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JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

START ING ON PAG E 9

What TNLA Membership Looks Like in 2017 PAGE 6

2015 Economic Impact Report PAGE 31

Notes from SFA Gardens: How to Re-Wild an Urban Garden page 39

New CertiďŹ ed Professionals page 44

TNLA Events to Kick Off the Year page 45

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JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

6 Changes in TNLA Membership Structure

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Things are changing at TNLA! This provides a guide to the new dues structure and information on how Member businesses can get ahead of the curve!

San Antonio

7 Texas Excellence in Landscaping Awards

$1.42B $1.45B

We’re thrilled to reveal the winners of the 2016-2017 Texas Excellence in Landscaping Awards! See photos and enjoy reading about the project details in this feature!

Dallas $3.11B

Houston $1.32B

31 Economic Impact Report & Analysis The 2015 Economic Impact Report is here! Things remained relatively stable across Green Industry sectors and indicators remained strong. On page 31, find helpful insights and meaningful figures that impact Green Industry businesses are the focus of this short analysis by Dr. Marco A. Palma.

Austin

$1.32B Other $7.98B Fort Worth

31

37 GreenVi$ion

by Mengmeng Gu, PhD International Plant Propagator Society Conference

39 Notes from SFA Gardens

by Dawn Stover

Designed Plant Communities

41 Bugs & Fuzz

by Dr. Kevin Ong Don’t Let Downy Become a Downer!

44 44 45 46

New Members New Certified Professionals Upcoming Events Advertiser Index

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7730 South IH-35 | Austin, TX 78745-6698 | (512) 280-5182 or (800) 880-0343 fax: (512) 280-3012 | email: info@tnlaonline.org | www.tnlaonline.org J A N A U R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7

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Texas Green Industry S a f e t y

g r o u p

Get in the Green! The workers’ compensation solution for the Texas green industry.

$4,842,058

Total dividends paid to TGI group members since 2007.

t Members retain their own experience modifier and receive a premium discount based on the group’s total premium, and are eligible for potential individual and group dividends.* t Members can earn an additional discount by participating in Texas Mutual® Insurance Company’s workers’ comp health care network. t Open to qualifying wholesale and retail nurseries, landscape contractors, growers, irrigation contractors and other green industry businesses. t Any licensed Texas agent can submit qualifying clients for consideration in the group.

*Past dividends are not a guarantee of future dividends, and the Texas Department of Insurance must approve all dividends. Group underwritten by Texas Mutual® Insurance Company.

For information, call Becky Walker, Program Manager at 800-899-3750


TNLA Green

The official publication of the Texas Nursery & Landscape Association January/February | Vol. 19 No. 1 OFFICERS Chairman of the Board . . . . Billy Long, TCLP, San Antonio Chairman-Elect . . . . Bill Carson, Austin Immediate Past Chairman . . . . Johnette Taylor, Dallas President . . . . Amy Graham, Austin

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Region I . . . . Kevin Grossberndt, San Antonio Region II . . . . Jay Williams, League City Region III . . . . Herman Vess, TMCNP, Edgewood Region IV . . . . Jason Craven, Dallas Region V . . . . Mike Whisenand, Fort Worth Region VI . . . . Steven Akers, Slaton Region VII . . . . Todd Kinney, TMCNP, Donna Region VIII . . . . Jared Pyka, Austin Supplier Director . . . . Tim Little, Dallas Landscape Director . . . . Scotty Rigsby, TCLP, Midlothian Grower Director . . . . Kevin Norris, Coppell Retail Director . . . . Joshua Bracken, TMCNP, Dallas

A Video Message from Amy Graham, TNLA President

TNL A STAFF President/CEO . . . . Amy Graham Director of Finance . . . . Cheryl Staritz Accounting Assistant . . . . Aimee Luna Director, Legislative and Regulatory Affairs . . . . Jeff Stokes Professional Knowledge and Education Manager . . . . James Theiss, TCLP, TCWSP, Certified Arborist Administrative Assistant, Strategic Initiatives . . . . Debra Allen Director, TNLA & EXPO Marketing/ Communications . . . Sarah Riggins ,CEM Director, Expo Exhibits and Membership . . . . Amy Prenger, CEM Business Development/Sales Executive . . . . Mike Yelverton , TCNP & TCWSP Administrative Assistant, EXPO . . . Trevor Peevey Office Operations Assistant . . . . Nancy E. Sollohub Region Field Manager . . . . Nathan Flint Communications Specialist . . . . Molly Wallace Sales Specialist . . . . Mark Studer

MISSIO N STAT E ME N T

MAGAZINE STAFF

The Texas Nursery & Landscape Association’s mission is to enhance members’ business success through legislative/ regulatory advocacy, education, networking, and promotion of professionalism.

Editor . . . . Molly Wallace Graphic Designer . . . . Marie Leonard Ad Sales . . . . Mark Studer

TNLA Green magazine is a member service of the Texas Nursery & Landscape Association, and is published bi-monthly. Advertising information is available from TNLA, 7730 South IH 35, Austin, Texas 78745, online at www.tnlaonline.org, or by calling (800) 880-0343. TNLA office hours are weekdays, 8:30AM - 4:30PM CST. © 2017 Texas Nursery & Landscape Association

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TNL AGREEN

New Opportunities to Be a Part of TNLA See how TNLA has incorprated some new changes this coming fiscal year to help simplify your Membership. • TNLA Has A New Fiscal Year

NEW

Have you been looking for your Member Dues Statement in the mail? We now have a NEW Fiscal Year – July 1 to June 30 replacing the March 1 – Last day in February timeline. You will be receiving your initial Dues Statement for the 2017-2018 fiscal year in March. The 2017 Election process will begin in January 2017 with new terms beginning on July 1, 2017.

TNLA Fiscal Year

NEW TNLA Member Dues Structure

• New TNLA Member Dues Structure

Along with the new fiscal year, we also have a new, less complicated Member Dues Structure.

ONE-TIME ONLY

NEW Member Dues Structure according to Gross Annual Sales in Texas:

Membership Savings

NEW Membership Types Are Now Available

$325 Less than $250,000 annually (Remained the same) $325 Out of State Members (Remained the same) $600 $250,000–$1.5 million annually (Change the dues level of $525 and $630 to a combined $600 rate)

$1,100 $1.5 million–$6 million (Change the dues level of $950 and $1,275 rate to a combined $1,100)

$1,650 Greater than $6 million annually (Change the current dues level of $1,575 to a $1,650 rate)

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TNL AGREEN

• Take Advantage Of A One-Time-Only Rollover

Membership Savings With the new fiscal year comes great opportunity … if your dues rate has increased, you are eligible to keep the same rate as 2016-2017 if you pay your dues PRIOR to March 1, 2017. After this date, all dues received will be placed at the new rate. Please call your TNLA Membership Team at (512) 579-3858 for details.

• We Have Broadened The Scope For All To Get Involved

In addition to the new fiscal year and dues rates, we have added Individual memberships to the TNLA Structure with the new criteria listed below.

Green Industry Professionals Can Now Take Advantage of TNLA’s NEW Membership Types: TNLA Certified individuals not currently employed by a TNLA Member company. $90 Green Industry certified individuals, such as landscape architects, licensed irrigators, arborists, etc. $90 Individuals that provide consultation services to the Green Industry $90 Individuals who would like to get into the industry but are currently unemployed by a Green Industry company. This individual would qualify for this membership for one year only. Lone Star Legacy Former TNLA Member that is currently retired from the industry $50

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OUR INDUSTRY IS MUCH STRONGER WITH YOU AS A MEMBER! There are a lot of new, exciting things happening. Help your business succeed by profiting from all the benefits TNLA has to offer. If you have questions on the latest TNLA membership benefits available to you or need further clarification on these new changes, please call your TNLA Membership Team at (512) 579-3858.

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TNL AGREEN

The Texas Excellence in Landscaping (TEIL) Awards showcase the best work of the State’s landscaping firms! Winning landscaping firms overcame challenges, collaborated with clients and created beautiful outdoor spaces! Projects are juried by a panel of Green Industry experts, and each project is judged on its own merits not against other submissions. Judges can give a Gold, Silver or Bronze award in one or more of the project categories. Notable projects may receive an Honorable Mention in lieu of an award. This year, two new award categories, Design and Unique Features, were added.

A. COMMERCIAL INSTALLATION A1. Under $50k A2. $50-$100K A3. Over $100K

B. COMMERCIAL MAINTENANCE C. RESIDENTIAL INSTALLATION C1. Under $25K C2. $25-$100K C3. Over $100K

D. RESIDENTIAL MAINTENANCE E. SPECIAL PROJECT F. UNIQUE FEATURES G. DESIGN

In the TEIL Award projects, you’ll find inspiration and innovative ideas! To see more of these award winning projects, and find out the category winners, be sure to attend the TNLA Awards Celebration at the 2017 Nursery/Landscape EXPO!

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TNL AGREEN

Gold Award COMMERCIA L M A INT E NA NCE

Dallas Arts District SOUTHERN BOTANICAL, INC. Restricted maintenance hours and environmental challenges make this Dallas arts district property a unique opportunity for _company_ to shine. Asian jasmine, Japanese maple and juniper beds give this space a unique look and feel. Containers are ďŹ lled with seasonal color and hand watered six days a week. The dry river beds are cleaned and arranged in a snake scale pattern and the rocks are raked to ensure a clean look. This Asian-inspired landscape is sure to inspire any visitor!

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Gold Award COMMERCIA L M A INT E NA NCE

Texas State Capitol CLEAN SCAPES, LP The Capitol grounds feature pecan, live oak and red oak trees. Saint Augustine turf rolls across the property creating picture perfect views. At the main entrance, ďŹ recracker ferns, buttery iris, society garlic and many other colorful plants greet all those who enter. Maintenance is carefully completed around the many sculptures, memorials and monuments that are scattered across the grounds. This maintenance is something that every Texan can be proud of!

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TNL AGREEN

Gold Award RESIDENT IA L M A INT E NA NCE

Private Residence MOSS LANDSCAPING This private Houston residence demands substantial care to maintain its pristine yard. The clients have a passion for Italian cooking and love having ten specialty edible herb gardens steps from their home. Container grown citrus trees and date palms require special care each week. This yard is ďŹ lled with one of a kind plant features. Japanese yews create a privacy wall, zoro zoysia grass provides a putting green and Cherokee climbing roses add a ďŹ nishing touch to the pool house. This yard is not only beautiful, but truly makes this home an oasis.

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TNL AGREEN

Gold Award RESIDENT IA L M A INT E NA NCE

Westover Hills Maintenance BONICK LANDSCAPING This mid-century modern estate in Fort Worth is carefully managed. Crews are only allowed on the property one day a week, and a garden manager is used to ensure that the landscaping is always immaculate. Pick pruning and hand trimming is required to maintain the natural form of the plants and to protect the many sculptures from damage. Gravel is manicured and stone terraces are detailed weekly. The pool, koi ponds and bog are also continuously maintained. This estate’s landscape is an all around stunner!

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IS THE CLOCK TICKING ON YOUR ROOT INTRUSION PROTECTION? The ONLY Root Intrusion Protection Designed to Last as Long as Your Dripline The latest addition to the best-selling line of landscape dripline, Netafim’s Techline® HCVXR is the ONLY landscape dripline that infuses Cupron® Copper Oxide directly into the mold of each emitter to provide a long-lasting root barrier for subsurface drip irrigation systems that won’t wash away after years of use. • Infused Cupron® Copper Oxide Combined with Netafim’s Physical Root Barrier Properties Provide Long Lasting Protection Against Roots Throughout the Life of the Dripline • High Check Valve in Each Emitter for Uniform Distribution on Sloped Landscapes • Built-in Anti-Siphon Feature Protects Against Debris • Four New Emitter Flow Rates • Laser Etching on the Dripline for Easy Identification

(888) 638-2346 www.netafimusa.com

15 YEAR WARRANTY The Landscape Industry’s Longest Root Intrusion Warranty


TNL AGREEN

Gold Award UN IQ U E F E AT U R E

Treehouse Park LANDOLOGY This park, built on the spot of former rice farms, is a gem in the Houston area. The treehouse provides an exciting area for children to explore and dramatic views to all who make the climb. Careful consideration for the health of the tree led to structural redesigns, but did not take away from the stunning visual impact of the treehouse. The elevated deck was built to work with the natural grade of the site and to protect the tree’s roots. The construction details add to the whimsical feel, and make the structure truly one of a kind!

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TNL AGREEN

Gold Award

COMMERC IA L INSTA L L AT IO N $ 1 0 0 , 0 0 0 +

Seaholm Power BRIGHTVIEW Unique design elements, reclaimed materials and tight spaces were potential pitfalls in this project, but BrightView used them to make it a stunning success! A custom soil blend was created to ensure that the grass remains healthy even with heavy foot trafďŹ c. Reclaimed brick was used to create a unique pattern in the elm grove, which provides relief from the sun during Austin summers. Plantings were strategically placed to soften the industrial design of the building, and succulents add color to the area. This project is a true success, and is enjoyed by thousands daily!

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TNL AGREEN

Gold Award

RESIDENT IA L INSTA L L AT IO N $ 1 0 0 , 0 0 0 +

Westover Hills Installation BONICK LANDSCAPING Previously a municipal landďŹ ll, this community park was completed in June 2016. In order to begin this project, the debris had to be cleared and soil had to be brought in. This project features the City of San Antonio’s largest playpad and largest splashpad. Trees, shrubs and plants were installed as multiple activity zones including a family play area, a skate park and a pavilion. Native and natural landscaping throughout create a beautiful environment. This park now attracts and delights residents of all ages!

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TNL AGREEN

Gold Award SPE CIA L P RO J E CT

University of Texas at Austin, Dell Medical School Green Roof BRIGHTVIEW This roof in Austin serves as a living laboratory on a building dedicated to scientiďŹ c advancement. This roof is more than an aesthetic and energy efďŹ cient feature; it is also an experimental space for plant researchers. Bluebonnets and spineless prickly pear were installed into a special soil blend specially designed for this project. Custom planting templates were brought in to ensure accurate planting of the selected plants. All soil and rock had to be delivered to the roof using a fabricated lift. This project blended science and art with incredible results!

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TNL AGREEN

Gold Award DE S IGN

Farquar BONICK LANDSCAPING This project strove to marry art and function in the yard of this Dallas artist. Mixed textures add visual interest to the driveway, and trees draw the eyes upward to put the house on display. The focal point of the backyard is a living green wall, which was enhanced with a gabion cage ďŹ lled with blue slag glass is mounted on a rebar wall. A variety of plants were added to the property to increase the lushness of the landscape. The beautiful collaboration between Bonick Landscaping and the client led to the creation of this truly unique design!

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Solid coverage for the Green Industry With over 40 years of experience and the endorsement of the Texas Nursery and Landscape Association, we’ve proven that we understand what it takes to protect your green industry business. We’ll make sure you have the insurance coverage needed to face the unique risks of your industry, the best rates available, and an exceptional service team.

Call us at 800-899-3750 or visit us at www.hiallc.com Dallas 972- 512-770 0

Houston 713 -2 92-570 0

San Antonio 210 - 5 81- 0 420


TNL AGREEN

Silver Awards COMMERC IA L IN STA L L AT ION $10 0, 0 00 +

Dallas Museum of Art, North Entry SOUTHERN BOTANICAL, INC. Commercial Installation $100,000+ The client hoped to create a unique space for visitors to enjoy in downtown Dallas. The plaza was refreshed and revitalized with a new lawn, patio and seat walls designed to showcase the works of art in the space. The installation of the green gabion wall provided a number of challenges, but proved to be the crowning jewel of this project. The ďŹ rst of its kind in the region, the gabion was designed around city utility lines, and incorporates drip irrigation to keep it lush year round. The new space provides a gorgeous respite from the hustle and bustle of the city!

San Jacinto Center

COMME RC IAL MAIN TE N AN C E

CLEAN SCAPES, LP This Austin property requires detailed maintenance to ensure that the clean lines and bright colors always look their best! Foxtail ferns, knock out roses, pink pinta and liriope are featured throughout the landscape and provide a sense of place. Mexican beach pebbles line the beds, which are maintained to ensure that they remain in place. The impeccable maintenance of this property makes the landscaping truly shine.

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TNL AGREEN

Silver Awards RESIDENTIAL INSTALLATION $25,000 - $100,000

Greenberg Residence MATT W. STEVENS LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT, LLC The attention to detail of this residential installation is truly one of a kind! Symmetrical planting beds were created in the front yard and filled with foxtail fern and seasonal color to welcome guests to the home. In the backyard, colored concrete was used to create walkways which allow for easy access to the entire backyard. Abundant plantings beautifully fill out the planting areas in the backyard and Japanese blueberry trees were placed along the back fence to add privacy and increase visual interest. The homeowners will enjoy the new outdoor spaces for years to come!

Gibson Residence

R E SID E N TIAL IN STAL L ATION $10 0, 0 00+

LAWNS OF DALLAS The homeowners wanted to create an outdoor living space in their backyard. The installation began by putting in a synthetic grass lawn, which could stand up to the rough play of the resident’s dogs and the heavy foot traffic at social events. Formal hedges create clean lines which are accented with ornate planters filled with colorful plantings. A large living fence finished the space and made the yard private. This functional, modern backyard will serve many purposes for years to come!

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TNL AGREEN

Silver Awards R ES I D EN T I A L I N STA L L AT I O N $100 , 00 0+

Sand Residence AJ’S LANDSCAPING & DESIGN, INC. The desire to have a beautiful place for family gatherings was the motivation for this backyard renovation. The boxwoods border the pool, helping to visually define the edge. Plants were strategically placed to soften the edges of the home in the small space. The glass tile used in both the pool and the water feature create a pleasant sound which adds to the ambiance of the area. The lush plantings in the seating area make for a lovely conversation area. This backyard is a wonderful retreat for the entire!

Rinehart Residence

SPE C IAL PROJ E C T

BILLY LONG ENTERPRISES, INC. The client sought to marry clean lines and traditional elegance in the landscape of this beautiful San Antonio home. Meandering pathways, built from stones harvested on the property during construction, help create transitions between areas of entertainment and relaxation despite the challenges of steep slopes and dramatic elevation changes. Native trees and special plantings help to add a lush and natural feel to the property. This property, designed by a TNLA Certified Professional, is now a true oasis nestled in Texas Hill Country.

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TNL AGREEN

Silver Awards SPECIAL PROJECTS

Bluestem Park ALLIANCE LANDSCAPE COMPANY, LLC This Fort Worth park transformed pasture lands and a stock pond into a rehabilitated Black Prairie landscape. This setting is a beautiful respite for visitors and contributes to the health of the overall ecological landscape. Wet weather conditions during the renovation created challenges including soil saturation, plant disease, erosion issues and threats from invasive species. Creek flooding issues were tackled to make the park safe, and non-native species were removed by hand and replaced with native species. Blooming wildflowers make the park stunning during any season while varying native grasses and plants highlight the organic design.

Fort Worth Botanic Garden Rose Garden Restoration

UN IQUE FE ATUR E S

BENNETT BENNER PARTNERS The Rose Garden is one of the signature features of the Fort Worth Botanic Garden. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2009. The restoration was based on plans and photographs from the archives of the Botanic Garden. Great care was taken to match profiles, layout and construction elements. New ipe timbers were used to replace the old wood elements and a cast stone lion’s head was recreated for the water fountain. Bennett Benner Partners gave new life to a beautiful garden that will surely last into the next century! 26

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TNL AGREEN

Bronze Awards COM M E RC I A L INSTALL ATION $1 00,00 0 +

RESIDENTIAL INSTALLATION $25,000 - $100,000

Tarrant County Community College Energy Technology Center

Green Residence

Brightview

Lawns of Dallas

COM M ERCIAL MAINTENANCE

RESIDENTIAL INSTALLATION $25,000 - $100,000

San Clemente at Davenport

Highland Park Manor

Clean Scapes Landscaping

Lawns of Dallas

COM M ERCIAL MAINTENANCE

RESIDENTIAL INSTALLATION $25,000 - $100,000

Research Park Plaza, Buildings III & IV

Hennessey Residence

Clean Scapes Landscaping

Matt W. Stevens Landscape Architect, LLC

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TNL AGREEN

Bronze Awards

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RESIDENTIAL INSTALLATION $25,000 - $100,000

SPECIAL PROJECTS

Obregon Residence

Tarrant Regional Water District Demonstration Garden

AJ’s Landscaping & Design, Inc.

Texas A&M AgriLife Research Water University

RE SID E N T I A L INSTALL ATION $1 00,00 0 +

DESIGN

Preston Hollow Retreat

Mills Residence

Lawns of Dallas

Matt W. Stevens Landscape Architect, LLC

RE SID E N T I A L INSTALL ATION $1 00,00 0 +

DESIGN

Dickard Residence

Urban Retreat

AJ’s Landscaping & Design, Inc.

AJ’s Landscaping & Design, Inc.

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TNL AGREEN

Honorable Mention Parkland Hospital BrightView

Research Park Plaza, Buildings I & II

Zen Garden

COMMERCIAL INSTALL ATION $100,000+

Clean Scapes, LP

Rebecca Winn of Whimsical Gardens

COMMERCIAL MAINTENANCE

SPECIAL PROJECT

Pearsall Park

Mills Residence

Mundo Verde Irrigation & Landscaping

Matt W. Stevens Landscape Architect, LLC

Tarrant Regional Water District Demonstration Garden

COMMERCIAL INSTALL ATION $100,000+

RESIDENTIAL INSTALL ATION $100,000+

Texas A&M AgriLife Research Water University DESIGN

SPECIAL THANKS to the judges who generously donated their time and expertise to scoring the Texas Excellence in Landscaping Awards, this program would not be possible without them!

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ORGANIX COMPOSTING NOW OPEN IN HUTCHINS 2600 Post Oak Road

•

Hutchins, TX 75141

COMPETITIVE PRICES NO WAIT TIME CERTIFIED SCALES ONSITE CHEAPER THAN LANDFILL RATES

Accepting Green Waste & Food Waste Selling USCC STA, TXDOT & OMRI Certified Compost, Topsoil and Mulch Delivery available in Dallas/Fort Worth area

Council US Composting

972-225-3664 ORGANIXRECYCLING.COM

Seal of Testing Assurance

Closer Mowing Heights Superior Turf Density

Impressive Leaf Texture Dark Green Color

Upright Leaf Blade Orientation Drought Tough Superior Sod Strength Cold Tolerant Excellent Traffic Pest Resistant Tolerance Good Lateral Vigorous Growth Root System

12 Reasons Why TifSport Bermudagrass Is the Standard For Texas Lawns & Landscaping

TIFSP RT

For More Information and a List of Licensed Growers Go to: www.tifsport.com 30

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Economic Contributions OF THE GREEN INDUSTRY TO THE TEXAS ECONOMY BY DR. MARCO A. PALMA AND DR. CHARLES R. HALL

Introduction

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fter bouncing back recently from the great recession with signiďŹ cant increases in sales for all sectors, green industry sales remained relatively at in 2015 with a slight decrease in overall gross sales of less than 1% from the 2014 levels. Retail sales were slightly down 1.8% in 2015, while landscaping sales increased 3.20%. The sales baseline for the nursery and greenhouse category was updated using the National Nursery Survey 2014 data conducted by the green industry research consortium (please

see greenindustryresearch.org for the full report). The survey incorporates responses from all 50 states in the U.S. The state of Texas is the third largest green industry state in terms of sales, economic output, employment and GDP contributions behind California and Florida. Total gross green industry sales are estimated at $18.9 billion. Following a big increase in 2013 to the highest peak in sales of $2.1 billion, the Production and Manufacturing sector experienced a slight decrease in sales

ACK N OWLE D GE MENTS

of 2.4% and 3.4% in 2014 and 2015 respectively, to a total of $1.98 billion in 2015. Most of the decrease in the production and manufacturing sector came from the Lawn and Garden Equipment Manufacturing sector, which experienced a 34.1% decrease to $420 million in 2015. The Prefabricated Metal Buildings sector was down 14.3% to a total of $21.2 million. The grower Nursery and Greenhouse sector sales increased 23.8% from 1.39 billion in 2014 to the highest all time sales peak of $1.54 billion in 2015. (continued on page 32)

Table 1. NAICS Codes for Green Industry Sectors

This report was made possible by a grant from the Texas Nursery and Landscape Association (TNLA). The Data was obtained from the Texas Comptrollers of Public Accounts (TCPA), Baseline data from the Green Industry Research Consortium National Nursery Survey. Others who contributed with this report include Carmen Escalante (TCPA), Dan Hanselka, Dean McCorkle, Rebekka Dudensing (Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service) and Alan Hodges (University of Florida). This report complies with the terms of the TNLA contract. The authors welcome comments or information about the usefulness and implications of  $Ĺ‚ĂŠĂˆÊÇ$

INDUSTRY SECTOR NAICS CODE Nursery & Greenhouse 1114 Lawn & Garden Equipment Mfg 333112 Greenhouse Manufacturing (Prefab. Metal Buildings)* 332311 Landscaping Services 561730 Landscape Architectural Services 541320 Flower, Nursery Stock And Florist Supplies Wholesalers 424930 Lawn & Garden Equipment & Supplies Stores 4442 Florists 4531 Building Material & Supplies Dealers* 4441 Food & Beverage Stores* 445 General Merchandise Stores* 452 Farm & Garden Machinery & Equipment Wholesalers* 423820

Please Log In to the Members Only section on TNLA Online to view the entire Economic Impact Report!

* Green industry represents a portion of overall business activity (Sectors not included in Previous Scope reports).

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Table 2. Total Green Industry Gross Sales in 2015 SECTOR (NAICS code) Production/Manufacturing Nursery & Greenhouse (1114) ^ Lawn & Garden Equipment Manufacturing (333112) ^ Prefabricated metal buildings (332311) (Greenhouses) ^* Horticultural Services Landscaping Services (561730) Landscape Architectural Services (541320) Wholesale & Retail Trade Horticulture Products (Gross) Flower, Nursery Stock and Florist Supplies Wholesalers (424930) Lawn & Garden Equipment & Supplies Stores (4442) Florists (4531) Building Material & Supplies Dealers (4441)* Food & Beverage Stores (445)* General Merchandise Stores (452)* Farm & Garden Equipment Wholesalers (423820)* Total All Sectors

Sales 1,983,586,654 1,541,737,025 420,609,523 21,240,107 4,764,483,805 4,455,234,684 309,249,121 12,135,946,293 733,872,337 5,695,194,031 1,049,681,888 1,742,450,764 417,339,726 1,605,929,700 891,477,847 18,884,016,753

Establishments 776 676 89 11 146,983,558 14,009 146,969,549 20,129 448 2,267 3,315 1,854 2,749 9,231 265 147,004,463

^ Estimated from Baseline data from Economic Research Service and Texas Comptrollers Office Data * NAICS represents a portion of Total Green Industry Sales

Table 3. Total Green Industry Sales 2009-2015 GROWER $1,983,586,654 $2,051,121,448 $2,100,242,682 $1,804,926,582 $1,918,432,053 $1,537,061,928 $1,336,866,584

2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009

LANDSCAPE $4,764,483,805 $4,612,211,522 $4,550,424,995 $4,054,303,568 $3,538,719,690 $3,390,016,982 $3,414,177,793

RETAIL (Gross) $12,135,946,293 $12,363,568,401 $11,721,100,798 $10,857,786,292 $10,374,997,040 $9,351,749,314 $9,039,697,678

RETAIL (Net) $3,675,090,499 $3,744,020,587 $3,549,464,140 $3,288,029,320 $3,141,827,767 $2,831,960,872 $2,737,463,255

TOTAL $10,423,160,958 $10,407,353,556 $10,200,131,818 $9,147,259,470 $8,598,979,510 $7,759,039,782 $7,488,507,632

Table 4. Total Green Industry Sales by Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), 2015 MSA Austin Dallas Fort Worth Houston San Antonio Other Total 32

GROWER 79,788,455 156,853,767 127,069,286 259,080,027 78,761,784 1,282,033,336 1,983,586,654

LANDSCAPE 611,345,884 1,148,627,061 343,899,553 1,337,296,448 369,253,369 954,061,490 4,764,483,805

RETAIL (Gross) 762,883,223 1,808,066,784 852,626,870 1,997,428,586 967,439,783 5,747,501,047 12,135,946,293

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TOTAL 1,454,017,561 3,113,547,612 1,323,595,710 3,593,805,061 1,415,454,936 7,983,595,872 18,884,016,753

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% OF TOTAL 7.70% 16.49% 7.01% 19.03% 7.50% 42.28% 100.00%

(continued from page 31) The Horticultural Services sector sales increased 3.2% to an all-time record of $4.76 billion. Wholesale and Retail had a slight decrease of 1.88% to a total of $12.1 billion in 2015. The net margins attributed to the retail sector accounted for almost $3.7 billion. Net margin represents the share of sales that can be attributed to the retail sector and not accounting for the portion of the sales that was included in the production and manufacturing sector. This study measures green industry sales in Texas by sector and then estimates economic contributions to the Texas Economy in terms of output, employment and value added.

Methodology In order to estimate economic contributions of the Green Industry to the Texas economy sales by each green industry sector need to be measured. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) was used to gather data on total green industry sales, including all sectors related to the green industry. The data used in this report were provided by the State Comptrollers Office, baseline data from the Green Industry Research Consortium National Nursery Survey, and includes industry sales through the end of fiscal year 2015. Every business in the state and the country is now classified by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), which replaced the old Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS was developed jointly by the United States, Canada and Mexico to provide new comparability in statistics about business activity across North America. Green industry firms fall within one of the NAICS codes in Table 1.

Green Industry Sales in Texas When reporting sales to the State Comptroller’s office, each firm must report all sales, including those sales in

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TNL AGREEN which sale taxes are collected and those that are not collected (wholesale). This reporting system has an area of potential slippage. For example, since wholesale growers do not collect any sales tax (for the state), some small and medium size growers are unaware of their reporting responsibilities. Not all of these firms realize that their services are subject to sale taxes. Therefore, unintended noncompliance has been a source of under reporting, which would underestimate green industry sales in Texas. Because of this potential slippage problem, additional data were used to supplement this report’s methodology. Table 2 shows Total Green Industry Gross Sales in 2015, and Table 3 shows sales from 2009-2015 for each green industry sector. Table 3 shows sales for the retail industry including gross sales, and also net sales. Net sales represent the margin sales that correspond to the retail sector only. Total industry sales, including grower, landscaping and retailing sales had a very minor decrease of 0.76% in 2015 for a total of $18.9 billion in gross sales. The grower sector experienced a slight decrease of 3.40% to a total of $1.98 billion. The landscaping sector increased sales by 3.20% to a total of $4.76 billion. Gross retail sales decreased slightly 1.88% to a total of $12.1 billion in 2015. Figures 1, 2, 3 and 4 represent industry sales for growers, landscaping, retailing (gross) and total gross industry sales respectively broken down by subsectors.

Figure 1. Grower Sales 2006-2015

Figure 2. Landscaping Sales 2006-2015

Figure 3. Retailing Sales 2006-2015

Table 4 presents green industry sales by sector and by major Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). There are 27 MSAs in Texas. The major MSAs are, Austin, Dallas, Ft. Worth, Houston, El Paso, and San Antonio. The economic scope reports sales in five of the major MSAs; together, the five major MSAs included in this report represent more than half of the total industry sales as shown in (continued on page 34) J A N A U R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7

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Figure 4. Total Industry Sales 2006-2015

(continued from page 33) Figure 5. Houston and Dallas hold the largest share of green industry sales in 2015 with 19.03% and 16.49% respectively. Figure 6 is a graphical representation of grower, landscaping and retailing sales by MSA in Texas.

Economic Contributions of the Green Industry to the Texas Economy

Figure 5. Total Green Industry Sales in Texas by MSA in 2015 12.1% Fort Worth 13.0% San Antonio 13.3% Austin Other 42.3%

MSA 57.7%

28.6% Dallas

33.0% Houston

The net sales data from the previous section were used to estimate total economic contributions of the Green Industry to the Texas Economy. To evaluate the economic impact contributions of the green industry to the Texas economy, economic models were developed using the Implan software system and associated Texas datasets (MIG, 2010). The Implan system includes more than 500 industries. Input-Output models represent the structure of a regional economy in terms of transactions, employees, households, and government institutions (Miller & Blair, 1985). The economic multipliers derived from the Implan model were used to estimate the total economic activity

Figure 6. Green Industry Sales by Outlet and by MSA, 2013-2015 Figure 7. Green Industry Economic Output Contributions to the Texas Economy in 2015 San Antonio

Austin $1.42B $1.45B Dallas $3.11B

Houston $1.32B $1.32B Other $7.98B Fort Worth

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TNL AGREEN generated in the state by sales (output) to final demand or exports. This includes the effects of intermediate purchases by green industry firms from other economic sectors (indirect effects) and the effects of green industry employee household consumer spending (induced effects), in addition to direct sales by industry firms. The wholesale and retail sectors use products from the production/manufacturing and horticultural services sectors; therefore, when calculating the impacts for the wholesale and retail trade horticulture products, output (retail sales) are reduced to reflect only the gross margin on sales to those sectors, otherwise we would be double counting the economic impact stemming from those products. Economic impact multipliers vary based on data about actual relationships in the economy. The total economic contributions of the Green Industry in Texas were estimated at $19.45 billion in output; 209,928 jobs,

and $11.9 billion in value added as shown in Table 5. For the production and manufacturing sectors, including nursery and greenhouse, lawn and garden equipment manufacturing, and metal building manufacturers, total output impacts were $3.1 billion; employment impacts were 24,430 jobs; and value added impacts were $1.96 billion. For the horticultural services sectors, including landscaping services and landscape architecture services, total output impacts were $9.06 billion; employment impacts were 117,313 jobs; and value added impacts were $5.46 billion. For the wholesale and retail trade sectors, total output impacts were $7.3 billion; employment impacts were 68,186 jobs; and value added impacts were $4.55 billion. The largest economic impact contributions for individual sectors were landscaping services, lawn and garden stores and nursery and greenhouse. (continued on page 36)

Table 5. Economic Contributions of the Green Industry in Texas, 2015 Production & Manufacturing Nursery & Greenhouse Lawn & Garden Equipment Manufacturing Prefabricated Metal Buildings Horticultural Services Landscaping Services Landscape Architecture Services Wholesale & Retail Trade Horticulture Products Flower, Nursery Stock & Florist Supplies Wholesalers Lawn & Garden Equipment & Supplies Stores Florists Building Material & Supplies Dealers Food & Beverage Stores General Merchandise Stores Farm & Garden Equipment Wholesalers Total (All Sectors)

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OUTPUT ($Mn) 3,104 2,425 640 39 9,060 8,387 673 7,285 231 3,672 986 1,124 215 776 280 19,450

EMPLOYMENT (jobs) 24,430 22,345 1,909 176 117,313 112,896 4,417 68,186 1,179 30,762 15,290 9,412 2,258 7,852 1,433 209,928

VALUE ADDED ($Mn) 1,959 1,735 208 16 5,456 5,058 397 4,547 145 2,287 612 700 138 489 177 11,962

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Economic Impact Study Summary BY DR. MARCO A. PALMA After bouncing back recently from the great recession with significant increases in sales for all sectors, Green Industry sales remained relatively flat in 2015 with a slight decrease in overall gross sales of less than 1% from the 2014 levels. Retail sales were slightly down 1.8% in 2015, while landscaping sales increased 3.20%. The sales baseline for the nursery and greenhouse category was updated using the National Nursery Survey 2014 data conducted by the green industry research consortium (please see http://greenindustryresearch. org for the full report). The survey incorporates responses from all 50 states in the U.S. The state of Texas is the third largest green industry state in terms of sales, economic output, employment and GDP contributions behind California and Florida. Total gross green industry sales are estimated at $18.9 billion. Following a big increase in 2013 to the highest peak in sales of $2.1 billion, the Production and Manufacturing sector experienced a slight decrease in sales of 2.4% and 3.4% in 2014 and 2015 respectively, to a total of $1.98 billion in 2015. Most of the decrease in the Production and Manufacturing sector came from the Lawn and Garden Equipment Manufacturing sector, which experienced a 34.1% decrease to $420 million in 2015. The Prefabricated Metal Buildings sector was down 14.3% to a

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TNL AGREEN Economic Impact Report (continued from page 35)

Measures of Economic Activity

Economic impact results are also reported by major metropolitan statistical area (MSA) as summarized in Table 6. The MSAs with the greatest economic impact contributions to the State’s economy are Houston and Dallas.

Sales or output is the dollar volume of a good or service produced or sold. Final Demand is sales to final consumers, including households, governments, and exports. Intermediate sales are sales to other industrial sectors. Income is the money

Please Log In to the Members Only section on TNLA Online to view the entire Economic Impact Report!

Economic Impact Summary (continued from page 35)

total of $21.2 million. The grower Nursery and Greenhouse sector sales increased 23.8% from 1.39 billion in 2014 to the highest all time sales peak of $1.54 billion in 2015. The Horticultural Services sector sales increased a modest 3.2% to an all-time record of $4.76 billion. Wholesale and Retail had a slight decrease of 1.88% to a total of $12.1 billion in 2015. The net margins attributed to the retail sector accounted for almost $3.7 billion. Net margin represents the share of sales that can be attributed to the retail sector and not accounting for the portion of the sales that was included in the production and manufacturing sector. This study measures green industry sales in Texas by sector and then estimates economic contributions to the Texas Economy in terms of output, employment and value added. The net sales data were used to estimate total economic contributions of the Green Industry to the Texas Economy. To evaluate the economic impact contributions of the green industry to the Texas economy, economic models were developed using the Implan software 36

system and associated Texas datasets (MIG, 2010). The Implan system includes more than 500 industries. Input-Output models represent the structure of a regional economy in terms of transactions, employees, households, and government institutions (Miller & Blair, 1985). The economic multipliers derived from the Implan model were used to estimate the total economic activity generated in the state by sales (output) to final demand or exports. This includes the effects of intermediate purchases by green industry firms from other economic sectors (indirect effects) and the effects of green industry employee household consumer spending (induced effects), in addition to direct sales by industry firms. The wholesale and retail sectors use products from the production/manufacturing and horticultural services sectors; therefore, when calculating the impacts for the wholesale and retail trade horticulture products, output (retail sales) are reduced to reflect only the gross margin on sales to those sectors, otherwise we would be double counting the economic impact stemming from those products. Economic impact multipliers vary based on data about actual relationships in the economy. The total economic

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earned within the region from production and sales. Total income includes personal income (wage and salary income, including income of sole proprietor’s profits and rents). Jobs or employment is a measure of the number of jobs required to produce a given volume of sales/production, expressed as full time equivalents, or as the total number including part time and seasonal positions. Value Added is the sum of total income and indirect business taxes.



contributions of the Green Industry in Texas were estimated at $19.45 billion in output; 209,928 jobs, and $11.9 billion in value added. For the Production and Manufacturing sectors, including Nursery and Greenhouse, Lawn and Garden Equipment Manufacturing, and Metal Building Manufacturers, total output impacts were $3.1 billion; employment impacts were 24,430 jobs; and value added impacts were $1.96 billion. For the Horticultural Services sectors, including Landscaping Services and Landscape Architecture Services, total output impacts were $9.06 billion; employment impacts were 117,313 jobs; and value added impacts were $5.46 billion. For the Wholesale and Retail Trade sectors, total output impacts were $7.3 billion; employment impacts were 68,186 jobs; and value added impacts were $4.55 billion. The largest economic impact contributions for individual sectors were Landscaping Services, Lawn and Garden Stores and Nursery and Greenhouse. The economic impact numbers reflect a strong contribution of the Green Industry to the Texas Economy. Green Industry sales are steady and growing at a similar pace as the U.S. economy.

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GRE E NV I$ IO N

Second Time’s the Charm– My International Plant Propagators’ Society Experience

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Dr. Mengmeng Gu, Department of Horticultural Sciences, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension

BY DR. MENGMENG GU

on’t get me wrong - the first time was very good! I was invited to give a talk during last year’s International Plant Propagators’ Society (IPPS) annual conference in Tampa, Florida. It was on my favorite topic, crapemyrtle bark scale. My talk was on the last day of the program and some folks stayed, just to listen to my talk. They were particularly concerned about the scale.

production knowledge and skills” (www.ipps.org). There are eight regions around the world and in addition, IPPS China is ‘brewing’.

What is IPPS? Who are they? “IPPS is an international association of plant production professionals, including those involved in horticultural research and education. During 1951 a group of about 70 plant propagators met in Cleveland, Ohio, and formed the IPPS with the aim to share their knowledge. Their motto ‘to seek and to share’ remains the core value guiding the Societies activities. IPPS has since broadened into an international forum for sharing plant

When Dr. Jim Robbins at the University of Arkansas asked what impressed me most at the IPPS 2016 conference, I answered “People, the people!”, an answer that he didn’t expect. First of all, IPPS is full of very knowledgeable people. Many people have been nursery owners or managers for a long time and truly know their stuff. Secondly, they are very humble and always eager to learn. I asked someone who’s very knowledgeable, Bill Barr, newly retired from Greenleaf Nursery in El Campo, why he comes to IPPS. He said there was so much he could learn from people attending the conference. People are willing to share (And yes, they are competitors!) and IPPS conference format encourages sharing. Bill had trouble rooting some holly cultivar, and Maarten van der Giessen from van der Geissen in Wilmer, AL (a suburb of Mobile) shared his own rooting secret. One full day and two half-day tours, in addition to two half-day 20-min presentations, cover a lot of grounds. The bus rides from one tour location to another were also learning moments. I made an effort to sit with someone I wanted to learn from, Brian Jackson from NC, Cheryl Boyer from KS and Bill Barr from, you know, TX. Throughout the

Pots are moved on a horizontal conveyer, and partially filled by the first conveyor, the worker put in a liner and the second conveyor fill the pots full. In the foreground is Mr. Kevin Gantt from Hefner’s Nursery in NC. J A N A U R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7

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Three are three North American Regions, Southern, Eastern and Western. Texas is the west boundary of the Southern region, which goes all the way to VA, SC and FL. 2016 the conference was held at Virginia Beach, VA.

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TNL AGREEN (continued from page 37) conference, people wrote their questions and put in a question box anonymously. After the Tuesday banquet, questions were pulled out of the questions box. I don’t remember a single question that didn’t get answered, and sometimes there were more than one volunteer providing answers. Interestingly there were a couple of questions on crapemyrtles and I was able to help with my two cents.

I was a little nervous (silly!) during my first IPPS last year-----so you should really give IPPS at least two chances if you are not convinced that you belong the first time. This time, I felt I was in Texas (while it actually couldn’t be further, as it’s in Virginia Beach)! Kevin Gantt from Hefner’s Nursery in NC called me several times to talk about my presentation topic, in addition to emails. Dee Johnson from Sanhills Community College, the moderator of my session, introduced herself to me the day before

Some trees are just too tall to work with. No problem! Put your workers on stilts.

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my talk and made sure that she said my name correctly. Afterwards, so many folks told me that they enjoyed my talk. Charlie Parkerson, the retired owner of Lancaster Farms and probably one of the co-founders of Southern Region IPPS, even came to thank me. I also got to meet two ‘new’ Greenleaf Nursery folks, Drew Tidmore, who sent me one liner of each plant they have so that I could say for sure “crapemyrtle bark scale doesn’t get on so and so plants”, and Jim Van Antwerp, VP and General Manager at El Campo. Am I convinced that I belong? After two conferences in two east coast states, you bet! If you like plants and like to grow them, you’ll love IPPS. You don’t have to travel that far, as IPPS 2017 (October 28 – November 1) will be in Dallas! Laura Miller, President of IPPS Southern Region and Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Tarrant County Horticulture Agent, Benjamin Berry of JBerry Nursery and Dave Creech of SFASU have pretty much got next year’s tours and presentations planned. I am helping to make IPPS 2017 as big a success as Texas. I won’t spill the beans, but I’ll give you some highlights of just one of the IPPS 2016 tour stops, Lancaster Farms.



While we can’t guarantee dividends every year, Texas Mutual has returned more than $2 billion to safety-conscious policyholder owners since 1999. © 2016 Texas Mutual Insurance Company

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N OTES F RO M SFA G A R DE NS

Designed Plant Communities BY DAWN STOVER

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Dawn Stover is a Research Associate with the SFA Mast Arboretum in Nacogdoches, Texas. As a Research Associate, Dawn currently manages the living plant collection within the SFA Mast Arboretum and the horticulture greenhouse facilities.

had the good fortune to hear landscape designer and author, Claudia West, speak at the Perennial Plant Association annual conference in the summer of 2015. The entire conference was inspiring in so many ways, and coincided with my growing interest in gardening for pollinators. Claudia spoke about the principles outlined in her new book “Planting in a Post Wild World” that she co-authored with Thomas Rainer. In this beautifully worded book, West and Rainer explore the creation of designed plant communities. As we lose more and more nature to urban growth and cropland, they provide a unique perspective on how to reintroduce nature and how to “re-wild” our cities. Often, our landscape style involves plants serving as motionless soldiers, lined up in formation and ready to go to battle with the next marauding

band of squirrels, or something as equally terrifying. Or plants are isolated individuals surrounded in seas of mulch, the latter of which is either a grossly missed planting opportunity or an invitation in waiting for weeds to establish. What if our landscapes were more reflective of the way the land looked before urban development, but in a planned style that would meet the approval of the local HOA? This naturalistic style of planting is what you’ll see in reclamation projects like the High Line in New York City, or the Gas Works Park in Seattle. Considering that our current culture seeks purpose in everything, and our landscapes are no exception. Do the plants attract pollinators, do they feed your family, and do they filter storm runoff, wash the dishes and change diapers? Plants have to be more than pretty, and using them in designed plant communities allows them to have much more purpose. Designed plant communities definitely puts the phrase “right plant, right place” into play, as plants are chosen to match the conditions in the landscape rather than asking an agave to thrive in a swamp, for instance. This method also does a fine job of championing native plants without dismissing the value of exotics. And while we think of native plant gardens as a bit unruly and even unkempt, this plant community method employs good design to create “visually compelling compositions.” The thing that I really like about this concept is the ability to combine good design, native plants and pollinator gardening in a neat, if not too tidy package. Additionally, there should be less maintenance as plants are often planted on onefoot centers – keeping in mind that this is a mostly perennial concept. These communities consist of 3 layers: structural, seasonal and groundcover. The groundcover layer is the most functional layer, albeit not the prettiest, serving to prevent erosion and weeds and acting as green mulch.

Firepink creates a seasonal impact beneath quaking aspen in the Elevated Garden at Chanticleer. J A N A U R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7

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TNL AGREEN (continued from page 39) The structural layer gives backbone and can include shrubs, trees and taller perennials. The visual impact comes from the seasonal layer that allows specific moments in the landscape as different perennials come into season. Grasses almost always dominate, and serve not only with weed suppression but also as pollinator habitat, and in turn wildlife habitat for larger vertebrates that feed on the pollinators.

I know this all sounds like another regurgitation of the often unattractive native plants movement, but one visit to Chanticleer, named “America’s most inspiring garden” by Garden Design magazine, would change your perception immediately! We are working on bringing this concept to public spaces in Nacogdoches, putting a distinctive southern flair to a concept originating in the Zone 5 Mafia of perennial growers in Pennsylvania and the mid-Atlantic. When you visit

Nacogdoches, take a stroll on the Banita Creek Trail to see the gardens at the Nacogdoches Farmers’ Market and Ab’s Park – both Parks for Monarchs, and then head over to the SFA Gardens to see the Monarch Waystation at the Kingham Children’s Garden Pavilion. With all of the movements afoot to save the monarchs, and save the pollinators, and cure nature deficit disorder in children, and to satisfy our desire to connect with nature, I think the designed plant community is a great way to marry ecology and landscapes in our urban jungles. Considering the current buzz centered around pollinators, we are excited to report that the Texas Pollinator PowWow will be hosting their next conference in Nacogdoches on May 5-7, 2017. The theme of this conference will be: It takes a Village: Biodiversity of Pollinators, Plants and People. There will be experts speaking on bees, butterflies, bats, birds and even black bear! The lineup includes Doug Tallamy, nationally known entomologist and author of Bringing Nature Home, Merlin Tuttle, founder of Bat Conservation International, Clay Bolt, Natural History and Conservation Photographer for organizations like Scientific America and Audubon Magazine, and a host of experts from SFA. Two interactive night activities include a moth night and a bat walk, and the conference wraps up with a field day at Boggy Slough, a conservation easement of The Conservation Fund. SFA Gardens is thrilled to partner with the PowWow as they bring their conference to the Pineywoods next spring. Registration is only $75 for the 3-day conference, and the special evening events are only $10 each. Visit www.texaspollinatorpowow. org for more information and registration forms.



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BUG S & FU ZZ

Don’t Let Downy Become a Downer! BY DR. KEVIN ONG

D

Dr. Kevin Ong directs the Texas Plant Disease Diagnostic Lab. He is an Associate Professor in the Department of Plant Pathology & Microbiology at Texas A&M University. Check out the Texas Plant Disease Diagnostic Lab facebook page (http://facebook.com/ TXPlantClinic)

owny mildew is a common name for a disease caused an Oomycete (water-mold). That common name is descriptive of a symptom that is observed with infection – mycelia with soft fuzzy appearance. There are several genera that can cause this disease on plants. Eg. Peronospora and Plasmopara. Common symptoms on most ornamentals start with irregular chlorotic lesions which can eventually turn necrotic (die and turn brown/black). Sporulation often occurs on underside of leaves, corresponding with the lesions observed from the top. As disease progresses, leaves will wither and plant will defoliate. Favorable conditions for disease are wet foliage and high humidity (> 85%). When disease hits under these conditions, it is very difficult to control. Several weeks ago, I was invited to a “workshop” about downy mildew on ornamentals in Philadelphia, PA. This was a meeting where a bunch of researchers, extension people and growers got together to discuss various aspects of these disease with the goal of identifying gaps

Damage caused by Peronospora sparsa, downy mildew of roses. This particular species does not sporulate a lot.

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that may exist in our knowledge of the pathogen causing downy mildew disease and how to manage it effectively. This meeting was organized by folks that had been working on the Impatiens Downy Mildew problem and are looking for ways to expand the knowledge base on the pathogens that caused downy mildew. (continued on page 42)

Heavy sporulation on underside of impatiens leaf of Plasmopara obducens, impatiens downy mildew (right leaf) compared to a healthy leaf (left leaf).

Dark oval globular sporangia of Peronospora belbahrii, downy mildew of basil.

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TNL AGREEN (continued from page 41)

Downy Mildew on Plants

What I Learned?

Plants where downy mildew has been observed on in the flower/nursery industry. (not complete list)

Did you know that downy mildew has been seen and reported on a bunch of different ornamentals? (see box). At the TPDDL, there had been several diagnosis of downy mildew on greenhouse plants – most memorable are the Impatiens Downy Mildew and Basil Downy Mildew. We have also come across downy mildew on coleus and roses.

Information provided by Ann Chase & Margery Daughtrey. Alyssum Argyranthemum Aster Basil Buddleia Cleome Coleus Coreopsis Digitalis Galium Geranium Geum Gillardia Heliathus Iberis Impatiens

I also learned that this water mold can make oospores that can survive on plant debris in the soil for long periods (years). A colleague showed results of an experiment that oospores of Impatiens downy mildew (Plasmopara obducens) can still produce infective propagules after laying in fallow soil for a while, and that steam (heat) appears to be most effective against it.

Lamium Lisianthus Ornamental cabbage Ornamental kale Osteospermum Pansy Rose Rosemary Rudbeckia Runus Salvia Scabiosa Snapdragon Viburnum Veronica

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TNL AGREEN This experience showed me that we know a lot about this disease and the pathogens that causes it BUT there is still so much that we do NOT know. This meeting in Philadelphia is trying to prioritize areas of study. The input of grower, retailers and landscapers are valuable to the researchers. It is often said that researchers can dream too big and too far ahead. The inclusion of growers at this meeting was to ďŹ nd out what practical need that are immediate or needs to be determined in the short term. You can help by putting

in your 2-cents. An online survey to gather input can be found at www. surveymonkey.com/r/DownyMildew .

Is This a Problem in Texas? Several years ago when the Impatiens Downy Mildew (IDM) epidemic was occurring on the eastern seaboard, I foolishly said that it was not going to be a problem for Texas. My reasoning was that in most parts of Texas, we are sunny and get hot quickly in the spring. However, that year we had our

ďŹ rst case of IDM from the landscape. I had forgotten to consider that the impatiens would be planted in understory areas that are often irrigated. I still think that we have better odds dealing with downy mildew diseases in Texas than the folks in the northeast, but I like to know what downy problem you run into so that we can also address Texas green professional needs.



Let Your Voice Be Heard! Tell researchers where to focus their efforts. Complete the survey at www.surveymonkey.com/r/DownyMildew

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Welcome!

N E W ME MB E R S

TNLA would like to welcome its new members. If you would like to become a member, or if you have anyquestions or concerns about your current membership, please contact us at 800.880.0343. Visit www.tnlaonline.org to learn about the beneďŹ ts of becoming a part of TNLA.

REGION 1

Supplier

Government

REGION 7

Landscape

Lazy B Trees, LLC Cliff Brewer 20397 Red Oak Drive Cleveland, TX 77328

Stefanie Boivin City of Allen 1500 S. Jupiter Rd., Apt 912 Allen, TX 75002

Landscape

Texscape Services (Branch) Gary Koscielski 10852 Hillpoint San Antonio, TX 78217 www.texscapeservices.com

REGION 2 Landscape Passion for Design, LLC Lynn Murphy 9002 Chimney Rock Rd Suite G-127 Houston, TX k77096 www.passionfordesignllc.com Native Land Design (Branch) Ben Collinsworth 440 Cobia Dr Katy, TX 77494 www.nativelanddesign.com

REGION 4 Landscape Dinardo Landscape Jared Dinardo 213 S. Forest Crest Dr Garland, TX 75042 www.dinardolandscape.com Brightview (Branch) Justin Hilton 11439 Denton Dr. Dallas, TX 75229 www.brightview.com

Patrick Dickinson Texas A&M AgriLife Research Water University 17360 Coit Rd Dallas, TX 75252

REGION 6 Landscape ELS Lubbock/Fence Lubbock Allison Berry 2625 23rd St. Lubbock, TX 79410

AquaGreen Global, LLC Devin Guinn 810 E. Jefferson Blvd Dallas, TX 75203 www.agglobal.us

IN M EM ORY Velma Bradshaw Leavell died at the age of 101 on October 6, 2016. Velma was a longtime Member of TNLA in Region II. She married Edward Bradshaw, owner of Bradshaw’s Florist and Garden Center in 1932. After Eddie Bradshaw’s passing, Velma became manager of the family’s 300 acre as well as Bradshaw’s Nurseries in League City. She served the Galveston Chamber of Commerce, the Senior Guild of Trinity Episcopal Church, the Florists Transworld Delivery Association of Texas, the American Association of Nurserymen and many other organizations in her extensive charitable work. She married David Leavell, Publisher of the Galveston Daily News in 1970 and continued her very active life. After his passing, she completed her autobiography entitled, MY LIFE A MIXED BOUQUET. She is survived by two children, four grandchildren and nine great grandchildren.

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Native Land Design Ben Collinsworth 301 Brushy Creek Rd., Ste 108 Cedar Park, TX 78613 www.nativelanddesign.com

Verturo Construction Company, LLC Colin Ashburn PO Box 610 McAllen, TX 78505 www.verturoconstruction.com

OUT OF STATE Grower

Native Land Design (Branch) Ben Collinsworth 3101 S Conway Ave. Mission, TX 78572 www.nativelanddesign.com

Bailey Nurseries Sue Gundersen 1325 Bailey Road St. Paul, MN 55119 www.baileynurseries.com

REGION 8

Sustane Natural Fertilizer Gregory Naffz 310 Holiday Ave. Cannon Falls, MN 55009 www.sustane.com

Supplier

Landscape Paul’s Lawn and Landscape Paul Fuller 201 King Lane Leander, TX 78641 www.paulslawncedarpark.com

New TNLA B Ĺ‚Ăˆ Professionals TCLA Michael DeGroot Randall Lawrence, Baldi Gardens

TCNP Atticus Kimbrough, Calloway’s Kevin Thompson, Calloway’s William Eroe, Calloway’s Sandra De Britain, Calloway’s

TCLP Joel Ortiz, City of Addison

TMCNP David Hubbard, Calloway’s

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CA L E NDA R O F E V E N TS

Next Issue: The May/June issue focuses on Pest & Disease in the Texas Green Industry! Look for information on how to combat Imported Fire Ants, tree diseases and more!

January 01/10/17 Opening day of the State of Texas’ 85th Legislative Session 01/18/17 at 11:30am TNLA Region VII Meeting at the McAllen Recycling Center 01/26/17 at 5:30pm TNLA Region IV & V Combined Meeting at The Rec of Grapevine 01/27/17 at 8:00am TNLA Region II Winter Workshop at the Houston Community College Katy Campus 01/30/17 Deadline for nomination applications for TNLA officers to be submitted to the State office

February 02/08/17 Landscape Skillathon at the San Antonio Stock Show & Rodeo

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TNL AGREEN

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Organix Recycling 30 www.organixrecycling.com

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Texas Green Industry Workers www.hiallc.com

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Premier Tech Horticulture 8 www.pthorticulture.com/en

Spring Meadow Nursery 42 www.springmeadownursery.com

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Profile for TNLA GREEN Magazine

January/February 2017 TNLA Green Magazine  

In this issue you'll see the 2016-2017 Texas Excellence in Landscaping Award winning projects and the 2015 Economic Impact Report! As usual,...

January/February 2017 TNLA Green Magazine  

In this issue you'll see the 2016-2017 Texas Excellence in Landscaping Award winning projects and the 2015 Economic Impact Report! As usual,...