and health services.

Personal Care residential living offers mobile residents minimal assistance for daily activities.

Hospice provides pain relief for those with a terminal illness and a life expectancy of six months or less.

Rehabilitation Services is physical treatment in an inpatient or outpatient clinic.

Memory Care residential living is for those with dementia at different care levels

Skilled Nursing Care is 24-hour nursing services for residents in a care community

Palliative Care is specialized medical care for people living with a serious illness.

Respite Care provides shortterm care in order to provide relief for primary caregivers.

Find Help By Location

Search the Location Chart (on the right page) for specific types of care by location. The Map (right) coordinates with the Zone column. More details for all care communities listed in the chart can be found in the full directory listing starting on page 68. If you are interested in a listing, call 502.327.8855 or email Advertising@TodaysMediaNow.com. *Published rates are given by company.

Payment Options: These definitions can help you navigate the payment options in each directory: Private – consumer pays out-of-pocket. Private Ins. – could include Medicare supplements or HMOs/health insurance. LTCi – long-term care insurance; helps cover the cost of services for people who have an extended physical illness, extended disability, or cognitive impairment. VA – Veterans Administration; provides financial assistance to retired veterans needing medical, surgical, and rehabilitative care.

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Search our care community directory online by scanning the QR code.


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Zone

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ay Ca re UofL Health – Frazier Rehab Institute Christian Care Communities – Christian Health Center, Friendship House and Chapel House The Altenheim Nazareth Home Twinbrook Assisted Living Nazareth Home – Clifton ElderServe Adult Day Health Center Creekside on Bardstown Belmont Village St. Matthews Masonic Homes Kentucky – Louisville Louisville Campus, Meadow, Miralea and Village Active Lifestyle Communities Vitality Living St. Matthew Westport Place Health Campus Magnolia Springs Louisville Senior Living Anthology of Louisville Creekside on Whipps Mill Park Louisville by Charter Senior Living Christian Care Communities – Middletown The Forum at Brookside Forest Springs Health Campus The Legacy at English Station Valhalla Post Acute Franciscan Health Care Center Wesley Manor Retirement Community (The Aldersgate, Health Care Center, Hoskinson House) The Springs at Stony Brook Barton House The Willows at Springhurst Vitality Living Springdale Morning Pointe of Louisville Forest Hills Commons Glen Ridge Health Campus Heartsong East Adult Day Health Care Vitality Living Stony Brook Heartsong Memory Care and Adult Day Health Care Park Terrace Health Campus Green Valley Care Center BeeHive Homes of Goshen/Prospect The Springs at Oldham Reserve Sanders Ridge Health Campus The Grand Senior Living Hallmark House Shelby Farms Senior Living Cooper Trail Senior Living

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C X X C X C X X C X X C X C X C X C X C X X

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Adult Day Care

Aging-in-Place Communities

Assisted Living

Hospice Care

Memory Care

Palliative Care

Personal Care

Respite Care

Rehabilitation Services

Skilled Nursing

The Aldersgate at Wesley Manor

Barton House

Price Per Month: $4945-$5375

Price Per Month: $6430

Personal Care, including rehab and physician services, geriatric psychiatrist, daily activities, chapel, beauty salon, cable TV and phone service, longtenured staff for best care. Priority placement for short-term rehab and skilled nursing. No long-term contracts, entrance fees or deposits. Located on 35 beautiful acres. No long-term contracts, entrance fees or deposits.

Designed for Alzheimer’s & memory impairments. Dignified & individualized care, from meals to the activities they participate in, and how their room is decorated. Pets to love & care for, frequent meals promoting socialization, tree-filled backyard with a patio and walking path. Staff trained in dementia. Medical care by our nurses, therapists, psychiatrist & doctor.

Owner: Methodist Retirement Home, Inc.

Owner: Goodworks

Payment: Private, LTCi, VA

Payment: Private, LTCi

Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, 24-Hr Care, Physical/ Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces

Features and Services: Showers, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, 24-Hr Care, Physical/ Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Chef on Staff

5012 E Manslick Rd, Louisville, KY 40219 (502) 969-3277 • WesMan.org

6830 Overlook Dr, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 423-7177 • bartonlouisville.com

BeeHive Homes of Goshen/Prospect 12336 US Hwy 42, Goshen, KY 40026 (502) 292-3200 • beehivehomes.com/goshen Price Per Month: $4100

The Altenheim

936 Barret Ave, Louisville, KY 40204 (502) 584-7417 thealtenheim.org Price Per Day: $100-$315 Number of beds: 32 (N/R, MC), 30 (PC) Enjoy our beautiful Highlands park-like setting with updated furnishings no matter your living arrangements – independent, assisted, personal care, memory care, nursing/rehab or short-term stay. Our selective menus with salad/cold bar offer a ton of variety. Staffing levels are above expectations and truthfully make us what we are today! Our Aging-in-Place community offers an above average staff-to-resident ratio, allowing time for visits with residents as well as necessary care. Hosparus care supports our staff when requested. We have a secure Memory Care unit, specializing in activity programs for residents offered by trained staff and volunteers. Our Personal Care option provides the independence of living at home. Owner: The Altenheim Payment: Private, LTCi Features and Services: Laundry, 24-Hour Care, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Tours/Trips, Medication Given, Pets Allowed, Chef on Staff

Anthology of Louisville

1105 Dorsey Ln, Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 966-7077 • anthologyseniorliving.com Price Per Day: $113-$145 The Personal Care apartments provide the stability and safety needed for residents’ independence. Our memory care utilizes innovative programs, including IN2L and FITMINDS. The supportive memory care we deliver is reflective of the resident’s lifestyles, routines and comfort levels. Owner: Anthology Senior Living Payment: Private, Private Ins., LTCi, VA Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Laundry, Meal Prep, Errands, 24-Hr Care, Physical/ Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Open Kitchen, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Movie Room, Chef on Staff

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Your loved one will be safe 24/7 with our trained, caring staff. Our home is small for an easier transition. With our low resident to staff ratio we get to know your loved one quicker. Many activities include professional singers and exercise provided by the YMCA. Hair salon. Free cable TV and WiFi. Owner: Eric and Catherine Sherrard Payment: Private, LTCi, VA Features and Services: Transportation, Available, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Laundry, Meal Prep, 24-Hr Care, Physical/Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Game Night, Tours/ Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Chef on Staff

Belmont Village St. Matthews

4600 Bowling Blvd, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 721-7500 • belmontvillage.com Cost per day: $139-$341 The Community Built for Life – Belmont Village St. Matthews offers a variety of senior living options. Our residents enjoy an environment that allows as much independence or assistance that they may need. Our Community is designed inside and out to complement the style of the area and create a comfortable, familiar space for our residents. Private apartments are available in a variety of floor plans, and as a licensed Personal Care Community, our residents don’t have to move if care needs change and couples with differing care needs can stay together. We have been recognized for our award winning memory care programming, including our Circle of Friends® program designed to address mild to moderate cognitive impairment and varying stages of dementia. Founded in research and developed by experts, our memory care activities are therapeutic and engaging, with attainable goals that allow our residents to stay involved, maintain function and have happy fulfilling days. Owner: Belmont Village, L.P. Payment: Private, LTCi Features and Services: Chef prepared meals, Transportation, Housekeeping, Laundry, on-site Therapy services, Entertainment and Happy hour, Medication management, Bathing, dressing, toileting assistance, Activities and outings, Pet friendly.


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Adult Day Care

Aging-in-Place Communities

Assisted Living

Hospice Care

Memory Care

Christian Care Communities – Christian Health Center, Friendship House and Chapel House 920 S 4th St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 583-6533 • ChristianCareCommunities.org/Louisville Price Per Day: Varies by Level of Care

Palliative Care

Personal Care

Respite Care

Rehabilitation Services

Skilled Nursing

Forest Hills Commons

9107 Taylorsville Rd Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 499-5533 • ASCCare.com Price Per Month: $2495-$5750

We offer affordable and recently renovated apartments in Old Louisville. Easy access to nursing and support services at Health Center next door.

Variety of floor plans with patio or balcony options. Personalized support services by licensed nursing staff. Wide range of social and recreational programs. Specialized memory care neighborhood catering to all residents.

Owner: Christian Care Communities, Inc.

Owner: American Senior Communities

Payment: Medicare, Medicare Advantage Plans, Medicaid, private

Payment: Private, LTCi, VA

Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, 24-Hr Care, Physical/Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Movie Room, Chef on Staff

Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Laundry, Meal Prep, Errands, 24-Hr Care, Physical/Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Open Kitchen, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Movie Room, Chef on Staff

Cooper Trail Senior Living

Forest Springs Health Campus

Price Per Month: $3083-$5539

Price Per Month: $3147-$4787

Compassionate staff, activities, respite & outpatient services on-site.

Full continuum of care, short-term care, therapy services on-site.

Operated by: Trilogy Health Services, LLC

Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC

Payment: Private, LTCi

Payment: Private, Medicare, Medicaid, LTCi

325 Lincoln Way, Bardstown KY 40004 (502) 572-4329 • coopertrailsl.com

4120 Wooded Acre Ln, Louisville, KY 40245 (502) 243-1643 • forestspringshc.com

Creekside on Bardstown

3535 Bardstown Rd, Louisville, KY 40218 (502) 919-7715 • creeksideonbardstown.com Price Per Month: $3500-$5500 Family/home like atmosphere that is all inclusive. We provide scheduled transportation to and from doctor appointments, telephone, cable, wifi, compassionate caregivers to assist with toileting, and more. We also provide 3 home-made meals per days with 3 snacks. Owner: Elmington Senior Living Payment: Private, VA, LTCi Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, Errands, 24-Hr Care, Physical/Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Movie Room, Chef on Staff

Creekside on Whipps Mill

9701 Whipps Mill Rd, Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 919-8470 • creeksideonwhippsmill.com Price Per Month: $3450-$4500 Family/home like atmosphere that is all inclusive. We provide scheduled transportation to and from doctor appointments, telephone, cable, wifi, compassionate caregivers to assist with toileting, and more. We also provide 3 home-made meals per days with 3 snacks. Owner: Elmington Senior Living Payment: Private, VA, LTCi Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, Errands, 24-Hr Care, Physical/Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Pets Allowed, Chef on Staff

The Forum at Brookside

200 Brookside Dr, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 245-3048 theforumatbrookside.com Price Per Day: $165-$247 Number of units: Ambassador Suites, 24 Apts There are 24 apartments in Personal Care Ambassador Suites. Newly renovated Alcove and One Bedroom residences. Elegant restaurantstyle dining room and a private landscaped courtyard with gazebo. Personal Care is a licensed “step-up” from typical assisted living, since Personal Care permits the administration of medication by licensed professionals. We partner with Ageility, a national leader in developing specialized rehabilitation and fitness training solutions. Through our onsite Ageility clinic, we provide easy-to-access outpatient rehab and fitness training. If you’re recovering from injury or surgery, you’ll appreciate our physical and occupational therapy that focuses on prevention and wellness. Owner: Five Star Senior Living, Inc. Payment: Private, LTCi Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Laundry, Meal Prep, Errands, 24-Hr Care, Physical/Occupational/Speech Therapy, Water/Aquatic Exercise, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Open Kitchen, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Movie Room, Chef on Staff

ElderServe Adult Day Health Center

Franciscan Health Care Center

Price Per Day: $60

Price Per Month: $3146

Activities meeting needs who are frail, disabled or facing memory loss.

Full continuum of care, short-term care, therapy services on-site.

Owner: ElderServe, Inc.

Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC

Payment: Private, VA, Medicaid Waiver

Payment: Private, LTCi, Medicare, Medicaid

631 S. 28th St, Louisville, KY 40211 (502) 776-3066 • elderserveinc.org

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3625 Fern Valley Rd, Louisville, KY 40219 (502) 964-3381 • franciscanhc.com


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Adult Day Care

Aging-in-Place Communities

Assisted Living

Hospice Care

Memory Care

Palliative Care

Personal Care

Respite Care

Rehabilitation Services

Skilled Nursing

Glen Ridge Health Campus

6415 Calm River Way, Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 297-8590 • glenridgehc.com Price Per Month: $4167 Full continuum of care, short-term care, therapy services on-site. Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment: Private, Medicare, Medicaid, LCTi

Harmony at Tucker Station

12523 Taylorsville Rd, Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 694-4673 HarmonySeniorServices.com Price Per Month: $2750+

The Grand Senior Living

9300 Civic Way, Prospect, KY 40059 (502) 310-1542 thegrand-sl.com Price Per Month: $4400-$6850 Number of units: 24 (MC), 62 (PC) Housekeeping, laundry services, 24/7 staff on site and nursing staff trained in Dementia care, activity program, fitness center, secured outdoor courtyard, menu items to delight a variety of tastes with 3 meals daily, assistance with dining, medications and incontinence management. All-inclusive pricing. Short term stays available. Signature Passion Program with family care services and support groups.

Our Louisville, Kentucky, senior living community offers a range of senior living options to provide as much or as little assistance as you may need. Choose from Independent Living, Personal Care and Memory Care to get the right level of support from our caring, expert team. We are committed to serving our residents in a way that provides comfort and enrichment in your life. Harmony stands out among senior living communities for our uniquely engaging calendar of events, enriching activities, and world-class care services. Owner: Harmony Senior Services Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Laundry, Errands, 24-Hr Care, Physical Therapy, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Open Kitchen, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Movie Room, Chef on Staff

Owner: Management, Civitas Senior Living Payment: Private, LTCi, VA Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, House Cleaning, Bathing Assistance, Dressing Assistance, Laundry, Meal Prep, 24-Hr Care, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Water/ Aquatic Exercise, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Movie Room, Chef on Staff

Health Care Center, Wesley Manor

5012 East Manslick Rd, Louisville, KY 40219 (502) 969-3277 • WesMan.org Price Per Day: $280-$320

Green Valley Care Center

Short-term/inpatient rehab in private rooms; long-term skilled nursing care in semi-private rooms. Weekly visits by geriatric physician, psychiatrist who are on call 24/7. Regularly scheduled podiatry, dental, vision and hearing clinics. Full time chaplain. Free Wi-Fi, cable TV and phone service. Sensory stimulation and state of the art virtual reality activities. Life Plan community.

3118 Green Valley Rd, New Albany IN 47150 (812) 945-2341 • greenvalleycarecenter.com

Owner: Methodist Retirement Home, Inc.

Price Per Day: $282-$385

Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, 24-Hr Care, Physical/ Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces

Short-term rehab to home, long-term care and secured memory care unit. Owner: Life Care Centers of America Payment: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins., LTCi

Hallmark House

10301 Coneflower Ln, Prospect, KY 40059 (502) 290-6706 • hallmarkhouseky.com

Payment: Medicare, Private, Medicaid, LTCi, VA

Heartsong Adult Day Health Care 9260 Stonestreet Rd, Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 935-3300 • heartsong-mc.com Price Per Day: $66-$74 | Type: medical

Price Per Month: $5750-$6000

Activities to promote cognitive, physical, social, and spiritual well-being.

Our 32-apt community is for individuals with memory impairment. The open floor plan consists of two large living rooms, kitchenettes, nurses station and library. Our all-inclusive rate consists of assistance with daily activities (dressing, bathing, grooming), laundry, medication management, housekeeping, and meals. Salon services available. Respite stays welcome!

Owner: Heartsong Memory Care, LLC

Owner: J.A. Street & Associates Payment: Private, LTCi, VA Features and Services: Showers, Separate Units, Eating Help, Meal Prep, 24-Hr Care, Physical/Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Outdoor Spaces, Pets Allowed, Movie Room, Chef on Staff

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Payment: Private, Medicaid, VA, LTCi

Heartsong East Adult Day Health Care 10720 Plantside Dr, Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 935-3300 Price Per Day: $78 | Type: medical Activities to promote cognitive, physical, social, and spiritual well-being. Owner: CJL Group, LLC Payment: Private, Medicaid, LTCi


Heartsong Memory Care

9260 Stonestreet Rd, Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 935-3300 • heartsong-mc.com Price Per Month: $4950-$5250 Geriatric psych specialist & primary MD/NP visits. SHORT TERM STAYS. Owner: Heartsong Memory Care, LLC Payment: Private, LTCi

Hoskinson House at Wesley Manor 5012 E Manslick Rd, Louisville, KY 40219 (502) 969-3277 • WesMan.org Price Per Month: $2990-$5310 Activities, salon, spa, outpatient rehab, chapel, library, ice cream parlor, WiFi, cable TV and phone service. 5 floor plans. Long-tenured staff. No longterm contracts, entrance fees or deposits. Respite stays welcome. Life Plan community with priority placement for Personal Care/Memory Support, Skilled Nursing/Rehab and Patio Homes on beautiful 35-acre campus. Owner: Methodist Retirement Home, Inc. Payment: Private, LTCi, VA

Masonic Homes Kentucky — Louisville Campus 3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 259-9627 masonichomesky.com

Price Per Day: Varies depending on level of care Capacity: Independent living – 402 apts/12 patio homes; assisted living – 48 apts; personal and memory care - 51; skilled nursing – 167 Masonic offers a full continuum of aging care services including independent living, assisted living, personal care, rehabilitation therapies, memory care, skilled nursing care, home care, dialysis, and on-site medical clinic. It offers the region’s only Life Care and Life Plan programs offering priority access and discounts on health care services for entry fee residents.

Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, 24-Hr Care, Physical/ Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Pets Allowed

The Louisville Campus offers a park-like setting situated on 82-acres and includes paved walking paths, community gardens and a resident dog park. Residents enjoy 24/7 security, chef-prepared meals, transportation, life enrichment activities, art studio and craft shop, salon services, movie theaters and Harry Lusk Family Amphitheater.

The Legacy at English Station

Owner: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc.

13700 English Villa Dr, Louisville, KY 40245 (502) 254-2361 • legacyatenglishstation.com Price Per Month: $6218 Memory care honoring unique life stories, highly trained caregivers. Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC

Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, Errands, 24-Hr Care, Physical/Occupational/Speech Therapy, Water/Aquatic Exercise, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Open Kitchen, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Movie Room, Chef on Staff

Payment: Private, LTCi

Magnolia Springs Louisville Senior Living

Morning Pointe of Louisville

Price Per Month: $2995-$7200

Price Per Day: $106+

Number of beds: 20 (MC), 66 (AL)

Number of beds: 44 (MC); 73 (PC)

Memory Care: Home-like setting with all private apartments. Our specialized program, Heartfelt CONNECTIONS, enhances the lives of our residents by providing a safe, secure, and comfortable environment for your loved one with dementia. Secured outdoor courtyard, daily activities, salon.

Conveniently located between Watterson Trail and Bardstown Road, a single level, state-of-the-art Senior Living/Personal Care community on nine acres. Comfortable home-like environment. 24-hour licensed nursing and aide staff to assist with clinical needs in addition to personal care services.

Assisted Living: More than a place to live, Magnolia Springs represents a place to celebrate life with purpose. Specializing in food, family, friends, and fun. Onsite: salon, restaurant style dining, laundry, activities, movie theatre, personal garages, PT/OT/Speech Therapy, Long-tenure staff, 24 hr on-site staff, access to different care levels.

Morning Pointe of Louisville offers early, mid and memory care services, all on our South Hurstbourne campus. 24-hour nursing care, personal care plus many services and amenities of the traditional assisted living community with the added safety and security of a specialized Alzheimer’s Center of Excellence.

Owner: Life Care Services, LLC

Owner: Independent Healthcare Partners/Morning Pointe

Payment: Private, LTCi, VA

Payment: Private, LTCi, VA

Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Laundry, Meal Prep, Errands, 24-Hr Care, Physical/Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Open Kitchen, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Movie Room, Chef on Staff

Features and Services: Transportation Available, Showers Available, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing Assistance, Dressing Assistance, Laundry, Meal Prep, 24-Hour Care, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Game Night, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Chef on Staff

8225 Whipps Mill Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 716-5160 mslouisville.com

4711 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40291 (502) 873-3800 morningpointe.com

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Adult Day Care

Aging-in-Place Communities

Assisted Living

Hospice Care

Memory Care

Palliative Care

Personal Care

Respite Care

Rehabilitation Services

Skilled Nursing

Nazareth Home

Park Louisville by Charter Senior Living

Price Per Day: $201-$340

Price Per Month: $3500-$4700

Number of beds: 48 (MC), 87 (SN), 25 (RS), 33 (PC)

Park Louisville’s goal is simple, “to enhance the human spirit.” Our values are demonstrated by our dementia experts and passionate care partners who deliver unparalleled life experiences. Park Louisville provides premier personal care services that empower residents to live their life with dignity. As one of Louisville’s first stand-alone memory care communities, our renowned memory care program sets us apart.

2000 Newburg Rd, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 459-9681 nazhome.org

Nazareth Home offers rehab and restorative therapy, specializing in dementia care and personal care with an award-winning therapeutic recreation and exercise program. Experience a neighborhood living design with caring and professional staff, gourmet dining, on-site religious services, secure green spaces, daily activities, beauty shop and rehab services. Open to persons of all faith traditions. Free tours. Personal Care program includes apartments and activities designed for independence and choice. All rooms are spacious to promote recovery, privacy and family involvement. Skilled and long-term nursing care, all private rooms, exercise, social activities, massage and holistic therapy. Short stay Medicare recovery program bridging hospital to home. Owner: Nazareth Home, Inc. Payment: Private, LTCi, Medicare, Medicaid Features and Services: Showers Available, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing Assistance, Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, 24-Hr Care, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Open Kitchen, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Chef on Staff

10451 Linn Station Rd, Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 423-8776 parklouisville.com

Flourish Memory Care is supported by leading-edge research – that people living with Alzheimer’s and dementia can grow and flourish, regardless of where they may be on their journey. Our exclusive memory care program provides therapeutic activities that focus on cognitive, creative, community, motivation, physical, social, and spiritual wellness. We offer furnished, move-in ready suites for immediate residency. All-inclusive care is provided: medication administration, bathing, dressing, grooming, housekeeping and meals (cueing provided), a spacious courtyard, weekly bus outings, on-site therapy services (Physical, Occupational, and Speech Pathology), in-house therapy gym, with 24-hr medical and psychiatric staff available. Transportation to physician appointments with escort services offered. Owner: Charter Senior Living Payment: Private

Park Terrace Health Campus

9700 Stonestreet Rd, Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 995-6600 • parkterracehc.com Price Per Day: $283 On-site skilled nursing, memory care services, private/semi-private. Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment: Medicare, Medicaid, Private, Private Ins.

Nazareth Home – Clifton

2120 Payne St, Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 895-9425 nazhome.org

Sanders Ridge Health Campus

Price Per Day: $176-$320

Price Per Month: $3404-$7740

Number of beds: 12 (PC), 26 (Rehab), 69 (LTC)

Full continuum of care, short-term care, therapy services on-site.

Award-winning staff provides nursing care, short stay and outpatient rehab, activities, dining and transportation. Easy access from I-64 on U.S. 60. Therapeutic recreation and exercise programs. On-site religious services. Skilled and long-term nursing care, private rooms, exercise, social activities, massage and holistic therapy. Fine dining and activity programs. Short stay Medicare recovery program bridging hospital to home. Personal Care program includes apartments and activities designed for independence and choice. All rooms are spacious to promote privacy and family involvement.

Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC

Owner: Nazareth Home, Inc. Payment: Private, LTCi, Medicare, Medicaid Features and Services: Showers Available, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing Assistance, Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, 24-Hour Care, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Open Kitchen, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Chef on Staff

74 Spring 2022 / TodaysTransitions.com

119 E Sanders Lane, Mt. Washington KY 40047 (502) 251-3821 • sandersridgehc.com

Payment: Medicare, Medicaid, LTCi, Private

Shelby Farms Senior Living

100 Williamsburg Dr, Shelbyville KY 40065 (502) 257-9485 • shelbyfarmssl.com Compassionate staff, activities, respite & outpatient services on-site. Operated by: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment: Private, LTCi


Today's Transitions / Spring 2022

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Adult Day Care

Aging-in-Place Communities

Assisted Living

Hospice Care

Memory Care

Palliative Care

Personal Care

Respite Care

Rehabilitation Services

Skilled Nursing

The Springs at Oldham Reserve

2000 East Peak Rd, LaGrange, KY 40031 (502) 265-4420 • springsatoldhamreserve.com Full continuum of care, meals, activities, gorgeous surroundings. Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment: Private, Medicare, Medicaid, LTCi

The Springs at Stony Brook

2200 Stony Brook Dr, Louisville, KY 40220 (502) 491-4692 • springsatstonybrook.com Price Per Month: $2476-$5871 Full continuum of care, meals, activities, gorgeous surroundings. Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment: Private, Medicare, Medicaid, LTCi

Twinbrook Assisted Living

3525 Ephraim McDowell Dr, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 452-6330 • twinbrookassistedliving.com Price Per Month: $2750-$3150 Private apartments with emergency call cords, planned activities, medication reminders, assistance with bathing, dressing, grooming, three meals daily, transportation to shopping, charges for additional services may apply. Staff on duty 24 hours. Family owned & operated. Mass 6 days/week. Owner: Bryan S McCoy, Inc. Payment: Private, VA, LTCi Features and Services: Transportation Available, Showers Available, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing Assistance, Dressing Assistance, Laundry, Meal Prep, Errands, 24-Hour Care, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Game Night, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Chef on Staff

Vitality Living Springdale

4501 Springdale Rd , Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 412-0222 vitalityseniorliving.com/senior-living-locations/ kentucky/springdale/ Price Per Month: $3500-$4850 VITALITY LIVING SPRINGDALE IS REDESIGNING SENIOR LIVING IN KENTUCKY WITH YOU IN MIND. Vitality is your premier choice for senior living in Kentucky. We are committed to ensuring that every service and amenity helps create the enriched, active life you or your loved one deserves. Vitality Living Springdale specializes in assisted living and memory care that allow adults to experience a lifestyle with vitality at any age. Owner: Vitality Senior Living Payment: Private, VA, LTCi Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Separate Units, House Cleaning, Bathing Assistance, Laundry, Meal Prep, 24-Hr Care, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Happy Hour, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Garden, Pets Allowed, Movie Room, Chef on Staff

UofL Health — Frazier Rehab Institute 200 Abraham Flexner Way, Louisville, KY 40202 (502) 582-7400 • UofLHealth.com Price Per Day: $1800 Inpatient/stroke/brain injury/spinal cord injury/cancer rehab; PT/OT/ST. Owner: UofL Health Payment: Medicare, Medicaid, private ins., LTCi, VA

Valhalla Post Acute

300 Shelby Station Dr, Louisville, KY 40245 (502) 254-0009 • valhallapa.com Valhalla Post is a skilled nursing facility providing compassionate and personal skilled care. We specialize in providing in-patient and outpatient rehabilitation services to help our resident regain their independence and return to the highest level of function possible. Norton Healthcare physician is available, private rehab suites with private baths and a 6,000 sq ft therapy gym with state-of-the-art equipment. Whether needing long or short term recover care, our team can create a care program tailored to their needs. Payment: Medicaid, LTCi, Private Insurance, Private Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, Bathing Assistance, Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, 24-Hr Care, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Dining Room

Vitality Living St. Matthews

120 S Hubbards Ln, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 896-1759 vitalityseniorliving.com/senior-living-locations/ kentucky/st-matthews/ Price Per Month: $2995-$3595 As the premier independent living and assisted living community in the St. Matthews area, we are conveniently located in the unique St. Matthews neighborhood, with easy access to shopping, dining, festivals and the arts, Vitality Living St. Matthews offers independent living and assisted living in the heart of Louisville, KY. This vibrant senior living community offers all the comforts of home with none of the day-to-day obligations of owning one. After a morning meditation workshop, enjoy good conversation over breakfast. Take a stroll through the tree-lined streets nearby or meet neighbors for an afternoon shopping spree. At Vitality Living, the choice is always yours. Whether you are ready now or are just beginning to think about senior living, we invite you to stop by or call to schedule a tour at your convenience. We are here to serve you 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Owner: Vitality Senior Living Payment: Private,LTCi, VA Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, House Cleaning, Laundry, Errands, 24-Hr Care, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Outdoor Spaces, Movie Room, Chef on Staff

76 Spring 2022 / TodaysTransitions.com


Today's Transitions / Spring 2022

77


Adult Day Care

Aging-in-Place Communities

Assisted Living

Hospice Care

Memory Care

Vitality Living Stony Brook

3451 S Hurstbourne Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 499-1393 vitalityseniorliving.com/senior-living-locations/ kentucky/stony-brook/ Price Per Month: $2655-$4985 Vitality Living is your premier choice for senior living in Louisville, whether you need assisted living or memory care. Vitality Living Stony Brook offers independent living, assisted living, and memory care. We support our residents’ needs as well as their interests with a calendar filled with a variety of activities to keep our residents as engaged, social, and independent as possible. Families will find peace of mind by knowing that their family members are well taken care of and enjoying life. You’ll find plenty of comfortable common spaces to spend time with friends and family, whether it’s in the spacious family room, furnished sitting areas, front/back porches, or the large dining room. Large windows throughout our community give it an open and airy feel. Owner: Vitality Senior Living Payment: Private, LTCi, VA Aid & Attendance Benefits Features and Services: Transportation, Showers, House Cleaning, Bathing & Dressing Assistance, Eating Help, Laundry, Meal Prep, Errands, 24-Hr Care, Physical/Occupational/Speech Therapy, Dining Room, Exercise Facility, Game Night, Tours/Trips, Emergency Assistance, Medication Given, Outdoor Spaces, Movie Room, Chef on Staff

Westport Place Health Campus 4247 Westport Rd, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 893-3033 • westportplacehc.com Price Per Month: $5112 Full continuum of care, short-term care, therapy services on-site. Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment: Private, Medicare, Medicaid, LTCi

The Willows at Springhurst

3101 N Hurstbourne Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 412-3775 • willowsatspringhurst.com Price Per Month: $4550-$5878 Licensed RNs, skilled nursing, short-term care, therapy services on-site. Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment: Private, Medicare, Medicaid, LTCi

AT TODAYSTRANSITIONS.COM YOU WILL FIND: • A list of all local caregiving communities: nursing home care, home health care, assisted living, memory care, and living options. • Comprehensive directories of care communities and resources complete with features, photos, and reviews. 78 Spring 2022 / TodaysTransitions.com

Palliative Care

Personal Care

Respite Care

Rehabilitation Services

Skilled Nursing

Active Day of Hikes Point 3403 Breckenridge Ln, Louisville, KY 40220 Cost per day: $50-$72 Active Day of Watterson Park 1920 Goldsmith Ln, Louisville, KY 40218 Cost per day: $50-$72 Alternative Adult Day Health Care Center 147 Wilma Ave, Louisville, KY 40229 Cost per day: $50 (varies) Amber Oaks Assisted Living 156 Haven Hill Rd, Shelbyville, KY 40065 Cost per month: $1950-$2900 Autumn Woods Health Campus 2911 Green Valley Rd, New Albany, IN 47150 Cost per day: $238+ Azalea Hills Assisted Living 3700 Lafayette Pkwy, Floyds Knobs, IN 47119 Cost per month: $1825-$4125 Baptist Health La Grange Rehab and Skilled Care 1025 New Moody Ln, La Grange, KY 40031 Cost per day: $332 Baptist Health Louisville Acute Rehabilitation 4000 Kresge Way, Louisville, KY 40207 Cost per day: varies based on ins. coverage BeeHive Homes of Brandenburg 103 Commerce Dr, Brandenburg, KY 40108 Cost per month: $3400-$3600 BeeHive Homes of Lyndon 8401 La Grange Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 Cost per month: $3400-$4000 BeeHive Homes of Smyrna 8800 Smyrna Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40228 Cost per month: $3400-$5100 Bennett Place Senior Living 3928 Horne Ave, New Albany, IN 47150 Cost per month: $2400-$3000 Brookdale Stonestreet 9521 Stonestreet Rd, Louisville 40272 Cost per month: $2420-$3930 Cherokee Park Rehabilitation 2100 Millvale Rd, Louisville, KY 40205 Cost per day: $257-$428 Christian Care Communities – Middletown 11530 Herrick Ln, Louisville, KY 40243 Price Per Month: $3500+ Christian Health Center – The Meadow 920 S 4th St, Louisville, KY 40203 Cost per day: $285-$307 Clark Rehabilitation & Skilled Nursing Facility 517 North Little League Blvd, Clarksville, IN 47129 Cost per day: $170-$275 Clifton Oaks Center 446 Mt. Holly Ave, Louisville, KY 40206 Cost per day: $215-$239 CountrySide Meadows 640 Jericho Rd, La Grange, KY 40031 Cost per month: $2350-$4350 Crescent Grove Memory and Personal Care 3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville KY 40207 Price Per Day: $176-$240 Crescent Place 148 Allen Dr, Shelbyville, KY 40065 Cost per month: $2400-$3500 Crestview Healthcare and Rehabilitation 1871 Midland Trail, Shelbyville, KY 40065 Cost per day: $245-$270 Dominion Senior Living of Louisville 6000 Hunting Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 Cost per month: $3725-$4990 Eastern Star Home 923 Eastern Star Ct, Louisville, KY 40204 Price Per Day: $120-$207 Elmcroft of Mount Washington 520 Woodlake Dr, Mount Washington, KY 40047 Cost per month: $3000+ Enclave of East Louisville 100 Shelby Station Dr, Louisville, KY 40245 Cost per month: $4441-$7361


Episcopal Church Home 7504 Westport Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 Cost per day: $173-$316 Essex Nursing and Rehabilitation Center 9600 Lamborne Blvd, Louisville, KY 40272 Cost per day: $250 Freedom Adult Day Healthcare 4511 Bardstown Rd, Louisville, KY 40218 Cost per hour: $12, half-day min. Gathering Club 4940 Hazelwood Ave, Louisville, KY 40214 Cost per day: $67 Genesis Kensington Center 225 St. John Rd, Elizabethtown, KY 42701 Cost per day: $262-$406 Genesis Klondike Center 3802 Klondike Ln, Louisville, KY 40218 Cost per day: $298-$323 Genesis Regency Center 1550 Raydale Dr, Louisville, KY 40219 Cost per day: $240-$283 Georgetown Manor Nursing and Rehab 900 Gagel Ave, Louisville, KY 40216 Cost per day: $197-$211 Green Meadows Health Care Center 310 Boxwood Run Rd, Mt. Washington, KY 40047 Cost per day: $220-$305 Grove Pointe Assisted Living 3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 Price Per Month: $4700-$6750 Harrison Healthcare Center 150 Beechmont Dr, Corydon, IN 47112 Cost per day: $245 Hellenic Senior Living 2632 Grant Line Rd, New Albany, IN 47150 Cost per month: $3600-$3900 Helmwood Healthcare 106 Diecks Dr, Elizabethtown, KY 42701 Cost per day: $218-$252 Highlands Health & Rehabilitation Center 1705 Stevens Ave, Louisville, KY 40205 Cost per day: $185-$200 Hillcreek Rehabilitation and Care Center 3116 Breckinridge Ln, Louisville, KY 40220 Cost per day: $255-$280 Hillcrest Centre for Health and Rehabilitation 203 Sparks Ave, Jeffersonville, IN 47130 Cost per day: $159-$250 Hometown Manor Assisted Living of Bardstown 103 Manor Dr, Bardstown, KY 40004 Cost per month: $2200-$2500 Hometown Manor Assisted Living of Shelbyville 74 Mack Walters Rd, Shelbyville, KY 40065 Cost per month: $2000-$2400 Indian Creek Healthcare Center 240 Beechmont Dr, Corydon, IN 47112 Cost per day: $155-$240 Jeffersontown Rehabilitation 3500 Good Samaritan Way, Jeffersontown, KY 40299 Cost per day: $218-$253 Just Family Adult Day Center 127 Lees Valley Rd, Shepherdsville, KY 40165 Cost per day: $61.60 Landmark of Louisville (formerly Parkway) 1155 Eastern Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40217 Cost per day: $220-$245 Lincoln Hills Health Center 326 Country Club Dr, New Albany, IN 47150 Cost per day: $184-$214 Louisville East Post-Acute 4200 Browns Ln, Louisville, KY 40220 Cost per day: $246-$358 Lyndon Woods Care and Rehabilitation 1101 Lyndon Ln, Louisville, KY 40222 Cost per month: $6772-$7787 Magnolia Springs East Louisville Senior Living 13600 La Grange Rd, Louisville, KY 40245 Cost per month: $3615-$7035

The Mansion on Main 1420 East Main St, New Albany, IN 47150 Cost per month: $3465-$4095 Maple Manor Christian Homes, Inc. 643 West Utica St, Sellersburg, IN 47172 Cost per day: $180 Masonic Home of Shelbyville 711 Frankfort Rd, Shelbyville, KY 40065 Cost per day: $236-$295 Masonic Home of Shelbyville – The Pillars 711 Frankfort Rd, Shelbyville, KY 40065 Cost per month: $2174-$3043 New Albany Nursing & Rehabilitation 201 E Elm St, New Albany, IN 47150 Cost per month: $1500-$2400 New Castle Nursing & Rehab 50 Adams St, New Castle, KY 40050 Cost per day: $217-$204 Oaks Assisted Living 1010 Richwood Way, La Grange, KY 40031 Cost per month: $3080-$3410 Peggy's Place Adult Life Center 1730 Audubon Dr, Ste 100, New Albany, IN 47150 Cost per day: $75 Providence — A Diversicare Community 4915 Charlestown Rd, New Albany, IN 47150 Cost per day: $222-$332 Richwood Nursing & Rehab 1012 Richwood Way, La Grange, KY 40031 Cost per day: $202-$233 Riverbend Assisted Living 2715 Charlestown Pike, Jeffersonville, IN 47130 Cost per month: $2150-$4995 Rivers Edge Nursing & Rehabilitation Center 6301 Bass Rd, Prospect, KY 40059 Cost per day: $202-$208 RiverSide Meadows 308 E. Chestnut St, Jeffersonville, IN 47130 Cost per day: $55 Riverview Village 586 Eastern Blvd, Clarksville, IN 47129 Cost per day: $135-$160 Rolling Hills Healthcare Center 3625 St. Joseph Rd, New Albany, IN 47150 Cost per day: $224 Rose Anna Hughes Home at Westminster 2120 Buechel Bank Rd, Louisville, KY 40218 Cost per day: $65-$134 Sam Swope Care Center 3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 Cost per day: $295-$360 Sellersburg Healthcare Center 7823 Old Hwy 60, Sellersburg, IN 47172 Cost per day: $143-$241 Seneca Place 3526 Dutchman’s Ln, Louisville, KY 40205 Cost per day: $231-$273 Signature Healthcare at Jefferson Manor 1801 Lynn Way, Louisville, KY 40222 Cost per day: $255-$278 Signature Healthcare at Jefferson Place 1705 Herr Ln, Louisville, KY 40222 Cost per day: $295 Signature Healthcare at Rockford Rehab & Wellness Center 4700 Quinn Dr, Louisville, KY 40216 Cost per day: $223-$240 Signature Healthcare at Summerfield Rehab & Wellness Center 1877 Farnsley Rd, Louisville, KY 40216 Cost per day: $242-$266 Signature Healthcare of East Louisville 2529 Six Mile Ln, Louisville, KY 40220 Cost per day: $250-$310

Signature Healthcare of South Louisville 1120 Cristland Rd, Louisville, KY 40214 Cost per day: $240-$450 Signature Healthcare of Sts. Mary & Elizabeth Hospital 1850 Bluegrass Ave, Louisville, KY 40215 Cost per day: $500 Southern Indiana Rehab Hospital 3104 Blackiston Blvd, New Albany, IN 47150 Cost per day: $600-$1300 St. Matthews Care Center 227 Browns Ln, Louisville, KY 40207 Cost per day: $214-$254 StoryPoint Middletown 500 Meridian Hills Dr, Louisville, KY 40243 Price Per Month: $3400-$4300 StoryPoint Prospect 6901 Carslaw Court, Prospect, KY 40059 Price Per Month: $3500+ Sunrise of Louisville 6700 Overlook Dr, Louisville, KY 40241 Cost per day: $98-$110 Sycamore Heights 2141 Sycamore Ave, Louisville, KY 40206 Cost per day: $224-$258 Symphony at Valley Farms 10201 Valley Farms Blvd, Louisville, KY 40272 Cost per month: $3754-$5330 Thornton Terrace Health Campus 188 Thornton Rd, Hanover, IN 47243 Cost per month: $3495+ Traditions at Beaumont 10210 Long Home Rd, Louisville, KY 40291 Cost per month: $3075-$4700 Treyton Oak Towers 211 W. Oak St, Louisville, KY 40203 Cost per day: $154-$400 Tri-County Community Action Agency Adult Day Program 1015 Dispatchers Way, La Grange, KY 40031 Cost per day: $72 or $9/hr Twin Oaks Assisted Living 98 Adams St, New Castle, KY 40050 Cost per month: $1950-$3000 The Villages at Historic Silvercrest 1 Silvercrest Dr, New Albany, IN 47150 Cost per month: $4161+ The Villas of Guerin Woods 1002 Sister Barbara Way, Georgetown, IN 47122 Cost per day: $120-$310 Vitality Living Elizabethtown 133 Heartland Dr, Elizabethtown, KY 42701 Cost per month: $4850+ Wedgewood Healthcare Center 101 Potters Ln, Clarksville, IN 47129 Cost per day: $221-$270 Westminster Health & Rehab Center 2210 Greentree North, Clarksville, IN 47129 Cost per day: $210 Westminster Terrace 2116 Buechel Bank Rd, Louisville, KY 40218 Cost per day: $253-$284 Westminster Village 2200 Greentree Blvd N, Clarksville, IN 47129 Cost per month: $2875-$3985 Wickshire Blankenbaker 903 Blankenbaker Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40243 Cost per month: $2395-$4925 Windsor Ridge Assisted Living 2700 Waters Edge Pkwy, Jeffersonville, IN 47130 Cost per month: $2850-$3250

Today's Transitions / Spring 2022

79


CAREGIVER TRY THIS!

By Carrie Vittitoe

Eat This!

O

ne reason to enjoy spring is because more food options are available. Asparagus is one of those spring produce favorites. “Asparagus is a low-calorie vegetable that is an excellent source of essential vitamins and minerals, especially folate and vitamins A, C, and K,” says Raegan Stremel, marketing and events manager at Rainbow Blossom Natural Food Markets. She suggests roasting it with lemon for a healthy side dish.

Roasted Asparagus With Lemon INGREDIENTS: • 1 bundle of fresh asparagus

INSTRUCTIONS: Preheat oven to 425 degrees.

• 1 whole lemon

Wash and pat asparagus dry and trim the stiff ends off.

• 1 tsp olive oil

Place asparagus on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper (for clean up ease).

• Salt/pepper to taste

Drizzle olive oil over asparagus to coat.

• Garlic (optional)

Season with salt and pepper to taste. Slice whole lemon and place thin pieces on top of asparagus. You can dice garlic and sprinkle over asparagus if desired. Place the baking sheet in oven for eight to10 minutes.

Take This!

For those living in the Ohio River Valley, now is the time when allergies can flare. A possible way to ease symptoms is to try nettle. “Nettle is a natural antihistamine that can help with allergies. It’s gentle enough to give to children with direction from a pediatrician, but may provide seasonal allergy relief in adults, too. You can find it in tincture, capsule, tea, and whole plant forms,” Raegan says. Some people even make their own soup using fresh nettles, but the plant does have hairy fibers on it that can cause skin irritation so be careful if you go this route. 80 Spring 2022 / TodaysTransitions.com

Do This!

After a long winter spent inside with little physical activity, our bodies may not adjust easily to increased walking or running when the weather warms up. Our shoes may also be worn which can cause plantar fasciitis-type foot pain. Raegan suggests myofascial release therapy, which can be done using a small ball. While a tennis ball works, some people may want to purchase an acupressure ball like a Spoonk Groove Ball. “Myofascial release can improve your range of motion, reduce soreness, help assist the tissue recovery process, help the body relax overall, improve circulation, and release tension, knots, and even stress,” she says. spoonkspace.com • Sit in a comfortable chair or on a sofa. • Place a Spoonk Groove Ball (or small ball) on the floor, just under your foot. • Roll the ball around with your foot until you find a sensitive spot or pressure point. • Press down with your foot just enough to feel the point soften. • Hold for three to five minutes. Andrea McGrath, Rainbow Blossom wellness category manager, also contributed to this article.


Today's Transitions / Spring 2022

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Tech

3min
page 61

Caregiver Solutions

3min
page 61

Try This

3min
pages 82-84

There’s No Place Like Home

4min
page 64

Schedules

6min
pages 62-63

Caregiver Solutions

3min
pages 60-61

Building A Backyard Addition

8min
pages 56-59

Making Space

3min
page 49

People

4min
page 48

Spring Cookout

2min
pages 46-47

Things To Do

3min
pages 44-45

Add Some Sizzle

3min
pages 40-43

Renew Your Skin

5min
pages 36-39

Three Food Groups That Can Change Your Life

5min
pages 30-33

Fitness

2min
pages 34-35

A Visit With

3min
pages 20-21

Retirement

9min
pages 22-25

TodaysTransitions.com Happenings

2min
pages 10-11

Gardening

5min
pages 28-29

Volunteer

3min
pages 26-27

I Love My

4min
pages 16-17

Entertainment

3min
pages 18-19

Renew Your Spirits With A Road Trip

5min
pages 12-15
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